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Sample records for hole binary dynamics

  1. Binary black hole merger dynamics and waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Choi, Dae-II; Koppitz, Michael; vanMeter, James

    2006-01-01

    We apply recently developed techniques for simulations of moving black holes to study dynamics and radiation generation in the last few orbits and merger of a binary black hole system. Our analysis produces a consistent picture from the gravitational wave forms and dynamical black hole trajectories for a set of simulations with black holes beginning on circular-orbit trajectories at a variety of initial separations. We find profound agreement at the level of 1% among the simulations for the last orbit, merger and ringdown, resulting in a final black hole with spin parameter a/m = 0.69. Consequently, we are confident that this part of our waveform result accurately represents the predictions from Einstein's General Relativity for the final burst of gravitational radiation resulting from the merger of an astrophysical system of equal-mass non-spinning black holes. We also find good agreement at a level of roughly 10% for the radiation generated in the preceding few orbits.

  2. Binary Black Holes: Mergers, Dynamics, and Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-04-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, data analysis, and astrophysics.

  3. precession: Dynamics of spinning black-hole binaries with python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Davide; Kesden, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We present the numerical code precession, a new open-source python module to study the dynamics of precessing black-hole binaries in the post-Newtonian regime. The code provides a comprehensive toolbox to (i) study the evolution of the black-hole spins along their precession cycles, (ii) perform gravitational-wave-driven binary inspirals using both orbit-averaged and precession-averaged integrations, and (iii) predict the properties of the merger remnant through fitting formulas obtained from numerical-relativity simulations. precession is a ready-to-use tool to add the black-hole spin dynamics to larger-scale numerical studies such as gravitational-wave parameter estimation codes, population synthesis models to predict gravitational-wave event rates, galaxy merger trees and cosmological simulations of structure formation. precession provides fast and reliable integration methods to propagate statistical samples of black-hole binaries from/to large separations where they form to/from small separations where they become detectable, thus linking gravitational-wave observations of spinning black-hole binaries to their astrophysical formation history. The code is also a useful tool to compute initial parameters for numerical-relativity simulations targeting specific precessing systems. precession can be installed from the python Package Index, and it is freely distributed under version control on github, where further documentation is provided.

  4. Dynamic fisheye grids for binary black hole simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilhão, Miguel; Noble, Scott C.

    2014-03-01

    We present a new warped gridding scheme adapted to simulating gas dynamics in binary black hole spacetimes. The grid concentrates grid points in the vicinity of each black hole to resolve the smaller scale structures there, and rarefies grid points away from each black hole to keep the overall problem size at a practical level. In this respect, our system can be thought of as a ‘double’ version of the fisheye coordinate system, used before in numerical relativity codes for evolving binary black holes. The gridding scheme is constructed as a mapping between a uniform coordinate system—in which the equations of motion are solved—to the distorted system representing the spatial locations of our grid points. Since we are motivated to eventually use this system for circumbinary disc calculations, we demonstrate how the distorted system can be constructed to asymptote to the typical spherical polar coordinate system, amenable to efficiently simulating orbiting gas flows about central objects with little numerical diffusion. We discuss its implementation in the Harm3d code, tailored to evolve the magnetohydrodynamics equations in curved spacetimes. We evaluate the performance of the system’s implementation in Harm3d with a series of tests, such as the advected magnetic field loop test, magnetized Bondi accretion, and evolutions of hydrodynamic discs about a single black hole and about a binary black hole. Like we have done with Harm3d, this gridding scheme can be implemented in other unigrid codes as a (possibly) simpler alternative to adaptive mesh refinement.

  5. Dynamical Formation of the GW150914 Binary Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Carl L.; Haster, Carl-Johan; Chatterjee, Sourav; Kalogera, Vicky; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-06-01

    We explore the possibility that GW150914, the binary black hole (BBH) merger recently detected by Advanced LIGO, was formed by gravitational interactions in the core of a dense star cluster. Using models of globular clusters (GCs) with detailed N-body dynamics and stellar evolution, we show that a typical cluster with a mass of 3× {10}5{M}ȯ to 6× {10}5{M}ȯ is optimal for forming GW150914-like BBHs that will merge in the local universe. We identify the most likely dynamical processes for forming GW150914 in such a cluster, and we show that the detection of GW150914 is consistent with the masses and merger rates expected for BBHs from GCs. Our results show that dynamical processes provide a significant and well-understood pathway for forming BBH mergers in the local universe. Understanding the contribution of dynamics to the BBH merger problem is a critical step in unlocking the full potential of gravitational-wave astronomy.

  6. Dynamical Formation Signatures of Black Hole Binaries in the First Detected Mergers by LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O’Leary, Ryan M.; Meiron, Yohai; Kocsis, Bence

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical formation of stellar-mass black hole–black hole binaries has long been a promising source of gravitational waves for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). Mass segregation, gravitational focusing, and multibody dynamical interactions naturally increase the interaction rate between the most massive black holes in dense stellar systems, eventually leading them to merge. We find that dynamical interactions, particularly three-body binary formation, enhance the merger rate of black hole binaries with total mass M tot roughly as \\propto {M}{{tot}}β , with β ≳ 4. We find that this relation holds mostly independently of the initial mass function, but the exact value depends on the degree of mass segregation. The detection rate of such massive black hole binaries is only further enhanced by LIGO’s greater sensitivity to massive black hole binaries with M tot ≲ 80 {M}ȯ . We find that for power-law BH mass functions dN/dM ∝ M ‑α with α ≤ 2, LIGO is most likely to detect black hole binaries with a mass twice that of the maximum initial black hole mass and a mass ratio near one. Repeated mergers of black holes inside the cluster result in about ∼5% of mergers being observed between two and three times the maximum initial black hole mass. Using these relations, one may be able to invert the observed distribution to the initial mass function with multiple detections of merging black hole binaries.

  7. Dynamical Formation of Black Hole Binaries in Globular Clusters and the Origins of GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rodriguez, Carl L.

    2016-06-01

    We show that GW150914, the binary black hole merger detected last year by LIGO, could easily have been formed dynamically through interactions in the dense core of an old globular cluster. Using models of globular clusters with detailed N-body dynamics and stellar evolution, we show that a typical cluster can very naturally form a binary black hole with "heavy" components that will merge at low redshift, like GW150914. We describe in some detail the dynamical interaction processes that could form such a system. Finally, we also show that theoretical predictions for this dynamical formation channel are in general far more robust than those from "population synthesis" studies for isolated massive binaries in the field.

  8. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    PubMed

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations. PMID:23002736

  9. Gas Dynamics of the Central Cavity during Black Hole Binary Inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Dennis

    2016-03-01

    During galaxy mergers, as a result of dynamical friction (stars, gas, etc.) and gravitational slingshot, the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) from each galaxy will become gravitationally bound and eventually merge due to gravitational radiation. It is expected that gas will form a circumbinary accretion disk around the SMBH binary that will persistently feed individual ``mini-disks'' via dense streams out to their tidal truncation radii. We present simulations of SMBH binaries in this astrophysical environment during the general relativistic inspiral regime. We place particular emphasis on the dynamics of the individual mini-disks where violent shocks via disk-disk and disk-stream interactions will likely produce intense electromagnetic emission. This signal emanating from the mini-disks will likely prove instrumental in direct detection of SMBH binaries with currently available observatories.

  10. Gravitational waves from quasicircular black-hole binaries in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2012-12-21

    Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity cannot be strongly constrained with current experiments because it reduces to general relativity in the weak-field limit. This theory, however, introduces modifications in the nonlinear, dynamical regime, and thus it could be greatly constrained with gravitational waves from the late inspiral of black-hole binaries. We complete the first self-consistent calculation of such gravitational waves in this theory. For favorable spin orientations, advanced ground-based detectors may improve existing solar system constraints by 6 orders of magnitude. PMID:23368447

  11. Infalling clouds on to supermassive black hole binaries - I. Formation of discs, accretion and gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicovic, F. G.; Cuadra, J.; Sesana, A.; Stasyszyn, F.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Tanaka, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that most - if not all - galaxies harbour a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus; hence binaries of these massive objects are an inevitable product of the hierarchical evolution of structures in the Universe, and represent an important but thus-far elusive phase of galaxy evolution. Gas accretion via a circumbinary disc is thought to be important for the dynamical evolution of SMBH binaries, as well as in producing luminous emission that can be used to infer their properties. One plausible source of the gaseous fuel is clumps of gas formed due to turbulence and gravitational instabilities in the interstellar medium, that later fall towards and interact with the binary. In this context, we model numerically the evolution of turbulent clouds in near-radial infall on to equal-mass SMBH binaries, using a modified version of the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) code GADGET-3. We present a total of 12 simulations that explore different possible pericentre distances and relative inclinations, and show that the formation of circumbinary discs and discs around each SMBH (`mini-discs') depend on those parameters. We also study the dynamics of the formed discs, and the variability of the feeding rate on to the SMBHs in the different configurations.

  12. General Relativistic Mini-Disk Dynamics during Black Hole Binary Inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    During galaxy mergers, as a result of dynamical friction (stars, gas, etc.) and gravitational slingshot, the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) from each galaxy will become gravitationally bound and eventually merge due to gravitational radiation. It is expected that gas will form a circumbinary accretion disk around the SMBH binary that will persistently feed individual "mini-disks" via dense streams out to their tidal truncation radii. However, these radii are not well known during the late stages of inspiral and merger. We present general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations aimed at resolving this uncertainty and producing templates of unique electromagnetic (EM) signatures for such systems to assist in direct observational detection with currently available observatories. We place particular emphasis on the dynamics of the individual "mini-disks" where violent shocks via disk-disk and disk-stream interactions will likely produce intense EM emission.

  13. Dynamics of precessing binary black holes using the post-Newtonian approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hartl, Michael D.; Buonanno, Alessandra

    2005-01-15

    We investigate the (conservative) dynamics of binary black holes using the Hamiltonian formulation of the post-Newtonian (PN) equations of motion. The Hamiltonian we use includes spin-orbit coupling, spin-spin coupling, and mass monopole/spin-induced quadrupole interaction terms. We investigate the qualitative effects of these terms on the orbits; in the case of both quasicircular and eccentric orbits, we search for the presence of chaos (using the method of Lyapunov exponents) for a large variety of initial conditions. For quasicircular orbits, we find no chaotic behavior for black holes with total mass 10-40M{sub {center_dot}} when initially at a separation corresponding to a Newtonian gravitational-wave (GW) frequency less than {approx}150 Hz. Only for rather small initial radial distances (corresponding to a GW frequency larger than {approx}150 Hz), for which spin-spin induced oscillations in the radial separation are rather important, do we find chaotic solutions, and even then they are rare. Moreover, these chaotic quasicircular orbits are of questionable astrophysical significance, since they originate from direct parametrization of the equations of motion rather than from widely separated binaries evolving to small separations under gravitational radiation reaction. In the case of highly eccentric orbits, which for ground-based interferometers are not astrophysically favored, we again find chaotic solutions, but only at pericenters so small that higher order PN corrections, especially higher spin PN corrections, should also be taken into account. Taken together, our surveys of quasicircular and eccentric orbits find chaos only for orbits that are either of dubious astrophysical interest for ground-based interferometers or which violate the approximations required for the equations of motion to be physically valid at the post-Newtonian order considered.

  14. A Dynamical Study of the Black Hole X-Ray Binary Nova Muscae 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Orosz, Jerome A.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Steeghs, Danny; Longa-Peña, Penélope; Callanan, Paul J.; Gou, Lijun; Ho, Luis C.; Jonker, Peter G.; Reynolds, Mark T.; Torres, Manuel A. P.

    2015-06-01

    We present a dynamical study of the Galactic black hole binary system Nova Muscae 1991 (GS/GRS 1124-683). We utilize 72 high-resolution Magellan Echellette spectra and 72 strictly simultaneous V-band photometric observations; the simultaneity is a unique and crucial feature of this dynamical study. The data were taken on two consecutive nights and cover the full 10.4 hr orbital cycle. The radial velocities of the secondary star are determined by cross-correlating the object spectra with the best-match template spectrum obtained using the same instrument configuration. Based on our independent analysis of five orders of the echellette spectrum, the semi-amplitude of the radial velocity of the secondary is measured to be {{K}2}=406.8+/- 2.7 km s-1, which is consistent with previous work, while the uncertainty is reduced by a factor of 3. The corresponding mass function is f(M)=3.02+/- 0.06 {{M}⊙ }. We have also obtained an accurate measurement of the rotational broadening of the stellar absorption lines (vsin i=85.0+/- 2.6 km s-1), and hence the mass ratio of the system q=0.079+/- 0.007. Finally, we have measured the spectrum of the non-stellar component of emission that veils the spectrum of the secondary. In a future paper, we will use our veiling-corrected spectrum of the secondary and accurate values of K2 and q to model multi-color light curves and determine the systemic inclination and the mass of the black hole. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  15. ON THE DYNAMICAL FORMATION OF VERY YOUNG, X-RAY EMITTING BLACK HOLE BINARIES IN DENSE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Garofali, Kristen; Converse, Joseph M.; Chandar, Rupali; Rangelov, Blagoy

    2012-08-10

    We recently discovered a population of very young ({tau} {approx}< 6-8 Myr), X-ray emitting black hole binaries (BHBs) in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 4449. These BHBs are located within or near to very young star clusters, indicating that they form within the clusters, but that some fraction are dynamically ejected. Here we present results from a suite of N-body simulations of N = 16,384 ({approx}6000 M{sub Sun }) star clusters, similar to the masses of BHB hosts in NGC 4449, through the first 10 Myr of their lives. Our goal is to determine whether dynamical interactions are responsible for the observed population of BHBs in NGC 4449. Our simulations span a wide range of initial size and density profiles, both with and without primordial mass segregation, testing both realistic initial conditions and extreme ones. We find that clusters without primordial mass segregation only dynamically produce BHBs within 10 Myr when they are extremely compact and centrally concentrated. Preliminary results that include primordial binaries support this conclusion. The introduction of strong primordial mass segregation, however, greatly increases the rapidity with which the binaries form, although these are still not tight enough that they will emit X-rays. We conclude that X-ray emitting BHBs are unlikely to form dynamically in clusters of this mass under realistic conditions. Instead, they probably originate from binaries that contain two massive stars with small orbital separations, which are present from the cluster's birth.

  16. Binary black holes' effects on electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L; Neilsen, David

    2009-08-21

    In addition to producing gravitational waves, the dynamics of a binary black hole system could induce emission of electromagnetic radiation by affecting the behavior of plasmas and electromagnetic fields in their vicinity. We here study how the electromagnetic fields are affected by a pair of orbiting black holes through the merger. In particular, we show how the binary's dynamics induce a variability in possible electromagnetically induced emissions as well as a possible enhancement of electromagnetic fields during the late-merge and merger epochs. These time dependent features will likely leave their imprint in processes generating detectable emissions and can be exploited in the detection of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves. PMID:19792706

  17. Binary black hole accretion from a circumbinary disk: Gas dynamics inside the central cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Farris, Brian D.; Duffell, Paul; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; Haiman, Zoltan

    2014-03-10

    We present the results of two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamical simulations of circumbinary disk accretion using the finite-volume code DISCO. This code solves the 2D viscous Navier-Stokes equations on a high-resolution moving mesh which shears with the fluid flow, greatly reducing advection errors in comparison with a fixed grid. We perform a series of simulations for binary mass ratios in the range 0.026 ≤ q ≤ 1.0, each lasting longer than a viscous time so that we reach a quasi-steady accretion state. In each case, we find that gas is efficiently stripped from the inner edge of the circumbinary disk and enters the cavity along accretion streams, which feed persistent 'mini disks' surrounding each black hole. We find that for q ≳ 0.1, the binary excites eccentricity in the inner region of the circumbinary disk, creating an overdense lump which gives rise to enhanced periodicity in the accretion rate. The dependence of the periodicity on mass ratio may provide a method for observationally inferring mass ratios from measurements of the accretion rate. We also find that for all mass ratios studied, the magnitude of the accretion onto the secondary is sufficient to drive the binary toward larger mass ratio. This suggests a mechanism for biasing mass-ratio distributions toward equal mass.

  18. Binary Black Hole Accretion from a Circumbinary Disk: Gas Dynamics inside the Central Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Brian D.; Duffell, Paul; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; Haiman, Zoltan

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamical simulations of circumbinary disk accretion using the finite-volume code DISCO. This code solves the 2D viscous Navier-Stokes equations on a high-resolution moving mesh which shears with the fluid flow, greatly reducing advection errors in comparison with a fixed grid. We perform a series of simulations for binary mass ratios in the range 0.026 <= q <= 1.0, each lasting longer than a viscous time so that we reach a quasi-steady accretion state. In each case, we find that gas is efficiently stripped from the inner edge of the circumbinary disk and enters the cavity along accretion streams, which feed persistent "mini disks" surrounding each black hole. We find that for q >~ 0.1, the binary excites eccentricity in the inner region of the circumbinary disk, creating an overdense lump which gives rise to enhanced periodicity in the accretion rate. The dependence of the periodicity on mass ratio may provide a method for observationally inferring mass ratios from measurements of the accretion rate. We also find that for all mass ratios studied, the magnitude of the accretion onto the secondary is sufficient to drive the binary toward larger mass ratio. This suggests a mechanism for biasing mass-ratio distributions toward equal mass.

  19. ECCENTRIC EVOLUTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasawa, Masaki; An, Sangyong; Matsubayashi, Tatsushi; Funato, Yoko; Makino, Junichiro

    2011-04-10

    In recent numerical simulations, it has been found that the eccentricity of supermassive black hole (SMBH)-intermediate black hole (IMBH) binaries grows toward unity through interactions with the stellar background. This increase of eccentricity reduces the merging timescale of the binary through the gravitational radiation to a value well below the Hubble time. It also gives a theoretical explanation of the existence of eccentric binaries such as that in OJ287. In self-consistent N-body simulations, this increase of eccentricity is always observed. On the other hand, the result of the scattering experiment between SMBH binaries and field stars indicated that the eccentricity dose not change significantly. This discrepancy leaves the high eccentricity of the SMBH binaries in N-body simulations unexplained. Here, we present a stellar-dynamical mechanism that drives the increase of the eccentricity of an SMBH binary with a large mass ratio. There are two key processes involved. The first one is the Kozai mechanism under a non-axisymmetric potential, which effectively randomizes the angular momenta of surrounding stars. The other is the selective ejection of stars with prograde orbits. Through these two mechanisms, field stars extract the orbital angular momentum of the SMBH binary. Our proposed mechanism causes the increase in the eccentricity of most of SMBH binaries, resulting in the rapid merger through gravitational wave radiation. Our result has given a definite solution to the 'last-parsec problem'.

  20. Cassini states for black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandre C. M.

    2016-03-01

    Cassini states correspond to the equilibria of the spin axis of a body when its orbit is perturbed. They were initially described for planetary satellites, but the spin axes of black hole binaries also present this kind of equilibria. In previous works, Cassini states were reported as spin-orbit resonances, but actually the spin of black hole binaries is in circulation and there is no resonant motion. Here we provide a general description of the spin dynamics of black hole binary systems based on a Hamiltonian formalism. In absence of dissipation, the problem is integrable and it is easy to identify all possible trajectories for the spin for a given value of the total angular momentum. As the system collapses due to radiation reaction, the Cassini states are shifted to different positions, which modifies the dynamics around them. This is why the final spin distribution may differ from the initial one. Our method provides a simple way of predicting the distribution of the spin of black hole binaries at the end of the inspiral phase.

  1. Flip-Flopping Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, Carlos O.; Healy, James

    2015-04-01

    We study binary spinning black holes to display the long term individual spin dynamics. We perform a full numerical simulation starting at an initial proper separation of d ≈25 M between equal mass holes and evolve them down to merger for nearly 48 orbits, 3 precession cycles, and half of a flip-flop cycle. The simulation lasts for t =20 000 M and displays a total change in the orientation of the spin of one of the black holes from an initial alignment with the orbital angular momentum to a complete antialignment after half of a flip-flop cycle. We compare this evolution with an integration of the 3.5 post-Newtonian equations of motion and spin evolution to show that this process continuously flip flops the spin during the lifetime of the binary until merger. We also provide lower order analytic expressions for the maximum flip-flop angle and frequency. We discuss the effects this dynamics may have on spin growth in accreting binaries and on the observational consequences for galactic and supermassive binary black holes.

  2. Flip-flopping binary black holes.

    PubMed

    Lousto, Carlos O; Healy, James

    2015-04-10

    We study binary spinning black holes to display the long term individual spin dynamics. We perform a full numerical simulation starting at an initial proper separation of d≈25M between equal mass holes and evolve them down to merger for nearly 48 orbits, 3 precession cycles, and half of a flip-flop cycle. The simulation lasts for t=20 000M and displays a total change in the orientation of the spin of one of the black holes from an initial alignment with the orbital angular momentum to a complete antialignment after half of a flip-flop cycle. We compare this evolution with an integration of the 3.5 post-Newtonian equations of motion and spin evolution to show that this process continuously flip flops the spin during the lifetime of the binary until merger. We also provide lower order analytic expressions for the maximum flip-flop angle and frequency. We discuss the effects this dynamics may have on spin growth in accreting binaries and on the observational consequences for galactic and supermassive binary black holes. PMID:25910104

  3. Modeling Flows Around Merging Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are produced by the merger of galaxies. The final stages of the black hole coalescence produce strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. In cases in which the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We have taken a first step towards this problem by mapping the flow of pressureless matter in the dynamic, 3-D general relativistic spacetime around the merging black holes. We report on the results of these initial simulations and discuss their likely importance for future hydrodynamical simulations.

  4. Apparent horizons in binary black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre Marie

    Over the last decade, advances in computing technology and numerical techniques have lead to the possible theoretical prediction of astrophysically relevant waveforms in numerical simulations. With the building of gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory, we stand at the epoch that will usher in the first experimental study of strong field general relativity. One candidate source for ground based detection of gravitational waveforms, the orbit and merger of two black holes, is of great interest to the relativity community. The binary black hole problem is the two-body problem in general relativity. It is a stringent dynamical test of the theory. The problem involves the evolution of the Einstein equation, a complex system of non-linear, dynamic, elliptic-hyperbolic equations intractable in closed form. Numerical relativists are now developing the technology to evolve the Einstein equation using numerical simulations. The generation of these numerical I codes is a ``theoretical laboratory'' designed to study strong field phenomena in general relativity. This dissertation reports the successful development and application of the first multiple apparent horizon tracker applied to the generic binary black hole problem. I have developed a method that combines a level set of surfaces with a curvature flow method. This method, which I call the level flow method, locates the surfaces of any apparent horizons in the spacetime. The surface location then is used to remove the singularities from the computational domain in the evolution code. I establish the following set of criteria desired in an apparent horizon tracker: (1)The robustness of the tracker due to its lack of dependence on small changes to the initial guess; (2)The generality of the tracker in its applicability to generic spacetimes including multiple back hole spacetimes; and (3)The efficiency of the tracker algorithm in CPU time. I demonstrate the apparent

  5. Binaries of massive black holes in rotating clusters: dynamics, gravitational waves, detection and the role of eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, P.; Eichhorn, C.; Porter, E. K.; Spurzem, R.

    2010-02-01

    The dynamical evolution of binaries of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs; massive black holes with a mass ranging between 102 and 104Msolar) in stellar clusters has recently received an increasing amount of attention. This is at least partially due to the fact that if the binary is hard enough to evolve to the phase at which it will start emitting gravitational waves (GWs) efficiently, there is a good probability that it will be detectable by future space-borne detectors like Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. We study this evolution in the presence of rotation in the cluster by carrying out a series of simulations of an equal-mass binary of IMBHs embedded in a stellar distribution with different rotational parameters. The survey indicates that eccentricities and inclinations are primarily determined by the initial conditions of the IMBHs and the influence of dynamical friction, even though they are finally perturbed by the scattering of field stars. In particular, the eccentricity is strongly connected to the initial IMBHs velocities, and values of ~0.7 up to 0.9 are reached for low initial velocities, while almost circular orbits result if the initial velocities are increased. Evidence suggests a dependency of the eccentricity on the rotation parameter. We found only weak changes in the inclination, with slight variations of the orientation of the angular momentum vector of the binary. Counter-rotation simulations yield remarkably different results in eccentricity. A Monte Carlo study indicates that these sources will be detectable by a detector such as Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) with median signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of between 10 and 20 over a three-year period, although some events had SNR of 300 or greater. Furthermore, one should also be able to estimate the chirp mass with median fractional errors of 10-4, reduced mass of the order of 10-3 and luminosity distance of the order of 10-1. Finally, these sources will have a median angular

  6. Precision Measurement of Black Hole Binary Dynamics: Analyzing the LISA Data Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Thorpe, James Ira; Baker, John G.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Kelly, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    One of the richest potential sources of insight into fundamental physics that LISA will be capable of observing is the inspiral of supermassive black hole binaries (BHBs). However, the data analysis challenge presented by the LISA data stream is quite unlike the situation for present day gravitational wave detectors. In order to make the precision measurements necessary to achieve LISA's science goals, the BHB signal must be distinguished from a data stream that not only contains instrumental noise, but potentially thousands of other signals as well, so that the "background" we wish to separate out to focus on the BHB signal is likely to be highly nonstationary and nongaussian, as well as being of scientific interest in its own right. In addition, whereas the theoretical templates that we calculate in order to ultimately estimate the parameters can afford to be somewhat inaccurate and still be effective for present day and near future detectors, this is not the case for LISA, and extremely high fidelity of the theoretical templates for high signal-to-noise signals will be required to prevent theoretical errors from dominating the parameter estimates. NVe, will describe efforts in the community of LISA data analysts to address the challenges regarding the specific issue of BHB signals. These efforts include using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach with the freedom to model the BHB and the other signals present in the data stream simultaneously, rather than trying to remove other signals and risk biasing the remaining data. The Mock LISA Data Challenge is a community of LISA scientists who generate rounds of simulated LISA noise with increasingly difficult signal content, and invite the LISA data analysis community to exercise their methods, or develop new methods, in an attempt to extract the parameters for the signals embedded in the mock data. In addition to practical approaches such ,is this to assess the level of parameter accuracy, one can apply the Fisher

  7. A jet emission model to probe the dynamics of accretion and ejection coupling in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzac, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Compact jets are probably the most common form of jets in X-ray binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei. They seem to be present in all sources in the so-called hard X-ray spectral state. They are characterised by a nearly flat Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) extending from the radio to the infrared bands. This emission is usually interpreted as partially self absorbed synchrotron emission from relativistic leptons accelerated in the jet. The observed flat spectral shape requires energy dissipation and acceleration of particules over a wide range of distances along the jet. This distributed energy dissipation is likely to be powered by internal shocks caused by fluctuations of the outflow velocity. I will discuss such an internal shock model in the context of black hole binaries. I will show that internal shocks can produce the observed SEDs and also predict a strong, wavelength dependent, variability that resembles the observed one. The assumed velocity fluctuations of the jet must originate in the accretion flow. The model thus predicts a strong connection between the observable properties of the jet in the radio to IR bands, and the variability of the accretion flow as observed in X-rays. If the model is correct, this offers a unique possibility to probe the dynamics of the coupled accretion and ejection processes leading to the formation of compact jets.

  8. Close supermassive binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. Martin

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that when the peaks of the broad emission lines in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are significantly blueshifted or redshifted from the systemic velocity of the host galaxy, this could be a consequence of orbital motion of a supermassive blackhole binary (SMB). The AGN J1536+0441 (=SDSS J153636.22+044127.0) has recently been proposed as an example of this phenomenon. It is proposed here instead that 1536+044 is an example of line emission from a disc. If this is correct, the lack of clear optical spectral evidence for close SMBs is significant and argues either that the merging of close SMBs is much faster than has generally been hitherto thought, or if the approach is slow, that when the separation of the binary is comparable to the size of the torus and broad-line region, the feeding of the black holes is disrupted.

  9. Spin flips in generic black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, Carlos O.; Healy, James; Nakano, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    We study the spin dynamics of individual black holes in a binary system. In particular we focus on the polar precession of spins and the possibility of a complete flip of spins with respect to the orbital plane. We perform a full numerical simulation that displays these characteristics. We evolve equal mass binary spinning black holes for t =20 ,000 M from an initial proper separation of d =25 M down to merger after 48.5 orbits. We compute the gravitational radiation from this system and compare it to 3.5 post-Newtonian generated waveforms finding close agreement. We then further use 3.5 post-Newtonian evolutions to show the extension of this spin flip-flop phenomenon to unequal mass binaries. We also provide analytic expressions to approximate the maximum flip-flop angle and frequency in terms of the binary spins and mass ratio parameters at a given orbital radius. Finally we discuss the effect this spin flip flop would have on accreting matter and other potential observational effects.

