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Sample records for hollow anode glow

  1. Comparative Spectroscopic Temperature Measurements In Hydrogen Hollow Cathode Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majstorovic, G. Lj.; Šišovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2010-07-01

    We report results of optical emission spectroscopy measurements of rotational Trot and translational temperature Ttr of hydrogen molecules. The light source was hollow cathode glow discharge with titanium cathode operated in hydrogen at low pressure. The rotational temperature of excited electronic states of H2 was determined either from relative line intensities of the R branch of the GK ? B band or from the Q branch of the Fulcher-a diagonal band. The population of excited energy levels, determined from relative line intensities, was used to derive ro-vibronic temperature of the ground state of hydrogen molecule.

  2. High-pressure dc glow discharges in hollow diamond cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, B. S.; Turner, C.; May, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    We report the generation and characterization of dc helium microdischarges at several times atmospheric pressure in monolithic diamond hollow-cathode devices having cavity diameters on the order of 100 μm. I-V characteristics indicated operation in the glow discharge regime even at nearly 10 atm, while spectroscopic measurements of the N2 C3Πu  →  B3Πg emission returned rotational temperatures always around 420 K, with a pressure-dependent vibrational population distribution. The variation of breakdown voltage with pressure closely followed Paschen’s law, but with offsets in both axes that we tentatively ascribe to strong diffusive loss and a partial thermalization of electron energies under the high pressures considered here.

  3. Low pressure glow discharge in a system with hollow electrode at floating potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babinov, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the research of the low pressure gas discharge in a system with hollow electrode at the floating potential. The main characteristic features of the discharge distinguishing it from the glow discharge with hollow cathode are described. The studied type of discharge has good perspective to use in the plasma emission systems allowing to reach high current efficiency of the ion sources.

  4. Hollow-anode plasma source for molecular beam epitaxy of gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Newman, N.; Rubin, M.; Dickinson, M.; Thomson, A.; Jones, E.; Phatak, P.; Gassmann, A.

    1995-09-01

    GaN films have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a hollow-anode nitrogen plasma source. The source was developed to minimize defect formation as a result of contamination and ion damage. The hollow-anode discharge is a special form of glow discharge with very small anode area. A positive anode voltage drop of 30--40 V and an increased anode sheath thickness leads to ignition of a relatively dense plasma in front of the anode hole. Driven by the pressure gradient, the ``anode`` plasma forms a bright plasma jet streaming with supersonic velocity towards the substrate. Films of GaN have been grown on (0001) SiC and (0001) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at a temperature from 600--800 C. The films were investigated by photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescence. The film with the highest structural quality had a rocking curve with 5 arcmin, the lowest reported value for MBE growth to date.

  5. Interconnected hollow carbon nanospheres for stable lithium metal anodes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guangyuan; Lee, Seok Woo; Liang, Zheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Yan, Kai; Yao, Hongbin; Wang, Haotian; Li, Weiyang; Chu, Steven; Cui, Yi

    2014-08-01

    For future applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid storage, batteries with higher energy storage density than existing lithium ion batteries need to be developed. Recent efforts in this direction have focused on high-capacity electrode materials such as lithium metal, silicon and tin as anodes, and sulphur and oxygen as cathodes. Lithium metal would be the optimal choice as an anode material, because it has the highest specific capacity (3,860 mAh g(-1)) and the lowest anode potential of all. However, the lithium anode forms dendritic and mossy metal deposits, leading to serious safety concerns and low Coulombic efficiency during charge/discharge cycles. Although advanced characterization techniques have helped shed light on the lithium growth process, effective strategies to improve lithium metal anode cycling remain elusive. Here, we show that coating the lithium metal anode with a monolayer of interconnected amorphous hollow carbon nanospheres helps isolate the lithium metal depositions and facilitates the formation of a stable solid electrolyte interphase. We show that lithium dendrites do not form up to a practical current density of 1 mA cm(-2). The Coulombic efficiency improves to ∼ 99% for more than 150 cycles. This is significantly better than the bare unmodified samples, which usually show rapid Coulombic efficiency decay in fewer than 100 cycles. Our results indicate that nanoscale interfacial engineering could be a promising strategy to tackle the intrinsic problems of lithium metal anodes. PMID:25064396

  6. Interconnected hollow carbon nanospheres for stable lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guangyuan; Lee, Seok Woo; Liang, Zheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Yan, Kai; Yao, Hongbin; Wang, Haotian; Li, Weiyang; Chu, Steven; Cui, Yi

    2014-08-01

    For future applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid storage, batteries with higher energy storage density than existing lithium ion batteries need to be developed. Recent efforts in this direction have focused on high-capacity electrode materials such as lithium metal, silicon and tin as anodes, and sulphur and oxygen as cathodes. Lithium metal would be the optimal choice as an anode material, because it has the highest specific capacity (3,860 mAh g-1) and the lowest anode potential of all. However, the lithium anode forms dendritic and mossy metal deposits, leading to serious safety concerns and low Coulombic efficiency during charge/discharge cycles. Although advanced characterization techniques have helped shed light on the lithium growth process, effective strategies to improve lithium metal anode cycling remain elusive. Here, we show that coating the lithium metal anode with a monolayer of interconnected amorphous hollow carbon nanospheres helps isolate the lithium metal depositions and facilitates the formation of a stable solid electrolyte interphase. We show that lithium dendrites do not form up to a practical current density of 1 mA cm-2. The Coulombic efficiency improves to ˜99% for more than 150 cycles. This is significantly better than the bare unmodified samples, which usually show rapid Coulombic efficiency decay in fewer than 100 cycles. Our results indicate that nanoscale interfacial engineering could be a promising strategy to tackle the intrinsic problems of lithium metal anodes.

  7. Development of hollow anode penning ion source for laboratory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shyam, A.; Das, R.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-03-01

    The research work presented here focuses for the development of miniature penning type ion source. One hollow anode penning type ion source was developed in our laboratory. The size of the ion source is 38 mm diameter and 55 mm length. The ion source consists of two cathodes, a hollow anode and one piece of rare earth permanent magnet. The plasma was created in the plasma region between cathodes and the hollow anode. The J × B force in the region helps for efficient ionization of the gas even in the high vacuum region˜1×10 -5 Torr. The ions were extracted in the axial direction with help of the potential difference between the electrodes and the geometry of the extraction angle. The effect of the extraction electrode geometry for efficient extraction of the ions from the plasma region was examined. This ion source is a self extracted ion source. The self extracted phenomena reduce the cost and the size of the ion source. The extracted ion current was measured by a graphite probe. An ion current of more than 200 μA was observed at the probe placed 70 mm apart from the extraction electrode. In this paper, the structure of the ion source, effect of operating pressure, potential difference and the magnetic field on the extracted ion current is reported.

  8. Plasma Treatment of Polyethylene Powder Particles in Hollow Cathode Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Quitzau, Meike; Bornholdt, Sven; Kersten, Holger

    2008-09-07

    Polyethylen (PE) is widely used in the production of foils, insulators, packaging materials, plastic bottles etc. Untreated PE is hydrophobic due to its unpolar surface. Therefore, it is hard to print or glue PE and the surface has to be modified before converting.In the present experiments a hollow cathode glow discharge is used as plasma source which is mounted in a spiral conveyor in order to ensure a combines transport of PE powder particles. With this set-up a homogeneous surface treatment of the powder is possible while passing the glow discharge. The plasma treatment causes a remarkable enhancement of the hydrophilicity of the PE powder which can be verified by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  9. Role of electrostatic and magnetic electron confinement in a hollow-cathode glow discharge in a nonuniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Metel, A. S. Grigoriev, S. N.; Volosova, M. A.; Bolbukov, V. P.; Melnik, Yu. A.

    2015-02-15

    Glow discharge with electron confinement in an electrostatic trap has been studied. The trap is formed by a cylindrical hollow cathode, as well as by a flat target on its bottom and a grid covering its output aperture, both being negatively biased relative to the cathode. At a gas pressure of 0.2–0.4 Pa, the fraction of ions sputtering the target (δ = 0.13) in the entire number of ions emitted by the uniform discharge plasma corresponds to the ratio of the target surface area to the total surface area of the cathode, grid, and target. When a nonuniform magnetic field with force lines passing through the target center (where the magnetic induction reaches 35 mT), as well as through the grid, hollow cathode, and target periphery (where the field lines are arc-shaped), is applied to the trap, its influence on the discharge depends on the magnetic induction B{sub 0} at the target edge. At B{sub 0} = 1 mT, the electrons emitted from the target periphery and drifting azimuthally in the arc-shaped field insignificantly contribute to gas ionization. Nevertheless, since fast electrons that are emitted from the cathode and oscillate inside it are forced by the magnetic field to come more frequently to the target, thereby intensifying gas ionization near the latter, the fraction δ doubles and the plasma density near the target becomes more than twice as high as that near the grid. At B{sub 0} = 6 mT, the contribution of electrons emitted from the target surface to gas ionization near the target grows up and δ increases two more times. At cathode-target voltages in the range of 0–3 kV, the current in the target circuit vanishes as the voltage between the anode and the cathode decreases to zero.

  10. Role of electrostatic and magnetic electron confinement in a hollow-cathode glow discharge in a nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metel, A. S.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Volosova, M. A.; Bolbukov, V. P.; Melnik, Yu. A.

    2015-02-01

    Glow discharge with electron confinement in an electrostatic trap has been studied. The trap is formed by a cylindrical hollow cathode, as well as by a flat target on its bottom and a grid covering its output aperture, both being negatively biased relative to the cathode. At a gas pressure of 0.2-0.4 Pa, the fraction of ions sputtering the target (δ = 0.13) in the entire number of ions emitted by the uniform discharge plasma corresponds to the ratio of the target surface area to the total surface area of the cathode, grid, and target. When a nonuniform magnetic field with force lines passing through the target center (where the magnetic induction reaches 35 mT), as well as through the grid, hollow cathode, and target periphery (where the field lines are arc-shaped), is applied to the trap, its influence on the discharge depends on the magnetic induction B 0 at the target edge. At B 0 = 1 mT, the electrons emitted from the target periphery and drifting azimuthally in the arc-shaped field insignificantly contribute to gas ionization. Nevertheless, since fast electrons that are emitted from the cathode and oscillate inside it are forced by the magnetic field to come more frequently to the target, thereby intensifying gas ionization near the latter, the fraction δ doubles and the plasma density near the target becomes more than twice as high as that near the grid. At B 0 = 6 mT, the contribution of electrons emitted from the target surface to gas ionization near the target grows up and δ increases two more times. At cathode-target voltages in the range of 0-3 kV, the current in the target circuit vanishes as the voltage between the anode and the cathode decreases to zero.

  11. Spectroscopic study of hydrogen rotational, vibrational and translational temperatures in a hollow cathode glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majstorovic, G. Lj.

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen hollow cathode glow discharges (HCGD) have been extensively used for study of fundamental discharge processes as well as for wide variety of applications. For instance, recently, this type of discharge was utilized for producing hydrogen by reforming natural gas (da Silva et al. 2006). The translational or gas kinetic temperature in gas discharges is a parameter of utmost importance in the field of plasma chemistry while vibrationally excited neutral hydrogen molecules play significant role in the chemistry of weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas. This is why the modeling of cold, reactive hydrogen plasma includes rotational and vibrational energy of the hydrogen molecule. This is the reason why we study HC discharge parameters like rotational, translational and vibrational temperature. Several diagnostic techniques are developed to determine gas kinetic temperature T_g like coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Here we selected OES. This diagnostic technique provides information about atom, molecule and ion density in excited and ground state, as well as rotational, vibrational, and gas temperature including the excitation temperature of certain group of excited levels. The technique is applied for measurements of the rotational T_rot, vibrational T_vib and determines translational temperatures in a hollow cathode glow discharge in hydrogen. The rotational temperature of excited electron energy levels is determined from the Boltzmann plot of intensities of rotational moleculelar hydrogen lines belonging to Fulcher-alpha diagonal bands. Following procedure described elsewhere (Astashkevich et al. 2006) the temperature of ground state rovibronic levels is evaluated. The constrains of rotational temperature are discussed in detail. The vibrational temperature is also determined, but from the relative intensities of the H_2 Fulcher-alpha diagonal bands. The dependence of these

  12. Hollow electrode enhanced radio frequency glow plasma and its application to the chemical vapor deposition of microcrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tabuchi, Toshihiro; Mizukami, Hiroyuki; Takashiri, Masayuki

    2004-09-01

    A hollow electrode enhanced radio frequency (rf) glow plasma excitation technique and its application to the chemical vapor deposition of microcrystalline silicon films have been studied. In this technique, the reactor has two types of hollow structure. One is a hollow counterelectrode, and the other serves as both a hollow counterelectrode and a hollow rf electrode. The application of these discharge types to semiconductor processing is studied in the case of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon thin films. High crystallinity, photosensitivity and a maximum deposition rate of 6.0 nm/s can all be achieved at plasma excitation frequency of 13.56 MHz and substrate temperature of 300 deg. C. Properties of these plasmas are investigated by observing the plasma emission pattern, optical emission spectrum analysis and electrical parameters of the rf electrode. It is found that the plasma technique using both types of hollow discharge not only results in higher intensity of SiH{sup *} and H{alpha} but also in much smaller self-bias voltage of the rf electrode. Faster processing of device grade hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films can also be achieved under lower rf power compared to use of the hollow counterelectrode technique alone.

  13. Spectroscopic study of high energy excited deuterium atoms in a hollow cathode glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Majstorovic, G. Lj.; Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2007-04-15

    The presented results are concerned with the shape of the Balmer alpha line emitted from a low pressure dc glow discharge with stainless steel (SS) and titanium (Ti) hollow cathode (HC) with D{sub 2} or Ar/D{sub 2}/H{sub 2} gas mixture. The analysis indicates that the line profile represents a convolution of three Gaussian profiles resulting from different collision excitation processes. The average energy of excited deuterium atoms determined from the width of the broadest Gaussian is about 86 eV in both HCs. In Ar/D{sub 2}/H{sub 2} gas mixtures, the energies are in the range from 33 eV to 47 eV, but with much larger contribution of this Gaussian to the Balmer alpha profile. In discharges with hydrogen isotopes, the energy derived from the medium-width Gaussian is in the range from 4 eV to 6 eV, while in gas mixtures it is between 1 eV and 2 eV. The width of the narrowest Gaussian slightly exceeds the instrumental broadening and it is always below 0.5 eV.

  14. Effect of the electric field of the anode sheath on the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Pal', A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Suetin, N. V.; Timofeev, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.

    2007-01-15

    Arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes on silicon substrates were grown in the anode sheath of a dc glow discharge. In order to clarify the role of the electric field in the growth of nanotubes, numerical simulations of charged particle transport in the anode sheath were carried out in the drift-diffusion approximation. The distributions of the charged particle density and electric field are obtained. Possible mechanisms whereby the electric field influences the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes are analyzed. It is found that the nanotubes grow in the region in which the electric field is enhanced due to the depletion of positive ions in the anode sheath.

  15. Silk-regulated hierarchical hollow magnetite/carbon nanocomposite spheroids for lithium-ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Weiqin; Zhu, Guobin; Kaplan, David L; Cao, Chuanbao; Zhu, Hesun; Lu, Qiang

    2015-03-20

    Hierarchical olive-like structured carbon-Fe3O4 nanocomposite particles composed of a hollow interior and a carbon coated surface are prepared by a facile, silk protein-assisted hydrothermal method. Silk nanofibers as templates and carbon precursors first regulate the formation of hollow Fe2O3 microspheres and then they are converted into carbon by a reduction process into Fe3O4. This process significantly simplifies the fabrication and carbon coating processes to form complex hollow structures. When tested as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, these hollow carbon-coated particles exhibit high capacity (900 mAh g(-1)), excellent cycle stability (180 cycles) and rate performance due to their unique hierarchical hollow structure and carbon coating. PMID:25706314

  16. Silk-regulated hierarchical hollow magnetite/carbon nanocomposite spheroids for lithium ion battery anodes

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Weiqin; Zhu, Guobin; Kaplan, David L; Cao, Chuanbao; Zhu, Hesun

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical olive-like structured carbon-Fe3O4 nanocomposite particles composed of a hollow interior and a carbon coated surface are prepared by a facile, silk protein-assisted hydrothermal method. Silk nanofibers as templates and carbon precursors first regulate the formation of hollow Fe2O3 microspheres and then they are converted into carbon in a reduction process into Fe3O4. This process significantly simplifies the fabrication and carbon coating processes to form complex hollow structures. When tested as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, these hollow carbon-coated particles exhibite high capacity (900 mAh g−1), excellent cycle stability (180 cycles) and rate performance due to their unique hierarchical hollow structure and carbon coating. PMID:25706314

  17. Destruction of 4-phenolsulfonic acid in water by anodic contact glow discharge electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiming; An, Baigang; Wang, Shaoyan; Li, Lixiang; Jin, Wenjie; Li, Lihua

    2013-06-01

    Destruction of 4-phenolsulfonic acid (4-PSA) in water was carried out using anodic contact glow discharge electrolysis. Accompanying the decay of 4-PSA, the amount of total organic carbon (TOC) in water correspondingly decreased, while the sulfonate group of 4-PSA was released as sulfate ion. Oxalate and formate were obtained as minor by-products. Additionally, phenol, 1,4-hydroquinone, hydroxyquinol and 1,4-benzoquinone were detected as primary intermediates in the initial stages of decomposition of 4-PSA. A reaction pathway involving successive attacks of hydroxyl and hydrogen radicals was assumed on the basis of the observed products and kinetics. It was revealed that the decay of both 4-PSA and TOC obeyed a first-order rate law. The effects of different Fe ions and initial concentrations of 4-PSA on the degradation rate were investigated. It was found that the presence of Fe ions could increase the degradation rate of 4-PSA, while initial concentrations lower than 80 mmol/L had no significant effect on kinetic behaviour. The disappearance rate of 4-PSA was significantly affected by pH. PMID:24191593

  18. MoS2 coated hollow carbon spheres for anodes of lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufei; Wang, Ye; Yang, Jun; Shi, Wenhui; Yang, Huiying; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-06-01

    With the assistance of resorcinol-formaldehyde, MoS2 coated hollow carbon spheres (C@MoS2) were synthesized through a facile hydrothermal route followed by heat and alkali treatments. The measurements indicate that the hollow carbon spheres with an average diameter of 300 nm and shell thickness of 20 nm. And the hollow core are uniformly covered by ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with a length increased to 400 nm. The unique hollow structure and the synergistic effect between carbon layer and MoS2 nanosheets significantly enhance the rate capability and electrochemical stability of C@MoS2 spheres as anode material of lithium-ion battery. The synthesized C@MoS2 delivered a capacity of 750 mAh g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1. More importantly, the C@MoS2 maintained a reversible capacity of 533 mAh g-1 even at a high current density of 1000 mA g-1. The study indicated that MoS2 coated hollow carbon spheres can be promising anode material for next generation high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  19. The Effect of Anode Material and Secondary Gas Injection on Self-organized Patterns in Atmospheric Pressure Glows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovach, Yao; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    Plasma self-organization on anode surfaces in DC glow discharges remains poorly understood. This effort aims to elucidate the nature of self-organization through the study of resulting patterns on both liquid and metal electrode surfaces. Self-organization pattern formation and behavior were studied as a function of inter-electrode spacing, electrode material type, gas composition and gas flow rate using emission spectroscopy and fast camera imaging. The response of the patterns to variation in these parameters is reported. These results are used as a basis for speculating upon the underlying physical processes that give rise to the self-organization. NSF CBET 1336375.

  20. Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines in a hollow cathode glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2008-11-15

    The results of Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines from a stainless steel (SS) and copper (Cu) hollow cathode (HC) glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture are reported. The experimental profiles in ammonia discharge are fitted well by superposing three Gaussian profiles. The half widths, in energy units, of narrow and medium Gaussians are in the ranges 0.3-0.4 eV and 3-4 eV, respectively, for both hollow cathodes what is expected on the basis of earlier electron beam{yields}NH{sub 3} experiments. The half widths of the largest Gaussian in ammonia are 46 and 55 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. In argon-ammonia discharge, three Gaussians are also required to fit experimental profiles. While half widths of narrow and medium Gaussians are similar to those in ammonia, the half widths of the largest Gaussians are 35 and 42 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. The half widths of the largest Gaussians in ammonia and in argon-ammonia mixture indicate the presence of excessive Doppler broadening.

  1. Hollow silica-copper-carbon anodes using copper metal-organic frameworks as skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zixu; Xin, Fengxia; Cao, Can; Zhao, Chongchong; Shen, Cai; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Hollow silica-copper-carbon (H-SCC) nanocomposites are first synthesized using copper metal-organic frameworks as skeletons to form Cu-MOF@SiO2 and then subjected to heat treatment. In the composites, the hollow structure and the void space from the collapse of the MOF skeleton can accommodate the huge volume change, buffer the mechanical stress caused by lithium ion insertion/extraction and maintain the structural integrity of the electrode and a long cycling stability. The ultrafine copper with a uniform size of around 5 nm and carbon with homogeneous distribution from the decomposition of the MOF skeleton can not only enhance the electrical conductivity of the composite and preserve the structural and interfacial stabilization, but also suppress the aggregation of silica nanoparticles and cushion the volume change. In consequence, the resulting material as an anode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) delivers a reversible capacity of 495 mA h g-1 after 400 cycles at a current density of 500 mA g-1. The synthetic method presented in this paper provides a facile and low-cost strategy for the large-scale production of hollow silica/copper/carbon nanocomposites as an anode in LIBs.Hollow silica-copper-carbon (H-SCC) nanocomposites are first synthesized using copper metal-organic frameworks as skeletons to form Cu-MOF@SiO2 and then subjected to heat treatment. In the composites, the hollow structure and the void space from the collapse of the MOF skeleton can accommodate the huge volume change, buffer the mechanical stress caused by lithium ion insertion/extraction and maintain the structural integrity of the electrode and a long cycling stability. The ultrafine copper with a uniform size of around 5 nm and carbon with homogeneous distribution from the decomposition of the MOF skeleton can not only enhance the electrical conductivity of the composite and preserve the structural and interfacial stabilization, but also suppress the aggregation of silica nanoparticles and

  2. Hollow Cobalt Selenide Microspheres: Synthesis and Application as Anode Materials for Na-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Ko, You Na; Choi, Seung Ho; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-03-16

    The electrochemical properties of hollow cobalt oxide and cobalt selenide microspheres are studied for the first time as anode materials for Na-ion batteries. Hollow cobalt oxide microspheres prepared by one-pot spray pyrolysis are transformed into hollow cobalt selenide microspheres by a simple selenization process using hydrogen selenide gas. Ultrafine nanocrystals of Co3O4 microspheres are preserved in the cobalt selenide microspheres selenized at 300 °C. The initial discharge capacities for the Co3O4 and cobalt selenide microspheres selenized at 300 and 400 °C are 727, 595, and 586 mA h g(-1), respectively, at a current density of 500 mA g(-1). The discharge capacities after 40 cycles for the same samples are 348, 467, and 251 mA h g(-1), respectively, and their capacity retentions measured from the second cycle onward are 66, 91, and 50%, respectively. The hollow cobalt selenide microspheres have better rate performances than the hollow cobalt oxide microspheres. PMID:26918934

  3. Modification of polyethylene powder with an organic precursor in a spiral conveyor by hollow cathode glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quitzau, M.; Wolter, M.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Kersten, H.; Faupel, F.

    2010-06-01

    Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) films were deposited on polyethylene (PE, (C2H4)n) powder by hollow cathode glow discharge. The reactive species in different HMDSO/Ar plasmas were studied by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Increasing the HMDSO fraction in the gas mixture additional compounds like CHx, OH, SiC and SiO can be identified. After deposition the formed silicon and carbon containing groups (C-O, C=O, SiC and SiO) on the PE powder surface have been analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Changes in wettability depending on the HMDSO fraction were investigated by contact angle measurements (CAM). The free surface energy of the PE powder decreases with increasing HMDSO fraction in the process gas and encapsulation of the powder particles occurs. An aging effect of the plasma treated PE surface was observed depending on the process gas composition. The higher the HMDSO fraction the less is the aging effect of the plasma treated PE surface.

  4. Hollow Structured Silicon Anodes with Stabilized Solid Electrolyte Interphase Film for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiuliang; Liu, Yuan; Ma, Tianyi; Zhu, Wentao; Qiu, Xinping

    2015-10-28

    Silicon has been considered as a promising anode material for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries due to its high specific capacity. Its huge volume expansion during the alloying reaction with lithium spoils the stability of the interface between electrode and electrolyte, resulting in capacity degradation. Herein, we synthesized a novel hollow structured silicon material with interior space for accumulating the volume change during the lithiation. The as-prepared material shows excellent cycling stability, with a reversible capacity of ∼1650 m Ah g(-1) after 100 cycles, corresponding to 92% retention. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were carried out to monitor the growth of SEI film, and the results confirm the stable solid electrolyte interphase film on the surface of hollow structured silicon. PMID:26402521

  5. Comparison of Cu-II 781 nm lasers using high-voltage hollow-cathode and hollow-anode-cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Peard, K.A.; Tobin, R.C. . Dept. of Physics); Donko, Z.; Rozsa, K. ); Szalai, L. )

    1994-09-01

    Voltage-current characteristics and the Cu-II 780.8 nm laser performances are described for a novel segmented hollow cathode and for three- and four-slot hollow-anode cathode (HAC) tubes. Each of these operate at a higher voltage and with higher slope resistance than a conventional hollow cathode and produce improved laser performance. The best laser performance is obtained with the segmented tube. The application of a longitudinal magnetic field raises the discharge voltage and enhances the laser performance for the segmented tube and raises the voltage for the four-slot HAC tube. The magnetic field lowers the voltage and reduces the laser performance with the three-slot HAC tube. The voltage effects are attributed to the deflection of the fast electrons by the magnetic field and represent experimental evidence for the oscillation of electrons in a hollow-cathode discharge.

  6. Electrochemical engineering of hollow nanoarchitectures: pulse/step anodization (Si, Al, Ti) and their applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaiying; Liu, Guohua; Hoivik, Nils; Johannessen, Erik; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2014-03-01

    Hollow nanoarchitectured materials with straight channels play a crucial role in the fields of renewable energy, environment and biotechnology due to their one-dimensional morphology and extraordinary properties. The current challenge is the difficulty on tailoring hollow nanoarchitectures with well-controlled morphology at a relatively low cost. As a conventional technique, electrochemistry exhibits its unique advantage on machining nanostructures. In this review, we present the progress of electrochemistry as a valuable tool in construction of novel hollow nanoarchitectures through pulse/step anodization, such as surface pre-texturing, modulated, branched and multilayered pore architectures, and free-standing membranes. Basic principles for electrochemical engineering of mono- or multi-ordered nanostructures as well as free-standing membranes are extracted from specific examples (i.e. porous silicon, aluminum and titanium oxide). The potential of such nanoarchitectures are further demonstrated for the applications of photovoltaics, water splitting, organic degradation, nanostructure templates, biosensors and drug release. The electrochemical techniques provide a powerful approach to produce nanostructures with morphological complexity, which could have far-reaching implications in the design of future nanoscale systems. PMID:24292021

  7. Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} hollow nanospheres as anode material for enhanced performance in lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sasidharan, Manickam; Gunawardhana, Nanda; Yoshio, Masaki; Nakashima, Kenichi

    2012-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} hollow nanosphere constructed electrode delivers high capacity of 172 mAh g{sup −1} after 250 cycles and maintains structural integrity and excellent cycling stability. Highlights: ► Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} hollow nanospheres synthesis was synthesized by soft-template. ► Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} hollow nanospheres were investigated as anode material in Li-ion battery. ► Nanostructured electrode delivers high capacity of 172 mAh g{sup −1} after 250 cycles. ► The electrode maintains the structural integrity and excellent cycling stability. ► Nanosized shell domain facilitates fast lithium intercalation/deintercalation. -- Abstract: Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} hollow nanospheres of average diameter ca. ∼29 nm and hollow cavity size ca. 17 nm were synthesized using polymeric micelles with core–shell–corona architecture under mild conditions. The hollow particles were thoroughly characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal (TG/DTA) and nitrogen adsorption analyses. Thus obtained Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} hollow nanospheres were investigated as anode materials for lithium ion rechargeable batteries for the first time. The nanostructured electrode delivers high capacity of 172 mAh g{sup −1} after 250 cycles of charge/discharge at a rate of 0.5 C. More importantly, the hollow particles based electrodes maintains the structural integrity and excellent cycling stability even after exposing to high current density 6.25 A g{sup −1}. The enhanced electrochemical behavior is ascribed to hollow cavity coupled with nanosized Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} shell domain that facilitates fast lithium intercalation/deintercalation kinetics.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of the plasma in a hollow anode with an incorporated ferroelectric plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Krokhmal, A.; Gleizer, J.Z.; Krasik, Ya.E.; Yarmolich, D.; Felsteiner, J.; Bernshtam, V.

    2004-10-01

    Spectroscopic measurements are reported of the plasma formed inside a hollow anode (HA) with a ferroelectric plasma source (FPS) incorporated in it. The HA was used as a cathode in a diode supplied by an accelerating pulse ({<=}300 kV, {<=}400 ns). It was found that the HA discharge (1.2 kA, 10 {mu}s) is accompanied by the formation of a dense ({approx_equal}8x10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}) plasma layer at the surface of the FPS. This surface plasma serves as a practically unlimited source of electrons. In the bulk of the HA plasma the density is {approx_equal}3x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and it remains the same during the accelerating pulse whereas the plasma electron temperature increases from 4 to 11 eV.

  9. Process for thermal imaging scanning of a swaged heater for an anode subassembly of a hollow cathode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for thermal imaging scanning of a swaged heater of an anode subassembly of a hollow cathode assembly, comprising scanning a swaged heater with a thermal imaging radiometer to measure a temperature distribution of the heater; raising the current in a power supply to increase the temperature of the swaged heater; and measuring the swaged heater temperature using the radiometer, whereupon the temperature distribution along the length of the heater shall be less than plus or minus 5 degrees C.

  10. Hollow Porous SiO2 Nanocubes Towards High-performance Anodes for Lithium-ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Nan; Wang, Fang; Zhong, Hao; Li, Yan; Wang, Yu; Hu, Lin; Chen, Qianwang

    2013-01-01

    The high theoretical capacity and low discharge potential of silicon have attracted much attention on Si-based anodes. Herein, hollow porous SiO2 nanocubes have been prepared via a two-step hard-template process and evaluated as electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. The hollow porous SiO2 nanocubes exhibited a reversible capacity of 919 mAhg−1 over 30 cycles. The reasonable property could be attributed to the unique hollow nanostructure with large volume interior and numerous crevices in the shell, which could accommodate the volume change and alleviate the structural strain during Li ions' insertion and extraction, as well as allow rapid access of Li ions during charge/discharge cycling. It is found that the formation of irreversible or reversible lithium silicates in the anodes determines the capacity of a deep-cycle battery, fast transportation of Li ions in hollow porous SiO2 nanocubes is beneficial to the formation of Li2O and Si, contributing to the high reversible capacity. PMID:23535780

  11. Broad beam gas ion source with hollow cathode discharge and four-grid accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Deli; Pu, Shihao; Huang, Qi; Tong, Honghui; Cui, Xirong; Chu, Paul K.

    2007-04-01

    A broad beam gas ion source based on low-pressure hollow cathode glow discharge is described. An axial magnetic filed produced by AlNiCo permanent magnets enhances the glow discharge in the ion source as a result of the magnetizing electrons between the hollow cathode and rod anode. The gas plasma is produced by magnetron hollow cathode glow discharge in the hollow cathode and a collimated broad ion beam is extracted by a four-grid accelerator system. A weak magnetic field of several millitesla is enough to ignite the magnetron glow discharge at pressure lower than 0.1 Pa, thereby enabling stable and continuous high-current discharge to form the homogeneous plasma. A four-grid accelerator, which separates the extraction and acceleration of the ion beam, is used in this design to generate the high-energy ion beam from 10 keV to 60 keV at a working pressure of 10-4 Torr. Although a higher gas pressure is necessary to maintain the low-pressure glow discharge when compared to hot filament discharge, the hollow cathode ion source is operational with reactive gases such as oxygen in the high-voltage continuous mode. A laterally uniform ion beam can be achieved by using the four-grid accelerator system. The effects of the rod anode length on the characteristics of the plasma discharge as well as ion beam extraction from the ion source are discussed.

  12. Synthesis of Hollow Nanorods of SiO2 Anode Material by AAO Template Synthesis Method for Lithium Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Gi-Won; Kim, Cheong; Jang, Byeong-Chan; Yang, Su-Bin; Son, Jong-Tae

    2015-11-01

    Silicon oxide hollow nanorods (SiO2-HNs) were prepared via a two-step anodization of aluminum template. SiO2 was synthesized using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as the Si source that has not been applied to the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template method. The SiO2-HNs obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical test. The results show that SiO2 nanorods with hollow morphology were successfully formed by the AAO template. The SiO2-HNs were investigated as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries and delivered an initial reversible capacity of 1344.26 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 17 mAg(-1). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the synthesis of SiO2-HN using TEOS as the Si source by a two-step anodization of AAO template. PMID:26726592

  13. Graphitic Carbon Conformal Coating of Mesoporous TiO2 Hollow Spheres for High-Performance Lithium Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Li, Wei; Shen, Dengke; Zhao, Dongyuan; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-10-14

    Rational design and controllable synthesis of TiO2 based materials with unique microstructure, high reactivity, and excellent electrochemical performance for lithium ion batteries are crucially desired. In this paper, we developed a versatile route to synthesize hollow TiO2/graphitic carbon (H-TiO2/GC) spheres with superior electrochemical performance. The as-prepared mesoporous H-TiO2/GC hollow spheres present a high specific surface area (298 m(2) g(-1)), a high pore volume (0.31 cm(3) g(-1)), a large pore size (∼5 nm), well-defined hollow structure (monodispersed size of 600 nm and inner diameter of ∼400 nm, shell thickness of 100 nm), and small nanocrystals of anatase TiO2 (∼8 nm) conformably encapsulated in ultrathin graphitic carbon layers. As a result, the H-TiO2/GC hollow spheres achieve excellent electrochemical reactivity and stability as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. A high specific capacity of 137 mAh g(-1) can be achieved up to 1000 cycles at a current density of 1 A g(-1) (5 C). We believe that the mesoporous H-TiO2/GC hollow spheres are expected to be applied as a high-performance electrode material for next generation lithium ion batteries. PMID:26414170

  14. A novel anode comprised of C&N co-doped Co3O4 hollow nanofibres with excellent performance for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunshuang; Chen, Gang; Sun, Jingxue; Zhou, Xin; Lv, Chade

    2016-07-20

    C&N co-doped Co3O4 hollow nanofibres are prepared by combining the electrospinning technique and the hydrothermal method, which show a high reversible capacity and excellent cycling stability as anode materials for Li-ion batteries. DFT calculations give a good explanation for the experimentally enhanced conductivity in C&N co-doped Co3O4 hollow nanofibres. PMID:27389924

  15. Growth of Hollow Transition Metal (Fe, Co, Ni) Oxide Nanoparticles on Graphene Sheets through Kirkendall Effect as Anodes for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianbo; Qu, Bin; Zhao, Yang; Li, Chunyan; Chen, Yujin; Sun, Chunwen; Gao, Peng; Zhu, Chunling

    2016-01-26

    A general strategy based on the nanoscale Kirkendall effect has been developed to grow hollow transition metal (Fe, Co or Ni) oxide nanoparticles on graphene sheets. When applied as lithium-ion battery anodes, these hollow transition metal oxide-based composites exhibit excellent electrochemical performance, with high reversible capacities and long-term stabilities at a high current density, superior to most transition metal oxides reported to date. PMID:26502895

  16. Hollow carbon nanospheres/silicon/alumina core-shell film as an anode for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Yao, Fei; Bae, Jung Jun; Chang, Jian; Zamfir, Mihai Robert; Le, Duc Toan; Pham, Duy Tho; Yue, Hongyan; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-01-01

    Hollow carbon nanospheres/silicon/alumina (CNS/Si/Al2O3) core-shell films obtained by the deposition of Si and Al2O3 on hollow CNS interconnected films are used as the anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. The hollow CNS film acts as a three dimensional conductive substrate and provides void space for silicon volume expansion during electrochemical cycling. The Al2O3 thin layer is beneficial to the reduction of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation. Moreover, as-designed structure holds the robust surface-to-surface contact between Si and CNSs, which facilitates the fast electron transport. As a consequence, the electrode exhibits high specific capacity and remarkable capacity retention simultaneously: 1560 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 1 A g−1 with the capacity retention of 85% and an average decay rate of 0.16% per cycle. The superior battery properties are further confirmed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance measurement. PMID:25564245

  17. Hollow/porous nanostructures derived from nanoscale metal-organic frameworks towards high performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; Chen, Qianwang

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), owing to their high energy density, light weight, and long cycle life, have shown considerable promise for storage devices. The successful utilization of LIBs depends strongly on the preparation of nanomaterials with outstanding lithium storage properties. Recent progress has demonstrated that hollow/porous nanostructured oxides are very attractive candidates for LIBs anodes due to their high storage capacities. Here, we aim to provide an overview of nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs)-templated synthesis of hollow/porous nanostructured oxides and their LIBs applications. By choosing some typical NMOFs as examples, we present a comprehensive summary of synthetic procedures for nanostructured oxides, such as binary, ternary and composite oxides. Hollow/porous structures are readily obtained due to volume loss and release of internally generated gas molecules during the calcination of NMOFs in air. Interestingly, the NMOFs-derived hollow/porous structures possess several special features: pores generated from gas molecules release will connect to each other, which are distinct from ``dead pores'' pore size often appears to be <10 nm; in terms of surface chemistry, the pore surface is hydrophobic. These structural features are believed to be the most critical factors that determine LIBs' performance. Indeed, it has been shown that these NMOFs-derived hollow/porous oxides exhibit excellent electrochemical performance as anode materials for LIBs, including high storage capacity, good cycle stability, and so on. For example, a high charge capacity of 1465 mA h g-1 at a rate of 300 mA g-1 was observed after 50 cycles for NMOFs-derived Co3O4 porous nanocages, which corresponds to 94.09% of the initial capacity (1557 mA h g-1), indicating excellent stability. The capacity of NMOFs-derived Co3O4 is higher than that of other Co3O4 nanostructures obtained by a conventional two-step route, including nanosheets (1450 mA h g-1 at 50 mA g-1

  18. Periodic organosilica hollow nanospheres as anode materials for lithium ion rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasidharan, Manickam; Nakashima, Kenichi; Gunawardhana, Nanda; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Ito, Masanori; Inoue, Masamichi; Yusa, Shin-Ichi; Yoshio, Masaki; Tatsumi, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    Polymeric micelles with core-shell-corona architecture have been found to be the efficient colloidal templates for synthesis of periodic organosilica hollow nanospheres over a broad pH range from acidic to alkaline media. In alkaline medium, poly (styrene-b-[3-(methacryloylamino)propyl] trimethylammonium chloride-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PMAPTAC-PEO) micelles yield benzene-silica hollow nanospheres with molecular scale periodicity of benzene groups in the shell domain of hollow particles. Whereas, an acidic medium (pH 4) produces diverse hollow particles with benzene, ethylene, and a mixture of ethylene and dipropyldisulfide bridging functionalities using poly(styrene-b-2-vinyl pyridine-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PVP-PEO) micelles. These hollow particles were thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTA), Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si MAS NMR and 13CP-MAS NMR), Raman spectroscopy, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses. The benzene-silica hollow nanospheres with molecular scale periodicity in the shell domain exhibit higher cycling performance of up to 300 cycles in lithium ion rechargeable batteries compared with micron-sized dense benzene-silica particles.Polymeric micelles with core-shell-corona architecture have been found to be the efficient colloidal templates for synthesis of periodic organosilica hollow nanospheres over a broad pH range from acidic to alkaline media. In alkaline medium, poly (styrene-b-[3-(methacryloylamino)propyl] trimethylammonium chloride-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PMAPTAC-PEO) micelles yield benzene-silica hollow nanospheres with molecular scale periodicity of benzene groups in the shell domain of hollow particles. Whereas, an acidic medium (pH 4) produces diverse hollow particles with benzene, ethylene, and a mixture of ethylene and

  19. A unique hollow Li3VO4/carbon nanotube composite anode for high rate long-life lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Qidong; Sheng, Jinzhi; Wei, Qiulong; An, Qinyou; Wei, Xiujuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Mai, Liqiang

    2014-10-01

    A unique hollow Li3VO4/CNT composite is synthesized via a facile method as an anode material in lithium batteries. Our work opens up the way for a promising material with high rate capability and good cycling stability due to its efficient Li(+) diffusion and relatively high structure stability. PMID:25155363

  20. Study of nonlinear oscillations in a glow discharge plasma using empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert Huang transform

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, A. M.; Sekar Iyengar, A. N.; Janaki, M. S.

    2013-02-15

    Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) based time series analysis was carried out on nonlinear floating potential fluctuations obtained from hollow cathode glow discharge plasma in the presence of anode glow. HHT was used to obtain contour plots and the presence of nonlinearity was studied. Frequency shift with time, which is a typical nonlinear behaviour, was detected from the contour plots. Various plasma parameters were measured and the concepts of correlation coefficients and the physical contribution of each intrinsic mode function have been discussed. Physically important quantities such as instantaneous energy and their uses in studying physical phenomena such as intermittency and non-stationary data have also been discussed.

  1. Si nanoparticles encapsulated in elastic hollow carbon fibres for Li-ion battery anodes with high structural stability.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shan; Shen, Laifa; Tong, Zhenkun; Zheng, Hao; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2015-04-28

    Silicon has a large specific capacity which is an order of magnitude beyond that of conventional graphite, making it a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries. However, the large volume changes (∼ 300%) during cycling caused material pulverization and instability of the solid-electrolyte interphase resulting in poor cyclability which prevented its commercial application. Here, we have prepared a novel one-dimensional core-shell nanostructure in which the Si nanoparticles have been confined within hollow carbon nanofibres. Such a unique nanostructure exhibits high conductivity and facile ion transport, and the uniform pores within the particles which are generated during magnesiothermic reduction can serve as a buffer zone to accommodate the large volume changes of Si during electrochemical lithiation. Owing to these advantages, the composite shows high rate performance and good cycling stability. The optimum design of the core-shell nanostructure shows promise for the synthesis of a variety of high-performance electrode materials. PMID:25826238

  2. Design and initial results from a kilojoule level dense plasma focus with hollow anode and cylindrically symmetric gas puff

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, J. L. Falabella, S.; Tang, V.; Schmidt, A.; Guethlein, G.; Hawkins, S.; Rusnak, B.

    2014-01-15

    We have designed and built a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) Z-pinch device using a kJ-level capacitor bank and a hollow anode, and fueled by a cylindrically symmetric gas puff. Using this device, we have measured peak deuteron beam energies of up to 400 keV at 0.8 kJ capacitor bank energy and pinch lengths of ∼6 mm, indicating accelerating fields greater than 50 MV/m. Neutron yields of on the order of 10{sup 7} per shot were measured during deuterium operation. The cylindrical gas puff system permitted simultaneous operation of DPF with a radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator for beam-into-plasma experiments. This paper describes the machine design, the diagnostic systems, and our first results.

  3. Porous hollow carbon spheres decorated with molybdenum diselenide nanosheets as anodes for highly reversible lithium and sodium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xing; Zhang, Zhian; Fu, Yun; Li, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Porous hollow carbon spheres (PHCS) decorated with MoSe2 nanosheets (MoSe2@ PHCS) are synthesized via a three-step process. Uniform and conformal MoSe2 nanosheets are firmly attached to PHCS according to the characterization of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. Enhanced electrochemical performance of MoSe2@PHCS is investigated in lithium-ion and sodium-ion storage. The MoSe2@PHCS deliver a reversible lithium storage capacity of 681 mA h g-1 for 100 discharge/charge cycles. In Na-ion batteries, it manifests a reversible sodium capacity of 580 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles. Three synergic effects can be attributed to the enhanced electrochemical performance of MoSe2@PHCS: (1) both the sheet structure of the MoSe2 and the mechanically robust carbon sphere supporter can accommodate stress from cycling; (2) the porous hollow carbon spheres matrix in the MoSe2@PHCS offers a beneficial conductivity environment; (3) uniform and conformal MoSe2 nanosheets attachment shortens the electronic lithium-ion and sodium-ion pathway during cycling. The MoSe2@PHCS have a great potential as an anode for lithium and sodium batteries.Porous hollow carbon spheres (PHCS) decorated with MoSe2 nanosheets (MoSe2@ PHCS) are synthesized via a three-step process. Uniform and conformal MoSe2 nanosheets are firmly attached to PHCS according to the characterization of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. Enhanced electrochemical performance of MoSe2@PHCS is investigated in lithium-ion and sodium-ion storage. The MoSe2@PHCS deliver a reversible lithium storage capacity of 681 mA h g-1 for 100 discharge/charge cycles. In Na-ion batteries, it manifests a reversible sodium capacity of 580 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles. Three synergic effects can be attributed to the enhanced electrochemical performance of MoSe2@PHCS: (1) both the sheet

  4. Experimental studies of anode sheath phenomena in a Hall thruster discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    Both electron-repelling and electron-attracting anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were characterized by measuring the plasma potential with biased and emissive probes [L. Dorf, Y. Raitses, V. Semenov, and N. J. Fisch, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 1070 (2004)]. In the present work, two-dimensional structures of the plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster with clean and dielectrically coated anodes are identified. Possible mechanisms of anode sheath formation in a Hall thruster are analyzed. The path for current closure to the anode appears to be the determining factor in the anode sheath formation process. The main conclusion of this work is that the anode sheath formation in Hall thrusters differs essentially from that in the other gas discharge devices, such as a glow discharge or a hollow anode, because the Hall thruster utilizes long electron residence times to ionize rather than high neutral pressures.

  5. Experimental studies of anode sheath phenomena in a Hall thruster discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-05-15

    Both electron-repelling and electron-attracting anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were characterized by measuring the plasma potential with biased and emissive probes [L. Dorf, Y. Raitses, V. Semenov, and N. J. Fisch, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 1070 (2004)]. In the present work, two-dimensional structures of the plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster with clean and dielectrically coated anodes are identified. Possible mechanisms of anode sheath formation in a Hall thruster are analyzed. The path for current closure to the anode appears to be the determining factor in the anode sheath formation process. The main conclusion of this work is that the anode sheath formation in Hall thrusters differs essentially from that in the other gas discharge devices, such as a glow discharge or a hollow anode, because the Hall thruster utilizes long electron residence times to ionize rather than high neutral pressures.

  6. Experimental Studies of Anode Sheath Phenomena in a Hall Thruster Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2004-12-17

    Both electron-repelling and electron-attracting anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were characterized by measuring the plasma potential with biased and emissive probes [L. Dorf, Y. Raitses, V. Semenov, and N.J. Fisch, Appl. Phys. Let. 84 (2004) 1070]. In the present work, two-dimensional structures of the plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster with clean and dielectrically coated anodes are identified. Possible mechanisms of anode sheath formation in a Hall thruster are analyzed. The path for current closure to the anode appears to be the determining factor in the anode sheath formation process. The main conclusion of this work is that the anode sheath formation in Hall thrusters differs essentially from that in the other gas discharge devices, like a glow discharge or a hollow anode, because the Hall thruster utilizes long electron residence times to ionize rather than high neutral pressures.

  7. Graphitic Carbon-Coated FeSe2 Hollow Nanosphere-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid Nanofibers as an Efficient Anode Material for Sodium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-04-01

    A novel one-dimensional nanohybrid comprised of conductive graphitic carbon (GC)-coated hollow FeSe2 nanospheres decorating reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanofiber (hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO) was designed as an efficient anode material for sodium ion batteries and synthesized by introducing the nanoscale Kirkendall effect into the electrospinning method. The electrospun nanofibers transformed into hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hybrid nanofibers through a Fe@GC–rGO intermediate. The discharge capacities of the bare FeSe2 nanofibers, nanorod FeSe2–rGO–amorphous carbon (AC) hybrid nanofibers, and hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hyrbid nanofibers at a current density of 1 A g‑1 for the 150th cycle were 63, 302, and 412 mA h g‑1, respectively, and their corresponding capacity retentions measured from the 2nd cycle were 11, 73, and 82%, respectively. The hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hybrid nanofibers delivered a high discharge capacity of 352 mA h g‑1 even at an extremely high current density of 10 A g‑1. The enhanced electrochemical properties of the hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO composite nanofibers arose from the synergetic effects of the FeSe2 hollow morphology and highly conductive rGO matrix.

  8. Graphitic Carbon-Coated FeSe2 Hollow Nanosphere-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid Nanofibers as an Efficient Anode Material for Sodium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    A novel one-dimensional nanohybrid comprised of conductive graphitic carbon (GC)-coated hollow FeSe2 nanospheres decorating reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanofiber (hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO) was designed as an efficient anode material for sodium ion batteries and synthesized by introducing the nanoscale Kirkendall effect into the electrospinning method. The electrospun nanofibers transformed into hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hybrid nanofibers through a Fe@GC–rGO intermediate. The discharge capacities of the bare FeSe2 nanofibers, nanorod FeSe2–rGO–amorphous carbon (AC) hybrid nanofibers, and hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hyrbid nanofibers at a current density of 1 A g−1 for the 150th cycle were 63, 302, and 412 mA h g−1, respectively, and their corresponding capacity retentions measured from the 2nd cycle were 11, 73, and 82%, respectively. The hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hybrid nanofibers delivered a high discharge capacity of 352 mA h g−1 even at an extremely high current density of 10 A g−1. The enhanced electrochemical properties of the hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO composite nanofibers arose from the synergetic effects of the FeSe2 hollow morphology and highly conductive rGO matrix. PMID:27033096

  9. Promotional role of B2O3 in enhancing hollow SnO2 anode performance for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruiqing; Li, Deyu; Tian, Dong; Xia, Guofeng; Wang, Chen; Xiao, Ning; Li, Ning; Mack, Nathan H.; Li, Qing; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    A composite anode consisting of hollow SnO2 microspheres covered by glass-like B2O3 layers was prepared via a combined hydrothermal-impregnation method, which results in much improved electrochemical performance in lithium ion batteries, relative to pristine SnO2 anodes. The cycling and rate capabilities of the SnO2-B2O3 composite anodes were investigated as a function of B2O3 content. The balance between increased electron-acceptor effect and compromised electronic conductivity due to addition of B2O3 is maximized around 20 wt% B2O3 loading. The best performing SnO2-B2O3 composite anode exhibits a specific capacity of 622.7 mAh g-1 up to 160 cycles, and is able to maintain a capacity above 528.6 mAh g-1 at rate of 5C. These enhanced performance characteristics are attributed to the unique composite structures consisting of the hollow SnO2 cores and the B2O3 buffer layers, which likely are beneficial for reducing the overall volume changes. Importantly, the decreased charge transfer resistance and increased Li+ diffusion coefficient, resulting from B2O3 coating, lead to overall improvement of rate performance for the composite anodes. Such-fabricated composite structures are stable during the Li+ insertion/extraction, thereby promoting cycling stability.

