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Sample records for holmium silicates

  1. High-pressure synthesis and single-crystal structure refinement of gadolinium holmium silicate hydroxyapatite Gd{sub 4.33}Ho{sub 4.33}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chao; Liu Xiaoyang . E-mail: liuxy@jlu.edu.cn; Fleet, M.E.; Feng, Shouhua; Xu Ruren

    2006-07-15

    Single crystals of gadolinium holmium silicate hydroxyapatite Gd{sub 4.33}Ho{sub 4.33}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} have been synthesized at 2.0GPa and 1450 deg. C using a piston-cylinder-type high-pressure apparatus. The crystal symmetry by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis is hexagonal, space group P6{sub 3}/m (No. 176), with a=9.3142(5)A, c=6.7010(4)A, Z=1. Gadolinium and Ho are disordered over the two large cation positions, A(1) and A(2), and charge balance in this silicate apatite is maintained by cation vacancies in A(1). Two other apatite-structure crystals investigated have P3-bar and Imma symmetry, and represent either partially ordered Gd-Ho distributions or crystal strain induced during quenching.

  2. Holmium laser pumped with a neodymium laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.R.; Rabinovich, W.S.

    1991-07-30

    This patent describes a solid-state laser device. It comprises a holmium laser having a first host material doped with an amount of holmium ions sufficient to produce an output laser emission at about 3 {mu}m when the holmium ions in the holmium laser are pumped by a pump beam at a wavelength of about 1.1 {mu}m; and neodymium laser pump source means for supplying a pump beam to pump the holmium ions in the holmium laser at a wavelength of about 1.1 {mu}m.

  3. Metals fact sheet: Holmium/thulium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This article discusses the geology, exploitation, market, and applications of holmium and thulium. Holmium and thulium are important part in the development of specific laser technologies, x-ray film and high-temperature superconductors.

  4. Magnetic structure of holmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechan, M. J.; Stassis, C.

    1984-03-01

    The magnetic structure of high purity single crystals of holmium has been studied by neutron diffraction techniques. Although the general characteristics of the magnetic structure have been found to agree with earlier measurements, some discrepancies have been resolved and new features have been observed. The magnetic form factor has been measured and compared with relativistic atomic calculations. The low temperature structure (T<20 K) is that of a conical ferromagnet with wave vector (1/6)(2π/c) along the c axis. The basal plane moment is 9.7 μB and the c-axis ferromagnetic component is 1.6 μB at T=6 K. Bunching of the basal plane moments around the easy hexagonal direction has been observed below T=50 K. Evidence for asphericity in the magnetization density is presented and discussed. The wave vector of the basal plane modulation decreases monotonically with temperature in general accordance with the Elliott-Wedgewood theory. Several inflection points were observed, however, which correspond to commensurability with the chemical lattice. The measured temperature dependence of the c- and a-axis lattice constants shows significant magnetostriction. The possibility of a c-axis modulated moment is discussed.

  5. Early complications with the holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Stewart, Steven C.; Ruckle, Herbert C.; Poon, Michael W.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to report early complications in our initial experience with the holmium laser in 133 patients. A retrospective study of patients undergoing endourological procedures with the holmium laser was performed. Complications included urinary tract infection (3), post-operative bradycardia (1), inverted T-waves (1), intractable flank pain (1), urinary retention (1), inability to access a lower pole calyx with a 365 micron fiber (9), stone migration (5), termination of procedure due to poor visualization (2). No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred. The holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. In our initial experience, the holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of genitourinary pathology. Use of laser fibers larger than 200 microns occasionally limit deflection into a lower pole or dependent calyx.