  10. Black hole binaries and microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2013-12-01

    This is a general review on the observations and physics of black hole X-ray binaries and microquasars, with the emphasize on recent developments in the high energy regime. The focus is put on understanding the accretion flows and measuring the parameters of black holes in them. It includes mainly two parts: i) Brief review of several recent review article on this subject; ii) Further development on several topics, including black hole spin measurements, hot accretion flows, corona formation, state transitions and thermal stability of standard think disk. This is thus not a regular bottom-up approach, which I feel not necessary at this stage. Major effort is made in making and incorporating from many sources useful plots and illustrations, in order to make this article more comprehensible to non-expert readers. In the end I attempt to make a unification scheme on the accretion-outflow (wind/jet) connections of all types of accreting BHs of all accretion rates and all BH mass scales, and finally provide a brief outlook.

  11. Birth of Massive Black Hole Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Colpi, M.; Dotti, M.; Mayer, L.; Kazantzidis, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-19

    If massive black holes (BHs) are ubiquitous in galaxies and galaxies experience multiple mergers during their cosmic assembly, then BH binaries should be common albeit temporary features of most galactic bulges. Observationally, the paucity of active BH pairs points toward binary lifetimes far shorter than the Hubble time, indicating rapid inspiral of the BHs down to the domain where gravitational waves lead to their coalescence. Here, we review a series of studies on the dynamics of massive BHs in gas-rich galaxy mergers that underscore the vital role played by a cool, gaseous component in promoting the rapid formation of the BH binary. The BH binary is found to reside at the center of a massive self-gravitating nuclear disc resulting from the collision of the two gaseous discs present in the mother galaxies. Hardening by gravitational torques against gas in this grand disc is found to continue down to sub-parsec scales. The eccentricity decreases with time to zero and when the binary is circular, accretion sets in around the two BHs. When this occurs, each BH is endowed with it own small-size ({approx}< 0.01 pc) accretion disc comprising a few percent of the BH mass. Double AGN activity is expected to occur on an estimated timescale of {approx}< 1 Myr. The double nuclear point-like sources that may appear have typical separation of {approx}< 10 pc, and are likely to be embedded in the still ongoing starburst. We note that a potential threat of binary stalling, in a gaseous environment, may come from radiation and/or mechanical energy injections by the BHs. Only short-lived or sub-Eddington accretion episodes can guarantee the persistence of a dense cool gas structure around the binary necessary for continuing BH inspiral.

  12. Inspiralling, nonprecessing, spinning black hole binary spacetime via asymptotic matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Brennan; Mundim, Bruno C.; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Campanelli, Manuela

    2016-05-01

    We construct a new global, fully analytic, approximate spacetime which accurately describes the dynamics of nonprecessing, spinning black hole binaries during the inspiral phase of the relativistic merger process. This approximate solution of the vacuum Einstein's equations can be obtained by asymptotically matching perturbed Kerr solutions near the two black holes to a post-Newtonian metric valid far from the two black holes. This metric is then matched to a post-Minkowskian metric even farther out in the wave zone. The procedure of asymptotic matching is generalized to be valid on all spatial hypersurfaces, instead of a small group of initial hypersurfaces discussed in previous works. This metric is well suited for long term dynamical simulations of spinning black hole binary spacetimes prior to merger, such as studies of circumbinary gas accretion which requires hundreds of binary orbits.

  13. Detecting gravity waves from binary black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlquist, Hugo D.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most attractive possible sources of strong gravitational waves would be a binary system comprising massive black holes (BH). The gravitational radiation from a binary is an elliptically polarized, periodic wave which could be observed continuously - or at intervals whenever a detector was available. This continuity of the signal is certainly appealing compared to waiting for individual pulses from infrequent random events. It also has the advantage over pulses that continued observation can increase the signal-to-noise ratio almost indefinitely. Furthermore, this system is dynamically simple; the theory of the generation of the radiation is unambiguous; all characteristics of the signal can be precisely related to the dynamical parameters of the source. The current situation is that while there is no observational evidence as yet for the existence of massive binary BH, their formation is theoretically plausible, and within certain coupled constraints of mass and location, their existence cannot be observationally excluded. Detecting gravitational waves from these objects might be the first observational proof of their existence.

  14. Evolution of binary black-hole spacetimes.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Frans

    2005-09-16

    We describe early success in the evolution of binary black-hole spacetimes with a numerical code based on a generalization of harmonic coordinates. Indications are that with sufficient resolution this scheme is capable of evolving binary systems for enough time to extract information about the orbit, merger, and gravitational waves emitted during the event. As an example we show results from the evolution of a binary composed of two equal mass, nonspinning black holes, through a single plunge orbit, merger, and ringdown. The resultant black hole is estimated to be a Kerr black hole with angular momentum parameter a approximately 0.70. At present, lack of resolution far from the binary prevents an accurate estimate of the energy emitted, though a rough calculation suggests on the order of 5% of the initial rest mass of the system is radiated as gravitational waves during the final orbit and ringdown. PMID:16197061

  15. Bringing Black Holes Together: How Supermassive Black Hole Binaries Form and Plunge Through the Final Parsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly

    2016-04-01

    Astronomers now know that supermassive black holes reside in nearly every galaxy.Though these black holes are an observational certainty, nearly every aspect of their evolution -- from their birth, to their fuel source, to their basic dynamics -- is a matter of lively debate. In principle, gas-rich major galaxy mergers can generate the central stockpile of fuel needed for a low mass central black hole seed to grow quickly into a supermassive one. During a galaxy merger, the black holes in each galaxy meet and form a supermassive binary black hole; as the binary orbit shrinks through its final parsec, it becomes the loudest gravitational wave source in the Universe and a powerful agent to sculpt the galactic center. This talk will touch on some current and ongoing work on refining our theories of how supermassive black hole binaries form, evolve within, and alter their galaxy host.

  16. Retrograde binaries of massive black holes in circumbinary accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Context. We explore the hardening of a massive black hole binary embedded in a circumbinary gas disc under a specific circumstance: when the binary and the gas are coplanar and the gas is counter-rotating. The binary has unequal mass and the interaction of the gas with the lighter secondary black hole is the main cause of the braking torque on the binary that shrinks with time. The secondary black hole, revolving in the direction opposite to the gas, experiences a drag from gas-dynamical friction and from direct accretion of part of it. Aims: In this paper, using two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamical grid simulations we investigate the effect of changing the accretion prescriptions on the dynamics of the secondary black hole, which in turn affect the binary hardening and eccentricity evolution. Methods: We find that realistic accretion prescriptions lead to results that differ from those inferred assuming accretion of all the gas within the Roche Lobe of the secondary black hole. Results: When considering gas accretion within the gravitational influence radius of the secondary black hole (which is smaller than the Roche Lobe radius) to better describe gas inflows, the shrinking of the binary is slower. In addition, in this case, a smaller amount of accreted mass is required to reduce the binary separation by the same amount. Different accretion prescriptions result in different discs' surface densities, which alter the black hole's dynamics back. Full 3D Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics realizations of a number of representative cases, run over a shorter interval of time, validate the general trends observed in the less computationally demanding 2D simulations. Conclusions: Initially circular black hole binaries increase their eccentricity only slightly, which then oscillates around small values (<0.1) while they harden. By contrast, initially eccentric binaries become more and more eccentric. A semi-analytical model describing the black hole's dynamics under

  17. Microlensing Signature of Binary Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Sahu, Kailash; Littenberg, Tyson

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the light curves of galactic bulge stars magnified via microlensing by stellar-mass binary black holes along the line-of-sight. We show the sensitivity to measuring various lens parameters for a range of survey cadences and photometric precision. Using public data from the OGLE collaboration, we identify two candidates for massive binary systems, and discuss implications for theories of star formation and binary evolution.

  18. Periastron advance in black-hole binaries.

    PubMed

    Le Tiec, Alexandre; Mroué, Abdul H; Barack, Leor; Buonanno, Alessandra; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Sago, Norichika; Taracchini, Andrea

    2011-09-30

    The general relativistic (Mercury-type) periastron advance is calculated here for the first time with exquisite precision in full general relativity. We use accurate numerical relativity simulations of spinless black-hole binaries with mass ratios 1/8≤m(1)/m(2)≤1 and compare with the predictions of several analytic approximation schemes. We find the effective-one-body model to be remarkably accurate and, surprisingly, so also the predictions of self-force theory [replacing m(1)/m(2)→m(1)m(2)/(m(1)+m(2))(2)]. Our results can inform a universal analytic model of the two-body dynamics, crucial for ongoing and future gravitational-wave searches. PMID:22107182

  19. Massive Binary Black Holes in the Cosmic Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpi, Monica; Dotti, Massimo

    2011-02-01

    Binary black holes occupy a special place in our quest for understanding the evolution of galaxies along cosmic history. If massive black holes grow at the center of (pre-)galactic structures that experience a sequence of merger episodes, then dual black holes form as inescapable outcome of galaxy assembly, and can in principle be detected as powerful dual quasars. But, if the black holes reach coalescence, during their inspiral inside the galaxy remnant, then they become the loudest sources of gravitational waves ever in the universe. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna is being developed to reveal these waves that carry information on the mass and spin of these binary black holes out to very large look-back times. Nature seems to provide a pathway for the formation of these exotic binaries, and a number of key questions need to be addressed: How do massive black holes pair in a merger? Depending on the properties of the underlying galaxies, do black holes always form a close Keplerian binary? If a binary forms, does hardening proceed down to the domain controlled by gravitational wave back reaction? What is the role played by gas and/or stars in braking the black holes, and on which timescale does coalescence occur? Can the black holes accrete on flight and shine during their pathway to coalescence? After outlining key observational facts on dual/binary black holes, we review the progress made in tracing their dynamics in the habitat of a gas-rich merger down to the smallest scales ever probed with the help of powerful numerical simulations. N-Body/hydrodynamical codes have proven to be vital tools for studying their evolution, and progress in this field is expected to grow rapidly in the effort to describe, in full realism, the physics of stars and gas around the black holes, starting from the cosmological large scale of a merger. If detected in the new window provided by the upcoming gravitational wave experiments, binary black holes will provide a deep view

  20. Dynamical evolution of stellar mass black holes in dense stellar clusters: estimate for merger rate of binary black holes originating from globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, A.

    2013-10-01

    We have performed N-body simulations of globular clusters (GCs) in order to estimate a detection rate of mergers of binary stellar mass black holes (BBHs) by means of gravitational wave (GW) observatories. For our estimate, we have only considered mergers of BBHs which escape from GCs (BBH escapers). BBH escapers merge more quickly than BBHs inside GCs because of their small semimajor axes. N-body simulation cannot deal with a GC with the number of stars N ˜ 106 due to its high calculation cost. We have simulated dynamical evolution of small N clusters (104 ≲ N ≲ 105), and have extrapolated our simulation results to large N clusters. From our simulation results, we have found the following dependence of BBH properties on N. BBHs escape from a cluster at each two-body relaxation time at a rate proportional to N. Semimajor axes of BBH escapers are inversely proportional to N, if initial mass densities of clusters are fixed. Eccentricities, primary masses and mass ratios of BBH escapers are independent of N. Using this dependence of BBH properties, we have artificially generated a population of BBH escapers from a GC with N ˜ 106, and have estimated a detection rate of mergers of BBH escapers by next-generation GW observatories. We have assumed that all the GCs are formed 10 or 12 Gyr ago with their initial numbers of stars Ni = 5 × 105-2 × 106 and their initial stellar mass densities inside their half-mass radii ρh,i = 6 × 103-106 M⊙ pc-3. Then, the detection rate of BBH escapers is 0.5-20 yr-1 for a BH retention fraction RBH = 0.5. A few BBH escapers are components of hierarchical triple systems, although we do not consider secular perturbation on such BBH escapers for our estimate. Our simulations have shown that BHs are still inside some of GCs at the present day. These BHs may marginally contribute to BBH detection.

  1. Binary black hole mergers in f(R) theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhoujian; Galaviz, Pablo; Li, Li-Fang

    2013-05-01

    In the near future, gravitational wave detection is set to become an important observational tool for astrophysics. It will provide us with an excellent means to distinguish different gravitational theories. In the effective form, many gravitational theories can be cast into an f(R) theory. In this article, we study the dynamics and gravitational waveform of an equal-mass binary black hole system in f(R) theory. We reduce the equations of motion in f(R) theory to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon coupled equations. In this form, it is straightforward to modify our existing numerical relativistic codes to simulate binary black hole mergers in f(R) theory. We consider a scalar field with the shape of a spherical shell containing binary black holes scalar field. We solve the initial data numerically using the Olliptic code. The evolution part is calculated using the extended AMSS-NCKU code. Both codes were updated and tested to solve the problem of binary black holes in f(R) theory. Our results show that the binary black hole dynamics in f(R) theory is more complex than in general relativity. In particular, the trajectory and merger time are strongly affected. Via the gravitational wave, it is possible to constrain the quadratic part parameter of f(R) theory in the range |a2|<1011m2. In principle, a gravitational wave detector can distinguish between a merger of a binary black hole in f(R) theory and the respective merger in general relativity. Moreover, it is possible to use gravitational wave detection to distinguish between f(R) theory and a non-self-interacting scalar field model in general relativity.

  2. Quasi periodic oscillations in black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    Fast time variability is the most prominent characteristic of accreting systems and the presence of quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) is a constant in all accreting systems, from cataclysmic variables to AGNs, passing through black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries and through the enigmatic ultra-luminous X-ray sources. In this paper, I will briefly review the current knowledge of QPOs in black hole X-ray binaries, mainly focussing on their observed properties, but also mentioning the most important models that have been proposed to explain the origin of QPOs over the last decades.

  3. Simulating merging binary black holes with nearly extremal spins

    SciTech Connect

    Lovelace, Geoffrey; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela

    2011-01-15

    Astrophysically realistic black holes may have spins that are nearly extremal (i.e., close to 1 in dimensionless units). Numerical simulations of binary black holes are important tools both for calibrating analytical templates for gravitational-wave detection and for exploring the nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime. However, all previous simulations of binary-black-hole inspiral, merger, and ringdown have been limited by an apparently insurmountable barrier: the merging holes' spins could not exceed 0.93, which is still a long way from the maximum possible value in terms of the physical effects of the spin. In this paper, we surpass this limit for the first time, opening the way to explore numerically the behavior of merging, nearly extremal black holes. Specifically, using an improved initial-data method suitable for binary black holes with nearly extremal spins, we simulate the inspiral (through 12.5 orbits), merger and ringdown of two equal-mass black holes with equal spins of magnitude 0.95 antialigned with the orbital angular momentum.

  4. Supermassive Black Hole Binaries: The Search Continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanović, Tamara

    Gravitationally bound supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) are thought to be a natural product of galactic mergers and growth of the large scale structure in the universe. They however remain observationally elusive, thus raising a question about characteristic observational signatures associated with these systems. In this conference proceeding I discuss current theoretical understanding and latest advances and prospects in observational searches for SBHBs.

  5. Hybrid Black-Hole Binary Initial Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundim, Bruno C.; Kelly, Bernard J.; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Zlochower, Yosef; Campanelli, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    "Traditional black-hole binary puncture initial data is conformally flat. This unphysical assumption is coupled with a lack of radiation signature from the binary's past life. As a result, waveforms extracted from evolutions of this data display an abrupt jump. In Kelly et al. [Class. Quantum Grav. 27:114005 (2010)], a new binary black-hole initial data with radiation contents derived in the post-Newtonian (PN) calculations was adapted to puncture evolutions in numerical relativity. This data satisfies the constraint equations to the 2.5PN order, and contains a transverse-traceless "wavy" metric contribution, violating the standard assumption of conformal flatness. Although the evolution contained less spurious radiation, there were undesired features; the unphysical horizon mass loss and the large initial orbital eccentricity. Introducing a hybrid approach to the initial data evaluation, we significantly reduce these undesired features."

  6. Jets in black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    I will review selected aspects of observations and theory of jets in black-hole binaries. The radio and gamma-ray emission of jets differs significantly between the low and high-mass X-ray binaries, which appears to be due jet-wind interaction (in particular, formation of recollimation shocks) in the latter. Also, both radio and X-ray emission of the jets can be significantly absorbed in the stellar wind of the donors in high-mass binaries. I will also review the theory of radiative processes in jets, their contributions to broad-band spectra, estimates of the jet power, the role of black-hole spin in powering jets, and the possibility that the base of the jet is the main source of X-ray emission (the lamppost model).

  7. Final remnant of binary black hole mergers: Multipolar analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Robert

    2009-10-15

    Methods are presented to define and compute source multipoles of dynamical horizons in numerical relativity codes, extending previous work in the isolated and dynamical horizon formalisms to allow for horizons that are not axisymmetric. These methods are then applied to a binary black hole merger simulation, providing evidence that the final remnant is a Kerr black hole, both through the (spatially) gauge-invariant recovery of the geometry of the apparent horizon, and through a detailed extraction of quasinormal ringing modes directly from the strong-field region.

  8. Superkicks in hyperbolic encounters of binary black holes.

    PubMed

    Healy, James; Herrmann, Frank; Hinder, Ian; Shoemaker, Deirdre M; Laguna, Pablo; Matzner, Richard A

    2009-01-30

    Generic inspirals and mergers of binary black holes produce beamed emission of gravitational radiation that can lead to a gravitational recoil or kick of the final black hole. The kick velocity depends on the mass ratio and spins of the binary as well as on the dynamics of the binary configuration. Studies have focused so far on the most astrophysically relevant configuration of quasicircular inspirals, for which kicks as large as approximately 3300 km s;(-1) have been found. We present the first study of gravitational recoil in hyperbolic encounters. Contrary to quasicircular configurations, in which the beamed radiation tends to average during the inspiral, radiation from hyperbolic encounters is plunge dominated, resulting in an enhancement of preferential beaming. As a consequence, it is possible in highly relativistic scatterings to achieve kick velocities as large as 10 000 km s;(-1). PMID:19257409

  9. Genuine Spin-Flip in Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, Carlos; Healy, James

    2015-04-01

    We perform a full numerical simulation of binary spinning black holes to display the long term spin dynamics. We start the simulation at an initial proper separation between the equal mass holes of d ~ 25 M and evolve them down to merger for nearly 48 orbits, 3 precession cycles and half of a flip-flop cycle. The simulation lasts for t = 20000 M and displays a change in the orientation of the spin of the black holes with one of them going from initially aligned with the orbital angular momentum to a complete anti-alignment after half of a flip-flop cycle. We compare this evolution with an integration of the 3.5 Post-Newtonian equations of motion and spin evolution to show that this process continuously flip-flops the spin during the lifetime of the binary until merger. We also provide lower order analytic expressions for the maximum flip-flop angle and frequency. We discuss the effects on spin growth in accreting binaries and the observational consequences for galactic and supermassive binary black holes.

  10. Gravitational Rocket from the Merging Massive Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.

    2005-12-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are expected to be among the most fascinating gravitational wave sources, observable by the NASA/ESA LISA detector. Not only will the merger events reveal the rich phenomenology of extremely strong and dynamical gravity deep inside the potential wells at the centers of galaxies (thus providing an excellent testing ground for general relativity), it will also make important contributions to the astrophysics of massive black hole evolutions. Typical black hole mergers involve asymmetric radiation of gravitational waves and lose linear momentum as well as energy and angular momentum. As a result, the merger remnant receives a kick from the GW emission: a gravitational rocket effect. High kick velocities (higher than the escape velocites of the host structure) would have a strong impact on our understanding of how massive black holes have evolved over time and, in particular, on the estimates of the merger rate for LISA. The main difficulties in calculations of the kick velocities has been in the last moments of the merger where the full theory of general relativity must be employed to accurately model the black hole dynamics. I describe a recent calculation of the kick velocities from numerical relativity simulations of the merging black hole binaries. Support from NASA ATP#02-0043-0056 is greatly appreciated.

  11. Gravitational Rocket from the Merging Massive Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are expected to be among the most fascinating gravitational wave sources, observable by the NASA/ESA LISA detector. Not only will the merger events reveal the rich phenomenology of extremely strong and dynamical gravity deep inside the potential wells at the centers of galaxies (thus providing an excellent testing ground for general relativity), it will also make important contributions to the astrophysics of massive black hole evolutions. Typical black hole mergers involve asymmetric radiation of gravitational waves and lose linear momentum as well as energy and angular momentum. As a result, the merger remnant receives a kick from the GW emission: a gravitational rocket effect. High kick velocities (higher than the escape velocities of the host structure) would have a strong impact on our understanding of how massive black holes have evolved over time and, in particular, on the estimates of the merger rate for LISA. The main difficulties in calculations of the kick velocities has been in the last moments of the merger where the full theory of general relativity must be employed to accurately model the black hole dynamics. I describe a recent calculation of the kick velocities from numerical relativity simulations of the merging black hole binaries.

  12. Binary Black Hole Mergers from Globular Clusters: Implications for Advanced LIGO.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carl L; Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Chatterjee, Sourav; Haster, Carl-Johan; Rasio, Frederic A

    2015-07-31

    The predicted rate of binary black hole mergers from galactic fields can vary over several orders of magnitude and is extremely sensitive to the assumptions of stellar evolution. But in dense stellar environments such as globular clusters, binary black holes form by well-understood gravitational interactions. In this Letter, we study the formation of black hole binaries in an extensive collection of realistic globular cluster models. By comparing these models to observed Milky Way and extragalactic globular clusters, we find that the mergers of dynamically formed binaries could be detected at a rate of ∼100 per year, potentially dominating the binary black hole merger rate. We also find that a majority of cluster-formed binaries are more massive than their field-formed counterparts, suggesting that Advanced LIGO could identify certain binaries as originating from dense stellar environments. PMID:26274407

  13. Testing general relativity using golden black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K.; Mishra, Chandra Kant; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter; Nichols, David A.; Chen, Yanbei; Nielsen, Alex B.; Berry, Christopher P. L.; London, Lionel

    2016-07-01

    The coalescences of stellar-mass black-hole binaries through their inspiral, merger, and ringdown are among the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. If a GW signal is observed with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the masses and spins of the black holes can be estimated from just the inspiral part of the signal. Using these estimates of the initial parameters of the binary, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be uniquely predicted making use of general-relativistic numerical simulations. In addition, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be independently estimated from the merger-ringdown part of the signal. If the binary black-hole dynamics is correctly described by general relativity (GR), these independent estimates have to be consistent with each other. We present a Bayesian implementation of such a test of general relativity, which allows us to combine the constraints from multiple observations. Using kludge modified GR waveforms, we demonstrate that this test can detect sufficiently large deviations from GR and outline the expected constraints from upcoming GW observations using the second-generation of ground-based GW detectors.

  14. Black-Hole Binaries, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Centrella, Joan; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.; vanMeter, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the predictions of general relativity for the dynamical interactions of two black holes has been a long-standing unsolved problem in theoretical physics. Black-hole mergers are monumental astrophysical events ' releasing tremendous amounts of energy in the form of gravitational radiation ' and are key sources for both ground- and spacebased gravitational wave detectors. The black-hole merger dynamics and the resulting gravitational waveforms can only he calculated through numerical simulations of Einstein's equations of general relativity. For many years, numerical relativists attempting to model these mergers encountered a host of problems, causing their codes to crash after just a fraction of a binary orbit cnuld be simulated. Recently ' however, a series of dramatic advances in numerical relativity has ' for the first time, allowed stable / robust black hole merger simulations. We chronicle this remarkable progress in the rapidly maturing field of numerical relativity, and the new understanding of black-hole binary dynamics that is emerging. We also discuss important applications of these fundamental physics results to astrophysics, to gravitationalwave astronomy, and in other areas.

  15. Observational signatures of binary supermassive black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Roedig, Constanze; Krolik, Julian H.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2014-04-20

    Observations indicate that most massive galaxies contain a supermassive black hole, and theoretical studies suggest that when such galaxies have a major merger, the central black holes will form a binary and eventually coalesce. Here we discuss two spectral signatures of such binaries that may help distinguish them from ordinary active galactic nuclei. These signatures are expected when the mass ratio between the holes is not extreme and the system is fed by a circumbinary disk. One such signature is a notch in the thermal continuum that has been predicted by other authors; we point out that it should be accompanied by a spectral revival at shorter wavelengths and also discuss its dependence on binary properties such as mass, mass ratio, and separation. In particular, we note that the wavelength λ {sub n} at which the notch occurs depends on these three parameters in such a way as to make the number of systems displaying these notches ∝λ{sub n}{sup 16/3}; longer wavelength searches are therefore strongly favored. A second signature, first discussed here, is hard X-ray emission with a Wien-like spectrum at a characteristic temperature ∼100 keV produced by Compton cooling of the shock generated when streams from the circumbinary disk hit the accretion disks around the individual black holes. We investigate the observability of both signatures. The hard X-ray signal may be particularly valuable as it can provide an indicator of black hole merger a few decades in advance of the event.

  16. Gravitational wave emission from binary supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesana, A.

    2013-12-01

    Massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) are unavoidable outcomes of the hierarchical structure formation process, and, according to the theory of general relativity, are expected to be the loudest gravitational wave (GW) sources in the Universe. In this paper I provide a broad overview of MBHBs as GW sources. After reviewing the basics of GW emission from binary systems and of MBHB formation, evolution and dynamics, I describe in some details the connection between binary properties and the emitted gravitational waveform. Direct GW observations will provide an unprecedented wealth of information about the physical nature and the astrophysical properties of these extreme objects, allowing to reconstruct their cosmic history, dynamics and coupling with their dense stellar and gaseous environment. In this context I describe ongoing and future efforts to make a direct detection with space based interferometry and pulsar timing arrays, highlighting the invaluable scientific payouts of such enterprises.

  17. Understanding the "antikick" in the merger of binary black holes.

    PubMed

    Rezzolla, Luciano; Macedo, Rodrigo P; Jaramillo, José Luis

    2010-06-01

    The generation of a large recoil velocity from the inspiral and merger of binary black holes represents one of the most exciting results of numerical-relativity calculations. While many aspects of this process have been investigated and explained, the "antikick," namely, the sudden deceleration after the merger, has not yet found a simple explanation. We show that the antikick can be understood in terms of the radiation from a deformed black hole where the anisotropic curvature distribution on the horizon correlates with the direction and intensity of the recoil. Our analysis is focused on Robinson-Trautman spacetimes and allows us to measure both the energies and momenta radiated in a gauge-invariant manner. At the same time, this simpler setup provides the qualitative and quantitative features of merging black holes, opening the way to a deeper understanding of the nonlinear dynamics of black-hole spacetimes. PMID:20867159

  18. Energy Versus Angular Momentum in Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Nagar, Alessandro; Pollney, Denis; Reisswig, Christian

    2012-03-01

    Using accurate numerical-relativity simulations of (nonspinning) black-hole binaries with mass ratios 1∶1, 2∶1, and 3∶1, we compute the gauge-invariant relation between the (reduced) binding energy E and the (reduced) angular momentum j of the system. We show that the relation E(j) is an accurate diagnostic of the dynamics of a black-hole binary in a highly relativistic regime. By comparing the numerical-relativity ENR(j) curve with the predictions of several analytic approximation schemes, we find that, while the canonically defined, nonresummed post-Newtonian-expanded EPN(j) relation exhibits large and growing deviations from ENR(j), the prediction of the effective one body formalism, based purely on known analytical results (without any calibration to numerical relativity), agrees strikingly well with the numerical-relativity results.

  19. Binary pairs of supermassive black holes - Formation in merging galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtaoja, L.; Valtonen, M. J.; Byrd, G. G.

    1989-08-01

    A process in which supermassive binary blackholes are formed in nuclei of supergiant galaxies due to galaxy mergers is examined. There is growing evidence that mergers of galaxies are common and that supermassive black holes in center of galaxies are also common. Consequently, it is expected that binary black holes should arise in connection with galaxy mergers. The merger process in a galaxy modeled after M87 is considered. The capture probability of a companion is derived as a function of its mass. Assuming a correlation between the galaxy mass and the blackholes mass, the expected mass ratio in binary black holes is calculated. The binary black holes formed in this process are long lived, surviving longer than the Hubble time unless they are perturbed by black holes from successive mergers. The properties of these binaries agree with Gaskell's (1988) observational work on quasars and its interpretation in terms of binary black holes.

  20. Constructing binary black hole template banks using numerical relativity waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush

    2013-04-01

    We present methods for constructing and validating template banks for gravitational waves from high mass binary black holes in advanced gravitational-wave detectors using waveforms from numerical relativity. We construct these template banks using numerical waveforms from the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes (SXS) collaboration. We show how a template bank can be constructed using numerical waveforms for non-spinning black hole binaries and discuss how this can be extended into the aligned spin black hole binary space.

  1. Exact teleparallel gravity of binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hanafy, W.; Nashed, G. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    An exact solution of two singularities in the teleparallel equivalent to general relativity theory has been obtained. A holographic visualization of the binary black holes (BBHs) space-time, due to the non vanishing torsion scalar field, has been given. The acceleration tensor of BBHs space-time has been calculated. The results identify the repulsive gravity zones of the BBHs field. The total conserved quantities of the BBHs has been evaluated. Possible gravitational radiation emission by the system has been calculated without assuming a weak field initial data.