  10. Kirkendall-effect-based growth of dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures for lithium-ion battery anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yingying; Huang Xintang; Wang Kai; Liu Jinping; Jiang Jian; Ding Ruimin; Ji Xiaoxu; Li Xin

    2010-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures have been prepared via a Kirkendall-effect-based approach for the first time and have been demonstrated as a high-performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The as-prepared hollow structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical properties. A CuO hollow structure composed of nanocubes outside and a dense film inside was selected as a typical example of the optimized design; it exhibited significantly improved cyclability at a current rate of 0.5 C, with the average Coulombic efficiency of {approx}97.0% and 57.9% retention of the discharge capacity of the second cycle after 50 cycles. The correlation between the structure features of the hollow CuO and their electrochemical behavior was discussed in detail. Smaller size of primary structure and larger internal space of electrode materials are crucial to better electrochemical performance. This work represents that Kirkendall effect is a promising method to fabricate excellent hollow electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: SEM images of 3D dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures prepared via a Kirkendall-effect-based approach have been shown. The as-prepared CuO electrode exhibited significantly improved cyclability for Li-ion batteries.

  11. Metal-organic framework derived porous CuO/Cu2O composite hollow octahedrons as high performance anode materials for sodium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Qin, Wei; Li, Dongsheng; Yan, Dong; Hu, Bingwen; Sun, Zhuo; Pan, Likun

    2015-11-25

    Porous CuO/Cu2O composite hollow octahedrons were synthesized simply by annealing Cu-based metal-organic framework templates. When evaluated as anode materials for sodium ion batteries, they exhibit a high maximum reversible capacity of 415 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles at 50 mA g(-1) with excellent cycling stability and good rate capability. PMID:26412211

  12. CuO/Cu2O composite hollow polyhedrons fabricated from metal-organic framework templates for lithium-ion battery anodes with a long cycling life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; Huang, Yimin; Zhang, Fapei; Chen, Qianwang

    2013-05-01

    Novel CuO/Cu2O hollow polyhedrons with porous shells were fabricated by thermal decomposition of coordination compound [Cu3(btc)2]n (btc = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) polyhedrons at 350 °C. When tested as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, these hollow polyhedrons exhibited a reversible lithium storage capacity as high as 740 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1 after 250 cycles even if the charge-discharge process is stopped for one week during the test time.Novel CuO/Cu2O hollow polyhedrons with porous shells were fabricated by thermal decomposition of coordination compound [Cu3(btc)2]n (btc = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) polyhedrons at 350 °C. When tested as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, these hollow polyhedrons exhibited a reversible lithium storage capacity as high as 740 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1 after 250 cycles even if the charge-discharge process is stopped for one week during the test time. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and characterization: Fig. S1-S8. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00623a

  13. A dual-structured anode/Ni-mesh current collector hollow fibre for micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Wu, Zhentao; Li, K.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a unique dual-structured hollow fibre design has been developed for micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs), using a single-step phase-inversion assisted co-extrusion technique. The dual-structured design consists of an outer anode layer and an inner anodic current collecting layer that are formed simultaneously during fabrication. Meanwhile, a plurality of micro-channels initiating from the exterior surface of the anode layer penetrate through the two layers, forming a highly asymmetric anode and a mesh current collecting layer, which significantly facilitates the gas transport. With the increasing thickness of the current collecting layer (approximately 15-60 μm), electrical conductivity increases from 1.9 × 104 S cm-1 to 4.0 × 104 S cm-1, while the mechanical strength drops slightly from approximately 168-113 MPa due to its 'dragging effect' during co-sintering. The benefits of improved current collection may potentially overweigh the reduced mechanical property, especially when dual-structured hollow fibres of this type are bundled together to form a stack. Moreover, benefiting from this innovative design, sustainable development of a larger scale of MT-SOFC stack or system becomes less challenging, since technical issues, such as concentration polarization and efficient current collection, hampering the MT-SOFC system design, can be completely overcome.

  14. Kirkendall-effect-based growth of dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures for lithium-ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yingying; Huang, Xintang; Wang, Kai; Liu, Jinping; Jiang, Jian; Ding, Ruimin; Ji, Xiaoxu; Li, Xin

    2010-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures have been prepared via a Kirkendall-effect-based approach for the first time and have been demonstrated as a high-performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The as-prepared hollow structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical properties. A CuO hollow structure composed of nanocubes outside and a dense film inside was selected as a typical example of the optimized design; it exhibited significantly improved cyclability at a current rate of 0.5 C, with the average Coulombic efficiency of ˜97.0% and 57.9% retention of the discharge capacity of the second cycle after 50 cycles. The correlation between the structure features of the hollow CuO and their electrochemical behavior was discussed in detail. Smaller size of primary structure and larger internal space of electrode materials are crucial to better electrochemical performance. This work represents that Kirkendall effect is a promising method to fabricate excellent hollow electrode materials for Li-ion batteries.

  15. Powerful glow discharge excilamp

    DOEpatents

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Panchenko, Aleksey N.; Skakun, Victor S.; Sosnin, Edward A.; Wang, Francis T.; Myers, Booth R.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A powerful glow discharge lamp comprising two coaxial tubes, the outer tube being optically transparent, with a cathode and anode placed at opposite ends of the tubes, the space between the tubes being filled with working gas. The electrodes are made as cylindrical tumblers placed in line to one other in such a way that one end of the cathode is inserted into the inner tube, one end of the anode coaxially covers the end of the outer tube, the inner tube penetrating and extending through the anode. The increased electrodes' surface area increases glow discharge electron current and, correspondingly, average radiation power of discharge plasma. The inner tube contains at least one cooling liquid tube placed along the axis of the inner tube along the entire lamp length to provide cathode cooling. The anode has a circumferential heat extracting radiator which removes heat from the anode. The invention is related to lighting engineering and can be applied for realization of photostimulated processes under the action of powerful radiation in required spectral range.

  16. Improved hydrogen ionization rate in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation by enlarging the interaction path using an insulating tube

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhuo; Zhu Ying; Li Liuhe; He Fushun; Dun Dandan; Li Fen; Lu Qiuyuan; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-02-15

    A small pointed hollow anode and large tabular cathode are used in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation (EGD-PIII). Electrons are repelled from the substrate by the electric field formed by the negative voltage pulses and concentrate in the vicinity of the anode to enhance the self-glow discharge process. To extend the application of EGD-PIII to plasma gases with low ionization rates, an insulating tube is used to increase the interaction path for electrons and neutrals in order to enhance the discharge near the anode. Results obtained from numerical simulation based on the particle-in-cell code, finite element method, and experiments show that this configuration enhances the ionization rate and subsequent ion implant fluence. The process is especially suitable for gases that have low ionization rates such as hydrogen and helium.

  17. Glowing Veggies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlin, Pirketta; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Extends the work of Weimer and Battino in electrical conductivity demonstrations creating "glowing" vegetables (see article this issue) to other vegetables and the spectra generated by other elements other than the sodium in pickle brines. Describes a study on the effect of concentration and voltage on glow intensity. (MKR)

  18. Size-controlled SnO2 hollow spheres via a template free approach as anodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, Akkisetty; Deepa, Melepurath; Rao, Tata Narasinga

    2014-08-01

    Tin oxide hollow spheres (SnO2 HS) with high structural integrity were synthesized by using a one pot hydrothermal approach with organic moieties as structure controlling agents. By adjusting the proportion of acetylacetone (AcAc) in the precursor formulation, SnO2 HS of 200 and 350 nm dimensions, with a uniform shell thickness of about 50 nm, were prepared. Using the optimized solution composition with a Sn precursor, heating duration dependent structural evolution of SnO2 was performed at a fixed temperature of 160 °C, which revealed a transition from solid spheres (1 h) to aggregated spheres (4 h) to porous spheres (10 h) to optimized HS (13 h) and finally to broken enlarged HS (24 h). A heating temperature dependent study carried out with a constant heating span of 13 h showed a metamorphosis from spheres with solid cores (140 °C) to ones with hollow cores (160 °C), culminating with fragmented HS, expanded in dimensions (180 °C). A growth mechanism was proposed for the optimized SnO2 HS (2.5 or 5.0 mL of AcAc, 160 °C, 13 h) and the performance of these HS as anodes for Li ions batteries was evaluated by electrochemical studies. The 200 nm SnO2 HS demonstrated an initial lithium storage capacity of 1055 mA h g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1, and they retained a capacity of 540 mA h g-1 after 50 charge-discharge cycles. The SnO2 HS also showed excellent rate capability as the electrode exhibited a capacity of 422 mA h g-1 even at a high current density of 2000 mA g-1. The notable capacity of SnO2 HS is a manifestation of the mono-disperse quality of the SnO2 HS coupled with the high number of electrochemically addressable sites, afforded by the large surface area of the HS and the striking cyclability is also attributed to the unique structure of HS, which is resistant to degradation upon repeated ion insertion/extraction. The SnO2 HS were also found to be luminescent, thus indicating their usefulness for not only energy storage but also for energy

  19. Hierarchical Nanocomposite of Hollow N-Doped Carbon Spheres Decorated with Ultrathin WS2 Nanosheets for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaohui; Ding, Zhengping; Ma, Cheng; Wu, Laidi; Liu, Jiatu; Chen, Libao; Ivey, Douglas G; Wei, Weifeng

    2016-07-27

    Hierarchical nanocomposite of ultrathin WS2 nanosheets uniformly attached on the surface of hollow nitrogen-doped carbon spheres (WS2@HNCSs) were successfully fabricated via a facile synthesis strategy. When evaluated as an anode material for LIBs, the hierarchical WS2@HNCSs exhibit a high specific capacity of 801.4 mA h g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1), excellent rate capability (545.6 mA h g(-1) at a high current density of 2 A g(-1)), and great cycling stability with a capacity retention of 95.8% after 150 cycles at 0.5 A g(-1). The Li-ion storage properties of our WS2@HNCSs nanocomposite are much better than those of the previously most reported WS2-based anode materials. The impressive electrochemical performance is attributed to the robust nanostructure and the favorable synergistic effect between the ultrathin (3-5 layers) WS2 nanosheets and the highly conductive hollow N-doped carbon spheres. The hierarchical hybrid can simultaneously facilitate fast electron/ion transfer, effectively accommodate mechanical stress from cycling, restrain agglomeration, and enable full utilization of the active materials. These characteristics make WS2@HNCSs a promising anode material for high-performance LIBs. PMID:27381381

  20. Flowing Liquid Anode Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge as an Excitation Source for Optical Emission Spectrometry with the Improved Detectability of Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, and Zn.

    PubMed

    Greda, Krzysztof; Swiderski, Krzysztof; Jamroz, Piotr; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-09-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in contact with a flowing liquid anode (FLA-APGD) was developed as the efficient excitation source for the optical emission spectrometry (OES) detection. Differences in the appearance and the electrical characteristic of the FLA-APGD and a conventional system operated with a flowing liquid cathode (FLC-APGD) were studied in detail and discussed. Under the optimal operating conditions for the FLA-APGD, the emission from the analytes (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, and Zn) was from 20 to 120 times higher as compared to the FLC-APGD. Limits of detections (LODs) established with a novel FLA-APGD system were on average 20 times better than those obtained for the FLC-APGD. A further improvement of the LODs was achieved by reducing the background shift interferences and, as a result, the LODs for Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, and Zn were 0.004, 0.040, 0.70, 1.7, 0.035, and 0.45 μg L(-1), respectively. The precision of the FLA-APGD-OES method was evaluated to be within 2-5% (as the relative standard deviation of the repeated measurements). The method found its application in the determination of the content of Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, and Zn in a certified reference material (CRM) of Lobster hepatopancreas (TORT-2), four brass samples as well as mineral water and tea leaves samples spiked with the analytes. In the case of brass samples, a reference method, i.e., inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was used. A good agreement between the results obtained with FLA-APGD-OES and the certified values for the CRM TORT-2 as well as the reference values obtained with ICP-OES for the brass samples was revealed, indicating the good accuracy of the proposed method. The recoveries obtained for the spiked samples of mineral water and tea leaves were within the range of 97.5-102%. PMID:27476678

  1. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; Han, Lili; Lin, Ruoqian; Xin, Huolin L.; Wu, Zexing; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize themore » particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.« less

  2. Three-dimensional hollow-structured binary oxide particles as an advanced anode material for high-rate and long cycle life lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deli; Wang, Jie; He, Huan; Han, Lili; Lin, Ruoqian; Xin, Huolin L.; Wu, Zexing; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-12-30

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising anode candidates for next-generation lithium-ion batteries for their high theoretical capacity. However, the large volume expansion and low lithium ion diffusivity leading to a poor charging/discharging performance. In this study, we developed a surfactant and template-free strategy for the synthesis of a composite of CoxFe3–xO4 hollow spheres supported by carbon nanotubes via an impregnation–reduction–oxidation process. The synergy of the composite, as well as the hollow structures in the electrode materials, not only facilitate Li ion and electron transport, but also accommodate large volume expansion. Using state-of-the-art electron tomography, we directly visualize the particles in 3-D, where the voids in the hollow structures serve to buffer the volume expansion of the material. These improvements result in a high reversible capacity as well as an outstanding rate performance for lithium-ion battery applications. As a result, this study sheds light on large-scale production of hollow structured metal oxides for commercial applications in energy storage and conversion.

  3. Ionic liquid-assisted solvothermal synthesis of hollow Mn2O3 anode and LiMn2O4 cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Wang, Jun; Jia, Haiping; Kloepsch, Richard; Liu, Haidong; Beltrop, Kolja; Li, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Mn-based Mn2O3 anode and LiMn2O4 cathode materials are prepared by a solvothermal method combined with post annealing process. Environmentally friendly ionic liquid 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate as both structure-directing agent and fluorine source is used to prepare hollow polyhedron MnF2 precursor. Both target materials Mn2O3 anode and LiMn2O4 cathode have the morphology of the MnF2 precursor. The Mn2O3 anode using carboxymethyl cellulose as binder could deliver slight better electrochemical performance than the one using poly (vinyldifluoride) as binder. The former has an initial charge capacity of 800 mAh g-1 at a current density of 101.8 mA g-1, and exhibits no obvious capacity decay for 150 cycles at 101.8 mA g-1. The LiMn2O4 cathode material prepared with molten salt assistant could display much better electrochemical performance than the one prepared without molten salt assistance. In particular, it has an initial discharge capacity of 117.5 mAh g-1 at a current density of 0.5C and good rate capability. In the field of lithium ion batteries, both the Mn2O3 anode and LiMn2O4 cathode materials could exhibit enhanced electrochemical performance due to the well formed morphology based on the ionic liquid-assisted solvothermal method.

  4. Facile synthesis and electrochemical performances of hollow graphene spheres as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ran-Ran; Zhao, Dong-Lin; Bai, Li-Zhong; Yao, Ning-Na; Xu, Li

    2014-07-01

    The hollow graphene oxide spheres have been successfully fabricated from graphene oxide nanosheets utilizing a water-in-oil emulsion technique, which were prepared from natural flake graphite by oxidation and ultrasonic treatment. The hollow graphene oxide spheres were reduced to hollow graphene spheres at 500°C for 3 h under an atmosphere of Ar(95%)/H2(5%). The first reversible specific capacity of the hollow graphene spheres was as high as 903 mAh g-1 at a current density of 50 mAh g-1. Even at a high current density of 500 mAh g-1, the reversible specific capacity remained at 502 mAh g-1. After 60 cycles, the reversible capacity was still kept at 652 mAh g-1 at the current density of 50 mAh g-1. These results indicate that the prepared hollow graphene spheres possess excellent electrochemical performances for lithium storage. The high rate performance of hollow graphene spheres thanks to the hollow structure, thin and porous shells consisting of graphene sheets.

  5. One-Pot Fabrication of Hierarchical Nanosheet-Based TiO2 -Carbon Hollow Microspheres for Anode Materials of High-Rate Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhaokui; Yang, Mu; Wang, Jingjing; Gao, Hongyi; Lu, Yunfeng; Wang, Ge

    2016-04-18

    Hierarchical and hollow nanostructures have recently attracted considerable attention because of their fantastic architectures and tunable property for facile lithium ion insertion and good cycling stability. In this study, a one-pot and unusual carving protocol is demonstrated for engineering hollow structures with a porous shell. Hierarchical TiO2 hollow spheres with nanosheet-assembled shells (TiO2 NHS) were synthesized by the sequestration between the titanium source and 2,2'-bipyridine-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid, and kinetically controlled etching in trifluoroacetic acid medium. In addition, annealing such porous nanostructures presents the advantage of imparting carbon-doped functional performance to its counterpart under different atmospheres. Such highly porous structures endow very large specifics surface area of 404 m(2)  g(-1) and 336 m(2)  g(-1) for the as-prepared and calcination under nitrogen gas. C/TiO2 NHS has high capacity of 204 mA h g(-1) at 1 C and a reversible capacity of 105 mA h g(-1) at a high rate of 20 C, and exhibits good cycling stability and superior rate capability as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26970239

  6. Design and synthesis of hollow NiCo2O4 nanoboxes as anodes for lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junfen; Ru, Qiang; Mo, Yudi; Hu, Shejun; Hou, Xianhua

    2016-07-28

    Hollow porous NiCo2O4-nanoboxes (NCO-NBs) were synthesized with zeolitic imidazolate framework-67 (ZIF-67) nanocrystals as the template followed by a subsequent annealing treatment. The structure and morphology of the NCO-NBs were characterized using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. When tested as potential anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, these porous NCO-NBs with a well-defined hollow structure manifested enhanced performance of Li storage. The discharge capacity of the NCO-NBs remained 1080 mA h g(-1) after 150 cycles at a current rate of 500 mA g(-1) and 884 mA h g(-1) could be obtained at a current density of 2000 mA g(-1) after 200 cycles. Even when cycled at a high density of 8000 mA g(-1), a comparable capacity of 630 mA h g(-1) could be achieved. Meanwhile, the Na storage behavior of NCO-NBs as anode materials of sodium ion batteries (SIBs) was initially investigated and they exhibited a high initial discharge capacity of 826 mA h g(-1), and a moderate capacity retention of 328 mA h g(-1) was retained after 30 cycles. The improved electrochemical performance for NCO-NBs could be attributed to the hierarchical hollow structure and the desirable composition, which provide enough space to alleviate volume expansion during the Li(+)/Na(+) insertion/extraction process and facilitate rapid transport of ions and electrons. PMID:27353639

  7. Co-extrusion of electrolyte/anode functional layer/anode triple-layer ceramic hollow fibres for micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells-electrochemical performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Wu, Zhentao; Li, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of an anode functional layer (AFL) with controlled thickness on physical and electrochemical properties of a micro-tubular SOFC have been systematically studied. A series of electrolyte/AFL/anode triple-layer hollow fibres with controllable AFL thicknesses (16.9-52.7 μm) have been fabricated via a single-step phase-inversion assisted co-extrusion technique. Both robustness of the cell and gas-tightness of the electrolyte layer are considerably improved by introducing the AFL of this type. The fracture force of the sample with the thickest AFL (9.67 N) almost doubles when compared to the electrolyte/anode dual-layer counterpart (5.24 N). Gas-tightness of the electrolyte layer is also considerably increased as AFL contributes to better-matched sintering behaviours between different components. Moreover, the formation of an AFL simultaneously with electrolyte and anode significantly improves the cell performances. The sample with the thinnest AFL (approximately 16.9 μm, 6% of the total anode thickness) leads to a 30% (from 0.89 to 1.21 W cm-2) increase in maximum power density, due to increased triple-phase boundaries (TPB). However, further increase in TPB from a thicker AFL is less effective for improving the cell performance, due to the substantially increased fuel diffusion resistance and subsequently higher concentration polarization. This indicates that the control over the AFL thickness is critically important in avoiding offsetting the benefits of extended TPB and consequently decreased cell performances.

  8. Three-dimensional tin dioxide/carbon composite constructed by hollow nanospheres with quasi-sandwich structures as improved anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghua; Tian, Yang; Zhang, Zhengxi; Yang, Li; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2016-02-01

    Tin dioxide (SnO2)-based materials have been considered to be promisingly alternative advanced anode materials for lithium-ion batteries and thus attracted wide attention. So far, the research focus of SnO2-based anode materials is to search and develop effective strategies for overcoming the obstacles, such as rapid capacity fading and poor rate capability, which seriously impede the practical application of SnO2-based electrodes. Herein, we have successfully combined nanoscale SnO2 with 3-dimensional carbon (C) conductivity framework to form a 3-dimensional unparalleled SnO2/C composite constructed by closely interconnected hollow nanospheres with quasi-sandwich structures. When evaluated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the as-prepared SnO2/C composite exhibits improved cycling performance and high rate capability, delivering a high capacity of 576.6 mAh g-1 at 200 mA g-1 even after 500 cycles, and a capacity of 411.7 mAh g-1 even at 5 A g-1 during rate test. The unparalleled 3-dimensional architecture should be responsible for the good electrochemical performance.

  9. Preparation of fluorine-doped, carbon-encapsulated hollow Fe3O4 spheres as an efficient anode material for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hongbo; Zhou, Qun; Pan, Yue; Gu, Hongwei; Zheng, Junwei

    2014-03-01

    Herein we report the design and synthesis of fluorine-doped, carbon-encapsulated hollow Fe3O4 spheres (h-Fe3O4@C/F) through mild heating of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-coated hollow Fe3O4 spheres. The spheres exhibit enhanced cyclic and rate performances. The as-prepared h-Fe3O4@C/F shows significantly improved electrochemical performance, with high reversible capacities of over 930 mA h g-1 at a rate of 0.1 C after 70 cycles, 800 mA h g-1 at a rate of 0.5 C after 120 cycles and 620 mA h g-1 at a rate of 1 C after 200 cycles. This improved lithium storage performance is mainly ascribed to the encapsulation of the spheres with fluorine-doped carbon, which not only improves the reaction kinetics and stability of the solid electrolyte interface film but also prevents aggregation and drastic volume change of the Fe3O4 particles. These spheres thus represent a promising anode material in lithium-ion battery applications.Herein we report the design and synthesis of fluorine-doped, carbon-encapsulated hollow Fe3O4 spheres (h-Fe3O4@C/F) through mild heating of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-coated hollow Fe3O4 spheres. The spheres exhibit enhanced cyclic and rate performances. The as-prepared h-Fe3O4@C/F shows significantly improved electrochemical performance, with high reversible capacities of over 930 mA h g-1 at a rate of 0.1 C after 70 cycles, 800 mA h g-1 at a rate of 0.5 C after 120 cycles and 620 mA h g-1 at a rate of 1 C after 200 cycles. This improved lithium storage performance is mainly ascribed to the encapsulation of the spheres with fluorine-doped carbon, which not only improves the reaction kinetics and stability of the solid electrolyte interface film but also prevents aggregation and drastic volume change of the Fe3O4 particles. These spheres thus represent a promising anode material in lithium-ion battery applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional TGA, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, EDX spectra and elemental mapping, XRD and

  10. Porous Ni0.14Mn0.86O1.43 hollow microspheres as high-performing anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhong; Yuan, Xianxia; Li, Lin; Ma, Zi-Feng; Zhang, Lei; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-09-01

    A uniformly dispersed bi-component nanocompotise of transition metal oxide (Mn2O3)/mixed transition metal oxide (NiMn2O4) with a porous and hollow microspheric sructure has been successfully prepared with a facile method based on the complexation between Ni2+ and NH3. The obtained nanocomposite of 0.29 Mn2O3/0.14 NiMn2O4, expressed as Ni0.14Mn0.86O1.43, with nanometer-sized building blocks exhibits a high reversible capacity of 615 mA h g-1, which is about 90% of theoretical value at the current density of 800 mA h g-1, and long lifespan with retained capacities of 553 and 408 mA h g-1 after 150 cycles at 200 and 800 mA g-1, respectively, as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Unique Urchin-like Ca2Ge7O16 Hierarchical Hollow Microspheres as Anode Material for the Lithium Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Feng, Chuanqi; Liu, Hua Kun; Guo, Zaiping

    2015-01-01

    Germanium is an outstanding anode material in terms of electrochemical performance, especially rate capability, but its developments are hindered by its high price because it is rare in the crust of earth, and its huge volume variation during the lithium insertion and extraction. Introducing other cheaper elements into the germanium-based material is an efficient way to dilute the high price, but normally sacrifice its electrochemical performance. By the combination of nanostructure design and cheap element (calcium) introduction, urchin-like Ca2Ge7O16 hierarchical hollow microspheres have been successfully developed in order to reduce the price and maintain the good electrochemical properties of germanium-based material. The electrochemical test results in different electrolytes show that ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate/diethyl carbonate (3/4/3 by volume) with 5 wt% fluoroethylene carbonate additive is the most suitable solvent for the electrolyte. From the electrochemical evaluation, the as-synthesized Ca2Ge7O16 hollow microspheres exhibit high reversible specific capacity of up to 804.6 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 100 cycles and remarkable rate capability of 341.3 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 4 A g(-1). The growth mechanism is proposed based on our experimental results on the growth process. PMID:26061390

  12. Unique Urchin-like Ca2Ge7O16 Hierarchical Hollow Microspheres as Anode Material for the Lithium Ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Feng, Chuanqi; Liu, Hua Kun; Guo, Zaiping

    2015-06-01

    Germanium is an outstanding anode material in terms of electrochemical performance, especially rate capability, but its developments are hindered by its high price because it is rare in the crust of earth, and its huge volume variation during the lithium insertion and extraction. Introducing other cheaper elements into the germanium-based material is an efficient way to dilute the high price, but normally sacrifice its electrochemical performance. By the combination of nanostructure design and cheap element (calcium) introduction, urchin-like Ca2Ge7O16 hierarchical hollow microspheres have been successfully developed in order to reduce the price and maintain the good electrochemical properties of germanium-based material. The electrochemical test results in different electrolytes show that ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate/diethyl carbonate (3/4/3 by volume) with 5 wt% fluoroethylene carbonate additive is the most suitable solvent for the electrolyte. From the electrochemical evaluation, the as-synthesized Ca2Ge7O16 hollow microspheres exhibit high reversible specific capacity of up to 804.6 mA h g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1 after 100 cycles and remarkable rate capability of 341.3 mA h g-1 at a current density of 4 A g-1. The growth mechanism is proposed based on our experimental results on the growth process.

  13. Preparation of fluorine-doped, carbon-encapsulated hollow Fe3O4 spheres as an efficient anode material for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hongbo; Zhou, Qun; Pan, Yue; Gu, Hongwei; Zheng, Junwei

    2014-04-01

    Herein we report the design and synthesis of fluorine-doped, carbon-encapsulated hollow Fe3O4 spheres (h-Fe3O4@C/F) through mild heating of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-coated hollow Fe3O4 spheres. The spheres exhibit enhanced cyclic and rate performances. The as-prepared h-Fe3O4@C/F shows significantly improved electrochemical performance, with high reversible capacities of over 930 mA h g(-1) at a rate of 0.1 C after 70 cycles, 800 mA h g(-1) at a rate of 0.5 C after 120 cycles and 620 mA h g(-1) at a rate of 1 C after 200 cycles. This improved lithium storage performance is mainly ascribed to the encapsulation of the spheres with fluorine-doped carbon, which not only improves the reaction kinetics and stability of the solid electrolyte interface film but also prevents aggregation and drastic volume change of the Fe3O4 particles. These spheres thus represent a promising anode material in lithium-ion battery applications. PMID:24598908

  14. Encapsulation of SnO2 nanoparticles into hollow TiO2 nanowires as high performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghua; Zhang, Zhengxi; Yang, Li; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2014-05-01

    In this work, a new nanostructure of SnO2 nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated into hollow TiO2 nanowires (SnO2@TiO2) has been successfully fabricated. This unique architecture intrinsically possess void space in between the TiO2 shell and SnO2 nanoparticle cores, as confirmed by XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM and HRTEM characterizations. The TiO2 shell of the composite can not only alleviate the pulverization and drastic volume change of the SnO2 NPs and maintain the structural integrity, but also contribute to the total capacity of the composite. Moreover, the void space can also accommodate the volume expansion of SnO2 and provide highly efficient channels for the fast transport of both electrons and lithium ion during discharge/charge cycling process. When tested as potential anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the as-prepared hollow TiO2 nanowires shell encapsulating SnO2 NPs architecture exhibits good lithium storage performance and excellent cyclability (which delivers a higher reversible capacity of 445 mAh g-1 at 800 mA g-1 after 500 cycles). The unique architecture should be responsible for the superior electrochemical performance.

  15. Unique Urchin-like Ca2Ge7O16 Hierarchical Hollow Microspheres as Anode Material for the Lithium Ion Battery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Feng, Chuanqi; Liu, Hua Kun; Guo, Zaiping

    2015-01-01

    Germanium is an outstanding anode material in terms of electrochemical performance, especially rate capability, but its developments are hindered by its high price because it is rare in the crust of earth, and its huge volume variation during the lithium insertion and extraction. Introducing other cheaper elements into the germanium-based material is an efficient way to dilute the high price, but normally sacrifice its electrochemical performance. By the combination of nanostructure design and cheap element (calcium) introduction, urchin-like Ca2Ge7O16 hierarchical hollow microspheres have been successfully developed in order to reduce the price and maintain the good electrochemical properties of germanium-based material. The electrochemical test results in different electrolytes show that ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate/diethyl carbonate (3/4/3 by volume) with 5 wt% fluoroethylene carbonate additive is the most suitable solvent for the electrolyte. From the electrochemical evaluation, the as-synthesized Ca2Ge7O16 hollow microspheres exhibit high reversible specific capacity of up to 804.6 mA h g−1 at a current density of 100 mA g−1 after 100 cycles and remarkable rate capability of 341.3 mA h g−1 at a current density of 4 A g−1. The growth mechanism is proposed based on our experimental results on the growth process. PMID:26061390

  16. Enhanced electrochemical performance of template-free carbon-coated iron(II, III) oxide hollow nanofibers as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Mi Eun; Pham-Cong, De; Kim, Ji Yoon; Choi, Hun Seok; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jong Pil; Kim, Jinwoo; Jeong, Se Young; Cho, Chae Ryong

    2015-06-01

    Carbon-coated Fe3O4 hollow nanofibers (Fe3O4/C hNFs) as a lithium ion battery anode material are prepared through electrospinning, annealing, and hydrothermal processing. At a high current density of 1000 mAg-1, the template-free Fe3O4/C hNFs exhibit high 1st- and 150th-cycle specific capacities of ∼963 and 978 mAhg-1, respectively. Moreover, Fe3O4/C hNFs have excellent and stable rate capability, compared to that of the Fe3O4 hNFs, and a capacity of 704 mAhg-1 at a current density of 2000 mAg-1. Owing to the carbon layer, the Li-ion diffusion coefficient of the Fe3O4/C hNFs, 8.10 × 10-14 cm2 s-1, is 60 times higher than that (1.33 × 10-15 cm2 s-1) of the Fe3O4 hNFs. These results indicate that Fe3O4/C hNFs may have important implications for developing high performance anodes for next-generation lithium ion batteries.

  17. Pseudo-stir bar hollow fiber solid/liquid phase microextraction combined with anodic stripping voltammetry for determination of lead and cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Hoseini, Hasan Ali; Mohammadi-Nokhandani, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Javad

    2014-11-01

    A new procedure is presented for the determination of low concentrations of lead and cadmium in water samples. Ligand assisted pseudo-stir bar hollow fiber solid/liquid phase microextraction using sol-gel sorbent reinforced with carbon nanotubes was combined with differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry for simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead in tap water, and Darongar river water samples. In the present work, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) using a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) was used in order to determine the ultra trace level of lead and cadmium ions in real samples. This method is based on accumulation of lead and cadmium ions on the electrode using different ligands; Quinolin-8-ol, 5,7-diiodo quinoline-8-ol, 4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazole-2(3H)-one and 2-{[2-(2-Hydroxy-ethylamino)-ethylamino]-methyl}-phenol as the complexing agent. The optimized conditions were obtained. The relationship between the peak current versus concentration was linear over the range of 0.05-500 ng mL(-1) for Cd (II) and Pb (II). The limits of detection for lead and cadmium were 0.015 ng mL(-1) and 0.012 ng mL(-1), respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the pre-concentration factors are 2440 and 3710 for Cd (II) and Pb (II) in 5 mL of water sample, respectively. PMID:25685537

  18. Pseudo-stir bar hollow fiber solid/liquid phase microextraction combined with anodic stripping voltammetry for determination of lead and cadmium in water samples

    PubMed Central

    Es’haghi, Zarrin; Hoseini, Hasan Ali; Mohammadi-Nokhandani, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Javad

    2013-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for the determination of low concentrations of lead and cadmium in water samples. Ligand assisted pseudo-stir bar hollow fiber solid/liquid phase microextraction using sol–gel sorbent reinforced with carbon nanotubes was combined with differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry for simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead in tap water, and Darongar river water samples. In the present work, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) using a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) was used in order to determine the ultra trace level of lead and cadmium ions in real samples. This method is based on accumulation of lead and cadmium ions on the electrode using different ligands; Quinolin-8-ol, 5,7-diiodo quinoline-8-ol, 4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazole-2(3H)-one and 2-{[2-(2-Hydroxy-ethylamino)-ethylamino]-methyl}-phenol as the complexing agent. The optimized conditions were obtained. The relationship between the peak current versus concentration was linear over the range of 0.05–500 ng mL−1 for Cd (II) and Pb (II). The limits of detection for lead and cadmium were 0.015 ng mL−1 and 0.012 ng mL−1, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the pre-concentration factors are 2440 and 3710 for Cd (II) and Pb (II) in 5 mL of water sample, respectively. PMID:25685537

  19. Mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon hollow spheres as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Kaifu; An, Weili; Fu, Jijiang; Gao, Biao; Wang, Lei; Peng, Xiang; Cheng, Gary J.; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon hollow spheres (N-MCHSs) were prepared using mesoporous silica hollow spheres as template and dopamine as carbon precursor. The N-MCHSs demonstrate high specific surface area and vegetable sponge-like mesoporous shell with interconnected "carbon bridges", facilitating continuous electron transport and Li ion diffusion, and making the whole structure more stable. The influence of N contents and N-bonding configuration on the Li storage of N-MCHSs is discussed. The N-MCHSs carbonized at 800 °C demonstrate high reversible capacity and excellent rate performance, delivering a capacity of 485 mAh g-1 at a current of 0.5 A g-1 after 1,100 cycles. Even up to 4.0 A g-1, a high capacity of 214 mAh g-1 can be remained. The high electrochemical performance of N-MCHSs can be ascribed to mesoporous carbon hollow spheres structure and high level pyridinic nitrogen doping.

  20. Glow discharge plasma deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Weakliem, Herbert A.; Vossen, Jr., John L.

    1984-05-29

    A glow discharge plasma reactor for deposition of thin films from a reactive RF glow discharge is provided with a screen positioned between the walls of the chamber and the cathode to confine the glow discharge region to within the region defined by the screen and the cathode. A substrate for receiving deposition material from a reactive gas is positioned outside the screened region. The screen is electrically connected to the system ground to thereby serve as the anode of the system. The energy of the reactive gas species is reduced as they diffuse through the screen to the substrate. Reactive gas is conducted directly into the glow discharge region through a centrally positioned distribution head to reduce contamination effects otherwise caused by secondary reaction products and impurities deposited on the reactor walls.

  1. Characterization of argon direct-current glow discharge with a longitudinal electric field applied at ambient air

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-01-01

    A direct-current-driven plasma jet is developed by applying a longitudinal electric field on the flowing argon at ambient air. This plasma shows a torch shape with its cross-section increased from the anode to the cathode. Comparison with its counterparts indicates that the gas flow plays a key role in variation of the plasma structure and contributes much to enlarging the plasma volume. It is also found that the circular hollow metal base promotes generation of plasma with a high-power volume density in a limited space. The optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnosis indicates that the plasma comprises many reactive species, such as OH, O, excited N2, and Ar metastables. Examination of the rotational and vibrational temperature indicates that the plasma is under nonequilibrium condition and the excited species OH(A 2Σ+), O(5P), and N2(C 3Πu) are partly generated by energy transfer from argon metastables. The spatially resolved OES of plasma reveals that the negative glow, Faraday dark space, and positive column are distributed across the gas gap. The absence of the anode glow is attributed to the fact that many electrons in the vicinity of the anode follow ions into the positive column due to the ambipolar diffusion in the flowing gas. PMID:25205176

  2. Characterization of argon direct-current glow discharge with a longitudinal electric field applied at ambient air.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-01-01

    A direct-current-driven plasma jet is developed by applying a longitudinal electric field on the flowing argon at ambient air. This plasma shows a torch shape with its cross-section increased from the anode to the cathode. Comparison with its counterparts indicates that the gas flow plays a key role in variation of the plasma structure and contributes much to enlarging the plasma volume. It is also found that the circular hollow metal base promotes generation of plasma with a high-power volume density in a limited space. The optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnosis indicates that the plasma comprises many reactive species, such as OH, O, excited N2, and Ar metastables. Examination of the rotational and vibrational temperature indicates that the plasma is under nonequilibrium condition and the excited species OH(A (2)Σ(+)), O((5)P), and N2(C (3)Πu) are partly generated by energy transfer from argon metastables. The spatially resolved OES of plasma reveals that the negative glow, Faraday dark space, and positive column are distributed across the gas gap. The absence of the anode glow is attributed to the fact that many electrons in the vicinity of the anode follow ions into the positive column due to the ambipolar diffusion in the flowing gas. PMID:25205176

  3. Examination of interior surfaces using glow-discharge illumination

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Petrini, Richard R.; Carter, Gary W.

    1978-01-01

    Endoscopic examination of the interior of a hollow structure through a light pipe that is inserted into the structure, the interior being illuminated by means of a glow discharge that is established with a high voltage applied between the structure wall as one electrode and a second electrode that is inserted into the structure, or establishing the glow with two electrodes inserted into the structure.

  4. Beware Broken Glow Sticks

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159698.html Beware Broken Glow Sticks Contents can irritate skin, eyes, mouth, poison-control ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Letting kids chew or cut glow sticks is a bad idea, health experts say. While ...

  5. Influence of thin porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on aluminum cathode to the H{sub a}lpha line shape in glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Steflekova, V.; Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2009-06-01

    The results of the Balmer alfa line shape study in a plane cathode-hollow anode Grimm discharge with aluminum (Al) cathode covered with thin layer of porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are presented. The comparison with same line profile recorded with pure Al cathode shows lack of excessive Doppler broadened line wings, which are always detected in glow discharge with metal cathode. The effect is explained by the lack of strong electric field in the cathode sheath region, which is missing in the presence of thin oxide layer in, so called, spray discharge.

  6. Designed Functional Systems for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries Anode: From Solid to Hollow, and to Core-Shell NiCo2O4 Nanoparticles Encapsulated in Ultrathin Carbon Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Zhang, Huijuan; Fang, Ling; Bai, Yuanjuan; Wang, Yu

    2016-02-24

    Binary metal oxides have been considered as ideal and promising anode materials, which can ameliorate and enhance the electrochemical performances of the single metal oxides, such as electronic conductivity, reversible capacity, and structural stability. In this research, we report a rational method to synthesize some novel sandwich-like NiCo2O4@C nanosheets arrays for the first time. The nanostructures exhibit the unique features of solid, hollow, and even core-shell NiCo2O4 nanoparticles encapsulated inside and a graphitized carbon layers coating outside. Compared to the previous reports, these composites demonstrate more excellent electrochemical performances, including superior rate capability and excellent cycling capacity. Therefore, the final conclusion would be given that these multifarious sandwich-like NiCo2O4@C composites could be highly qualified candidates for lithium-ion battery anodes in some special field, in which good capability and high capacity are urgently required. PMID:26835912

  7. MOF-Derived Porous Co3O4 Hollow Tetrahedra with Excellent Performance as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dan; Zhou, Xian-Long; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Zhou, Zhen; Bu, Xian-He

    2015-09-01

    Porous Co3O4 hollow tetrahedra were prepared through the thermolysis of metal-organic frameworks and presented reversible capacities of 1196 and 1052 mAh g(-1) at 50 and 200 mA g(-1) after 60 charge/discharge cycles, respectively. Such excellent performances stem from the well-defined hollow structure of Co3O4 tetrahedra. PMID:26262572

  8. Nano electrochemical reactors of Fe2O3 nanoparticles embedded in shells of nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fangcai; He, Mengni; Yang, Yang; Chen, Qianwang

    2015-02-01

    Iron oxides are extensively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of their large specific capacities. However, they undergo huge volume changes during cycling that result in anode pulverization and loss of electrical connectivity. As a result, the capacity retention of the iron oxide anodes is poor and should be improved for commercial applications. Herein, we report the preparation of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles embedded in nitrogen-doped hollow carbon sphere shells (Fe2O3@N-C) by the direct pyrolysis of Fe-based zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (Fe-ZIF) at 620 °C in air. As an anode material for LIBs, the capacity retained was 1573 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 0.1 C (1 C = 1000 mA g-1). Even undergoing the high-rate capability test twice, it can still deliver a remarkably reversible and stable capacity of 1142 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 1 C. The excellent electrochemical performance is attributed to the unique structure of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles uniformly distributed in the shell of nitrogen-doped carbon spheres, which simultaneously solve the major problems of pulverization, facilitate rapid electrochemical kinetics, and effectively avoid the aggregation of Fe2O3 nanoparticles during de/lithiation. The novel method developed in this work for the synthesis of functional hybrid materials can be extended to the preparation of various MOFs-derived functional nanocomposites owing to the versatility of links and metal centers in MOFs.Iron oxides are extensively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of their large specific capacities. However, they undergo huge volume changes during cycling that result in anode pulverization and loss of electrical connectivity. As a result, the capacity retention of the iron oxide anodes is poor and should be improved for commercial applications. Herein, we report the preparation of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles

  9. Hierarchical hollow microflowers constructed from mesoporous single crystalline CoMn2O4 nanosheets for high performance anode of lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lixin; He, Guofeng; Lei, Shiwen; Qi, Guisheng; Jiu, Hongfang; Wang, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchical hollow microflowers constructed from mesoporous single crystalline CoMn2O4 nanosheets were synthesized by a solvothermal route followed by calcination in air. It was found that the amount of deionized water plays a key role in the formation of the well-defined hierarchical hollow structure. A possible formation mechanism of the hierarchical hollow microflowers is proposed based on the time-dependent experimental results. In addition, the unique structure of CoMn2O4 microflowers exhibits superior electrochemical performances with an initial discharge specific capacity of 1024 mA h g-1 at 1000 mA g-1 and remains at 650 mA h g-1 with a coulombic efficiency of 98.7% after 500 cycles.

  10. Nano electrochemical reactors of Fe2O3 nanoparticles embedded in shells of nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fangcai; He, Mengni; Yang, Yang; Chen, Qianwang

    2015-02-28

    Iron oxides are extensively investigated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of their large specific capacities. However, they undergo huge volume changes during cycling that result in anode pulverization and loss of electrical connectivity. As a result, the capacity retention of the iron oxide anodes is poor and should be improved for commercial applications. Herein, we report the preparation of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles embedded in nitrogen-doped hollow carbon sphere shells (Fe2O3@N-C) by the direct pyrolysis of Fe-based zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (Fe-ZIF) at 620 °C in air. As an anode material for LIBs, the capacity retained was 1573 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles at a current density of 0.1 C (1 C = 1000 mA g(-1)). Even undergoing the high-rate capability test twice, it can still deliver a remarkably reversible and stable capacity of 1142 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles at a current density of 1 C. The excellent electrochemical performance is attributed to the unique structure of ultrasmall Fe2O3 nanoparticles uniformly distributed in the shell of nitrogen-doped carbon spheres, which simultaneously solve the major problems of pulverization, facilitate rapid electrochemical kinetics, and effectively avoid the aggregation of Fe2O3 nanoparticles during de/lithiation. The novel method developed in this work for the synthesis of functional hybrid materials can be extended to the preparation of various MOFs-derived functional nanocomposites owing to the versatility of links and metal centers in MOFs. PMID:25631451

  11. Glow discharge conditioning of the PDX vacuum vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Cohen, S.A.; Rossnagel, S.M.; McCracken, G.M.; Staib, P.

    1980-03-01

    A glow discharge technique has been developed and applied to the conditioning of the large (38 m/sup 3/) Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) vacuum vessel. The discharge parameters and working gas (H/sub 2/) were chosen to maximize C and O removal and minimize metal sputtering. The glow discharge was produced by biasing one or two internal anodes at 400 V to sustain a discharge current of 2 to 4 A per anode. Purified H/sub 2/ at a pressure of 3 x 10/sup -2/ torr was flowed through PDX at approx. 10 t-l/s. The effectiveness of the glow discharge conditioning was monitored by measuring impurity gas (CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, and CO) exhaust rates by mass spectrometry and C and O surface removal rates by in-situ AES and XPS.

  12. Evolution of Striation in Pulsed Glow Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanye; He, Feng; Zhao, Xiaofei; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-01-01

    In this work, striations in pulsed glow discharges are studied by experiments and Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Collision (PIC/MCC) simulation. The spatio-temporal evolution of the potential and the electron energy during the discharge are analyzed. The processes of striation formation in pulsed glow discharges and dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) are compared. The results show that the mechanisms of striation in pulsed DC discharge and DBD are similar to each other. The evolution of electron energy distribution function before and after the striation formation indicates that the striation results from the potential well of the space charge. During a pulsed breakdown, the striations are formed one by one towards the anode in a weak field channel. This indicates that the formation of striations in a pulsed discharge depends on the flow of modulated electrons. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10875010 and 11175017)

  13. Copper doped hollow structured manganese oxide mesocrystals with controlled phase structure and morphology as anode materials for lithium ion battery with improved electrochemical performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Qun; Yin, Longwei; Li, Zhaoqiang; Wang, Xuekun; Qi, Yongxin; Ma, Jingyun

    2013-11-13

    We develop a facile synthesis route to prepare Cu doped hollow structured manganese oxide mesocrystals with controlled phase structure and morphology using manganese carbonate as the reactant template. It is shown that Cu dopant is homogeneously distributed among the hollow manganese oxide microspherical samples, and it is embedded in the lattice of manganese oxide by substituting Mn(3+) in the presence of Cu(2+). The crystal structure of manganese oxide products can be modulated to bixbyite Mn2O3 and tetragonal Mn3O4 in the presence of annealing gas of air and nitrogen, respectively. The incorporation of Cu into Mn2O3 and Mn3O4 induces a great microstructure evolution from core-shell structure for pure Mn2O3 and Mn3O4 samples to hollow porous spherical Cu-doped Mn2O3 and Mn3O4 samples with a larger surface area, respectively. The Cu-doped hollow spherical Mn2O3 sample displays a higher specific capacity of 642 mAhg(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 100 cycles, which is about 1.78 times improvement compared to that of 361 mA h g(-1) for the pure Mn2O3 sample, displaying a Coulombic efficiency of up to 99.5%. The great enhancement of the electrochemical lithium storage performance can be attributed to the improvement of the electronic conductivity and lithium diffusivity of electrodes. The present results have verified the ability of Cu doping to improve electrochemical lithium storage performances of manganese oxides. PMID:24080017

  14. PIC/MCC Simulation of Radio Frequency Hollow Cathode Discharge in Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qing; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lianzhu

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional PIC/MCC model is developed to simulate the nitrogen radio frequency hollow cathode discharge (rf-HCD). It is found that both the sheath oscillation heating and the secondary electron heating together play a role to maintain the rf-HCD under the simulated conditions. The mean energy of ions (N2+, N+) in the negative glow region is greater than the thermal kinetic energy of the molecular gas (N2), which is an important characteristic of rf-HCD. During the negative portion of the hollow electrode voltage cycle, electrons mainly follow pendulum movement and produce a large number of ionization collisions in the plasma region. During the positive voltage of the rf cycle, the axial electric field becomes stronger and its direction is pointing to the anode (substrate), therefore the ions move toward the anode (substrate) via the axial electric field acceleration. Compared with dc-HCD, rf-HCD is more suitable for serving as a plasma jet nozzle at low pressure. supported by Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (No. A2012205072)

  15. Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow microspheres as anode and carbon fiber as cathode for high performance quantum dot and dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Veerappan; Kong, Eui-Hyun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Jang, Hyun Myung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2014-02-01

    Cauliflower-like tin oxide (SnO2) hollow microspheres (HMS) sensitized with multilayer quantum dots (QDs) as photoanode and alternative stable, low-cost counter electrode are employed for the first time in QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow spheres mainly consist of 50 nm-sized agglomerated nanoparticles; they possess a high internal surface area and light scattering in between the microspheres and shell layers. This makes them promising photoanode material for both QDSCs and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and chemical bath deposition (CBD) are used for QD-sensitizing the SnO2 microspheres. Additionally, carbon-nanofiber (CNF) with a unique structure is used as an alternative counter electrode (CE) and compared with the standard platinum (Pt) CE. Their electrocatalytic properties are measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and Tafel-polarization. Under 1 sun illumination, solar cells made with hollow SnO2 photoanode sandwiched with the stable CNF CE showed a power conversion efficiency of 2.5% in QDSCs and 3.0% for DSCs, which is quite promising with the standard Pt CE (QDSCs: 2.1%, and DSCs: 3.6%).Cauliflower-like tin oxide (SnO2) hollow microspheres (HMS) sensitized with multilayer quantum dots (QDs) as photoanode and alternative stable, low-cost counter electrode are employed for the first time in QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow spheres mainly consist of 50 nm-sized agglomerated nanoparticles; they possess a high internal surface area and light scattering in between the microspheres and shell layers. This makes them promising photoanode material for both QDSCs and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and chemical bath deposition (CBD) are used for QD-sensitizing the SnO2 microspheres. Additionally, carbon-nanofiber (CNF) with a

  16. Preparation of hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 coated by a carbon shell as a stable anode for optimized lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Song, Haili; Li, Honglin; Tan, Yinghua; Fu, Hao; Li, Chao; Lei, Xiang; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2015-12-01

    A one-step hydrothermal method was successfully used to fabricate hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2. Then the as-prepared sS-MoS2 was decorated with a carbon shell using dopamine as a carbon source by a facile route, resulting in hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 decorated with carbon shell (sS-MoS2@C). A synergistic effect was observed for the two-component material, leading to new electrochemical processes for lithium storage, with improved electroconductivity and structural soundness, triggering an ascending capacity upon cycling. The as-prepared sS-MoS2@C exhibits optimized electrochemical behaviour with high specific capacity (1107 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1), superior high-rate capability (805 mA h g-1 at 5000 mA g-1) and good cycling stability (91.5% of capacity retained after 100 cycles), suggesting its potential application in high-energy lithium-ion batteries.A one-step hydrothermal method was successfully used to fabricate hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2. Then the as-prepared sS-MoS2 was decorated with a carbon shell using dopamine as a carbon source by a facile route, resulting in hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 decorated with carbon shell (sS-MoS2@C). A synergistic effect was observed for the two-component material, leading to new electrochemical processes for lithium storage, with improved electroconductivity and structural soundness, triggering an ascending capacity upon cycling. The as-prepared sS-MoS2@C exhibits optimized electrochemical behaviour with high specific capacity (1107 mA h g-1 at 100 mA g-1), superior high-rate capability (805 mA h g-1 at 5000 mA g-1) and good cycling stability (91.5% of capacity retained after 100 cycles), suggesting its potential application in high-energy lithium-ion batteries. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05595d

  17. Detrapping of tungsten nanoparticles in a direct-current argon glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couëdel, L.; Kumar K., Kishor; Arnas, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanoparticles are grown from the sputtering of a tungsten cathode in a direct current argon glow discharge. Laser light scattering of a vertical laser sheet going through the plasma reveals that the dust particle cloud is compressed and pushed towards the anode during the discharge. Scanning electron microscopy images of substrates exposed to the plasma for given durations show that dust particles are continuously falling down on the anode during the discharge. These observations are explained by the fact that the electrostatic force at the negative glow-anode sheath boundary cannot balance the ion drag, gravity, and thermophoresis forces for particles of more than a few tens of nanometres in diameter.