  6. Holmium:YAG surgical lasers.

    PubMed

    1995-03-01

    "Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG)" is the shorthand name for a family of solid-state lasers that use the doping element holmium in a laser crystal (e.g., YAG [yttrium-aluminum-garnet]) and that emit energy at approximately 2.1 microns. This wavelength is relatively new to medicine and has been used in laser surgery for only about the last six years. Like the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser when it was first used clinically, the Ho:YAG laser is poised for rapid and wide-spread use. Ho:YAG lasers, like CO2 lasers, offer precise cutting with minimal damage to adjacent tissue; however, unlike CO2 lasers, they also offer fiberoptic delivery (which is ideal for endoscopic use) and the ability to treat tissue in a liquid-filled environment (e.g., saline, blood). The initial specialty for which the Ho:YAG laser was used was arthroscopic surgery, especially diskectomy. Today, it is effectively used in many surgical specialties, including general surgery, urology, laparoscopy, neurosurgery, lithotripsy, angioplasty, orthopedic surgery (which includes procedures such as meniscectomy, bone sculpting [may also be performed in plastic surgery], and some experimental surgery, such as cartilage shrinking to tighten loose joints), and dentistry. Because of its broad range of potential applications, it has been called the "Swiss Army Knife" of lasers. High-powered Ho:YAG lasers, which enable surgeons to work more quickly and cut more smoothly, have been made available only within the last three years (units offering > 20 W) to 18 months (units offering > 60 W). Because of this rapid increase, high-powered units are still relatively expensive, and it is not yet clear whether maximum power outputs will continue to increase or whether the cost of higher-power units will begin to come down. Although low-power and high-power Ho:YAG lasers can be used for the same procedures, their different ranges of possible clinical techniques make them better suited to different applications: low-power units are

  7. Electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Yu M

    2000-06-30

    The electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms was studied by the method of extended crossing beams. The cross sections and the optical excitation functions were obtained for odd levels of Ho I, including the 22014 cm{sup -1} laser level. Over 99% of the atoms were shown to reside in the ground level prior to collisions with electrons. Also measured were the excitation cross sections for six even levels, which presumably participate in the formation of inversion population in a gas-discharge holmium vapour laser. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Spectrum of the holmium atom arising from bombardment of a tantalum surface by holmium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vasileva, E.K.; Morozov, S.N.

    1986-12-01

    The ion--photon emission spectrum of holmium has been recorded and investigated. It is shown that the appearance of so-called continuous radiation (CR) is due to excitation of the lower triplet system of terms.

  9. Holmium laser lithotripsy of bladder calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.

    1998-07-01

    Although the overall incidence of bladder calculi has been decreasing, it is still a significant disease affecting adults and children. Prior treatment options have included open cystolitholapaxy, blind lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and visual lithotripsy with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes. The holmium laser has been found to be extremely effective in the treatment of upper tract calculi. This technology has also been applied to the treatment of bladder calculi. We report our experience with the holmium laser in the treatment of bladder calculi. Twenty- five patients over a year and a half had their bladder calculi treated with the Holmium laser. This study was retrospective in nature. Patient demographics, stone burden, and intraoperative and post-operative complications were noted. The mean stone burden was 31 mm with a range of 10 to 60 mm. Preoperative diagnosis was made with either an ultrasound, plain film of the abdomen or intravenous pyelogram. Cystoscopy was then performed to confirm the presence and determine the size of the stone. The patients were then taken to the operating room and given a regional or general anesthetic. A rigid cystoscope was placed into the bladder and the bladder stone was then vaporized using the holmium laser. Remaining fragments were washed out. Adjunctive procedures were performed on 10 patients. These included transurethral resection of the prostate, transurethral incision of the prostate, optic internal urethrotomy, and incision of ureteroceles. No major complications occurred and all patients were rendered stone free. We conclude that the Holmium laser is an effective and safe modality for the treatment of bladder calculi. It was able to vaporize all bladder calculi and provides a single modality of treating other associated genitourinary pathology.

  10. Percutaneous holmium laser fulguration of calyceal diverticula.

    PubMed

    Alwaal, Amjad; Azhar, Raed A; Andonian, Sero

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Calyceal diverticular stones are uncommon findings that represent a challenge in their treatment, due to the technical difficulty in accessing the diverticulum, and the high risk of their recurrence. Current percutaneous technique for calyceal diverticular stones involves establishing a renal access, clearing the stone, and fulguration of the diverticular lining with a roller-ball cautery electrode using hypotonic irrigation solution such as sterile water or glycine solution which may be associated with the absorption of hypotonic fluids with its inherent electrolyte disturbances. Case Report. In this paper, we present for the first time percutaneous holmium laser fulguration of calyceal diverticula in 2 patients using normal saline. Their immediate postoperative sodium was unchanged and their follow-up imaging showed absence of stones. Both patients remain asymptomatic at 30 months post-operatively. Conclusion. This demonstrates that holmium laser is a safe alternative method to fulgurate the calyceal diverticulum after clearing the stone percutaneously. PMID:22606636

  11. Holmium laser for multifunctional use in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Graham M.; Shroff, Sunil; Thomas, Robert; Kellett, Michael

    1994-05-01

    The holmium laser pulsed at 350 microsecond cuts tissue and fragments calculi. It has been assessed for minimally invasive urological intervention. It is useful for partly excising and partly coagulating tumors, incising strictures and the obstructed PUJ. It partly drill and partly fragments urinary calculi however hard. Other lasers are more effective at any one particular application, but this laser is a useful compromise as a multifunctional device.