  2. Binary Black Hole Mergers from Planet-like Migrations.

    PubMed

    Gould; Rix

    2000-03-20

    If supermassive black holes (BHs) are generically present in galaxy centers, and if galaxies are built up through hierarchical merging, BH binaries are at least temporary features of most galactic bulges. Observations suggest, however, that binary BHs are rare, pointing toward a binary lifetime far shorter than the Hubble time. We show that, almost regardless of the detailed mechanism, all stellar dynamical processes are too slow in reducing the orbital separation once orbital velocities in the binary exceed the virial velocity of the system. We propose that a massive gas disk surrounding a BH binary can effect its merger rapidly, in a scenario analogous to the orbital decay of super-Jovian planets due to a proto-planetary disk. As in the case of planets, gas accretion onto the secondary (here a supermassive BH) is integrally connected with its inward migration. Such accretion would give rise to quasar activity. BH binary mergers could therefore be responsible for many or most quasars. PMID:10702125

  3. Exploring Black Hole Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hyeyoun

    2015-10-01

    This thesis explores the evolution of different types of black holes, and the ways in which black hole dynamics can be used to answer questions about other physical systems. We first investigate the differences in observable gravitational effects between a four-dimensional Randall-Sundrum (RS) braneworld universe compared to a universe without the extra dimension, by considering a black hole solution to the braneworld model that is localized on the brane. When the brane has a negative cosmological constant, then for a certain range of parameters for the black hole, the intersection of the black hole with the brane approximates a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole on the brane with corrections that fall off exponentially outside the horizon. We compute the quasinormal modes of the braneworld black hole, and compare them to the known quasinormal modes of the three-dimensional BTZ black hole. We find that there are two distinct regions for the braneworld black hole solutions that are reflected in the dependence of the quasinormal modes on the black hole mass. The imaginary parts of the quasinormal modes display phenomenological similarities to the quasinormal modes of the three-dimensional BTZ black hole, indicating that nonlinear gravitational effects may not be enough to distinguish between a lower-dimensional theory and a theory derived from a higher-dimensional braneworld. Secondly, we consider the evolution of non-extremal black holes in N=4, d=2 supergravity, and investigate how such black holes might evolve over time if perturbed away from extremality. We study this problem in the probe limit by finding tunneling amplitudes for a Dirac field in a single-centered background, which gives the decay rates for the emission of charged probe black holes from the central black hole. We find that there is no minimum to the potential for the probe particles at a finite distance from the central black hole, so any probes that are emitted escape to infinity. If

  4. The Final Merger of Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Centrealla, Joan; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.; vanMeter, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in the field of numerical relativity have led to dramatic progress in understanding the predictions of General Relativity for the dynamical interactions of two black holes in the regime of very strong gravitational fields. Such black-hole binaries are important astrophysical systems and are a key target of current and developing gravitational-wave detectors. The waveform signature of strong gravitational radiation emitted as the black holes fall together and merge provides a clear observable record of the process. After decades of slow progress / these mergers and the gravitational-wave signals they generate can now be routinely calculated using the methods of numerical relativity. We review recent advances in understanding the predicted physics of events and the consequent radiation, and discuss some of the impacts this new knowledge is having in various areas of astrophysics

  5. OJ287 binary black hole system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtonen, M.; Ciprini, S.

    The light curve of the quasar OJ287 extends from 1891 up today without major gaps. This is partly due to extensive studies of historical plate archives by Rene Hudec and associates, partly due to several observing campaigns in recent times. Here we summarize the results of the 2005 - 2010 observing campaign in which several hundred scientists and amateur astronomers took part. The main results are the following: (1) The 2005 October optical outburst came at the expected time, thus confirming the general relativistic precession in the binary black hole system. This result disproved the model of a single black hole system with accretion disk oscillations, as well as several toy models of binaries without relativistic precession. In the latter models the main outburst would have been a year later. (2) The nature of the radiation of the 2005 October outburst was expected to be bremsstrahlung from hot gas at the temperature of 3× 105 oK. This was confirmed by combined ground based and ultraviolet observations using the XMM-Newton X-ray telescope. (3) A secondary outburst of the same nature was expected at 2007 September 13. Within the accuracy of observations (about 6 hours), it started at the correct time. Thus the prediction was accurate at the same level as the prediction of the return of Halley's comet in 1986. (4) Further synchrotron outbursts were expected following the two bremsstrahlung outbursts. They came as scheduled between 2007 October and 2009 December. (5) Due to the effect of the secondary on the overall direction of the jet, the parsec scale jet was expected to rotate in the sky by a large angle around 2009. This rotation may have been seen at high frequency radio observations. OJ287 binary black hole system is currently our best laboratory for testing theories of gravitation. Using OJ287, the correctness of General Relativity has now been demonstrated up to the third Post-Newtonian order, at higher order than has been possible using the binary pulsars.

  6. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, John

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GE0600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, data analysis, and astrophysics.

  7. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This discussion examines these gravitational patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. The focus is on recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by the space-based gravitational wave detector LISA.

  8. Measuring Massive Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    The coalescence of two massive black holes produces gravitational waves (GWs) which can be detected by the space-based detector LISA. By measuring these waves, LISA can determine the various parameters which characterize the source. Measurements of the black hole masses and spins will provide information about the growth of black holes and their host galaxies over time. Measurements of a source's sky position and distance may help astronomers identify an electromagnetic counterpart to the GW event. The counterpart's redshift, combined with the GW-measured luminosity distance, can then be used to measure the Hubble constant and the dark energy parameter $w$. Because the potential science output is so high, it is useful to know in advance how well LISA can measure source parameters for a wide range of binaries. We calculate expected parameter estimation errors using the well-known Fisher matrix method. Our waveform model includes the physics of spin precession, as well as subleading harmonics. When these higher-order effects are not included, strong degeneracies between some parameters cause them to be poorly determined by a GW measurement. When precession and subleading harmonics are properly included, the degeneracies are broken, reducing parameter errors by one to several orders of magnitude.

  9. Binary black hole mergers from globular clusters: Masses, merger rates, and the impact of stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Carl L.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of GW150914, the binary black hole merger detected by Advanced LIGO, has the potential to revolutionize observational astrophysics. But to fully utilize this new window into the Universe, we must compare these new observations to detailed models of binary black hole formation throughout cosmic time. Expanding upon our previous work [C. L. Rodriguez, M. Morscher, B. Pattabiraman, S. Chatterjee, C.-J. Haster, and F. A. Rasio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 051101 (2015).], we study merging binary black holes formed in globular clusters using our Monte Carlo approach to stellar dynamics. We have created a new set of 52 cluster models with different masses, metallicities, and radii to fully characterize the binary black hole merger rate. These models include all the relevant dynamical processes (such as two-body relaxation, strong encounters, and three-body binary formation) and agree well with detailed direct N -body simulations. In addition, we have enhanced our stellar evolution algorithms with updated metallicity-dependent stellar wind and supernova prescriptions, allowing us to compare our results directly to the most recent population synthesis predictions for merger rates from isolated binary evolution. We explore the relationship between a cluster's global properties and the population of binary black holes that it produces. In particular, we derive a numerically calibrated relationship between the merger times of ejected black hole binaries and a cluster's mass and radius. With our improved treatment of stellar evolution, we find that globular clusters can produce a significant population of massive black hole binaries that merge in the local Universe. We explore the masses and mass ratios of these binaries as a function of redshift, and find a merger rate of ˜5 Gpc-3yr-1 in the local Universe, with 80% of sources having total masses from 32 M⊙ to 64 M⊙. Under standard assumptions, approximately one out of every seven binary black hole mergers

  10. Binary black hole simulations for surrogate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemberger, Daniel; SXS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Analytic or data-driven models of binary black hole coalescences are used to densely cover the full parameter space, because it is computationally infeasible to do so using numerical relativity (NR). However, these models still need input from NR, either for calibration, or because the model is agnostic to the underlying physics. We use the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) to provide a large number of simulations to aid the construction of a NR surrogate model in a 5-dimensional subset of the parameter space. I will present an analysis of the simulations that were used to construct the surrogate model. I will also describe the infrastructure that was needed to efficiently perform a large number of simulations across many computational resources.

  11. Merging binary black holes formed through chemically homogeneous evolution in short-period stellar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya; de Mink, Selma E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore a newly proposed channel to create binary black holes of stellar origin. This scenario applies to massive, tight binaries where mixing induced by rotation and tides transports the products of hydrogen burning throughout the stellar envelopes. This slowly enriches the entire star with helium, preventing the build-up of an internal chemical gradient. The stars remain compact as they evolve nearly chemically homogeneously, eventually forming two black holes, which we estimate typically merge 4-11 Gyr after formation. Like other proposed channels, this evolutionary pathway suffers from significant theoretical uncertainties, but could be constrained in the near future by data from advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected merger rate over cosmic time to explore the implications and uncertainties. Our default model for this channel yields a local binary black hole merger rate of about 10 Gpc-3 yr-1 at redshift z = 0, peaking at twice this rate at z = 0.5. This means that this channel is competitive, in terms of expected rates, with the conventional formation scenarios that involve a common-envelope phase during isolated binary evolution or dynamical interaction in a dense cluster. The events from this channel may be distinguished by the preference for nearly equal-mass components and high masses, with typical total masses between 50 and 110 M⊙. Unlike the conventional isolated binary evolution scenario that involves shrinkage of the orbit during a common-envelope phase, short time delays are unlikely for this channel, implying that we do not expect mergers at high redshift.

  12. Binary black hole shadows, chaotic scattering and the Cantor set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Jake O.; Dolan, Sam R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the qualitative features of binary black hole shadows using the model of two extremally charged black holes in static equilibrium (a Majumdar–Papapetrou solution). Our perspective is that binary spacetimes are natural exemplars of chaotic scattering, because they admit more than one fundamental null orbit, and thus an uncountably infinite set of perpetual null orbits which generate scattering singularities in initial data. Inspired by the three-disc model, we develop an appropriate symbolic dynamics to describe planar null geodesics on the double black hole spacetime. We show that a one-dimensional (1D) black hole shadow may be constructed through an iterative procedure akin to the construction of the Cantor set; thus the 1D shadow is self-similar. Next, we study non-planar rays, to understand how angular momentum affects the existence and properties of the fundamental null orbits. Taking slices through 2D shadows, we observe three types of 1D shadow: regular, Cantor-like, and highly chaotic. The switch from Cantor-like to regular occurs where outer fundamental orbits are forbidden by angular momentum. The highly chaotic part is associated with an unexpected feature: stable and bounded null orbits, which exist around two black holes of equal mass M separated by {a}1\\lt a\\lt \\sqrt{2}{a}1, where {a}1=4M/\\sqrt{27}. To show how this possibility arises, we define a certain potential function and classify its stationary points. We conjecture that the highly chaotic parts of the 2D shadow possess the Wada property. Finally, we consider the possibility of following null geodesics through event horizons, and chaos in the maximally extended spacetime.

  13. ALIGNMENT OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARY ORBITS AND SPINS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M. Coleman; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies of accretion onto supermassive black hole binaries suggest that much, perhaps most, of the matter eventually accretes onto one hole or the other. If so, then for binaries whose inspiral from {approx}1 pc to {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -2} pc is driven by interaction with external gas, both the binary orbital axis and the individual black hole spins can be reoriented by angular momentum exchange with this gas. Here we show that, unless the binary mass ratio is far from unity, the spins of the individual holes align with the binary orbital axis in a time {approx}few-100 times shorter than the binary orbital axis aligns with the angular momentum direction of the incoming circumbinary gas; the spin of the secondary aligns more rapidly than that of the primary by a factor {approx}(m{sub 1}/m{sub 2}){sup 1/2} > 1. Thus the binary acts as a stabilizing agent, so that for gas-driven systems, the black hole spins are highly likely to be aligned (or counteraligned if retrograde accretion is common) with each other and with the binary orbital axis. This alignment can significantly reduce the recoil speed resulting from subsequent black hole merger.

  14. Constraints on individual supermassive black hole binaries from pulsar timing array limits on continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Katelin; Ma, Chung-Pei

    2016-06-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are placing increasingly stringent constraints on the strain amplitude of continuous gravitational waves emitted by supermassive black hole binaries on subparsec scales. In this paper, we incorporate independent information about the dynamical masses Mbh of supermassive black holes in specific galaxies at known distances and use this additional information to further constrain whether or not those galaxies could host a detectable supermassive black hole binary. We estimate the strain amplitudes from individual binaries as a function of binary mass ratio for two samples of nearby galaxies: (1) those with direct dynamical measurements of Mbh in the literature, and (2) the 116 most massive early-type galaxies (and thus likely hosts of the most massive black holes) within 108 Mpc from the MASSIVE Survey. Our exploratory analysis shows that the current PTA upper limits on continuous waves (as a function of angular position in the sky) can already constrain the mass ratios of hypothetical black hole binaries in many galaxies in our samples. The constraints are stronger for galaxies with larger Mbh and at smaller distances. For the black holes with Mbh ≳ 5 × 109 M⊙ at the centres of NGC 1600, NGC 4889, NGC 4486 (M87), and NGC 4649 (M60), any binary companion in orbit within the PTA frequency bands would have to have a mass ratio of a few per cent or less.

  15. Inspiralling, spinning, non-precessing binary black hole spacetime via asymptotic matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Brennan; Mundim, Bruno; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Campanelli, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    We construct and present a new global, fully analytic, approximate spacetime which accurately describes the dynamics of non-precessing, spinning black hole binaries during the inspiral phase of the relativistic merger process. This approximate solution of the vacuum Einstein's equations can be obtained by asymptotically matching perturbed Kerr solutions near the two black holes to a post-Newtonian metric valid far from the two black holes. This metric is then matched to a post-Minkowskian metric even farther out in the wave zone. The procedure of asymptotic matching is generalized to be valid on all spatial hypersurfaces, instead of a small group of initial hypersurfaces discussed in previous works. This metric is well suited for long term dynamical simulations of spinning black hole binary spacetimes prior to merger, such as studies of circumbinary gas accretion which requires hundreds of binary orbits.

  16. A New Channel for the Formation of Binary Black Holes - Chemically Homogeneous Evolution in Tidally Distorted Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya; De Mink, Selma

    2016-07-01

    We explore a new channel to create binary black holes of stellar origin. This scenario applies to massive, tidally distorted binaries where mixing slowly enriches the entire star with helium produced by nuclear bruning. The stars evolve nearly chemically homogeneously and remain compact, eventually forming to two black holes. We find that this channel preferentially creates binary black holes, with comparable masses (m2/m1>0.65) and total masses between 50 and 110 solar masses. These typically merge 4-11 Gyr after formation implying local binary black hole merger rate of about 10 Gpc-3 yr-1 at redshift z = 0, peaking at twice this rate at z = 0.5 (Mandel & de Mink 2016). The channel is competitive, in terms of expected rates, with the conventional formation scenarios that involve a common envelope phase during isolated binary evolution or dynamical interaction in a dense cluster. The parameters for GW150914 and the rate inferred during the first 16 days O1 run are consistent with the predictions from this channel. While GW150914 may have originated from this channel, we can not distinguish at present between this and the two classical formation channels. However, the near future perspective of probing the black hole demographics is extremely promising.

  17. Tests and applications of the SXS binary black hole catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Mark; Simulations of Extreme Spacetimes (SXS) Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Numerical relativity is the only reliable method of computing the full gravitational waveform--including inspiral, merger, and ringdown--for strongly-gravitating systems like coalescing black holes, which are of foremost importance to gravitational-wave interferometers such as LIGO. We have used the Spectral Einstein Code [black-holes.org/SpEC.html] to construct a public catalog of hundreds of binary black hole simulations, for use by gravitational-wave science, and for calibration of fast analytic models of binary black-hole waveforms. We discuss the current status of the catalog, tests of the resulting waveforms, and selected applications.

  18. Calculating Gravitational Wave Signature from Binary Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2003-01-01

    Calculations of the final merger stage of binary black hole evolution can only be carried out using full scale numerical relativity simulations. We review the status of these calculations, highlighting recent progress and current challenges.

  19. Tidal disruption events by a massive black hole binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricarte, Angelo; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Dai, Lixin; Coppi, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) are a natural byproduct of galaxy mergers. Previous studies have shown that flares from stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) are modified by the presence of a secondary perturber, causing interruptions in the light curve. We study the dynamics of TDE debris in the presence of a milliparsec-separated MBHB by integrating ballistic particle orbits in the time-varying potential of the binary. We find that gaps in the light curve appear when material misses the accretion radius on its first return to pericentre. Subsequent recurrences can be decomposed into `continuous' and `delayed' components, which exhibit different behaviour. We find that this potential can substantially alter the locations of stream self-intersections. When debris is confined to the plane, we find that close encounters with the secondary massive black hole (MBH) leave noticeable signatures on the fallback rate and can result in significant accretion on to the secondary MBH. Tight, equal-mass MBHBs accrete equally, periodically trading the infalling stream.

  20. Ultra--Low-Frequency Gravitational Radiation from Massive Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Mohan; Romani, Roger W.

    1995-06-01

    For massive black hole binaries produced in galactic mergers, we examine the possibility of inspiral induced by interaction with field stars. We model the evolution of such binaries for a range of galaxy core and binary parameters, using numerical results from the literature to compute the binary's energy and angular momentum loss rates due to stellar encounters and including the effect of back-action on the field stars. We find that only a small fraction of binary systems can merge within a Hubble time via unassisted stellar dynamics. External perturbations may, however, cause efficient inspiral. Averaging over a population of central black holes and galaxy mergers, we computed the expected background of gravitational radiation with periods Pw ˜ 1-10 yr. Comparison with sensitivities from millisecond pulsar timing suggests that the strongest sources may be detectable with modest improvements to present experiments.

  1. Analyzing and improving initial data for binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigsby, Jason D.

    Binary black holes are one of the most likely sources of gravitational radiation to be detected by projects such as LIGO and LISA. This radiation causes the binary to lose energy and angular momentum with the black holes adiabatically spiraling together. The strongest radiation is emitted at merger, where the strong fields and lack of symmetry require the use of fully numerical methods for solving Einstein's equations. Numerical simulations of binary black holes require the specification of initial data to be used with evolution equations. The physics of a binary black hole system in numerical relativity will largely be determined by the initial data. This dissertation is concerned with the analysis and improvement of that initial data. There will be two main parts to this dissertation. The first part will be concerned with how initial data is created. This starts with a presentation of the 3+1 decomposition which rewrites Einstein's field equations as a set of constraint and evolution equations. This will be followed with a discussion of the conformal thin-sandwich decomposition and excision methods which rewrite a portion of the 3+1 decomposition as a well-posed set of elliptic equations and boundary conditions that can be used to determine initial data. Then I will discuss the the physics of binary black holes, what physical measurements we can apply and how they are used to find astrophysically likely initial data for binary black holes. Lastly, there will be a discussion of the implementation of these methods. The second section will cover my own research into binary black hole initial data. I will describe tests of methods for finding binaries in quasicircular orbit, thought to be the most likely scenario for binary sources of gravitational waves. This is entwined with tests to better understand spin in binary black holes. I will then report on efforts to understand eccentricity in binary black hole initial data. Finally I will discuss efforts to improve

  2. Unstable Flip-flopping spinning binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, Carlos; Healy, James

    2016-03-01

    We give a unified description of the flip-flop effect in spinning binary black holes and the anti-alignment instability in terms of real and imaginary flip-flop frequencies. We find that this instability is only effective for 0 . 5 < q < 1 . We provide analytic expressions that determine the region of parameter space for which the instability occurs in terms of maps of the mass ratio and spin magnitudes (q ,α1 ,α2) . This restricts the priors of parameter estimation techniques from the observation of gravitational waves from binary black holes and is relevant for astrophysical modeling and final recoil computations of such binary systems.

  3. Improved initial data for binary black hole simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throwe, William

    2014-03-01

    Asymptotically matched approximate analytic metrics can provide realistic initial data for binary black hole simulations. We have simulated these data using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) and observe that they show decreased junk radiation and physical parameter drift as compared to commonly used initial data. We have generalized previous asymptotically matched data sets to allow for arbitrary initial hole velocities, and have demonstrated that this method can be used to adjust the eccentricity of the simulated binaries, including describing binary systems with quasicircular orbits.

  4. Formation of discs around super-massive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicovic, Felipe G.; Cuadra, Jorge; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    We model numerically the evolution of 104 M ⊙ turbulent molecular clouds in near-radial infall onto 106 M ⊙, equal-mass supermassive black hole binaries, using a modified version of the SPH code gadget-3. We investigate the different gas structures formed depending on the relative inclination between the binary and the cloud orbits. Our first results indicate that an aligned orbit produces mini-discs around each black hole, almost aligned with the binary; a perpendicular orbit produces misaligned mini-discs; and a counter-aligned orbit produces a circumbinary, counter-rotating ring.

  5. Hot accretion flows onto binary and single black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Roman; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Ruiz, Milton; Shapiro, Stuart; Etienne, Zachariah; Pfeiffer, Harald; McKinney, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Accreting black holes (BHs) are at the core of relativistic astrophysics as messengers of the strong-field regime of General Relativity and prime targets of several observational campaigns, including imaging the black hole shadow in SagA* and M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope. Binary Black Holes are one of the most promising gravitational wave sources for adLIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays and - if accreting - can provide a strong electromagnetic counterpart. I will present results from global GRMHD simulations of both single and binary BHs embedded in a hot, magnetized disk, highlighting differences in their observational appearance including their gravitational and electromagnetic radiation.

  6. Template bank for gravitational waveforms from coalescing binary black holes: Nonspinning binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Ajith, P.; Hewitson, M.; Babak, S.; Chen, Y.; Krishnan, B.; Whelan, J. T.; Dorband, N.; Pollney, D.; Rezzolla, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Bruegmann, B.; Hannam, M.; Husa, S.; Sperhake, U.; Diener, P.; Gonzalez, J.; Santamaria, L.; Thornburg, J.

    2008-05-15

    Gravitational waveforms from the inspiral and ring-down stages of the binary black-hole coalescences can be modeled accurately by approximation/perturbation techniques in general relativity. Recent progress in numerical relativity has enabled us to model also the nonperturbative merger phase of the binary black-hole coalescence problem. This enables us to coherently search for all three stages of the coalescence of nonspinning binary black holes using a single template bank. Taking our motivation from these results, we propose a family of template waveforms which can model the inspiral, merger, and ring-down stages of the coalescence of nonspinning binary black holes that follow quasicircular inspiral. This two-dimensional template family is explicitly parametrized by the physical parameters of the binary. We show that the template family is not only effectual in detecting the signals from black-hole coalescences, but also faithful in estimating the parameters of the binary. We compare the sensitivity of a search (in the context of different ground-based interferometers) using all three stages of the black-hole coalescence with other template-based searches which look for individual stages separately. We find that the proposed search is significantly more sensitive than other template-based searches for a substantial mass range, potentially bringing about remarkable improvement in the event rate of ground-based interferometers. As part of this work, we also prescribe a general procedure to construct interpolated template banks using nonspinning black-hole waveforms produced by numerical relativity.

  7. Computing Binary Black Hole Initial Data in Damped Harmonic Gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Vijay; Scheel, Mark; Simulating Extreme Spacetimes Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Binary black hole evolution in the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) is currently done in the damped harmonic (DH) gauge, which has proven very useful for merger simulations. However, the initial data for the simulation is constructed in a different gauge. Once the evolution starts we need to perform a smooth gauge transformation to the DH gauge, introducing additional gauge dynamics into the evolution. In this work, we construct the initial data in the DH gauge itself, which allows us to avoid the above gauge transformation. This can have added benefits such as possibly reducing junk radiation, making it easier to achieve a desired orbital eccentricity, reducing the runtime of simulations, and being able to start evolution closer to the merger.

  8. Asymptotically matched quasicircular binary black hole initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throwe, William

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate initial data for binary black hole simulations based on asymptotically matching a generic post-Newtonian binary metric with tidally deformed Schwarzschild solutions. These data have been evolved using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) and have been shown to result in reduced junk radiation and smaller mass drift than our previous initial data sets. The use of a generic post-Newtonian binary metric for the near-field region allows us to adjust the eccentricity of simulated binaries, allowing for quasicircular simulations with eccentricities similar to those produced by previous initial data sets.

  9. The formation and gravitational-wave detection of massive stellar black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Buonanno, Alessandra; Cantiello, Matteo; Fryer, Chris L.; Holz, Daniel E.; Mandel, Ilya; Miller, M. Coleman

    2014-07-10

    If binaries consisting of two ∼100 M{sub ☉} black holes exist, they would serve as extraordinarily powerful gravitational-wave sources, detectable to redshifts of z ∼ 2 with the advanced LIGO/Virgo ground-based detectors. Large uncertainties about the evolution of massive stars preclude definitive rate predictions for mergers of these massive black holes. We show that rates as high as hundreds of detections per year, or as low as no detections whatsoever, are both possible. It was thought that the only way to produce these massive binaries was via dynamical interactions in dense stellar systems. This view has been challenged by the recent discovery of several ≳ 150 M{sub ☉} stars in the R136 region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Current models predict that when stars of this mass leave the main sequence, their expansion is insufficient to allow common envelope evolution to efficiently reduce the orbital separation. The resulting black hole-black hole binary remains too wide to be able to coalesce within a Hubble time. If this assessment is correct, isolated very massive binaries do not evolve to be gravitational-wave sources. However, other formation channels exist. For example, the high multiplicity of massive stars, and their common formation in relatively dense stellar associations, opens up dynamical channels for massive black hole mergers (e.g., via Kozai cycles or repeated binary-single interactions). We identify key physical factors that shape the population of very massive black hole-black hole binaries. Advanced gravitational-wave detectors will provide important constraints on the formation and evolution of very massive stars.

  10. Status of Initial Data for Binary Black Hole Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Gregory

    2006-04-01

    The first initial data for black-hole binaries were derived from analytic time-symmetric multi-hole solutions of Misner and Lindquist in the early 1960s. These served as a test-bed for all of the pioneering efforts to evolve black-hole binaries to collision. The first major revolution in this field was introduced by Bowen and York in 1980, allowed for time-asymmetric data representing boosted and spinning holes, and required the numerical solution of a single scalar boundary-value problem. Initial-data methods based on the Bowen-York extrinsic curvature were developed and explored over the last 25 years and initial data based on these methods are still widely used for black-hole binary evolutions. However, in the past 5 years, a second major revolution has taken place that promises to yield initial data that is much more astrophysically realistic. These new initial-data sets are more computationally expensive to construct and their full physical content is still being explored. In this talk, we will look at this new method for constructing black-hole binary initial data, see what it does well, and where it needs further improvement.

  11. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF COMPACT BINARIES NEAR MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SOURCES AND OTHER EXOTICA

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio; Perets, Hagai B.

    2012-09-20

    The environment near supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galactic nuclei contains a large number of stars and compact objects. A fraction of these are likely to be members of binaries. Here we discuss the binary population of stellar black holes and neutron stars near SMBHs and focus on the secular evolution of such binaries, due to the perturbation by the SMBH. Binaries with highly inclined orbits with respect to their orbit around the SMBH are strongly affected by secular Kozai processes, which periodically change their eccentricities and inclinations (Kozai cycles). During periapsis approach, at the highest eccentricities during the Kozai cycles, gravitational wave (GW) emission becomes highly efficient. Some binaries in this environment can inspiral and coalesce at timescales much shorter than a Hubble time and much shorter than similar binaries that do not reside near an SMBH. The close environment of SMBHs could therefore serve as a catalyst for the inspiral and coalescence of binaries and strongly affect their orbital properties. Such compact binaries would be detectable as GW sources by the next generation of GW detectors (e.g., advanced-LIGO). Our analysis shows that {approx}0.5% of such nuclear merging binaries will enter the LIGO observational window while on orbits that are still very eccentric (e {approx}> 0.5). The efficient GW analysis for such systems would therefore require the use of eccentric templates. We also find that binaries very close to the SMBH could evolve through a complex dynamical (non-secular) evolution, leading to emission of several GW pulses during only a few years (though these are likely to be rare). Finally, we note that the formation of close stellar binaries, X-ray binaries, and their merger products could be induced by similar secular processes, combined with tidal friction rather than GW emission as in the case of compact object binaries.

  12. Binary black hole evolutions of approximate puncture initial data

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre M.; Hinder, Ian; Herrmann, Frank; Vaishnav, Birjoo

    2009-07-15

    Approximate solutions to the Einstein field equations are valuable tools to investigate gravitational phenomena. An important aspect of any approximation is to investigate and quantify its regime of validity. We present a study that evaluates the effects that approximate puncture initial data, based on skeleton solutions to the Einstein constraints as proposed by [G. Faye, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schaefer, Phys. Rev. D 69, 124029 (2004).], have on numerical evolutions. Using data analysis tools, we assess the effectiveness of these constraint-violating initial data for both initial and advanced LIGO and show that the matches of waveforms from skeleton data with the corresponding waveforms from constraint-satisfying initial data are > or approx. 0.97 when the total mass of the binary is > or approx. 40M{sub {center_dot}}. In addition, we demonstrate that the differences between the skeleton and the constraint-satisfying initial data evolutions, and thus waveforms, are due to negative Hamiltonian constraint violations present in the skeleton initial data located in the vicinity of the punctures. During the evolution, the skeleton data develops both Hamiltonian and momentum constraint violations that decay with time, with the binary system relaxing to a constraint-satisfying solution with black holes of smaller mass and thus different dynamics.