  18. Detrapping of tungsten nanoparticles in a direct-current argon glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Couëdel, L. Kumar, K. Kishor; Arnas, C.

    2014-12-15

    Nanoparticles are grown from the sputtering of a tungsten cathode in a direct current argon glow discharge. Laser light scattering of a vertical laser sheet going through the plasma reveals that the dust particle cloud is compressed and pushed towards the anode during the discharge. Scanning electron microscopy images of substrates exposed to the plasma for given durations show that dust particles are continuously falling down on the anode during the discharge. These observations are explained by the fact that the electrostatic force at the negative glow-anode sheath boundary cannot balance the ion drag, gravity, and thermophoresis forces for particles of more than a few tens of nanometres in diameter.

  19. Preparation of hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 coated by a carbon shell as a stable anode for optimized lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bangjun; Yu, Ke; Song, Haili; Li, Honglin; Tan, Yinghua; Fu, Hao; Li, Chao; Lei, Xiang; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2016-01-01

    A one-step hydrothermal method was successfully used to fabricate hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2. Then the as-prepared sS-MoS2 was decorated with a carbon shell using dopamine as a carbon source by a facile route, resulting in hollow microsphere@onion-like solid nanosphere MoS2 decorated with carbon shell (sS-MoS2@C). A synergistic effect was observed for the two-component material, leading to new electrochemical processes for lithium storage, with improved electroconductivity and structural soundness, triggering an ascending capacity upon cycling. The as-prepared sS-MoS2@C exhibits optimized electrochemical behaviour with high specific capacity (1107 mA h g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1)), superior high-rate capability (805 mA h g(-1) at 5000 mA g(-1)) and good cycling stability (91.5% of capacity retained after 100 cycles), suggesting its potential application in high-energy lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26620104

  20. Study of short atmospheric pressure dc glow microdischarge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Chirtsov, Alexander; Emelin, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen

  1. Dynamics of multiple double layers in high pressure glow discharge in a simple torus

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Paul, Manash; Sharma, P. K.; Thakur, A.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Bora, D.

    2014-06-15

    Parametric characterization of multiple double layers is done during high pressure glow discharge in a toroidal vessel of small aspect ratio. Although glow discharge (without magnetic field) is known to be independent of device geometry, but the toroidal boundary conditions are conducive to plasma growth and eventually the plasma occupy the toroidal volume partially. At higher anode potential, the visibly glowing spots on the body of spatially extended anode transform into multiple intensely luminous spherical plasma blob structures attached to the tip of the positive electrode. Dynamics of multiple double layers are observed in argon glow discharge plasma in presence of toroidal magnetic field. The radial profiles of plasma parameters measured at various toroidal locations show signatures of double layer formation in our system. Parametric dependence of double layer dynamics in presence of toroidal magnetic field is presented here.

  2. Hollow Nanobarrels of α-Fe2O3 on Reduced Graphene Oxide as High-Performance Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Soo; Park, Seyong; Lee, Wooyoung; Yoon, Young Soo

    2016-01-27

    Alpha-phase iron oxide nanoparticles (α-NPs), α-iron oxide hollow nanobarrels (α-HNBs), and α-HNBs on reduced graphene oxide (α-HNBs/RGO) for Li-ion batteries (LIBs) were synthesized by a time-efficient microwave method to improve the low electrical conductivity of iron oxide and exploit the porous structure of RGO, which prevents the volume expansion of α-Fe2O3 during the insertion/extraction. On the other hand, α-HNBs (∼200 nm in diameter, ∼360 nm in length) provide a short diffusion path for Li ions and accommodate the strain generated by the volume change. The α-HNBs/RGO hybrid structure was synthesized by a one-step microwave-assisted hydrothermal method to bond α-HNBs with RGO. The as-prepared α-HNBs/RGO electrode exhibited a superior reversible capacity of 1279 mA h g(-1) at 0.5 C after the first cycle; such a capacity was nearly recovered after numerous cycles (2nd to 100th cycle, 95%). The long-term cyclability of α-HNBs/RGO shows 478 mA h g(-1) after 1000 cycles. Moreover, the α-HNBs/RGO electrode shows a high rate capacity of 403 mA h g(-1) even at 10 C. The α-HNBs/RGO exhibited a better electrochemical performance that could be attributed to the absence of nanoparticle agglomeration and RGO restacking, which provided a buffer effect against the volume expansion, promoted electrical conductivity and high structural integrity. PMID:26717009

  3. Electron concentration distribution in a glow discharge in air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedzianov, R. B.; Gaisin, F. M.; Sabitov, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    Electron concentration distributions in a glow discharge in longitudinal and vortex air flows are determined from the attenuation of the electromagnetic wave passing through the plasma using microwave probes. An analysis of the distribution curves obtained indicates that electron concentration decreases in the direction of the anode. This can be explained by charge diffusion toward the chamber walls and electron recombination and sticking within the discharge.

  4. Positive Streamers and Glows in Air and Exhaust Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, R.

    1998-10-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have been made of the effects of sub-microsecond voltage pulses on the plasma chemistry of real flue gases in a test cell. Chemical analysis shows that, for real flue gases, the pulsed system can remove up to 90 % of NO, and 30 % of SO_2, if a residence time of ~ 30s is used. We also find that (i) water vapour is essential to the removal of SO_2, but not for the removal of NO or NO_2; and (ii) that small quantities of N_2O are produced. The removal of SO2 is primarily due to reactions with OH radicals from water vapour, producing sulphuric acid, whereas nitrogen oxides are reduced by N atoms. When a positive voltage is abruptly applied to a point in air at atmospheric pressure, positive streamers are produced. A theory is presented for the development of the first such streamer by solving the continuity equations for electrons, positive ions and negative ions, including the effects of ionisation, attachment, recombination, electron diffusion, and photoionisation, simultaneously with Poisson's equation. With an applied voltage of 20 kV across a 50 mm gap, the streamer does not reach the cathode. When the voltage is sustained in the presence of free electrons, the electric field at the anode starts to recover until positive glow pulses develop at the anode. The presence of the positive glow corona precludes any further streamer formation; this limits the number of chemical reactions stimulated by the discharge because the positive glow is confined close to the anode. Thus, a limit is set for the voltage pulse width. A theory is also presented for the current and light pulses of positive glow corona from a point in air; results are obtained by solving the continuity equations, described above, in concentric sphere geometry. A series of ``saw--toothed'' current pulses of period ~ 1 μs are predicted with a dc current level. Accompanying the current peaks are discrete 30 ns wide pulses of light. It is found that if, in the presence

  5. Effects of traces of molecular gases (hydrogen, nitrogen) in glow discharges in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steers, E. B. M.; Smid, P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2008-07-01

    The "Grimm" type of low pressure glow discharge source, introduced some forty years ago, has proved to be a versatile analytical source. A flat sample is used as the cathode and placed about 0.2mm away from the end of a hollow tubular anode leading to an obstructed discharge. When the source was first developed, it was used for the direct analysis of solid metallic samples by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), normally with argon as the plasma gas; it was soon found that, using suitable electrical parameters, the cathode material was sputtered uniformly from a circular crater of diameter equal to that of the tubular anode, so that the technique could be used for compositional depth profile analysis (CDPA). Over the years the capability and applications of the technique have steadily increased. The use of rf powered discharges now permits the analysis of non-conducting layers and samples; improved instrumental design now allows CDPA of ever thinner layers (e.g. resolution of layers 5 nm thick in multilayer stacks is possible). For the original bulk material application, pre-sputtering could be used to remove any surface contamination but for CDPA, analysis must start immediately the discharge is ignited, so that any surface contamination can introduce molecular gases into the plasma gas and have significant analytical consequences, especially for very thin layers; in addition, many types of samples now analysed contain molecular gases as components (either as occluded gas, or e.g. as a nitride or oxide), and this gas enters the discharge when the sample is sputtered. It is therefore important to investigate the effect of such foreign gases on the discharge, in particular on the spectral intensities and hence the analytical results. The presentation will concentrate mainly on the effect of hydrogen in argon discharges, in the concentration range 0-2 % v/v but other gas mixtures (e.g. Ar/N_2, Ne/H_2) will be considered for comparison. In general, the introduction of

  6. Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Frizzle, Patrick B.

    2002-08-20

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

  7. Hollow Retroreflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A hollow retroreflector is a mirror-like instrument that reflects light and other radiations back to the source. After developing a hollow retroreflector for NASA's Apollo-Soyuz mission, PLX, Inc. continued to expand the technology and develop a variety of retroreflector systems. The Lateral Transfer Hollow Retroreflector maintains precise separation, at any wavelength, of incoming and existing beams regardless of their orientation. It can be used as an instrument or as a component of an optical system. In the laboratory, it offers a new efficient means of beam positioning. In other applications, it connects laser resonators, aligns telescope mirrors and is useful in general boresighting and alignment.

  8. The theory of positive glow corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, R.

    1997-11-01

    A theory for the current and light pulses of positive glow corona from a point in air is presented; this phenomenon was first observed as an apparently continuous glow by Michael Faraday. Results are obtained, in concentric sphere geometry, for air at atmospheric pressure, by solving the continuity equations for electrons, positive ions, negative ions and metastable oxygen molecules, coupled with Poisson's equation. A series of `saw-toothed' current pulses of period about 0022-3727/30/22/008/img1 is predicted with a DC current level. Accompanying the current peaks are discrete pulses of light 30 ns wide. Successive `shells' of positive ions, from successive current pulses, carry 96% of the mean current. The mean current - voltage relationship has the classic square-law form. The seed electrons required for successive pulses are detached from negative ions by metastable oxygen molecules. Photo-ionization is crucial for the discharge at the anode and for the formation of negative ions throughout the gap. The pulse frequency varies with applied voltage and is found to be approximately proportional to the positive-ion mobility. The surface electric field at the central electrode remains close to Peek's onset field. The origin of onset streamers is explained and sub-microsecond voltage pulses are found to produce streamers. The results for concentric-cylinder electrodes are described briefly.

  9. Detection of surface glow related to spacecraft glow phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Cohen, S. A.; Manos, D. M.; Motley, R. W.; Ono, M.

    1986-01-01

    A source of low energy neutral atoms and molecules has been developed by using a biased limiter to scrape off and reflect neutralized ions from a toroidal plasma. Beams of nitrogen and nitrogen-oxygen mixtures with energies of 1 to 15 eV and fluxes greater than about 10 to the 14 per centimeter per second were directed onto target surfaces consisting of Z-302 and Z-306 paints. With the nitrogen beams, a glow due to beam-surface interactions was successfully detected. In addition, a volume glow effect due to beam-gas interactions was observed which may play a role in spacecraft glow.

  10. Detection of surface glow related to spacecraft glow phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, W.D.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.; Motley, R.W.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.; Roberts, D.; Selberg, H.

    1986-02-01

    We have developed a high flux source of low energy neutral beams to study the spacecraft glow phenomena by using a biased limiter to neutralize plasma in ACT-1. Beams of nitrogen and nitrogen-oxygen mixtures with energies of 1 to 15 eV and fluxes greater than or equal to 10/sup 14//cm/sup 2//s were directed on target surfaces consisting of Z-302 and Z-306 paints. With the nitrogen beams we successfully detected a glow due to beam-surface interactions. In addition, we discovered a volume glow effect due to beam-gas interactions which may also play a role in spacecraft glow. 11 refs., 14 figs.

  11. Reproducing continuous radio blackout using glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Kai; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Donglin; Shao, Mingxu; Zhang, Hanlu

    2013-10-15

    A novel plasma generator is described that offers large-scale, continuous, non-magnetized plasma with a 30-cm-diameter hollow structure, which provides a path for an electromagnetic wave. The plasma is excited by a low-pressure glow discharge, with varying electron densities ranging from 10{sup 9} to 2.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}. An electromagnetic wave propagation experiment reproduced a continuous radio blackout in UHF-, L-, and S-bands. The results are consistent with theoretical expectations. The proposed method is suitable in simulating a plasma sheath, and in researching communications, navigation, electromagnetic mitigations, and antenna compensation in plasma sheaths.

  12. Immobilization of proteins on glow discharge treated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiaei, D.; Safranj, A.; Chen, J. P.; Johnston, A. B.; Zavala, F.; Deelder, A.; Castelino, J. B.; Markovic, V.; Hoffman, A. S.

    Certain glow discharge-treated surfaces have been shown to enhance retention of adsorbed proteins. On the basis of this phenomenon, we have investigated the possibility of immobilizing (a) albumin for developing thromboresistant and non-fouling surfaces, (b) antibodies for immuno-diagnostic assays and (c) enzymes for various biosensors and industrial bioprocesses. Albumin retention was highest on surfaces treated with tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) compared to untreated surfaces or other glow discharge treatments studied. Preadsorption of albumin on TFE-treated surfaces resulted in low fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion. IgG retention was also highest on TFE-treated surfaces. The lower detection limits of both malaria antigen and circulating anodic antigen of the schistosomiasis worm were enhanced following glow discharge treatment of the assay plates with TFE. Both TFE and tetrachloroethylene (TCE) glow discharge treated surfaces showed high retention of adsorbed horseradish peroxidase (HRP). However, the retained specific activity of HRP after adsorption on TCE-treated surfaces was remarkably higher than on TFE-treated surfaces.

  13. Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

  14. Hollow-cathode evaporators

    SciTech Connect

    Saenko, V.A.; Kravatskii, V.A.; Veremeichenko, G.N.; Vladimirov, A.I.

    1985-08-01

    This paper describes devices for producing plasma from the vapor of a solid substance under vacuum and depositing films from the plasma. The plasma is produced by a discharge between a hollow cathode crucible and an anode, which are placed in a magnetic field longitudinal in relation to the vapor flow. The basic parameters are: film deposition rate 1-70 nm/sec, consumption of working substance 1-30 mg/sec, ionization factor for the working substance in the flow 1-10%, ion-current density at the substrate 0.1-10 mA/cm/sup 2/. Films of Cu, Au, Ag, Cr, and A1 have been made with parameters better than those of films deposited without ionization.

  15. Nitrogen Glow Discharge by a DC Virtual Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shager, Azza M.; Sroor, Amany T.; Tayeb, Hoda A. El; Gamal, Hoda A. El; Masoud, Mohamed M.

    2008-08-01

    A DC glow discharge operating with a virtual cathode is studied. The system consists of a solid disc cathode and mesh anode. The discharge occurs in nitrogen gas at the left-hand side of Paschen's curve. The plasma electron density in the axial direction has been found to be 0.2 · 108 cm-3 at 2 cm from the mesh. The electron temperature peak value has been found to be 3.5 eV at 6 cm from the mesh. The radial distribution of the plasma electron density and temperature are discussed. The variation of the plasma parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Hollow cathodes for arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebben, Craig R.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to prevent exterior spot emission, hollow cathode bodies and orifice plates were constructed from boron nitride which is an electrical insulator, but the orifice plates melted and/or eroded at high interelectrode pressures. The most suitable hollow cathodes tested included a refractory metal orifice plate in a boron nitride body, with the insert insulated electrically from the orifice plate. In addition, the hollow cathode interior was evacuated to assure a low pressure at the insert surface, thus promoting diffuse electron emission. At high interelectrode pressures, the electrons tended to flow through the orifice plate rather than through the orifice, which could result in overheating of the orifice plate. Using a carefully aligned centerline anode, electron flow through the orifice could be sustained at interelectrode pressures up to 500 torr - but the current flow path still occasionally jumped from the orifice to the orifice plate. Based on these tests, it appears that a hollow cathode would operate most effectively at pressures in the arcjet regime with a refractory, chemically stable, and electrically insulating cathode body and orifice plate.

  17. Mechanistic investigations of shuttle glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Holtzclaw, K. W.; Krech, R. H.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Leone, A.; Blumberg, W. A. M.

    1993-01-01

    A series of laboratory measurements have been performed in order to provide a mechanistic interpretation for the visible shuttle glow. These studies involved interactions of an 8 km/s oxygen atom beam with both contaminant dosed surfaces and gaseous targets. We conclude that visible shuttle glow arises from surface mediated O + NO recombination via a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and that the gas-phase exchange reaction O + N2 - NO + N provides a viable source of precursor NO above surfaces oriented in the ram direction.

  18. Mechanistic investigations of shuttle glow

    SciTech Connect

    Caledonia, G.E.; Holtzclaw, K.W.; Krech, R.H.; Sonnenfroh, D.M. ); Leone, A. ); Blumber, W.A.M. )

    1993-03-01

    A series of laboratory measurements have been performed in order to provide a mechanistic interpretation for the visible shuttle glow. These studies involved interactions in an 8 km/s oxygen atom beam with both contaminant dosed surfaces and gaseous targets. The authors conclude that visible shuttle glow arises from surface mediated O + NO recombination via a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and that the gas-phase exchange reaction O + N[sub 2] [r arrow] NO + N provides a viable source of precursor NO above surfaces oriented in the ram direction. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  20. Ion bombardment glow-discharge furnaces for atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Two glow discharge plasma devices for the atomic emission analysis of aqueous samples were investigated. The devices use thermal vaporization of samples from a graphite cathode coupled with glow-discharge excitation. Furnace heating of the cathode is accomplished by the positive ion bombardment of the cathode during plasma operation. The dc plasma operates in Ar at 0.5-5.0 torr, with currents up to 250 mA. A cw, axial magnetic field of up to 1.25 kG is applied to the cylindrical-post cathode system to reduce electron losses, thereby increasing plasma excitation and ionization efficiency. At higher currents, the cathodes heat to temperatures as high as 2,500{degree}C in the case of the cylindrical-post cathode. Hollow-cathode heating temperatures are lower under comparable conditions, due to the larger cathode surface area, greater cathode mass, and lower power dissipation. The peak furnace temperature using this configuration is approximately 2100{degree}C. The role of the emission of thermionic electrons from the hot cathodes in limiting the cathode heating and in regulating the cathode temperature are considered. Sample residues of up to 50 ng of the analyte are vaporized from the cylindrical-post cathode within a few seconds of the initiation of the discharge, resulting in a transient emission intensity profile. With the hollow-cathode furnace, vaporization may take several seconds. Although a lower rate of cathode heating and a lower sample vapor residence time results in limits of detection which are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those achieved using the cylindrical-post cathode system. For the hollow cathode, limits of detection are on the order of 10 pg to 1 ng.

  1. Modelling of tokamak glow discharge cleaning II: comparison with experiment and application to ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, D.; Douai, D.; Hagelaar, G.; Pitts, R. A.

    2015-02-01

    The primary function of the ITER glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system will be the preparation of in-vessel component surfaces prior to the machine start-up. It may also contribute to tritium removal in the nuclear phase. In GDC, conditioning efficiency is strongly dependent on the homogeneity of the flux of ions impinging onto wall surfaces. In order to assess the wall particle flux distribution in ITER, a novel 2D multi-fluid model, described in a companion paper, has recently been developed and is benchmarked here against both experimental glow discharge data obtained in a small laboratory chamber with cylindrical geometry and from two large toroidal devices: the JET tokamak and the RFX reverse field pinch. In the laboratory plasma, simulated and measured plasma electron density and temperature are in a good agreement in the negative glow region, while discrepancies exist in the anode glow, where the fluid description of the model is inaccurate due to long mean free paths of electrons. Calculated and measured ion flux distribution profiles in RFX are found in good agreement, whereas in JET comparison it is more difficult, due to the complex geometry of the first wall which leads to local inhomogeneities in the measured flux. Simulations of H2-GDC for ITER with one or two anodes indicate fairly homogeneous plasma parameters and wall ion flux in the negative glow at 0.5 Pa, a commonly used gas pressure for GDC in existing fusion devices. Although the axisymmetric geometry in the model does not allow all seven ITER anodes to be powered simultaneously in the simulations, the results can be extrapolated to the full system and predict ion current densities on wall surfaces close to the simple expectation of total anode current divided by wall surface area (0.21 A m-2), which is relevant to GDC in JET and other machines.

  2. Anode power deposition in magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallimore, A. D.; Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1993-06-01

    Results of anode heat-flux and anode fail measurements from a multimegawatt self-field quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster are presented. Measurements were obtained with argon and helium propellants for a variety of currents and mass flow rates. Anode heat flux was directly measured with thermocouples attached to the inner surface of a hollowed section. Anode falls were determined both from floating probes and through heat flux measurements. Comparison of data acquired through either method shows excellent agreement. Anode falls varied between 4-50 V with anode power fractions reaching 70 percent with helium at 150 kW, and 50 percent with argon at 1.9 MW. The anode fall was found to correlate well with electron Hall parameters calculated from triple Langmuir and magnetic probe data collected near the anode. Two possible explanations for this result are proposed: (1) the establishment of large electric fields at the anode to maintain current conduction across the strong magnetic fields; and (2) anomalous resistivity resulting from the onset of microturbulence in the plasma. To investigate the latter hypothesis, electric field, magnetic field, and current density profiles measured in the vicinity of the anode were incorporated into Ohm's law to estimate the electrical conductivity. Results of this analysis show a substantial deviation of the measured conductivity from that calculated with classical formulas. These results imply that anomalous effects are present in the plasma near the anode.

  3. Anode power deposition in magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, A. D.; Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Results of anode heat-flux and anode fail measurements from a multimegawatt self-field quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster are presented. Measurements were obtained with argon and helium propellants for a variety of currents and mass flow rates. Anode heat flux was directly measured with thermocouples attached to the inner surface of a hollowed section. Anode falls were determined both from floating probes and through heat flux measurements. Comparison of data acquired through either method shows excellent agreement. Anode falls varied between 4-50 V with anode power fractions reaching 70 percent with helium at 150 kW, and 50 percent with argon at 1.9 MW. The anode fall was found to correlate well with electron Hall parameters calculated from triple Langmuir and magnetic probe data collected near the anode. Two possible explanations for this result are proposed: (1) the establishment of large electric fields at the anode to maintain current conduction across the strong magnetic fields; and (2) anomalous resistivity resulting from the onset of microturbulence in the plasma. To investigate the latter hypothesis, electric field, magnetic field, and current density profiles measured in the vicinity of the anode were incorporated into Ohm's law to estimate the electrical conductivity. Results of this analysis show a substantial deviation of the measured conductivity from that calculated with classical formulas. These results imply that anomalous effects are present in the plasma near the anode.

  4. Second Workshop on Spacecraft Glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H., Jr. (Editor); Moorehead, T. W. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of space glow were considered. Results of a workshop held on May 6 to 7, 1985, at the Space Science Laboratory of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama are presented. The topics of discussion are divided as follows: (1) in situ observations; (2) theoretical calculations; (3) laboratory measurements; and (4) future experiments.

  5. Effect of a floating circular aperture on a dc glow discharge dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Kim, Su-Hyun; Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-01

    We have investigated novel effects observed when a floating aperture, either 6 mm or 8 mm in diameter, is placed 1-2 cm in front of an anode disk (4 cm diameter) that is used to form a dc glow discharge dusty plasma. Dust is incorporated into the anode glow plasma from a tray located below the anode which contained kaolin powder. The glow discharge traps particles with an average size of 1 micron. When the aperture is placed in front of the disk, well-defined pear-shaped or spherical dust clouds are formed, depending on the diameter of the aperture and its distance from the anode. The dust interacts with the aperture through the potential structure associated with the floating (negative) plate in which the aperture is located. The dust cloud is imaged using a CCD camera and a thin sheet of 532 nm laser light. Some of the effects observed include: outwardly expanding spherical dust acoustic waves and shocks, dust rotation around a void formed at the aperture, and a dust/discharge instability in which the discharge is periodically quenched and reignited while the dust cloud expands and contracts, with the dust retaining a residual charge.

  6. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Anders, Simone; Dickinson, Michael; Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  7. Influence of annular magnet on discharge characteristics in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liuhe; Wang Zhuo; Lu Qiuyuan; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Pang Enjing; Dun Dandan; He Fushun; Li Fen

    2011-01-10

    A permanent annular magnet positioned at the grounded anode alters the discharge characteristics in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation (EGD-PIII). The nonuniform magnetic field increases the electron path length and confines electron motion due to the magnetic mirror effect and electron-neutral collisions thus occur more frequently. The plasma potential and ion density measured by a Langmuir probe corroborate that ionization is improved near the grounded anode. This hybrid magnetic field EGD-PIII method is suitable for implantation of gases with low ionization rates.

  8. Common Gamma-ray Glows above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Nicole; Smith, David; Dwyer, Joseph; Hazelton, Bryna; Grefenstette, Brian; Lowell, Alex; Splitt, Michael; Lazarus, Steven; Rassoul, Hamid

    2013-04-01

    Gamma-ray glows are continuous, long duration gamma- and x-ray emission seen coming from thunderclouds. The Airborne for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) observed 12 gamma-ray glows during its summer 2009 flight campaign over the areas of Colorado and Florida in the United States. For these glows we shall present their spectra, relationship to lightning activity and how their duration and size changes as a function of distance. Gamma-ray glows follow the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) spectrum and have been previously measured from the ground and inside the cloud. ADELE measured most glows as it flew above the screening layer of the cloud. During the brightest glow on August 21, 2009, we can show that we are flying directly into a downward facing relativistic runaway avalanche, indicative of flying between the upper positive and negative screening layer of the cloud. In order to explain the brightness of this glow, RREA with an electric field approaching the limit for relativistic feedback must be occurring. Using all 12 glows, we show that lightning activity diminishes during the onset of the glow. Using this along with the fact that glows occur as the field approaches the level necessary for feedback, we attempt to distinguish between two possibilities: that glows are evidence that RREA with feedback, rather than lightning, is sometimes the primary channel for discharging the cloud, or else that the overall discharging is still controlled by lightning, with glows simply appearing during times when a subsidence of lightning allows the field to rise above the threshold for RREA.

  9. Glow Sticks: Spectra and Color Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer; Birriel, Ignacio

    2014-10-01

    Glow sticks are a popular Halloween staple familiar to most of our students. The production of light via a chemical reaction is called "chemiluminescence," and glow sticks are often used as demonstrations and experiments in the chemistry classroom to study reaction rates as a function of temperature.1-3 A black light can be used to illuminate glow sticks that have not been cracked or those that are "dead" in order to demonstrate fluorescence in liquid chemicals.4 In this article, we present the use of glow sticks as an inexpensive demonstration of spectra and color addition.

  10. Spacecraft ram glow and surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Llewellyn, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Space shuttle glow intensity measurements show large differences when the data from different missions are compared. In particular, on the 41-G mission the space shuttle ram glow was observed to display an unusually low intensity. Subsequent investigation of this measurement and earlier measurements suggest that there was a significant difference in temperature of the glow producing ram surfaces. The highly insulating properties coupled with the high emissivity of the shuttle tile results in surfaces that cool quickly when exposed to deep space on the night side of the orbit. The increased glow intensity is consistent with the hypothesis that the glow is emitted from excited NO2. The excited NO2 is likely formed through three body recombination (OI + NO + M = NO2*) where ramming of OI interacts with weakly surface bound NO. The NO is formed from atmospheric OI and NI which is scavenged by the spacecraft moving through the atmosphere. It is postulated that the colder surfaces retain a thicker layer of NO thereby increasing the probability of the reaction. It has been found from the glow intensity/temperature data that the bond energy of the surface bound precursor, leading to the chemical recombination producing the glow, is approximately 0.14 eV. A thermal analysis of material samples of STS-8 was made and the postulated temperature change of individual material samples prior to the time of glow measurements above respective samples are consistent with the thermal effect on glow found for the orbiter surface.

  11. ADELE's Common Gamma-Ray Glows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. A.; Smith, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Hazelton, B. J.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Lowell, A.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    Gamma-ray glows have been observed for the first time as a common, long duration phenomenon from the tops of thunderclouds. The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) observed 12 gamma-ray glows during its Summer 2009 flight campaign. We present their spectra, their relationship to lightning activity and show how the duration and size of a glow changes with distance from the glow. Since glows have a very hard spectrum, with many counts above 5 MeV, they may be evidence of a continual relativistic runaway process with positron feedback. We compare our spectra with simulations of relativistic runaway in the atmosphere with all effects of feedback included. We show that the lightning activity diminishes during the onset of a glow. From our simulations we attempt to distinguish between the two possibilities for this decrease: the mechanism responsible for glows is only able to become significant when lightning activity subsides or glows are actually stifling the lightning activity and considerably limiting the charging of the cloud. Comparison of the data with our simulations will determine if runaway or feedback are necessary to explain the glow brightness and if these mechanisms have significant effects on the total charging of the cloud.

  12. Carbon-Coated Hierarchical SnO2 Hollow Spheres for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiannan; Dou, Yuhai; Ruan, Boyang; Sun, Ziqi; Chou, Shu-Lei; Dou, Shi Xue

    2016-04-18

    Hierarchical SnO2 hollow spheres self-assembled from nanosheets were prepared with and without carbon coating. The combination of nanosized architecture, hollow structure, and a conductive carbon layer endows the SnO2 -based anode with improved specific capacity and cycling stability, making it more promising for use in lithium ion batteries. PMID:26888027

  13. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Prelec, Krsto

    1983-01-01

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  14. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

    1980-12-12

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  15. Anodizing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This anodizing process traces its origin to the 1960's when Reynolds Metals Company, under contract with Goddard Space Flight Center, developed a multipurpose anodizing electrolyte (MAE) process to produce a hard protective finish for spacecraft aluminum. MAE produces a high-density, abrasion-resistant film prior to the coloring step, in which the pores of the film are impregnated with a metallic form of salt. Tru-Color product applications include building fronts, railing, curtain walls, doors and windows.

  16. APEX reveals glowing stellar nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Illustrating the power of submillimetre-wavelength astronomy, an APEX image reveals how an expanding bubble of ionised gas about ten light-years across is causing the surrounding material to collapse into dense clumps that are the birthplaces of new stars. Submillimetre light is the key to revealing some of the coldest material in the Universe, such as these cold, dense clouds. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 40/08 Glowing Stellar Nurseries The region, called RCW120, is about 4200 light years from Earth, towards the constellation of Scorpius. A hot, massive star in its centre is emitting huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, which ionises the surrounding gas, stripping the electrons from hydrogen atoms and producing the characteristic red glow of so-called H-alpha emission. As this ionised region expands into space, the associated shock wave sweeps up a layer of the surrounding cold interstellar gas and cosmic dust. This layer becomes unstable and collapses under its own gravity into dense clumps, forming cold, dense clouds of hydrogen where new stars are born. However, as the clouds are still very cold, with temperatures of around -250˚ Celsius, their faint heat glow can only be seen at submillimetre wavelengths. Submillimetre light is therefore vital in studying the earliest stages of the birth and life of stars. The submillimetre-wavelength data were taken with the LABOCA camera on the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, located on the 5000 m high plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Atacama desert. Thanks to LABOCA's high sensitivity, astronomers were able to detect clumps of cold gas four times fainter than previously possible. Since the brightness of the clumps is a measure of their mass, this also means that astronomers can now study the formation of less massive stars than they could before. The plateau of Chajnantor is also where ESO, together with international partners, is building a next generation submillimetre telescope, ALMA

  17. Glow Sticks: Spectra and Color Mixing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer; Birriel, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Glow sticks are a popular Halloween staple familiar to most of our students. The production of light via a chemical reaction is called "chemiluminescence," and glow sticks are often used as demonstrations and experiments in the chemistry classroom to study reaction rates as a function of temperature. A black light can be used to…

  18. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Glish, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above.

  19. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  20. Arcjet anode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichon, Paul G. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    There is disclosed an anode for an arcjet thruster which resists erosion during start-up on constriction during steady-state operation. The anode includes a converging upstream portion, a diverging downstream portion and a constricted portion disposed therebetween. In one embodiment of the invention, rails formed in the constricted portion accelerate the passage of an arc during start-up reducing erosion. In a second embodiment, a higher strength material resists bulging as a result of the thermal gradient within the nozzle.

  1. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  2. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, James Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  3. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented. PMID:24593637

  4. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Results show that the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid and that the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline. Moreover, the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  5. Is the negative glow plasma of a direct current glow discharge negatively charged?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, E. A.; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Saifutdinov, A. I.

    2015-02-01

    A classic problem in gas discharge physics is discussed: what is the sign of charge density in the negative glow region of a glow discharge? It is shown that traditional interpretations in text-books on gas discharge physics that states a negative charge of the negative glow plasma are based on analogies with a simple one-dimensional model of discharge. Because the real glow discharges with a positive column are always two-dimensional, the transversal (radial) term in divergence with the electric field can provide a non-monotonic axial profile of charge density in the plasma, while maintaining a positive sign. The numerical calculation of glow discharge is presented, showing a positive space charge in the negative glow under conditions, where a one-dimensional model of the discharge would predict a negative space charge.

  6. Is the negative glow plasma of a direct current glow discharge negatively charged?

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, E. A.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2015-02-15

    A classic problem in gas discharge physics is discussed: what is the sign of charge density in the negative glow region of a glow discharge? It is shown that traditional interpretations in text-books on gas discharge physics that states a negative charge of the negative glow plasma are based on analogies with a simple one-dimensional model of discharge. Because the real glow discharges with a positive column are always two-dimensional, the transversal (radial) term in divergence with the electric field can provide a non-monotonic axial profile of charge density in the plasma, while maintaining a positive sign. The numerical calculation of glow discharge is presented, showing a positive space charge in the negative glow under conditions, where a one-dimensional model of the discharge would predict a negative space charge.

  7. The Influence of Polymer Film on an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge in Helium*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nersisyan, Gagik; Graham, William

    2004-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) have potential in polymer surface modification. Here the affect of low density polyethylene (LDPE) film, placed on the electrodes and in the inter-electrode gap, on the development and the uniformity of pulsed APGDs in helium has been studied using short exposure time images and emission spectroscopy of the gap. The APGD was generated between two parallel, glass-ceramic plates, covering metallic mesh electrodes driven by a sinusoidal (5 kV peak to peak) voltage at a frequency of 30 kHz. The build-up of the APGD started from a weak luminous region near the anode followed by the formation of a bright negative glow. When the film was tightly pressed to one of the dielectric plates the intensity of the negative glow decreased and after about 5 minutes the discharge became spatially non-uniform. When the film was stretched through the middle of the gap, it behaved like a dielectric barrier splitting the gap into two APGD regions i.e. with a negative glow on both sides. The affect of the film on the emission spectroscopy and on the electric characteristics will be discussed.

  8. Simulation Study of an Extended Density DC Glow Toroidal Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Granda-Gutierrez, E. E.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.; Benitez-Read, J. S.; Pacheco-Sotelo, J. O.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Valencia A, R.; Barocio, S. R.

    2006-12-04

    Conventional wisdom assigns the DC glow discharge regime to plasma currents below {approx}500 mA values, beyond which the discharge falls into the anomalous glow and the turbulent arc regimes. However, we have found evidence that, during toroidal discharges, this barrier can be ostensibly extended up to 800 mA. Thus, a computer simulation has been applied to the evolution of the main electrical characteristics of such a glow discharge plasma in a toroidal vessel in order to design and construct a respective voltage/current controlled source. This should be able to generate a DC plasma in the glow regime with which currents in the range 10-3-100 A can be experimented and 109-1010 cm-3 plasma densities can be achieved to PIII optimization purposes. The plasma is modelled as a voltage-controlled current source able to be turned on whenever the breakdown voltage is reached across the gap between the anode and the vessel wall. The simulation outcome fits well our experimental measurements showing that the plasma current obeys power laws that are dependent on the power current and other control variables such as the gas pressure.

  9. Characteristics of thermoluminescence glow curves for materials exhibiting more than one glow peak

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of thermoluminescence glow curves, containing one or more glow peaks, have been determined for situations where the assumptions invoked to obtain the usual first and second order kinetics do not apply. First order kinetics occurs only when retrapping is negligible. If more than one glow peak is present and retrapping occurs between different types of traps the glow peaks can be approximated, except in the wings, by the usual first and second order expressions; but often physically unrealistic parameters are obtained. These studies indicate that dating is best accomplished with minerals exhibiting first order kinetics. 6 figures, 1 table.

  10. Orbiter glow observations at high spectral resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, D. J. W.; Mende, S. B.; Yn, E. J. ADMCDADE, I. C. AEMENDE, S. B.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment flow on mission STS 41-G as part of the Canadian complement of experiments was designed to obtain relatively high resolution spectra of the Orbiter glow phenomenon over limited spectral regions centered on prominent upper atmospheric emissions. Observations were carried out successfully at altitudes of 360 km and 230 km although those at the lower altitude were limited by degradation of the image intensifier. Definitive glow results were obtained at the end of a thruster firing which showed the spectrum to be a continuum at a resolution of approximately 0.4 nm centered at a wavelength of 360 nm. Results at other wavelengths in the absence of any firings strongly suggest that the Orbiter glow is a continuum throughout the spectral region 550 nm to 760 nm. A discussion is presented that considers the reaction NO + O2 as being a possible candidate for the mechanism producing the shuttle glow.

  11. Ultrasonic nebulization atmospheric pressure glow discharge - Preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greda, Krzysztof; Jamroz, Piotr; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge (μAPGD) generated between a small-sized He nozzle jet anode and a flowing liquid cathode was coupled with ultrasonic nebulization (USN) for analytical optical emission spectrometry (OES). The spatial distributions of the emitted spectra from the novel coupled USN-μAPGD system and the conventional μAPGD system were compared. In the μAPGD, the maxima of the intensity distribution profiles of the atomic emission lines Ca, Cd, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na and Sr were observed in the near cathode region, whereas, in the case of the USN-μAPGD, they were shifted towards the anode. In the novel system, the intensities of the analytical lines of the studied metals were boosted from several to 35 times. As compared to the conventional μAPGD-OES with the introduction of analytes through the sputtering and/or the electrospray-like nebulization of the flowing liquid cathode solution, the proposed method with the USN introduction of analytes in the form of a dry aerosol provides improved detectability of the studied metals. The detection limits of metals achieved with the USN-μAPGD-OES method were in the range from 0.08 μg L- 1 for Li to 52 μg L- 1 for Mn.

  12. Infrared spectral measurement of space shuttle glow

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadijian, M.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared spectral measurements of the space shuttle glow were successfully conducted during the STS-39 space shuttle mission. Analysis indicates that NO, NO[sup +], OH, and CO are among the molecules associated with the infrared glow phenomenon. During orbiter thruster firings the glow intensities in the infrared are enhanced by factors of 10x to 100x with significant changes in spectral distribution. These measurements were obtained with the Spacecraft Kinetic Infrared Test (SKIRT) payload which included a cryogenic infrared circular variable filter (CVF) spectrometer (0.6 [mu]m to 5.4 [mu]) and a number of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometers (0.2 [mu]m to 5.4 [mu]m and 9.9 [mu]m to 10.4 [mu]m). In addition, glow measurements were unsuccessfully attempted with the Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle (CIRRIS-1A) with its 2.5 [mu]m to 25 [mu]m Fourier transform interferometer. SKIRT CVF obtained over 14,000 spectra of quiescent shuttle glow, thruster enhanced shuttle glow, upper atmosphere airglow, aurora, orbiter environment, and deep space non-glow backgrounds during its eight day mission. The SKIRT radiometers operated almost continuously throughout the mission to provide a detailed history of the IR/VIS/UV optical environment associated with the operation of large spacecraft structures in low earth orbit. This dissertation will primarily address those measurements conducted by the SKIRT spectrometer as they relate to space shuttle glow in the infrared. The STS-39 Space Shuttle Discovery was launched from the NASA Kennedy Space Center on 28 April 1991 into a 57 degree inclination circular orbit at an altitude of 260 km.

  13. Laboratory investigation of shuttle glow mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Holtzclaw, K. W.; Green, B. D.; Krech, R. H.; Leone, A.; Swenson, G.

    1990-10-01

    A fast oxygen atom source was used to investigate the Shuttle glow phenomena in the laboratory. Both room temperature and cooled targets were dosed with NO and then irradiated by 8 km/s oxygen atoms. The observed fluorescence is spectrally similar to that seen on the Shuttle supporting previous suggestions that recombination of O with surface bound NO is the responsible mechanism for the visible Shuttle glow.

  14. Vehicle glow measurements on the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Swenson, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    From the combined data set of glow observations on shuttle flight STS-3, STS-4, STS-5, STS-8, STS-9, 41-E, and 41-G some of the properties of the shuttle glow are discussed. Comparison of the STS-3 and STS-5 (240 and 305 km altitude, respectively) photographs shows that the intensity of the glow is about a factor of 3.5 brighter on the low-altitude (STS-3) flight. In an experiment to observe the dependence of the intensity on the ram angle, the angle of incidence between the spacecraft surface normal and the velocity vector, the Orbiter was purposely rotated about the x axis on the STS-5 mission. For a relatively large angle between the velocity vector and the surface normal there is an appreciable glow, provided the surface is not shadowed by some other spacecraft structure. As the angle becomes less the glow intensifies. Material samples were also exposed in the ram direction during nightside orbits and the glow surrounding the samples was photographed.

  15. Analysis Of The Different Zones Of Glow Discharge Of Ethyl Alcohol (C2H6O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, C.; Reyes, P. G.; Mulia, J.; Castillo, F.; Martínez, H.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the emission spectroscopy of ethyl alcohol in some regions, also is determine the result elements of the glow discharge, the spectrums were observed in a range of 200 at 1100 nm in the different zones inside of the tube at different distances of 20 and 30 cm. The elements are: in anode region C6H5 (483.02nm), CHO (519.56nm) and H2 (560.47nm), in the positive column CO2+ (315.52 y 337.00nm), O+ (357.48nm), CH+ (380.61nm) and CO+ (399.73nm); in the cathode region we observed O+ (391.19nm), CHOCHO (428.00nm), CO+ (471.12nm) and H2 (656.52nm). C6H5, CHO y H2 species occurring in all regions analyzed varying the glow discharge emission intensity.

  16. Survey of ultraviolet shuttle glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, K. A.; Uckler, G. J.; Tobiska, K.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Colorado Get Away Special (GAS) project utilizes the efforts of its students to place experiments on the shuttle. The objective of one experiment, the shuttle glow study, is to conduct a general survey of emissions in the ultraviolet near vehicle surfaces. An approximate wavelength range of 1900 to 3000 A will be scanned to observe predominant features. Special emphasis will be placed on studying the band structure of NO near 2000 A and the Mg+ line at 2800 A. The spectrometer, of Ebert-Faste 1/8-meter design, will perform the experiment during spacecraft night. It will be oriented such that the optical axis points to the cargo bay zenith. In order to direct the field-of-view of the instrument onto the shuttle vertical stabilizer (tail), a mirror assembly is employed. The mirror system has been designed to rotate through 7.5 degrees of arc using 10 positions resulting in a spatial resolution of 30 x 3 cm, with the larger dimension corresponding to the horizontal direction. Such a configuration can be attained from the forwardmost position in the cargo bay. Each spatial position will be subjected to a full spectral scan with a resolution on the order of 10 A.

  17. Characterization of a radio frequency hollow electrode discharge at low gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadi, Amir Mohammad; Trottenberg, Thomas; Rehders, Stefan; Strunskus, Thomas; Kersten, Holger; Faupel, Franz

    2015-08-01

    A radio frequency (RF) hollow discharge configuration is presented, which makes use of a combination of RF plasma generation and the hollow cathode effect. The system was especially designed for the treatment of nanoparticles, plasma polymerization, and nanocomposite fabrication. The process gas streams through the plasma in the inner of the cylindrical electrode system. In the here presented measurements, pure argon and argon with oxygen admixtures are exemplarily used. The discharge is characterized by probe measurements in the effluent, electrical measurements of the discharge parameters, and visual observations of the plasma glow. It is found that the RF fluctuations of the plasma potential are weak. The plasma potential resembles the one of a DC hollow cathode discharge, the RF hollow electrode acts as a cathode due to the self-bias, and a high voltage sheath forms in its inner cylinder.

  18. Characterization of a radio frequency hollow electrode discharge at low gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahadi, Amir Mohammad; Rehders, Stefan; Strunskus, Thomas; Faupel, Franz; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kersten, Holger

    2015-08-15

    A radio frequency (RF) hollow discharge configuration is presented, which makes use of a combination of RF plasma generation and the hollow cathode effect. The system was especially designed for the treatment of nanoparticles, plasma polymerization, and nanocomposite fabrication. The process gas streams through the plasma in the inner of the cylindrical electrode system. In the here presented measurements, pure argon and argon with oxygen admixtures are exemplarily used. The discharge is characterized by probe measurements in the effluent, electrical measurements of the discharge parameters, and visual observations of the plasma glow. It is found that the RF fluctuations of the plasma potential are weak. The plasma potential resembles the one of a DC hollow cathode discharge, the RF hollow electrode acts as a cathode due to the self-bias, and a high voltage sheath forms in its inner cylinder.

  19. Hollow spherical supramolecular dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Percec, Virgil; Peterca, Mihai; Dulcey, Andrés E; Imam, Mohammad R; Hudson, Steven D; Nummelin, Sami; Adelman, Peter; Heiney, Paul A

    2008-10-01

    The synthesis of a library containing 12 conical dendrons that self-assemble into hollow spherical supramolecular dendrimers is reported. The design principles for this library were accessed by development of a method that allows the identification of hollow spheres, followed by structural and retrostructural analysis of their Pm3n cubic lattice. The first hollow spherical supramolecular dendrimer was made by replacing the tapered dendron, from the previously reported tapered dendritic dipeptide that self-assembled into helical pores, with its constitutional isomeric conical dendron. This strategy generated a conical dendritic dipeptide that self-assembled into a hollow spherical supramolecular dendrimer that self-organizes in a Pm3n cubic lattice. Other examples of hollow spheres were assembled from conical dendrons without a dipeptide at their apex. These are conical dendrons originated from tapered dendrons containing additional benzyl ether groups at their apex. The inner part of the hollow sphere assembled from the dipeptide resembles the path of a spherical helix or loxodrome and, therefore, is chiral. The spheres assembled from other conical dendrons are nonhelical, even when they contain stereocenters on the alkyl groups from their periphery. Functionalization of the apex of the conical dendrons with diethylene glycol allowed the encapsulation of LiOTf and RbOTf in the center of the hollow sphere. These experiments showed that hollow spheres function as supramolecular dendritic capsules and therefore are expected to display functions complementary to those of other related molecular and supramolecular structures. PMID:18771261

  20. Io Glowing in the Dark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Volcanic hot spots and auroral emissions glow on the darkside of Jupiter's moon Io in the image at left. The image was taken by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on 29 June, 1996 UT while Io was in Jupiter's shadow. It is the best and highest-resolution image ever acquired of hot spots or auroral features on Io. The mosaic at right of 1979 Voyager images is shown with an identical scale and projection to identify the locations of the hot spots seen in the Galileo image. The grid marks are at 30 degree intervals of latitude and longitude. North is to the top.

    In the nighttime Galileo image, small red ovals and perhaps some small green areas are from volcanic hot spots with temperatures of more than about 700 kelvin (about 1000 degrees Fahrenheit). Greenish areas seen near the limb, or edge of the moon, are probably the result of auroral or airglow emissions of neutral oxygen or sulfur atoms in volcanic plumes and in Io's patchy atmosphere. The image was taken from a range of 1,035,000 kilometers (about 643,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  1. Low-current hollow-cathode discharge in a trigger unit of a cold cathode thyratron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landl, N. V.; Korolev, Y. D.; Frants, O. B.; Geyman, V. G.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper deals with the investigations of the effect of cathode emissivity on the regimes of low-current hollow-cathode glow discharge. It is shown that an increase in the emissivity due to the so-called high-emissivity tablet allows the essential decrease in the discharge initiation voltage and the discharge burning voltage. The model of current sustaining for the hollow-cathode discharge, which takes into account the external emission current has been developed. On basis of the model, the current-voltage characteristics of the discharge have been interpreted.

  2. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

    1990-12-31

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  3. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Henning, Sten A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  4. Normal glow discharge in axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S.; Shang, J.

    2014-10-01

    Theory and results of mathematical modeling of a glow discharge in a parallel-plate configuration with axial magnetic field is presented. The model consists of continuity equations for electron and ion fluids, the Poisson equation for the self-consistent electric field. Numerical simulation results are presented for two-dimensional glow discharge at various initial conditions. The results are obtained for molecular nitrogen at pressure 1-5 Torr, emf of power supply 1-2 kV, and magnetic field induction B = 0-0.5 T. It is shown that in the presence of the axial magnetic field the glow discharge is rotated around its axis of symmetry. Nevertheless it is shown that in the investigated range of discharge parameters in an axial magnetic field the law of the normal current density is retained.

  5. A GLOWING POOL OF LIGHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NGC 3132 is a striking example of a planetary nebula. This expanding cloud of gas, surrounding a dying star, is known to amateur astronomers in the southern hemisphere as the 'Eight-Burst' or the 'Southern Ring' Nebula. The name 'planetary nebula' refers only to the round shape that many of these objects show when examined through a small visual telescope. In reality, these nebulae have little or nothing to do with planets, but are instead huge shells of gas ejected by stars as they near the ends of their lifetimes. NGC 3132 is nearly half a light year in diameter, and at a distance of about 2000 light years is one of the nearer known planetary nebulae. The gases are expanding away from the central star at a speed of 9 miles per second. This image, captured by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, clearly shows two stars near the center of the nebula, a bright white one, and an adjacent, fainter companion to its upper right. (A third, unrelated star lies near the edge of the nebula.) The faint partner is actually the star that has ejected the nebula. This star is now smaller than our own Sun, but extremely hot. The flood of ultraviolet radiation from its surface makes the surrounding gases glow through fluorescence. The brighter star is in an earlier stage of stellar evolution, but in the future it will probably eject its own planetary nebula. In the Heritage Team's rendition of the Hubble image, the colors were chosen to represent the temperature of the gases. Blue represents the hottest gas, which is confined to the inner region of the nebula. Red represents the coolest gas, at the outer edge. The Hubble image also reveals a host of filaments, including one long one that resembles a waistband, made out of dust particles which have condensed out of the expanding gases. The dust particles are rich in elements such as carbon. Eons from now, these particles may be incorporated into new stars and planets when they form from interstellar gas and dust. Our own Sun may eject a

  6. Instability of plasma plume of micro-hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-11-15

    The micro-hollow cathode gas discharge driven by thermionic emission is studied using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions simulation. The electron current is extracted from the plasma plume penetrating into the keeper–anode space through a small keeper orifice from the cathode-keeper space. The results of simulations and a simplified analytical model showed that the plasma density and extracted current can exhibit deep modulation in the range of frequencies of tens of MHz. This modulation appears when the space-charge limited current between the plume boundary and the anode exceeds the plasma thermal electron current through the orifice.