  12. Semiconductor disk laser-pumped subpicosecond holmium fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorovskiy, A Yu; Marakulin, A V; Leinonen, T; Kurkov, Andrei S; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2012-01-31

    The first passively mode-locked holmium fibre laser has been demonstrated, with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) as a mode locker. Semiconductor disk lasers have been used for the first time to pump holmium fibre lasers. We obtained 830-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 34 MHz with an average output power of 6.6 mW.

  13. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  14. Holmium fibre laser with record quantum efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Tsvetkov, V B; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A; Medvedkov, O I; Kosolapov, A F

    2011-06-30

    We report holmium-doped fibre lasers with a Ho{sup 3+} concentration of 1.6 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and lasing wavelengths of 2.02, 2.05, 2.07 and 2.1 {mu}m at a pump wavelength of 1.15 {mu}m. The slope efficiency of the lasers has been measured. The maximum efficiency, 0.455, has been obtained at a lasing wavelength of 2.05 {mu}m. The laser efficiency is influenced by both the optical loss in the wing of a vibrational absorption band of silica and active-ion clustering. (lasers)

  15. Holmium: YAG laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Bukala, B; Denstedt, J D

    1999-04-01

    The holmium laser is a relatively new multipurpose medical laser that recently became available for use in urology. There has been considerable interest in this device, as it seems to combine the cutting properties of the carbon dioxide laser with the coagulating properties of the neodymium:YAG laser, making it particularly appealing for many surgical applications. The last decade has seen enthusiasm for the use of laser energy for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this article, we review the technique of Ho:YAG laser resection of the prostate, including the essential equipment and perioperative patient care. PMID:10360503

  16. Holmium laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, K; Iida, S; Tomiyasu, K; Shimada, A; Suekane, S; Noda, S

    1998-06-01

    A total of 35 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were treated with the Ho: YAG laser using a new technique termed holmium laser resection of the prostate or HoLRP. The laser energy was applied directly to prostatic tissue exclusively through the use of a standard 550 micron end-firing fiber. A high-powered holmium laser was used and was set at 2.4 J per pulse at 25 pulses per second for an average power of 60 W. The mean preoperative AUA Symptom Score was 24. Postoperatively, the score dropped to 10.9, 8.2, 5.2, and 4.6 at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively. The peak urine flow rate improved from 6.3 mL/sec preoperatively to 15.1, 15.3 and 16 mL/sec at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. A foley catheter was removed within 24 hours of completion of the operation in 31 patients (89%), and voiding was improved. The HoLRP technique was bloodless, and the short-term results were satisfactory. Most importantly, the defect produced by HoLRP is identical to that of a conventional transurethral resection. These initial results demonstrate that HoLRP is a useful surgical alternative in the treatment of patients with obstructive BPH. PMID:9658303

  17. Perspectives of holmium laser resection of the prostate: cutting effects with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenauer, Rolf H.; Droege, Gerit; Brinkmann, Ralf; Neuss, Malte; Gafumbegete, Evariste; Jocham, Dieter

    1998-07-01

    Laser prostatectomy shows an improvement in peak urinary flow rates, in post-void residual urine volumes and also a symptomatic improvement when compared to the transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P). Time to achieve symptomatic improvement is delayed with many established laser procedures compared to standard resection. However, this disadvantage can be solved with a new resection technique using a pulsed holmium laser. Nevertheless, this advanced technique shows a few problems in a first clinical trial. Besides this clinical study, in vitro experiments were carried out in order to determine the optimal irradiation parameters with respect to resection rate, incision/ablation quality and handling. Prostate tissue of radical prostatectomies and chicken breast as model were irradiated with a pulsed holmium-laser in vitro with different laser parameters using a bare fiber in contact to tissue. The incision quality (depths and coagulation/vaporization effects) was analyzed with regard to pulse energy (speed of incision, angle of incision) and fiber diameter. Fast flash photography was performed to analyze thermo-mechanical side-effects. Fast flash photography reveals cavitation bubble up to 7 mm length in water and dissections in tissue. The ablation rate increases proportional to the laser pulse energy. The Holmium Laser Resection of the Prostate (HOLRP) in humans with available instrumentation right now shows equieffective results compared to the transurethral resection, no need for transfusion, no transurethral resection syndrome, short time for catheterization. Further technical approvement may significantly improve holmium laser prostate resection. We present a new application system for the laser resection.