  13. Topics in general relativity: Binary black holes and hyperbolic formulations of Einstein's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvi, Kashif

    2002-09-01

    This thesis consists of three projects in general relativity on topics related to binary black holes and the gravitational waves they emit. The first project involves calculating a four-metric that is an approximate solution to Einstein's equations representing two widely separated nonrotating black holes in a circular orbit. This metric is constructed by matching a post-Newtonian metric to two tidally distorted Schwarzschild metrics using the framework of matched asymptotic expansions. The four-metric presented here provides physically realistic initial data that are tied to the binary's inspiral phase and can be evolved numerically to determine the gravitational wave output during the late stages of inspiral as well as the merger. The second project is on the tidal interaction of binary black holes during the inspiral phase. The holes' tidal distortion results in the flow of energy and angular momentum into or out of the holes in a process analogous to Newtonian tidal friction in a planet-moon system. The changes in the black holes' masses, spins, and horizon areas during inspiral are calculated for a circular binary with holes of possibly comparable masses. The absorption or emission of energy and angular momentum by the holes is shown to have a negligible influence on the binary's orbital evolution when the holes have comparable masses. The tidal-interaction analysis presented in this thesis is applicable to a black hole in a binary with any companion body (e.g., a neutron star) that is well separated from the hole. The final project is on first-order hyperbolic formulations of Einstein's equations, which are promising as a basis for numerical simulation of binary black holes. This thesis presents two first-order symmetrizable hyperbolic systems that include the lapse and shift as dynamical fields and have only physical characteristic speeds. The first system may be useful in numerical work; the second system allows one to show that any solution to Einstein

  14. Rapid merger of binary primordial black holes: An implication for GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new scenario for the evolution of the binaries of primordial black holes (PBH). We consider dynamical friction by ambient dark matter, scattering of dark matter particles with a highly eccentric orbit besides the standard two-body relaxation process to refill the loss cone, and interaction between the binary and a circumbinary disk, assuming that PBHs do not constitute the bulk of dark matter. Binary PBHs lose the energy and angular momentum by these processes, which could be sufficiently efficient for a typical configuration. Such a binary coalesces due to the gravitational wave emission on a time scale much shorter than the age of the universe. We estimate the density parameter of the resultant gravitational wave background. Astrophysical implications concerning the formation of intermediate-mass to supermassive black holes is also discussed.

  15. Rapid merger of binary primordial black holes: An implication for GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new scenario for the evolution of the binaries of primordial black holes (PBH). We consider dynamical friction by ambient dark matter, scattering of dark matter particles with a highly eccentric orbit besides the standard two-body relaxation process to refill the loss cone, and interaction between the binary and a circumbinary disk, assuming that PBHs do not constitute the bulk of dark matter. Binary PBHs lose the energy and angular momentum by these processes, which could be sufficiently efficient for a typical configuration. Such a binary coalesces due to the gravitational wave emission on a time scale much shorter than the age of the universe. We estimate the density parameter of the resultant gravitational wave background. Astrophysical implications concerning the formation of intermediate-mass to supermassive black holes is also discussed.

  16. Magneto centrifugal winds from accretion discs around black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravorty, S.; Petrucci, P.; Ferreira, J.; Henri, G.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray observations of black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) suggest that disc winds occur in the softer (disk-dominated) states of the outburst and are less prominent or absent in the harder (power-law dominated) states, which are more characterized by radio-loud jets. We investigate the presence/absence and physical characteristics of disk winds in BHBs through the use of the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) solutions of Ferreira (1997). These models treat accretion and ejection self-consistently within a self-similar ansatz that allows to solve the full set of dynamical MHD equations without neglecting any term. As a consequence the ejection efficiency is not a free parameter but depends on the global structure of the disk. By testing different sets of solutions with varying disk aspect ratio and ejection efficiency, we attempt to reproduce the observed state dependent prevalence of the winds. With no a priori theoretical assumption about the state of the black hole, we recover this observed bias of the winds for the softer states. In this talk I shall detail the methods employed by us, followed by the results.

  17. Tidal disruption as a probe for supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Fukun; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are the products of frequent galaxy mergers. It is very hard to be detected in quiescent galaxy. By using one million particle direct N-body simulations on special many-core hardware (GPU cluster), we study the dynamical co-evolution of SMBHB and its surrounding stars, specially focusing on the evolution of stellar tidal disruption event (TDE) rates before and after the coalescence of the SMBHB. We find a boosted TDE rate during the merger of the galaxies. After the coalescence of two supermassive black holes (SMBHs), the post-merger SMBH can get a kick velocity due to the anisotropic GW radiations. Our results about the recoiling SMBH, which oscillates around galactic center, show that most of TDEs are contributed by unbound stars when the SMBH passing through galactic center. In addition, the TDE light curve in SMBHB system is significantly different from the curve for single SMBH, which can be used to identify the SMBHB.

  18. Measuring the redshift factor in binary black hole simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Lewis, Adam; Pfeiffer, Harald

    2016-03-01

    The redshift factor z is an invariant quantity of fundamental interest in Post-Newtonian and self-force descriptions of circular binaries. It allows for interconnections between each theory, and plays a central role in the Laws of Binary Black Hole Mechanics, which link local quantities to asymptotic measures of energy and angular momentum in these systems. Through these laws, the redshift factor is conjectured to have a close relation to the surface gravity of the event horizons of black holes in circular orbits. We have implemented a novel method for extracting the redshift factor on apparent horizons in numerical simulations of quasicircular binary inspirals. Our results confirm the conjectured relationship between z and the surface gravity of the holes. This redshift factor allows us to test PN and self-force predictions for z in spacetimes where the binary is only approximately circular, and allows for an array of new comparisons between analytic approximations and numerical simulations. I will present our new method, our initial results in using z to verify the Laws of Binary Black Holes Mechanics, and discuss future directions for this work.

  19. Unstable flip-flopping spinning binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, Carlos O.; Healy, James

    2016-06-01

    We provide a unified description of the flip-flop and the antialignment instability effects in spinning black hole binaries in terms of real and imaginary flip-flop frequencies. We find that this instability is only effective for mass ratios 0.5 binary black holes and it is relevant for their astrophysical modeling and final recoil computations.

  20. Quasilocal linear momentum in black-hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Badri; Lousto, Carlos O.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2007-10-15

    We propose a quasilocal formula for the linear momentum of black-hole horizons inspired by the formalism of quasilocal horizons. We test this formula using two complementary configurations: (i) by calculating the large orbital linear momentum of the two black holes in an unequal-mass, zero-spin, quasicircular binary and (ii) by calculating the very small recoil momentum imparted to the remnant of the head-on collision of an equal-mass, anti-aligned-spin binary. We obtain results consistent with the horizon trajectory in the orbiting case, and consistent with the net radiated linear momentum for the much smaller head-on recoil velocity.

  1. Precessional Instability in Binary Black Holes with Aligned Spins.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Davide; Kesden, Michael; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Klein, Antoine; Berti, Emanuele; Sperhake, Ulrich; Trifirò, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    Binary black holes on quasicircular orbits with spins aligned with their orbital angular momentum have been test beds for analytic and numerical relativity for decades, not least because symmetry ensures that such configurations are equilibrium solutions to the spin-precession equations. In this work, we show that these solutions can be unstable when the spin of the higher-mass black hole is aligned with the orbital angular momentum and the spin of the lower-mass black hole is antialigned. Spins in these configurations are unstable to precession to large misalignment when the binary separation r is between the values r(ud±)=(√(χ(1))±√(qχ(2)))(4)(1-q)(-2)M, where M is the total mass, q≡m(2)/m(1) is the mass ratio, and χ(1) (χ(2)) is the dimensionless spin of the more (less) massive black hole. This instability exists for a wide range of spin magnitudes and mass ratios and can occur in the strong-field regime near the merger. We describe the origin and nature of the instability using recently developed analytical techniques to characterize fully generic spin precession. This instability provides a channel to circumvent astrophysical spin alignment at large binary separations, allowing significant spin precession prior to merger affecting both gravitational-wave and electromagnetic signatures of stellar-mass and supermassive binary black holes. PMID:26551802

  2. Precessional Instability in Binary Black Holes with Aligned Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerosa, Davide; Kesden, Michael; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Klein, Antoine; Berti, Emanuele; Sperhake, Ulrich; Trifirò, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    Binary black holes on quasicircular orbits with spins aligned with their orbital angular momentum have been test beds for analytic and numerical relativity for decades, not least because symmetry ensures that such configurations are equilibrium solutions to the spin-precession equations. In this work, we show that these solutions can be unstable when the spin of the higher-mass black hole is aligned with the orbital angular momentum and the spin of the lower-mass black hole is antialigned. Spins in these configurations are unstable to precession to large misalignment when the binary separation r is between the values ru d ±=(√{χ1 }±√{q χ2 })4(1 -q )-2M , where M is the total mass, q ≡m2/m1 is the mass ratio, and χ1 (χ2) is the dimensionless spin of the more (less) massive black hole. This instability exists for a wide range of spin magnitudes and mass ratios and can occur in the strong-field regime near the merger. We describe the origin and nature of the instability using recently developed analytical techniques to characterize fully generic spin precession. This instability provides a channel to circumvent astrophysical spin alignment at large binary separations, allowing significant spin precession prior to merger affecting both gravitational-wave and electromagnetic signatures of stellar-mass and supermassive binary black holes.

  3. Binary Populations and Stellar Dynamics in Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.; Belkus, H.; Van Bever, J.; Mennekens, N.

    2008-06-01

    We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, η Car, ζ Pup, γ2 Velorum and WR 140.

  4. Distinguishing Compact Binary Population Synthesis Models Using Gravitational Wave Observations of Coalescing Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Simon; Ohme, Frank; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The coalescence of compact binaries containing neutron stars or black holes is one of the most promising signals for advanced ground-based laser interferometer gravitational-wave (GW) detectors, with the first direct detections expected over the next few years. The rate of binary coalescences and the distribution of component masses is highly uncertain, and population synthesis models predict a wide range of plausible values. Poorly constrained parameters in population synthesis models correspond to poorly understood astrophysics at various stages in the evolution of massive binary stars, the progenitors of binary neutron star and binary black hole systems. These include effects such as supernova kick velocities, parameters governing the energetics of common envelope evolution and the strength of stellar winds. Observing multiple binary black hole systems through GWs will allow us to infer details of the astrophysical mechanisms that lead to their formation. Here we simulate GW observations from a series of population synthesis models including the effects of known selection biases, measurement errors and cosmology. We compare the predictions arising from different models and show that we will be able to distinguish between them with observations (or the lack of them) from the early runs of the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. This will allow us to narrow down the large parameter space for binary evolution models.

  5. Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO and LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns.

  6. Black holes in binary stellar systems and galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    In the last 40 years, following pioneering papers by Ya B Zeldovich and E E Salpeter, in which a powerful energy release from nonspherical accretion of matter onto a black hole (BH) was predicted, many observational studies of black holes in the Universe have been carried out. To date, the masses of several dozen stellar-mass black holes (M_BH = (4{-}20) M_\\odot) in X-ray binary systems and of several hundred supermassive black holes (M_BH = (10^{6}{-}10^{10}) M_\\odot) in galactic nuclei have been measured. The estimated radii of these massive and compact objects do not exceed several gravitational radii. For about ten stellar-mass black holes and several dozen supermassive black holes, the values of the dimensionless angular momentum a_* have been estimated, which, in agreement with theoretical predictions, do not exceed the limiting value a_* = 0.998. A new field of astrophysics, so-called black hole demography, which studies the birth and growth of black holes and their evolutionary connection to other objects in the Universe, namely stars, galaxies, etc., is rapidly developing. In addition to supermassive black holes, massive stellar clusters are observed in galactic nuclei, and their evolution is distinct from that of supermassive black holes. The evolutionary relations between supermassive black holes in galactic centers and spheroidal stellar components (bulges) of galaxies, as well as dark-matter galactic haloes are brought out. The launch into Earth's orbit of the space radio interferometer RadioAstron opened up the real possibility of finally proving that numerous discovered massive and highly compact objects with properties very similar to those of black holes make up real black holes in the sense of Albert Einstein's General Relativity. Similar proofs of the existence of black holes in the Universe can be obtained by intercontinental radio interferometry at short wavelengths \\lambda \\lesssim 1 mm (the international program, Event Horizon Telescope).

  7. Catching supermassive black hole binaries without a net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Porter, Edward K.

    2007-01-01

    The gravitational wave signals from coalescing Supermassive Black Hole Binaries are prime targets for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). With optimal data processing techniques, the LISA observatory should be able to detect black hole mergers anywhere in the Universe. The challenge is to find ways to dig the signals out of a combination of instrument noise and the large foreground from stellar mass binaries in our own galaxy. The standard procedure of matched filtering against a grid of templates can be computationally prohibitive, especially when the black holes are spinning or the mass ratio is large. Here we develop an alternative approach based on Metropolis-Hastings sampling and simulated annealing that is orders of magnitude cheaper than a grid search. For the first time, we show that it is possible to detect and characterize the signals from binary systems of Schwarzschild Black Holes that are embedded in instrument noise and a foreground containing millions of galactic binaries. Our technique is computationally efficient, robust, and applicable to both high and low signal-to-noise ratio systems.

  8. Growth of Supermassive Black Holes, Galaxy Mergers, and Binary SMBHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komossa, Stefanie

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy mergers are the sites of major black hole growth. They power luminous quasars, and form supermassive binary black holes (SMBBHs) at their centers. Coalescing binaries are among the strongest sources of gravitational waves (GWs) in the universe. Studying the early and advanced stages galaxy merging, and the onset of accretion onto one or both BHs, informs us about feedback processes, and the origin of the scaling relations between SMBHs and their host galaxies. During gas-rich and gas-poor mergers, the initial conditions are set which later determine the amplitude of GW recoil. Identification of the compact SMBBHs, at parsec and sub-parsec scales, provides us with important constraints on the interaction processes that govern the shrinkage of the binary beyond "the final parsec". Here, I give an overview of the status of observations, important open questions, and future surveys, with an emphasis on SMBBHs.

  9. Binary black hole merger gravitational waves and recoil in the large mass ratio limit

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararajan, Pranesh A.; Hughes, Scott A.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2010-05-15

    Spectacular breakthroughs in numerical relativity now make it possible to compute spacetime dynamics in almost complete generality, allowing us to model the coalescence and merger of binary black holes with essentially no approximations. The primary limitation of these calculations is now computational. In particular, it is difficult to model systems with large mass ratio and large spins, since one must accurately resolve the multiple length scales that play a role in such systems. Perturbation theory can play an important role in extending the reach of computational modeling for binary systems. In this paper, we present first results of a code that allows us to model the gravitational waves generated by the inspiral, merger, and ringdown of a binary system in which one member of the binary is much more massive than the other. This allows us to accurately calibrate binary dynamics in the large mass ratio regime. We focus in this analysis on the recoil imparted to the merged remnant by these waves. We closely examine the ''antikick,'' an antiphase cancellation of the recoil arising from the plunge and ringdown waves, described in detail by Schnittman et al. We find that, for orbits aligned with the black hole spin, the antikick grows as a function of spin. The total recoil is smallest for prograde coalescence into a rapidly rotating black hole, and largest for retrograde coalescence. Amusingly, this completely reverses the predicted trend for kick versus spin from analyses that only include inspiral information.

  10. Grazing Collision of Binary Black Holes II: From Merger Towards Ringdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2000-04-01

    One of the great challenges in gravitational physics is to simulate the collision of two black holes in order to study the resulting gravitational radiation. The Agave collaboration has successfully collided two spinning black holes in a grazing merger. The eventual goal of this work is to simulate the orbit, merger and ringdown stages of an astrophysical binary black hole system. The success of the grazing collision has proven to be strongly dependent on predicting the dynamics of the apparent horizons during the evolution. This is due to the fact that the region inside the apparent horizon containing the singularity is removed from the computational domain. Once the black holes have merged, one is left with a single black hole horizon. The spacetime is of a highly distorted black hole. We present results from simulations of the merged to ringdown stage in the life of a binary black hole collision. We show not only how crucial a role the dynamics of the apparent horizon plays in extending the lifetime of the simulation towards ringdown, but also the vital role the appropriate prescription of gauge conditions plays.

  11. A candidate sub-parsec supermassive binary black hole system.

    PubMed

    Boroson, Todd A; Lauer, Tod R

    2009-03-01

    The role of mergers in producing galaxies, together with the finding that most large galaxies harbour black holes in their nuclei, implies that binary supermassive black hole systems should be common. Here we report that the quasar SDSS J153636.22+044127.0 is a plausible example of such a system. This quasar shows two broad-line emission systems, separated in velocity by 3,500 km s(-1). A third system of unresolved absorption lines has an intermediate velocity. These characteristics are unique among known quasars. We interpret this object as a binary system of two black holes, having masses of 10(7.3) and 10(8.9) solar masses separated by approximately 0.1 parsec with an orbital period of approximately 100 years. PMID:19262667

  12. Accuracy of binary black hole waveform models for aligned-spin binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Chu, Tony; Fong, Heather; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel A.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela

    2016-05-01

    Coalescing binary black holes are among the primary science targets for second generation ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Reliable gravitational waveform models are central to detection of such systems and subsequent parameter estimation. This paper performs a comprehensive analysis of the accuracy of recent waveform models for binary black holes with aligned spins, utilizing a new set of 84 high-accuracy numerical relativity simulations. Our analysis covers comparable mass binaries (mass-ratio 1 ≤q ≤3 ), and samples independently both black hole spins up to a dimensionless spin magnitude of 0.9 for equal-mass binaries and 0.85 for unequal mass binaries. Furthermore, we focus on the high-mass regime (total mass ≳50 M⊙ ). The two most recent waveform models considered (PhenomD and SEOBNRv2) both perform very well for signal detection, losing less than 0.5% of the recoverable signal-to-noise ratio ρ , except that SEOBNRv2's efficiency drops slightly for both black hole spins aligned at large magnitude. For parameter estimation, modeling inaccuracies of the SEOBNRv2 model are found to be smaller than systematic uncertainties for moderately strong GW events up to roughly ρ ≲15 . PhenomD's modeling errors are found to be smaller than SEOBNRv2's, and are generally irrelevant for ρ ≲20 . Both models' accuracy deteriorates with increased mass ratio, and when at least one black hole spin is large and aligned. The SEOBNRv2 model shows a pronounced disagreement with the numerical relativity simulation in the merger phase, for unequal masses and simultaneously both black hole spins very large and aligned. Two older waveform models (PhenomC and SEOBNRv1) are found to be distinctly less accurate than the more recent PhenomD and SEOBNRv2 models. Finally, we quantify the bias expected from all four waveform models during parameter estimation for several recovered binary parameters: chirp mass, mass ratio, and effective spin.

  13. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderón; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.

    2016-02-01

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0 ×10-21. It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203 000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1 σ . The source lies at a luminosity distance of 41 0-180+160 Mpc corresponding to a redshift z =0.0 9-0.04+0.03 . In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 3 6-4+5M⊙ and 2 9-4+4M⊙ , and the final black hole mass is 6 2-4+4M⊙ , with 3. 0-0.5+0.5M⊙ c2 radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  14. Binary Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, J.; Boggs, W.; Kelly, B.; McWilliams, S.; vanMeter, J.

    2008-01-01

    The final merger of comparable mass binary black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for LISA. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. We will present the results of new simulations of black hole mergers with unequal masses and spins, focusing on the gravitational waves emitted and the accompanying astrophysical "kicks." The magnitude of these kicks has bearing on the production and growth of supermassive black holes during the epoch of structure formation, and on the retention of black holes in stellar clusters.

  15. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger.

    PubMed

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; 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Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, H; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; 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    2016-02-12

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10(-21). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203,000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1σ. The source lies at a luminosity distance of 410(-180)(+160)  Mpc corresponding to a redshift z=0.09(-0.04)(+0.03). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 36(-4)(+5)M⊙ and 29(-4)(+4)M⊙, and the final black hole mass is 62(-4)(+4)M⊙, with 3.0(-0.5)(+0.5)M⊙c(2) radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger. PMID:26918975

  16. Pulsar-black hole binaries in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Loeb, Abraham

    2011-08-01

    Binaries consisting of a pulsar and a black hole (BH) are a holy grail of astrophysics, both for their significance for stellar evolution and for their potential application as probes of strong gravity. In spite of extensive surveys of our Galaxy and its system of globular clusters, no pulsar-black hole (PSR-BH) binary has been found to date. Clues as to where such systems might exist are therefore important. We show that if the central parsec around Sgr A★ harbours a cluster of ˜25 000 stellar BHs (as predicted by mass-segregation arguments) and if it is also rich in recycled pulsar binaries (by analogy with globular clusters), then three-body exchange interactions should produce PSR-BHs in the Galactic Centre. Simple estimates of the formation rate and survival time of these binaries suggest that a few PSR-BHs should be present in the central parsec today. The proposed formation mechanism makes unique predictions for the PSR-BH properties: (1) the binary would reside within ˜1 pc of Sgr A★; (2) the pulsar would be recycled, with a period of ˜1 to a few tens of milliseconds, and a low magnetic field B≲ 1010 G; (3) the binary would have high eccentricity, e˜ 0.8, but with a large scatter and (4) the binary would be relatively wide, with semimajor axis ab˜ 0.1 -≳3 au. The potential discovery of a PSR-BH binary therefore provides a strong motivation for deep, high-frequency radio searches for recycled pulsars towards the Galactic Centre.

  17. Rapid formation of supermassive black hole binaries in galaxy mergers with gas.

    PubMed

    Mayer, L; Kazantzidis, S; Madau, P; Colpi, M; Quinn, T; Wadsley, J

    2007-06-29

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are a ubiquitous component of the nuclei of galaxies. It is normally assumed that after the merger of two massive galaxies, a SMBH binary will form, shrink because of stellar or gas dynamical processes, and ultimately coalesce by emitting a burst of gravitational waves. However, so far it has not been possible to show how two SMBHs bind during a galaxy merger with gas because of the difficulty of modeling a wide range of spatial scales. Here we report hydrodynamical simulations that track the formation of a SMBH binary down to scales of a few light years after the collision between two spiral galaxies. A massive, turbulent, nuclear gaseous disk arises as a result of the galaxy merger. The black holes form an eccentric binary in the disk in less than 1 million years as a result of the gravitational drag from the gas rather than from the stars. PMID:17556550

  18. Rapid Formation of Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in Galaxy Mergers with Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L.; Kazantzidis, S.; Madau, P.; Colpi, M.; Quinn, T.; Wadsley, J.; /McMaster U.

    2008-03-24

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are a ubiquitous component of the nuclei of galaxies. It is normally assumed that, following the merger of two massive galaxies, a SMBH binary will form, shrink due to stellar or gas dynamical processes and ultimately coalesce by emitting a burst of gravitational waves. However, so far it has not been possible to show how two SMBHs bind during a galaxy merger with gas due to the difficulty of modeling a wide range of spatial scales. Here we report hydrodynamical simulations that track the formation of a SMBH binary down to scales of a few light years following the collision between two spiral galaxies. A massive, turbulent nuclear gaseous disk arises as a result of the galaxy merger. The black holes form an eccentric binary in the disk in less than a million years as a result of the gravitational drag from the gas rather than from the stars.

  19. The search for massive black hole binaries with LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Porter, Edward K.

    2007-12-01

    In this work we focus on the search and detection of massive black hole binary (MBHB) systems, including systems at high redshift. As well as expanding on previous works where we used a variant of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), called Metropolis Hastings Monte Carlo, with simulated annealing, we introduce a new search method based on frequency annealing which leads to a more rapid and robust detection. We compare the two search methods on systems where we do and do not see the merger of the black holes. In the non-merger case, we also examine the posterior distribution exploration using a 7D MCMC algorithm. We demonstrate that this method is effective in dealing with the high correlations between parameters, has a higher acceptance rate than previously proposed methods and produces posterior distribution functions that are close to the prediction from the Fisher information matrix. Finally, after carrying out searches where there is only one binary in the data stream, we examine the case where two black hole binaries are present in the same data stream. We demonstrate that our search algorithm can accurately recover both binaries, and more importantly showing that we can safely extract the MBHB sources without contaminating the rest of the data stream.

  20. Geometry of deformed black holes. I. Majumdar-Papapetrou binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerák, O.; Basovník, M.

    2016-08-01

    Although black holes are eminent manifestations of very strong gravity, the geometry of space-time around and even inside them can be significantly affected by additional bodies present in their surroundings. We study such an influence within static and axially symmetric (electro)vacuum space-times described by exact solutions of Einstein's equations, considering astrophysically motivated configurations (such as black holes surrounded by rings) as well as those of pure academic interest (such as specifically "tuned" systems of multiple black holes). The geometry is represented by the simplest invariants determined by the metric (the lapse function) and its gradient (gravitational acceleration), with special emphasis given to curvature (the Kretschmann and Ricci-square scalars). These quantities are analyzed and their level surfaces plotted both above and below the black-hole horizons, in particular near the central singularities. Estimating that the black hole could be most strongly affected by the other black hole, we focus, in this first paper, on the Majumdar-Papapetrou solution for a binary black hole and compare the deformation caused by "the other" hole (and the electrostatic field) with that induced by rotational dragging in the well-known Kerr and Kerr-Newman solutions.

  1. Properties of the Binary Black Hole Merger GW150914.

    PubMed

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Laguna, P; Ossokine, S; Scheel, M A; Szilagyi, B; Teukolsky, S; Zlochower, Y

    2016-06-17

    On September 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected a gravitational-wave transient (GW150914); we characterize the properties of the source and its parameters. The data around the time of the event were analyzed coherently across the LIGO network using a suite of accurate waveform models that describe gravitational waves from a compact binary system in general relativity. GW150914 was produced by a nearly equal mass binary black hole of masses 36_{-4}^{+5}M_{⊙} and 29_{-4}^{+4}M_{⊙}; for each parameter we report the median value and the range of the 90% credible interval. The dimensionless spin magnitude of the more massive black hole is bound to be <0.7 (at 90% probability). The luminosity distance to the source is 410_{-180}^{+160}  Mpc, corresponding to a redshift 0.09_{-0.04}^{+0.03} assuming standard cosmology. The source location is constrained to an annulus section of 610  deg^{2}, primarily in the southern hemisphere. The binary merges into a black hole of mass 62_{-4}^{+4}M_{⊙} and spin 0.67_{-0.07}^{+0.05}. This black hole is significantly more massive than any other inferred from electromagnetic observations in the stellar-mass regime. PMID:27367378

  2. Properties of the Binary Black Hole Merger GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J. V.; Vañó-Viñuales, A.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Brügamin, B.; Campanelli, M.; Clark, M.; Hamberger, D.; Kidder, L. E.; Kinsey, M.; Laguna, P.; Ossokine, S.; Scheel, M. A.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    On September 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected a gravitational-wave transient (GW150914); we characterize the properties of the source and its parameters. The data around the time of the event were analyzed coherently across the LIGO network using a suite of accurate waveform models that describe gravitational waves from a compact binary system in general relativity. GW150914 was produced by a nearly equal mass binary black hole of masses 3 6-4+5M⊙ and 2 9-4+4M⊙ ; for each parameter we report the median value and the range of the 90% credible interval. The dimensionless spin magnitude of the more massive black hole is bound to be <0.7 (at 90% probability). The luminosity distance to the source is 41 0-180+160 Mpc , corresponding to a redshift 0.0 9-0.04+0.03 assuming standard cosmology. The source location is constrained to an annulus section of 610 deg2 , primarily in the southern hemisphere. The binary merges into a black hole of mass 6 2-4+4M⊙ and spin 0.6 7-0.07+0.05. This black hole is significantly more massive than any other inferred from electromagnetic observations in the stellar-mass regime.

  3. Modeling AGN outbursts from supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    2012-12-01

    When galaxies merge to assemble more massive galaxies, their nuclear supermassive black holes (SMBHs) should form bound binaries. As these interact with their stellar and gaseous environments, they will become increasingly compact, culminating in inspiral and coalescence through the emission of gravitational radiation. Because galaxy mergers and interactions are also thought to fuel star formation and nuclear black hole activity, it is plausible that such binaries would lie in gas-rich environments and power active galactic nuclei (AGN). The primary difference is that these binaries have gravitational potentials that vary - through their orbital motion as well as their orbital evolution - on humanly tractable timescales, and are thus excellent candidates to give rise to coherent AGN variability in the form of outbursts and recurrent transients. Although such electromagnetic signatures would be ideally observed concomitantly with the binary's gravitational-wave signatures, they are also likely to be discovered serendipitously in wide-field, high-cadence surveys; some may even be confused for stellar tidal disruption events. I discuss several types of possible "smoking gun" AGN signatures caused by the peculiar geometry predicted for accretion disks around SMBH binaries.

  4. X-ray binaries and black hole candidates: a review of optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Jorge

    This chapter summarizes the optical properties of X-ray binaries, with special emphasis on the class of low mass X-ray binaries and soft X-ray transients. The latter provide the most compelling evidence for the existence of black holes in the Universe, with nine well-established dynamical studies. We review the techniques employed to extract the component masses and discuss the importance of systematic effects. Despite the growing number of black hole cases, the uncertainties involved are still too large to draw statistical conclusions on the mass distribution of collapsed objects. We also present new observational techniques which may help to improve the mass determinations and set constraints on the theory of supernovae and black hole formation.