  7. Formation of Porous Anodic Oxide Film on Titanium in Phosphoric Acid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Thompson, G. E.

    2015-01-01

    A sequential breakdown anodizing conditions on cp-Ti in phosphoric acid has been investigated in the present study. Anodic oxide films were formed at 100, 150, and 200 V, examined by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A porous oxide texture was formed at each voltage. The thickness of anodic porous oxide increased with the increase of anodic voltage. Nano-particulates were formed around and within the pores, and the size of pores increased with increased voltage due to the expansion of particulates. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition was initiated during the film growth. The degree of crystallinity in the anodic oxide film fabricated at 200 V is more abundant than 150 and 100 V. Increased content of the phosphorus species was incorporated into the porous film with the increase of anodic voltage, stabilizing for the nanocrystals developed within the oxide.

  8. Hollow cathode plasma coupling study, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    The electron collection and emission characteristics of a simple hollow cathode contactor, an extended anode hollow cathode contactor supplied by JSC, and a ring cusp magnetic field contactor are presented and the effects of discharge power and argon or xenon expellant flowrate on these characteristics are examined. All of the contactors are shown to exhibit good electron emission performance over a wide range of discharge power and expellant type and flowrate. Good electron performance is shown to be more difficult to achieve. Results suggest that the extended anode and ring cusp contactors should perform satisfactorily to electron emission currents beyond 1000 mA and electron collection currents beyond 500 mA. All contactors performed better on xenon than argon. A general theory of plasma contactor operation in both the electron collection and electron emission modes, which describes the current-limiting effects of space-charge phenomena is given. This current-limiting and collecting phenomenon is shown to be a function of driving potential differences and emitting and collecting surface radius ratio for the case of a spherical geometry. Discharge power did not appear to influence the electron collection current substantially in the experiments so it is suggested in light of the model that the contactors are generally not limited by their ion production capabilities under conditions at which they were tested.

  9. A low-power magnetic-field-assisted plasma jet generated by dielectric-barrier discharge enhanced direct-current glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-01-06

    A magnetic field is introduced to the dielectric-barrier discharge enhanced direct-current glow discharge for efficient plasma generation, with the discharge power of 2.7 W and total energy consumption reduced to 34% of the original. By spatially examining the emission spectra and plasma temperature, it is found that their peaks shift from edges to the center and the negative and anode glows merge into the positive column and disappear, accompanied by improvement of uniformity and chemical activity of the enlarged plasma. This lies in the enhancement of ionization in the curved and lengthened electron path and the dispersion of discharge domains.

  10. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  11. Hollow cathode apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hollow cathode apparatus is described, which can be rapidly and reliably started. An ignitor positioned upstream from the hollow cathode, generates a puff of plasma that flows with the primary gas to be ionized through the cathode. The plasma puff creates a high voltage breakdown between the downstream end of the cathode and a keeper electrode, to heat the cathode to an electron-emitting temperature.

  12. Fuel cell components and systems having carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fibers

    DOEpatents

    Langry, Kevin C; Farmer, Joseph C

    2015-04-28

    A method, according to one embodiment, includes acquiring a structure having an ionically-conductive, electrically-resistive electrolyte/separator layer covering an inner or outer surface of a carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fiber and a catalyst along one side thereof, adding an anode that extends along at least part of a length of the structure, and adding a cathode that extends along at least part of the length of the structure, the cathode being on an opposite side of the hollow fiber as the anode.

  13. A lithium-fluoride flashover ion source cleaned with a glow discharge and irradiated with vacuum-ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, E. J. T.; Woodworth, J. R.; Bieg, K. W.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Sweeney, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied methods of varying the ion species generated by a lithium-fluoride overcoated anode in a 0.5-MV magnetically insulated ion diode. We found that cleaning the anode surface with a 13.6-MHz rf glow discharge or illuminating the anode with a pulsed soft x-ray, vacuum-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation source just before the accelerator pulse significantly altered the ion species of the ion beam produced by the diode. The glow-discharge plasma removed adsorbates (carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen) from the surface of the LiF flashover source. The ions seen were lithium and hydrogen. Unfortunately, the diode impedance with a lithium-fluoride anode was high and the ion efficiency was low; however, XUV irradiation of the surface dramatically lowered the impedance by desorbing neutrals from the ion source via photon-stimulated desorption. Current densities of ten times the Child-Langmuir space-charge limit were achieved under XUV irradiation. In particular, ion currents increased by over a factor of 3 when 12 mJ/cm2 of XUV radiation was used. However, with XUV irradiation the largest fraction of ions were fluorine, oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen, not lithium.

  14. Striations in an ethyl alcohol glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, P. G.; Gómez, A.; Torres, C.; Martínez, H.; Castillo, F.; Vergara, J.

    2015-03-01

    This research shows the behavior of striations in glow discharge generated with high purity ethyl alcohol at a pressure of 0.6 Torr. This paper present the number of striations as a function of the of current and voltage discharge.

  15. Current collection by high voltage anodes in near ionospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniades, John A.; Greaves, Rod G.; Boyd, D. A.; Ellis, R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors experimentally identified three distinct regimes with large differences in current collection in the presence of neutrals and weak magnetic fields. In magnetic field/anode voltage space the three regions are separated by very sharp transition boundaries. The authors performed a series of laboratory experiments to study the dependence of the region boundaries on several parameters, such as the ambient neutral density, plasma density, magnetic field strength, applied anode voltage, voltage pulsewidth, chamber material, chamber size and anode radius. The three observed regimes are: classical magnetic field limited collection; stable medium current toroidal discharge; and large scale, high current space glow discharge. There is as much as several orders of magnitude of difference in the amount of collected current upon any boundary crossing, particularly if one enters the space glow regime. They measured some of the properties of the plasma generated by the breakdown that is present in regimes II and III in the vicinity of the anode including the sheath modified electrostatic potential, I-V characteristics at high voltage as well as the local plasma density.

  16. Polypyrrole-Coated Zinc Ferrite Hollow Spheres with Improved Cycling Stability for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoran; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Liang; Huang, Xiaodan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-07-01

    Here, ZnFe2 O4 double-shell hollow microspheres are designed to accommodate the large volume expansion during lithiation. A facile and efficient vapor-phase polymerization method has been developed to coat the ZnFe2 O4 hollow spheres with polypyrrole (PPY). The thin PPY coating improves not only the electronic conductivity but also the structural integrity, and thus the cycling stability of the ZnFe2 O4 hollow spheres. Our work sheds light on how to enhance the electrochemical performance of transition metal oxide-based anode materials by designing delicate nanostructures. PMID:27259158

  17. Experimental investigations of dust levitation in a DC glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Niraj; Behrend, Christina; Jiang, Feng; Post-Zwicker, Andrew

    2003-10-01

    Dusty plasmas continue to be of considerable interest to both the astrophysical and plasma processing communities. We recently constructed a DC glow discharge source to investigate dust behavior and its effect on the plasma parameters. The system, roughly based upon one reported elsewhere(1) consists of a 4" stainless steel cross with two planar stainless steel electrodes. Both the anode and cathode are biased with respect to the chamber ground. Typical values are 100 V and -410 V, respectively with argon as the working gas and 1.5 cm electrode distance. The silica dust particles are 3 - 5 microns in diameter and rested on a stainless tray that could be electrically isolated, biased, or grounded. Clouds were observed by scattering light from a He-Ne laser into a CCD camera and the plasma diagnosed by a Langmuir probe. A variety of dust modes are observed, including dust acoustic and dust lattice modes. We report on our initial results investigating the charging of the dust grains and the sheath structure surrounding the dust cloud. (1)Thomas, E., Watson, M., Phys. Plasmas, 7, 3194 (2000)

  18. The Smokey Hollow Community The Smokey Hollow Community, Informal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    The Smokey Hollow Community - The Smokey Hollow Community, Informal boundaries by street name: North to South: East Jefferson Street to East Van Buren Street. West to East: South Gadsden Street to Marvin Street., Tallahassee, Leon County, FL

  19. Smokey Hollow Ethnographic Landscape Circa 1955 The Smokey Hollow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Smokey Hollow Ethnographic Landscape Circa 1955 - The Smokey Hollow Community, Informal boundaries by street name: North to South: East Jefferson Street to East Van Buren Street. West to East: South Gadsden Street to Marvin Street., Tallahassee, Leon County, FL

  20. Non-linear macro evolution of a dc driven micro atmospheric glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.

    2015-10-15

    We studied the macro evolution of the micro atmospheric glow discharge generated between a micro argon jet into ambient air and static water. The micro discharge behaves similarly to a complex ecosystem. Non-linear behaviors are found for the micro discharge when the water acts as a cathode, different from the discharge when water behaves as an anode. Groups of snapshots of the micro discharge formed at different discharge currents are captured by an intensified charge-coupled device with controlled exposure time, and each group consisted of 256 images taken in succession. Edge detection methods are used to identify the water surface and then the total brightness is defined by adding up the signal counts over the area of the micro discharge. Motions of the water surface at different discharge currents show that the water surface lowers increasingly rapidly when the water acts as a cathode. In contrast, the water surface lowers at a constant speed when the water behaves as an anode. The light curves are similar to logistic growth curves, suggesting that a self-inhibition process occurs in the micro discharge. Meanwhile, the total brightness increases linearly during the same time when the water acts as an anode. Discharge-water interactions cause the micro discharge to evolve. The charged particle bomb process is probably responsible for the different behaviors of the micro discharges when the water acts as cathode and anode.

  1. Non-linear macro evolution of a dc driven micro atmospheric glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.

    2015-10-01

    We studied the macro evolution of the micro atmospheric glow discharge generated between a micro argon jet into ambient air and static water. The micro discharge behaves similarly to a complex ecosystem. Non-linear behaviors are found for the micro discharge when the water acts as a cathode, different from the discharge when water behaves as an anode. Groups of snapshots of the micro discharge formed at different discharge currents are captured by an intensified charge-coupled device with controlled exposure time, and each group consisted of 256 images taken in succession. Edge detection methods are used to identify the water surface and then the total brightness is defined by adding up the signal counts over the area of the micro discharge. Motions of the water surface at different discharge currents show that the water surface lowers increasingly rapidly when the water acts as a cathode. In contrast, the water surface lowers at a constant speed when the water behaves as an anode. The light curves are similar to logistic growth curves, suggesting that a self-inhibition process occurs in the micro discharge. Meanwhile, the total brightness increases linearly during the same time when the water acts as an anode. Discharge-water interactions cause the micro discharge to evolve. The charged particle bomb process is probably responsible for the different behaviors of the micro discharges when the water acts as cathode and anode.

  2. Optimization of hollow cathode discharge electrode for damage free remote plasma removal process for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Tae S.; Han, Qing; Yang, Dongqing; Park, Soonam; Lubomirsky, Dima; Venkataraman, Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Cone-shaped hollow cathode electrode configuration for a damage free remote plasma removal process has been optimized for given pressures based on Paschen characteristic curves, voltage-current characteristics and time-resolved discharge observations as well as oxide film removal performances. Remote plasmas have been generated in two types of cone-shaped electrodes with mixtures of He, NF3, and NH3 for pressure range of 1-30 Torr. Paschen characteristic curves and voltage-current (V-I) characteristics define an operating pressure for low breakdown voltage and the hollow cathode effect to minimize the particles. Sinusoidal voltage waveform and asymmetry electrode configuration alternate the glow discharge and hollow cathode discharge modes in a cycle. The current and infrared emission intensity from the glow discharge increases together for both cone-shaped electrodes with increasing pressure, whereas the hollow cathode discharge plasma emits strong infrared only when pD condition is satisfied. For the wide cone electrode configuration, high voltage operation at higher pressure results in particle contamination on the processed wafer by high energy ion bombardment. Operating at optimum pressure for a given electrode configuration shows faster oxide etch rate with better uniformity over a whole 300 mm wafer.

  3. Erosion of a-C:H films deposited on W, Mo, and stainless steel under interaction with air glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalavutdinov, R. Kh.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Bukhovets, V. L.; Zakharov, A. P.; Mazul, I. V.

    2011-08-01

    An air direct current glow discharge with a hollow cathode was used as source of chemically active oxygen for selective removal of amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) films deposited on W, Mo, and stainless steel. The films were removed both directly in the discharge and afterglow region. The film erosion rates depend on the sample position relatively to plasma and decrease in the order: hollow cathode, positive column, afterglow region. It was shown that primary (1-3 nm) continuous amorphous and secondary (1-30 nm) island-like oxide films were formed on the metal surfaces after removal of the a-C:H films. Polycrystalline island-like oxide films were generated due to recrystallization of the primary films. Material oxidation suppression was caused by reactions of oxygen ion neutralization and atomic oxygen recombination on metals.

  4. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  5. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  6. Use of glow discharge in fluidized beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Wood, P. C.; Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Static charges and agglomerization of particles in a fluidized bed systems are minimized by maintaining in at least part of the bed a radio frequency glow discharge. This approach is eminently suitable for processes in which the conventional charge removing agents, i.e., moisture or conductive particle coatings, cannot be used. The technique is applied here to the disproportionation of calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate to yield calcium superoxide, an exceptionally water and heat sensitive reaction.

  7. Advances in aluminum anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dale, K. H.

    1969-01-01

    White anodize is applied to aluminum alloy surfaces by specific surface preparation, anodizing, pigmentation, and sealing techniques. The development techniques resulted in alloys, which are used in space vehicles, with good reflectance values and excellent corrosive resistance.

  8. FLUORINE CELL ANODE ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Cable, R.E.; Goode, W.B. Jr.; Henderson, W.K.; Montillon, G.H.

    1962-06-26

    An improved anode assembly is deslgned for use in electrolytlc cells ln the productlon of hydrogen and fluorlne from a moIten electrolyte. The anode assembly comprises a copper post, a copper hanger supported by the post, a plurality of carbon anode members, and bolt means for clamplng half of the anode members to one slde of the hanger and for clamplng the other half of the anode members to the other slde of the hanger. The heads of the clamplng bolts are recessed withln the anode members and carbon plugs are inserted ln the recesses above the bolt heads to protect the boIts agalnst corroslon. A copper washer is provided under the head of each clamplng boIt such that the anode members can be tightly clamped to the hanger with a resultant low anode jolnt resistance. (AEC)

  9. NASA CONNECT: 'Glow with the Flow'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    'Geometry and Algebra: Glow with the Flow' is the second of five programs in the 2000-2001 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes teh 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and tehcnology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site adn register http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Geometry and Algebra: Glow with the Flow', students will learn about the force of drag and how NASA engineers use models and glowing paints to see how air flows over vehicles in a wind tunnel. Students will also discover how the blended wing body(BWB), a concept super jumbo jet that resembles a flying wing, will affect air travelers of the future. Students will observe NASA engineers using geometry and algebra when they measure and design models to be tested in wind tunnels. By conducting classroom and on-line activities, students will make connections between NASA research and the mathematics, science and technology they learn in their classroom.

  10. Comparative Study of Electric Field Measurement in Glow Discharges using Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Shahid; Saleem, M.; Baig, M. A.

    2008-10-22

    The net electric field inside low-pressure glow discharges has been measured using laser optogalvanic spectroscopy of 1s2s {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}np{sup 1}P{sub 1} Rydberg series of atomic helium. Three different types of discharges, an inductively coupled RF discharge cell operating at 4 MHz, a homemade DC discharge cell and a commercial see-through hollow cathode lamp have been used for these studies. The Rydberg series terminates earlier in the high electric field discharge as compared to that in the low electric field discharge. The net electric field also produces shift and broadens the observed spectral lines especially in the high lying Rydberg transitions. The electric field has been determined from the series termination and also from the energy shift of the observed transitions.

  11. Aluminothermic reduction enabled synthesis of silicon hollow microspheres from commercialized silica nanoparticles for superior lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Wei; Liu, Yi-Tao; Xie, Xu-Ming; Ye, Xiong-Ying

    2016-06-28

    We report the aluminothermic reduction enabled synthesis of silicon hollow microspheres from commercialized silica nanoparticles by controlled transformation and organization. The synergistically integrated merits of a simple process and delicate structural design lay a basis for developing an industrially viable silicon anode with optimized electrochemical performances. PMID:27302245

  12. Fuel cell components and systems having carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fibers

    DOEpatents

    Langry, Kevin C.; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-08

    According to one embodiment, a system includes a structure having an ionically-conductive, electrically-resistive electrolyte/separator layer covering an inner or outer surface of a carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fiber and a catalyst coupled to the hollow fiber, an anode extending along at least part of a length of the structure, and a cathode extending along at least part of the length of the structure, the cathode being on an opposite side of the hollow fiber as the anode. In another embodiment, a method includes acquiring a structure having an ionically-conductive, electrically-resistive electrolyte/separator layer covering an inner or outer surface of a carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fiber and a catalyst along one side thereof, adding an anode that extends along at least part of a length of the structure, and adding a cathode that extends along at least part of the length of the structure on an opposite side as the anode.

  13. Perceived three-dimensional shape toggles perceived glow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjung; Wilcox, Laurie M; Murray, Richard F

    2016-05-01

    Most surfaces reflect light from external sources, but others emit light: they glow. Glowing surfaces are often a sign of an important feature of the environment, such as a heat source or a bioluminescent life form, but we know little about how the human visual system identifies them. Previous work has shown that luminance and luminance gradients are important in glow perception [1,2]. While a link between glow and shape has been suggested in the literature [3], there has been no systematic investigation of this relationship. Here we show that perceived three-dimensional shape plays a decisive role in glow perception; vivid percepts of glow can be toggled on and off, simply by changing cues to three-dimensional shape while holding other image features constant. PMID:27166688

  14. Ring-cusp ion thruster with shell anode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Rawlin, V. K.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An improved ion thruster for low specific impulse operation in the 1500 sec to 6000 sec range has a multicusp boundary field provided by high strength magnets on an iron anode shell which lengthens the paths of electrons from a hollow cathode assembly. A downstream anode pole piece in the form of an iron ring supports a ring of magnets to provide a more uniform beam profile. A cylindrical cathode magnet can be moved selectively in an axial direction along a feed tube to produce the desired magnetic field at the cathode tip.

  15. The temporal development of hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Mai T.; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Gerdin, Glenn A.; Lee, Ja H.

    1990-01-01

    The temporal development of hollow cathode discharges was studied by means of electrical and optical diagnostic techniques. The results indicate that the discharge develops in two stages. The initial breakdown occurs along the longest straight path of the system, i.e., from the anode to the bottom of the cathode hole. This predischarge is confined to a narrow filament along the axis and carries a current of up to hundreds of milliamperes. The resulting distortion of the electric field in the cathode hole is assumed to cause a radial breakdown from the filamentary plasma on the axis to the edge of the cathode hole. After this second breakdown, an increase in current by more than three orders of magnitude is observed. Measurements with axial magnetic fields support the two-stage model.

  16. Investigation of a high impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with hollow load

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Heng; Shu Ting; Li Zhiqiang

    2012-09-15

    A novel high-impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with greatly restrained power deposition on the anode has been investigated. Methods to increase the MILO impedance and decrease the anode current are discussed. A MILO with impedance of 30 {Omega} and power conversion efficiency of 25% is presented by particle-in-cell simulations. Compared with the previous MILO in our lab, the anode current of the proposed MILO is reduced about 50%, the power conversion efficiency doubles, and the power deposition on anode is reduced nearly one half. Furthermore, considerations for reducing the power deposition on load have also been carried out in MILO design, and the load current is reduced to 4.6 kA, only 17% of the total anode current. Finally, a hollow load was introduced to reduce the power deposition density on the load, without decreasing the power conversion efficiency.

  17. Characterization of hollow cathode, ring cusp discharge chambers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study into the effects of changes in such physical design parameters as hollow cathode position, anode position and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance, is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction and ion beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate specific means by which changes in these design parameters induce changes in performance, i.e., through changes in the loss rates of primary electrons to the anode, of ions to discharge chamber walls or of ions to cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid, (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density on the discharge chamber centerline, and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface and so there are no steep magnetic flux density gradients near the walls through which ions can be lost by Bohm diffusion. The uniformity of the plasma density at the grids can also be improved by moving the point of primary electron injection into the discharge chamber off of the chamber centerline. Other results show the discharge chamber losses decrease when a filament cathode is substituted for a hollow cathode to the extent of the hollow cathode operating power. When plasma ion energy cost is determined in such a way that the cost of operating the hollow cathode is subtracted out, the performance using either electron source is similar.

  18. RHETT/EPDM Flight Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Patterson, Michael; Pastel, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the BMDO Russian Hall Electric Thruster Technology program two xenon hollow cathodes, a flight unit and a flight spare were fabricated, acceptance tested and delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use on the Electric Propulsion Demonstration Module. These hollow cathodes, based on the International Space Station plasma contactor design, were fabricated at the NASA Lewis Research Center for use with a D-55 anode layer thruster in the first on-orbit operational application of this technology. The 2.2 Ampere nominal emission current of this device was obtained with a xenon flow rate of 0.6 mg/s. Ignition of the cathode discharge was accomplished through preheating the active electron emitter with a resistive heating element before application of a 650 volt ignition pulse between the emitter and an external starting electrode. The successful acceptance testing of the Electric Propulsion Demonstration Module utilizing these cathodes demonstrated the suitability of cathodes based on barium impregnated inserts in an enclosed keeper configuration for use with Hall thruster propulsion systems.

  19. Nanotubes within transition metal silicate hollow spheres: Facile preparation and superior lithium storage performances

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; An, Yongling; Zhai, Wei; Gao, Xueping; Feng, Jinkui; Ci, Lijie; Xiong, Shenglin

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} were successfully prepared by a facile hydrothermal method using SiO{sub 2} nanosphere. • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} were tested as anode materials for lithium batteries. • The hollow Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, MnSiO{sub 3} and CuSiO{sub 3} delivered superior electrochemical performance. • The lithium storage mechanism is probe via cyclic voltammetry and XPS. - Abstract: A series of transition metal silicate hollow spheres, including cobalt silicate (Co{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), manganese silicate (MnSiO{sub 3}) and copper silicate (CuSiO{sub 3}.2H{sub 2}O, CuSiO{sub 3} as abbreviation in the text) were prepared via a simple and economic hydrothermal method by using silica spheres as chemical template. Time-dependent experiments confirmed that the resultants formed a novel type of hierarchical structure, hollow spheres assembled by numerous one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes building blocks. For the first time, the transition metal silicate hollow spheres were characterized as novel anode materials of Li-ion battery, which presented superior lithium storage capacities, cycle performance and rate performance. The 1D nanotubes assembly and hollow interior endow this kind of material facilitate fast lithium ion and electron transport and accommodate the big volume change during the conversion reactions. Our study shows that low-cost transition metal silicate with rationally designed nanostructures can be promising anode materials for high capacity lithium-ion battery.

  20. Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

  1. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  2. Hollow Microporous Organic Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Buyi; Yang, Xinjia; Xia, Lingling; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Tan, Bien

    2013-07-01

    Fabrication of hollow microporous organic capsules (HMOCs) could be very useful because of their hollow and porous morphology, which combines the advantages of both microporous organic polymers and non-porous nanocapsules. They can be used as storage materials or reaction chambers while supplying the necessary path for the design of controlled uptake/release systems. Herein, the synthesis of HMOCs with high surface area through facile emulsion polymerization and hypercrosslinking reactions, is described. Due to their tailored porous structure, these capsules possessed high drug loading efficiency, zero-order drug release kinetics and are also demonstrated to be used as nanoscale reactors for the prepareation of nanoparticles (NPs) without any external stabilizer. Moreover, owing to their intrinsic biocompatibility and fluorescence, these capsules exhibit promising prospect for biomedical applications.

  3. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  4. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  5. Hollow Microporous Organic Capsules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Buyi; Yang, Xinjia; Xia, Lingling; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Tan, Bien

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of hollow microporous organic capsules (HMOCs) could be very useful because of their hollow and porous morphology, which combines the advantages of both microporous organic polymers and non-porous nanocapsules. They can be used as storage materials or reaction chambers while supplying the necessary path for the design of controlled uptake/release systems. Herein, the synthesis of HMOCs with high surface area through facile emulsion polymerization and hypercrosslinking reactions, is described. Due to their tailored porous structure, these capsules possessed high drug loading efficiency, zero-order drug release kinetics and are also demonstrated to be used as nanoscale reactors for the prepareation of nanoparticles (NPs) without any external stabilizer. Moreover, owing to their intrinsic biocompatibility and fluorescence, these capsules exhibit promising prospect for biomedical applications. PMID:23820511

  6. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies July 2001 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the on-orbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  7. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies from July 2011 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the onorbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  8. Study of Discharging Characteristics of Hollow Cathode Surge Protective Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xueling; Chen, Jingliang; Xu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2010-02-01

    A hollow cathode surge protective gap (HCSPG) was designed, and the discharge characteristics was investigated in an air and nitrogen gas environment. For both the gap spacing D and the hole diameter varphi of HCSPG of 3 mm, the voltage protective value Up of HCSPG is about 3.5 kV and its converting time tc exceeds 100 ns at an air pressure from 10 Pa to 100 Pa. The maximum converting time tc from glow to arc discharging reaches 1600 ns at an air pressure of 100 Pa, while the minimum converting time tc is 120 ns at 10 Pa. For a triggered HCSPG, Up is reduced to about 1.6 kV while the converting time is 120 ns with a semiconductor trigger device and 50 ns with a dielectric porcelain trigger device under an air pressure of 100 Pa.

  9. Experimental investigation of a capacitive blind hollow cathode discharge with central gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Müller, M.; Petkow, D.; Herdrich, G.; Lein, S.

    2014-12-01

    The operating parameters and resulting plasma properties of a blind hollow cathode (BHC) discharge have been investigated. The hollow cathode was driven capacitively with a pulsed dc signal of 200 kHz in a power range between 50 and 100 W at an ambient pressure of about 10 Pa. The working gas was argon, which was introduced with a ceramic capillary at different positions of the longitudinal axis of the hollow cathode with flow rates of between 30 and 1000 sccm. The current-voltage characteristics were recorded. The pressure at the end of the BHC was measured with a miniaturized pressure transducer with varying volumetric flow rate and axial position of the capillary in the hollow cathode. To characterize the ignition behaviour of the system, the measured breakdown voltages were compared with phenomenological Paschen curves calculated from the pressure data. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to examine the origins of the light emission, comparing the glow mode and hollow cathode mode in particular. A high-speed camera recorded some plasma processes. A mounting with an indium tin oxide coated glass was used to observe the inner volume of the BHC along the longitudinal axis, while the plasma was operated with different parameters. The optical observations revealed an inhomogeneous plasma condition along the axis.

  10. Glow discharge based device for solving mazes

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, Alexander E. Mironenko, Maxim S.; Selemir, Victor D.; Maksimov, Artem N.; Pylayev, Nikolay A.

    2014-09-15

    A glow discharge based device for solving mazes has been designed and tested. The device consists of a gas discharge chamber and maze-transformer of radial-azimuth type. It allows changing of the maze pattern in a short period of time (within several minutes). The device has been tested with low pressure air. Once switched on, a glow discharge has been shown to find the shortest way through the maze from the very first attempt, even if there is a section with potential barrier for electrons on the way. It has been found that ionization waves (striations) can be excited in the maze along the length of the plasma channel. The dependancy of discharge voltage on the length of the optimal path through the maze has been measured. A reduction in discharge voltage with one or two potential barriers present has been found and explained. The dependency of the magnitude of discharge ignition voltage on the length of the optimal path through the maze has been measured. The reduction of the ignition voltage with the presence of one or two potential barriers has been observed and explained.

  11. Acting green elicits a literal warm glow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufik, Danny; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Environmental policies are often based on the assumption that people only act environmentally friendly if some extrinsic reward is implicated, usually money. We argue that people might also be motivated by intrinsic rewards: doing the right thing (such as acting environmentally friendly) elicits psychological rewards in the form of positive feelings, a phenomenon known as warm glow. Given the fact that people's psychological state may affect their thermal state, we expected that this warm glow could express itself quite literally: people who act environmentally friendly may perceive the temperature to be higher. In two studies, we found that people who learned they acted environmentally friendly perceived a higher temperature than people who learned they acted environmentally unfriendly. The underlying psychological mechanism pertains to the self-concept: learning you acted environmentally friendly signals to yourself that you are a good person. Together, our studies show that acting environmentally friendly can be psychologically rewarding, suggesting that appealing to intrinsic rewards can be an alternative way to encourage pro-environmental actions.

  12. The Glowing Eye of NGC 6751

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have obtained images of the strikingly unusual planetary nebula, NGC 6751. Glowing in the constellation Aquila like a giant eye, the nebula is a cloud of gas ejected several thousand years ago from the hot star visible in its center. The Hubble observations were obtained in 1998 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) by a team of astronomers led by Arsen Hajian of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, DC. The Hubble Heritage team, working at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, has prepared this color rendition by combining the Hajian team's WFPC2 images taken through three different color filters that isolate nebular gases of different temperatures. The nebula shows several remarkable and poorly understood features. Blue regions mark the hottest glowing gas, which forms a roughly circular ring around the central stellar remnant. Orange and red show the locations of cooler gas. The cool gas tends to lie in long streamers pointing away from the central star, and in a surrounding, tattered-looking ring at the outer edge of the nebula. The origin of these cooler clouds within the nebula is still uncertain, but the streamers are clear evidence that their shapes are affected by radiation and stellar winds from the hot star at the center.

  13. Power balance at cathode in glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Suraj, K.S.; Mukherjee, S.

    2005-11-15

    When an electrode is biased negatively ({approx} few hundred volts) with respect to a metallic chamber, maintained at a subatmospheric pressure ({approx} few millibars), glow discharge plasma is formed around the electrode (cathode). The plasma supplies ions and other species to the cathode, along with other events at the cathode, and its temperature also rises. From the measurement of temporal temperature profile, in the pressure range of 0.5-5 mbars, the thermal influx at the cathode has been determined. Various modes of power input to the cathode are estimated from the discharge parameters. The contribution of ions and neutrals to the total input power is obtained theoretically from respective velocity distributions at the cathode considering charge exchange as the dominant collision mechanism inside the sheath region. The comparison of experimental and theoretical results suggests that in the pressure range being considered, which is typical of glow discharges, the major contribution to the energy input at the cathode comes from energetic neutrals generated by the charge-exchange collision inside the collisional ion sheath.

  14. Cerenkov glow observations from spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyo, J. Jr.

    1987-07-01

    The observation of Cerenkov glow from a fuel assembly is an attractive method of detecting the presence of radioactive material. The simple, hand-held instrumentation is very easy to use and does not require penetration of the water in the spent fuel pool. An obstacle to routine use of the instrument arises in that the standard night vision devices have a broad band wavelength response which required the pool area to be darkened. Various techniques used to limit the bandwidth of the devices for use in viewing the Cerenkov glow in the presence of facility illumination have furthered implementation. A properly specified, commercially available instrument has been used to make narrow band observations at two power reactors without interference from the facility illumination. Problems of interpretation of the observations persist. The technique has no useful role to play in the verification of an assembly at the rod level. As an item, the assembly can be verified as containing radioactive material in many instances; however some ambiguous situations were encountered.

  15. Phenomena of oscillations in atmospheric pressure direct current glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fu-cheng; Yan, Wen; Wang, De-zhen

    2013-12-15

    Self-sustained oscillations in a dc glow discharge with a semiconductor layer at atmospheric pressure were investigated by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the dc glow discharge initially becomes unstable in the subnormal glow region and gives rise to oscillations of plasma parameters. A variety of oscillations with one or more frequencies have been observed under different conditions. The discharge oscillates between the glow discharge mode and the Townsend discharge mode in the oscillations with large amplitude while operates in the subnormal glow discharge mode all the while in the oscillations with small amplitude. Fourier Transform spectra of oscillations reveal the transition mechanism between different oscillations. The effects of semiconductor conductivity on the oscillation frequency of the dominant mode, gas voltage, as well as the discharge current have also been analyzed.

  16. Evolution of the CaF2:Tm (TLD-300) glow curve as an indicator of beam quality for low-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, I. D.; Avila, O.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Brandan, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    We study the high- to low- temperature signal ratio (HLTR) of the CaF2:Tm glow curve as a function of beam quality for low-energy photon beams with effective energy between 15.2 and 33.6 keV, generated with W, Mo and Rh anodes. CaF2:Tm dosemeters (TLD-300) were exposed to x-rays and 60Co gamma-rays. Glow curves were deconvoluted into 7 peaks, using computerized glow curve deconvolution and HLTR was evaluated. Air kerma and dose in water were between 2.1-15.0 mGy and 49.8-373.8 mGy, respectively. All peaks in the glow curve showed a linear response with respect to air kerma and dose in water. HLTR values decreased monotonically between 1.029  ±  0.010 (at 15.2 keV) and 0.821  ±  0.011 (33.6 keV), and no effects due to the use of different anode/filter combinations were observed. The results indicate a relatively high value of HLTR (about 1 for 17 keV effective energy, or 3 keV μm-1 track-average LET) and a measurable dependence on the photon beam quality. Comparison of these photon data with HLTR for ions shows good quantitative agreement. The reported evolution of the CaF2:Tm glow curve could facilitate the estimation of the effective energy of unknown photon fields by this technique.

  17. Effect of hydrogen ratio on plasma parameters of N2-H2 gas mixture glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Brulsy, R. A.; Abd Al-Halim, M. A.; Abu-Hashem, A.; Rashed, U. M.; Hassouba, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    A dc plane glow discharge in a nitrogen-hydrogen (N2-H2) gas mixture has been operated at discharge currents of 10 and 20 mA. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at different hydrogen concentrations is measured. A Maxwellian EEDF is found in the positive column region, while in both cathode fall and negative glow regions, a non-Maxwellian one is observed. Langmuir electric probes are used at different axial positions, gas pressures, and hydrogen concentrations to measure the electron temperature and plasma density. The electron temperature is found to increase with increasing H2 concentration and decrease with increasing both the axial distance from the cathode and the mixture pressure. At first, with increasing distance from the cathode, the ion density decreases, while the electron density increases; then, as the anode is further approached, they remain nearly constant. At different H2 concentrations, the electron and ion densities decrease with increasing the mixture pressure. Both the electron and ion densities slightly decrease with increasing H2 concentration.

  18. Rational synthesis of carbon-coated hollow Ge nanocrystals with enhanced lithium-storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Chu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Chaoji; Xiang, Jingwei; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Yunhui; Hu, Xianluo

    2016-06-01

    High-capacity anode materials based on alloy-type group IV elements always have large volume expansion during lithiation when they are used in lithium-ion batteries. Designing hollow structures is a well-established strategy to accommodate the volume change because of sufficient internal void space. Here we report a facile template-free route to prepare hollow Ge nanospheres without using any templates through a quasi-microemulsion method. Ge nanocrystals are preferably self-assembled along the interface of liquid vesicles between water and tetrahydrofuran, and well-defined hollow architectures of ~50 nm in diameter are formed. Both the wall thickness and hollow interiors can be easily tuned. After subsequent carbon coating via pyrolysis of acetylene, the as-formed Ge@C nanocomposite with hollow interiors exhibits a highly reversible capacity of about 920 mA h g-1 at 200 mA g-1 over 50 cycles, and excellent rate capability. The small size and the high structural integrity of hollow Ge@C structures contribute to the superior lithium-storage performances.High-capacity anode materials based on alloy-type group IV elements always have large volume expansion during lithiation when they are used in lithium-ion batteries. Designing hollow structures is a well-established strategy to accommodate the volume change because of sufficient internal void space. Here we report a facile template-free route to prepare hollow Ge nanospheres without using any templates through a quasi-microemulsion method. Ge nanocrystals are preferably self-assembled along the interface of liquid vesicles between water and tetrahydrofuran, and well-defined hollow architectures of ~50 nm in diameter are formed. Both the wall thickness and hollow interiors can be easily tuned. After subsequent carbon coating via pyrolysis of acetylene, the as-formed Ge@C nanocomposite with hollow interiors exhibits a highly reversible capacity of about 920 mA h g-1 at 200 mA g-1 over 50 cycles, and excellent rate

  19. Carbonate fuel cell anodes

    DOEpatents

    Donado, R.A.; Hrdina, K.E.; Remick, R.J.

    1993-04-27

    A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process is described for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

  20. Carbonate fuel cell anodes

    DOEpatents

    Donado, Rafael A.; Hrdina, Kenneth E.; Remick, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

  1. Linear ion source with magnetron hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, D.L.; Pu, S.H.; Wang, L.S.; Qiu, X.M.; Chu, Paul K.

    2005-11-15

    A linear ion source with magnetron hollow cathode discharge is described in this paper. The linear ion source is based on an anode layer thruster with closed-drift electrons that move in a closed path in the ExB fields. An open slit configuration is designed at the end of the ion source for the extraction of the linear ion beam produced by the magnetron hollow cathode discharge. The special configurations enable uninterrupted and expanded operation with oxygen as well as other reactive gases because of the absence of an electron source in the ion source. The ion current density and uniformity were experimentally evaluated. Using the ion source, surface modification was conducted on polyethylene terephthalate polymer films to improve the adhesion strength with ZnS coatings.

  2. Mercury - the hollow planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury is turning out to be a planet characterized by various kinds of endogenous hole (discounting impact craters), which are compared here. These include volcanic vents and collapse features on horizontal scales of tens of km, and smaller scale depressions ('hollows') associated with bright crater-floor deposits (BCFD). The BCFD hollows are tens of metres deep and kilometres or less across and are characteristically flat-floored, with steep, scalloped walls. Their form suggests that they most likely result from removal of surface material by some kind of mass-wasting process, probably associated with volume-loss caused by removal (via sublimation?) of a volatile component. These do not appear to be primarily a result of undermining. Determining the composition of the high-albedo bluish surface coating in BCFDs will be a key goal for BepiColombo instruments such as MIXS (Mercury Imaging Xray Spectrometer). In contrast, collapse features are non-circular rimless pits, typically on crater floors (pit-floor craters), whose morphology suggests collapse into void spaces left by magma withdrawal. This could be by drainage of either erupted lava (or impact melt) or of shallowly-intruded magma. Unlike the much smaller-scale BCFD hollows, these 'collapse pit' features tend to lack extensive flat floors and instead tend to be close to triangular in cross-section with inward slopes near to the critical angle of repose. The different scale and morphology of BCFD hollows and collapse pits argues for quite different modes of origin. However, BCFD hollows adjacent to and within the collapse pit inside Scarlatti crater suggest that the volatile material whose loss was responsible for the growth of the hollows may have been emplaced in association with the magma whose drainage caused the main collapse. Another kind of volcanic collapse can be seen within a 25 km-wide volcanic vent outside the southern rim of the Caloris basin (22.5° N, 146.1° E), on a 28 m/pixel MDIS NAC image

  3. Nitrogen soft and hard X-ray emissions using different shapes of anodes in a 4-kJ plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahtab, M.; Habibi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of different anode tip geometries on the intensity of soft and hard X-rays emitted from a 4-kJ plasma focus device is investigated using five different anode tips. The shapes of the uppermost region of these anodes (tips) have been cylindrical-flat, cylindrical-hollow, spherical-convex, cone-flat, and cone-hollow. For time-resolved measurement of the emitted X-rays, several BPX-65 pin diodes covered by different filters and a fast plastic scintillator are used. Experimental results have shown that, the highest intensity of the both soft and hard X-ray is recorded in cone-flat, spherical-convex, and cone-hollow tips, respectively. The use of cone-flat anode tip has augmented the emitted X-ray three times.

  4. Structure of anodized Al-Zr sputter deposited coatings and effect on optical appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Canulescu, Stela; Shabadi, Rajashekhara; Rechendorff, Kristian; Dirscherl, Kai; Ambat, Rajan

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism of interaction of light with the microstructure of anodized layer giving specific optical appearance is investigated using Al-Zr sputter deposited coating as a model system on an AA6060 substrate. Differences in the oxidative nature of various microstructural components result in the evolution of typical features in the anodized layer, which are investigated as a function of microstructure and correlated with its optical appearance. The Zr concentration in the coating was varied from 6 wt.% to 23 wt.%. Heat treatment of the coated samples was carried out at 550 °C for 4 h in order to evolve Al-Zr based second phase precipitates in the microstructure. Anodizing was performed using 20 wt.% sulphuric acid at 18 °C with an intention to study the effect of anodizing on the Al-Zr based precipitates in the coating. Detailed microstructural characterization of the coating and anodized layer was carried out using high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction analysis, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, and optical appearance using spectrophotometry. The evolution of microstructure in the anodized layer as a function of anodizing parameters and their influence on the interaction of light is investigated and the results in general are applicable to discolouration of anodized layer on recycled aluminium alloys due to intermetallics.

  5. Study Of Erosion Rates And Surface Effects of Different Hollow Cathode Materials During Vacuum Microarc Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Atta Khedr, M.; Abdel Moneim, H.M.

    2005-03-17

    Studies of the properties of the emitted plasma from graphite, titanium, titanium Carbide, Stainless Steel, Cupper and Molybdenum Hollow Cathode materials during vacuum microarc were carried out. Using high voltage of 30 KV, short arc duration (0.5 - 4 {mu}s) and arc currents (100 - 450 A), each cathode material was subjected to 1000-3000 arc discharges under high vacuum (10-8 mbar) conditions. The angular distributions for the evaporants in each case were measured and show an exponential isotropic distribution in agreement with the theoretical predictions. The total erosion rates of evaporants and molten droplets were estimated and showed clearly their, dependence on the cathode material and on the hollow cathode geometry. The damages on the cathode surfaces and the inside of the hollow cathodes were investigated by the scanning electron microscope. Crater formation were formed spreading inside the hole of the hollow cathodes as well as on the rim surfaces and were found to differ according to both geometry and material of the hollow cathodes. The crater evacuation velocity and plasma pressure were determined. The damage on the anode tip showed erosion on the pen anode tip to the extent of drilling hole. The mechanism responsible for such phenomena is discussed.

  6. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 micrometers, a density of about 1 to about 6 pounds/cubic foot and a volume change of 1 to about 20% by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bonded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cubic feet and a compression strength of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq inch.

  7. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 microns, a density of about I to about 6 pounds/ft3 and a volume change of 1 to about 20% by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bounded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cu ft and a compression strength of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq in.

  8. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 microns a density of about 1 to about 6 pounds/cubic ft and a volume change of 1 to about 20 percent by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bonded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cubic ft and a compression strength 2 of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq in.

  9. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  10. Anodizing Aluminum with Frills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltz, Anne E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    "Anodizing Aluminum" (previously reported in this journal) describes a vivid/relevant laboratory experience for general chemistry students explaining the anodizing of aluminum in sulfuric acid and constrasting it to electroplating. Additions to this procedure and the experiment in which they are used are discussed. Reactions involved are also…

  11. Probiotic bacteria induce a 'glow of health'.

    PubMed

    Levkovich, Tatiana; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Smillie, Christopher; Varian, Bernard J; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Lakritz, Jessica R; Alm, Eric J; Erdman, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    Radiant skin and hair are universally recognized as indications of good health. However, this 'glow of health' display remains poorly understood. We found that feeding of probiotic bacteria to aged mice induced integumentary changes mimicking peak health and reproductive fitness characteristic of much younger animals. Eating probiotic yogurt triggered epithelial follicular anagen-phase shift with sebocytogenesis resulting in thick lustrous fur due to a bacteria-triggered interleukin-10-dependent mechanism. Aged male animals eating probiotics exhibited increased subcuticular folliculogenesis, when compared with matched controls, yielding luxuriant fur only in probiotic-fed subjects. Female animals displayed probiotic-induced hyperacidity coinciding with shinier hair, a feature that also aligns with fertility in human females. Together these data provide insights into mammalian evolution and novel strategies for integumentary health. PMID:23342023

  12. Shock wave propagation in glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, B. N.

    1998-10-01

    The modification of acoustic shock wave propagation characteristics in a 25 cm long positive column low pressure (10 to 50 Torr), low current density (2 to 10 mA/cm^2) argon and N2 dc discharges have been measured by laser beam deflection technique. The simultaneous multi point shock velocity, dispersion and damping have been measured both inside and outside the glow discharge region. The local shock velocity is found to increase with the increased propagation path length through the discharge; for Mach number greater than 1.7 the upstream velocity exceeded the downstream velocity in contrast to the opposite behavior in neutral gas. The damping and dispersion are also dependent on the propagation distance. The recovery of the shock dispersion and damping in the post discharge region, for a given discharge condition, are functions of the initial Mach number. The optical measurement of the wall and the gas (rotational) temperatures suggest the observed shock features can not be solely explained by the gas heating in a self sustained discharge. The results are similar for both Ar and N2 discharges showing that vibrational excitation and relaxation are not essential^1. The explanation of the observed weak shock propagation properties in a glow discharge appears to require long range cooperative interactions that enhance heavy particle collisional energy transfer rates for the measured discharge conditions. Unlike collisional shock wave propagation in highly ionized plasmas^2,3, the exact energy coupling mechanism between the nonequilibrium weakly ionized plasma and shock is not understood. 1. A.I. Osipov and A.V. Uvarov, Sov. Phys. Usp. 35, 903 (1992) and other references there in. 2. M. Casanova, O. Larroche and J-P Matte, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2143 (1991). 3. M.C.M. van de Sanden, R. van den Bercken and D.C. Schram, Plasma Sources Sci.Technol. 3, 511 (1994).

  13. Glow Discharge Characteristics in Transverse Supersonic Air Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timerkaev, B. A.; Zalyaliev, B. R.; Saifutdinov, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    A low pressure glow discharge in a transverse supersonic gas flow of air at pressures of the order 1 torr has been experimentally studied for the case where the flow only partially fills the inter electrode gap. It is shown that the space region with supersonic gas flow has a higher concentration of gas particles and, therefore, works as a charged particle generator. The near electrode regions of glow discharge are concentrated specifically in this region. This structure of glow discharge is promising for plasma deposition of coatings under ultralow pressures

  14. Self-pulsing of hollow cathode discharge in various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Y.; He, F. Jiang, X. X.; Ouyang, J. T.; Xie, K.

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, we investigate the self-pulsing phenomenon of cavity discharge in a cylindrical hollow cathode in various gases including argon, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and air. The current-voltage characteristics of the cavity discharge, the waveforms of the self-pulsing current and voltage as well as the repetition frequency were measured. The results show that the pulsing frequency ranges from a few to tens kilohertz and depends on the averaged current and the pressure in all gases. The pulsing frequency will increase with the averaged current and decrease with the pressure. The rising time of the current pulse is nearly constant in a given gas or mixture. The self-pulsing does not depend on the external ballast but is affected significantly by the external capacitor in parallel with the discharge cell. The low-current self-pulsing in hollow cathode discharge is the mode transition between Townsend and glow discharges. It can be described by the charging-discharging process of an equivalent circuit consisting of capacitors and resistors.

  15. Novel light-weight, high-performance anode-supported microtubular solid oxide fuel cells with an active anode functional layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Wang, Yao; Ren, Cong; Fang, Shumin; Mao, Yating; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-10-01

    Influence of the air-gap, the distance from the tube-in-orifice spinneret to the upper surface of the external coagulant bath during the extrusion/phase-inversion process, on the microstructure of nickel - yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) hollow fibers has been systematically studied. When the air-gap is 0 cm, the obtained Ni-YSZ hollow fiber has a sandwich microstructure. However, when the air-gap is increased to 15 cm, a bi-layer Ni-YSZ hollow fiber consisting of a thin layer with small pores and a thick support with highly porous fingerlike macrovoids has been achieved. The output power density of microtubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs) with a cell configuration of Ni-YSZ/YSZ/YSZ-LSM increases from 594 mW cm-2 for the cells with the Ni-YSZ anode of sandwich microstructure to 832 mW cm-2 for the cells with the Ni-YSZ anode of bi-layer microstructure at 750 °C, implying that to achieve the same output power density, the weight of the cells with the bi-layer anode support can be reduced to 41.5% compared with that of the cells with the sandwich anode support. Thermal-cycling test shows no obvious degradation on the open-circuit-voltage (OCV), indicating that the MT-SOFCs have robust resistance to thermal cycling.

  16. Research of the DC discharge of He-Ne gas mixture in hollow core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinbing; Duan, Lian

    2013-09-01

    Since the first waveguide 0.633 μm He-Ne laser from a 20 cm length of 430 μm glass capillary was reported in 1971, no smaller waveguide gas laser has ever been constructed. Recently as the development of low loss hollow core PBG fiber, it is possible to constract a He-Ne lasers based on hollow-core PBG fibers. For the small diameter of the air hole, it is necessary to do some research to obtain glow discharge in hollow core fibers. In this paper, the experimental research of DC discharge in 200 μm bore diameter hollow core fibers was reported. Stable glow discharge was obained at varioue He-Ne mixtures from 4 Torr to 18 Torr. In order to obtain the plasma parameter of the discharge, the trace gasses of N2 and H2 were added to the He-Ne mixtures, the optical emission spectroscopy of the discharge was recorded by a PI 2750 spectroscopy with a CCD camera. The gas temperature (Tg) could be obtained by matching the simulated rovibronic band of the N2 emission with the observed spectrum in the ultraviolet region. The spectral method was also used to obtained the electron density, which is based on the analysis of the wavelength profile of the 486.13 nm Hβ line, and the electron temperature was obtain by Boltzmann plot methods. Experimental results show that it is very difficult to achieve DC discharge in bore diameter less than 50 μm, and a RF discharge method was proposed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (61078033).

  17. On the transition from stable positive glow corona to streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lipeng; Becerra, Marley

    2016-06-01

    A 2D numerical simulation of the transition from stable positive glow corona to streamers in coaxial cylindrical configuration is presented. The hydrodynamic model with several convection-dominated continuity equations together with Poisson equation are solved with consideration of the ionization layer. The transition from a stable positive glow corona produced under a DC voltage to streamers is investigated under a sudden change of the applied voltage. The critical rate of rise of voltage required for the transition from positive glow to streamer corona is evaluated with a voltage ramp. By introducing either physical or numerical instabilities into the model, streamers with filamentary structures are observed, which produce a sudden increase of the discharge current by more than two orders of magnitude. It is also found that the surface electric field of the corona-generating conductor deviates from the onset electric field, casting doubts about the validity of Kaptzov’s approximation to evaluate the transition from stable glow to streamers.

  18. Vehicle/Atmosphere Interaction Glows: Far Ultraviolet, Visible, and Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G.

    1999-10-01

    Spacecraft glow information has been gathered from a number of spacecraft including Atmospheric and Dynamic satellites, and Space Shuttles (numerous flights) with dedicated pallet flow observations on STS-39 (DOD) and STS-62 (NASA). In addition, a larger number of laboratory experiments with low energy oxygen beam studies have made important contributions to glow understanding. The following report provides information on three engineering models developed for spacecraft glow including the far ultraviolet to ultraviolet (1400-4000 A), and infrared (0.9-40 microns) spectral regions. The models include effects resulting from atmospheric density/altitude, spacecraft temperature, spacecraft material, and ram angle. Glow brightness would be predicted as a function of distance from surfaces for all wavelengths.

  19. Glow discharge techniques for conditioning high vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1988-03-01

    A review is given of glow discharge techniques which are useful for conditioning vacuum vessels for high vacuum applications. Substantial development of glow discharge techniques has been done for the purpose of in-situ conditioning of the large ultrahigh vacuum systems for particle accelerators and magnetic fusion devices. In these applications the glow discharge treatments remove impurities from vessel surfaces in order to minimize particle-induced desorption coefficients. Cleaning mechanisms involve a mixture of sputtering and ion- (or neutral) induced desorption effects depending on the gas mixture (ArO/sub 2/ vs. H/sub 2/) and excitation method (DC, RF, and ECR). The author will review the methodology of glow discharge conditioning, diagnostic measurements provided by residual gas and surface composition analysis, and applications to vessel conditioning and materials processing. 76 refs., 16 figs.

  20. Vehicle/Atmosphere Interaction Glows: Far Ultraviolet, Visible, and Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G.

    1999-01-01

    Spacecraft glow information has been gathered from a number of spacecraft including Atmospheric and Dynamic satellites, and Space Shuttles (numerous flights) with dedicated pallet flow observations on STS-39 (DOD) and STS-62 (NASA). In addition, a larger number of laboratory experiments with low energy oxygen beam studies have made important contributions to glow understanding. The following report provides information on three engineering models developed for spacecraft glow including the far ultraviolet to ultraviolet (1400-4000 A), and infrared (0.9-40 microns) spectral regions. The models include effects resulting from atmospheric density/altitude, spacecraft temperature, spacecraft material, and ram angle. Glow brightness would be predicted as a function of distance from surfaces for all wavelengths.

  1. Glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and OMS pods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This 35mm frame, photographed as the Space Shuttle Columbia was orbiting Earth during a 'night' pass, documents the glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods of the spacecraft.

  2. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  3. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies. [ion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate whether changes in performance are caused by changes in the loss rate of primary electrons to the anode or the loss rate of ions to discharge chamber walls or cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid; (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline; and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  4. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  5. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  6. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  7. Rational synthesis of carbon-coated hollow Ge nanocrystals with enhanced lithium-storage properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Chaoji; Xiang, Jingwei; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Yunhui; Hu, Xianluo

    2016-06-16

    High-capacity anode materials based on alloy-type group IV elements always have large volume expansion during lithiation when they are used in lithium-ion batteries. Designing hollow structures is a well-established strategy to accommodate the volume change because of sufficient internal void space. Here we report a facile template-free route to prepare hollow Ge nanospheres without using any templates through a quasi-microemulsion method. Ge nanocrystals are preferably self-assembled along the interface of liquid vesicles between water and tetrahydrofuran, and well-defined hollow architectures of ∼50 nm in diameter are formed. Both the wall thickness and hollow interiors can be easily tuned. After subsequent carbon coating via pyrolysis of acetylene, the as-formed Ge@C nanocomposite with hollow interiors exhibits a highly reversible capacity of about 920 mA h g(-1) at 200 mA g(-1) over 50 cycles, and excellent rate capability. The small size and the high structural integrity of hollow Ge@C structures contribute to the superior lithium-storage performances. PMID:27253080

  8. The measurements of vehicle glow on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Banks, P. M.; Nobles, R.; Garriott, O. K.; Hoffman, J.

    1983-01-01

    From the combined data set of glow observations on STS-3, STS-4 and STS-5 some of the properties of the shuttle glow were observed. Comparison of the STS-3 (240 km) and STS-5 (305 km) photographs show that the intensity of the glow is about a factor of 3.5 brighter on the low altitude (STS-3) flight. The orbiter was purposely rotated about the x axis in an experiment on STS-5 to observe the dependence of the intensity on the angle of incidence between the spacecraft surface normal and the velocity vector. For a relatively large angle between the velocity vector and the surface normal there is an appreciable glow, provided the surface is not shadowed by some other spacecraft structure. As the angle becomes less the glow intensifies. The grating experiments (STS-4 photography only, STS-5 image intensifier photography) provided a preliminary low resolution spectra of the spacecraft glow. Accurate wavelength calibrations of the STS-5 instrument permitted measuring of the spectrum and intensity of the Earth's airglow.

  9. Anodes - Technology review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, L.; Wills, R. G. A.

    2014-06-01

    Many electrochemical energy storage technologies utilize anodes that are specific to the chemistry of the device. Anodes must be designed for devices including primary and secondary batteries, fuel cells and capacitors. These applications include a diverse range of operational conditions, including aqueous, solid or organic media. This paper will provide a brief overview of anode technologies for medium (e.g. electric and hybrid electric vehicles) and large (e.g. integration of renewable energy generation to electrical networks) battery applications. Established and developing storage technologies will be discussed to provide an insight into how anodes (materials, manufacturing processes and modes of operation) differ between specific applications and devices. Lead-acid batteries are used as a case study to provide a practical example and guide discussion onto the question of future challenges and opportunities.

  10. Anode insulator for electrolytic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.J.

    1986-10-28

    An improved anode insulator is described for use in an electrowinning cell, including spaced anodes each supported by an anode header bar, each having the improved anode insulators disposed thereon for preventing contact with spaced cathodes that are respectively disposed between adjacent anodes, each improved anode insulator comprising: (a) first and second elongated insulating means disposed along intermediate portions of opposite faces of one of the anodes for preventing any contact between the faces of that anode and adjacent cathodes; (b) upper connecting means disposed around the top and side portions of the anode header bar supporting that anode and conforming to the shape of the header bar; and (c) lower connecting means for joining the lower end portions of the first and second elongated insulating means.

  11. A Study of a Striated Positive Column after Ethanol Impurity Injection in an Air DC Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak, Laura; Post Zwicker, Andrew

    2003-04-01

    In a glow discharge when ethanol (CH3CH2OH) was injected, a series of atypical striations formed through the positive column. When the pressure decreased as the ethanol evaporated and was evacuated by the vacuum pump, this behavior decayed away until only an anode glow or normal discharge remained. Varying interelectrode spacings and quantities of ethanol yielded similar patterns. The typical evolution as the pressure decreased consisted of a visible traveling wave traveling from the anode to the cathode followed by numerous, thin ( 1.6 mm) striations evenly spaced down the entire length of the positive column. These, shifted back toward the anode and transformed into bent striations with the tip of the 'V' pointing toward the cathode, and finally, the 'V' striations grouped into fours and took on the appearance of beats. The unusual 'V' striations may be due in part to a contraction of the column, causing the equipotential surfaces to shift from smooth convex to the observed striation shape. The conditions for this contraction effect include a nonlinearly increasing dependence of electron production rate on electron density and a bulk recombination rate higher than that at the tube walls. Visible emission spectra indicated the presence of carbon monoxide (CO), signifying that the striations are due to not only vibrational excitation of the ethanol molecule but also to decomposition and subsequent excitation of the decomposition products as well. One possible mechanism of decomposition is the formation of a radical cation from the ethanol molecule and the ensuing loss of a proton to yield formaldehyde; this then would follow an analogous decomposition to produce carbon monoxide. Thus, there may exist additional charged species which can then contribute to the unique observations. Further analysis, if possible, will include higher temporal resolution spectroscopy and a detailed model of the positive column under these specific conditions.

  12. Method for sizing hollow microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

    1975-10-29

    Hollow Microspheres may be effectively sized by placing them beneath a screen stack completely immersed in an ultrasonic bath containing a liquid having a density at which the microspheres float and ultrasonically agitating the bath.

  13. Anodic oxidation of benzoquinone using diamond anode.

    PubMed

    Panizza, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The anodic degradation of 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ), one of the most toxic xenobiotic, was investigated by electrochemical oxidation at boron-doped diamond anode. The electrolyses have been performed in a single-compartment flow cell in galvanostatic conditions. The influence of applied current (0.5-2 A), BQ concentration (1-2 g dm(-3)), temperature (20-45 °C) and flow rate (100-300 dm(3) h(-1)) has been studied. BQ decay kinetic, the evolution of its oxidation intermediates and the mineralization of the aqueous solutions were monitored during the electrolysis by high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements. The results obtained show that the use of diamond anode leads to total mineralization of BQ in any experimental conditions due to the production of oxidant hydroxyl radicals electrogenerated from water discharge. The decay kinetics of BQ removal follows a pseudo-first-order reaction, and the rate constant increases with rising current density. The COD removal rate was favoured by increasing of applied current, recirculating flow rate and it is almost unaffected by solution temperature. PMID:24710725

  14. Lunar horizon glow and the Clementine mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, H. A.; Potter, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine spacecraft is to be launched into Earth orbit in late January for subsequent insertion into lunar orbit in late February, 1994. There, its primary mission is to produce -- over a period of about two months -- a new photographic map of the entire surface of the Moon; this will be done, in a variety of wavelengths and spatial resolutions, in a manner greatly superior to that previously accomplished for the whole Moon. It will then go on to fly by and photograph the asteroid Geographos. A secondary goal that has been accepted for this mission is to take a series of photographs designed to capture images of, and determine the brightness and extent of, the Lunar Horizon Glow (LHG). One form of LHG is caused by the solar stimulation of emission from Na and K atoms in the lunar exosphere. The scale height of this exosphere is of the order of 100 km. There are also brighter LHG components, with much smaller scale heights, that appear to be caused by scattered off of an exospheric lunar dust cloud.

  15. Advances in the Remote Glow Discharge Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Arturo; Zwicker, A.; Rusaits, L.; McNulty, M.; Sosa, Carl

    2014-10-01

    The Remote Glow Discharge Experiment (RGDX) is a DC discharge plasma with variable pressure, end-plate voltage and externally applied axial magnetic field. While the experiment is located at PPPL, a webcam displays the live video online. The parameters (voltage, magnetic field and pressure) can be controlled remotely in real-time by opening a URL which shows the streaming video, as well as a set of Labview controls. The RGDX is designed as an outreach tool that uses the attractive nature of a plasma in order to reach a wide audience and extend the presence of plasma physics and fusion around the world. In March 2014, the RGDX was made publically available and, as of early July, it has had approximately 3500 unique visits from 107 countries and almost all 50 US states. We present recent upgrades, including the ability to remotely control the distance between the electrodes. These changes give users the capability of measuring Paschen's Law remotely and provides a comprehensive introduction to plasma physics to those that do not have access to the necessary equipment.

  16. Coaxial (tubular) glow discharge in electronegative gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovitskii, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    The positive-column plasma of a low- and medium-pressure electronegative glow discharge initiated in the gap between two coaxial cylindrical tubes has been considered (the current is directed along the tube axis). It is assumed that the gas mixture contains halogens, and ion diffusion is not negligibly weak. It is found that the coaxial discharge is characterized by plasma separation into three coaxial regions with different compositions in the direction transverse to the current. It has been shown that the ionization and excitation frequencies of atoms are higher than in the purely cylindrical case, even for a small (0.05-0.15) ratio of the radii of the inner and outer walls. An asymptotic analysis of the continuity equations yields analytic expressions that make it possible to rapidly and easily estimate the geometrical parameters of the spatial distributions of charge particle concentrations, as well as energy parameters of the plasma for the radii ratio that exceed 0.3. The conditions for the applicability of analytic relations and their accuracy are established from a comparison of the results of analytic and numerical calculations.

  17. Cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow spheres for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Yan, Qingyu; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of cobalt silicate novel hierarchical hollow spheres via a facile hydrothermal method is presented. With a unique hollow structure, the Co2SiO4 provides a large surface area, which can shorten the lithium ions diffusion length and effectively accommodate the volumetic variation during the lithiation/de-lithiation process. Serving as an anode material in lithium-ion battery application, the Co2SiO4 electrode demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity (first-cycle charge capacity of 948.6 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1)), a cycling durability (specific capacity of 791.4 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles at 100 mA g(-1)), and a good rate capability (specific capacity of 349.4 mAh g(-1) at 10 A g(-1)). The results indicate that the cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow sphere holds the potential applications in energy storage electrodes. PMID:27479691

  18. Cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow spheres for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Yan, Qingyu; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of cobalt silicate novel hierarchical hollow spheres via a facile hydrothermal method is presented. With a unique hollow structure, the Co2SiO4 provides a large surface area, which can shorten the lithium ions diffusion length and effectively accommodate the volumetic variation during the lithiation/de-lithiation process. Serving as an anode material in lithium-ion battery application, the Co2SiO4 electrode demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity (first-cycle charge capacity of 948.6 mAh g‑1 at 100 mA g‑1), a cycling durability (specific capacity of 791.4 mAh g‑1 after 100 cycles at 100 mA g‑1), and a good rate capability (specific capacity of 349.4 mAh g‑1 at 10 A g‑1). The results indicate that the cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow sphere holds the potential applications in energy storage electrodes.

  19. Hollow Retroreflectors Offer Solid Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A technician who lead a successful team of scientists, engineers, and other technicians in the design, fabrication, and characterization of cryogenic retroreflectors for the NASA Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) mission to Saturn, developed a hollow retroreflector technology while working at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. With 16 years of NASA experience, the technician teamed up with another NASA colleague and formed PROSystems, Inc., of Sharpsburg, Maryland, to provide the optics community with an alternative source for precision hollow retroreflectors. The company's hollow retroreflectors are front surface glass substrates assembled to provide many advantages over existing hollow retroreflectors and solid glass retroreflectors. Previous to this new technology, some companies chose not to use hollow retroreflectors due to large seam widths and loss of signal. The "tongue and groove" facet design of PROSystems's retroreflector allows for an extremely small seam width of .001 inches. Feedback from users is very positive regarding this characteristic. Most of PROSystems's primary customers mount the hollow retroreflectors in chrome steel balls for laser tracker targets in applications such as automobile manufacturing and spacecraft assembly.

  20. Two-dimensional model of orificed micro-hollow cathode discharge for space application

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Vekselman, V.; Haber, I.

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, we describe results of self-consistent two-dimensional (x-z) particle-in-cell simulations, with a Monte Carlo collision model, of an orificed micro-hollow cathode operating in a planar diode geometry. The model includes thermionic electron emission with Schottky effect, secondary electron emission due to cathode bombardment by the plasma ions, several different collision processes, and a non-uniform xenon background gas density in the cathode-anode gap. Simulated results showing behavior of the plasma density, potential distribution, and energy flux towards the hollow cathode and orifice walls, are discussed. In addition, results of simulations showing the effect of different Xe gas pressures, orifice size, and cathode voltage, on operation of the micro-hollow cathode are presented.

  1. Electrospun manganese-cobalt oxide hollow nanofibres synthesized via combustion reactions and their lithium storage performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Soo Min; Kim, So Yeun; Kim, Jae-Geun; Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Jong-Won; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Young-Jun; Shahabuddin, Mohammed; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kim, Jung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Mesoporous hollow fibres of MnCo2O4 and CoMn2O4 were synthesized by electrospinning and highly exothermic oxygen-mediated combustion reactions during calcination, in which the heating rate affected the final fibre morphology (e.g., single- or double-shell). The anodes consisting of hollow fibres showed excellent electrochemical properties for lithium-ion batteries.Mesoporous hollow fibres of MnCo2O4 and CoMn2O4 were synthesized by electrospinning and highly exothermic oxygen-mediated combustion reactions during calcination, in which the heating rate affected the final fibre morphology (e.g., single- or double-shell). The anodes consisting of hollow fibres showed excellent electrochemical properties for lithium-ion batteries. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section; additional thermal analyses; XRD patterns; SEM and TEM results; N2 adsorption isotherms; differential capacity plots of galvanostatic voltage profiles and coulombic efficiency during cycling. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01145k

  2. Hollow fiber catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua; Moser, W.; Shelekhin, A.; Pien, Shyhing

    1993-09-01

    The objective of the present research is to investigate the possibility of the enhancement of the H{sub 2}S thermal decomposition in the IGCC system by employing the hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactor. To accomplish the objective, the following major components in the analysis of the high temperature membrane reactor must be investigated: high-temperature stability of the porous glass membrane; catalytic properties of MoS{sub 2} and of the porous glass membrane; catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2}S in a packed bed reactor; catalytic decomposition of 100%, 8.6%, and 1.1% H{sub 2}S gas mixtures in the membrane reactor. The study has been shown that the conversion of the H{sub 2}S can be increased in the packed bed membrane reactor compared to the equilibrium conversion on the shell side. The development of a mathematical model for the proposed process is in progress. The model will enable optimization of the H{sub 2}S decomposition. These conditions include selectivity factors and pressure drop across the membrane.

  3. Enhanced Glow Discharge Production of Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert; Zhong, Shi

    1998-01-01

    Studies starting in late seventies have shown Mars atmosphere can be used as a feedstock for oxygen production using simple chemical processing systems during early phases of the Mars exploration program. This approach has been recognized as one of the most important in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) concepts for enabling future round trip Mars missions. It was determined a decade ago that separation of oxygen can be accomplished efficiently by permeation through a silver membrane at temperatures well below 1000 K. This process involves adsorption of atomic oxygen on the surface and its subsequent diffusion through a silver lattice via an oxygen concentration gradient. We have determined recently that glow discharge can be used to liberate atomic oxygen from Mars atmosphere and that the oxygen can be collected through a silver permeation membrane. Recently, we demonstrated a substantial increase in energy efficiency of the process by applying a radio frequency discharge in combination with a silver permeation membrane. The experiments were performed using pure carbon dioxide in the pressure range equal to Mars surface conditions. Energy efficiency was defined as the ratio of the energy required to dissociate a unit mass of oxygen from carbon dioxide to the (electrical) energy consumed by the overall system during the dissociation and collection process. The research effort, started at NASA Langley Research Center, continued with this project. Oxygen production apparatus, built and operated under the research grant NAG1-1140 was relocated to the Atomic Beams Laboratory at ODU in July 1996, being since then in fall operation.

  4. High Volumetric Capacity Three-Dimensionally Sphere-Caged Secondary Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Xi; Kim, Jinwoo; Zheng, Qiye; Ning, Hailong; Sun, Pengcheng; Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Niu, Junjie; Braun, Paul V

    2016-07-13

    High volumetric energy density secondary batteries are important for many applications, which has led to considerable efforts to replace the low volumetric capacity graphite-based anode common to most Li-ion batteries with a higher energy density anode. Because most high capacity anode materials expand significantly during charging, such anodes must contain sufficient porosity in the discharged state to enable the expansion, yet not excess porosity, which lowers the overall energy density. Here, we present a high volumetric capacity anode consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite formed in only a few steps which includes both a 3D structured Sn scaffold and a hollow Sn sphere within each cavity where all the free Sn surfaces are coated with carbon. The anode exhibits a high volumetric capacity of ∼1700 mA h cm(-3) over 200 cycles at 0.5C, and a capacity greater than 1200 mA h cm(-3) at 10C. Importantly, the anode can even be formed into a commercially relevant ∼100 μm thick form. When assembled into a full cell the anode shows a good compatibility with a commercial LiMn2O4 cathode. In situ TEM observations confirm the electrode design accommodates the necessary volume expansion during lithiation. PMID:27322627

  5. Accurate hierarchical control of hollow crossed NiCo2O4 nanocubes for superior lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong; Liu, Lixiang; Li, Tingting; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Jiajia; Guo, Yuanyuan; Guo, Yicheng

    2014-04-01

    An effective approach of simultaneously coordinating etching and precipitation reactions is employed to prepare hollow crossed NiCo2O4 nanocubes as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Firstly, amorphous hollow (NiCox)O(OH) nanoboxes form uniformly, and subsequent calcination results in the formation of NiCo2O4 nanocubes that exhibit a stable reversible capacity of 1160 mA h g-1 at constant current density of 200 mA g-1 with capacity retention of over 91.1% after 200 cycles. The unique hollow structure can shorten the Li-ion diffusion path, which benefits the rate of performance. Furthermore, the hollow structure offers a sufficient void space to alleviate the mechanical stress caused by volume change. Additionally, the multi-element characteristics of active materials allow the volume change to take place in a stepwise manner. Therefore, hollow crossed NiCo2O4 nanocube electrodes exhibit excellent electrochemical performance. This method is simple and of low cost, which may open a new avenue for fast synthesis of hollow crossed structural nano-functional materials for energy storage, catalysts, sensors and other new applications.An effective approach of simultaneously coordinating etching and precipitation reactions is employed to prepare hollow crossed NiCo2O4 nanocubes as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Firstly, amorphous hollow (NiCox)O(OH) nanoboxes form uniformly, and subsequent calcination results in the formation of NiCo2O4 nanocubes that exhibit a stable reversible capacity of 1160 mA h g-1 at constant current density of 200 mA g-1 with capacity retention of over 91.1% after 200 cycles. The unique hollow structure can shorten the Li-ion diffusion path, which benefits the rate of performance. Furthermore, the hollow structure offers a sufficient void space to alleviate the mechanical stress caused by volume change. Additionally, the multi-element characteristics of active materials allow the volume change to take place in a stepwise manner

  6. Observation of the glow-to-arc transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Saito, Shigeki; Takahashi, Kunio; Onzawa, Tadao

    2002-10-01

    Researches of the glow-to-arc transitions have been required for a new development of the welding technology in low current. It is important to clarify the characteristics of plasma in the transitions because there have been few reports investigated the transitions in detail. The glow-to-arc transitions were observed in argon at atmospheric pressure. The Th-W electrodes of 1 mm in a diameter are used. Both of the electrodes are needle-shaped and set in a quartz tube coaxially. Plasma is generated between the electrodes with the gap spacing of 1 mm. A DC power supply has been applying constant voltage of 600 V during the discharge. A high-speed camera is used to record the images of plasma in the transitions with the measurement of voltage and current between the electrodes. As a result, two things were confirmed for the behavior of the glow-to-arc transition. First, plasma extended over the cathode surface in the transition from the glow to the arc. Second, temperature in the tip of the cathode would increase gradually during the glow and decrease during the arc.

  7. Rf glow discharge optical emission spectrometry for the analysis of arrays of Ni nanowires in nanoporous alumina and titania membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prida, V. M.; Navas, D.; Pirota, K. R.; Hernandez-Velez, M.; Menéndez, A.; Bordel, N.; Pereiro, R.; Sanz-Medel, A.; Hernando, B.; Vazquez, M.

    2006-05-01

    Anodic alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) nanoporous oxide membranes are among the most widely studied self-organized nanopore templates, formed by uniform and well aligned arrays of synthetized nanometric pores or tubes. Here, we perform a comparative study of the depth profiling analysis in self-ordered alumina and titania nanoporous membrane templates by means of the radiofrequency glow discharge coupled to optical emission spectrometry (rf-GD-OES) technique. The densely packed columnar arrays of hexagonally self-ordered nanoporous alumina membranes investigated, with an average inner pore diameter of 35 nm and 105 nm interspacing, give an uniform thickness pore length about more than 5 μm, depending on the anodization time. Meanwhile, the analysis of the anodized titania nanotubes, with an average inner pore diameter of 100 nm and 40 nm wall thickness, shown to be about 300 nm in length. Each type of membranes were also studied in both cases, when the nanopores were empty and after filling with electrodeposited Ni. The direct analysis by rf-GD-OES reveals the ability of this technique to control the quality of these so synthesized nanocomposites formed by electrodeposited Ni nanowires into the alumina and titania nanoporous templates.

  8. Low cost MCFC anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

  9. Hybrid modelling of open glow discharge with account of nonlocal ionization by fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Stepan; Eremin, Denis; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly

    2015-11-01

    Cage and open discharges as well as hollow cathode devices are used for creating negative glow plasma. In order to perform numerical simulations of such kind of plasma object properly it is necessary to account for nonlocal excitation and ionization induced by fast electrons emitted from cathode and accelerated up to energies 102-103eV in cathode voltage drop. In this work a numerical study of open discharge in argon is presented. Simulations were performed using simple hybrid model that incorporates nonlocal ionization by fast electrons into ``extended'' fluid framework. Electron energy balance is written with account of electron heating due to coulomb interaction between ``bulks'' (with energies less than 1eV) and ``intermediate'' electrons (with energies up to inelastic collisions energy threshold). Distributions of main discharge parameters, such charged particle densities, electron temperature, electric potential, current-voltage characteristics of the discharge were obtained. Comparison with experimental results showed good agreement and suggests good applicability of the model. This work was supported by Russian Science Foundation (project #14-19-00311).

  10. Rechargeable sodium alloy anode

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, T.R.

    1988-06-28

    A secondary battery is described comprising: (a) an anode which comprises an alloy of sodium and one or metals selected from the group consisting of tin, lead antimony, bismuth, selenium and tellerium, (b) an electrolyte comprising one or more organic solvents and one or more sodium salts dissolved therein forming dissolved sodium cations in solution; and (c) a cathode; the sodium cations from the electrolyte alloying with the one or more metals of the alloy in the anode during the charging of the battery and sodium in the alloy disoloving in the electrolyte during the discharging of the battery.

  11. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  12. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas'yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  13. Extension of spatiotemporal chaos in glow discharge-semiconductor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmet, Marat Fen, Mehmet Onur; Rafatov, Ismail

    2014-12-15

    Generation of chaos in response systems is discovered numerically through specially designed unidirectional coupling of two glow discharge-semiconductor systems. By utilizing the auxiliary system approach, [H. D. I. Abarbanel, N. F. Rulkov, and M. M. Sushchik, Phys. Rev. E 53, 4528–4535 (1996)] it is verified that the phenomenon is not a chaos synchronization. Simulations demonstrate various aspects of the chaos appearance in both drive and response systems. Chaotic control is through the external circuit equation and governs the electrical potential on the boundary. The expandability of the theory to collectives of glow discharge systems is discussed, and this increases the potential of applications of the results. Moreover, the research completes the previous discussion of the chaos appearance in a glow discharge-semiconductor system [D. D. Šijačić U. Ebert, and I. Rafatov, Phys. Rev. E 70, 056220 (2004).].

  14. Numerical analysis of a hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge for radioactive waste treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Min-Ho; Seo, Jun-Ho; Yang, O.-Bong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a numerical analysis is carried out in order to investigate the effects of the electrode configuration and the operation conditions on the arc flow structure and the performance of a hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge. From the numerical results, a swirl injection of plasma gas and a hollowed cathode with a convergent entrance are found to help control the recirculation directions of backflows and the attachment position of the anode spot in the rear electrode. For example, the anode spot is observed to be moved to the central point of the blocked side in the rear electrode (the anode) when the plasma-forming gases are injected with a swirl. This attachment point is predicted to act as a stable anode spot for the transferred operation of the hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge. In addition, the torch performance is analyzed for operation variables, such as the arc current and the gas flow rates. Similar to that of a conventional hollow electrode plasma torch, the scale-up of input power is accompanied by increases in the arc current and the gas flow rate while increasing the arc current brings about a deterioration in the torch efficiency, which is defined as the ratio of the exit enthalpy to the input power. On the other hand, the temperature profiles at the torch's exit plane show relatively negligible differences for various arc currents and gas flow rates due to the cathode spot being close to the torch exit. Based on these features, we expect the hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge to be a promising tool for treating radioactive wastes in a single step, both as a non-transferred-type plasma incinerator for combustibles and as a transferred-type arc-melter for non-combustibles.

  15. New route for hollow materials

    PubMed Central

    Rivaldo-Gómez, C. M.; Ferreira, F. F.; Landi, G. T.; Souza, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Hollow micro/nano structures form an important family of functional materials. We have used the thermal oxidation process combined with the passage of electric current during a structural phase transition to disclose a colossal mass diffusion transfer of Ti ions. This combination points to a new route for fabrication of hollow materials. A structural phase transition at high temperature prepares the stage by giving mobility to Ti ions and releasing vacancies to the system. The electric current then drives an inward delocalization of vacancies, condensing into voids, and finally turning into a big hollow. This strong physical phenomenon leading to a colossal mass transfer through ionic diffusion is suggested to be driven by a combination of phase transition and electrical current followed by chemical reaction. We show this phenomenon for Ti leading to TiO2 microtube formation, but we believe that it can be used to other metals undergoing structural phase transition at high temperatures. PMID:27554448

  16. Hollow nanotubular toroidal polymer microrings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiyeong; Baek, Kangkyun; Kim, Myungjin; Yun, Gyeongwon; Ko, Young Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Hwang, Ilha; Kim, Jeehong; Natarajan, Ramalingam; Park, Chan Gyung; Sung, Wokyung; Kim, Kimoon

    2014-02-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in the self-assembly of nano- and microscale architectures with well-defined sizes and shapes, a self-organization-based synthesis of hollow toroids has, so far, proved to be elusive. Here, we report the synthesis of polymer microrings made from rectangular, flat and rigid-core monomers with anisotropically predisposed alkene groups, which are crosslinked with each other by dithiol linkers using thiol-ene photopolymerization. The resulting hollow toroidal structures are shape-persistent and mechanically robust in solution. In addition, their size can be tuned by controlling the initial monomer concentrations, an observation that is supported by a theoretical analysis. These hollow microrings can encapsulate guest molecules in the intratoroidal nanospace, and their peripheries can act as templates for circular arrays of metal nanoparticles.

  17. Novel hollow powder porous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sypeck, D.J.; Parrish, P.A.; Wadley, H.N.G.

    1998-12-31

    Recent finite element calculations indicate that structures constructed from partially compacted hollow spheres exhibit a greater stiffness and strength than many other cellular structures at comparable density. It has been observed that gas atomization of metallic powders often leads to entrapment of the flow field gas. The resulting hollow powders are an unwanted by-product in the sense that they lead to porosity and future sites of defect in solid parts. Here a method is developed to separate the hollow powders according to their size, shape and density. They are then consolidated to a porous structure. Examples of this are given for both a titanium alloy and a nickel-base superalloy. The compressive mechanical properties are measured and compared to those of other porous structures.

  18. New route for hollow materials.

    PubMed

    Rivaldo-Gómez, C M; Ferreira, F F; Landi, G T; Souza, J A

    2016-01-01

    Hollow micro/nano structures form an important family of functional materials. We have used the thermal oxidation process combined with the passage of electric current during a structural phase transition to disclose a colossal mass diffusion transfer of Ti ions. This combination points to a new route for fabrication of hollow materials. A structural phase transition at high temperature prepares the stage by giving mobility to Ti ions and releasing vacancies to the system. The electric current then drives an inward delocalization of vacancies, condensing into voids, and finally turning into a big hollow. This strong physical phenomenon leading to a colossal mass transfer through ionic diffusion is suggested to be driven by a combination of phase transition and electrical current followed by chemical reaction. We show this phenomenon for Ti leading to TiO2 microtube formation, but we believe that it can be used to other metals undergoing structural phase transition at high temperatures. PMID:27554448

  19. Hollow sphere ceramic particles for abradable coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.N.; Bader, N.F. III; Dorfman, M.R.

    1984-05-22

    A hollow sphere ceramic flame spray powder is disclosed. The desired constituents are first formed into agglomerated particles in a spray drier. Then the agglomerated particles are introduced into a plasma flame which is adjusted so that the particles collected are substantially hollow. The hollow sphere ceramic particles are suitable for flame spraying a porous and abradable coating. The hollow particles may be selected from the group consisting of zirconium oxide and magnesium zirconate.

  20. Data requirements for verification of ram glow chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.

    1985-01-01

    A set of questions is posed regarding the surface chemistry producing the ram glow on the space shuttle. The questions surround verification of the chemical cycle involved in the physical processes leading to the glow. The questions, and a matrix of measurements required for most answers, are presented. The measurements include knowledge of the flux composition to and from a ram surface as well as spectroscopic signatures from the U to visible to IR. A pallet set of experiments proposed to accomplish the measurements is discussed. An interim experiment involving an available infrared instrument to be operated from the shuttle Orbiter cabin is also be discussed.

  1. Hierarchical CoS2@C hollow microspheres constructed by nanosheets with superior lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiwei; Li, Tingting; Hu, Qian; Li, Chengpin; Guo, Hong

    2015-07-01

    An effective approach of alcoholysis is employed to prepare hollow CoS2@C hybrid nanosheets aggregates as anode materials for Li-ion batteries. Amorphous carbon can be loaded on the CoS2 nanoparticles uniformly in the solvothermal alcoholysis process, and the subsequent calcination results of the formation of hollow structures. The capacity of the sample can remain stable as high as 720 mAhg-1 after 200 cycles, and it also exhibits good rate capacity. The nano-scaled characteristics of CoS2 nanosheets embedded in the aggregates ensure the electrode having a high capacity and the fast Li-ion diffusion in the electrode. The in-situ introduction of carbon renders the electrode having a good electronic conductivity and can effectively prevent the formation of polysulfide anions. The unique hollow structures can shorten the length of Li-ion diffusion, which is benefit for the rate performance. The hollow structure also offers a sufficient void space, which sufficiently alleviates the mechanical stress caused by volume change. Therefore, the prepared hierarchical hollow CoS2@C materials constructed by nanosheets exhibit outstanding electrochemical performance.

  2. Linear and Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves, Shocks and Stationary Structures in a dc-Glow-Discharge Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlino, Robert

    2011-10-01

    In 1990, Rao, Shukla, and Yu (Planet. Space Sci. 38, 543) predicted the existence of the dust acoustic (DA) wave, a low-frequency (~ few Hz), compressional dust density wave that propagates through a dusty plasma at a phase speed ~ several cm/s. The DA wave was first observed by Chu et. al., (J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 27, 296, 1994) in an rf-produced dusty plasma, and by Barkan et. al., (Barkan et. al. Phys. Plasmas 2, 2161, 1995) who obtained video images of the DA wave trains using light scattering from a dust suspension confined in an anodic glow discharge plasma formed within a Q machine plasma. The dispersion relation for DAWs was measured by Thompson et. al., (Phys. Plasmas 4, 2331, 1997) in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma by modulating the discharge current at a set frequency. DAWs have been investigated by many groups both in weakly-coupled and strongly-coupled dusty plasmas (E. Thomas, Jr., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 49, 316, 2009). In most experiments where DA waves are present, the wave amplitude is relatively high, indicating that they are nonlinear. In this talk, results of our recent experiments on DAWs will be presented. The following experiments, performed in a dc glow-discharge dusty plasma will be described: (1) Observations of spontaneously excited nonlinear, cylindrical DAWs, which exhibit confluence of waves propagating at different speeds. (2) Investigations of self-steepening DAWs that develop into DA shocks with thicknesses comparable to the interparticle separation (Heinrich et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 115001, 2009). (3) Measurements of the linear growth rates of DAWs excited in merging dust clouds. (4) The formation of stationary, stable dust density structures appearing as non-propagating DAWs (Heinrich et. al., Phys. Rev. E, in press, 2011). This work was performed in collaboration with S. H. Kim, J. R. Heinrich, and J. K. Meyer. Work supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG01-04ER54795

  3. Anode initiated surface flashover switch

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.; Koss, Robert J.

    2003-04-29

    A high voltage surface flashover switch has a pair of electrodes spaced by an insulator. A high voltage is applied to an anode, which is smaller than the opposing, grounded, cathode. When a controllable source of electrons near the cathode is energized, the electrons are attracted to the anode where they reflect to the insulator and initiate anode to cathode breakdown.

  4. Inert Anode Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1999-07-01

    This ASME report provides a broad assessment of open literature and patents that exist in the area of inert anodes and their related cathode systems and cell designs, technologies that are relevant for the advanced smelting of aluminum. The report also discusses the opportunities, barriers, and issues associated with these technologies from a technical, environmental, and economic viewpoint.

  5. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  6. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  7. Cracking associated with micrometeoroid impact craters in anodized aluminum alloy clamps on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murr, Lawrence E.; Niou, Chorng S.; Quinones, Stella; Murr, Kyle S.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a reusable hollow-cylindrical satellite sustaining a total of 57 different experiments. The 130 sq m of spacecraft surface area included anodized 6061-T6 Al alloy bay frames and clamps for holding experiment trays in the bay areas. Attention is presently given to the micrometeoroid impact crater features observed on two tray clamps recovered from the LDEF leading-edge locations. It is found that even very subtle surface modifications in structural alloy anodizing can influence micrometeoroid impact crater cracking, notable radial cracking due to the ejecta-rim of the impact craters.

  8. Hollow tin/chromium whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Li, James C. M.

    2010-05-01

    Tin whiskers have been an engineering challenge for over five decades. The mechanism has not been agreed upon thus far. This experiment aimed to identify a mechanism by applying compressive stresses to a tin film evaporated on silicon substrate with an adhesion layer of chromium in between. A phenomenon was observed in which hollow whiskers grew inside depleted areas. Using focused ion beam, the hollow whiskers were found to contain both tin and chromium. At the bottom of the depleted areas, thin tin/tin oxide film remained over the chromium layer. It indicates that tin transport occurred along the interface between tin and chromium layers.

  9. A Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCM)

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Cohen; Z. Wang

    1998-04-01

    A new type of plasma sputtering device, named the hollow cathode magnetron (HCM), has been developed by surrounding a planar magnetron cathode with a hollow cathode structure (HCS). Operating characteristics of HCMs, current-voltage ( I-V ) curves for fixed discharge pressure and voltage-pressure ( V-p ) curves for fixed cathode current, are measured. Such characteristics are compared with their planar magnetron counterparts. New operation regimes, such as substantially lower pressures (0.3 mTorr), were discovered for HCMs. Cathode erosion profiles show marked improvement over planar magnetron in terms of material utilization. The use of HCMs for thin film deposition are discussed.

  10. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  11. Hollow waveguide for urology treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, H.; Němec, M.; Koranda, P.; Pokorný, J.; Kőhler, O.; Drlík, P.; Miyagi, M.; Iwai, K.; Matsuura, Y.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of our work was the application of the special sealed hollow waveguide system for the urology treatment - In our experimental study we have compared the effects of Ho:YAG (wavelength 2100 nm) and Er:YAG (wavelength 2940 nm) laser radiation both on human urinary stones (or compressed plaster samples which serve as a model) fragmentation and soft ureter tissue incision in vitro. Cyclic Olefin Polymer - coated silver (COP/Ag) hollow glass waveguides with inner and outer diameters 700 and 850 μm, respectively, were used for the experiment. To prevent any liquid to diminish and stop the transmission, the waveguide termination was utilized.

  12. Quartz antenna with hollow conductor

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Benabou, Elie

    2002-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) antenna for plasma ion sources is formed of a hollow metal conductor tube disposed within a glass tube. The hollow metal tubular conductor has an internal flow channel so that there will be no coolant leakage if the outer glass tube of the antenna breaks. A portion of the RF antenna is formed into a coil; the antenna is used for inductively coupling RF power to a plasma in an ion source chamber. The antenna is made by first inserting the metal tube inside the glass tube, and then forming the glass/metal composite tube into the desired coil shape.

  13. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  14. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  15. Characteristics of sheath-driven tangential flow produced by a low-current DC surface glow discharge plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jichul; Shajid Rahman, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    An experimental investigation of low-speed flow actuation at near-atmospheric pressure is presented. The flow actuation is achieved via low-current ( \\lesssim 1.0 mA) continuous or pulsed DC surface glow discharge plasma. The plasma actuator, consisting of two sharp-edged nickel electrodes, produces a tangential flow in a direction from anode to cathode, and is visualized using high-speed schlieren photography. The induced flow velocity estimated via the schlieren images reaches up to 5 m/s in test cases. The actuation capability increases with pressure and electrode gap distances, and the induced flow velocity increases logarithmically with the discharge power. Pulsed DC exhibits slightly improved actuation capability with better directionality. An analytic estimation of induced flow velocity obtained based on ion momentum in the cathode sheath and gas dynamics in one-dimensional flow yields values similar to those measured.

  16. Effect of hydrogen ratio on plasma parameters of N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixture glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    El-Brulsy, R. A.; Abd Al-Halim, M. A.; Abu-Hashem, A.; Rashed, U. M.; Hassouba, M. A.

    2012-05-15

    A dc plane glow discharge in a nitrogen-hydrogen (N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}) gas mixture has been operated at discharge currents of 10 and 20 mA. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at different hydrogen concentrations is measured. A Maxwellian EEDF is found in the positive column region, while in both cathode fall and negative glow regions, a non-Maxwellian one is observed. Langmuir electric probes are used at different axial positions, gas pressures, and hydrogen concentrations to measure the electron temperature and plasma density. The electron temperature is found to increase with increasing H{sub 2} concentration and decrease with increasing both the axial distance from the cathode and the mixture pressure. At first, with increasing distance from the cathode, the ion density decreases, while the electron density increases; then, as the anode is further approached, they remain nearly constant. At different H{sub 2} concentrations, the electron and ion densities decrease with increasing the mixture pressure. Both the electron and ion densities slightly decrease with increasing H{sub 2} concentration.

  17. Electrolytic Formation of Crystalline Silicon/Germanium Alloy Nanotubes and Hollow Particles with Enhanced Lithium-Storage Properties.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Yu, Le; Wang, Dihua; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-06-20

    Crystalline silicon(Si)/germanium(Ge) alloy nanotubes and hollow particles are synthesized for the first time through a one-pot electrolytic process. The morphology of these alloy structures can be easily tailored from nanotubes to hollow particles by varying the overpotential during the electro-reduction reaction. The continuous solid diffusion governed by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect results in the formation of inner void in the alloy particles. Benefitting from the compositional and structural advantages, these SiGe alloy nanotubes exhibit much enhanced lithium-storage performance compared with the individual solid Si and Ge nanowires as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries. PMID:27159140

  18. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bird, Charles R.; Rockett, Paul D.

    1987-01-01

    An x-ray source having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events.

  19. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bird, C.R.; Rockett, P.D.

    1987-08-04

    An x-ray source is disclosed having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events. 5 figs.

  20. Anodic plasma in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, Michael

    2008-03-01

    In this paper plasma dynamics and ionization of propellant gas are modeled within the anode holes used for gas injection of a Hall thruster. Under conditions of anode coating with dielectric material, the discharge current should close within these holes, which results in ionization and formation of plasma jets emanating from the openings. The model shows that gas ionization inside the anode holes is very significant. For instance, the electron density increases by two orders of magnitude under certain conditions. The potential drop in the anode region which includes the electrostatic sheath inside the hole and potential drop along the hole might be positive or negative, depending on the anode hole radius.

  1. Hollow vortices in weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikas; Crowdy, Darren

    2014-11-01

    In a two-dimensional, inviscid and steady fluid flow, hollow vortices are bounded regions of constant pressure with non-zero circulation. It is known that for an infinite row of incompressible hollow vortices, analytical solutions for the flow field and the shape of the hollow vortex boundary can be obtained using conformal mapping methods. In this talk, we show how to derive analytical expressions for a weakly compressible hollow vortex row. This is done by introducing a new method based on the Imai-Lamla formula. We will also touch upon how to extend these results to a von-Karman street of hollow vortices.

  2. Hollow vortices in weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikas; Crowdy, Darren

    2015-11-01

    In a two-dimensional, inviscid and steady fluid flow, hollow vortices are bounded regions of constant pressure with non-zero circulation. It is known that for an infinite row of incompressible hollow vortices, analytical solutions for the flow field and the shape of the hollow vortex boundary can be obtained using conformal mapping methods. In this talk, we show how to derive analytical expressions for a weakly compressible hollow vortex row. This is done by introducing a new method based on the Imai-Lamla formula. We will also touch upon how to extend these results to a von-Karman street of hollow vortices.

  3. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  4. Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-11-30

    A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

  5. Mechanism of boriding from pastes in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, S.A.; Al'tshuler, S.A.

    1987-09-01

    The authors investigate the boridation of steel 45 from the standpoint of the glow-discharge dissociation of a borax paste and the plasma arc spraying of the resulting boron into the steel. The effects of process parameters on the impregnation of boron into the steel and its phase behavior in the boridation process are discussed.

  6. Metal Mesh Smear Sampling for Glow Discharge Analytical Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Barshick, C.M.; Ramsey, J.M.; Smith, D.H.

    2000-06-01

    Metal mesh smear sampling is being developed and evaluated for use in a number of glow discharge and other optical and mass spectrometric techniques. Sensitive elemental and isotopic analyses thus will be coupled with a convenient sampling scheme similar to one that is common for radiological surveys.

  7. Degradation of Organics in a Glow Discharge Under Martian Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, P. E.; Calle, L. M.; Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Trigwell, S.; Starnes, J. W.; Schuerger, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to understand the consequences of glow electrical discharges on the chemistry and biology of Mars. The possibility was raised some time ago that the absence of organic material and carbonaceous matter in the Martian soil samples studied by the VikinG Landers might be due in part to an intrinsic atmospheric mechanism such as glow discharge. The high probability for dust interactions during Martian dust storms and dust devils, combined with the cold, dry climate of Mars most likely results in airborne dust that is highly charged. Such high electrostatic potentials generated during dust storms on Earth are not permitted in the low-pressure CO2 environment on Mars; therefore electrostatic energy released in the form of glow discharges is a highly likely phenomenon. Since glow discharge methods are used for cleaning and sterilizing surfaces throughout industry, the idea that dust in the Martian atmosphere undergoes a cleaning action many times over geologic time scales appears to be a plausible one.

  8. Synchronization between two coupled direct current glow discharge plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chaubey, Neeraj; Mukherjee, S.; Sen, A.; Sekar Iyengar, A. N.

    2015-02-15

    Experimental results on the nonlinear dynamics of two coupled glow discharge plasma sources are presented. A variety of nonlinear phenomena including frequency synchronization and frequency pulling are observed as the coupling strength is varied. Numerical solutions of a model representation of the experiment consisting of two coupled asymmetric Van der Pol type equations are found to be in good agreement with the observed results.

  9. SkyGlowNet as a Vehicle for STEM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flurchick, K. M.; Craine, E. R.; Culver, R. B.; Deal, S.; Foster, C.

    2013-06-01

    SkyGlowNet is an emerging network of internet-enabled sky brightness meters (iSBM) that continuously record and log sky brightness at the zenith of each network node site. Also logged are time and weather information. These data are polled at a user-defined frequency, typically about every 45 seconds. The data are uploaded to the SkyGlowNet website, initially to a proprietary area where the data for each institution are embargoed for one or two semesters as students conduct research projects with their data. When released from embargo, the data are moved to another area where they can be accessed by all SkyGlowNet participants. Some of the data are periodically released to a public area on the website. In this presentation we describe the data formats and provide examples of both data content and the structure of the website. Early data from two nodes in the SkyGlowNet have been characterized, both quantitatively and qualitatively, by undergraduate students at NCAT. A summary of their work is presented here. These analyses are of utility in helping those new to looking at these data to understand how to interpret them. In particular, we demonstrate differences between effects on light at night and sky brightness due to astronomical cycles, atmospheric phenomena, and artificial lighting. Quantitative characterization of the data includes statistical analyses of parsed segments of the temporal data stream. An attempt is made to relate statistical metrics to specific types of phenomena.

  10. Camp GLOW (Girls Leading Our World): Handbook for Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    Camp GLOW (Girls Leading Our World) began in Romania in 1995 as a weeklong leadership camp with the purpose of encouraging young women to become active citizens by building their self-esteem and confidence, increasing their self-awareness, and developing their skills in goal-setting, assertiveness, and career and life planning. Since that first…

  11. Array of surface-confined glow discharges in atmospheric pressure helium: Modes and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Liu, D. X. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com; Nie, Q. Y.; Li, H. P.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com

    2014-05-19

    Array of atmospheric pressure surface discharges confined by a two-dimensional hexagon electrode mesh is studied for its discharge modes and temporal evolution so as to a theoretical underpinning to their growing applications in medicine, aerodynamic control, and environmental remediation. Helium plasma surface-confined by one hexagon-shaped rim electrode is shown to evolve from a Townsend mode to a normal and abnormal glow mode, and its evolution develops from the rim electrodes as six individual microdischarges merging in the middle of the hexagon mesh element. Within one hexagon element, microdischarges remain largely static with the mesh electrode being the instantaneous cathode, but move towards the hexagon center when the electrode is the instantaneous anode. On the entire array electrode surface, plasma ignition is found to beat an unspecific hexagon element and then spreads to ignite surrounding hexagon elements. The spreading of microdischarges is in the form of an expanding circle at a speed of about 3 × 10{sup 4} m/s, and their quenching starts in the location of the initial plasma ignition. Plasma modes influence how input electrical power is used to generate and accelerate electrons and as such the reaction chemistry, whereas plasma dynamics are central to understand and control plasma instabilities. The present study provides an important aspect of plasma physics of the atmospheric surface-confined discharge array and a theoretical underpinning to its future technological innovation.

  12. Rapid oxidation and immobilization of arsenic by contact glow discharge plasma in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Hu, Ping; Zheng, Xing; Zheng, Jingtang; Tan, Minghui; Wu, Mingbo; Xue, Qinzhong

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is a priority pollutant in aquatic ecosystem and therefore the remediation of arsenic-bearing wastewater is an important environmental issue. This study unprecedentedly reported simultaneous oxidation of As(III) and immobilization of arsenic can be achieved using contact glow discharge process (CGDP). CGDP with thinner anodic wire and higher energy input were beneficial for higher As(V) production efficiency. Adding Fe(II) in CGDP system significantly enhanced the oxidation rate of As(III) due to the generations of additional OH and Fe(IV) species, accompanied with which arsenic can be simultaneously immobilized in one process. Arsenic immobilization can be favorably obtained at solution pH in the range of 4.0-6.0 and Fe(II) concentration from 250 to 1000 μM. The presence of organics (i.e., oxalic acid, ethanol and phenol) retarded the arsenic immobilization by scavenging OH or complexing Fe(III) in aqueous solution. On the basis of these results, a mechanism was proposed that the formed ionic As(V) rapidly coprecipitated with Fe(III) ions or was adsorbed on the ferric oxyhydroxides with the formation of amorphous ferric arsenate-bearing ferric oxyhydroxides. This CGDP-Fenton system was of great interest for engineered systems concerned with the remediation of arsenic containing wastewater. PMID:25600320

  13. ANODIC TREATMENT OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kolodney, M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for effecting eloctrolytic dissolution of a metallic uranium article at a uniform rate. The uranium is made the anode in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution containing nitrate ions furnished by either ammonium nitrate, lithium nitrate, sodium nitrate, or potassium nitrate. A stainless steel cathode is employed and electrolysls carried out at a current density of about 0.1 to 1 ampere per square inch.

  14. Nickel anode electrode

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Benedict, Mark

    1987-01-01

    A nickel anode electrode fabricated by oxidizing a nickel alloying material to produce a material whose exterior contains nickel oxide and whose interior contains nickel metal throughout which is dispersed the oxide of the alloying material and by reducing and sintering the oxidized material to form a product having a nickel metal exterior and an interior containing nickel metal throughout which is dispersed the oxide of the alloying material.

  15. Fabrication of porous anodic alumina using normal anodization and pulse anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, I. K.; Yam, F. K.; Hassan, Z.

    2015-05-01

    This article reports on the fabrication of porous anodic alumina (PAA) by two-step anodizing the low purity commercial aluminum sheets at room temperature. Different variations of the second-step anodization were conducted: normal anodization (NA) with direct current potential difference; pulse anodization (PA) alternate between potential differences of 10 V and 0 V; hybrid pulse anodization (HPA) alternate between potential differences of 10 V and -2 V. The method influenced the film homogeneity of the PAA and the most homogeneous structure was obtained via PA. The morphological properties are further elucidated using measured current-transient profiles. The absent of current rise profile in PA indicates the anodization temperature and dissolution of the PAA structure were greatly reduced by alternating potential differences.