  5. Dynamics of Charged Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilhão, Miguel; Cardoso, Vitor; Herdeiro, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We report on numerical simulations of charged-black-hole collisions.We focus on head-on collisions of non-spinning black holes, starting from rest and with the same charge to mass ratio. The addition of charge to black holes introduces a new interesting channel of radiation and dynamics. The amount of gravitational-wave energy generated throughout the collision decreases by about three orders of magnitude as the charge-to-mass ratio is increased from 0 to 0.98. This is a consequence of the smaller accelerations present for larger values of the charge.

  6. Black Hole - Neutron Star Binary Simulations at Georgia Tech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Roland

    2009-05-01

    Mixed compact object binaries consisting of a black hole and a neutron star are expected to be not only one of the primary sources of gravitational radiation to be observed by interferometric detectors but also the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts. We report on the status of our effort at Georgia Tech to model these mixed binary systems using the moving puncture method. The results are obtained with an enhanced version our vacuum MayaKranc code coupled to the hydrodynamics Whisky code. We present preliminary results of gravitational waveforms and the disruption of the neutron star for simple polytropic equations of state.

  7. Evolution of binary black holes in self gravitating discs. Dissecting the torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roedig, C.; Sesana, A.; Dotti, M.; Cuadra, J.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Haardt, F.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Massive black hole binaries, formed in galaxy mergers, are expected to evolve in dense circumbinary discs. Understanding of the disc-binary coupled dynamics is vital to assess both the final fate of the system and its potentially observable features. Aims: Aimed at understanding the physical roots of the secular evolution of the binary, we study the interplay between gas accretion and gravity torques in changing the binary elements (semi-major axis and eccentricity) and its total angular momentum budget. We pay special attention to the gravity torques, by analysing their physical origin and location within the disc. Methods: We analysed three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the evolution of initially quasi-circular massive black hole binaries (BHBs) residing in the central hollow (cavity) of massive self-gravitating circumbinary discs. We performed a set of simulations adopting different thermodynamics for the gas within the cavity and for the "numerical size" of the black holes. Results: We show that (i) the BHB eccentricity growth found in our previous work is a general result, independent of the accretion and the adopted thermodynamics; (ii) the semi-major axis decay depends not only on the gravity torques but also on their subtle interplay with the disc-binary angular momentum transfer due to accretion; (iii) the spectral structure of the gravity torques is predominately caused by disc edge overdensities and spiral arms developing in the body of the disc and, in general, does not reflect directly the period of the binary; (iv) the net gravity torque changes sign across the BHB corotation radius (positive inside vs negative outside) We quantify the relative importance of the two, which appear to depend on the thermodynamical properties of the instreaming gas, and which is crucial in assessing the disc-binary angular momentum transfer; (v) the net torque manifests as a purely kinematic (non-resonant) effect as it stems from the

  8. Binary black hole initial data from matched asymptotic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Tichy, Wolfgang; Owen, Benjamin J.; Brügmann, Bernd

    2006-11-01

    We present an approximate metric for a binary black-hole spacetime to construct initial data for numerical relativity. This metric is obtained by asymptotically matching a post-Newtonian metric for a binary system to a perturbed Schwarzschild metric for each hole. In the inner zone near each hole, the metric is given by the Schwarzschild solution plus a quadrupolar perturbation corresponding to an external tidal gravitational field. In the near zone, well outside each black hole but less than a reduced wavelength from the center of mass of the binary, the metric is given by a post-Newtonian expansion including the lowest-order deviations from flat spacetime. When the near zone overlaps each inner zone in a buffer zone, the post-Newtonian and perturbed Schwarzschild metrics can be asymptotically matched to each other. By demanding matching (over a 4-volume in the buffer zone) rather than patching (choosing a particular 2-surface in the buffer zone), we guarantee that the errors are small in all zones. The resulting piecewise metric is made formally C∞ with smooth transition functions so as to obtain the finite extrinsic curvature of a 3-slice. In addition to the metric and extrinsic curvature, we present explicit results for the lapse and the shift, which can be used as initial data for numerical simulations. This initial data is not accurate all the way to the asymptotically flat ends inside each hole, and therefore must be used with evolution codes which employ black hole excision rather than puncture methods. This paper lays the foundations of a method that can be straightforwardly iterated to obtain initial data to higher perturbative order.

  9. Binary Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, J.; Boggs, W.; Kelly, B.; McWilliams, S.; van Meter, J.

    2007-12-01

    The final merger of comparable mass binary black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for LISA. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. We will present the results of new simulations of black hole mergers with unequal masses and spins, focusing on the gravitational waves emitted and the accompanying astrophysical "kicks.” The magnitude of these kicks has bearing on the production and growth of supermassive blackholes during the epoch of structure formation, and on the retention of black holes in stellar clusters. This work was supported by NASA grant 06-BEFS06-19, and the simulations were carried out using Project Columbia at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (Ames Research Center) and at the NASA Center for Computational Sciences (Goddard Space Flight Center).

  10. Black-hole binary evolutions with the LEAN code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperhake, Ulrich

    2007-05-01

    Numerical simulations of black-hole binaries, obtained with the Lean code, are presented. The code is demonstrated to produce state-of-the-art evolutions of inspiralling and merging black holes with convergent waveforms. We further compare results from head-on collisions of Brill-Lindquist and Kerr-Schild data to study the dependency of the waveforms on the choice of initial data type. In this comparison we find good qualitative agreement between the results of both data types, but observe a systematic discrepancy of about 10% in the wave amplitudes. Several attempts to explain the observed discrepancy are discussed.

  11. Uncovering Binary Supermassive Black Holes in Merging Galaxy Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, Paul; Satyapal, Shobita; Ellison, Sara L.; Secrest, Nathan; Gliozzi, Mario; Rothberg, Barry

    2016-01-01

    It is now well known that virtually all galaxies host a central supermassive black hole (SMBH) and that galaxy interactions are ubiquitous. Theory predicts these interactions would funnel gas toward the central regions of galaxies, potentially triggering gas accretion onto the SMBH, causing them to appear as binary active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, despite decades of searching and strong theoretical reasons that they should exist, observationally confirmed cases of binary AGNs are extremely rare, and most have been discovered serendipitously. Since galaxy mergers are likely to be characterized by dusty environments, it is possible that the optical signatures of a significant number of binary AGNs are obscured. Observations from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) may hold the key for increasing the rate of discovery of binary AGN in late-stage mergers. Starting with a sample of ~4,000 galaxy pairs, we searched for mid-IR signatures of binary AGNs. In this poster, we report on the detection frequency of binary AGNs identified through mid-infrared observations and explore its dependence on merger stage.

  12. Superluminal Jets and Other Properties of Black Holes Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Discoveries in the past few years of radio jets in Galactic black hole candidates have provided a link between active galactic nuclei (AGNS) and the compact stars in binary systems. The availability of binary systems relatively close by is an opportunity to learn about the jet production mechanism on a timescale a million times shorter than that of an AGN. Evidence is clearly seen of correlated high energy X-ray and gamma ray emission to radio emission from jets, linking the accretion and jet production mechanisms. objects such as GRS 1915+105, GRO J1655-40 and Cyg X-3 show striking properties which distinguish them from other black hole candidates. Our theoretical understanding of these systems is still in the formative stages. I review some of the most recent multiwavelength data and point out questions raised by these observations.

  13. Eccentricity boost of stars around shrinking massive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Mao; Seto, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Based on a simple geometrical approach, we analyze the evolution of the Kozai-Lidov mechanism for stars around shrinking massive black hole binaries on circular orbits. We find that, due to a peculiar bifurcation pattern induced by the Newtonian potential of stellar clusters, the orbit of stars could become highly eccentric. This transition occurs abruptly for stars with small initial eccentricities. The approach presented in this paper may be useful for studying the Kozai-Lidov mechanism in various astrophysical contexts.

  14. Results from Binary Black Hole Simulations in Astrophysics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Present and planned gravitational wave observatories are opening a new astronomical window to the sky. A key source of gravitational waves is the merger of two black holes. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), in particular, is expected to observe these events with signal-to-noise ratio's in the thousands. To fully reap the scientific benefits of these observations requires a detailed understanding, based on numerical simulations, of the predictions of General Relativity for the waveform signals. New techniques for simulating binary black hole mergers, introduced two years ago, have led to dramatic advances in applied numerical simulation work. Over the last two years, numerical relativity researchers have made tremendous strides in understanding the late stages of binary black hole mergers. Simulations have been applied to test much of the basic physics of binary black hole interactions, showing robust results for merger waveform predictions, and illuminating such phenomena as spin-precession. Calculations have shown that merging systems can be kicked at up to 2500 km/s by the thrust from asymmetric emission. Recently, long lasting simulations of ten or more orbits allow tests of post-Newtonian (PN) approximation results for radiation from the last orbits of the binary's inspiral. Already, analytic waveform models based PN techniques with incorporated information from numerical simulations may be adequate for observations with current ground based observatories. As new advances in simulations continue to rapidly improve our theoretical understanding of the systems, it seems certain that high-precision predictions will be available in time for LISA and other advanced ground-based instruments. Future gravitational wave observatories are expected to make precision.

  15. The Signature of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Black hole-neutron star (BHNS) binaries are key gravitational wave sources, merging in the frequency band to which Earth-based GW detectors are most sensitive. Furthermore, as possible candidates for short-hard gamma ray bursts, combined observations in both gravitational and electromagnetic bands of BHNS mergers is thus an exciting possibility. This talk will discuss results from simulations that account for gravitational and magnetic effects as well as connections with processes capable of explaining key features of gamma ray bursts.

  16. Observing Mergers of Nonspinning Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams S.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly Bernard J.; Thorpe, J. Ira; vanMeter, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of numerical relativity now make it possible to calculate the final, most powerful merger phase of binary black hole coalescence. We present the application of nonspinning numerical relativity waveforms to the search for and precision measurement of black hole binary coalescences using LISA. In particular, we focus on the advances made in moving beyond the equal mass, nonspinning case into other regions of parameter space, focusing on the case of nonspinning holes with ever-increasing mass ratios. We analyze the available unequal mass merger waveforms from numerical relativity, and compare them to two models, both of which use an effective one body treatment of the inspiral, but which use fundamentally different approaches to the treatment of the merger-ringdown. We confirm the expected mass ratio scaling of the merger, and investigate the changes in waveform behavior and their observational impact with changing mass ratio. Finally, we investigate the potential contribution from the merger portion of the waveform to measurement uncertainties of the binary's parameters for the unequal mass case.

  17. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Massive black hole (MBH) binaries are found at the centers of most galaxies. MBH mergers trace galaxy mergers and are strong sources of gravitational waves. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities. causing them to crash well before the black hole:, in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Recently this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This presentation shows how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. Focus is on the recent advances that that reveal these waveforms, and the potential for discoveries that arises when these sources are observed by LIGO and LISA.

  18. Binary black hole late inspiral: Simulations for gravitational wave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, John G.; McWilliams, Sean T.; van Meter, James R.; Centrella, Joan; Choi, Dae-Il; Kelly, Bernard J.; Koppitz, Michael

    2007-06-01

    Coalescing binary black hole mergers are expected to be the strongest gravitational wave sources for ground-based interferometers, such as the LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Until recently it has been impossible to reliably derive the predictions of general relativity for the final merger stage, which takes place in the strong-field regime. Recent progress in numerical relativity simulations is, however, revolutionizing our understanding of these systems. We examine here the specific case of merging equal-mass Schwarzschild black holes in detail, presenting new simulations in which the black holes start in the late-inspiral stage on orbits with very low eccentricity and evolve for ˜1200M through ˜7 orbits before merging. We study the accuracy and consistency of our simulations and the resulting gravitational waveforms, which encompass ˜14cycle before merger, and highlight the importance of using frequency (rather than time) to set the physical reference when comparing models. Matching our results to post-Newtonian (PN) calculations for the earlier parts of the inspiral provides a combined waveform with less than one cycle of accumulated phase error through the entire coalescence. Using this waveform, we calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for iLIGO, adLIGO, and LISA, highlighting the contributions from the late-inspiral and merger-ringdown parts of the waveform, which can now be simulated numerically. Contour plots of SNR as a function of z and M show that adLIGO can achieve SNR≳10 for some intermediate mass binary black holes (IMBBHs) out to z˜1, and that LISA can see massive binary black holes (MBBHs) in the range 3×104≲M/M⊙≲107 at SNR>100 out to the earliest epochs of structure formation at z>15.

  19. Characterizing spinning black hole binaries in eccentric orbits with LISA

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Joey Shapiro; Cornish, Neil J.

    2011-04-15

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is designed to detect gravitational wave signals from astrophysical sources, including those from coalescing binary systems of compact objects such as black holes. Colliding galaxies have central black holes that sink to the center of the merged galaxy and begin to orbit one another and emit gravitational waves. Some galaxy evolution models predict that the binary black hole system will enter the LISA band with significant orbital eccentricity, while other models suggest that the orbits will already have circularized. Using a full 17 parameter waveform model that includes the effects of orbital eccentricity, spin precession, and higher harmonics, we investigate how well the source parameters can be inferred from simulated LISA data. Defining the reference eccentricity as the value one year before merger, we find that for typical LISA sources, it will be possible to measure the eccentricity to an accuracy of parts in a thousand. The accuracy with which the eccentricity can be measured depends only very weakly on the eccentricity, making it possible to distinguish circular orbits from those with very small eccentricities. LISA measurements of the orbital eccentricity can help constraints theories of galaxy mergers in the early universe. Failing to account for the eccentricity in the waveform modeling can lead to a loss of signal power and bias the estimation of parameters such as the black hole masses and spins.

  20. Binary Black Hole Initial Data Without Elliptic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winicour, Jeffrey; Racz, Istvan

    2016-03-01

    We describe a radically new method for solving the constraints of Einstein's equations which does not involve elliptic equations. Instead, the constraints are formulated as a symmetric hyperbolic system which can be integrated radially inward from an outer boundary. In this method, the initial metric data for a binary black hole can be freely prescribed, e.g. in a 4-dimensional superimposed Kerr-Schild form for the individual boosted black holes. Two pieces of extrinsic curvature data, which represent the two gravitational degrees of freedom, can also be freely prescribed by superimposing the individual black hole data. The remaining extrinsic curvature data are then determined by the hyperbolic constraint system. Because no puncture or excision boundary conditions are necessary, this approach offers a simple alternative that could provide more physically realistic binary black hole initial data than present methods. Here we present a computational framework for implementing this new method. JW was supported by NSF Grant PHY-1505965 to the University of Pittsburgh. IR was supported in part by the Die Aktion Osterreich-Ungarn, Wissenschafts- und Erziehungskooperation Grant 90ou1.

  1. Puncture Initial Data for Highly Spinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchlin, Ian; Healy, James; Lousto, Carlos; Zlochower, Yosef

    2015-04-01

    Accretion arguments suggest that some astrophysical black-holes will possess nearly extremal spins. It is expected that gravitational wave signals from orbiting and merging black-hole binaries will be detected by Advanced LIGO in the next few years. Accurate waveform models are needed to interpret detector data. We solve the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints of General Relativity representing two black-holes with nearly extremal spins and ultra-relativistic boosts in the puncture formalism using spectral methods in the Cactus/Einstein Toolkit framework. We use a non-conformally-flat ansatz with an attenuated superposition of two conformally rescaled Lorentz-boosted-Kerr 3-metrics and their corresponding conformal extrinsic curvatures. The initial data are evolved in time using moving punctures in the BSSN and Z4 formalisms. We compare with the standard Bowen-York conformally-flat ansatz, finding an order of magnitude smaller burst of spurious radiation.

  2. Simulating Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes Mergers as LISA Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the simulation of gravitational waves from Binary Massive Black Holes with LISA observations is shown. The topics include: 1) Massive Black Holes (MBHs); 2) MBH Binaries; 3) Gravitational Wavws from MBH Binaries; 4) Observing with LISA; 5) How LISA sees MBH binary mergers; 6) MBH binary inspirals to LISA; 7) Numerical Relativity Simulations; 8) Numerical Relativity Challenges; 9) Recent Successes; 10) Goddard Team; 11) Binary Black Hole Simulations at Goddard; 12) Goddard Recent Advances; 13) Baker, et al.:GSFC; 13) Starting Farther Out; 14) Comparing Initial Separation; 15) Now with AMR; and 16) Conclusion.

  3. Rapid and Bright Stellar-mass Binary Black Hole Mergers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartos, Imre

    2016-06-01

    Galactic nuclei are expected to harbor the densest population of stellar-mass black holes, accounting for as much as ∼ 2% of the mass of the nuclear stellar cluster. A significant fraction (∼ 30%) of these black holes can reside in binaries. We discuss the fate of the black hole binaries in active galactic nuclei, which get trapped in the inner region of the accretion disk around the central supermassive black hole. Binary black holes can migrate into and then rapidly merge within the disk. The binaries also accrete a significant amount of gas from the disk, potentially leading to detectable X-ray or gamma-ray emission.

  4. Evolution of binary supermassive black holes and the final-parsec problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Eugene

    2016-02-01

    I review the evolution of binary supermassive black holes and focus on the stellar-dynamical mechanisms that may help to overcome the final-parsec problem - the possible stalling of the binary at a separation much larger than is required for an efficient gravitational wave emission. Recent N-body simulations have suggested that a departure from spherical symmetry in the nucleus of the galaxy may keep the rate of interaction of stars with the binary at a high enough level so that the binary continues to shrink rather rapidly. However, a major problem of all these simulations is that they do not probe the regime where collisionless effects are dominant - in other words, the number of particles in the simulation is still not sufficient to reach the asymptotic behavior of the system. I present a novel Monte Carlo method for simulating both collisional and collisionless evolution of non-spherical stellar systems, and apply it for the problem of binary supermassive black hole evolution. I show that in triaxial galaxies the final-parsec problem is largely non-existent, while in the axisymmetric case it seems to still exist in the limit of purely collisionless regime relevant for real galaxies, but disappears in the N-body simulations where the feasible values of N are still too low to get rid of collisional effects.

  5. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs. PMID:26684106

  6. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso≳1052 erg ), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  7. Accuracy of Binary Black Hole waveforms for Advanced LIGO searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Barkett, Kevin; Bhagwat, Swetha; Chu, Tony; Fong, Heather; Brown, Duncan; Pfeiffer, Harald; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela

    2015-04-01

    Coalescing binaries of compact objects are flagship sources for the first direct detection of gravitational waves with LIGO-Virgo observatories. Matched-filtering based detection searches aimed at binaries of black holes will use aligned spin waveforms as filters, and their efficiency hinges on the accuracy of the underlying waveform models. A number of gravitational waveform models are available in literature, e.g. the Effective-One-Body, Phenomenological, and traditional post-Newtonian ones. While Numerical Relativity (NR) simulations provide for the most accurate modeling of gravitational radiation from compact binaries, their computational cost limits their application in large scale searches. In this talk we assess the accuracy of waveform models in two regions of parameter space, which have only been explored cursorily in the past: the high mass-ratio regime as well as the comparable mass-ratio + high spin regime.s Using the SpEC code, six q = 7 simulations with aligned-spins and lasting 60 orbits, and tens of q ∈ [1,3] simulations with high black hole spins were performed. We use them to study the accuracy and intrinsic parameter biases of different waveform families, and assess their viability for Advanced LIGO searches.

  8. Momentum flow in black-hole binaries. I. Post-Newtonian analysis of the inspiral and spin-induced bobbing

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Drew; Nichols, David A.; Chen Yanbei; Thorne, Kip S.

    2009-12-15

    A brief overview is presented of a new Caltech/Cornell research program that is exploring the nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime in binary black-hole collisions and mergers, and of an initial project in this program aimed at elucidating the flow of linear momentum in binary black holes (BBHs). The 'gauge-dependence' (arbitrariness) in the localization of linear momentum in BBHs is discussed, along with the hope that the qualitative behavior of linear momentum will be gauge-independent. Harmonic coordinates are suggested as a possibly preferred foundation for fixing the gauge associated with linear momentum. For a BBH or other compact binary, the Landau-Lifshitz formalism is used to define the momenta of the binary's individual bodies in terms of integrals over the bodies' surfaces or interiors, and define the momentum of the gravitational field (spacetime curvature) outside the bodies as a volume integral over the field's momentum density. These definitions will be used in subsequent papers that explore the internal nonlinear dynamics of BBHs via numerical relativity. This formalism is then used, in the 1.5 post-Newtonian approximation, to explore momentum flow between a binary's bodies and its gravitational field during the binary's orbital inspiral. Special attention is paid to momentum flow and conservation associated with synchronous spin-induced bobbing of the black holes, in the so-called 'extreme-kick configuration' (where two identical black holes have their spins lying in their orbital plane and antialigned)

  9. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. This situation has changed dramatically in the past year, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for the holy grail of numerical relativity, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LISA and LIGO.

  10. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2008-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Recently this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for the holy grail of numerical relativity, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LIGO and LISA.

  11. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2008-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities. causing them to crash well before the black hole:, in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Recently this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for the holy grail of numerical relativity, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LIGO and LISA.

  12. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the massive black hole (MBH) binaries that are found at the center of most galaxies, "astronomical messenger", gravitational waves (GW), and the use of numerical relativity understand the features of these phenomena. The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity.. This talk will take you on this quest for the holy grail of numerical relativity, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LIGO and LISA.

  13. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Recently this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for the holy grail of numerical relativity, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LIGO and LISA

  14. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2008-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields. We need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Recently this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for the holy grail of numerical relativity, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LIGO and LISA.

  15. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Recently this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for the holy grail of numerical relativity, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simutation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LIGO and LISA.

  16. Binary Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Recently this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for the holy grail of numerical relativity, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LIGO and LISA.

  17. Merging of unequal mass binary black holes in non-axisymmetric galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczik, Peter; Wang, Long; Nitadori, Keigo; Spurzem, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    In this work we study the stellar-dynamical hardening of unequal mass massive black hole (MBH) binaries in the central regions of galactic nuclei. We present a comprehensive set of direct N-body simulations of the problem, varying both the total mass and the mass ratio of the MBH binary. Our initial model starts as an axisymmetric, rotating galactic nucleus, to describe the situation right after the galaxies have merged, but the black holes are still unbound to each other. We confirm that results presented in earlier works (Berczik et al. 2006; Khan et al. 2013; Wang et al. 2014) about the solution of the ``last parsec problem'' (sufficiently fast black hole coalescence for black hole growth in cosmological context) are robust for both for the case of unequal black hole masses and large particle numbers. The MBH binary hardening rate depends on the reduced mass ratio through a single parameter function, which quantitatively quite well agrees with standard 3 body scattering theory (see e.g., Hills 1983). Based on our results we conclude that MBH binaries at high redshifts are expected to merge with a factor of ~ 2 more efficiently, which is important to determine the possible overall gravitational wave signals. However, we have not yet fully covered all the possible parameter space, in particular with respect to the preceding of the galaxy mergers, which may lead to a wider variety of initial models, such as initially more oblate and / or even significantly triaxial galactic nuclei. Our N-body simulations were carried out on a new special supercomputers using the hardware acceleration with graphic processing units (GPUs).

  18. Accuracy of Binary Black Hole Waveform Models for Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prayush; Fong, Heather; Barkett, Kevin; Bhagwat, Swetha; Afshari, Nousha; Chu, Tony; Brown, Duncan; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Pfeiffer, Harald; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; Simulating Extreme Spacetimes (SXS) Team

    2016-03-01

    Coalescing binaries of compact objects, such as black holes and neutron stars, are the primary targets for gravitational-wave (GW) detection with Advanced LIGO. Accurate modeling of the emitted GWs is required to extract information about the binary source. The most accurate solution to the general relativistic two-body problem is available in numerical relativity (NR), which is however limited in application due to computational cost. Current searches use semi-analytic models that are based in post-Newtonian (PN) theory and calibrated to NR. In this talk, I will present comparisons between contemporary models and high-accuracy numerical simulations performed using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC), focusing at the questions: (i) How well do models capture binary's late-inspiral where they lack a-priori accurate information from PN or NR, and (ii) How accurately do they model binaries with parameters outside their range of calibration. These results guide the choice of templates for future GW searches, and motivate future modeling efforts.

  19. ON THE MASS RADIATED BY COALESCING BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barausse, E.; Morozova, V.; Rezzolla, L.

    2012-10-10

    We derive an analytic phenomenological expression that predicts the final mass of the black hole (BH) remnant resulting from the merger of a generic binary system of BHs on quasi-circular orbits. Besides recovering the correct test-particle limit for extreme mass-ratio binaries, our formula reproduces well the results of all the numerical-relativity simulations published so far, both when applied at separations of a few gravitational radii and when applied at separations of tens of thousands of gravitational radii. These validations make our formula a useful tool in a variety of contexts ranging from gravitational-wave (GW) physics to cosmology. As representative examples, we first illustrate how it can be used to decrease the phase error of the effective-one-body waveforms during the ringdown phase. Second, we show that, when combined with the recently computed self-force correction to the binding energy of nonspinning BH binaries, it provides an estimate of the energy emitted during the merger and ringdown. Finally, we use it to calculate the energy radiated in GWs by massive BH binaries as a function of redshift, using different models for the seeds of the BH population.

  20. ON THE DETECTABILITY OF DUAL JETS FROM BINARY BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Moesta, Philipp; Alic, Daniela; Rezzolla, Luciano; Zanotti, Olindo; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2012-04-20

    We revisit the suggestion that dual jets can be produced during the inspiral and merger of supermassive black holes when these are immersed in a force-free plasma threaded by a uniform magnetic field. By performing independent calculations of the late inspiral and merger, and by computing the electromagnetic (EM) emission in a way which is consistent with estimates using the Poynting flux, we show that a dual-jet structure is present but energetically subdominant with respect to a non-collimated and predominantly quadrupolar emission, which is similar to the one computed when the binary is in electrovacuum. While our findings set serious restrictions on the detectability of dual jets from coalescing binaries, they also increase the chances of detecting an EM counterpart from these systems.

  1. Masses of black holes in binary stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, Anatolii M.

    1996-08-01

    Mass determination methods and their results for ten black holes in X-ray binary systems are summarised. A unified interpretation of the radial velocity and optical light curves allows one to reliably justify the close binary system model and to prove the correctness of determination of the optical star mass function fv(m).The orbit plane inclination i can be estimated from an analysis of optical light curve of the system, which is due mainly to the ellipsoidal shape of the optical star (the so-called ellipticity effect). The component mass ratio q = mx/mv is obtained from information about the distance to the binary system as well as from data about rotational broadening of absorption lines in the spectrum of the optical star. These data allow one to obtain from the value of fv(m) a reliable value of the black hole mass mx or its low limit, as well as the optical star mass mv. An independent estimate of the optical star mass mv obtained from information about its spectral class and luminosity gives us test results. Additional test comes from information about the absence or presence of X-ray eclipses in the system. Effects of the non-zero dimension of the optical star, its pear-like shape, and X-ray heating on the absorption line profiles and the radial velocity curve are investigated. It is very significant that none of ten known massive (mx > 3M) X-ray sources considered as black hole candidates is an X-ray pulsar or an X-ray burster of the first kind.

  2. Accurate evolutions of inspiralling neutron-star binaries: Prompt and delayed collapse to a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, Luca; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2008-10-01

    Binary neutron-star systems represent primary sources for the gravitational-wave detectors that are presently operating or are close to being operating at the target sensitivities. We present a systematic investigation in full general relativity of the dynamics and gravitational-wave emission from binary neutron stars which inspiral and merge, producing a black hole surrounded by a torus. Our results represent the state of the art from several points of view: (i) We use high-resolution shock-capturing methods for the solution of the hydrodynamics equations and high-order finite-differencing techniques for the solution of the Einstein equations; (ii) We employ adaptive mesh-refinement techniques with “moving boxes” that provide high-resolution around the orbiting stars; (iii) We use as initial data accurate solutions of the Einstein equations for a system of binary neutron stars in irrotational quasicircular orbits; (iv) We exploit the isolated-horizon formalism to measure the properties of the black holes produced in the merger; (v) Finally, we use two approaches, based either on gauge-invariant perturbations or on Weyl scalars, to calculate the gravitational waves emitted by the system. Within our idealized treatment of the matter, these techniques allow us to perform accurate evolutions on time scales never reported before (i.e. ˜30ms) and to provide the first complete description of the inspiral and merger of a neutron-star binary leading to the prompt or delayed formation of a black hole and to its ringdown. We consider either a polytropic equation of state or that of an ideal fluid and show that already with this idealized treatment a very interesting phenomenology can be described. In particular, we show that while higher-mass polytropic binaries lead to the prompt formation of a rapidly rotating black hole surrounded by a dense torus, lower-mass binaries give rise to a differentially rotating star, which undergoes large oscillations and emits large

  3. Observing Massive Black Hole Binary Coalescences with LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Massive black hole binary coalescences are among the most important astrophysical sources of gravitational waves to be observed by LISA. The ability to observe and characterize such sources with masses approximately equal to 105 M/odot and larger at high redshifts is strongly dependent on the sensitivity of LISA in the low frequency (0.1 mHz and below) regime. We examine LISA's ability to observe these systems at redshifts up to z approximately equal to 10 for various proposed values of the low frequency sensitivity, under current assumptions about the merger rates. The discussion will focus on the astrophysical information that can be gained by these observations.