  16. Accurate hierarchical control of hollow crossed NiCo2O4 nanocubes for superior lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Liu, Lixiang; Li, Tingting; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Jiajia; Guo, Yuanyuan; Guo, Yicheng

    2014-05-21

    An effective approach of simultaneously coordinating etching and precipitation reactions is employed to prepare hollow crossed NiCo2O4 nanocubes as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Firstly, amorphous hollow (NiCox)O(OH) nanoboxes form uniformly, and subsequent calcination results in the formation of NiCo2O4 nanocubes that exhibit a stable reversible capacity of 1160 mA h g(-1) at constant current density of 200 mA g(-1) with capacity retention of over 91.1% after 200 cycles. The unique hollow structure can shorten the Li-ion diffusion path, which benefits the rate of performance. Furthermore, the hollow structure offers a sufficient void space to alleviate the mechanical stress caused by volume change. Additionally, the multi-element characteristics of active materials allow the volume change to take place in a stepwise manner. Therefore, hollow crossed NiCo2O4 nanocube electrodes exhibit excellent electrochemical performance. This method is simple and of low cost, which may open a new avenue for fast synthesis of hollow crossed structural nano-functional materials for energy storage, catalysts, sensors and other new applications. PMID:24728284

  17. Inert anodes for aluminum smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, J.D.; Ray, S.P.; Baker, F.W.; DeYoung, D.H.; Tarcy, G.P.

    1986-02-01

    The use of nonconsumable or inert anodes for replacement of consumable carbon anodes in Hall electrolysis cells for the production of aluminum has been a technical and commercial goal of the aluminum industry for many decades. This report summarizes the technical success realized in the development of an inert anode that can be used to produce aluminum of acceptable metal purity in small scale Hall electrolysis cells. The inert anode material developed consists of a cermet composition containing the phases: copper, nickel ferrite and nickel oxide. This anode material has an electrical conductivity comparable to anode carbon used in Hall cells, i.e., 150 ohm {sup {minus}1}cm{sup {minus}1}. Metal purity of 99.5 percent aluminum has been produced using this material. The copper metal alloy present in the anode is not removed by anodic dissolution as does occur with cermet anodes containing a metallic nickel alloy. Solubility of the oxide phases in the cryolite electrolyte is reduced by: (1) saturated concentration of alumina, (2) high nickel oxide content in the NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} composition, (3) lowest possible cell operating temperature, (4) additions of alkaline or alkaline earth fluorides to the bath to reduce solubilities of the anode components, and (5) avoiding bath contaminants such as silica. Dissolution rate measurements indicate first-order kinetics and that the rate limiting step for dissolution is mass transport controlled. 105 refs., 234 figs., 73 tabs.

  18. Sodium ion insertion in hollow carbon nanowires for battery applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Lifen; Sushko, Maria L; Wang, Wei; Schwenzer, Birgit; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Saraf, Laxmikant V; Yang, Zhengguo; Liu, Jun

    2012-07-11

    Hollow carbon nanowires (HCNWs) were prepared through pyrolyzation of a hollow polyaniline nanowire precursor. The HCNWs used as anode material for Na-ion batteries deliver a high reversible capacity of 251 mAh g(-1) and 82.2% capacity retention over 400 charge-discharge cycles between 1.2 and 0.01 V (vs Na(+)/Na) at a constant current of 50 mA g(-1) (0.2 C). Excellent cycling stability is also observed at an even higher charge-discharge rate. A high reversible capacity of 149 mAh g(-1) also can be obtained at a current rate of 500 mA g(-1) (2C). The good Na-ion insertion property is attributed to the short diffusion distance in the HCNWs and the large interlayer distance (0.37 nm) between the graphitic sheets, which agrees with the interlayered distance predicted by theoretical calculations to enable Na-ion insertion in carbon materials. PMID:22686335

  19. Sodium Ion Insertion in Hollow Carbon Nanowires for Battery Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Lifen; Sushko, Maria L.; Wang, Wei; Schwenzer, Birgit; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Yang, Zhenguo; Liu, Jun

    2012-07-11

    Hollow Carbon Nanowires (HCNWs) were prepared through pyrolyzation of hollow polyaniline nanowires precursor. The HCNWs used as anode material for Na-ion batteries delivers a high reversible capacity of 251 mAh g{sup -1} and 82.2% capacity retention over 400 charge/discharge cycles between 1.2 and 0.01 V (vs. Na{sup +}/Na) at a constant current of 50 mA g{sup -1} (0.2 C). Excellent cycling stability is also observed at even higher charge-discharge rate. A high reversible capacity of 149 mAh g{sup -1} also can be obtained at a current rate of 500 mA g{sup -1} (2C). The good Na ion insertion property is attributed to the short diffusion distance in the HCNWs, and the large interlayer distance (0.37 nm) between the graphitic sheets, which agrees with the interlayered distance predicted by theoretical calculation to enable Na ion insertion in carbon materials.

  20. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  1. Facile synthesis of hollow carbon nanospheres from hollow chitosan nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ya; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2006-04-01

    Hollow carbon nanospheres (HCNS) with large surface area were synthesized from hollow chitosan nanospheres by one-step pyrolysis with a relatively low temperature (550 degrees C). The resulted HCNS is fully carbonized and partially graphitized under the experiment conditions. It is an important and facile method to prepare the uniform, shape- and size-controlled carbon nanomaterials by carbonization of the natural polysaccharide compounds and their derivatives. The as-prepared HCNS has a narrow size distribution in hollow carbon nanospheres (about 53 nm). The structure and size of HCNS are reproducible and could be tunable by changing the preparation conditions. The characterizations to estimate the composition, decompose properties, crystalline form, structure and surface property of the HCNS were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction measurement (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, and the N2 adsorption-desorption isothermal process. The present preparation method makes it feasible to synthesize carbon nanospheres in abundance in the lab, and the synthesized HCNS could be a promising support for metal catalysts, an ideal matrix connecting with DNA or other bioactive substances. PMID:16736772

  2. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.A.; Scott, J.W.

    1984-11-06

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 80/sup 0/ C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V.

  3. Photoelectrochemical cell with nondissolving anode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, A. B.; Kaiser, S. W.; Wrighton, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Improved electrolytic cells have efficiencies comparable to those of best silicon solar cells but are potentially less expensive to manufacture. Cells consist of light-sensitive n-type semiconductor anode and metallic cathode immersed in electrolytic solution. Reversible redox cells produce no chemical change in electrolyte and stabilize anode against dissolving. Cell can produce more than 500 mW of power per square centimeter of anode area at output voltage of 0.4 V.

  4. Collimation with hollow electron beams.

    PubMed

    Stancari, G; Valishev, A; Annala, G; Kuznetsov, G; Shiltsev, V; Still, D A; Vorobiev, L G

    2011-08-19

    A novel concept of controlled halo removal for intense high-energy beams in storage rings and colliders is presented. It is based on the interaction of the circulating beam with a 5-keV, magnetically confined, pulsed hollow electron beam in a 2-m-long section of the ring. The electrons enclose the circulating beam, kicking halo particles transversely and leaving the beam core unperturbed. By acting as a tunable diffusion enhancer and not as a hard aperture limitation, the hollow electron beam collimator extends conventional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The first results on the collimation of 980-GeV antiprotons are presented. PMID:21929171

  5. Thin film buried anode battery

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Liu, Ping

    2009-12-15

    A reverse configuration, lithium thin film battery (300) having a buried lithium anode layer (305) and process for making the same. The present invention is formed from a precursor composite structure (200) made by depositing electrolyte layer (204) onto substrate (201), followed by sequential depositions of cathode layer (203) and current collector (202) on the electrolyte layer. The precursor is subjected to an activation step, wherein a buried lithium anode layer (305) is formed via electroplating a lithium anode layer at the interface of substrate (201) and electrolyte film (204). The electroplating is accomplished by applying a current between anode current collector (201) and cathode current collector (202).

  6. Electrochemical cell with gelled anode

    SciTech Connect

    Bahary, W.S.

    1983-04-19

    An electrochemical cell having a gelled anode, wherein the gelling agent is an anionic polysaccharide having a rigid ordered structure such as extracellular microbial polysaccharides, particularly xanthan gum.

  7. A dynamic inert metal anode.

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn, J. N.

    1998-11-09

    A new concept for a stable anode for aluminum electrowinning is described. The anode consists of a cup-shaped metal alloy container filled with a molten salt that contains dissolved aluminum. The metal alloy can be any of a number of alloys, but it must contain aluminum as a secondary alloying metal. A possible alloy composition is copper with 5 to 15 weight percent aluminum. In the presence of oxygen, aluminum on the metal anode's exterior surface forms a continuous alumina film that is thick enough to protect the anode from chemical attack by cryolite during electrolysis and thin enough to maintain electrical conductivity. However, the alumina film is soluble in cryolite, so it must be regenerated in situ. Film regeneration is achieved by the transport of aluminum metal from the anode's molten salt interior through the metal wall to the anode's exterior surface, where the transported aluminum oxidizes to alumina in the presence of evolving oxygen to maintain the protective alumina film. Periodic addition of aluminum metal to the anode's interior keeps the aluminum activity in the molten salt at the desired level. This concept for an inert anode is viable as long as the amount of aluminum produced at the cathode greatly exceeds the amount of aluminum required to maintain the anode's protective film.

  8. Novel LaBO3 hollow nanospheres of size 34±2 nm templated by polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Manickam; Gunawardhana, Nanda; Luitel, Hom Nath; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Masamichi; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Watari, Takanori; Yoshio, Masaki; Tatsumi, Takashi; Nakashima, Kenichi

    2012-03-15

    Novel lanthanum borate (LaBO(3)) hollow nanospheres of size 34±2 nm have been reported for the first time by soft-template self-assembly process. Poly(styrene-b-acrylic acid-b-ethylene oxide) (PS-PAA-PEO) micelle with core-shell-corona architecture serves as an efficient soft template for fabrication of LaBO(3) hollow particles using sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) and LaCl(3)⋅7H(2)O as the precursors. In this template, the PS block (core) acts as a template of the void space of hollow particle, the anionic PAA block (shell) serves as reaction field for metal ion interactions, and the PEO block (corona) stabilizes the polymer/lanthana composite particles. The PS-PAA-PEO micelles and the resulting LaBO(3) hollow nanospheres were thoroughly characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction, magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance ((11)B MAS NMR), energy dispersive X-ray analysis, thermal analyses, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses. The nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses and TEM observation of the hollow particles confirmed the presence of disordered mesopores in the LaBO(3) shell domain. The solid state (11)B MAS NMR spectra of LaBO(3) hollow nanospheres revealed that the shell part contains both trigonal and tetrahedral boron species. The LaBO(3) hollow particles were applied to anode materials in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries (LIBs). The hollow particles exhibited high coulombic efficiency and charge-discharge cycling capacities of up to 100 cycles in the LIBs. PMID:22257959

  9. A flexible freestanding Si/rGO hybrid film anode for stable Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haoxuan; Jing, Shilong; Hu, Yanjie; Jiang, Hao; Li, Chunzhong

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of flexible freestanding electrodes with superior electrochemical performance is challenging now in consumer electronics miniaturization. Herein, we demonstrate a simple and scalable synthesis of hollow silicon nanosheets, which then hybridizes with rGO into flexible films by layer-by-layer assembly process. The resulting Si/rGO films, when applied as a free-standing LIBs anode, exhibit a high reversible specific capacity of 904 mAh g-1 at 200 mA g-1 (about 2 times higher than theoretical value of graphite anode), and meanwhile maintain a long cycle life (650 mAh g-1 after 150 cycles). In addition, a flexible full battery has also been assembled based on the flexible film as an anode and the commercial LiCoO2 as a cathode, which impressively delivers a high specific capacity of 700 and 613 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1 after 15 cycles in flat and bent state, respectively. Such intriguing electrochemical performances can be mainly attributed to the two-dimensional hollow nanostructure of silicon and their strong synergistic effect with rGO. It is reckoned that our Si/rGO films are a promising anode for advanced flexible LIBs.

  10. Hollow Spheres in Composite Materials and Metallic Hollow Sphere Composites (MHSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, Erika; Molitor, Martin

    The newly developed metallic hollow spheres are used in combination with a polymeric matrix for producing metallic hollow-sphere-composites (MSHC), which have been developed for mechanical engineering applications in the “InnoZellMet” project.

  11. Cascade decays of hollow ions

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, G. ); Hahn, Y. )

    1991-05-01

    A multiple-electron-emission process for atoms with one or more inner-shell vacancies is treated using the radiative- and Auger-electron-emission cascade model, in which inner-shell holes are assumed to decay by sequentially emitting radiations and/or Auger electrons. Such hollow ions are produced by synchrotron irradiation of atomic targets and in ion-surface interactions with multiple-electron transfers. The final charge-state distribution is determined by the Auger and radiative branching ratios at each stage of the decay sequence. At intermediate stages of cascade, hollow ions with more than one hole in different ionization stages are created. The Ne, Mg, and Fe{sup 14+} ions with the initial 1{ital s}, 2{ital s}, and 2{ital p} vacancies are considered in detail, and the core charge dependence of the maximum charge state is studied. The hollow Mg ion with double initial 1{ital s} holes is analyzed, and the result compared with that for the case of one 1{ital s} hole. The peak is shifted more than two units to a higher degree of ionization. The correlated shake-off and shake-up multiple-electron processes are not considered, but they are expected to cause further shifts.

  12. Purification of nanoparticles by hollow fiber diafiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeken, J.

    2012-09-01

    Hollow Fiber Diafiltration (Hollow Fiber Tangential Flow Filtration) is an efficient and rapid alternative to traditional methods of nanoparticle purification such as ultracentrifugation, stirred cell filtration, dialysis or chromatography. Hollow Fiber Diafiltration can be used to purify a wide range of nanoparticles including liposomes, colloids, magnetic particles and nanotubes. Hollow Fiber Diafiltration is a membrane based method where pore size determines the retention or transmission of solution components. It is a flow process where the sample is gently circulated through a tubular membrane. With controlled replacement of the permeate or (dialysate), pure nanoparticles can be attained. Hollow Fiber Diafiltration can be directly scaled up from R&D volumes to production. By adding more membrane fibers and maintaining the operating parameters, large volumes can be processed in the same time with the same pressure, and flow dynamics as bench-scale volumes. Keywords: hollow fiber, Diafiltration, filtration, purification, tangential flow filtration.

  13. Thin flexible intercalation anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.C.; Cieslak, W.R.; Klassen, S.E.; Lagasse, R.R.

    1994-10-01

    Poly(acrylonitrile) fibers have been pyrolyzed under various conditions to form flexible carbon yarns capable of intercalating lithium ions. These fibers have also been formed into both woven and non woven cloths. Potentiostatic, potentiodynamic and galvanostatic tests have been conducted with these materials in several electrolytes. In some tests, a potential hold was used after each constant current charge and discharge. These tests have shown some of these flexible materials to reversibly intercalate lithium ions to levels that are suitable for use as a practical battery anode.

  14. Radiation effects on ETFE polymer exposed to glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisawa, Renato Amaral; Abidzina, Volha; de Almeida, Adelaide; Budak, Satilmis; Tereshko, I.; Elkin, I.; Ila, Daryush

    2007-08-01

    The polymer ethylenetetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) is composed of alternating ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene segments. Because it has applications in areas such as medical physics and industrial coatings, there is a great interest in surface modification studies of ETFE polymer. When this material is exposed to ionizing radiation it suffers damage that depends on the type, energy and intensity of the irradiation. In order to determine the radiation damage mechanism from exposure to low voltage plasma, ETFE films were exposed to residual gas plasma in glow discharge regime to a fluence of 2 × 1017 ions/cm2. Irradiated films were analyzed with optical absorption photospectrometry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the structural changes caused by low energy glow discharge.

  15. Glow discharge electron impact ionization source for miniature mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Song, Qingyu; Noll, Robert J; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2007-05-01

    A glow discharge electron impact ionization (GDEI) source was developed for operation using air as the support gas. An alternative to the use of thermoemission from a resistively heated filament electron source for miniature mass spectrometers, the GDEI source is shown to have advantages of long lifetime under high-pressure operation and low power consumption. The GDEI source was characterized using our laboratory's handheld mass spectrometer, the Mini 10. The effects of the discharge voltage and pressure were investigated. Design considerations are illustrated with calculations. Performance is demonstrated in a set of experimental tests. The results show that the low power requirements, mechanical ruggedness, and quality of the data produced using the small glow discharge ion source make it well-suited for use with a portable handheld mass spectrometer. PMID:17441220

  16. Glow Discharge Induced Hydroxyl Radical Degradation of 2-Naphthylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Quanfang; Yu, Jie; Gao, Jinzhang; Yang, Wu

    2005-06-01

    In an aqueous solution, normal electrolysis at high voltages switches over spontaneously to glow discharge electrolysis and gives rise to hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and aqueous electron, as well as several other active species. Hydroxyl radical directly attacks organic contaminants to make them oxidized. In the present paper, 2-naphthylamine is eventually degraded into hydrogen carbonate and carbon dioxide. The degradation process is analyzed by using an Ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrum, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). It is demonstrated that 2-naphthylamine (c0 =30 mg·l-1) is completely converted within 2h at 30°C and 600 V by glow discharge electrolysis, and the degradation is strongly dependent upon the presence of ferrous ions. COD is ascended in the absence of ferrous ions and descended in the presence of them.

  17. Dust-void formation in a dc glow discharge.

    PubMed

    Fedoseev, A V; Sukhinin, G I; Dosbolayev, M K; Ramazanov, T S

    2015-08-01

    Experimental investigations of dusty plasma parameters of a dc glow discharge were performed in a vertically oriented discharge tube. Under certain conditions, dust-free regions (voids) were formed in the center of the dust particle clouds that levitated in the strong electric field of a stratified positive column. A model for radial distribution of dusty plasma parameters of a dc glow discharge in inert gases was developed. The behavior of void formation was investigated for different discharge conditions (type of gas, discharge pressure, and discharge current) and dust particle parameters (particle radii and particle total number). It was shown that it is the ion drag force radial component that leads to the formation of voids. Both experimental and calculated results show that the higher the discharge current the wider dust-free region (void). The calculations also show that more pronounced voids are formed for dust particles with larger radii and under lower gas pressures. PMID:26382534

  18. Sensitive glow discharge ion source for aerosol and gas analysis

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2007-08-14

    A high sensitivity glow discharge ion source system for analyzing particles includes an aerodynamic lens having a plurality of constrictions for receiving an aerosol including at least one analyte particle in a carrier gas and focusing the analyte particles into a collimated particle beam. A separator separates the carrier gas from the analyte particle beam, wherein the analyte particle beam or vapors derived from the analyte particle beam are selectively transmitted out of from the separator. A glow discharge ionization source includes a discharge chamber having an entrance orifice for receiving the analyte particle beam or analyte vapors, and a target electrode and discharge electrode therein. An electric field applied between the target electrode and discharge electrode generates an analyte ion stream from the analyte vapors, which is directed out of the discharge chamber through an exit orifice, such as to a mass spectrometer. High analyte sensitivity is obtained by pumping the discharge chamber exclusively through the exit orifice and the entrance orifice.

  19. Conversion Reaction-Based Oxide Nanomaterials for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seung-Ho; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Sung, Yung-Eun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-04-01

    Developing high-energy-density electrodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) is of primary importance to meet the challenges in electronics and automobile industries in the near future. Conversion reaction-based transition metal oxides are attractive candidates for LIB anodes because of their high theoretical capacities. This review summarizes recent advances on the development of nanostructured transition metal oxides for use in lithium ion battery anodes based on conversion reactions. The oxide materials covered in this review include oxides of iron, manganese, cobalt, copper, nickel, molybdenum, zinc, ruthenium, chromium, and tungsten, and mixed metal oxides. Various kinds of nanostructured materials including nanowires, nanosheets, hollow structures, porous structures, and oxide/carbon nanocomposites are discussed in terms of their LIB anode applications. PMID:26627913

  20. Controlled Synthesis of Hollow Manganese Oxide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Min; Oh, Kyung Hee; Ham, Kyung-Sik

    2016-02-01

    Carbon spheres have been prepared from glucose under hydrothermal conditions to facilitate the synthesis of hollow manganese oxides. The phases of manganese oxide are controlled by changing annealing temperature of the manganese monoxide on a carbon sphere template. The particles on the carbon surface get an agglomeration and make dense oxide shell during the calcination step, which result in typical hollow structures. The electrochemical properties of hollow manganese oxides have been investigated to elucidate their relative catalytic activities. PMID:27433689

  1. Process for making hollow carbon spheres

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia C.; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N.; Knapp, Angela Michelle

    2013-04-16

    A hollow carbon sphere having a carbon shell and an inner core is disclosed. The hollow carbon sphere has a total volume that is equal to a volume of the carbon shell plus an inner free volume within the carbon shell. The inner free volume is at least 25% of the total volume. In some instances, a nominal diameter of the hollow carbon sphere is between 10 and 180 nanometers.

  2. Method to fabricate hollow microneedle arrays

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Ingersoll, David; Schmidt, Carrie; Flemming, Jeb

    2006-11-07

    An inexpensive and rapid method for fabricating arrays of hollow microneedles uses a photoetchable glass. Furthermore, the glass hollow microneedle array can be used to form a negative mold for replicating microneedles in biocompatible polymers or metals. These microneedle arrays can be used to extract fluids from plants or animals. Glucose transport through these hollow microneedles arrays has been found to be orders of magnitude more rapid than natural diffusion.

  3. Inward Lithium-Ion Breathing of Hierarchically Porous Silicon Anodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Qiangfeng; Gu, Meng; Yang, Hui; Li, Bing; Zhang, Cunman; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fang; Dai, Fang; Yang, Li; Liu, Zhongyi; et al

    2015-11-05

    Silicon has been identified as one of the most promising candidates as anode for high performance lithium-ion batteries. The key challenge for Si anodes is the large volume change induced chemomechanical fracture and subsequent rapid capacity fading upon cyclic charge and discharge. Improving capacity retention thus critically relies on smart accommodation of the volume changes through nanoscale structural design. In this work, we report a novel fabrication method for hierarchically porous Si nanospheres (hp-SiNSs), which consist of a porous shell and a hollow core. Upon charge/discharge cycling, the hp-SiNSs accommodate the volume change through reversible inward expansion/contraction with negligible particle-levelmore » outward expansion. Our mechanics analysis revealed that such a unique volume-change accommodation mechanism is enabled by the much stiffer modulus of the lithiated layer than the unlithiated porous layer and the low flow stress of the porous structure. Such inward expansion shields the hp-SiNSs from fracture, opposite to the outward expansion in solid Si during lithiation. Lithium ion battery assembled with this new nanoporous material exhibits high capacity, high power, long cycle life and high coulombic efficiency, which is superior to the current commercial Si-based anode materials. We find the low cost synthesis approach reported here provides a new avenue for the rational design of hierarchically porous structures with unique materials properties.« less

  4. Inward lithium-ion breathing of hierarchically porous silicon anodes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiangfeng; Gu, Meng; Yang, Hui; Li, Bing; Zhang, Cunman; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fang; Dai, Fang; Yang, Li; Liu, Zhongyi; Xiao, Xingcheng; Liu, Gao; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chongmin; Lu, Yunfeng; Cai, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Silicon has been identified as a highly promising anode for next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The key challenge for Si anodes is large volume change during the lithiation/delithiation cycle that results in chemomechanical degradation and subsequent rapid capacity fading. Here we report a novel fabrication method for hierarchically porous Si nanospheres (hp-SiNSs), which consist of a porous shell and a hollow core. On charge/discharge cycling, the hp-SiNSs accommodate the volume change through reversible inward Li breathing with negligible particle-level outward expansion. Our mechanics analysis revealed that such inward expansion is enabled by the much stiffer lithiated layer than the unlithiated porous layer. LIBs assembled with the hp-SiNSs exhibit high capacity, high power and long cycle life, which is superior to the current commercial Si-based anode materials. The low-cost synthesis approach provides a new avenue for the rational design of hierarchically porous structures with unique materials properties. PMID:26538181

  5. Inward lithium-ion breathing of hierarchically porous silicon anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qiangfeng; Gu, Meng; Yang, Hui; Li, Bing; Zhang, Cunman; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fang; Dai, Fang; Yang, Li; Liu, Zhongyi; Xiao, Xingcheng; Liu, Gao; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chongmin; Lu, Yunfeng; Cai, Mei

    2015-11-01

    Silicon has been identified as a highly promising anode for next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The key challenge for Si anodes is large volume change during the lithiation/delithiation cycle that results in chemomechanical degradation and subsequent rapid capacity fading. Here we report a novel fabrication method for hierarchically porous Si nanospheres (hp-SiNSs), which consist of a porous shell and a hollow core. On charge/discharge cycling, the hp-SiNSs accommodate the volume change through reversible inward Li breathing with negligible particle-level outward expansion. Our mechanics analysis revealed that such inward expansion is enabled by the much stiffer lithiated layer than the unlithiated porous layer. LIBs assembled with the hp-SiNSs exhibit high capacity, high power and long cycle life, which is superior to the current commercial Si-based anode materials. The low-cost synthesis approach provides a new avenue for the rational design of hierarchically porous structures with unique materials properties.

  6. Inward Lithium-Ion Breathing of Hierarchically Porous Silicon Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Qiangfeng; Gu, Meng; Yang, Hui; Li, Bing; Zhang, Cunman; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fang; Dai, Fang; Yang, Li; Liu, Zhongyi; Xiao, Xingcheng; Liu, Gao; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chong M.; Lu, Yunfeng; Cai, Mei

    2015-11-05

    Silicon has been identified as one of the most promising candidates as anode for high performance lithium-ion batteries. The key challenge for Si anodes is the large volume change induced chemomechanical fracture and subsequent rapid capacity fading upon cyclic charge and discharge. Improving capacity retention thus critically relies on smart accommodation of the volume changes through nanoscale structural design. In this work, we report a novel fabrication method for hierarchically porous Si nanospheres (hp-SiNSs), which consist of a porous shell and a hollow core. Upon charge/discharge cycling, the hp-SiNSs accommodate the volume change through reversible inward expansion/contraction with negligible particle-level outward expansion. Our mechanics analysis revealed that such a unique volume-change accommodation mechanism is enabled by the much stiffer modulus of the lithiated layer than the unlithiated porous layer and the low flow stress of the porous structure. Such inward expansion shields the hp-SiNSs from fracture, opposite to the outward expansion in solid Si during lithiation. Lithium ion battery assembled with this new nanoporous material exhibits high capacity, high power, long cycle life and high coulombic efficiency, which is superior to the current commercial Si-based anode materials. The low cost synthesis approach reported here provides a new avenue for the rational design of hierarchically porous structures with unique materials properties.

  7. Inward lithium-ion breathing of hierarchically porous silicon anodes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qiangfeng; Gu, Meng; Yang, Hui; Li, Bing; Zhang, Cunman; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fang; Dai, Fang; Yang, Li; Liu, Zhongyi; Xiao, Xingcheng; Liu, Gao; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chongmin; Lu, Yunfeng; Cai, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Silicon has been identified as a highly promising anode for next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The key challenge for Si anodes is large volume change during the lithiation/delithiation cycle that results in chemomechanical degradation and subsequent rapid capacity fading. Here we report a novel fabrication method for hierarchically porous Si nanospheres (hp-SiNSs), which consist of a porous shell and a hollow core. On charge/discharge cycling, the hp-SiNSs accommodate the volume change through reversible inward Li breathing with negligible particle-level outward expansion. Our mechanics analysis revealed that such inward expansion is enabled by the much stiffer lithiated layer than the unlithiated porous layer. LIBs assembled with the hp-SiNSs exhibit high capacity, high power and long cycle life, which is superior to the current commercial Si-based anode materials. The low-cost synthesis approach provides a new avenue for the rational design of hierarchically porous structures with unique materials properties. PMID:26538181

  8. Inward Lithium-Ion Breathing of Hierarchically Porous Silicon Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Qiangfeng; Gu, Meng; Yang, Hui; Li, Bing; Zhang, Cunman; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fang; Dai, Fang; Yang, Li; Liu, Zhongyi; Xiao, Xingcheng; Liu, Gao; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chong M.; Lu, Yunfeng; Cai, Mei

    2015-11-05

    Silicon has been identified as one of the most promising candidates as anode for high performance lithium-ion batteries. The key challenge for Si anodes is the large volume change induced chemomechanical fracture and subsequent rapid capacity fading upon cyclic charge and discharge. Improving capacity retention thus critically relies on smart accommodation of the volume changes through nanoscale structural design. In this work, we report a novel fabrication method for hierarchically porous Si nanospheres (hp-SiNSs), which consist of a porous shell and a hollow core. Upon charge/discharge cycling, the hp-SiNSs accommodate the volume change through reversible inward expansion/contraction with negligible particle-level outward expansion. Our mechanics analysis revealed that such a unique volume-change accommodation mechanism is enabled by the much stiffer modulus of the lithiated layer than the unlithiated porous layer and the low flow stress of the porous structure. Such inward expansion shields the hp-SiNSs from fracture, opposite to the outward expansion in solid Si during lithiation. Lithium ion battery assembled with this new nanoporous material exhibits high capacity, high power, long cycle life and high coulombic efficiency, which is superior to the current commercial Si-based anode materials. We find the low cost synthesis approach reported here provides a new avenue for the rational design of hierarchically porous structures with unique materials properties.

  9. Positional glow curve simulation for thermoluminescent detector (TLD) system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, C. J.; Kearfott, K. J.

    1999-02-01

    Multi- and thin element dosimeters, variable heating rate schemes, and glow-curve analysis have been employed to improve environmental and personnel dosimetry using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Detailed analysis of the effects of errors and optimization of techniques would be highly desirable. However, an understanding of the relationship between TL light production, light attenuation, and precise heating schemes is made difficult because of experimental challenges involved in measuring positional TL light production and temperature variations as a function of time. This work reports the development of a general-purpose computer code, thermoluminescent detector simulator, TLD-SIM, to simulate the heating of any TLD type using a variety of conventional and experimental heating methods including pulsed focused or unfocused lasers with Gaussian or uniform cross sections, planchet, hot gas, hot finger, optical, infrared, or electrical heating. TLD-SIM has been used to study the impact on the TL light production of varying the input parameters which include: detector composition, heat capacity, heat conductivity, physical size, and density; trapped electron density, the frequency factor of oscillation of electrons in the traps, and trap-conduction band potential energy difference; heating scheme source terms and heat transfer boundary conditions; and TL light scatter and attenuation coefficients. Temperature profiles and glow curves as a function of position time, as well as the corresponding temporally and/or spatially integrated glow values, may be plotted while varying any of the input parameters. Examples illustrating TLD system functions, including glow curve variability, will be presented. The flexible capabilities of TLD-SIM promises to enable improved TLD system design.

  10. The Use of DC Glow Discharges as Undergraduate Educational Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie A. Wissel and Andrew Zwicker, Jerry Ross, and Sophia Gershman

    2012-10-09

    Plasmas have a beguiling way of getting students excited and interested in physics. We argue that plasmas can and should be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum as both demonstrations and advanced investigations of electromagnetism and quantum effects. Our device, based on a direct current (DC) glow discharge tube, allows for a number of experiments into topics such as electrical breakdown, spectroscopy, magnetism, and electron temperature.

  11. Zenith angle dependence of the geocoronal Lyman-alpha glow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, F.; Kumar, S.; Bowyer, S.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the observations made on the zenith angle dependence and intensity of the geocoronal hydrogen Lyman-alpha glow by means of one of four extreme ultraviolet photometers flown to an altitude of 264 km on a Nike Tomahawk rocket launched from Thumba, India, in March 1970. The results obtained are compared with Meier and Mange's (1970) theoretical predictions. The possible causes for the discrepancies found are discussed.

  12. Effect of glow discharge air plasma on grain crops seed

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, A.E.; Lazarenko, E.M.; Selemir, V.D.

    2000-02-01

    Oat and barley seeds have been exposed to both continuous and pulsed glow discharge plasmas in air to investigate the effects on germination and sprout growth. Statistical analysis was used to evaluate the effect of plasma exposure on the percentage germination and length of sprout growth. A stimulating effect of plasma exposure was found together with a strong dependence on whether continuous or pulsed discharges were used.

  13. Inception of Snapover and Gas Induced Glow Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J. T.; Vayner, B. V.; Degroot, W. A.; Ferguson, D. C.; Thomson, C. D.; Dennison, J. R.; Davies, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Ground based experiments of the snapover phenomenon were conducted in the large vertical simulation chamber at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plasma Interaction Facility (PIF). Two Penning sources provided both argon and xenon plasmas for the experiments. The sources were used to simulate a variety of ionospheric densities pertaining to a spacecraft in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Secondary electron emission is believed responsible for dielectric surface charging, and all subsequent snapover phenomena observed. Voltage sweeps of conductor potentials versus collected current were recorded in order to examine the specific charging history of each sample. The average time constant for sample charging was estimated between 25 and 50 seconds for all samples. It appears that current drops off by approximately a factor of 3 over the charging time of the sample. All samples charged in the forward and reverse bias directions, demonstrated hysteresis. Current jumps were only observed in the forward or positive swept voltage direction. There is large dispersion in tile critical snapover potential when repeating sweeps on any one sample. The current ratio for the first snapover region jumps between 2 and 4.6 times, with a standard deviation less than 1.6. Two of the samples showed even larger current ratios. It is believed the second large snapover region is due to sample outgassing. Under certain preset conditions, namely at the higher neutral gas background pressures, a perceptible blue-green glow was observed around the conductor. The glow is believed to be a result of secondary electrons undergoing collisions with an expelled tenuous cloud of gas, that is outgassed from the sample. Spectroscopic measurements of the glow discharge were made in an attempt to identify specific lines contributing to the observed glow.

  14. Plasma kinetics of ethanol conversion in a glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D. S.; Tsymbalyuk, A. N.; Shchedrin, A. I.

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism of ethanol conversion in a nonequilibrium glow discharge has been studied. It is shown that molecular hydrogen is produced in reactions between ethanol molecules and hydrogen atoms in the initial stage and in reactions involving active H, CH2OH, CH3CHOH, and formaldehyde in the final stage. Comparison with experimental data shows that the kinetic mechanism used in these calculations correctly predicts the concentrations of the main components of the gas mixture.

  15. Spacecraft Glow and the Eisg/skirt Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Gary R.; Ahmadjian, Mark; Jennings, Don; Visentine, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to develop an understanding of the physical processes leading to spacecraft glow phenomena. The emphasis is to be on surface temperature and altitude effects. A complete understanding of the phenomena could be used to accomplish the following: (1) characterize optical instrument backgrounds; (2) provide guidelines for thermal insulations; (3) characterize material selection for flight optics and associated spacecraft; and (4) affect flight-operation altitude selection for relevant missions.

  16. Hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur cathodes for high specific capacity rechargeable lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guangyuan; Yang, Yuan; Cha, Judy J; Hong, Seung Sae; Cui, Yi

    2011-10-12

    Sulfur has a high specific capacity of 1673 mAh/g as lithium battery cathodes, but its rapid capacity fading due to polysulfides dissolution presents a significant challenge for practical applications. Here we report a hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur cathode for effective trapping of polysulfides and demonstrate experimentally high specific capacity and excellent electrochemical cycling of the cells. The hollow carbon nanofiber arrays were fabricated using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, through thermal carbonization of polystyrene. The AAO template also facilitates sulfur infusion into the hollow fibers and prevents sulfur from coating onto the exterior carbon wall. The high aspect ratio of the carbon nanofibers provides an ideal structure for trapping polysulfides, and the thin carbon wall allows rapid transport of lithium ions. The small dimension of these nanofibers provides a large surface area per unit mass for Li(2)S deposition during cycling and reduces pulverization of electrode materials due to volumetric expansion. A high specific capacity of about 730 mAh/g was observed at C/5 rate after 150 cycles of charge/discharge. The introduction of LiNO(3) additive to the electrolyte was shown to improve the Coulombic efficiency to over 99% at C/5. The results show that the hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur structure could be a promising cathode design for rechargeable Li/S batteries with high specific energy. PMID:21916442

  17. General Synthetic Strategy for Hollow Hybrid Microspheres through a Progressive Inward Crystallization Process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ping; Lin, Xi-Jie; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Wei; Cao, An-Min; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-05-11

    Hollow hybrid microspheres have found great potential in different areas, such as drug delivery, nanoreactors, photonics, and lithium-ion batteries. Here, we report a simple and scalable approach to construct high-quality hollow hybrid microspheres through a previously unexplored growth mechanism. Starting from uniform solid microspheres with low crystallinity, we identified that a hollowing process can happen through the progressive inward crystallization process initiated on the particle surface: the gradual encroachment of the crystallization frontline toward the core leads to the depletion of the center and forms the central cavity. We showed that such a synthetic platform was versatile and can be applicable for a large variety of materials. By using the production of Li4Ti5O12-carbon hollow hybrid microspheres as an example, we demonstrated that high-performance anode materials could be achieved through synthesis and structure control. We expect that our findings offer new perspectives in different areas ranging from materials chemistry, energy storage devices, catalysis, to drug delivery. PMID:27096883

  18. Towards a reduced chemistry module of a He-Ar-Cu hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailova, D.; van Dijk, J.; Grozeva, M.; Degrez, G.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2011-05-01

    This study is aimed at finding a reduced chemistry module for a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) excited in a He-Ar-Cu mixture. This enables us to construct lean and reliable models that can be used as a part of the design tool of HCDs. To this end estimative calculations and numerical simulations are performed under optimal conditions for lasing. An analysis of the species behaviour and reactions is made and as a result the model is simplified by means of reducing the number of species and reactions. The consequences of these reductions are justified by comparing the results of the simplified models with those of a more complete one. This study delivers a model that is chemically lean and thus, much less time consuming. It can be used in optimization studies to find the optimum in the plasma control parameter set of HCDs. The technique developed in this study for HCDs can be applied to glow discharges in general.

  19. Arsenic and antimony determination by on-line flow hydride generation glow discharge optical emission detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillermo Orellana-Velado, Néstor; Fernández, Matilde; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2001-01-01

    Hollow cathode (HC) and conventional flat cathode (FC) glow discharge (GD) optical emission spectrometry (OES) were used as detectors for the determination of arsenic and antimony by on-line hydride generation (HG) in a flow system. Both radiofrequency (rf) and direct current (dc) sources were investigated to produce the discharge. The design of the HC and FC and also the parameters governing the discharge (pressure, He flow rate, voltage, current and delivered power) and the HG (sodium borohydride concentration and reagent flow rates) were investigated using both cathodes. The analytical performance characteristics of HG-GD-OES with HC and FC were evaluated for some emission lines of arsenic (193.7, 200.3, 228.8 and 234.9 nm). The best detection limit (0.2 μg l -1) was obtained when the emission line of 228.8 nm was used with FC. Under the same arsenic optimized experimental conditions, the system was evaluated to determine antimony at 259.7, 252.7 and 231.1 nm, 252.7 nm being the emission line which produced the best detection limit (0.7 μg l -1). The rf-HC-GD-OES system was applied successfully to the determination of arsenic in freeze-dried urine in the standard reference material 2670 from NIST. Finally, a flow injection system was assayed to determine arsenic at 228.8 nm, using a dc-GD with both FC and HC. The results indicated that for low volumes of sample, the HC discharge allows better analytical signals than the FC.

  20. Spectral identification/elimination of molecular species in spacecraft glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, B. D.; Marinelli, W. J.; Rawlins, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Computer models of molecular electronic and vibrational emission intensities were developed. Known radiative emission rates (Einstein coefficients) permit the determination of relative excited state densities from spectral intensities. These codes were applied to the published spectra of glow above shuttle surface and to the Spacelab 1 results of Torr and Torr. The theoretical high-resolution spectra were convolved with the appropriate instrumental slit functions to allow accurate comparison with data. The published spacelab spectrum is complex but N2+ Meinel emission can be clearly identified in the ram spectrum. M2 First Positive emission does not correlate well with observed features, nor does the CN Red System. Spectral overlay comparisons are presented. The spectrum of glow above shuttle surfaces, in contrast to the ISO data, is not highly structured. Diatomic molecular emission was matched to the observed spectral shape. Source excitation mechanisms such as (oxygen atom)-(surface species) reaction product chemiluminescence, surface recombination, or resonance fluorescent re-emission will be discussed for each tentative assignment. These assignments are the necessary first analytical step toward mechanism identification. Different glow mechanisms will occur above surfaces under different orbital conditions.

  1. The One Atmosphere Glow Discharge in Air: Phenomenology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Gadri, Rami; Sherman, Daniel M.; Chen, Zhiyu; Karakaya, Fuat; Reece Roth, J.

    1999-10-01

    The existence of an atmospheric pressure RF glow plasma with the characteristics of a classical low pressure DC glow discharge has been experimentally and theoretically demonstrated [1, 2]. At the UTK Plasma Sciences Laboratory, the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) in air has been applied to a wide range of plasma processing applications. The technology is simple, technically attractive, and suitable for online treatment of webs and 3-dimensional workpieces. A parallel plate reactor and a Remote Exposure Reactor (RER) have been developed for direct plasma immersion and remote exposure, respectively. The RER is based on generating active species capable of sterilization and surface treatment in a uniform surface layer of the OAUGDP on planar panels [3], and convecting the active species to a remote chamber where the workpiece is located. A related surface plasma has been developed for indoor air filtration systems. In addition, the surface plasma on flat panels modified the boundary layer in wind tunnel tests to produce electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow effects that can be used to increase or decrease aerodynamic drag [3]. [1] Massines et al., J. Appl. Phys., Vol. 83, N 6, pp 2950-2957, Mar. 1998. [2] J. R. Roth, "Industrial Plasma Engineering" Vol. I: Principles. Inst. Phys. Pub., Bristol and philadelphia, ISBN 0-7503-0318-2, 1995. [3] Roth et al., AIAA Paper 98-0328, 36th AIAA Meeting, Reno NV, 1998, Jan. 12-15.

  2. Development of blood compatible materials by glow discharge-treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Y.; Sasakawa, S.

    Glow discharge-treatment was applied to preparation of blood compatible materials. Plasticized polyvinylchloride (PVC) which is used for blood bags was treated in the presence of various gases or monomers. Wettability of PVC was modified by the treatment over a wide range. And leakage of plasticizer, di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), was prevented. When platelet concentrates were stored in the treated PVC bags, impairment of platelet functions was suppressed by the prevention of DEHP leakage. But platelet adhesion to the surfaces increased by the treatments. Aldehyde groups were grafted on polyethylene film (PE) by glow discharge-treatment in the presence of formaldehyde gas. Although the aldehyde-grafted PE (HCHO-PE) had higher reactivity with platelet than PE after albumin coating, it exhibited excellent antithrombogenicity after blood plasma coating. HCHO-PE adsorbed proteins with almost the same composition as blood plasma, although non-treated PE adsorbed proteins with higher fibinogen/albumin ratio. Segmented-polyurethane which is well known to exhibit good antithrombogenicity, also formed the adsorption layer having composition like that of blood plasma. These results suggest that protein layer adsorbed with blood plasma composition is hardly recognized by platelets. Glow discharge-treatment is a simple and effective method for surface modification of medical polymers.

  3. Analysis of thermoluminescent glow peaks of zoisite under beta irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Ccallata, Henry Javier; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2010-08-04

    In this study, the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of natural crystal of zoisite were investigated after beta ({sup 90}Sr) irradiation at room temperature (RT). Zoisite, of chemical formula Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4})(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})O(OH), is found in Minas Gerais State, Brazil as natural mineral of silicate, member of the epidote group. The glow curve of a natural sample submitted to a heat treatment at 600 deg. C is composed of two broad peaks, centered at about 110-130 deg. C and another one at about 205-210 deg. C. A heating rate of 4 deg. C s{sup -1} was used in the temperature range from RT to 300 deg. C. The additive dose, T{sub m}-T{sub STOP} thermal cleaning, initial rise, variable heating rate and computerized glow curve deconvolution methods have shown that the glow curve is a superposition of six peaks at 100, 130, 155, 175, 200 and 230 deg. C. The trapping parameters for the individual peaks have been calculated. The TL dose response of 130 and 200 deg. C peaks has a linear response. Zoisite is a candidate for a TL dosimeter because of its high sensitivity.

  4. Space shuttle ram glow: Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, S.

    1985-01-01

    The ram glow data gathered to data from imaging experiments on space shuttle suggest the glow is a continuum (within 34 angstrom resolution); the continuum shape is such that the peak is near 7000 angstroms decreasing to the blue and red, and the average molecular travel leading to emission after leaving the surface is 20 cm (assuming isotropic scattering from the surface). Emission continuum is rare in molecular systems but the measured spectrum does resemble the laboratory spectrum of NO2 (B) recombination continuum. The thickness of the observed emission is consistent with the NO2 hypothesis given an exit velocity of approx. 2.5 km/sec (1.3 eV) which leaves approx. 3.7 eV of ramming OI energy available for unbonding the recombined NO2 from the surface. The NO2 is formed in a 3-body recombination of OI + NO + m = NO2 + m where OI originates from the atmosphere and NO is chemically formed on the surface from atmospheric NI and OI. The spacecraft surface then acts as the n for the reaction: Evidence exists from orbital mass spectrometer data that the NO and NO2 chemistry described in this process does occur on surfaces of spectrometer orifices in orbit. Surface temperature effects are likely a factor in the NO sticking efficiency and, therefore, glow intensities.

  5. Space shuttle Ram glow: Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, S.

    1985-09-01

    The ram glow data gathered to data from imaging experiments on space shuttle suggest the glow is a continuum (within 34 angstrom resolution); the continuum shape is such that the peak is near 7000 angstroms decreasing to the blue and red, and the average molecular travel leading to emission after leaving the surface is 20 cm (assuming isotropic scattering from the surface). Emission continuum is rare in molecular systems but the measured spectrum does resemble the laboratory spectrum of NO2 (B) recombination continuum. The thickness of the observed emission is consistent with the NO2 hypothesis given an exit velocity of approx. 2.5 km/sec (1.3 eV) which leaves approx. 3.7 eV of ramming OI energy available for unbonding the recombined NO2 from the surface. The NO2 is formed in a 3-body recombination of OI + NO + m = NO2 + m where OI originates from the atmosphere and NO is chemically formed on the surface from atmospheric NI and OI. The spacecraft surface then acts as the n for the reaction: Evidence exists from orbital mass spectrometer data that the NO and NO2 chemistry described in this process does occur on surfaces of spectrometer orifices in orbit. Surface temperature effects are likely a factor in the NO sticking efficiency and, therefore, glow intensities.

  6. Spatial and temporal variability of SWIR air glow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, David; Allen, Jeff; Gonglewski, John; Myers, Mike; Fertig, Gregory; Nolasco, Rudy; Maia, Francisco

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that luminance from photo-chemical reactions of hydroxyl ions in the upper atmosphere (~85 km altitude) produces a significant amount of night time radiation in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band between 0.9 and 1.7 μm wave length. This has been demonstrated as an effective illumination source for night time imaging applications. It addition it has been shown that observation of the spatial and temporal variations of the illumination can be used to characterize atmospheric tidal wave actions in the air glow region. These spatiotemporal variations manifest themselves as traveling wave patterns whose period and velocity are related to the wind velocity at 85 km as well as the turbulence induced by atmospheric vertical instabilities. We are interested in studying these phenomena for a variety of reasons. First they can give an insight into upper atmospheric physics, second we would like to understand the variations in order to determine if air glow can be used as a reliable illumination source for night time terrestrial imaging. To that end we have been collecting data on ground irradiance from air glow over the past six months at a site on the island of Kauai. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some initial analysis of this data.

  7. Glow discharge optical emission of plutonium and plutonium waste

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, R.K.; Spencer, W.A.

    1995-11-09

    The application of glow discharges to the analysis of nonconducting materials such as glasses and ceramics is of great interest due to the number of advantages afforded by their direct solids capabilities. These types of samples, by their chemical nature, pose difficulties in dissolution for their subsequent analysis by common spectroscopic instrumental methods such as inductively coupled plasma atomic emission (ICP-AES). The ability of the glow discharge to sputter-atomize and excite solid nonconducting materials greatly reduces sample preparation time, cost, and complexity of an analysis. In comparison with x-ray spectroscopies, GD also provides the advantage of a relatively uniform sample atomization rate, resulting in a lowering of matrix effects. In a traditional direct current glow discharge (dc-GD), the material to be analyzed must first be ground and thoroughly mixed with a conductive host matrix and pressed into a solid pellet. Additionally, atmospheric gases which are often trapped in the sample upon pressing can degrade the quality of the plasma and obscure analytical results by reducing sputtering rates and affecting excitation conditions. Internal standardization has been carried out in both atomic absorption and emission dc-GD analyses in order to improve precision and accuracy which are affected by these problems.

  8. Design and synthesis of micron-sized spherical aggregates composed of hollow Fe2O3 nanospheres for use in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Hong, Young Jun; Lee, Jong-Heun; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-04-01

    A novel structure denoted a ``hollow nanosphere aggregate'' is synthesized by introducing nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to the spray pyrolysis process. The hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates with spherical shape and micron size are synthesized as the first target material. A solid iron oxide-carbon composite powder that is prepared by a one-pot spray pyrolysis process is transformed into the hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates by sequential post-pyrolysis treatments under reducing and oxidizing atmospheres. The nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion plays a key role in the formation of the hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates with spherical shape and micron size. The unique structure of the hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates results in their superior electrochemical properties as an anode material for lithium ion batteries by improving the structural stability during cycling. The hollow metal oxide nanosphere aggregates with various compositions for wide applications including energy storage can be prepared by the simple fabrication method introduced in this study.A novel structure denoted a ``hollow nanosphere aggregate'' is synthesized by introducing nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to the spray pyrolysis process. The hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates with spherical shape and micron size are synthesized as the first target material. A solid iron oxide-carbon composite powder that is prepared by a one-pot spray pyrolysis process is transformed into the hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates by sequential post-pyrolysis treatments under reducing and oxidizing atmospheres. The nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion plays a key role in the formation of the hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates with spherical shape and micron size. The unique structure of the hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates results in their superior electrochemical properties as an anode material for lithium ion batteries by improving the structural stability during cycling. The hollow metal oxide nanosphere aggregates with

  9. Carbon supported trimetallic nickel-palladium-gold hollow nanoparticles with superior catalytic activity for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Changshuai; Hong, Wei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, Ni nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared in an aqueous solution by using sodium borohydride as reducing agent. With Ni NPs as the sacrificial template, hollow NiPdAu NPs are successfully prepared via partly galvanic displacement reaction between suitable metal precursors and Ni NPs. The as-synthesized hollow NiPdAu NPs can well dispersed on the carbon substrate. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are taken to analyze the morphology, structure and composition of the as-synthesized catalysts. The prepared catalysts show superior catalytic activity and stability for methanol electrooxidation in alkaline media compared with commercial Pd/C and Pt/C. Catalysts prepared in this work show great potential to be anode catalysts in direct methanol fuel cells.

  10. Bubble template synthesis of hollow gold nanoparticles and their applications as theranostic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chienwen

    Hollow gold nanoparticle with a sub-30nm polycrystalline shell and a 50 nm hollow core has been successfully synthesized through the reduction of sodium gold sulfite by electrochemically evolved hydrogen. Such hollow gold nanoparticles exhibit unique plasmonic properties. They strongly scatter and absorb near infrared light. In this thesis we seek to understand the formation mechanism of hollow gold nanoparticles in this new synthesis process and their plasmonic properties. Also, we explore their biomedical applications as theranostic agents (therapeutic and diagnostic imaging). A lithographically patterned electrode consisting of Ag stripes on a glass substrate was used to investigate the formation process of hollow gold nanoparticles. Ag stripes served as working electrode for electrochemically evolution of hydrogen, and adjacent glass areas provided supporting surface for hydrogen nanobubbles nucleation and growth. Hydrogen nanobubbles served as both templates and reducing agents to trigger the autocatalytic disproportionation reaction of sodium gold sulfite. The effects of applied potential and the additives in the electrolyte have been studied. It has been found that the size and size distribution of hollow gold nanoparticle are directly relative to the applied potential, i.e. the hydrogen evolution rate. It has also been found the addition of Ni2+ ions can greatly improve the size distribution of hollow gold nanoparticles that can be contributed to that the newly electrodeposited nickel metal can enhance the hydrogen evolution efficiency. Another additive, ethylenediamine (EDA) can suppress the autocatalytic reaction of gold sulfite to increase the stability of sodium gold sulfite electrolyte. To capture such electrochemically evolved hydrogen nanobubbles, and subsequently to generate hollow gold nanoparticles in large numbers, alumina membranes were placed on the top of the working electrode. Anodic alumina membrane consists of ~200 nm pores, which provides

  11. Tritium Generation from the Interaction of a Glow Discharge Plasma with Metals and with a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romodanov, V. A.

    2005-12-01

    We present results of our research on tritium generation through the bombardment of the surface of various metals by accelerated ions of hydrogen isotopes from a glow discharge plasma, with and without a magnetic field. The introduction of a magnetic field perpendicular to the sample surface results in an increase in the tritium activity, and in the tritium generation rate, of almost two orders of magnitude as compared to similar experiments run with no magnetic field. The largest tritium generation rates observed were obtained with the glow discharge operating in a magnetic field, and were in the range 109-1010 atom/s. This is higher than our background by three to four orders of magnitude. The use of a magnetic field has resulted in good reproducibility, and the development of a reliable tritium generation rate of about 1010 atom/s for tantalum, tungsten, and platinum. A new technique for the generation and measurement of excess heat is presented based on the transfusion of hydrogen isotopes through the metal wall of a hollow sample electrode toward the glow discharge. In the case of a vanadium cathode, the maximum excess thermal power is about 30% of the absorbed power. The generation of excess power is found to be maximized in the temperature 600-700 K for relative power, and 800-1000K for absolute power. The results of measurements support a nuclear origin for the tritium generation, as opposed to a conventional thermal activation explanation. Mass spectroscopic measurements show an increase in species with deuterium in discharge experiments with hydrogen gas and with deuterium gas. The tritium generation rate is found to increase with the addition of deuterium, but by an amount not commensurate with the amount of deuterium added. Measurements of the gamma spectrum indicate that positrons are not generated in the course of tritium generation. These observations allow us to assert that modified versions of p+p and p+d reactions are responsible for the

  12. Mesoporous Silicon-Based Anodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peramunage, Dharmasena

    2015-01-01

    For high-capacity, high-performance lithium-ion batteries. A new high-capacity anode composite based on mesoporous silicon is being developed. With a structure that resembles a pseudo one-dimensional phase, the active anode material will accommodate significant volume changes expected upon alloying and dealloying with lithium (Li).

  13. A thin-walled metallic hollow cathode as an atomizer for Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeyev, A. A.; Sholupov, S. E.

    1998-03-01

    A new kind of glow discharge atomizer, a thin-walled metallic hollow cathode (TMHC) combined with Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry using high frequency modulated light polarization (ZAAS-HFM), is studied. A theoretically suggested, and experimentally confirmed, model of the atom confinement in the TMHC yields the appearance of the diffusion traps for atoms at both ends of the cathode, which increases the residence time of the analyte atoms in the analysis volume. The high atomization efficiency in the glow discharge atomizer (caused by the ionic-thermal mechanism of sputtering) and the high selectivity of ZAAS-HFM are demonstrated in the analysis of complex matrix samples such as whole blood and urine. The analytical system TMHC + ZAAS-HFM is characterized by low detection limits, which are comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Owing to its rather low average power consumption (30-50 W) the TMHC can be used in a portable and mobile spectrometer, and is therefore suitable for the in situ analysis of various sample materials.

  14. Planned investigation of infrared emissions associated with the induced spacecraft glow: A shuttle infrared glow experiment (SIRGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Jennings, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of infrared molecular emissions induced by energetic collisions between ambient atmospheric species and surfaces in Earth orbit are investigated, using a low-nitrogen-cooled filter wheel photometer covering the wavelength range 0.9-.5 microns with a resolving power Lambda/Delta Lambda of approximately 100. This resolving power is sufficient for identification of the molecular or atomic fluorescent spaces causing the glow.

  15. Anode film formation and control

    DOEpatents

    Koski, Oscar; Marschman, Steven C.

    1990-01-01

    A protective film is created about the anode within a cryolite-based electrolyte during electrolytic production of aluminum from alumina. The film function to minimize corrosion of the anode by the cryolitic electrolyte and thereby extend the life of the anode. Various operating parameters of the electrolytic process are controlled to maintain the protective film about the anode in a protective state throughout the electrolytic reduction of alumina. Such parameters include electrolyte temperature, electrolyte ratio, current density, and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 concentration. An apparatus is also disclosed to enable identification of the onset of anode corrosion due to disruption of the film to provide real time information regarding the state of the film.

  16. Anode film formation and control

    DOEpatents

    Koski, O.; Marschman, S.C.

    1990-05-01

    A protective film is created about the anode within a cryolite-based electrolyte during electrolytic production of aluminum from alumina. The film functions to minimize corrosion of the anode by the cryolitic electrolyte and thereby extend the life of the anode. Various operating parameters of the electrolytic process are controlled to maintain the protective film about the anode in a protective state throughout the electrolytic reduction of alumina. Such parameters include electrolyte temperature, electrolyte ratio, current density, and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] concentration. An apparatus is also disclosed to enable identification of the onset of anode corrosion due to disruption of the film to provide real time information regarding the state of the film. 3 figs.

  17. Structural analysis of hollow blades: Torsional stress analysis of hollow fan blades for aircraft jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, A.; Sofue, Y.; Isobe, T.

    1979-01-01

    A torsional stress analysis of hollow fans blades by the finite element method is presented. The fans are considered to be double circular arc blades, hollowed 30 percent, and twisted by a component of the centrifugal force by the rated revolution. The effects of blade hollowing on strength and rigidity are discussed. The effects of reinforcing webs, placed in the hollowed section in varying numbers and locations, on torsional rigidity and the convergence of stresses, are reported. A forecast of the 30 percent hollowing against torsional loadings is discussed.

  18. Electrochemical Study of Hollow Carbon Nanospheres as High-Rate and Low Temperature Negative Electrodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jonathan David

    The continued advancements in portable electronics have demanded more advanced power sources. To date, lithium ion batteries have been the state-of-the-art for portable devices. One significant drawback of lithium ion batteries is the slow charging times and their performance at low temperatures. In this dissertation, we explore the electrochemical behavior of a new lithium ion, negative electrode active material, hollow carbon nanospheres (HCNS). HCNS are ˜50 nm in diameter hollow spheres with ˜5 - 10 nm graphic walls which have a nominal reversible capacity of ˜220 mAh/g. We assembled and cycled HCNS as a lithium ion anode material and compared it to graphite, currently used as the anode material in most commercial lithium ion batteries. The charging mechanism of HCNS is an intercalation of the lithium ions into the graphitic walls of the spheres, similar to graphite, determined by diffraction and electroanalytical techniques. However, the HCNS electrodes cycled at much higher charge and discharge rates than graphite. Additionally, we demonstrated HCNS cycling at low temperatures (-20 *C) in electrolytes not obtainable by graphite due to material exfoliation during cycling. Although, due to the large surface area of HCNS, the first cycle coulombic losses are very high. This work has resulted in an understanding of a potentially new lithium ion battery anode material with significantly better cycling attributes than the current anode material.

  19. Metal-organic framework derived hollow polyhedron metal oxide posited graphene oxide for energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Ramaraju, Bendi; Li, Cheng-Hung; Prakash, Sengodu; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2016-01-18

    A composite made from hollow polyhedron copper oxide and graphene oxide was synthesized by sintering a Cu-based metal-organic framework (Cu-MOF) embedded with exfoliated graphene oxide. As a proof-of-concept application, the obtained Cu(ox)-rGO materials were used in a lithium-ion battery and a sodium-ion battery as anode materials. Overall, the Cu(ox)-rGO composite delivers excellent electrochemical properties with stable cycling when compared to pure CuO-rGO and Cu-MOF. PMID:26587567

  20. Thermoluminescence glow curve analysis and CGCD method for erbium doped CaZrO3 phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ratnesh; Chopra, Seema

    2016-05-01

    The manuscript report the synthesis, thermoluminescence study at fixed concentration of Er3+ (1 mol%) doped CaZrO3 phosphor. The phosphors were prepared by modified solid state reaction method. The powder sample was characterized by thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve analysis. In TL glow curve the optimized concentration in 1mol% for UV irradiated sample. The kinetic parameters were calculated by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) techniaue. Trapping parameters gives the information of dosimetry loss in prepared phosphor and its usability in environmental monitoring and for personal monitoring. CGCD is the advance tool for analysis of complicated TL glow curves.

  1. Angular distribution of ion beam emitted from a 3.5 kJ plasma focus device using different shapes of anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of argon ion beam emitted from a small plasma focus device (PFD) with four different anode tips i.e., cylindrical with a flat top, cylindrical with a hollow top, cone with a flat top, and cone with a hollow top is studied at various working pressures. The angular distribution of ions is significantly reduced at angles higher than ± 11 ° and the maximum ion emission is between 0° and 11°. The maximum ion flux of about 5.57 ×1012 ions/steradian is obtained with cylindrical-flat anode tip that increases to 9.82 ×1012 ions/steradian per shot for cone-flat anode tip.

  2. Developments in Hollow Graphite Fiber Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Hollow graphite fibers will be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, will save weight in optical components. This program will optimize the processing and properties of hollow carbon fibers developed by MER and to scale-up the processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA.

  3. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Smith, Graham; Mahler, George J.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  4. Lithium batteries with laminar anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, A.H.

    1986-11-04

    This patent describes a laminar electrical cell, comprising an anode, a cathode, and an electrolyte permeable separator between the anode and the cathode. The anode consists essentially of a layer of lithium having at least one surface of unreacted lithium metal in direct contact with and adhered to a layer of conductive plastic with no intermediate adhesive promoting adjuncts. The cathode comprises a slurry of MnO/sub 2/ and carbon particles in a solution of a lithium salt in an organic solvent, the solution permeating the separator and being in contact with the lithium.

  5. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of

  6. An investigation into the role that a transverse magnetic field plays in the formation of large anode sheath potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. E.; Gallimore, A. D.

    1996-11-01

    A 9.25 A low-pressure (45-55 mTorr) hollow cathode arc discharge has been used to simulate plasma processes that occur at the anode of magnetoplasmadynamic accelerators used for space propulsion applications. The interest in the near-anode region is related to findings of past research, which indicate that large anode sheath potentials can drive as much as 70% of the input electrical power into the anode, thus degrading thrust efficiency. Presented here are results that essentially characterize the behavior of the near-anode plasma as a function of a transverse magnetic field. Plasma diagnostics included single Langmuir probe techniques, emission spectroscopy, and water calorimetry for anode heat flux measurements. Phenomenological arguments based on measurements taken suggest that observed changes in anode fall voltage are related to variations in the measured local electron number density as the magnetic field is varied. This behavior is attributed to the variations in the measured ionization rate, which is shown to be a nonlinear function of transverse magnetic field.

  7. ULTRAVIOLET INDUCED MOTION OF A FLUORESCENT DUST CLOUD IN AN ARGON DIRECT CURRENT GLOW DISCHARGE PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Hvasta, M.G.; and Zwicker, A.

    2008-01-01

    Dusty plasmas consist of electrons, ions, neutrals and nm-μm sized particles commonly referred to as dust. In man-made plasmas this dust may represent impurities in a tokamak or plasma etching processing. In astrophysical plasmas this dust forms structures such as planetary rings and comet tails. To study dusty plasma dynamics an experiment was designed in which a 3:1 silica (<5 μm diameter) and fl uorescent dust mixture was added to an argon DC glow discharge plasma and exposed to UV radiation. This fl uorescent lighting technique offers an advantage over laser scattering (which only allows two-dimensional slices of the cloud to be observed) and is simpler than scanning mirror techniques or particle image velocimetry. Under typical parameters (P=150 mTorr, V anode= 100 V, Vcathode= -400 V, Itotal < 2mA) when the cloud is exposed to the UV light (100W, λ = 365 nm) the mixture fl uoresces, moves ~2mm towards the light source and begins rotating in a clockwise manner (as seen from the cathode). By calibrating a UV lamp and adjusting the relative intensity of the UV with a variable transformer it was found that both translational and rotational velocities are a function of UV intensity. Additionally, it was determined that bulk cloud rotation is not seen when the dust tray is not grounded while bulk translation is. This ongoing experiment represents a novel way to control contamination in man-made plasmas and a path to a better understanding of UV-bathed plasma systems in space..

  8. Glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons in a chamber bombarded by fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metel, A. S.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Melnik, Yu. A.; Prudnikov, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    A metal substrate is immersed in plasma of glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons inside the vacuum chamber volume V ≈ 0.12 m3 filled with argon or nitrogen at pressures 0.005-5 Pa, and dependence of discharge characteristics on negative substrate potential is studied. Emitted by the substrate secondary electrons bombard the chamber walls and it results in electron emission growth of the chamber walls and rise of gas ionization intensity inside the chamber. Increase of voltage U between the chamber and the substrate up to 10 kV at a constant discharge current I d in the anode circuit results in a manifold rise of current I in the substrate circuit and decrease of discharge voltage U d between the anode and the chamber from hundreds to tens of volts. At pressure p < 0.05 Pa nonuniformity of plasma density does not exceed ˜10%. Using the Child-Langmuir law, as well as measurement results of sheath width d between homogeneous plasma and a lengthy flat substrate dependent on voltage U ion current density j i on the substrate surface and ion-electron emission coefficient γ i are calculated. After the current in circuit of a substrate made of the same material is measured, the γ i values may be used to evaluate the average dose of ion implantation. The rate of dose rise at a constant high voltage U is by an order of magnitude higher than in known systems equipped with generators of square-wave high-voltage pulses. Application to the substrate of 10-ms-wide sinusoidal high-voltage pulses, which follow each other with 100-Hz frequency, results in synchronous oscillations of voltage U and ion current I i in the substrate circuit. In this case variation of the sheath width d due to oscillations of U and Ii is insignificant and d does not exceed several centimeters thus enabling substrate treatment in a comparatively small vacuum chamber.

  9. Dual-frequency glow discharges in atmospheric helium

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaojiang; Guo, Ying; Dai, Lu; Zhang, Jing; Shi, J. J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the dual-frequency (DF) glow discharges in atmospheric helium were experimented by electrical and optical measurements in terms of current voltage characteristics and optical emission intensity. It is shown that the waveforms of applied voltages or discharge currents are the results of low frequency (LF) waveforms added to high frequency (HF) waveforms. The HF mainly influences discharge currents, and the LF mainly influences applied voltages. The gas temperatures of DF discharges are mainly affected by HF power rather than LF power.

  10. LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech

    SciTech Connect

    Rorick, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

  11. LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech

    ScienceCinema

    Rorick, Kevin

    2012-08-02

    Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

  12. Diode laser excited optogalvanic spectroscopy of glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, C.M.; Shaw, R.W.; Post-Zwicker, A., Young, J.P.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    The development of diode-laser-excited isotopically-selective optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) of uranium metal, oxide and fluoride in a glow discharge (GD) is presented. The technique is useful for determining isotopic ratios of {sup 235}U/({sup 235}U + {sup 238}U) in the above samples. The precision and accuracy of this determination is evaluated, and a study of experimental parameters pertaining to optimization of he measurement is discussed. Application of the GD-OGS to other f-transition elements is also described.

  13. Glow discharge assisted oxynitriding process of titanium for medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzchoń, Tadeusz; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Grzonka, Justyna; Sowińska, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Michał; Kamiński, Janusz; Kulikowski, Krzysztof; Borowski, Tomasz; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J.

    2015-04-01

    The plasma oxynitriding process is a prospective method of producing titanium oxides as an integral part of a diffusive nitrided surface layer on titanium implants. This hybrid process, which combines glow discharge assisted nitriding and oxidizing, permits producing TiO2 + Ti2N + αTi(N)-type diffusive surface layers. The oxynitrided surface layers improve the corrosion and wear resistance of the substrate material. Additionally, the nanocrystalline titanium oxide TiO2 (rutile) improves the biological properties of titanium and its alloys when in contact with blood, whereas the TiN + Ti2N + αTi(N) zone eliminates the effect of metalosis.

  14. Persistence of phosphor glow in microchannel plate image intensifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Image intensifier tubes using microchannel plate amplification stages and phosphor output stages are being increasingly used in various detection applications. In this paper, measurements of the decay times of what are attributed to be the P20 phosphors in various image intensifiers are reported. It is found that the long tail on the decay curve of the phosphor following illumination can be a limitation for certain observations. In addition, the background level of phosphor glow (which is seen by the subsequent detection system as a light signal) continues to build with continuing illumination.

  15. Glow discharge lamp: A light source for optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanathan, K. S.; Srinivasan, V.; Nalini, S.; Mahalingam, T. R.

    A glow discharge lamp based on a modified version of the Grimm design has been fabricated. Its utility as a radiation source for optical emission spectrography by standardizing a method for the analysis of low alloy steels using a set of certified standards from DMRL, Hyderabad, has been demonstrated. A model has been proposed where the sputtering rates of different metals have been correlated with their heats of sublimation, metallic radii, and densities. Sputtering rates of ten different metals obtained from literature have been used to test this model, and the correlation appears to be excellent.

  16. Radial Distributions of Dusty Plasma Parameters in a Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, A. V.; Sukhinin, G. I.

    2011-11-29

    A self-consistent model for radial distributions of dusty plasma parameters in a DC glow discharge based on the non-local Boltzmann equation for EEDF, the drift-diffusion equation for ions, and the Poisson equation for self-consistent electric field is presented. The results show that for the case of high dust particles density when the recombination of electrons and ions exceeds the ionization near the tube axis, radial electron and ion fluxes change their direction toward the center of the tube, and the radial electric field is reversed.

  17. Hierarchical Graphene-Encapsulated Hollow SnO2@SnS2 Nanostructures with Enhanced Lithium Storage Capability.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wangwang; Xie, Zhiqiang; Cui, Xiaodan; Zhao, Kangning; Zhang, Lei; Dietrich, Grant; Dooley, Kerry M; Wang, Ying

    2015-10-14

    Complex hierarchical structures have received tremendous attention due to their superior properties over their constitute components. In this study, hierarchical graphene-encapsulated hollow SnO2@SnS2 nanostructures are successfully prepared by in situ sulfuration on the backbones of hollow SnO2 spheres via a simple hydrothermal method followed by a solvothermal surface modification. The as-prepared hierarchical SnO2@SnS2@rGO nanocomposite can be used as anode material in lithium ion batteries, exhibiting excellent cyclability with a capacity of 583 mAh/g after 100 electrochemical cycles at a specific current of 200 mA/g. This material shows a very low capacity fading of only 0.273% per cycle from the second to the 100th cycle, lower than the capacity degradation of bare SnO2 hollow spheres (0.830%) and single SnS2 nanosheets (0.393%). Even after being cycled at a range of specific currents varied from 100 mA/g to 2000 mA/g, hierarchical SnO2@SnS2@rGO nanocomposites maintain a reversible capacity of 664 mAh/g, which is much higher than single SnS2 nanosheets (374 mAh/g) and bare SnO2 hollow spheres (177 mAh/g). Such significantly improved electrochemical performance can be attributed to the unique hierarchical hollow structure, which not only effectively alleviates the stress resulting from the lithiation/delithiation process and maintaining structural stability during cycling but also reduces aggregation and facilitates ion transport. This work thus demonstrates the great potential of hierarchical SnO2@SnS2@rGO nanocomposites for applications as a high-performance anode material in next-generation lithium ion battery technology. PMID:26389757

  18. Morphology-dependent performance of CuO anodes via facile and controllable synthesis for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Li, Qing; Wang, Fangfang; Xia, Guofeng; Liu, Ruiqing; Li, Deyu; Li, Ning; Spendelow, Jacob S; Wu, Gang

    2014-01-22

    Nanostructured CuO anode materials with controllable morphologies have been successfully synthesized via a facile and environmentally friendly approach in the absence of any toxic surfactants or templates. In particular, leaf-like CuO, oatmeal-like CuO, and hollow-spherical CuO were obtained by changing the ligand agents. The structures and electrochemical performance of these as-prepared CuO were fully characterized by various techniques, and the properties were found to be strongly dependent on morphology. As anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the leaf-like CuO and oatmeal-like CuO electrodes exhibit relatively high reversible capacities, whereas hollow-spherical CuO shows enhanced reversible capacity after initial degradation. Furthermore, an excellent high rate capability was obtained for the leaf-like CuO and hollow-spherical CuO electrodes. These results may provide valuable insights for the development of nanostructured anodes for next-generation high-performance lithium-ion batteries. PMID:24377276

  19. Electrically Conductive Anodized Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Trung Hung

    2006-01-01

    Anodized aluminum components can be treated to make them sufficiently electrically conductive to suppress discharges of static electricity. The treatment was conceived as a means of preventing static electric discharges on exterior satin-anodized aluminum (SAA) surfaces of spacecraft without adversely affecting the thermal-control/optical properties of the SAA and without need to apply electrically conductive paints, which eventually peel off in the harsh environment of outer space. The treatment can also be used to impart electrical conductivity to anodized housings of computers, medical electronic instruments, telephoneexchange equipment, and other terrestrial electronic equipment vulnerable to electrostatic discharge. The electrical resistivity of a typical anodized aluminum surface layer lies between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 13) Omega-cm. To suppress electrostatic discharge, it is necessary to reduce the electrical resistivity significantly - preferably to < or = 10(exp 9) Omega-cm. The present treatment does this. The treatment is a direct electrodeposition process in which the outer anodized surface becomes covered and the pores in the surface filled with a transparent, electrically conductive metal oxide nanocomposite. Filling the pores with the nanocomposite reduces the transverse electrical resistivity and, in the original intended outer-space application, the exterior covering portion of the nanocomposite would afford the requisite electrical contact with the outer-space plasma. The electrical resistivity of the nanocomposite can be tailored to a value between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 12) Omega-cm. Unlike electrically conductive paint, the nanocomposite becomes an integral part of the anodized aluminum substrate, without need for adhesive bonding material and without risk of subsequent peeling. The electrodeposition process is compatible with commercial anodizing production lines. At present, the electronics industry uses expensive, exotic

  20. Nano structural anodes for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Serkiz, Steven M.; McWhorter, Christopher S.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-07-07

    Anodes for proportional radiation counters and a process of making the anodes is provided. The nano-sized anodes when present within an anode array provide: significantly higher detection efficiencies due to the inherently higher electric field, are amenable to miniaturization, have low power requirements, and exhibit a small electromagnetic field signal. The nano-sized anodes with the incorporation of neutron absorbing elements (e.g., .sup.10B) allow the use of neutron detectors that do not use .sup.3He.

  1. Characteristics of a glow discharge maintained in the vapors of a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanov, A. N.; Kostrin, D. K.; Goncharov, V. D.; Lisenkov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Glow discharge in atmospheric pressure air in the discharge cell with a liquid cathode is considered. Current-voltage characteristic of such a system at different distances between the electrodes and various electrode placements, different thickness of the liquid layer and the cathode surface area are shown. Spectral emission of the glow discharge plasma in the vapors of a liquid is demonstrated.

  2. Glow experiment documentation of OMS/RCS pod and vertical stabilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Glow experiment documentation of one of the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) reaction control system (RCS) pods and a portion of the vertical stabilizer shows chemoluminescent effectresulting from atomic oxygen impacting the spacecraft and building to the point that the atomic oxygen atoms combine to form molecules of oxygen. The Image Intensifier on NIKON 35mm camera was used to record the glow.

  3. Glow experiment documentation of OMS/RCS pods and vertical stabilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Glow experiment documentation of orbital maneuvering system (OMS) reaction control system (RCS) pods and vertical stabilizer shows chemoluminescent effect resulting from atomic oxygen impacting the spacecraft and building to the point that the atomic oxygen atoms combine to form molecules of oxygen. Image intensifier on NIKON 35mm camera used to record glow on vertical tail and OMS pods.

  4. Glow experiment documentation of OMS/RCS pods and vertical stabilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Glow experiment documentation of orbital maneuvering system (OMS) reaction control system (RCS) pods and vertical stabilizer shows chemo-luminescent effect resulting from atomic oxygen impacting the spacecraft and building to the point that the atomic oxygen atoms combine to form molecules of oxygen. Image intensifier on NIKON 35mm camera was used to record glow on vertical tail and OMS pods.

  5. Assessing the Warm Glow Effect in Contingent Valuations for Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Soon-Jae; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Jung, Eun-Joo

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to present evidence of the warm glow effect in a public library setting. More specifically, it tests whether individual respondents with different values for the warm glow component report different values for their willingness to pay (WTP). The data come from a contingent valuation survey conducted on randomly selected citizens…

  6. LOX/Methane Main Engine Glow Plug Igniter Tests and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin; Ajmani, Kumud

    2009-01-01

    Ignition data for tests with a LOX/methane igniter that utilized a glow plug as the ignition source are presented. The tests were conducted in a vacuum can with thermally conditioned (cold) hardware. Data showing the effects of glow plug geometry, type, and igniter operating conditions are discussed. Comparisons between experimental results and multidimensional, transient computer models are also made.

  7. Anodized Steel Electrodes for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Sagu, Jagdeep S; Wijayantha, K G Upul; Bohm, Mallika; Bohm, Siva; Kumar Rout, Tapan

    2016-03-01

    Steel was anodized in 10 M NaOH to enhance its surface texture and internal surface area for application as an electrode in supercapacitors. A mechanism was proposed for the anodization process. Field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM) studies of anodized steel revealed that it contains a highly porous sponge like structure ideal for supercapacitor electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that the surface of the anodized steel was Fe2O3, whereas X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that the bulk remained as metallic Fe. The supercapacitor performance of the anodized steel was tested in 1 M NaOH and a capacitance of 18 mF cm(-2) was obtained. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that there was a large psueudocapacitive contribution which was due to oxidation of Fe to Fe(OH)2 and then further oxidation to FeOOH, and the respective reduction of these species back to metallic Fe. These redox processes were found to be remarkably reversible as the electrode showed no loss in capacitance after 10000 cycles. The results demonstrate that anodization of steel is a suitable method to produce high-surface-area electrodes for supercapacitors with excellent cycling lifetime. PMID:26891093

  8. Plasma mixing glow discharge device for analytical applications

    DOEpatents

    Pinnaduwage, L.A.

    1999-04-20

    An instrument for analyzing a sample has an enclosure that forms a chamber containing an anode which divides the chamber into a discharge region and an analysis region. A gas inlet and outlet are provided to introduce and exhaust a rare gas into the discharge region. A cathode within the discharge region has a plurality of pins projecting in a geometric pattern toward the anode for exciting the gas and producing a plasma discharge between the cathode and the anode. Low energy electrons (e.g. <0.5 eV) pass into the analysis region through an aperture. The sample to be analyzed is placed into the analysis region and bombarded by the metastable rare gas atoms and the low energy electrons extracted into from the discharge region. A mass or optical spectrometer can be coupled to a port of the analysis region to analyze the resulting ions and light emission. 3 figs.

  9. Plasma mixing glow discharge device for analytical applications

    DOEpatents

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.

    1999-01-01

    An instrument for analyzing a sample has an enclosure that forms a chamber containing an anode which divides the chamber into a discharge region and an analysis region. A gas inlet and outlet are provided to introduce and exhaust a rare gas into the discharge region. A cathode within the discharge region has a plurality of pins projecting in a geometric pattern toward the anode for exciting the gas and producing a plasma discharge between the cathode and the anode. Low energy electrons (e.g. <0.5 eV) pass into the analysis region through an aperture. The sample to be analyzed is placed into the analysis region and bombarded by the metastable rare gas atoms and the low energy electrons extracted into from the discharge region. A mass or optical spectrometer can be coupled to a port of the analysis region to analyze the resulting ions and light emission.

  10. Non-lead hollow point bullet

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Norman L.; Lowden, Richard A.

    2003-04-15

    The non-lead hollow point bullet of the instant invention comprises a mixed construction slug further comprising, a monolithic metal insert having a tapered (preferred conical) hollow point tip and a tapered (preferred conical) tail protrusion, and an unsintered powdered metal composite core in tandem alignment with the insert. The core has a hollow tapered (preferred conical) cavity tip portion coupled with the tapered (preferred conical) tail protrusion on the insert. An open tip jacket envelops at least a portion of the insert and the core. The jacket is swaged at the open tip.

  11. Designing Hollow Nano Gold Golf Balls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure. PMID:24937196

  12. Microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Linslal, C. L. Sebastian, S.; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Girijavallabhan, C. P.; Kailasnath, M.

    2015-03-30

    Strongly modulated laser emission has been observed from rhodamine B doped microring resonator embedded in a hollow polymer optical fiber by transverse optical pumping. The microring resonator is fabricated on the inner wall of a hollow polymer fiber. Highly sharp lasing lines, strong mode selection, and a collimated laser beam are observed from the fiber. Nearly single mode lasing with a side mode suppression ratio of up to 11.8 dB is obtained from the strongly modulated lasing spectrum. The microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser has shown efficient lasing characteristics even at a propagation length of 1.5 m.

  13. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-09

    Method is disclosed for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T [approx gt] 600 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10[sup 3] [mu]m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants. 1 fig.

  14. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1979-01-09

    Method for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T .gtorsim. 600.degree. C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  15. Verification of the dual integral glow analysis dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Eric Christopher

    2000-10-01

    The Dual Integral Glow Analysis (DINGA) method is a unique approach to the determination of the low-LET dose deposited within a thermoluminescent personnel dosimeter. DINGA creates its estimate of the dose deposited by utilizing the integrals of a sub-section of the glow curves obtained from opposite sides of one or more thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and knowledge of the TLDs thermophysical parameters. The performance of DINGA is evaluated with computational simulations for a variety of heating methods and error tolerance is also examined by introducing errors into the inputs the DINGA code. It has been found that DINGA's dose estimates are off approximately, in the worst case, the same percentage as the input parameter was varied. Experimental measurements are performed using a hot-gas heating method for large personnel doses and a laser heating method for smaller personnel doses with LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters. The dosimeters are exposed to select radiation fields generated by either certified sources or fields characterized by certified equipment. The DINGA dosimetry system is found to correctly report shallow and deep dose well within the limits required for certification by the National Voluntary Accreditation Program. The worst performance quotient is 0.19, well below the strictest limit of 0.30.

  16. Interaction of a surface glow discharge with a gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A. L. Schweigert, I. V.

    2010-05-15

    A surface glow discharge in a gas flow is of particular interest as a possible tool for controlling the flow past hypersonic aircrafts. Using a hydrodynamic model of glow discharge, two-dimensional calculations for a kilovolt surface discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.5 Torr are carried out in a stationary gas, as well as in a flow with a velocity of 1000 m/s. The discharge structure and plasma parameters are investigated near a charged electrode. It is shown that the electron energy in a cathode layer reaches 250-300 eV. Discharge is sustained by secondary electron emission. The influence of a high-speed gas flow on the discharge is considered. It is shown that the cathode layer configuration is flow-resistant. The distributions of the electric field and electron energy, as well as the ionization rate profile in the cathode layer, do not change qualitatively under the action of the flow. The basic effect of the flow's influence is a sharp decrease in the region of the quasineutral plasma surrounding the cathode layer due to fast convective transport of ions.

  17. Electrical properties of pulsed glow discharge Two new aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, V. V.; Voronov, M. V.; Hoffmann, V.; Eckert, J.

    2008-07-01

    At the application of pulsed glow discharge (PGD) a transient power of several kW can be reached. This leads to a significant increase of the excitation and ionization efficiency of the sputtered sample atoms. Moreover, with pulsed mode temporally resolved optical emission spectrometry (OES) and mass spectrometry (MS) deliver additional information about the chemical bonds (Harrison 1998, Bengtson et al. 2000, Hang et al. 1996, Klingler et al. 1990, Lewis et al. 2001, Jackson and King 2003). However, the practical application of pulsed glow discharge (PGD) requires an understanding of the processes taking place in the pulsed system. There are some publications, where attention was paid on the voltage current characteristics and the current signal shape of PGD (King and Pan 1993, Lewis et al. 2003). Nevertheless more attention should be paid on the electrical properties of the PGD. In this work the shapes of current, voltage and emission intensity signals, obtained with two different pulse generators are compared. For better understanding of processes, taking place in the discharge the knowledge of the gas temperature is very important. Several authors have mentioned that heating of the cathode leads to changes of the voltage current curve, mainly a decrease of the current at the same voltage. This can be explained by a lower gas density at the same pressure but at higher temperatures (Chenlong et al. 1999, Tian and Chu 2001, Kasik et al. 2002). This phenomenon gives an approach to estimate the gas temperature of the plasma.

  18. Demonstration of Separation Control Using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Active flow control of boundary-layer separation using glow-discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modem low-pressure-turbine airfoil. The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) free-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface-flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control.

  19. Demonstration of Separation Delay with Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Active flow control of boundary-layer separation using glow-discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modern low-pressure-turbine airfoil. The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2 percent) and high (2.5 percent) free-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface-flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control.

  20. Ozone generation using atmospheric pressure glow discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntat, Z.; Smith, I. R.; Razali, N. A. M.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents results from a study into the generation of ozone by a stable atmospheric glow discharge, using dry air as the feeding gas for ozone generation. The power supply is 50 Hz ac, with the use of a perforated aluminium sheet for the electrodes and soda lime glass as a dielectric layer in a parallel-plate configuration, stabilizing the generation process and enabling ozone to be produced. The stable glow discharge spreads uniformly at a gas breakdown voltage below 4.8 kV and requires only 330 mW discharge power, with a limitation of 3 mm on the maximum gap spacing for the dry air. With the technique providing a high collision rate between the electrons and gas molecules during the discharge process, a high ozone yield is obtained. An analysis of the effect on the production rate of parameters such as the input voltage, gas flow rate and reaction chamber dimensions resulted in a highest efficiency of production of almost 350 g kWh-1 and confirms its potential as an important ozone generation technology.

  1. Instrumentation for automated acquisition and analysis of TLD glow curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, I. J.; Kennett, T. J.; Harvey, J. W.

    1991-04-01

    Instrumentation for the automated and complete acquisition of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) data from a Panasonic UD-702E TLD reader is reported. The system that has been developed consists of both hardware and software components and is designed to operate with an IBM-type personal computer. Acquisition of glow curve, timing, and heating data has been integrated with elementary numerical analysis to permit real-time validity and diagnostic assessments to be made. This allows the optimization of critical parameters such as duration of the heating cycles and the time window for the integration of the dosimetry peak. The form of the Li 2B 4O 7:Cu TLD glow curve has been studied and a mathematical representation devised to assist in the implementation of automated analysis. Differences in the shape of the curve can be used to identify dosimetry peaks due to artifacts or to identify failing components. Examples of the use of this system for quality assurance in the TLD monitoring program at McMaster University are presented.

  2. On electron bunching and stratification of glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Golubovskii, Yuri B.; Kolobov, Vladimir I.; Nekuchaev, Vladimir O.

    2013-10-15

    Plasma stratification and excitation of ionization waves is one of the fundamental problems in gas discharge physics. Significant progress in this field is associated with the name of Lev Tsendin. He advocated the need for the kinetic approach to this problem contrary to the traditional hydrodynamic approach, introduced the idea of electron bunching in spatially periodic electric fields, and developed a theory of kinetic resonances for analysis of moving striations in rare gases. The present paper shows how Tsendin's ideas have been further developed and applied for understanding the nature of the well-known S-, P-, and R-striations observed in glow discharges of inert gases at low pressures and currents. We review numerical solutions of a Fokker-Planck kinetic equation in spatially periodic electric fields under the effects of elastic and inelastic collisions of electrons with atoms. We illustrate the formation of kinetic resonances at specific field periods for different shapes of injected Electron Distribution Functions (EDF). Computer simulations illustrate how self-organization of the EDFs occurs under nonlocal conditions and how Gaussian-like peaks moving along resonance trajectories are formed in a certain range of discharge conditions. The calculated EDFs agree well with the experimentally measured EDFs for the S, P, and R striations in noble gases. We discuss how kinetic resonances affect dispersion characteristics of moving striations and mention some non-linear effects associated with glow discharge stratification. We propose further studies of stratification phenomena combining physical kinetics and non-linear physics.

  3. Design and synthesis of micron-sized spherical aggregates composed of hollow Fe2O3 nanospheres for use in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sang; Hong, Young Jun; Lee, Jong-Heun; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-05-14

    A novel structure denoted a "hollow nanosphere aggregate" is synthesized by introducing nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to the spray pyrolysis process. The hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates with spherical shape and micron size are synthesized as the first target material. A solid iron oxide-carbon composite powder that is prepared by a one-pot spray pyrolysis process is transformed into the hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates by sequential post-pyrolysis treatments under reducing and oxidizing atmospheres. The nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion plays a key role in the formation of the hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates with spherical shape and micron size. The unique structure of the hollow Fe2O3 nanosphere aggregates results in their superior electrochemical properties as an anode material for lithium ion batteries by improving the structural stability during cycling. The hollow metal oxide nanosphere aggregates with various compositions for wide applications including energy storage can be prepared by the simple fabrication method introduced in this study. PMID:25899089

  4. Electrostatic Assembly of Sandwich-like Ag-C@ZnO-C@Ag-C Hybrid Hollow Microspheres with Excellent High-Rate Lithium Storage Properties.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingshui; Ma, Yating; Wang, Xuanpeng; Zeng, Deqian; Wang, Laisen; Mai, Liqiang; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2016-01-26

    Herein, we introduce a facile electrostatic attraction approach to produce zinc-silver citrate hollow microspheres, followed by thermal heating treatment in argon to ingeniously synthesize sandwich-like Ag-C@ZnO-C@Ag-C hybrid hollow microspheres. The 3D carbon conductive framework in the hybrids derives from the in situ carbonation of carboxylate acid groups in zinc-silver citrate hollow microspheres during heating treatment, and the continuous and homogeneous Ag nanoparticles on the outer and inner surfaces of hybrid hollow microspheres endow the shells with the sandwiched configuration (Ag-C@ZnO-C@Ag-C). When applied as the anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the fabricated hybrid hollow microspheres with sandwich-like shells reveal a very large reversible capacity of 1670 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at a current density of 0.2 A g(-1). Even at the very large current densities of 1.6 and 10.0 A g(-1), the high specific capacities of about 1063 and 526 mAh g(-1) can be retained, respectively. The greatly enhanced electrochemical properties of Ag-C@ZnO-C@Ag-C hybrid microspheres are attributed to their special structural features such as the hollow structures, the sandwich-like shells, and the nanometer-sized building blocks. PMID:26624924

  5. In-situ characterisation of the dynamics of a growing dust particle cloud in a direct-current argon glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, S.; Couëdel, L.; Arnas, C.; Kishor Kumar, K.; Pardanaud, C.; Onofri, F. R. A.

    2016-02-01

    The growth and the dynamics of a tungsten nanoparticle cloud were investigated in a direct-current low pressure argon glow discharge. Real-time analyses of the dust particle size and number concentration were performed in-situ by light extinction spectrometry, while spatial dynamics of the cloud was investigated with the laser light-sheet scattering method. Additional off-line electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements were also performed for comparison purpose. This experimental work reveals the existence of an agglomeration phase followed by the appearance of a new dust particle generation. While growing, the dust cloud is pushed towards the anode and the discharge edge. Afterwards, a new dust particle generation can grow in the space freed by the first generation of nanoparticles. The continuous growth, below the light extinction spectrometry scanning positions, explains the apparent dissimilarities observed between the in-line optical and the off-line electron microscopy analyses.

  6. Density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor, and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Ishigame, Hiroaki; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution. The densities of OH, Na and H2O had different spatial distributions, while the Na density had a similar distribution to mist, suggesting that mist is the source of Na in the gas phase. When the flow rate of helium toward the electrolyte surface was increased, the distributions of all the species densities concentrated in the neighboring region to the electrolyte surface more significantly. The densities of all the species were sensitive to the electric polarity of the power supply. In particular, we never detected Na and mist when the electrolyte worked as the anode of the dc discharge. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  7. GCAFIT—A new tool for glow curve analysis in thermoluminescence nanodosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Hafez, A. I.; Yasin, M. N.; Sadek, A. M.

    2011-05-01

    Glow curve analysis is widely used for dosimetric studies and applications. Therefore, a new computer program, GCAFIT, for deconvoluting first-order kinetics thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves and evaluating the activation energy for each glow peak in the glow curve has been developed using the MATLAB technical computing language. A non-linear function describing a single glow peak is fitted to experimental points using the Levenberg-Marquardt least-square method. The developed GCAFIT software was used to analyze the glow curves of TLD-100, TLD-600, and TLD-700 nanodosimeters. The activation energy E obtained by the developed GCAFIT software was compared with that obtained by the peak shape methods of Grossweiner, Lushchik, and Halperin-Braner. The frequency factor S for each glow peak was also calculated. The standard deviations are discussed in each case and compared with those of other investigators. The results show that GCAFIT is capable of accurately analyzing first-order TL glow curves. Unlike other software programs, the developed GCAFIT software does not require activation energy as an input datum; in contrast, activation energy for each glow peak is given in the output data. The resolution of the experimental glow curve influences the results obtained by the GCAFIT software; as the resolution increases, the results obtained by the GCAFIT software become more accurate. The values of activation energy obtained by the developed GCAFIT software a in good agreement with those obtained by the peak shape methods. The agreement with the Halperin-Braner and Lushchik methods is better than with that of Grossweiner. High E and S values for peak 5 were observed; we believe that these values are not real because peak 5 may in fact consist of two or three unresolved peaks. We therefore treated E and S for peak 5 as an effective activation energy, Eeff, and an effective frequency factor, Seff. The temperature value for peak 5 was also treated as an effective quantity

  8. Long duration gamma-ray glows observed from the tops of thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N.; Smith, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Hazelton, B. J.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Lowell, A.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2011-12-01

    The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) observed 12 γ-ray glows from thunderstorms near Montana and Florida during its Summer 2009 campaign. These glows have been observed from both the ground and air but this is the first evidence that they are a common, long duration occurrence at the tops of thunderclouds. Glows could be evidence that continuous relativistic runaway with feedback limits thunderstorm charging in a way that competes with lightning. We compare our observed glows to local lightning activity and find a slight but poor correlation, indicating that lightning and glows measure different aspects of cloud electrification. We have shown for all 11 of our observed glows in Florida that there is always an active cell nearby, but there were also many passes near active cells that had no observed glow. We will examine the meteorological differences between active lightning cells with and without glows. We have found the spectrum to be very hard for each glow, with a large fraction of the counts being above 5 MeV. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of relativistic runaway with positron feedback and a GEANT3 model of the atmosphere and instrument response from within a plane, we will distinguish between two different possibilities for a hard spectrum: an upward relativistic avalanche very deep in the atmosphere, so that most low energy photons have been removed via Compton scattering, and a downward relativistic avalanche between the upper positive and the screening layer, with the bremsstrahlung from the upward positron beam (a side-effect of feedback) producing the glow. If the latter model is correct, it demonstrates that positron feedback is indeed a common process in thunderclouds.

  9. Hollow Alveolus-Like Nanovesicle Assembly with Metal-Encapsulated Hollow Zeolite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chengyi; Zhang, Anfeng; Liu, Min; Gu, Lin; Guo, Xinwen; Song, Chunshan

    2016-08-23

    Inspired by the vesicular structure of alveolus which has a porous nanovesicle structure facilitating the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide, we designed a hollow nanovesicle assembly with metal-encapsulated hollow zeolite that would enhance diffusion of reactants/products and inhibit sintering and leaching of active metals. This zeolitic nanovesicle has been successfully synthesized by a strategy which involves a one-pot hydrothermal synthesis of hollow assembly of metal-containing solid zeolite crystals without a structural template and a selective desilication-recrystallization accompanied by leaching-hydrolysis to convert the metal-containing solid crystals into metal-encapsulated hollow crystals. We demonstrate the strategy in synthesizing a hollow nanovesicle assembly of Fe2O3-encapsulated hollow crystals of ZSM-5 zeolite. This material possesses a microporous (0.4-0.6 nm) wall of hollow crystals and a mesoporous (5-17 nm) shell of nanovesicle with macropores (about 350 nm) in the core. This hierarchical structure enables excellent Fe2O3 dispersion (3-4 nm) and resistance to sintering even at 800 °C; facilitates the transport of reactant/products; and exhibits superior activity and resistance to leaching in phenol degradation. Hollow nanovesicle assembly of Fe-Pt bimetal-encapsulated hollow ZSM-5 crystals was also prepared. PMID:27429013

  10. One-Dimensional Solutions for Transient Thermal Stresses in Functionally Graded Hollow Cylinders and Hollow Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootao, Yoshihiro; Tanigawa, Yoshinobu

    2008-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the theoretical treatment of transient thermoelastic problems involving functionally graded hollow cylinders and hollow spheres due to uniform heat supply. The thermal and thermoelastic coefficients of the hollow cylinders and hollow spheres are expressed as power functions of the radial coordinate. The one-dimensional solutions for the temperature changes in a transient state and the thermoelastic response are obtained herein. Some numerical results are shown in figures. Furthermore, the influence of the material nonhomogeneity on the temperature change, displacements and stresses is investigated.

  11. Metal Organic Frameworks Derived Hierarchical Hollow NiO/Ni/Graphene Composites for Lithium and Sodium Storage.

    PubMed

    Zou, Feng; Chen, Yu-Ming; Liu, Kewei; Yu, Zitian; Liang, Wenfeng; Bhaway, Sarang M; Gao, Min; Zhu, Yu

    2016-01-26

    Ni-based metal organic frameworks (Ni-MOFs) with unique hierarchical hollow ball-in-ball nanostructure were synthesized by solvothermal reactions. After successive carbonization and oxidation treatments, hierarchical NiO/Ni nanocrystals covered with a graphene shell were obtained with the hollow ball-in-ball nanostructure intact. The resulting materials exhibited superior performance as the anode in lithium ion batteries (LIBs): they provide high reversible specific capacity (1144 mAh/g), excellent cyclability (nearly no capacity loss after 1000 cycles) and rate performance (805 mAh/g at 15 A/g). In addition, the hierarchical NiO/Ni/Graphene composites demonstrated promising performance as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). Such a superior lithium and sodium storage performance is derived from the well-designed hierarchical hollow ball-in-ball structure of NiO/Ni/Graphene composites, which not only mitigates the volume expansion of NiO during the cycles but also provides a continuous highly conductive graphene matrix to facilitate the fast charge transfer and form a stable SEI layer. PMID:26592379

  12. Hollow rhodoliths increase Svalbard's shelf biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Rhodoliths are coralline red algal assemblages that commonly occur in marine habitats from the tropics to polar latitudes. They form rigid structures of high-magnesium calcite and have a good fossil record. Here I show that rhodoliths are ecosystem engineers in a high Arctic environment that increase local biodiversity by providing habitat. Gouged by boring mussels, originally solid rhodoliths become hollow ecospheres intensely colonised by benthic organisms. In the examined shelf areas, biodiversity in rhodolith-bearing habitats is significantly greater than in habitats without rhodoliths and hollow rhodoliths yield a greater biodiversity than solid ones. This biodiversity, however, is threatened because hollow rhodoliths take a long time to form and are susceptible to global change and anthropogenic impacts such as trawl net fisheries that can destroy hollow rhodoliths. Rhodoliths and other forms of coralline red algae play a key role in a plurality of environments and need improved management and protection plans. PMID:25382656

  13. Hollow rhodoliths increase Svalbard's shelf biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichert, Sebastian

    2014-11-01

    Rhodoliths are coralline red algal assemblages that commonly occur in marine habitats from the tropics to polar latitudes. They form rigid structures of high-magnesium calcite and have a good fossil record. Here I show that rhodoliths are ecosystem engineers in a high Arctic environment that increase local biodiversity by providing habitat. Gouged by boring mussels, originally solid rhodoliths become hollow ecospheres intensely colonised by benthic organisms. In the examined shelf areas, biodiversity in rhodolith-bearing habitats is significantly greater than in habitats without rhodoliths and hollow rhodoliths yield a greater biodiversity than solid ones. This biodiversity, however, is threatened because hollow rhodoliths take a long time to form and are susceptible to global change and anthropogenic impacts such as trawl net fisheries that can destroy hollow rhodoliths. Rhodoliths and other forms of coralline red algae play a key role in a plurality of environments and need improved management and protection plans.

  14. Space Test of Bare-Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An international team, lead by Tokyo Metropolitan University, is developing a mission concept for a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare-wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether propulsion. The tether is a tape with a 50-mm width, 0.05-mm thickness, and 1-km length. This will be the first space test of the OML theory. In addition, by being an engineering demonstration (of space tethers), the mission will demonstrate electric beam generation for "sounding" determination of the neutral density profile in the ionospheric "E-layer." If selected by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the mission will launch in early 2009 using an $520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above =100 km in attitude, the 1-km tape tether will be deployed at a rate of 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow.This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using electrodynamic tethers for propulsion or power generation.

  15. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  16. Process for Ignition of Gaseous Electrical Discharge Between Electrodes of a Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The design and manufacturing processes for Hollow Cathode Assemblies (HCA's) that operate over a broad range of emission currents up to 30 Amperes, at low potentials, with lifetimes in excess of 17,500 hours. The processes include contamination control procedures which cover hollow cathode component cleaning procedures, gas feed system designs and specifications, and hollow cathode activation and operating procedures to thereby produce cathode assemblies that have demonstrated stable and repeatable operating conditions, for both the discharge current and voltage. The HCA of this invention provides lifetimes of greater than 10,000 hours, and expected lifetimes of greater than 17,500 hours, whereas the present state-of-the-art is less than 500 hours at emission currents in excess of 1 Ampere. Stable operation is provided over a large range of operating emission currents, up to a 6:1 ratio, and this HCA can emit electron currents of up to 30 Amperes in magnitude to an external anode that simulates the current drawn to a space plasma, at voltages of less than 20 Volts.

  17. Process for testing a xenon gas feed system of a hollow cathode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The design and manufacturing processes for Hollow Cathode Assemblies (HCA's) that operate over a broad range of emission currents up to 30 Amperes, at low potentials, with lifetimes in excess of 17,500 hours. The processes include contamination control procedures which cover hollow cathode component cleaning procedures, gas feed system designs and specifications, and hollow cathode activation and operating procedures to thereby produce cathode assemblies that have demonstrated stable and repeatable operating conditions, for both the discharge current and voltage. The HCA of this invention provides lifetimes of greater than 10,000 hours, and expected lifetimes of greater than 17,500 hours, whereas the present state-of-the-art is less than 500 hours at emission currents in excess of 1 Ampere. Stable operation is provided over a large range of operating emission currents, up to a 6:1 ratio, and this HCA can emit electron currents of up to 30 Amperes in magnitude to an external anode that simulates the current drawn to a space plasma, at voltages of less than 20 Volts.