  4. MCMC exploration of supermassive black hole binary inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Porter, Edward K.

    2006-10-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna will be able to detect the inspiral and merger of super massive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) anywhere in the universe. Standard matched filtering techniques can be used to detect and characterize these systems. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are ideally suited to this and other LISA data analysis problems as they are able to efficiently handle models with large dimensions. Here we compare the posterior parameter distributions derived by an MCMC algorithm with the distributions predicted by the Fisher information matrix. We find excellent agreement for the extrinsic parameters, while the Fisher matrix slightly overestimates errors in the intrinsic parameters.

  5. Numerical simulations of single and binary black holes in scalar-tensor theories: Circumventing the no-hair theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Horbatsch, Michael; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    Scalar-tensor theories are a compelling alternative to general relativity and one of the most accepted extensions of Einstein’s theory. Black holes in these theories have no hair, but could grow “wigs” supported by time-dependent boundary conditions or spatial gradients. Time-dependent or spatially varying fields lead in general to nontrivial black hole dynamics, with potentially interesting experimental consequences. We carry out a numerical investigation of the dynamics of single and binary black holes in the presence of scalar fields. In particular we study gravitational and scalar radiation from black-hole binaries in a constant scalar-field gradient, and we compare our numerical findings to analytical models. In the single black hole case we find that, after a short transient, the scalar field relaxes to static configurations, in agreement with perturbative calculations. Furthermore we predict analytically (and verify numerically) that accelerated black holes in a scalar-field gradient emit scalar radiation. For a quasicircular black-hole binary, our analytical and numerical calculations show that the dominant component of the scalar radiation is emitted at twice the binary’s orbital frequency.

  6. Binary black hole spacetimes with a helical Killing vector

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Christian

    2004-12-15

    Binary black hole spacetimes with a helical Killing vector, which are discussed as an approximation for the early stage of a binary system, are studied in a projection formalism. In this setting the four-dimensional Einstein equations are equivalent to a three-dimensional gravitational theory with a SL(2,R)/SO(1,1) sigma model as the material source. The sigma model is determined by a complex Ernst equation. 2+1 decompositions of the three-metric are used to establish the field equations on the orbit space of the Killing vector. The two Killing horizons of spherical topology which characterize the black holes, the cylinder of light where the Killing vector changes from timelike to spacelike, and infinity are singular points of the equations. The horizon and the light cylinder are shown to be regular singularities, i.e., the metric functions can be expanded in a formal power series in the vicinity. The behavior of the metric at spatial infinity is studied in terms of formal series solutions to the linearized Einstein equations. It is shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the strong sense to have a smooth null infinity under the assumption that the metric tends asymptotically to the Minkowski metric. In this case the metric functions have an oscillatory behavior in the radial coordinate in a nonaxisymmetric setting, the asymptotic multipoles are not defined. The asymptotic behavior of the Weyl tensor near infinity shows that there is no smooth null infinity.

  7. High-velocity stars from the interaction of a globular cluster and a massive black hole binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragione, G.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    2016-05-01

    High-velocity stars are usually thought to be the dynamical product of the interaction of binary systems with supermassive black holes. In this paper, we investigate a particular mechanism of production of high-velocity stars as due to the close interaction between a massive and orbitally decayed globular cluster and a supermassive black hole binary. The high velocity acquired by some stars of the cluster comes from combined effect of extraction of their gravitational binding energy and from the slingshot due to the interaction with the black hole binary. After the close interaction, stars could reach a velocity sufficient to travel in the halo and even overcome the galactic potential well, while some of them are just stripped from the globular cluster and start orbiting around the galactic centre.

  8. Dynamics of binary asteroids. I - Hill's case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvineau, B.; Mignard, F.

    1990-02-01

    The present investigation of the dynamics of hypothesized binary (or multiple) asteroids attempts to evaluate the likelihood of their dynamic stability, giving attention to the trajectories of Hill's (1977) problem (including only the gravitational perturbation of the sun) to define the effects of solar perturbations on the relative motion of a binary asteroid. Only for the cases of close binary asteroids, can the Jacobian constant be unambiguously related to the semimajor axis of a weakly disturbed Keplerian ellipse. A greater likelihood is found for a stable asteroid with retrograde orbit, in both the synodic and the inertial frames, that with direct orbit.

  9. Energetics and phasing of nonprecessing spinning coalescing black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Alessandro; Damour, Thibault; Reisswig, Christian; Pollney, Denis

    2016-02-01

    We present an improved numerical relativity (NR) calibration of the new effective-one-body (EOB) model for coalescing nonprecessing spinning black hole binaries recently introduced by Damour and Nagar [Phys. Rev. D 90, 044018 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.044018]. We do so by comparing the EOB predictions to both the phasing and the energetics provided by two independent sets of NR data covering mass ratios 1 ≤q ≤9.989 and dimensionless spin range -0.95 ≤χ ≤+0.994 . One set of data is a subset of the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes (SXS) catalog of public waveforms; the other set consists of new simulations obtained with the Llama code plus Cauchy characteristic evolution. We present the first systematic computation of the gauge-invariant relation between the binding energy and the total angular momentum, Eb(j ), for a large sample of, spin-aligned, SXS and Llama data. The dynamics of the EOB model presented here involves only two free functional parameters, one [a6c(ν )] entering the nonspinning sector, as a 5PN effective correction to the interaction potential, and one [c3(a˜1,a˜2,ν )] in the spinning sector, as an effective next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order correction to the spin-orbit coupling. These parameters are determined [together with a third functional parameter Δ tNQC(χ ) entering the waveform] by comparing the EOB phasing with the SXS phasing, the consistency of the energetics being checked afterwards. The quality of the analytical model for gravitational wave data analysis purposes is assessed by computing the EOB/NR faithfulness. Over the NR data sample and when varying the total mass between 20 and 200 M⊙ the EOB/NR unfaithfulness (integrated over the NR frequency range) is found to vary between 99.493% and 99.984% with a median value of 99.944%.

  10. Binary Black Holes, Numerical Relativity, and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for these gravitational wave patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will be observed by LISA

  11. Cosmic Messengers: Binary Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy, more than the combined light from all the stars in the visible universe. This energy is emitted in the form of gravitational waves, and observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors such as LISA requires that we know the pattern or fingerprint of the radiation emitted. Since black hole mergers take place in regions of extreme gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein s equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these wave patterns. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these wave patterns. However, their computer codes have been plagued by problems that caused them to crash. . This situation has changed dramatically in the past 2 years, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will take you on this quest for these gravitational wave patterns, showing how a spacetime is constructed on a computer to build a simulation laboratory for binary black hole mergers. We will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms, and the dramatic new potential for discoveries that arises when these sources will. be observed by LISA.

  12. Observing Merging Massive Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J.; McWillimas, S.; Baker, J.; Arnaud, K.

    2009-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is expected to detect gravitational radiation from the inspiral and merger of massive black hole binaries at high redshifts with large signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). These high-SNR observations will make it possible to extract physical parameters such as hole masses and spins, luminosity distance, and sky position from the observed waveforms. LISA'S effectiveness as a tool for astrophysics will be influenced by the precision with which these parameters can be measured. In addition, the practicality of coordinated observations with other instruments will be affected by the temporal evolution of parameter errors such as sky position. We present estimates of parameter errors for the special case of non-spinning black holes. Our focus is on the contribution of the late inspiral and merger portions of the waveform, a regime which typically dominates the SNR but has not been extensively studied due to the historic lack of a precise description of the waveform. Advances in numerical relativity have recently made such studies possible. Initial results suggest that the portion of the waveform beyond the Schwarzchild inner-most stable circular orbit can reduce parameter uncertainties by up to a factor of two.

  13. Simulating Gravitational Wave Emission from Massive Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2008-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of very strong gravitational fields, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute these waveforms using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. In the past few years, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of amazing breakthroughs. This talk will focus on the recent advances that are revealing these waveforms. highlighting their astrophysical consequences and the dramatic new potential for discovery that arises when merging black holes will be observed using gravitational waves.

  14. Prospects for experimental research on black holes in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    Cygnus X-1, the single widely accepted example of a black hole in a binary system, is characterized by unusual X-ray properties. The X-ray spectrum of Cygnus X-1 is not cut off above 20 keV, as in most strong X-ray sources. Recent scintillation counter measurements reveal a power law spectrum extending from 40 to 200 keV with a photon spectral index of approximately 2.2. However, it is not clear that these and other X-ray properties of the system are related to the black-hole nature of Cygnus X-1. It is suggested that without a direct test to show that the mass of the compact object in other systems similar to Cygnus X-1 (Circinus X-1 and GX339-4) exceeds the limit of the neutron star mass, a better understanding of the accretion disk phenomenon must be achieved to demonstrate how the properties peculiar to these systems are related to the black hole nature of the compact object. Current accretion disk models are examined, including the alpha-accretion disk and two-temperature accretion disk models.

  15. A 15.65-solar-mass black hole in an eclipsing binary in the nearby spiral galaxy M 33.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Jerome A; McClintock, Jeffrey E; Narayan, Ramesh; Bailyn, Charles D; Hartman, Joel D; Macri, Lucas; Liu, Jiefeng; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Remillard, Ronald A; Shporer, Avi; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2007-10-18

    Stellar-mass black holes are found in X-ray-emitting binary systems, where their mass can be determined from the dynamics of their companion stars. Models of stellar evolution have difficulty producing black holes in close binaries with masses more than ten times that of the Sun (>10; ref. 4), which is consistent with the fact that the most massive stellar black holes known so far all have masses within one standard deviation of 10. Here we report a mass of (15.65 +/- 1.45) for the black hole in the recently discovered system M 33 X-7, which is located in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 (M 33) and is the only known black hole that is in an eclipsing binary. To produce such a massive black hole, the progenitor star must have retained much of its outer envelope until after helium fusion in the core was completed. On the other hand, in order for the black hole to be in its present 3.45-day orbit about its (70.0 +/- 6.9) companion, there must have been a 'common envelope' phase of evolution in which a significant amount of mass was lost from the system. We find that the common envelope phase could not have occurred in M 33 X-7 unless the amount of mass lost from the progenitor during its evolution was an order of magnitude less than what is usually assumed in evolutionary models of massive stars. PMID:17943124

  16. A 15.65-solar-mass black hole in an eclipsing binary in the nearby spiral galaxy M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, Jerome A.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Narayan, Ramesh; Bailyn, Charles D.; Hartman, Joel D.; Macri, Lucas; Liu, Jiefeng; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Remillard, Ronald A.; Shporer, Avi; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2007-10-01

    Stellar-mass black holes are found in X-ray-emitting binary systems, where their mass can be determined from the dynamics of their companion stars. Models of stellar evolution have difficulty producing black holes in close binaries with masses more than ten times that of the Sun (>10; ref. 4), which is consistent with the fact that the most massive stellar black holes known so far all have masses within one standard deviation of 10. Here we report a mass of (15.65+/-1.45) for the black hole in the recently discovered system M 33 X-7, which is located in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 (M 33) and is the only known black hole that is in an eclipsing binary. To produce such a massive black hole, the progenitor star must have retained much of its outer envelope until after helium fusion in the core was completed. On the other hand, in order for the black hole to be in its present 3.45-day orbit about its (70.0+/-6.9) companion, there must have been a `common envelope' phase of evolution in which a significant amount of mass was lost from the system. We find that the common envelope phase could not have occurred in M 33 X-7 unless the amount of mass lost from the progenitor during its evolution was an order of magnitude less than what is usually assumed in evolutionary models of massive stars.

  17. Low-Frequency Gravitational Radiation from Coalescing Massive Black Hole Binaries in Hierarchical Cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesana, Alberto; Haardt, Francesco; Madau, Piero; Volonteri, Marta

    2004-08-01

    We compute the expected low-frequency gravitational wave signal from coalescing massive black hole (MBH) binaries at the center of galaxies in a hierarchical structure formation scenario in which seed holes of intermediate mass form far up in the dark halo ``merger tree.'' The merger history of dark matter halos and associated MBHs is followed via cosmological Monte Carlo realizations of the merger hierarchy from redshift z=20 to the present in a ΛCDM cosmology. MBHs get incorporated through halo mergers into larger and larger structures, sink to the center because of dynamical friction against the dark matter background, accrete cold material in the merger remnant, and form MBH binary systems. Stellar dynamical (three-body) interactions cause the hardening of the binary at large separations, while gravitational wave emission takes over at small radii and leads to the final coalescence of the pair. A simple scheme is applied in which the ``loss cone'' is constantly refilled and a constant stellar density core forms because of the ejection of stars by the shrinking binary. The integrated emission from inspiraling MBH binaries at all redshifts is computed in the quadrupole approximation and results in a gravitational wave background (GWB) with a well-defined shape that reflects the different mechanisms driving the late orbital evolution. The characteristic strain spectrum has the standard hc(f)~f-2/3 behavior only in the range f=10-9to10-6 Hz. At lower frequencies the orbital decay of MBH binaries is driven by the ejection of background stars (``gravitational slingshot''), and the strain amplitude increases with frequency, hc(f)~f. In this range the GWB is dominated by 109-1010 Msolar MBH pairs coalescing at 0<~z<~2. At higher frequencies, f>10-6Hz, the strain amplitude, as steep as hc(f)~f-1.3, is shaped by the convolution of last stable circular orbit emission by lighter binaries (102-107 Msolar) populating galaxy halos at all redshifts. We discuss the

  18. SECULAR EVOLUTION OF BINARIES NEAR MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: FORMATION OF COMPACT BINARIES, MERGER/COLLISION PRODUCTS AND G2-LIKE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Prodan, Snezana; Antonini, Fabio; Perets, Hagai B. E-mail: antonini@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-02-01

    Here we discuss the evolution of binaries around massive black holes (MBHs) in nuclear stellar clusters. We focus on their secular evolution due to the perturbation by the MBHs, while simplistically accounting for their collisional evolution. Binaries with highly inclined orbits with respect to their orbits around MBHs are strongly affected by secular processes, which periodically change their eccentricities and inclinations (e.g., Kozai-Lidov cycles). During periapsis approach, dissipative processes such as tidal friction may become highly efficient, and may lead to shrinkage of a binary orbit and even to its merger. Binaries in this environment can therefore significantly change their orbital evolution due to the MBH third-body perturbative effects. Such orbital evolution may impinge on their later stellar evolution. Here we follow the secular dynamics of such binaries and its coupling to tidal evolution, as well as the stellar evolution of such binaries on longer timescales. We find that stellar binaries in the central parts of nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are highly likely to evolve into eccentric and/or short-period binaries, and become strongly interacting binaries either on the main sequence (at which point they may even merge), or through their later binary stellar evolution. The central parts of NSCs therefore catalyze the formation and evolution of strongly interacting binaries, and lead to the enhanced formation of blue stragglers, X-ray binaries, gravitational wave sources, and possible supernova progenitors. Induced mergers/collisions may also lead to the formation of G2-like cloud-like objects such as the one recently observed in the Galactic center.

  19. Gravitational Radiation Characteristics of Nonspinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, B. J.; Baker, J. G.; Boggs, W. D.; Centrella, J. M.; vanMeter, J. R.; McWilliams, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical relativity simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our analysis covers amplitude and phase characteristics of the radiation, suggesting a unified picture of the waveforms' dominant features in terms of an implicit rotating source, applying uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We construct a model of the late-stage frequency evolution that fits the l = m modes, and identify late-time relationships between waveform frequency and amplitude. These relationships allow us to construct a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modelling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model.

  20. Entropic force in black hole binaries and its Newtonian limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2012-03-01

    We give an exact solution for the static force between two black holes at the turning points in their binary motion. The results are derived by Gibbs’ principle and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy applied to the apparent horizon surfaces in time-symmetric initial data. New power laws are derived for the entropy jump in mergers, while Newton’s law is shown to derive from a new adiabatic variational principle for the Hilbert action in the presence of apparent horizon surfaces. In this approach, entropy is strictly monotonic such that gravity is attractive for all separations including mergers, and the Bekenstein entropy bound is satisfied also at arbitrarily large separations, where gravity reduces to Newton’s law. The latter is generalized to point particles in the Newtonian limit by application of Gibbs’ principle to world-lines crossing light cones.

  1. Observing Massive Black-hole Binaries With A Redesigned Lisa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Sean T.

    2012-01-01

    In response to recent events in NASA and ESA, which necessitate the redesign of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) to lower its cost, we present results of a design study that evaluates the impact of various redesigns on the study of massive black-hole binaries (MBHB). As a result of the shift in sensitivity towards higher frequencies in all of the redesigns, the final merger signal will be even more critical for characterizing the coalescence of MBHBs. We assess the achievable parameter accuracy of MBHB measurements with various redesign options, and how well we expect the final design choices to perform. We include spinning mergers with higher harmonics in our calculation, which was never previously included in LISA calculations, and highlights the need to include all of the available physics in order to recover any performance lost in the redesign.

  2. Gravitational Radiation Characteristics of Nonspinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Barnard

    2008-01-01

    "We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical relativity simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our analysis covers amplitude and phase characteristics of the radiation, suggesting a unified picture of the waveforms' dominant features in terms of an implicit rotating source. applying uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We construct a model of the late-stage frequency evolution that fits the $\\ell = m$ modes, and identify late-time relationships between waveform frequency and amplitude. These relationships allow us to construct a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modelling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model."

  3. Black hole binary inspiral: Analysis of the plunge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-02-01

    Binary black hole coalescence has its peak of gravitational-wave generation during the "plunge," the transition from quasicircular early motion to late quasinormal ringing (QNR). Although advances in numerical relativity have provided plunge waveforms, there is still no intuitive or phenomenological understanding of plunge comparable to that of the early and late stages. Here we make progress in developing such understanding by relying on insights of the linear mathematics of the particle perturbation model for the extreme mass limit. Our analysis, based on the Fourier-domain Green function, and a simple initial model, point to the crucial role played by the kinematics near the "light ring" (the circular photon orbit) in determining the plunge radiation and the excitation of QNR. That insight is then shown to successfully explain results obtained for particle motion in a Schwarzschild background.

  4. Observing Mergers of Non-Spinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Boggs, William D.; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the field of numerical relativity now make it possible to calculate the final, most powerful merger phase of binary black-hole coalescence for generic binaries. The state of the art has advanced well beyond the equal-mass case into the unequal-mass and spinning regions of parameter space. We present a study of the nonspinning portion of parameter space, primarily using an analytic waveform model tuned to available numerical data, with an emphasis on observational implications. We investigate the impact of varied m8BS ratio on merger signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for several detectors, and compare our results with expectations from the test-mass limit. We note a striking similarity of the waveform phasing of the merger waveform across the available mass ratios. Motivated by this, we calculate the match between our equal-mass and 4:1 mass-ratio waveforms during the merger as a function of location on the source sky, using a new formalism for the match that accounts for higher harmonics. This is an indicator of the amount of degeneracy in mass ratio for mergers of moderate mass ratio systems.

  5. Inspiraling black-hole binary spacetimes: Challenges in transitioning from analytical to numerical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlochower, Yosef; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Mundim, Bruno C.; Campanelli, Manuela; Noble, Scott; Zilhão, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    We explore how a recently developed analytical black-hole binary spacetime can be extended using numerical simulations to go beyond the slow-inspiral phase. The analytic spacetime solves the Einstein field equations approximately, with the approximation error becoming progressively smaller the more separated the binary. To continue the spacetime beyond the slow-inspiral phase, we need to transition. Such a transition was previously explored at smaller separations. Here, we perform this transition at a separation of D =20 M (large enough that the analytical metric is expected to be accurate), and evolve for six orbits. We find that small constraint violations can have large dynamical effects, but these can be removed by using a constraint-damping system like the conformal covariant formulation of the Z4 system. We find agreement between the subsequent numerical spacetime and the predictions of post-Newtonian theory for the waveform and inspiral rate that is within the post-Newtonian truncation error.

  6. NONLINEAR GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE MEMORY FROM BINARY BLACK HOLE MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Favata, Marc

    2009-05-10

    Some astrophysical sources of gravitational waves can produce a 'memory effect', which causes a permanent displacement of the test masses in a freely falling gravitational-wave detector. The Christodoulou memory is a particularly interesting nonlinear form of memory that arises from the gravitational-wave stress-energy tensor's contribution to the distant gravitational-wave field. This nonlinear memory contributes a nonoscillatory component to the gravitational-wave signal at leading (Newtonian-quadrupole) order in the waveform amplitude. Previous computations of the memory and its detectability considered only the inspiral phase of binary black hole coalescence. Using an 'effective-one-body' (EOB) approach calibrated to numerical relativity simulations, as well as a simple fully analytic model, the Christodoulou memory is computed for the inspiral, merger, and ringdown. The memory will be very difficult to detect with ground-based interferometers, but is likely to be observable in supermassive black hole mergers with LISA out to redshifts z {approx}< 2. Detection of the nonlinear memory could serve as an experimental test of the ability of gravity to 'gravitate'.

  7. Anatomy of the Binary Black Hole Recoil: A Multipolar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Buonanno, Alessandra; vanMeter, James R.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the recoil velocity computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including 1 = 4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (= 98%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (2 95%). We describe how the relative amplitude, and more importantly, the relative phase, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ring-down phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced, to a high level of accuracy, by an effective Newtonian formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing in the Newtonian formula the radial separation with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes. Analytic formulae, obtained by expressing the multipole moments in terms of the fundamental QNMs of a Kerr BH, are able to explain the onset and amount of '.anti-kick" for each of the simulations. Lastly, we apply this multipolar analysis to understand the remarkable difference between the amplitudes of planar and non-planar kicks for equal-mass spinning black holes.

  8. Binary Black Hole Late Inspiral: Simulations for Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; vanMeter, James R.; Centrella, Joan; Choi, Dae-Il; Kelly, Bernard J.; Koppitz, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Coalescing binary black hole mergers are expected to be the strongest gravitational wave sources for ground-based interferometers, such as the LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the spacebased interferometer LISA. Until recently it has been impossible to reliably derive the predictions of General Relativity for the final merger stage, which takes place in the strong-field regime. Recent progress in numerical relativity simulations is, however, revolutionizing our understanding of these systems. We examine here the specific case of merging equal-mass Schwarzschild black holes in detail, presenting new simulations in which the black holes start in the late inspiral stage on orbits with very low eccentricity and evolve for approximately 1200M through approximately 7 orbits before merging. We study the accuracy and consistency of our simulations and the resulting gravitational waveforms, which encompass approximately 14 cycles before merger, and highlight the importance of using frequency (rather than time) to set the physical reference when comparing models. Matching our results to PN calculations for the earlier parts of the inspiral provides a combined waveform with less than half a cycle of accumulated phase error through the entire coalescence. Using this waveform, we calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for iLIGO, adLIGO, and LISA, highlighting the contributions from the late-inspiral and merger-ringdown parts of the waveform which can now be simulated numerically. Contour plots of SNR as a function of z and M show that adLIGO can achieve SNR 2 10 for some IMBBHs out to z approximately equals 1, and that LISA can see MBBHs in the range 3 x 10(exp 4) approximately < M/Mo approximately < 10(exp 7) at SNR > 100 out to the earliest epochs of structure formation at z > 15.

  9. Improved gravitational waveforms from spinning black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Edward K.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2005-01-01

    The standard post-Newtonian approximation to gravitational waveforms, called T-approximants, from nonspinning black hole binaries are known not to be sufficiently accurate close to the last stable orbit of the system. A new approximation, called P-approximants, is believed to improve the accuracy of the waveforms rendering them applicable up to the last stable orbit. In this study we apply P-approximants to the case of a test particle in equatorial orbit around a Kerr black hole parameterized by a spin-parameter q that takes values between -1 and 1. In order to assess the performance of the two approximants we measure their effectualness (i.e., larger overlaps with the exact signal), and faithfulness (i.e., smaller biases while measuring the parameters of the signal) with the exact (numerical) waveforms. We find that in the case of prograde orbits, that is orbits whose angular momentum is in the same sense as the spin angular momentum of the black hole, T-approximant templates obtain an effectualness of ˜0.99 for spins q≲0.75. For 0.750.99 for all spins up to q=0.95. The bias in the estimation of parameters is much lower in the case of P-approximants than T-approximants. We find that P-approximants are both effectual and faithful and should be more effective than T-approximants as a detection template family when q>0. For q<0 both T- and P-approximants perform equally well so that either of them could be used as a detection template family.

  10. Laser Interferometer Space Antenna double black holes: dynamics in gaseous nuclear discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica; Haardt, Francesco

    2006-03-01

    We study the inspiral of double black holes, with masses in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) window of detectability, orbiting inside a massive circumnuclear, rotationally supported gaseous disc. Using high-resolution smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, we follow the black hole dynamics in the early phase when gas-dynamical friction acts on the black holes individually, and continue our simulation until they form a close binary. We find that in the early sinking the black holes lose memory of their initial orbital eccentricity if they corotate with the gaseous disc. As a consequence, the massive black holes bind forming a binary with a low eccentricity, consistent with zero within our numerical resolution limit. The cause of circularization resides in the rotation present in the gaseous background where dynamical friction operates. Circularization may hinder gravitational waves from taking over and leading the binary to coalescence. In the case of counter-rotating orbits, the initial eccentricity (if present) does not decrease, and the black holes may bind forming an eccentric binary. When dynamical friction has subsided, for equal mass black holes and regardless their initial eccentricity, angular momentum loss, driven by the gravitational torque exerted on the binary by surrounding gas, is nevertheless observable down to the smallest scale probed (~=1 pc). In the case of unequal masses, dynamical friction remains efficient down to our resolution limit, and there is no sign of formation of any ellipsoidal gas distribution that may further harden the binary. During inspiral, gravitational capture of gas by the black holes occurs mainly along circular orbits; eccentric orbits imply high relative velocities and weak gravitational focusing. Thus, the active galactic nucleus activity may be excited during the black hole pairing process and double active nuclei may form when circularization is completed, on distance scales of tens of parsecs.

  11. On the formation of galactic black hole low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-03-01

    Currently, there are 24 black hole (BH) X-ray binary systems that have been dynamically confirmed in the Galaxy. Most of them are low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) comprised of a stellar-mass BH and a low-mass donor star. Although the formation of these systems has been extensively investigated, some crucial issues remain unresolved. The most noticeable one is that, the low-mass companion has difficulties in ejecting the tightly bound envelope of the massive primary during the spiral-in process. While initially intermediate-mass binaries are more likely to survive the common envelope (CE) evolution, the resultant BH LMXBs mismatch the observations. In this paper, we use both stellar evolution and binary population synthesis to study the evolutionary history of BH LMXBs. We test various assumptions and prescriptions for the supernova mechanisms that produce BHs, the binding energy parameter, the CE efficiency and the initial mass distributions of the companion stars. We obtain the birthrate and the distributions of the donor mass, effective temperature and orbital period for the BH LMXBs in each case. By comparing the calculated results with the observations, we put useful constraints on the aforementioned parameters. In particular, we show that it is possible to form BH LMXBs with the standard CE scenario if most BHs are born through failed supernovae.

  12. Astrophysical Implications of the Binary Black-hole Merger GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of the gravitational-wave (GW) source GW150914 with the Advanced LIGO detectors provides the first observational evidence for the existence of binary black hole (BH) systems that inspiral and merge within the age of the universe. Such BH mergers have been predicted in two main types of formation models, involving isolated binaries in galactic fields or dynamical interactions in young and old dense stellar environments. The measured masses robustly demonstrate that relatively “heavy” BHs (≳ 25 {M}⊙ ) can form in nature. This discovery implies relatively weak massive-star winds and thus the formation of GW150914 in an environment with a metallicity lower than about 1/2 of the solar value. The rate of binary-BH (BBH) mergers inferred from the observation of GW150914 is consistent with the higher end of rate predictions (≳ 1 Gpc-3 yr-1) from both types of formation models. The low measured redshift (z≃ 0.1) of GW150914 and the low inferred metallicity of the stellar progenitor imply either BBH formation in a low-mass galaxy in the local universe and a prompt merger, or formation at high redshift with a time delay between formation and merger of several Gyr. This discovery motivates further studies of binary-BH formation astrophysics. It also has implications for future detections and studies by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, and GW detectors in space.

  13. Astrophysical Implications of the Binary Black-hole Merger GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D’Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of the gravitational-wave (GW) source GW150914 with the Advanced LIGO detectors provides the first observational evidence for the existence of binary black hole (BH) systems that inspiral and merge within the age of the universe. Such BH mergers have been predicted in two main types of formation models, involving isolated binaries in galactic fields or dynamical interactions in young and old dense stellar environments. The measured masses robustly demonstrate that relatively “heavy” BHs (≳ 25 {M}ȯ ) can form in nature. This discovery implies relatively weak massive-star winds and thus the formation of GW150914 in an environment with a metallicity lower than about 1/2 of the solar value. The rate of binary-BH (BBH) mergers inferred from the observation of GW150914 is consistent with the higher end of rate predictions (≳ 1 Gpc‑3 yr‑1) from both types of formation models. The low measured redshift (z≃ 0.1) of GW150914 and the low inferred metallicity of the stellar progenitor imply either BBH formation in a low-mass galaxy in the local universe and a prompt merger, or formation at high redshift with a time delay between formation and merger of several Gyr. This discovery motivates further studies of binary-BH formation astrophysics. It also has implications for future detections and studies by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, and GW detectors in space.

  14. Vacuum electromagnetic counterparts of binary black-hole mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Moesta, Philipp; Rezzolla, Luciano; Pollney, Denis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Yoshida, Shin'ichirou

    2010-03-15

    As one step towards a systematic modeling of the electromagnetic (EM) emission from an inspiralling black hole binary we consider a simple scenario in which the binary moves in a uniform magnetic field anchored to a distant circumbinary disc. We study this system by solving the Einstein-Maxwell equations in which the EM fields are chosen with strengths consistent with the values expected astrophysically and treated as test fields. Our initial data consists of a series of binaries with spins aligned or antialigned with the orbital angular momentum and we study the dependence of gravitational and EM signals with different spin configurations. Overall we find that the EM radiation in the lowest l=2, m=2 multipole accurately reflects the gravitational one, with identical phase evolutions and amplitudes that differ only by a scaling factor. This is no longer true when considering higher l modes, for which the amplitude evolution of the scaled EM emission is slightly larger, while the phase evolutions continue to agree. We also compute the efficiency of the energy emission in EM waves and find that it scales quadratically with the total spin and is given by E{sub EM}{sup rad}/M{approx_equal}10{sup -15}(M/10{sup 8}M{sub {center_dot}}){sup 2}(B/10{sup 4}G){sup 2}, hence 13 orders of magnitude smaller than the gravitational energy for realistic magnetic fields. Although large in absolute terms, the corresponding luminosity is much smaller than the accretion luminosity if the system is accreting at near the Eddington rate. Most importantly, this EM emission is at frequencies of {approx}10{sup -4}(10{sup 8}M{sub {center_dot}}/M) Hz, which are well outside those accessible to astronomical radio observations. As a result, it is unlikely that the EM emission discussed here can be detected directly and simultaneously with the gravitational-wave one. However, indirect processes, driven by changes in the EM fields behavior could yield observable events. In particular we argue that

  15. Implication of Lag cross over QPO frequency in black hole binaries during outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal Dutta, Broja; Sarathi Pal, Partha; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Studies of energy dependent temporal properties in different variability time scales can diagnose dynamics and geometry of accretion flows around black holes. The dependence of time lag on photon energy is more intriguing in black hole binaries. We study lag properties for high inclination sources using RXTE/PCA data. We find that the lag at QPO frequency generally rises as the frequency itself goes down in both high and low inclination sources. An exactly opposite result is found also in the declining phase. In TCAF solution, this implies that the lag would increase as the size of the Comptonizing region increases. We discussed all possible effects which could be controlling the property of the lag. We also find that for the high inclination objects, at a particular QPO frequency, time lag changes its sign from positive to negative, i.e., soft photons appearing before hard photons due to reflection and focusing effects. This frequency gives rise to a characteristic length-scale where the lag changes its sign. This characteristic length-scale is again would depend on inclination angles and the mass of the black holes. We discuss possibility of finding black hole mass with this lag property.

  16. Interim results from the ongoing hunt for supermassive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnoe, Jessie C.; Mathes, Gavin; Pennell, Alison; Brown, Stephanie Meghan; Eracleous, Michael; Boroson, Todd A.; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Halpern, Jules P.; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries seem to be an inevitable product of the prevailing galaxy evolution scenarios in which most massive galaxies play host to a central black hole and undergo a history of mergers and accretion over the course of cosmic time. The early stages of this process have been observed in the form of interacting galaxy pairs as well dual active galactic nuclei with kilo-parsec separations, but detections of the close, bound binaries that are expected to follow have proven elusive. With this motivation, we have been conducting a systematic observational search for sub-parsec separation supermassive black hole binaries. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that the secondary black hole in the system is active and the resulting broad emission lines are doppler shifted due to orbital motion in the binary (analogous to a single-line spectroscopc binary star). Our sample includes 88 binary candidates selected from z<0.7 Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars based on substantial offsets (>1000 km/s) of their broad Hβ emission lines relative to their systemic redshifts. I will present the latest results from the spectroscopic monitoring campaign that we are conducting to constrain the nature of the binary candidates. These include the radial velocity curves, which now use observations made through 2015, and the constraints that can be placed on the physical properties of the binary based on the radial velocity curves and observed flux variability of the binaries.

  17. Flaring Black Hole Accretion Disk in the Binary System V404 Cygni

    NASA Video Gallery

    On June 15, NASA's Swift caught the onset of a rare X-ray outburst from a stellar-mass black hole in the binary system V404 Cygni. Astronomers around the world are watching the event. In this syste...

  18. Expanding the catalog of binary black-hole simulations: aligned-spin configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tony; Pfeiffer, Harald; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; SXS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of numerical relativity is to model the inspiral and merger of binary black holes through sufficiently accurate and long simulations, to enable the successful detection of gravitational waves. However, covering the full parameter space of binary configurations is a computationally daunting task. The SXS Collaboration has made important progress in this direction recently, with a catalog of 174 publicly available binary black-hole simulations [black-holes.org/waveforms]. Nevertheless, the parameter-space coverage remains sparse, even for non-precessing binaries. In this talk, I will describe an addition to the SXS catalog to improve its coverage, consisting of 95 new simulations of aligned-spin binaries with moderate mass ratios and dimensionless spins as high as 0.9. Some applications of these new simulations will also be mentioned.

  19. Polymer dynamics in binary blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Loring, Roger F.

    1992-09-01

    We develop a theory of the dynamics of flexible linear polymers in a melt composed of macromolecules of two molecular weights and of the same chemical species. A polymer is represented by a freely jointed chain that moves by two dynamical processes. The first is a local jump motion that may be blocked by obstacles, and the second is a slithering mode that mimics reptation. The dynamics of the obstacles are determined self-consistently by an ansatz that associates their relaxation with the dynamics of the slowest mode of conformational relaxation of a chain. The calculations of the autocorrelation function of the end-to-end vector and of the mean squared displacement of the center of mass are related exactly to the solution of a random walk problem with dynamical disorder. We calculate the necessary random walk propagator by applying the dynamical effective medium approximation. Calculations of the dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient of both components on blend composition and on molecular weights are presented. The theory is shown to provide a unified description of diffusion in the unentangled and entangled regimes.

  20. Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binary Black Holes: Theoretical and Experimental Challenges

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    A network of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors (LIGO/VIRGO/GEO/...) is currently taking data near its planned sensitivity. Coalescing black hole binaries are among the most promising, and most exciting, gravitational wave sources for these detectors. The talk will review the theoretical and experimental challenges that must be met in order to successfully detect gravitational waves from coalescing black hole binaries, and to be able to reliably measure the physical parameters of the source (masses, spins, ...).

  1. Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binary Black Holes: Theoretical and Experimental Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-29

    A network of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors (LIGO/VIRGO/GEO/...) is currently taking data near its planned sensitivity. Coalescing black hole binaries are among the most promising, and most exciting, gravitational wave sources for these detectors. The talk will review the theoretical and experimental challenges that must be met in order to successfully detect gravitational waves from coalescing black hole binaries, and to be able to reliably measure the physical parameters of the source (masses, spins, ...).

  2. Massive black hole binaries from runaway collisions: the impact of metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela

    2016-07-01

    The runaway collision scenario is one of the most promising mechanisms to explain the formation of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in young dense star clusters. On the other hand, the massive stars that participate in the runaway collisions lose mass by stellar winds. In this paper, we discuss new N-body simulations of massive (6.5 × 104 M⊙) star clusters, in which we added upgraded recipes for stellar winds and supernova explosion at different metallicity. We follow the evolution of the principal collision product (PCP), through dynamics and stellar evolution, till it forms a stellar remnant. At solar metallicity, the mass of the final merger product spans from few solar masses up to ˜30 M⊙. At low metallicity (0.01-0.1 Z⊙) the maximum remnant mass is ˜250 M⊙, in the range of IMBHs. A large fraction (˜0.6) of the PCPs are not ejected from the parent star cluster and acquire stellar or black hole (BH) companions. Most of the long-lived binaries hosting a PCP are BH-BH binaries. We discuss the importance of this result for gravitational wave detection.

  3. Massive black hole binaries from runaway collisions: the impact of metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela

    2016-04-01

    The runaway collision scenario is one of the most promising mechanisms to explain the formation of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in young dense star clusters. On the other hand, the massive stars that participate in the runaway collisions lose mass by stellar winds. In this paper, we discuss new N-body simulations of massive (6.5 × 104 M⊙) star clusters, in which we added upgraded recipes for stellar winds and supernova explosion at different metallicity. We follow the evolution of the principal collision product (PCP), through dynamics and stellar evolution, till it forms a stellar remnant. At solar metallicity, the mass of the final merger product spans from few solar masses up to ˜30 M⊙. At low metallicity (0.01 - 0.1 Z⊙) the maximum remnant mass is ˜250 M⊙, in the range of IMBHs. A large fraction (˜0.6) of the PCPs are not ejected from the parent star cluster and acquire stellar or black hole (BH) companions. Most of the long-lived binaries hosting a PCP are BH-BH binaries. We discuss the importance of this result for gravitational wave detection.

  4. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhaoming

    2016-06-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron self-Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value dot{M} ˜ 3α dot{M}_Edd, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down on to the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary, our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenario for the state transition.

  5. Fully Relativistic Simulations of the Inspiral and Merger of Black Hole - Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, M.; Besselman, M.; Chawla, S.; Hirschmann, E. W.; Lehner, L.; Liebling, S. L.; Neilsen, D.; Tohline, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    We present fully relativistic simulations of the inspiral and merger of quasi-equilibrium binaries composed of a neutron star and a black hole. We vary the mass ratio of the binary, the spin angular momentum of the black hole and the initial separation in a series of simulations. We also explore the role of magnetic fields by including a dipole field in the neutron star and evolve the field in the MHD approximation. We use the adaptive mesh refinement package HAD to resolve the disparate length scales in the problem ranging from the radiation zone down to the internal dynamics of the initial neutron star and tidal remnant. We will briefly highlight our results for the gravitational radiation waveform as well as the fate of the neutron star's material including the fraction that forms a debris disk. This work was supported by the NSF through grants PHY-0803629 and PHY-0653375 to LSU. The computations presented here were performed on resources from the Teragrid and the Louisiana Optical Network Initiative (LONI).

  6. Suppression of the accretion rate in thin discs around binary black holes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragusa, Enrico; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J.

    2016-05-01

    We present three-dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations investigating the dependence of the accretion rate on the disc thickness around an equal-mass, circular black hole binary system. We find that for thick/hot discs, with H/R ≳ 0.1, the binary torque does not prevent the gas from penetrating the cavity formed in the disc by the binary (in line with previous investigations). The situation drastically changes for thinner discs, in this case the mass accretion rate is suppressed, such that only a fraction (linearly dependent on H/R) of the available gas is able to flow within the cavity and accrete on to the binary. Extrapolating this result to the cold and thin accretion discs expected around supermassive black hole binary systems implies that this kind of systems accretes less material than predicted so far, with consequences not only for the electromagnetic and gravitational waves emissions during the late inspiral phase but also for the recoil speed of the black hole formed after binary coalescence, thus influencing also the evolutionary path both of the binary and of the host galaxy. Our results, being scale-free, are also applicable to equal mass, circular binaries of stellar mass black holes, such as the progenitor of the recently discovered gravitational wave source GW150914.

  7. Suppression of the accretion rate in thin discs around binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragusa, Enrico; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations investigating the dependence of the accretion rate on the disc thickness around an equal-mass, circular black hole binary system. We find that for thick/hot discs, with H/R ≳ 0.1, the binary torque does not prevent the gas from penetrating the cavity formed in the disc by the binary (in line with previous investigations). The situation drastically changes for thinner discs; in this case the mass accretion rate is suppressed, such that only a fraction (linearly dependent on H/R) of the available gas is able to flow within the cavity and accrete on to the binary. Extrapolating this result to the cold and thin accretion discs expected around supermassive black hole binary systems implies that this kind of system accretes less material than predicted so far, with consequences not only for the electromagnetic and gravitational waves emissions during the late inspiral phase but also for the recoil speed of the black hole formed after binary coalescence, thus influencing also the evolutionary path both of the binary and of the host galaxy. Our results, being scale-free, are also applicable to equal-mass, circular binaries of stellar mass black holes, such as the progenitor of the recently discovered gravitational wave source GW150914.

  8. Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspirals in LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, J.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; Barr, B.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Beausoleil, R.; Belczynski, K.; Bennett, R.; Berukoff, S. J.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Bland, B.; Bochner, B.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgess, R.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castiglione, J.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chickarmane, V.; Chin, D.; Christensen, N.; Churches, D.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C.; Coldwell, R.; Coles, M.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Csatorday, P.; Cusack, B. J.; Cutler, C.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Daw, E.; Debra, D.; Delker, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Credico, A.; Díaz, M.; Ding, H.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dupuis, R. J.; Edlund, J. A.; Ehrens, P.; Elliffe, E. J.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fallnich, C.; Farnham, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Findley, T.; Fine, M.; Finn, L. S.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Giaime, J. A.; Gillespie, A.; Goda, K.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Grandclément, P.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimmett, D.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E.; Gustafson, R.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammond, M.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardham, C.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Hartunian, A.; Heefner, J.; Hefetz, Y.; Heinzel, G.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Hepler, N.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hindman, N.; Hoang, P.; Hough, J.; Hrynevych, M.; Hua, W.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jennrich, O.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnston, W. R.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, L.; Jungwirth, D.; Kalogera, V.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kells, W.; Kern, J.; Khan, A.; Killbourn, S.; Killow, C. J.; Kim, C.; King, C.; King, P.; Klimenko, S.; Koranda, S.; Kötter, K.; Kovalik, J.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Landry, M.; Langdale, J.; Lantz, B.; Lawrence, R.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lindquist, P.; Liu, S.; Logan, J.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Luna, M.; Lyons, T. T.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majid, W.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Mann, F.; Marin, A.; Márka, S.; Maros, E.; Mason, J.; Mason, K.; Matherny, O.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McHugh, M.; McNabb, J. W. C.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyoki, S.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nagano, S.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R.; Newton, G.; Nocera, F.; Noel, J. S.; Nutzman, P.; Olson, T.; O'Reilly, B.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottewill, A.; Ouimette, D.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswariah, C.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pitkin, M.; Plissi, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rao, S. R.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Redding, D.; Regehr, M. W.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reilly, K. T.; Reithmaier, K.; Reitze, D. H.; Richman, S.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Rizzi, A.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robison, L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Rong, H.; Rose, D.; Rotthoff, E.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Salzman, I.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sazonov, A.; Schilling, R.; Schlaufman, K.; Schmidt, V.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Seader, S. E.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seel, S.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shapiro, C. A.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shu, Q. Z.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sievers, L.; Sigg, D.; Sintes, A. M.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, M. R.; Sneddon, P. H.; Spero, R.; Spjeld, O.; Stapfer, G.; Steussy, D.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T.; Sumner, M. C.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Sylvestre, J.

    2006-03-01

    We report on a search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspirals in the data from the second science run of the LIGO interferometers. The search focused on binary systems with component masses between 3 and 20M⊙. Optimally oriented binaries with distances up to 1 Mpc could be detected with efficiency of at least 90%. We found no events that could be identified as gravitational waves in the 385.6 hours of data that we searched.

  9. An estimate of the probability of capture of a binary star by a supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremova, G. N.; Dremov, V. V.; Tutukov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    A simple model for the dynamics of stars located in a sphere with a radius of one-tenth of the central parsec, designed to enable estimation of the probability of capture in the close vicinity ( r < 10-3 pc) of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is presented. In the case of binary stars, such a capture with a high probability results in the formation of a hyper-velocity star. The population of stars in a sphere of radius <0.1 pc is calculated based on data for the Galactic rotation curve. To simulate the distortion of initially circular orbits of stars, these are subjected to a series of random shock encounters ("kicks"), whose net effect is to "push" these binary systems into the region of potential formation of hyper-velocity stars. The mean crossing time of the border of the close vicinity of the SMBH ( r < 10-3 pc) by the stellar orbit can be used to estimate the probability that a binary system is captured, followed by the possible ejection of a hyper-velocity star.

  10. Dynamics of phase separation of binary fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Maritan, Amos; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The results of molecular-dynamics studies of surface-tension-dominated spinodal decomposition of initially well-mixed binary fluids in the absence and presence of gravity are presented. The growth exponent for the domain size and the decay exponent of the potential energy of interaction between the two species with time are found to be 0.6 +/- 0.1, inconsistent with scaling arguments based on dimensional analysis.

  11. Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspiral, merger, and ringdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aronsson, M.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballinger, T.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belletoile, A.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J.-P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Derosa, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; de Rosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Fiore, L.; di Lieto, A.; di Palma, I.; di Paolo Emilio, M.; di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J.-C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Ely, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Liguori, N.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. D.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Mak, C.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreau, J.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Pardi, S.; Pareja, M.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pathak, D.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radke, T.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szokoly, G. P.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Turner, L.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    We present the first modeled search for gravitational waves using the complete binary black-hole gravitational waveform from inspiral through the merger and ringdown for binaries with negligible component spin. We searched approximately 2 years of LIGO data, taken between November 2005 and September 2007, for systems with component masses of 1-99M⊙ and total masses of 25-100M⊙. We did not detect any plausible gravitational-wave signals but we do place upper limits on the merger rate of binary black holes as a function of the component masses in this range. We constrain the rate of mergers for 19M⊙≤m1, m2≤28M⊙ binary black-hole systems with negligible spin to be no more than 2.0Mpc-3Myr-1 at 90% confidence.

  12. Relativistic boost as the cause of periodicity in a massive black-hole binary candidate.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Daniel J; Haiman, Zoltán; Schiminovich, David

    2015-09-17

    Because most large galaxies contain a central black hole, and galaxies often merge, black-hole binaries are expected to be common in galactic nuclei. Although they cannot be imaged, periodicities in the light curves of quasars have been interpreted as evidence for binaries, most recently in PG 1302-102, which has a short rest-frame optical period of four years (ref. 6). If the orbital period of the black-hole binary matches this value, then for the range of estimated black-hole masses, the components would be separated by 0.007-0.017 parsecs, implying relativistic orbital speeds. There has been much debate over whether black-hole orbits could be smaller than one parsec (ref. 7). Here we report that the amplitude and the sinusoid-like shape of the variability of the light curve of PG 1302-102 can be fitted by relativistic Doppler boosting of emission from a compact, steadily accreting, unequal-mass binary. We predict that brightness variations in the ultraviolet light curve track those in the optical, but with a two to three times larger amplitude. This prediction is relatively insensitive to the details of the emission process, and is consistent with archival ultraviolet data. Follow-up ultraviolet and optical observations in the next few years can further test this prediction and confirm the existence of a binary black hole in the relativistic regime. PMID:26381982

  13. Fundamental Dynamics of Black Hole Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haramein, Nassim

    2002-04-01

    The dynamics of rotating, charged black holes, obeying the Kerr-Newman metric is presented. These dynamical high-density, gravitationally collapsing, black hole systems for stellar, galactic, intergalactic and cosmogenesis appear to obey similar constraints on their mass, apparent density and radius. Under these extreme conditions, the gravitational force becomes "balanced" with the larger coupling constant of the electromagnetic force. Thus, the gravitational attraction forms dynamic pseudo equilibrium with the plasma dynamics surrounding the black holes. Thermodynamic-type processes occupy a role in energy transfer between gravitational attraction and electro-dynamic repulsion. Solving the modified Einstein-Maxwell's equations under high magnetic field conditions, with additional thermodynamic conditions, leads to a good description of the processes occurring externally, near and in the event horizons of the Kerr-Newman geometry and leads to a unification possibility. Reference; N. Haramein, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. AB06, 1154(2001)

  14. Precision Measurement of Complete Black Hole Binary Inspiral-Merger-Ringdown Signals with LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams, Sean T.

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, only the inspiral and ringdown phases of black hole binary (131-113) coalescences had been modeled. The merger signals, which were expected to be the most luminous portion of the total signal, were unavailable due to the technical difficulty of calculating the behavior of a BHB in this highly dynamical and non-linear regime. Advancements in the field of numerical relativity make it possible to include the merger segment of 131113 coalescence in the search for and characterization of gravitational wave signals. The implications for LISA include an increase in the event rate due to the increase in achievable signal-to-noise ratio, as well as potentially improved accuracy regarding the extraction of the source parameters. We investigate the degree to which mergers improve parameter estimation, by studying the impact of including mergers on achievable parameter accuracy over a significant range of masses and mass ratios for nonspinning systems, and its impact on LISA science.

  15. Investigating the effect of precession on searches for neutron-star-black-hole binaries with Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, Ian W.; Nitz, Alexander H.; Brown, Duncan A.; Lundgren, Andrew P.; Ochsner, Evan; Keppel, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The first direct detection of neutron-star- black-hole binaries will likely be made with gravitational-wave observatories. Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will be able to observe neutron-star- black-hole mergers at a maximum distance of 900 Mpc. To achieve this sensitivity, gravitational-wave searches will rely on using a bank of filter waveforms that accurately model the expected gravitational-wave signal. The emitted signal will depend on the masses of the black hole and the neutron star and also the angular momentum of both components. The angular momentum of the black hole is expected to be comparable to the orbital angular momentum when the system is emitting gravitational waves in Advanced LIGO's and Advanced Virgo's sensitive band. This angular momentum will affect the dynamics of the inspiralling system and alter the phase evolution of the emitted gravitational-wave signal. In addition, if the black hole's angular momentum is not aligned with the orbital angular momentum, it will cause the orbital plane of the system to precess. In this work we demonstrate that if the effect of the black hole's angular momentum is neglected in the waveform models used in gravitational-wave searches, the detection rate of (10+1.4)M⊙ neutron-star- black-hole systems with isotropic spin distributions would be reduced by 33%-37% in comparison to a hypothetical perfect search at a fixed signal-to-noise ratio threshold. The error in this measurement is due to uncertainty in the post-Newtonian approximations that are used to model the gravitational-wave signal of neutron-star- black-hole inspiralling binaries. We describe a new method for creating a bank of filter waveforms where the black hole has nonzero angular momentum that is aligned with the orbital angular momentum. With this bank we find that the detection rate of (10+1.4)M⊙ neutron-star- black-hole systems would be reduced by 26%-33%. Systems that will not be detected are ones where the precession of the orbital

  16. Spinning Black Hole Pairs: Dynamics and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Rebecca

    Black hole binaries will be an important source of gravitational radiation for both ground-based and future space-based gravitational wave detectors. The study of such systems will offer a unique opportunity to test the dynamical predictions of general relativity when gravity is very strong. To date, most investigations of black hole binary dynamics have focused attention on restricted scenarios in which the black holes do not spin (and thus are confined to move in a plane) and/or in which they stay on quasi-circular orbits. However, spinning black hole pairs in eccentric orbits are now understood to be astrophysically equally important. These spinning binaries exhibit a range of complicated dynamical behaviors, even in the absence of radiation reaction. Their conservative dynamics is complicated by extreme perihelion precession compounded by spin-induced precession. Although the motion seems to defy simple decoding, we are able to quantitatively define and describe the fully three-dimensional motion of arbitrary mass-ratio binaries with at least one black hole spinning and expose an underlying simplicity. To do so, we untangle the dynamics by constructing an instantaneous orbital plane and showing that the motion captured in that plane obeys elegant topological rules. In this thesis, we apply the above prescription to two formal systems used to model black hole binaries. The first is defined by the conservative 3PN Hamiltonian plus spin-orbit coupling and is particularly suitable to comparable-mass binaries. The second is defined by geodesics of the Kerr metric and is used exclusively for extreme mass-ratio binaries. In both systems, we define a complete taxonomy for fully three-dimensional orbits. More than just a naming system, the taxonomy provides unambiguous and quantitative descriptions of the orbits, including a determination of the zoom-whirliness of any given orbit. Through a correspondence with the rational numbers, we are able to show that all of the

  17. Lattice Dynamics of Equiatomic Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    In the present article, the calculations of the lattice dynamical properties of four equiatomic binary alloys viz. Na0.5Li0.5, Na0.5K0.5, Na0.5Rb0.5 and Na0.5Cs0.5 to second order in local model potential is discussed in terms of real-space sum of Born von Karman central force constants. Well known Ashcroft's empty core (EMC) model potential has been used to study the lattice dynamical properties. Instead of the average of the force constants of metallic Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, the pseudo-alloy-atom (PAA) is adopted to compute directly the force constants of four equiatomic sodium-based binary alloys. The exchange and correlation functions due to Hartree (H) and Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU) are used to investigate influence of screening effects. Results for the lattice constants i.e. C11, C12, C44, C12-C44, C12/C44 and bulk modulus (B) obtained using the Hartree screening function have higher values in comparison with the results obtained for the same properties using Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU) screening function. The results for the shear modulus (C¢), deviation from Cauchy's relation (C12/C44), Poisson's ratio (s), Young modulus (Y), propagation velocity of elastic waves, phonon dispersion curves and degree of anisotropy (A) are encouraging for the four equiatomic Na-based binary alloys.

  18. Dynamics and Habitability in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    2014-07-01

    Determining planetary habitability is a complex matter, as the interplay between a planet's physical and atmospheric properties with stellar insolation has to be studied in a self consistent manner. Standardized atmospheric models for Earth-like planets exist and are commonly accepted as a reference for estimates of Habitable Zones. In order to define Habitable Zone boundaries, circular orbital configurations around main sequence stars are generally assumed. In gravitationally interacting multibody systems, such as double stars, however, planetary orbits are forcibly becoming non circular with time. Especially in binary star systems even relatively small changes in a planet's orbit can have a large impact on habitability. Hence, we argue that a minimum model for calculating Habitable Zones in binary star systems has to include dynamical interactions.

  19. SEARCH FOR SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY SPECTROSCOPIC SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Wenhua; Greene, Jenny E.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Badenes, Carles

    2013-11-01

    Supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries are expected in a ΛCDM cosmology given that most (if not all) massive galaxies contain a massive black hole (BH) at their center. So far, however, direct evidence for such binaries has been elusive. We use cross-correlation to search for temporal velocity shifts in the Mg II broad emission lines of 0.36 < z < 2 quasars with multiple observations in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For ∼10{sup 9} M{sub ☉} BHs in SMBH binaries, we are sensitive to velocity drifts for binary separations of ∼0.1 pc with orbital periods of ∼100 yr. We find seven candidate sub-parsec-scale binaries with velocity shifts >3.4σ ∼ 280 km s{sup –1}, where σ is our systematic error. Comparing the detectability of SMBH binaries with the number of candidates (N ≤ 7), we can rule out that most 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉} BHs exist in ∼0.03-0.2 pc scale binaries, in a scenario where binaries stall at sub-parsec scales for a Hubble time. We further constrain that ≤16% (one-third) of quasars host SMBH binaries after considering gas-assisted sub-parsec evolution of SMBH binaries, although this result is very sensitive to the assumed size of the broad line region. We estimate the detectability of SMBH binaries with ongoing or next-generation surveys (e.g., Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph), taking into account the evolution of the sub-parsec binary in circumbinary gas disks. These future observations will provide longer time baselines for searches similar to ours and may in turn constrain the evolutionary scenarios of SMBH binaries.

  20. Binary-black-hole encounters, gravitational bursts, and maximum final spin.

    PubMed

    Washik, Matthew C; Healy, James; Herrmann, Frank; Hinder, Ian; Shoemaker, Deirdre M; Laguna, Pablo; Matzner, Richard A

    2008-08-01

    The spin of the final black hole in the coalescence of nonspinning black holes is determined by the "residual" orbital angular momentum of the binary. This residual momentum consists of the orbital angular momentum that the binary is not able to shed in the process of merging. We study the angular momentum radiated, the spin of the final black hole, and the gravitational bursts in a sequence of equal mass encounters. The initial orbital configurations range from those producing an almost direct infall to others leading to numerous orbits before infall, with multiple bursts of radiation. Our sequence consists of orbits with fixed impact parameter. What varies is the initial linear momentum of the black holes. For this sequence, the final black hole of mass M_{h} gets a maximum spin parameter a/M_{h} approximately 0.823, with this maximum occurring for initial orbital angular momentum L/M_{h};{2} approximately 1.176. PMID:18764445

  1. On the dynamics of tilted black hole-torus systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Vassilios; Galeazzi, Filippo; Font, José A.; Montero, Pedro J.; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2016-09-01

    We present results from three-dimensional, numerical relativity simulations of a tilted black hole-thick accretion disc system. The simulations are analysed using tracer particles in the disc which are advected with the flow. Such tracers, which we employ in these new simulations for the first time, provide a powerful means to analyse in detail the complex dynamics of tilted black hole-torus systems. We show how its use helps to gain insight into the overall dynamics of the system, discussing the origin of the observed black hole precession and the development of a global non-axisymmetric m = 1 mode in the disc. Our three-dimensional simulations show the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the instantaneous accretion rate, with frequencies in a range compatible with those observed in low-mass X-ray binaries with either a black hole or a neutron star component. The frequency ratio of the dominant low-frequency peak and the first overtone is o1/f ˜ 1.9, a frequency ratio not attainable when modelling the QPOs as p-mode oscillations in axisymmetric tori.