  18. BOX-DEATH HOLLOW ROADLESS AREA, UTAH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weir, Gordon W.; Lane, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, and a search for prospects and mineralized rock in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area, Utah indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the area. Additional exploratory drilling by industry seems warranted if wells elsewhere in the region find oil or gas in strata as yet untested in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area.

  19. Liquid molded hollow cell core composite articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernetich, Karl R. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A hollow core composite assembly 10 is provided, including a hollow core base 12 having at least one open core surface 14, a bondable solid film 22 applied to the open core surface 14, at least one dry face ply 30 laid up dry and placed on top of the solid film 22, and a liquid resin 32 applied to the at least one dry face ply 30 and then cured.

  20. Evaluation of a pulsed glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometer as a detector for gas chromatography and the influence of the glow discharge source parameters on the information volume in chemical speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Fliegel, Daniel; Fuhrer, Katrin; Gonin, Marc; Günther, Detlef

    2006-09-01

    The figures of merit of a pulsed glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometer (GD-TOFMS) as a detector for gas chromatography (GC) analysis were evaluated. The mass resolution for the GD-TOFMS was determined on FWHM in the high mass range (208Pb+) as high as 5,500. Precision of 400 subsequent analyses was calculated on 63Cu+ to be better than 1% RSD with no significant drift over the time of the analysis. Isotope precision based on the 63Cu+/65Cu+ ratio over 400 analyses was 1.5% RSD. The limits of detection for gaseous analytes (toluene in methanol as solvent) were determined to be as low as several hundred ppb or several hundred pg absolute without using any pre-concentration technique. Furthermore, the different GD source parameters like capillary distance, cathode-anode spacing, and GD source pressure with regards to the accessible elemental, structural, and molecular information were evaluated. It was demonstrated that each of these parameters has severe influence on the ratio of elemental, structural, and parent molecular information in chemical speciation analysis. PMID:16773303

  1. Synthesis of Highly Uniform Molybdenum-Glycerate Spheres and Their Conversion into Hierarchical MoS2 Hollow Nanospheres for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yawen; Yu, Le; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-06-20

    Highly uniform Mo-glycerate solid spheres are synthesized for the first time through a solvothermal process. The size of these Mo-glycerate spheres can be easily controlled in the range of 400-1000 nm by varying the water content in the mixed solvent. As a precursor, these Mo-glycerate solid spheres can be converted into hierarchical MoS2 hollow nanospheres through a subsequent sulfidation reaction. Owing to the unique ultrathin subunits and hollow interior, the as-prepared MoS2 hollow nanospheres exhibit appealing performance as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Impressively, these hierarchical structures deliver a high capacity of about 1100 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) with good rate retention and long cycle life. PMID:27095261

  2. Sharp transition between two regimes of operation of dc discharge with two anodes and thermionic emission from cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafaev, A. S.; Grabovskiy, A.; Demidov, V. I.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Koepke, M. E.

    2014-05-15

    In a dc discharge plasma with two anodes and thermionic emission from cathode, the two anodes are used for plasma control. The main anode is placed between the cathode and the other auxiliary anode has a circular opening for passing electron current from the cathode to the second anode. It is experimentally demonstrated that a plasma may exhibit a sudden transition between two quasi-stable conditions as one increases the cathode-electron current collected by the auxiliary anode through an aperture, i.e., hole, in the main anode. In one regime, a bright glowing “ball-shaped double layer” appears on the plasma side having a potential drop of 10–15 eV and concomitant ionization in the neighboring region attached to the opening. The second regime is characterized by a uniform potential profile in plasma and an absence of the ball-shaped double layer. The transition between these regimes is accompanied by a significant change in plasma properties, such as the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Controlling the EEDF is a valuable capability in technological applications. Increasing the gas pressure leads to the elimination of the first regime for sufficiently high gas pressure, the threshold being a few Torr. The disappearance of a regime transition can be explained by invoking an EEDF transition, from being nonlocal at low pressure to becoming local at high pressure. Local EEDF is determined by local values of electric field. Nonlocal EEDF is determined by electric field values elsewhere, and the electron can travel without energy loss over a path much longer than the discharge dimension.

  3. High-efficiency, nickel-ceramic composite anode current collector for micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Wu, Zhentao; Li, K.

    2015-04-01

    High manufacturing cost and low-efficient current collection have been the two major bottlenecks that prevent micro-tubular SOFCs from large-scale application. In this work, a new nickel-based composite anode current collector has been developed for anode-supported MT-SOFC, addressing reduced cost, manufacturability and current collection efficiencies. Triple-layer hollow fibers have been successfully fabricated via a phase inversion-assisted co-extrusion process, during which a thin nickel-based inner layer was uniformly coated throughout the interior anode surface for improved adhesion with superior process economy. 10 wt.% CGO was added into the inner layer to prevent the excessive shrinkage of pure NiO, thus helping to achieve the co-sintering process. The electrochemical performance tests illustrate that samples with the thinnest anodic current collector (15% of the anode thickness) displayed the highest power density (1.07 W cm-2). The impedance analysis and theoretical calculations suggest that inserting the anodic current collector could dramatically reduce the percentage of contact loss down to 6-10 % of the total ohmic loss (compared to 70% as reported in literatures), which proves the high efficiencies of new current collector design. Moreover, the superior manufacturability and process economy suggest this composite current collector suitable for mass-scale production.

  4. Tip-like anodic alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Q. W.; Ding, G. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Zheng, M. J.; Shen, W. Z.

    2007-05-01

    Porous anodic alumina membranes and various nanotips have been demonstrating individually their unique usefulness in current nanotechnology. We present a one-step electrochemical approach to fabricate nanoscale alumina tips (tip-like anodic alumina, TAA) in order to combine the benefits of porous anodic alumina and a nanoscale tip array. The realized TAA has an ordered tip surface with controllable aspect ratio and high sheet density of ~1011 cm-2. The formation of alumina nanotips is due to the heat-driven dissolution of the nanopore surface. We have further shown that the surface nanostructure in TAA leads to the wettability reversal, and preferred nucleation and growth during material deposition. The easy and large-scale fabrication of TAA makes it possible for novel nanodevice applications.

  5. Generation of multiple toroidal dust vortices by a non-monotonic density gradient in a direct current glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manjit Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Sharma, D.; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C.; Thomas, Edward

    2015-09-15

    Observation of two well-separated dust vortices in an unmagnetized parallel plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported in this paper. A non-monotonic radial density profile, achieved by an especially designed cathode structure using a concentric metallic disk and ring of different radii, is observed to produce double dust tori between cathode and anode. PIV analysis of the still images of the double tori shows oppositely rotating dust structures between the central disk and the ring. Langmuir probe measurements of background plasma shows a non-uniform plasma density profile between the disk and the ring. Location and sense of rotation of the dust vortices coincides with the location and direction of the radial gradient in the ion drag force caused by the radial density gradient. The experimentally observed dust vorticity matches well with the calculated one using hydrodynamic formulations with shear in ion drag dominating over the dust charge gradient. These results corroborate that a radial gradient in the ion drag force directed towards cathode is the principal cause of dust rotation.

  6. Measurement of temperature and emissivity of specularly reflecting glowing bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. P.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.; Krishnan, S.

    1988-01-01

    A new method of measuring the thermodynamic temperature of an object as well as the surface emissivity based on laser reflectivity has been developed. By using rotator analyzer ellipsometry, the light reflected from the sample at a specific angle of incidence can be analyzed for its ellipticity. The normal incidence reflectivity and emissivity are then extracted using standard relations. The thermodynamic temperature of the body is obtained simultaneously by measuring the intensity of emitted light at the same angle of incidence. Room temperature measurements are carried out on selected metals to test the system. Elevated temperature measurements on platinum foils show that this technique is reliable and accurate for monitoring and measuring the temperature and emissivity of specularly reflecting, glowing bodies.

  7. Xe isotopic fractionation in a cathodeless glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Fahey, A. J.

    1986-03-01

    Results are reported on the isotopic composition of Xe processed in cathodeless glow discharges in rarefied air at pressures of 20-40 microns Hg, in the presence of activated charcoal and in empty pyrex containers. Residual gas phase Xe and trapped Xe were found to be fractionated, with the trapped Xe fractionated up to 1 percent per amu. A model is presented for the fractionating process in which Xe ions are simultaneously implanted and sputtered from substrate material, with a mass dependence favoring retention of the heavy isotopes in the substrate. Results of the investigation show that plasma synthesis of carbonaceous material is unnecessary for producing Xe fractionations, and that the fractionations observed in previous synthesis experiments are probably due to implantation of ions into the synthesized material.

  8. Similarities and differences between gliding glow and gliding arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, St.; Bogaerts, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we have analyzed the properties of a gliding dc discharge in argon at atmospheric pressure. Despite the usual designation of these discharges as ‘gliding arc discharges’, it was found previously that they operate in two different regimes—glow and arc. Here we analyze the differences in both regimes by means of two dimensional fluid modeling. In order to address different aspects of the discharge operation, we use two models—Cartesian and axisymmetric in a cylindrical coordinate system. The obtained results show that the two types of discharges produce a similar plasma column for a similar discharge current. However, the different mechanisms of plasma channel attachment to the cathode could produce certain differences in the plasma parameters (i.e. arc elongation), and this can affect gas treatments applications.

  9. Mass dependency of turbulent parameters in stationary glow discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, A. B.; Wiggins, D. L.; Johnson, J. A. III

    2013-05-15

    A direct current glow discharge tube is used to determine how mass changes the effects of certain turbulence characteristics in a weakly ionized gas. Helium, neon, argon, and krypton plasmas were created, and an axial magnetic field, varied from 0.0 to 550.0 Gauss, was used to enhance mass dependent properties of turbulence. From the power spectra of light emission variations associated with velocity fluctuations, determination of mass dependency on turbulent characteristic unstable modes, energy associated with turbulence, and the rate at which energy is transferred from scale to scale are measured. The magnetic field strength is found to be too weak to overcome particle diffusion to the walls to affect the turbulence in all four types of plasmas, though mass dependency is still detected. Though the total energy and the rate at which the energy moves between scales are mass invariant, the amplitude of the instability modes that characterize each plasma are dependent on mass.

  10. Probiotic Bacteria Induce a ‘Glow of Health’

    PubMed Central

    Smillie, Christopher; Varian, Bernard J.; Ibrahim, Yassin M.; Lakritz, Jessica R.; Alm, Eric J.; Erdman, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Radiant skin and hair are universally recognized as indications of good health. However, this ‘glow of health’ display remains poorly understood. We found that feeding of probiotic bacteria to aged mice induced integumentary changes mimicking peak health and reproductive fitness characteristic of much younger animals. Eating probiotic yogurt triggered epithelial follicular anagen-phase shift with sebocytogenesis resulting in thick lustrous fur due to a bacteria-triggered interleukin-10-dependent mechanism. Aged male animals eating probiotics exhibited increased subcuticular folliculogenesis, when compared with matched controls, yielding luxuriant fur only in probiotic-fed subjects. Female animals displayed probiotic-induced hyperacidity coinciding with shinier hair, a feature that also aligns with fertility in human females. Together these data provide insights into mammalian evolution and novel strategies for integumentary health. PMID:23342023

  11. Flush-mounted probe diagnostics for argon glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liang Cao, Jinxiang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Du, Yinchang; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jin; Li, Xiao; Qin, Yongqiang; Zhao, Liang

    2014-09-15

    A comparison is made between plasma parameters measured by a flush-mounted probe (FP) and a cylindrical probe (CP) in argon glow discharge plasma. Parameters compared include the space potential, the plasma density, and the effective electron temperature. It is found that the ion density determined by the FP agrees well with the electron density determined by the CP in the quasi-neutral plasma to better than 10%. Moreover, the space potential and effective electron temperature calculated from electron energy distribution function measured by the FP is consistent with that measured by the CP over the operated discharge current and pressure ranges. These results present the FP can be used as a reliable diagnostic tool in the stable laboratory plasma and also be anticipated to be applied in other complicated plasmas, such as tokamaks, the region of boundary-layer, and so on.

  12. Glow discharge cleaning of carbon fiber composite and stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A.; Begrambekov, L.; Brémond, S.; Douai, D.; Kuzmin, A.; Sadovsky, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergasov, S.

    2011-08-01

    The paper experimentally investigates and analyses the features and mechanisms of both of oxygen removal by deuterium glow discharge from CFC, pyrolytic graphite and stainless steel subjected to irradiation in oxygen contaminated plasma. It is shown that oxygen implanted in pyrolytic graphite (PG) perpendicular to basal plates is removed after sputtering the layer slightly thicker than oxygen stopping zone (≈2 nm). Fast deuterium ions penetrating into CFC during GDC transfer the trapped oxygen atoms into the bulk. Thus, much thicker surface layer has to be removed (500-1000 nm) for oxygen release. Irradiation of stainless steel in plasma leads to formation of a barrier layer with thickness (2-4 nm) equal, or slightly higher than stopping range of oxygen ions. The layer accumulates the main fraction of implanted oxygen and prevents its penetration into the bulk. After barrier layer sputtering oxygen spreads into the bulk. Parameters and conditions of optimum GDC are discussed.

  13. Glow discharge deposition at high rates using disilane

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeswaran, G.; Corderman, R.R.; Kampas, F.J.; Vanier, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The research program reported makes use of the fact that amorphous silicon films can be grown faster from disilane in a glow discharge than from the traditional silane. The goal is to find a method to grow films at a high rate and with sufficiently high quality to be used in an efficient solar cell. It must also be demonstrated that the appropriate device structure can be successfully fabricated under conditions which give high deposition rates. High quality intrinsic films have been deposited at 20 A/s. Efficiency of 5.6% on steel substrates and 5.3% on glass substrates were achieved using disilane i-layers deposited at 15 A/s in a basic structure, without wide-gap doped layers or light trapping. Wide gap p-layers were deposited using disilane. Results were compared with those obtained at Vactronic using high power discharges of silane-hydrogen mixtures. (LEW)

  14. Evolution of a vortex in glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhomlinov, V.S.; Sheverev, V.A.; Oetuegen, M.V.

    2005-05-01

    The evolution of a vortex in glow discharge plasma is studied analytically. Specifically, the mechanism of local energy deposition into the flow by the plasma is considered and its effect on the structure of an inviscid vortex is analyzed. The vortex is modeled by a set of Euler's equations while the energy transferred by the plasma into the gas is represented by Rayleigh mechanism. In this mechanism, the amount of heat addition is a function of local gas density. The analysis indicates that the plasma can have a considerable effect on the structure of a vortex. The inviscid calculations show that in a uniform discharge, a 1 cm vortex dies out in a fraction of a second.

  15. Fluorination of polymethylmethaacrylate with tetrafluoroethane using DC glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruvenket, S.; Iyer, Ganjigunte R. S.; Shestakova, Larisa; Morgen, Per; Larsen, N. B.; Mohan Rao, G.

    2008-07-01

    Fluorination of polymer surfaces has technological applications in various fields such as microelectronics, biomaterials, textile, packing, etc. In this study PMMA surfaces were fluorinated using DC glow discharge plasma. Tetrafluoroethane was used as the fluorinating agent. On the fluorinated PMMA surface, static water contact angle, surface energy, optical transmittance (UV-vis), XPS and AFM analyses were carried out. After the fluorination PMMA surface becomes hydrophobic with water contact angle of 107° without losing optical transparency. Surface energy of fluorine plasma-treated PMMA decreased from 35 mJ/cm 2 to 21.2 mJ/cm 2. RMS roughness of the fluorinated surface was 4.01 nm and XPS studies revealed the formation of C-CF x and CF 3 groups on the PMMA surface.

  16. Morphology-controlled construction of hierarchical hollow hybrid SnO2@TiO2 nanocapsules with outstanding lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linzong; Guo, Hong; Li, Tingting; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Lixiang; Qiao, Jinli; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthesis containing microwave-assisted HCl etching reaction and precipitating reaction is employed to prepare hierarchical hollow SnO2@TiO2 nanocapsules for anode materials of Li-ion batteries. The intrinsic hollow nanostructure can shorten the lengths for both ionic and electronic transport, enlarge the electrode surface areas, and improving accommodation of the anode volume change during Li insertion/extraction cycling. The hybrid multi-elements in this material allow the volume change to take place in a stepwise manner during electrochemical cycling. In particular, the coating of TiO2 onto SnO2 can enhance the electronic conductivity of hollow SnO2 electrode. As a result, the as-prepared SnO2@TiO2 nanocapsule electrode exhibits a stably reversible capacity of 770 mA hg(-1) at 1 C, and the capacity retention can keep over 96.1% after 200 cycles even at high current rates. This approach may shed light on a new avenue for the fast synthesis of hierarchical hollow nanocapsule functional materials for energy storage, catalyst and other new applications. PMID:26482415

  17. Morphology-controlled construction of hierarchical hollow hybrid SnO2@TiO2 nanocapsules with outstanding lithium storage

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linzong; Guo, Hong; Li, Tingting; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Lixiang; Qiao, Jinli; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthesis containing microwave-assisted HCl etching reaction and precipitating reaction is employed to prepare hierarchical hollow SnO2@TiO2 nanocapsules for anode materials of Li-ion batteries. The intrinsic hollow nanostructure can shorten the lengths for both ionic and electronic transport, enlarge the electrode surface areas, and improving accommodation of the anode volume change during Li insertion/extraction cycling. The hybrid multi-elements in this material allow the volume change to take place in a stepwise manner during electrochemical cycling. In particular, the coating of TiO2 onto SnO2 can enhance the electronic conductivity of hollow SnO2 electrode. As a result, the as-prepared SnO2@TiO2 nanocapsule electrode exhibits a stably reversible capacity of 770 mA hg−1 at 1 C, and the capacity retention can keep over 96.1% after 200 cycles even at high current rates. This approach may shed light on a new avenue for the fast synthesis of hierarchical hollow nanocapsule functional materials for energy storage, catalyst and other new applications. PMID:26482415

  18. Morphology-controlled construction of hierarchical hollow hybrid SnO2@TiO2 nanocapsules with outstanding lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linzong; Guo, Hong; Li, Tingting; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Lixiang; Qiao, Jinli; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-10-01

    A novel synthesis containing microwave-assisted HCl etching reaction and precipitating reaction is employed to prepare hierarchical hollow SnO2@TiO2 nanocapsules for anode materials of Li-ion batteries. The intrinsic hollow nanostructure can shorten the lengths for both ionic and electronic transport, enlarge the electrode surface areas, and improving accommodation of the anode volume change during Li insertion/extraction cycling. The hybrid multi-elements in this material allow the volume change to take place in a stepwise manner during electrochemical cycling. In particular, the coating of TiO2 onto SnO2 can enhance the electronic conductivity of hollow SnO2 electrode. As a result, the as-prepared SnO2@TiO2 nanocapsule electrode exhibits a stably reversible capacity of 770 mA hg-1 at 1 C, and the capacity retention can keep over 96.1% after 200 cycles even at high current rates. This approach may shed light on a new avenue for the fast synthesis of hierarchical hollow nanocapsule functional materials for energy storage, catalyst and other new applications.

  19. NANOSTRUCTURED METAL OXIDES FOR ANODES OF LI-ION RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M.

    2009-12-04

    The aligned nanorods of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and nanoporous hollow spheres (NHS) of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated as the anodes for Li-ion rechargeable batteries. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods demonstrated 1433 mAh/g reversible capacity. The NHS of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} delivered 400 mAh/g and 250 mAh/g capacities respectively in multiple galvonastatic discharge-charge cycles. It was found that high capacity of NHS of metal oxides is sustainable attributed to their unique structure that maintains material integrity during cycling. The nanostructured metal oxides exhibit great potential as the new anode materials for Li-ion rechargeable batteries with high energy density, low cost and inherent safety.

  20. Engineering empty space between Si nanoparticles for lithium-ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Zheng, Guangyuan; Liu, Nian; Carney, Thomas J; Yang, Yuan; Cui, Yi

    2012-02-01

    Silicon is a promising high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries yet attaining long cycle life remains a significant challenge due to pulverization of the silicon and unstable solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation during the electrochemical cycles. Despite significant advances in nanostructured Si electrodes, challenges including short cycle life and scalability hinder its widespread implementation. To address these challenges, we engineered an empty space between Si nanoparticles by encapsulating them in hollow carbon tubes. The synthesis process used low-cost Si nanoparticles and electrospinning methods, both of which can be easily scaled. The empty space around the Si nanoparticles allowed the electrode to successfully overcome these problems Our anode demonstrated a high gravimetric capacity (~1000 mAh/g based on the total mass) and long cycle life (200 cycles with 90% capacity retention). PMID:22224827

  1. Physics and chemistry in glow dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massines, Françoise

    2001-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) are of great interest for application in gas chemistry, sterilization, surface activation or thin film deposition. But the development of a new process based on this discharge needs a clear understanding of the discharge physics and chemistry. The aim of this work is to contribute to that goal. One difficulty is the large variety of discharges called APGD. Then the first point of this talk will consist on a quick description of the different APGD families. This overview will be limited to dielectric barrier glow discharges. Then, we will focussed on those due to a Townsend breakdown. The analysis of their working domain in helium and in nitrogen shows that a lot of seed electrons are necessary to turn on the discharge through a Townsend breakdown. The main mechanism leading to these seed electrons depends (i) on the life time of the gas metastables compared to the delay between two consecutive discharges (ii) on the maximum ionisation level which can be reached without transition to FD. In helium, the origin of the seed electrons is mainly the electrons created by direct ionisation and Penning ionisation during a discharge or at the end of it, trapped in the positive column and still present in the gas when the following discharge is turned on. In nitrogen, the seed electrons are created by Penning ionisation just before the breakdown. Then in helium, the time between two discharges has to be short enough and a positive column is necessary as well as the presence of helium metastables. In N2, metastable density just before the breakdown is a dominant parameter. Moreover, the density of N2 molecules and then the gas temperature, is also important in order to maintain a large contribution of Penning ionisation compared to direct electronic ionisation. In all the gases, the metastables control the discharge development and then play an important role in the gas chemistry.

  2. Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth's surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.

  3. Hollow K0.27MnO2 Nanospheres as Cathode for High-Performance Aqueous Sodium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Qiao, Yun; Lou, Xiangdong; Zhang, Xinhe; Zhang, Wuxing; Huang, Yunhui

    2016-06-15

    Hollow K0.27MnO2 nanospheres as cathode material were designed for aqueous sodium ion batteries (SIBs) using polystyrene (PS) as a template. The samples were systematically studied by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As cathode materials for aqueous SIBs, the hollow structure can effectively improve the sodium storage property. A coin cell with hollow K0.27MnO2 as cathode and NaTi2(PO4)3 as anode exhibits a specific capacity of 84.9 mA h g(-1) at 150 mA g(-1), and the capacity of 56.6 mA h g(-1) is still maintained at an extremely high current density of 600 mA g(-1). For full cell measurement at the current density of 200 mA g(-1), 83% capacity retention also can be attained after 100 cycles. The as-designed hollow K0.27MnO2 nanospheres demonstrate long cyclability and high rate capability, which grant the potential for application in advanced aqueous SIBs. PMID:27229291

  4. Hollow glass for insulating layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merticaru, Andreea R.; Moagar-Poladian, Gabriel

    1999-03-01

    Common porous materials, some of which will be considered in the chapters of this book, include concrete, paper, ceramics, clays, porous semiconductors, chromotography materials, and natural materials like coral, bone, sponges, rocks and shells. Porous materials can also be reactive, such as in charcoal gasification, acid rock dissolution, catalyst deactivation and concrete. This study continues the investigations about the properties of, so-called, hollow glass. In this paper is presented a computer simulation approach in which the thermo-mechanical behavior of a 3D microstructure is directly computed. In this paper a computer modeling approach of porous glass is presented. One way to test the accuracy of the reconstructed microstructures is to computed their physical properties and compare to experimental measurement on equivalent systems. In this view, we imagine a new type of porous type of glass designed as buffer layer in multilayered printed boards in ICs. Our glass is a variable material with a variable pore size and surface area. The porosity could be tailored early from the deposition phases that permitting us to keep in a reasonable balance the dielectric constant and thermal conductivity.

  5. Efficiency of surface cleaning by a glow discharge for plasma spraying coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Kashapov, N. F.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Fadeev, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of the quality of cleaning steel surfaces by a glow discharge for plasma spraying. Shows the results of measurements of the angle of surface wetting and bond strength of the plasma coating to the surface treated. The dependence of the influence of the glow discharge power, chamber pressure, distance between the electrodes and the processing time of the surface on cleaning efficiency. Optimal fields of factors is found. It is shown increase joint strength coating and base by 30-80% as a result of cleaning the substrate surface by a glow discharge plasma spraying.

  6. Note: Rapid reduction of graphene oxide paper by glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Zheng; Qian, Jiajing; Duan, Liangping; Qiu, Kunzan Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2015-05-15

    This note reports on a novel method for the rapid reduction of graphene oxide (GO) paper using a glow discharge plasma reactor. Glow discharge is produced and sustained between two parallel-plate graphite electrodes at a pressure of 240 mTorr. By exposing GO paper at the junction of negative-glow and Faraday-dark area for 4 min, the oxygen-containing groups can be effectively removed (C/O ratio increases from 2.6 to 7.9), while the material integrality and flexibility are kept well. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the as-obtained reduced GO paper can be potentially used for supercapacitor application.

  7. Tested Demonstrations: Dyeing of Anodized Aluminum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides a list of needed materials, required preparations, and instructions for demonstrating the dyeing of anodized aluminum. Discusses the chemistry involved and gives equations for reactions occurring at the anode and cathode. (JM)

  8. Anodes for Rechargeable Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruiguo; Xu, Wu; Lu, Dongping; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-04-10

    In this work, we will review the recent developments on the protection of Li metal anode in Li-S batteries. Various strategies used to minimize the corrosion of Li anode and reducing its impedance increase will be analyzed. Other potential anodes used in sulfur based rechargeable batteries will also be discussed.

  9. Anode Fall Formation in a Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid A. Dorf; Yevgeny F. Raitses; Artem N. Smirnov; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2004-06-29

    As was reported in our previous work, accurate, nondisturbing near-anode measurements of the plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential performed with biased and emissive probes allowed the first experimental identification of both electron-repelling (negative anode fall) and electron-attracting (positive anode fall) anode sheaths in Hall thrusters. An interesting new phenomenon revealed by the probe measurements is that the anode fall changes from positive to negative upon removal of the dielectric coating, which appears on the anode surface during the course of Hall thruster operation. As reported in the present work, energy dispersion spectroscopy analysis of the chemical composition of the anode dielectric coating indicates that the coating layer consists essentially of an oxide of the anode material (stainless steel). However, it is still unclear how oxygen gets into the thruster channel. Most importantly, possible mechanisms of anode fall formation in a Hall thruster with a clean and a coated anodes are analyzed in this work; practical implication of understanding the general structure of the electron-attracting anode sheath in the case of a coated anode is also discussed.

  10. Method of making electrolytic capacitor anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Melody, B.; Eickelberg, E.W.

    1987-05-12

    A method is described of making an anode for an electrolytic capacitor. The method comprises providing a powder consisting of a film-forming metal, polyethylene oxide, and ammonium carbonate; pressing the powder to form an anode body; and heating the anode body to remove the polyethylene oxide and ammonium carbonate.

  11. Anode power deposition in quasi-steady MPD arcs. [accelerator anode heat flux measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saber, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    The power deposited in the anode of a quasi-steady MPD accelerator has been measured directly by thermocouples attached to the inside surface of a shell anode which provide a local measurement of anode heat flux. The results over a range of arc currents from 5.5 to 44 kiloamperes and argon mass flows from 1 g/sec to 48 g/sec show that the fraction of the total input power deposited in the anode decreases drastically from 50% at an arc power of 200 kW to 10% at 20 MW, and that anode power is not uniformly deposited in the anode. A theoretical model of the anode heat transfer, including effects of anode work function, electron thermal energy, and anode sheath, can be brought into reasonable agreement with the measurements, provided the effective range of the conduction electrons from within the discharge plasma to the anode surface is properly acknowledged.

  12. Anodization As A Repair Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groff, Roy E.; Maloney, Robert D.; Reeser, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Thin, hard oxide layer added to aluminum part. Surfaces on aluminum part worn out of tolerance by no more than 0.004 in. often repaired by anodizing to build up aluminum oxide layers. Oxide layers very hard and grounded to desired final dimensions.

  13. Electrochemical cell with calcium anode

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Hosmer, Pamela K.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1979-01-01

    An electrochemical cell comprising a calcium anode and a suitable cathode in an alkaline electrolyte consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of an hydroxide and a chloride. Specifically disclosed is a mechanically rechargeable calcium/air fuel cell with an aqueous NaOH/NaCl electrolyte.

  14. Influence of longitudinal argon flow on DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sha; Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Xu, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the influence of longitudinal argon flow on the DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. It is found that the charges exhibit distinct dynamic behaviors at different argon flow velocities, accompanied by a considerable change in the discharge structure. The positive argon flow allows for the reduction of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions, and even leads to the disappearance of negative glow. The negative argon flow gives rise to the enhancement of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions. These observations are attributed to the fact that the gas flow convection influences the transport of charges through different manners by comparing the argon flow velocity with the ion drift velocity. The findings are important for improving the chemical activity and work efficiency of the plasma source by controlling the gas flow in practical applications.

  15. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Glow Discharge Fine Particle Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Imazato, N.; Imano, M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2008-09-07

    Carbon fine particles were synthesized being negatively charged and confined in a glow discharge plasma. The deposited fine particles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and were confirmed to include single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  16. Glow discharge plasma treatment for surface cleaning and modification of metallic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Aronsson, B O; Lausmaa, J; Kasemo, B

    1997-04-01

    Glow discharge plasma treatment is a frequently used method for cleaning, preparation, and modification of biomaterial and implant surfaces. The merits of such treatments are, however, strongly dependent on the process parameters. In the present work the possibilities, limitations, and risks of plasma treatment for surface preparation of metallic materials are investigated experimentally using titanium as a model system, and also discussed in more general terms. Samples were treated by different low-pressure direct current plasmas and analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. The plasma system is a home-built, ultra-high vacuum-compatible system that allows sample introduction via a load-lock, and precise control of pressure, gas composition and flow rate, etc. This system allows uniform treatment of cylindrical and screw-shaped samples. With appropriate plasma parameters, argon plasma remove all chemical traces from former treatments (adsorbed contaminants and other impurities, and native oxide layers), in effect producing cleaner and more well-controlled surfaces than with conventional preparation methods. Removal (sputtering) rates up to 30 nm/min are possible. However, when inappropriate plasma parameters are used, the result may be increased contamination and formation of unintentional or undesired surface layers (e.g., carbides and nitrides). Plasma-cleaned surfaces provide a clean and reproducible starting condition for further plasma treatments to form well-controlled surface layers. Oxidation in pure O2 (thermally or in oxygen plasmas) results in uniform and stoichiometric TiO2 surface oxide layers of reproducible composition and thicknesses in the range 0.5-150 nm, as revealed by AES and XPS analyses. Titanium nitride layers were prepared by using N2 plasmas. While mild plasma treatments leave the surface microstructure unaffected

  17. Method for the production of fabricated hollow microspheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramanayake, Shan; Luebke, David R.

    2015-06-09

    The method relates to the fabrication of a polymer microspheres comprised of an asymmetric layer surrounding a hollow interior. The fabricated hollow microsphere is generated from a nascent hollow microsphere comprised of an inner core of core fluid surrounded by a dope layer of polymer dope, where the thickness of the dope layer is at least 10% and less than 50% of the diameter of the inner core. The nascent hollow microsphere is exposed to a gaseous environment, generating a vitrified hollow microsphere, which is subsequently immersed in a coagulation bath. Solvent exchange produces a fabricated hollow microsphere comprised of a densified outer skin surrounding a macroporous inner layer, which surrounds a hollow interior. In an embodiment, the polymer is a polyimide or a polyamide-imide, and the non-solvent in the core fluid and the coagulation bath is water. The fabricated hollow microspheres are particularly suited as solvent supports for gas separation processes.

  18. Optimization of the 3-Point Bending Failure of Anodized Aluminum Formed in Tartaric/Sulphuric Acid Using Doehlert Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensalah, W.; Feki, M.; De-Petris Wery, M.; Ayedi, H. F.

    2015-02-01

    The bending failure of anodized aluminum in tartaric/sulphuric acid bath was modeled using Doehlert design. Bath temperature, anodic current density, sulphuric acid, and tartaric acid concentrations were retained as variables. Thickness measurements and 3-point bending experiments were conducted. The deflection at failure ( D f) and the maximum load ( F m) of each sample were, then, deducted from the corresponding flexural responses. The treatment of experimental results has established mathematical models of second degree reflecting the relation of cause and effect between the factors and the studied properties. The optimum path study of thickness, deflection at failure, and maximum load, showed that the three optima were opposite. Multicriteria optimization using the desirability function was achieved in order to maximize simultaneously the three responses. The optimum conditions were: C tar = 18.2 g L-1, T = 17.3 °C, J = 2.37 A dm-2, C sul = 191 g L-1, while the estimated response values were e = 57.7 µm, D f = 5.6 mm, and F m = 835 N. Using the established models, a mathematical correlation was found between deflection at failure and thickness of the anodic oxide layer. Before bending tests, aluminum oxide layer was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy. After tests, the morphology and the composition of the anodic oxide layer were inspected by SEM, optical microscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy.

  19. Binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in glow discharge closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Scott R.; Christophorou, Loucas G.

    1990-01-01

    Highly efficient binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches are disclosed. The binary mixtures are combinations of helium or neon and selected perfluorides. The ternary mixtures are combinations of helium, neon, or argon, a selected perfluoride, and a small amount of gas that exhibits enhanced ionization characteristics. These mixtures are shown to be the optimum choices for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches by virtue of the combined physio-electric properties of the mixture components.

  20. 41-D crew briefings on use of camera for tail glow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Steve Mende briefs one of the 41-D mission specialists on the operation of a camera setup for tail glow observations (33844); Astronaut Steve A. Hawley, left is briefed by Mende on the 41-D tail glow experiment. Hawley is a mission specialist for the 41-D flight. They are examing the Nikon camera and other gear to be used in the experiment. The briefing was held in the mockup and integration lab (33845).

  1. Anode sheath transition in an anodic arc for synthesis of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The arc discharge with ablating anode or so-called anodic arc is widely used for synthesis of nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and fullerens, metal nanoparticles etc. We present the model of this arc, which confirms the existence of the two different modes of the arc operation with two different anode sheath regimes, namely, with negative anode sheath and with positive anode sheath. It was previously suggested that these regimes are associated with two different anode ablating modes—low ablation mode with constant ablation rate and the enhanced ablation mode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322). The transition of the arc operation from low ablation mode to high ablation mode is determined by the current density at the anode. The model can be used to self-consistently determine the distribution of the electric field, electron density and electron temperature in the near-anode region of the arc discharge. Simulations of the carbon arc predict that for low arc ablating modes, the current is driven mainly by the electron diffusion to the anode. For positive anode sheath, the anode voltage is close to the ionization potential of anode material, while for negative anode sheath, the anode voltage is an order of magnitude smaller. It is also shown that the near-anode plasma, is far from the ionization equilibrium.

  2. Effect of Test Parameters on the Friction Behaviour of Anodized Aluminium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Khalladi, A.; Elleuch, K.; De-Petris Wery, M.; Ayedi, H. F.

    2014-01-01

    The tribological behaviour of anodic oxide layer formed on Al5754, used in automotive applications, was investigated against test parameters. The friction coefficient under different normal loads, sliding speeds, and oxide thicknesses was studied using a pin on disc tribometer. Results show that the increase of load and sliding speed increase the friction coefficient. The rise of contact pressure and temperature seems to cause changes in wear mechanism. Glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to investigate the chemical composition of the oxide layer. Morphology and composition of the wear tracks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). On the basis of these characterization techniques, a wear mechanism was proposed. The observed mechanical properties can be related to the morphology and the chemical composition of the layer. PMID:27437452

  3. Hollow Silicon Nanostructures via the Kirkendall Effect.

    PubMed

    Son, Yoonkook; Son, Yeonguk; Choi, Min; Ko, Minseong; Chae, Sujong; Park, Noejung; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-10-14

    The Kirkendall effect is a simple, novel phenomenon that may be applied for the synthesis of hollow nanostructures with designed pore structures and chemical composition. We demonstrate the use of the Kirkendall effect for silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) nanowires (NWs) and nanoparticles (NPs) via introduction of nanoscale surface layers of SiO2 and GeO2, respectively. Depending on the reaction time, Si and Ge atoms gradually diffuse outward through the oxide layers, with pore formation in the nanostructural cores. Through the Kirkendall effect, NWs and NPs were transformed into nanotubes (NTs) and hollow NPs, respectively. The mechanism of the Kirkendall effect was studied via quantum molecular dynamics calculations. The hollow products demonstrated better electrochemical performance than their solid counterparts because the pores developed in the nanostructures resulted in lower external pressures during lithiation. PMID:26340592

  4. Polypyrrole hollow fiber for solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Deng, Jianjun; Xie, Zhuoying; Zhao, Yuanjin; Feng, Zhangqi; Kang, Xuejun; Gu, Zhongze

    2012-04-21

    We have developed a solid-phase extraction method based on conductive polypyrrole (PPy) hollow fibers which were fabricated by electrospinning and in situ polymerization. The electrospun poly (e-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers were employed as templates for the in situ surface polymerization of PPy under mechanical stirring or ultrasonication to obtain burr-shaped or smooth fiber shells, respectively. Hollow PPy fibers, achieved by removing the PCL templates, were the ideal sorbents for solid phase extraction of polar compounds due to their inherent multi-functionalities. By using the hollow PPy fibers, two important neuroendocrine markers of behavioural disorders, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid and homovanillic acid, were successfully extracted. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute recoveries of the above two neuroendocrine markers were 90.7% and 92.4%, respectively, in human plasma. Due to its simplicity, selectivity and sensitivity, the method may be applied to quantitatively analyse the concentrations of polar species in complex matrix samples. PMID:22398754

  5. Method of making a non-lead hollow point bullet

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Norman L.; Lowden, Richard A.

    2003-10-07

    The method of making a non-lead hollow point bullet has the steps of a) compressing an unsintered powdered metal composite core into a jacket, b) punching a hollow cavity tip portion into the core, c) seating an insert, the insert having a hollow point tip and a tail protrusion, on top of the core such that the tail protrusion couples with the hollow cavity tip portion, and d) swaging the open tip of the jacket.

  6. -Based Cermet Inert Anodes for Aluminum Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, ZhongLiang; Lai, YanQing; Li, ZhiYou; Chai, DengPeng; Li, Jie; Liu, YeXiang

    2014-11-01

    The new aluminum electrolysis technology based on inert electrodes has received much interest for several decades because of the environment and energy advantages. The key to realize this technique is the inert anode. This article presents China's recent developments of NiFe2O4-based cermet inert anodes, which include the optimization of material performance, the joint between the cermet inert anode and metallic bar, as well as the results of 20 kA pilot testing for a large-size inert anode group. The problems NiFe2O4-based cermet inert anodes face are also discussed.

  7. Template-free synthesis of hierarchical TiO2 hollow microspheres as scattering layer for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Yichuan; Wang, Linlin; Zhao, Jiachang; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang; Zhang, Qinghong; Xu, Jingli

    2016-04-01

    Hierarchical TiO2 hollow microspheres were synthesized by a 2-step process consisting of thermal hydrolysis and subsequent solvothermal reaction. Quasi-monodispersed solid TiO2 microspheres aggregated by amorphous particles were firstly obtained by the controlled thermal hydrolysis of titanium sulfate, and then the solid structures transformed to hollow ones and crystallized during the subsequent solvothermal treatment. SEM and TEM images of the samples revealed that the morphological evolution was in perfect accordance with the inside-out Ostwald ripening mechanism. The rich porosity and unique hierarchical hollow structure endow the TiO2 microspheres with a large specific surface area of 108.0 m2 g-1. As an effective anode material for dye-sensitized solar cells, TiO2 hollow microspheres showed good capability of dye adsorption and strong light scattering, leading to a comparable energy conversion efficiency to the commercial 18NR-T transparent titania. Finally, a high efficiency of 7.84% was achieved for the bi-layer DSSC by coating the hollow microspheres on top of the 18NR-T titania as the light scattering layer.

  8. Study of the glow curve structure of the minerals separated from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, S.; Ruiz Gurrola, B.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Tufiño, A.; Furetta, C.; Favalli, A.; Brown, F.

    2011-04-01

    The inorganic mineral fraction extracted from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) has been analysed using a thermoluminescence (TL) method, investigating the glow curve structure, including an evaluation of the kinetic parameters. Different grain sizes, i.e. 10, 74, and 149 μm, were selected from commercial black pepper. The X-ray diffraction of the inorganic fraction shows that quartz is the main mineral present in it. The samples were exposed to 1-25 kGy doses by gamma rays of 60Co in order to analyse the thermally stimulated luminescence response as a function of the delivered dose. The glow curves show a complex structure for different grain sizes of the pepper mineral samples. The fading of the TL signal at room temperature was obtained after irradiation, and it was observed that the maximum peaks of the glow curves shift towards higher values of the temperature when the elapsed time from irradiation increases. It seems that the fading characteristic may be related to a continuous trap distribution responsible for the complex structure of the glow curve. Similar glow curves structure behaviour was found under ultraviolet irradiation of the samples. The activation energy and the frequency factor were determined from the glow curves of different grain sizes using a deconvolution programme because of the evident complexity of the structure.

  9. Pine Hollow Watershed Project : FY 2000 Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District

    2001-06-01

    The Pine Hollow Project (1999-010-00) is an on-going watershed restoration effort administered by Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District and spearheaded by Pine Hollow/Jackknife Watershed Council. The headwaters are located near Shaniko in Wasco County, and the mouth is in Sherman County on the John Day River. Pine Hollow provides more than 20 miles of potential summer steelhead spawning and rearing habitat. The watershed is 92,000 acres. Land use is mostly range, with some dryland grain. There are no water rights on Pine Hollow. Due to shallow soils, the watershed is prone to rapid runoff events which scour out the streambed and the riparian vegetation. This project seeks to improve the quality of upland, riparian and in-stream habitat by restoring the natural hydrologic function of the entire watershed. Project implementation to date has consisted of construction of water/sediment control basins, gradient terraces on croplands, pasture cross-fences, upland water sources, and grass seeding on degraded sites, many of which were crop fields in the early part of the century. The project is expected to continue through about 2007. From March 2000 to June 2001, the Pine Hollow Project built 6 sediment basins, 1 cross-fence, 2 spring developments, 1 well development, 1 solar pump, 50 acres of native range seeding and 1 livestock waterline. FY2000 projects were funded by BPA, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, US Fish and Wildlife Service and landowners. In-kind services were provided by Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDI Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pine Hollow/Jackknife Watershed Council, landowners and Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District.

  10. Pulsed electromagnetic gas accelleration. [incorporation of hollow cathode in plasma discharge and suitability determination of MPD discharge as plasmadynamic laser source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Direct measurement with thermocouples of the power deposited in the anode of a multi-megawatt magnetoplasmadynamic discharge has shown the fractional anode power to decrease from 50% at 200 kW to 10% at 20 MW. Using local measurements of current density, electric potential, and electron temperature, the traditional model for heat conduction to the anode is found to be inadequate. Other experiments in which the voltage-current characteristics and exhaust velocities of MPD arcs using Plexiglas and boron nitride chamber insulators and various mass injection configurations show that ablation can affect nominal accelerator operation in several distinct ways. The incorporation of a hollow cathode in a 7 kA plasma discharge has shown that a stable current attachment can be realized in the cavity without the aid of cathode heaters, keeper electrodes, or emissive coatings.

  11. Hollow needle used to cut metal honeycomb structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, E. A.

    1966-01-01

    Hollow needle tool cuts metal honeycomb structures without damaging adjacent material. The hollow needle combines an electrostatic discharge and a stream of oxygen at a common point to effect rapid, accurate metal cutting. The tool design can be varied to use the hollow needle principle for cutting a variety of shapes.

  12. Plastic Hollow Tubes As Waveguides For IR Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, N.; Dror, J.; Mendlovic, D.

    1988-06-01

    A theoretical ray model was developed for energy distribution of IR radiation, transmitted through hollow straight and bent fibers. The theoretical results were compared with the experimental data obtained from measurements of our plastic hollow fibers. A satisfactory agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was achieved. Application of the plastic hollow fibers in surgery (on certain organic tissues) is described.

  13. [Vernier Anode Design and Image Simulation].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ai-rong; Ni, Qi-liang; Song, Ke-fei

    2015-12-01

    Based-MCP position-sensitive anode photon-counting imaging detector is good at detecting extremely faint light, which includes micro-channel plate (MCP), position-sensitive anode and readout, and the performances of these detectors are mainly decided by the position-sensitive anode. As a charge division anode, Vernier anode using cyclically varying electrode areas which replaces the linearly varying electrodes of wedge-strip anode can get better resolution and greater electrode dynamic range. Simulation and design of the Vernier anode based on Vernier's decode principle are given here. Firstly, we introduce the decode and design principle of Vernier anode with nine electrodes in vector way, and get the design parameters which are the pitch, amplitude and the coarse wavelength of electrode. Secondly, we analyze the effect of every design parameters to the imaging of the detector. We simulate the electron cloud, the Vernier anode and the detector imaging using Labview software and get the relationship between the pitch and the coarse wavelength of the anode. Simultaneously, we get the corresponding electron cloud for the designing parameters. Based on the result of the simulation and the practical machining demand, a nine electrodes Vernier anode was designed and fabricated which has a pitch of 891 µm, insulation width of 25 µm, amplitude of 50 µm, coarse pixel numbers of 5. PMID:26964205

  14. Anode power in quasisteady magnetoplasmadynamic accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saber, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Anode heat flux in a quasi-steady MPD accelerator has been measured directly and locally by thermocouples attached to the inside surface of a shell anode. These measurements show that over a range of arc current from 5.5 to 44 kA, and argon mass flow from 1 to 48 g/s, the fraction of the total arc power deposited in the anode decreases from 50% at 200 kW to 10% at 20 MW. A theoretical model of the anode heat transfer asserts that energy exchange between electrons and heavy particles in the plasma near the anode occurs over distances greater than the anode sheath thickness, and hence the usual anode fall voltage, electron temperature, and work function contributions to the anode heat flux are supplemented by a contribution from the interelectrode potential. Calculations of anode heat flux using the measured current density, plasma potential, and electron temperature in the plasma adjacent to the anode agree with the direct measurements and indicate that the decrease in anode power fraction at higher arc powers can be attributed to the smaller mean free paths in the interelectrode plasma.

  15. Anodes for cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Bullard; B.S. Covino, Jr.; S.D. Cramer; G.R. Holcomb; J.H. Russell

    2000-03-01

    Consumable anodes were evaluated in the laboratory for use in cathodic protection systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments and in areas where de-icing salts are employed. The anode materials include Zn-hydrogel and thermal-sprayed Zn, Zn-15Al, and Al-12Zn-0.2In. These anodes were evaluated for service in both galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) cathodic protection systems. ICCP anodes were electrochemically aged at a factor of 15 times greater than used by the Oregon Department of Transportation in typical coastal ICCP systems (2.2 mA/m{sup 2} based on anode area). Increasing moisture at the anode-concrete interface reduced the operating voltage of all the anodes. The pH at the anode-concrete interface fell to 7 to 8.5 with electrochemical age. Bond strength between the anodes and concrete decreased with electrochemical aging. Interfacial chemistry was the critical link between long-term anode performance and electrochemical age. Zn-hydrogel and the rmal-sprayed Zn and Al-12Zn-0.2In GCP anodes appear to supply adequate protection current to rebar in the Cape Perpetua Viaduct.

  16. A hollow cathode hydrogen ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    High current density ion sources have been used to heat plasmas in controlled thermonuclear reaction experiments. High beam currents imply relatively high emission currents from cathodes which have generally taken the form of tungsten filaments. A hydrogen ion source is described which was primarily developed to assess the emission current capability and design requirements for hollow cathodes for application in neutral injection devices. The hydrogen source produced ions by electron bombardment via a single hollow cathode. Source design followed mercury ion thruster technology, using a weak magnetic field to enhance ionization efficiency.

  17. Mass balancing of hollow fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielb, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A typical section model is used to analytically investigate the effect of mass balancing as applied to hollow, supersonic fan blades. A procedure to determine the best configuration of an internal balancing mass to provide flutter alleviation is developed. This procedure is applied to a typical supersonic shroudless fan blade which is unstable in both the solid configuration and when it is hollow with no balancing mass. The addition of an optimized balancing mass is shown to stabilize the blade at the design condition.

  18. Stabilized Hollow Ions Extracted in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Azuma, T.; Komaki, K.; Koike, F.; Masuda, H.; Kuroki, K.; Sekiguchi, M.

    1997-06-01

    K x rays emitted from 2.1 keV/uN{sup 6+} ions passed through a thin Ni microcapillary foil were measured in coincidence with the exit charge states. Ions with a K hole but with several electrons in outershells, i.e., hollow ions formed above a surface (in the first generation), were successfully extracted in vacuum. It was found that a considerable fraction of extracted hollow ions had extremely long lifetimes of the order of ns. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Fabrication of advanced design (grooved) cermet anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windisch, C. F., Jr.; Huettig, F. R.

    1993-05-01

    Attempts were made to fabricate full-size anodes with advanced, or grooved, design using isostatic pressing, slip casting injection molding. Of the three approaches, isostatic pressing produced an anode with dimensions nearest to the target specifications, without serious macroscopic flaws. This approach is considered the most promising for making advanced anodes for aluminum smelting. However, significant work still remains to optimize the physical properties and microstructure of the anode, both of which were significantly different from that of previous anodes. Injection molding and slip casting yielded anode materials with serious deficiencies, including cracks and holes. Injection molding gave cermet material with the best intrinsic microstructure, i.e., the microstructure of the material between macroscopic flaws was very similar to that of anodes previously made at PNL. The reason for the similarity may have to do with amount of residual binder in the material prior to sintering.

  20. Fabrication of advanced design (grooved) cermet anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Huettig, F.R.

    1993-05-01

    Attempts were made to fabricate full-size anodes with advanced, or grooved, design using isostatic pressing, slip casting injection molding. Of the three approaches, isostatic pressing produced an anode with dimensions nearest to the target specifications, without serious macroscopic flaws. This approach is considered the most promising for making advanced anodes for aluminum smelting. However, significant work still remains to optimize the physical properties and microstructure of the anode, both of which were significantly different from that of previous anodes. Injection molding and slip casting yielded anode materials with serious deficiencies, including cracks and holes. Injection molding gave cermet material with the best intrinsic microstructure, i.e., the microstructure of the material between macroscopic flaws was very similar to that of anodes previously made at PNL. Reason for the similarity may have to do with amount of residual binder in the material prior to sintering.