  2. Local temperature for dynamical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Sean A.; di Criscienzo, R.; Nadalini, M.; Vanzo, L.; Zerbini, S.

    2009-05-01

    A local Hawking temperature was recently derived for any future outer trapping horizon in spherical symmetry, using a Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method, and is given by a dynamical surface gravity as defined geometrically. Descriptions are given of the operational meaning of the temperature, in terms of what observers measure, and its relation to the usual Hawking temperature for static black holes. Implications for the final fate of an evaporating black hole are discussed.

  3. Hydrodynamical simulations of the tidal stripping of binary stars by massive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainetti, Deborah; Lupi, Alessandro; Campana, Sergio; Colpi, Monica

    2016-04-01

    In a galactic nucleus, a star on a low angular momentum orbit around the central massive black hole can be fully or partially disrupted by the black hole tidal field, lighting up the compact object via gas accretion. This phenomenon can repeat if the star, not fully disrupted, is on a closed orbit. Because of the multiplicity of stars in binary systems, also binary stars may experience in pairs such a fate, immediately after being tidally separated. The consumption of both the binary components by the black hole is expected to power a double-peaked flare. In this paper, we perform for the first time, with GADGET2, a suite of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of binary stars around a galactic central black hole in the Newtonian regime. We show that accretion luminosity light curves from double tidal disruptions reveal a more prominent knee, rather than a double peak, when decreasing the impact parameter of the encounter and when elevating the difference between the mass of the star which leaves the system after binary separation and the mass of the companion. The detection of a knee can anticipate the onset of periodic accretion luminosity flares if one of the stars, only partially disrupted, remains bound to the black hole after binary separation. Thus knees could be precursors of periodic flares, which can then be predicted, followed up and better modelled. Analytical estimates in the black hole mass range 105-108 M⊙ show that the knee signature is enhanced in the case of black holes of mass 106-107 M⊙.

  4. Proposed search for the detection of gravitational waves from eccentric binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, V.; Klimenko, S.; Christensen, N.; Huerta, E. A.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Gopakumar, A.; Haney, M.; Ajith, P.; McWilliams, S. T.; Vedovato, G.; Drago, M.; Salemi, F.; Prodi, G. A.; Lazzaro, C.; Tiwari, S.; Mitselmakher, G.; Da Silva, F.

    2016-02-01

    Most compact binary systems are expected to circularize before the frequency of emitted gravitational waves (GWs) enters the sensitivity band of the ground based interferometric detectors. However, several mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of binary systems, which retain eccentricity throughout their lifetimes. Since no matched-filtering algorithm has been developed to extract continuous GW signals from compact binaries on orbits with low to moderate values of eccentricity, and available algorithms to detect binaries on quasicircular orbits are suboptimal to recover these events, in this paper we propose a search method for detection of gravitational waves produced from the coalescences of eccentric binary black holes (eBBH). We study the search sensitivity and the false alarm rates on a segment of data from the second joint science run of LIGO and Virgo detectors, and discuss the implications of the eccentric binary search for the advanced GW detectors.

  5. The overlap of numerical relativity, perturbation theory and post-Newtonian theory in the binary black hole problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tiec, Alexandre

    2014-09-01

    Inspiralling and coalescing binary black holes are promising sources of gravitational radiation. The orbital motion and gravitational-wave emission of such system can be modeled using a variety of approximation schemes and numerical methods in general relativity: The post-Newtonian (PN) formalism, black hole perturbation theory (BHP), numerical relativity (NR) simulations and the effective one-body (EOB) model. We review recent work at the multiple interfaces of these analytical and numerical techniques, emphasizing the use of coordinate-invariant relationships to perform meaningful comparisons. Such comparisons provide independent checks of the validity of the various calculations, they inform the development of a universal, semi-analytical model of the binary dynamics and gravitational-wave emission and they help to delineate the respective domains of validity of each approximation method. For instance, several recent comparisons suggest that perturbation theory may find applications in a broader range of physical problems than previously thought, including the radiative inspiral of intermediate mass-ratio and comparable-mass black hole binaries.

  6. Constraining Sub-parsec Binary Supermassive Black Holes in Quasars with Multi-epoch Spectroscopy. I. The General Quasar Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham; Tremaine, Scott

    2013-09-01

    We perform a systematic search for sub-parsec binary supermassive black holes (BHs) in normal broad-line quasars at z < 0.8, using multi-epoch Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy of the broad Hβ line. Our working model is that (1) one and only one of the two BHs in the binary is active; (2) the active BH dynamically dominates its own broad-line region (BLR) in the binary system, so that the mean velocity of the BLR reflects the mean velocity of its host BH; (3) the inactive companion BH is orbiting at a distance of a few R BLR, where R BLR ~ 0.01-0.1 pc is the BLR size. We search for the expected line-of-sight acceleration of the broad-line velocity from binary orbital motion by cross-correlating SDSS spectra from two epochs separated by up to several years in the quasar rest frame. Out of ~700 pairs of spectra for which we have good measurements of the velocity shift between two epochs (1σ error ~40 km s-1), we detect 28 systems with significant velocity shifts in broad Hβ, among which 7 are the best candidates for the hypothesized binaries, 4 are most likely due to broad-line variability in single BHs, and the rest are ambiguous. Continued spectroscopic observations of these candidates will easily strengthen or disprove these claims. We use the distribution of the observed accelerations (mostly non-detections) to place constraints on the abundance of such binary systems among the general quasar population. Excess variance in the velocity shift is inferred for observations separated by longer than 0.4 yr (quasar rest frame). Attributing all the excess to binary motion would imply that most of the quasars in this sample must be in binaries, that the inactive BH must be on average more massive than the active one, and that the binary separation is at most a few times the size of the BLR. However, if this excess variance is partly or largely due to long-term broad-line variability, the requirement of a large population of close binaries is much weakened

  7. Supermassive recoil velocities for binary black-hole mergers with antialigned spins.

    PubMed

    González, José A; Hannam, Mark; Sperhake, Ulrich; Brügmann, Bernd; Husa, Sascha

    2007-06-01

    Recent calculations of the recoil velocity in binary black-hole mergers have found the kick velocity to be of the order of a few hundred km/s in the case of nonspinning binaries and about 500 km/s in the case of spinning configurations, and have lead to predictions of a maximum kick of up to 1300 km/s. We test these predictions and demonstrate that kick velocities of at least 2500 km/s are possible for equal-mass binaries with antialigned spins in the orbital plane. Kicks of that magnitude are likely to have significant repercussions for models of black-hole formation, the population of intergalactic black holes, and the structure of host galaxies. PMID:17677893

  8. Inspiral-merger-ringdown models for spinning black-hole binaries at the interface between analytical and numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taracchini, Andrea

    The long-sought direct detection of gravitational waves may only be a few years away, as a new generation of interferometric experiments of unprecedented sensitivity will start operating in 2015. These experiments will look for gravitational waves with frequencies from 10 to about 1000 Hz, thus targeting astrophysical sources such as coalescing binaries of compact objects, core collapse supernovae, and spinning neutron stars, among others. The search strategy for gravitational waves emitted by compact-object binaries consists in filtering the output of the detectors with template waveforms that describe plausible signals, as predicted by general relativity, in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, we modeled these systems through the effective-one-body approach to the general-relativistic 2-body problem. This formalism rests on the idea that binary coalescence is universal across different mass ratios, from the test-particle limit to the equal-mass regime. It bridges the gap between post-Newtonian theory (valid in the slow-motion, weak-field limit) and black-hole perturbation theory (valid in the small mass-ratio limit, but not limited to slow motion). The project unfolded along two main avenues of inquiry, with the goal of developing faithful inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms for generic spinning, stellar-mass black-hole binaries. On the one hand, we studied the motion and gravitational radiation of test masses orbiting Kerr black holes in perturbation theory, with the goal of extracting strong-field information that can be incorporated into effective-one-body models. On the other hand, we worked at the interface between analytical and numerical relativity by calibrating effective-one-body models against numerical solutions of Einstein's equations, and testing their accuracy when extrapolated to different regions of the parameter space. In the course of this project, we also studied conservative effects of the 2-body dynamics, namely the

  9. Robust GRMHD Evolutions of Merging Black-Hole Binaries in Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Bernard; Etienne, Zachariah; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Baker, John

    2016-03-01

    Black-hole binary (BHB) mergers are expected to be powerful sources of gravitational radiation at stellar and galactic scales. A typical astrophysical environment for these mergers will involve magnetized plasmas accreting onto each hole; the strong-field gravitational dynamics of the merger may churn this plasma in ways that produce characteristic electromagnetic radiation visible to high-energy EM detectors on and above the Earth. Here we return to a cutting-edge GRMHD simulation of equal-mass BHBs in a uniform plasma, originally performed with the Whisky code. Our new tool is the recently released IllinoisGRMHD, a compact, highly-optimized ideal GRMHD code that meshes with the Einstein Toolkit. We establish consistency of IllinoisGRMHD results with the older Whisky results, and investigate the robustness of these results to changes in initial configuration of the BHB and the plasma magnetic field, and discuss the interpretation of the ``jet-like'' features seen in the Poynting flux post-merger. Work supported in part by NASA Grant 13-ATP13-0077.

  10. Perturbed disks get shocked: Binary black hole merger effects on accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megevand, Miguel; Anderson, Matthew; Frank, Juhan; Hirschmann, Eric W.; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Motl, Patrick M.; Neilsen, David

    2009-07-01

    The merger process of a binary black hole system can have a strong impact on a circumbinary disk. In the present work we study the effect of both central mass reduction (due to the energy loss through gravitational waves) and a possible black hole recoil (due to asymmetric emission of gravitational radiation). For the mass reduction case and recoil directed along the disk’s angular momentum, oscillations are induced in the disk which then modulate the internal energy and bremsstrahlung luminosities. On the other hand, when the recoil direction has a component orthogonal to the disk’s angular momentum, the disk’s dynamics are strongly impacted, giving rise to relativistic shocks. The shock heating leaves its signature in our proxies for radiation, the total internal energy and bremsstrahlung luminosity. Interestingly, for cases where the kick velocity is below the smallest orbital velocity in the disk (a likely scenario in real active galactic nuclei), we observe a common, characteristic pattern in the internal energy of the disk. Variations in kick velocity simply provide a phase offset in the characteristic pattern implying that observations of such a signature could yield a measure of the kick velocity through electromagnetic signals alone.

  11. Probing the Galactic Binary Black Hole Spin with Photon Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2007-01-01

    It is generally considered that the X-ray emission in AGN and Galactic Black Hole Candidates is produced by flares above the surface of a geometrically thin optically thick accretion disk, which extends down to the Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) of the black hole. We consider the influence of the black hole geometry on the light curves of these flares. To this end we follow a large number of photon orbits emitted impulsively in a locally isotropic fashion, at any phase of the disk orbit and examine their arrival times at infinity by an observer near the plane of the disk. We find out that the presence of the black hole spin induces a certain delay in the photon arrivals, as prograde photon orbits reach the observer on shorter (on the average) times than the retrograde ones. We form a histogram of the differences in photon time arrivals and we find that it exhibits several well defined peaks depending on the flare position and the black hole spin separated by $\\Delta t \\simeq 30 M$, where M is the black hole mass. The peaks disappear as the spin parameter goes to zero, implying that one could in principle measure the value of the black hole spin with timing measurements of sufficiently high signal to noise ratio.

  12. Probing the Galactic Binary Black Hole Spin with Photon Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2007-01-01

    It is generally considered that the X-ray emission in AGN and Galactic Black Hole Candidates is produced by flares above the surface of a geometrically thin optically thick accretion disk, which extends down to the Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) of the black hole. We consider the influence of the black hole geometry on the light curves of these flares. To this end we follow a large number of photon orbits emitted impulsively in a locally isotropic fashion, at any phase of the disk orbit and examine their arrival times at infinity by an observer near the plane of the disk. We find out that the presence of the black hole spin induces a certain delay in the photon arrivals, as prograde photon orbits reach the observer on shorter (on the average) times than the retrograde ones. We form a histogram of the differences in photon time arrivals and we find that it exhibits several well defined peaks depending on the flare position and the black hole spin separated by $\\Delta t\\slmeq 30 M$, where M is the black hole mass. The peaks disappear as the spin parameter goes to zero, implying that one could in principle measure the value of the black hole spin with timing measurements of sufficiently high signal to noise ratio.

  13. High-energy signatures of binary systems of supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. E.; Vila, G. S.; Pérez, D.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Binary systems of supermassive black holes are expected to be strong sources of long gravitational waves prior to merging. These systems are good candidates to be observed with forthcoming space-borne detectors. Only a few of these systems, however, have been firmly identified to date. Aims: We aim at providing a criterion for the identification of some supermassive black hole binaries based on the characteristics of the high-energy emission of a putative relativistic jet launched from the most massive of the two black holes. Methods: We study supermassive black hole binaries where the less massive black hole has carved an annular gap in the circumbinary disk, but nevertheless there is a steady mass flow across its orbit. Such a perturbed disk is hotter and more luminous than a standard thin disk in some regions. Assuming that the jet contains relativistic electrons, we calculate its broadband spectral energy distribution focusing on the inverse Compton up-scattering of the disk photons. We also compute the opacity to the gamma rays produced in the jet by photon annihilation with the disk radiation and take into account the effects of the anisotropy of the target photon field as seen from the jet. Results: We find that the excess of low-energy photons radiated by the perturbed disk causes an increment in the external Compton emission from the jet in the X-ray band, and a deep absorption feature at energies of tens of TeVs for some sets of parameters. According to our results, observations with Cherenkov telescopes might help in the identification of supermassive black hole binaries, especially those black hole binaries that host primaries from tens to hundreds of million of solar masses.

  14. Energy conservation for dynamical black holes.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Sean A

    2004-12-17

    An energy conservation law is described, expressing the increase in mass-energy of a general black hole in terms of the energy densities of the infalling matter and gravitational radiation. This first law of black-hole dynamics describes how a black hole grows and is regular in the limit where it ceases to grow. An effective gravitational-radiation energy tensor is obtained, providing measures of both ingoing and outgoing, transverse and longitudinal gravitational radiation on and near a black hole. Corresponding energy-tensor forms of the first law involve a preferred time vector which plays the role of a stationary Killing vector. Identifying an energy flux, vanishing if and only if the horizon is null, allows a division into energy supply and work terms. The energy supply can be expressed in terms of area increase and a newly defined surface gravity, yielding a Gibbs-like equation. PMID:15697889

  15. Algebraic classification of numerical spacetimes and black-hole-binary remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Manuela; Lousto, Carlos O.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2009-04-15

    In this paper we develop a technique for determining the algebraic classification of a numerically generated spacetime, possibly resulting from a generic black-hole-binary merger, using the Newman-Penrose Weyl scalars. We demonstrate these techniques for a test case involving a close binary with arbitrarily oriented spins and unequal masses. We find that, postmerger, the spacetime quickly approaches Petrov type II, and only approaches type D on much longer time scales. These techniques, in combination with techniques for evaluating acceleration and Newman-Unti-Tamburino parameters, allow us to begin to explore the validity of the 'no-hair theorem' for generic merging-black-hole spacetimes.

  16. Consolidated RXTE Observing Grants on Observation of Neutron Stars and Black Holes in Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Thomas A.; Vaughan, Brian A.

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of neutron stars and black holes in binaries. The activities focused on observation made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The following areas were covered: long term observations of accreting binary pulsars with the All-Sky Monitor (ASM); observations of Centaurus X-3 with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) and the High-Energy X-ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE); observations of accreting pulsars with the PCA and HEXTE; studies of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO); and investigations of accreting black-hole candidates.

  17. Spectral formation in black hole and neutron star binaries: theory vs observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfanov, Marat

    2016-07-01

    I will discuss spectral formation in X-ray binaries with particular emphasis on the dichotomy between black holes and neutron stars. Predictions of theoretical models will be confronted with observations of compact X-ray sources in the Milky Way and beyond. I will discuss how the difference in the nature of the compact object leads to observable differences between accreting neutron stars and black holes and how accretion regimes change across the mass accretion rate range. This will be illustrated with observations of X-ray binaries in the Milky Way and external galaxies, the latter providing us with a unique possibility to explore accretion at its extremities.

  18. Patterns of disc-jet-wind coupling in black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fender, R.

    2015-07-01

    In this talk I will present the current state of the art in our understanding of the connection between accretion state and feedback in black hole X-ray binaries. In particular I will discuss how the X-ray accretion states, defined by their spectral and temporal properties, relate to phases of the production of relativistic (radio) jets and accretion disc winds. I will furthermore discuss how these patterns of behaviour contribute to the overall kinetic and radiative feedback during an outburst, and how comparable they may be to similar behaviour in neutron star X-ray binaries and supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei.

  19. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR MASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY SPECTROSCOPIC SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Tsalmantza, P.; Decarli, R.; Hogg, David W.; Dotti, M. E-mail: decarli@mpia.de

    2011-09-01

    We present the results of a systematic search for massive black hole binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic database. We focus on bound binaries, under the assumption that one of the black holes is active. In this framework, the broad lines associated with the accreting black hole are expected to show systematic velocity shifts with respect to the narrow lines, which trace the rest frame of the galaxy. For a sample of 54,586 quasars and 3929 galaxies at redshifts 0.1 < z < 1.5, we brute-force model each spectrum as a mixture of two quasars at two different redshifts. The spectral model is a data-driven dimensionality reduction of the SDSS quasar spectra based on a matrix factorization. We identified 32 objects with peculiar spectra. Nine of them can be interpreted as black hole binaries. This doubles the number of known black hole binary candidates. We also report on the discovery of a new class of extreme double-peaked emitters with exceptionally broad and faint Balmer lines. For all the interesting sources, we present detailed analysis of the spectra and discuss possible interpretations.

  20. Coarsening dynamics of binary Bose condensates.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Johannes; Natu, Stefan S; Das Sarma, S

    2014-08-29

    We study the dynamics of domain formation and coarsening in a binary Bose-Einstein condensate that is quenched across a miscible-immiscible phase transition. The late-time evolution of the system is universal and governed by scaling laws for the correlation functions. We numerically determine the scaling forms and extract the critical exponents that describe the growth rate of domain size and autocorrelations. Our data are consistent with inviscid hydrodynamic domain growth, which is governed by a universal dynamical critical exponent of 1/z=0.68(2). In addition, we analyze the effect of domain wall configurations which introduce a nonanalytic term in the short-distance structure of the pair correlation function, leading to a high-momentum "Porod" tail in the static structure factor, which can be measured experimentally. PMID:25215993

  1. Implications of the LIGO Discovery of a Binary Black Hole Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2016-03-01

    In this talk I will review how we extract astrophysical information from gravitational-wave signals, including source parameters and implied rates of black hole inspirals and mergers. I will discuss the implications of these results in the context of astrophysical models for binary black-hole formation as well as implications for testing general relativity in the strong-field regime, for the first time.

  2. Attempt to explain black hole spin in X-ray binaries by new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely believed that the spin of black holes in X-ray binaries is mainly natal. A significant spin-up from accretion is not possible. If the secondary has a low mass, the black hole spin cannot change too much even if the black hole swallows the whole stellar companion. If the secondary has a high mass, its lifetime is too short to transfer the necessary amount of matter and spin the black hole up. However, while black holes formed from the collapse of a massive star with solar metallicity are expected to have low birth spin, current spin measurements show that some black holes in X-ray binaries are rotating very rapidly. Here we show that, if these objects are not the Kerr black holes of general relativity, the accretion of a small amount of matter (2 ) can make them look like very fast-rotating Kerr black holes. Such a possibility is not in contradiction with any observation and it can explain current spin measurements in a very simple way.

  3. Measuring Parameters of Massive Black Hole Binaries with Partially-Aligned Spins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2010-01-01

    It is important to understand how well the gravitational-wave observatory LISA can measure parameters of massive black hole binaries. It has been shown that including spin precession in the waveform breaks degeneracies and produces smaller expected parameter errors than a simpler, precession-free analysis. However, recent work has shown that gas in binaries can partially align the spins with the orbital angular momentum, thus reducing the precession effect. We show how this degrades the earlier results, producing more pessimistic errors in gaseous mergers. However, we then add higher harmonics to the signal model; these also break degeneracies, but they are not affected by the presence of gas. The harmonics often restore the errors in partially-aligned binaries to the same as, or better than/ those that are obtained for fully precessing binaries with no harmonics. Finally, we investigate what LISA measurements of spin alignment can tell us about the nature of gas around a binary,

  4. Constraining the formation of black holes in short-period black hole low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Nelemans, Gijs

    2015-11-01

    The formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) is still very uncertain. Two main uncertainties are the amount of mass ejected in the supernova (SN) event (if any) and the magnitude of the natal kick (NK) the BH receives at birth (if any). Repetto et al., studying the position of Galactic X-ray binaries containing BHs, found evidence for BHs receiving high NKs at birth. In this paper, we extend that study, taking into account the previous binary evolution of the sources as well. The seven short-period BH X-ray binaries that we use are compact binaries consisting of a low-mass star orbiting a BH in a period less than 1 d. We trace their binary evolution backwards in time, from the current observed state of mass transfer, to the moment the BH was formed, and we add the extra information on the kinematics of the binaries. We find that several systems could be explained by no NK, just mass ejection, while for two systems (and possibly more) a high kick is required. So unless the latter have an alternative formation, such as within a globular cluster, we conclude that at least some BHs get high kicks. This challenges the standard picture that BH kicks would be scaled down from neutron star kicks. Furthermore, we find that five systems could have formed with a non-zero NK but zero mass ejected (i.e. no SN) at formation, as predicted by neutrino-driven NKs.

  5. Radio crickets: chirping jets from black hole binaries entering their gravitational wave inspiral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    We study a novel electromagnetic signature of supermassive black hole (BH) binaries whose inspiral starts being dominated by gravitational wave (GW) emission. Recent simulations suggest that the binary's member BHs can continue to accrete gas from the circumbinary accretion disc in this phase of the binary's evolution, all the way until coalescence. If one of the binary members produces a radio jet as a result of accretion, the jet precesses along a biconical surface due to the binary's orbital motion. When the binary enters the GW phase of its evolution, the opening angle widens, the jet exhibits milliarcsecond-scale wiggles, and the conical surface of jet precession is twisted due to apparent superluminal motion. The rapidly increasing orbital velocity of the binary gives the jet an appearance of a `chirp'. This helical chirping morphology of the jet can be used to infer the binary parameters. For binaries with mass 107-1010 M⊙ at redshifts z < 0.5, monitoring these features in current and archival data will place a lower limit on sources that could be detected by Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Pulsar Timing Arrays. In the future, microarcsecond interferometry with the Square Kilometre Array will increase the potential usefulness of this technique.

  6. Depleted galaxy cores and dynamical black hole masses

    SciTech Connect

    Rusli, S. P.; Erwin, P.; Saglia, R. P.; Thomas, J.; Fabricius, M.; Bender, R.; Nowak, N.

    2013-12-01

    Shallow cores in bright, massive galaxies are commonly thought to be the result of scouring of stars by mergers of binary supermassive black holes. Past investigations have suggested correlations between the central black hole mass and the stellar light or mass deficit in the core, using proxy measurements of M {sub BH} or stellar mass-to-light ratios (Y). Drawing on a wealth of dynamical models which provide both M {sub BH} and Y, we identify cores in 23 galaxies, of which 20 have direct, reliable measurements of M {sub BH} and dynamical stellar mass-to-light ratios (Y{sub *,dyn}). These cores are identified and measured using Core-Sérsic model fits to surface brightness profiles which extend out to large radii (typically more than the effective radius of the galaxy); for approximately one-fourth of the galaxies, the best fit includes an outer (Sérsic) envelope component. We find that the core radius is most strongly correlated with the black hole mass and that it correlates better with total galaxy luminosity than it does with velocity dispersion. The strong core-size-M {sub BH} correlation enables estimation of black hole masses (in core galaxies) with an accuracy comparable to the M {sub BH}-σ relation (rms scatter of 0.30 dex in log M {sub BH}), without the need for spectroscopy. The light and mass deficits correlate more strongly with galaxy velocity dispersion than they do with black hole mass. Stellar mass deficits span a range of 0.2-39 M {sub BH}, with almost all (87%) being <10 M {sub BH}; the median value is 2.2 M {sub BH}.

  7. Determination of Black Hole Masses in Galactic Black Hole Binaries Using Scaling of Spectral and Variability Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev

    2009-07-01

    We present a study of correlations between X-ray spectral and timing properties observed from a number of Galactic black hole (BH) binaries during hard-soft state spectral evolution. We analyze 17 transition episodes from eight BH sources observed with Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. Our scaling technique for BH mass determination uses a correlation between the spectral index and quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency. In addition, we use a correlation between the index and the normalization of the disk "seed" component to cross-check the BH mass determination and estimate the distance to the source. While the index-QPO correlations for two given sources contain information on the ratio of the BH masses in those sources, the index-normalization correlations depend on the ratio of the BH masses and the distance square ratio. In fact, the index-normalization correlation also discloses the index-mass accretion rate saturation effect given that the normalization of disk "seed" photon supply is proportional to the disk mass accretion rate. We present arguments that this observationally established index saturation effect is a signature of the bulk motion (converging) flow onto a BH, which was early predicted by the dynamical Comptonization theory. We use GRO J1655 - 40 as a primary reference source for which the BH mass, distance, and inclination angle are evaluated by dynamical measurements with unprecedented precision among other Galactic BH sources. We apply our scaling technique to determine BH masses and distances for Cygnus X-1, GX 339 - 4, 4U 1543 - 47, XTE J1550 - 564, XTE J1650 - 500, H 1743 - 322, and XTE J1859 - 226. A good agreement of our results for sources with known values of BH masses and distance provides independent verification for our scaling technique.

  8. Bifurcation timescales in power spectra of black hole binaries and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taishan; Li, Tipei

    2010-01-01

    For black hole binaries (BHBs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs), bifurcation timescales (BTs) Δ t b exist, below which time-domain power is significantly higher than the corresponding Fourier power. Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are removed from the Fourier spectra of BHBs. A relationship between BT, black hole mass and bolometric luminosity is derived. Strong anti-correlation between BT and luminosity of Cyg X-1 is found. After removing the QPOs, BTs are also obtained for two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), M82 X-1 and NGC5408 X-1. The results support that they harbor intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs).

  9. Dynamic Malicious Code Detection Based on Binary Translator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhe; Li, Minglu; Weng, Chuliang; Luo, Yuan

    The binary translator is a software component of a computer system. It converts binary code of one ISA into binary code of another ISA. Recent trends show that binary translators have been used to save CPU power consumption and CPU die size, which makes binary translators a possible indispensable component of future computer systems. And such situation would give new opportunities to the security of these computer systems. One of the opportunities is that we can perform malicious code checking dynamically in the layer of binary translators. This approach has many advantages, both in terms of capability of detection and checking overhead. In this paper, we proposed a working dynamic malicious code checking module integrated to an existent open-source binary translator, QEMU, and explained that our module's capability of detection is superior to other malicious code checking methods while acceptable performance is still maintained.

  10. Dynamics of black hole pairs. I. Periodic tables

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Janna; Grossman, Rebecca

    2009-02-15

    Although the orbits of comparable-mass, spinning black holes seem to defy simple decoding, we find a means to decipher all such orbits--in the absence of radiation reaction. The conservative dynamics is complicated by extreme perihelion precession compounded by spin-induced precession. We are able to quantitatively define and describe the fully three-dimensional motion of comparable-mass binaries with one black hole spinning and expose an underlying simplicity. To do so, we untangle the dynamics by capturing the motion in the orbital plane and explicitly separate out the precession of the plane itself. Our system is defined by the conservative third-order post-Newtonian Hamiltonian plus spin-orbit coupling for one spinning black hole with a nonspinning companion. Our results are twofold: (1) We derive highly simplified equations of motion in a nonorthogonal orbital basis, and (2) we define a complete taxonomy for fully three-dimensional orbits. More than just a naming system, the taxonomy provides unambiguous and quantitative descriptions of the orbits, including a determination of the zoom-whirliness of any given orbit. Through a correspondence with the rationals, we are able to show that zoom-whirl behavior is prevalent in comparable-mass binaries in the strong-field regime, as it is for extreme-mass-ratio binaries in the strong field. A first significant conclusion that can be drawn from this analysis is that all generic orbits in the final stages of inspiral under gravitational radiation losses are characterized by precessing clovers with few leaves, and that no orbit will behave like the tightly precessing ellipse of Mercury. The gravitational waveform produced by these low-leaf clovers will reflect the natural harmonics of the orbital basis - harmonics that, importantly, depend only on radius. The significance for gravitational wave astronomy will depend on the number of windings the pair executes in the strong-field regime. The third-order post