  18. Magneto-optical trapping of holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, J.; Hostetter, J.; Stratis, G.; Saffman, M.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate sub-Doppler laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the rare-earth element holmium. Atoms are loaded from an atomic beam source and captured in six-beam σ+-σ- molasses using a strong J =15/2↔J=17/2 cycling transition at λ =410.5 nm. Due to the small difference in hyperfine splittings and Landé g factors in the lower and upper levels of the cooling transition the MOT is self-repumped without additional repump light, and deep sub-Doppler cooling is achieved with the magnetic trap turned on. We measure the leakage out of the cycling transition to metastable states and find a branching ratio <10-5, which is adequate for state-resolved measurements on hyperfine encoded qubits.

  19. Midline Prostatic Cyst Marsupialization Using Holmium Laser.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Mehmet; Goger, Yunus Emre; Piskin, Mesut; Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Many of the prostatic cysts are asymptomatic and only 5% are symptomatic (Hamper et al., 1990; Higashi et al., 1990). These symptoms include pelvic pain, hematospermia, infertility, voiding dysfunction, prostatitis-like syndrome, and painful ejaculation. Treatment of prostatic cysts includes TRUSG guided drainage, endoscopic transurethral resection, and in some cases even open surgery. In the literature, endoscopic interventions use marsupialization of the midline prostatic cyst with transurethral resection (TUR) or transurethral incision with endoscopic urethrotomy (Dik et al., 1996; Terris, 1995). Holmium: YAG laser was employed for the marsupialization of the cyst wall in midline prostatic cyst treatment for the first time in the present study. Symptoms, treatment, and follow-up are presented in this paper. PMID:26101688

  20. Midline Prostatic Cyst Marsupialization Using Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Mehmet; Goger, Yunus Emre; Piskin, Mesut; Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Many of the prostatic cysts are asymptomatic and only 5% are symptomatic (Hamper et al., 1990; Higashi et al., 1990). These symptoms include pelvic pain, hematospermia, infertility, voiding dysfunction, prostatitis-like syndrome, and painful ejaculation. Treatment of prostatic cysts includes TRUSG guided drainage, endoscopic transurethral resection, and in some cases even open surgery. In the literature, endoscopic interventions use marsupialization of the midline prostatic cyst with transurethral resection (TUR) or transurethral incision with endoscopic urethrotomy (Dik et al., 1996; Terris, 1995). Holmium: YAG laser was employed for the marsupialization of the cyst wall in midline prostatic cyst treatment for the first time in the present study. Symptoms, treatment, and follow-up are presented in this paper. PMID:26101688

  1. Quantum state control of trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James; Yip, Christopher; Milner, William; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey; Saffman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Neutral Holmium with its large number of hyperfine ground states provides a promising approach for collective encoding of a multi-qubit register. A prerequisite for collective encoding is the ability to prepare different states in the 128 state hyperfine ground manifold. We report progress towards optical pumping and control of the hyperfine Zeeman state of trapped Ho atoms. Atoms are transferred from a 410.5 nm MOT into a 455 nm optical dipole trap. The atoms can be optically pumped using light driving the ground 6s2 , F = 11 to 6 s 6 p ,F' = 11 transition together with a F = 10 to F' = 11 repumper. Microwave fields are then used to drive transitions to hyperfine levels with 4 <= F <= 11 . Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  2. Delayed stimulated afterglow from holmium ions in crystals with coactivators

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, M.V.; Tkachuk, A.M.

    1980-12-01

    Delayed stimulated afterglow from holmium ions in ..cap alpha beta..-SrF/sub 2/-YF/sub 3/ crystals was observed and investigated. This took the form of several series of emission spikes separated by dark intervals after the action of a single pump pulse. The effect is attributed to some features of the mechanism for population of the upper active level of the lasing holmium ion in the presence of sensitizer ions. It is found that in order to observe the effect, the system must incorporate a metastable level from which energy transfer to the active level provides an independent ''additional pumping'' system for the holmium ions acting over times much longer than the pump pulse duration.

  3. Use of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Stefano

    1997-12-01

    The Holmium-YAG is a versatile laser with multiple soft- tissue applications including tissue incision and vaporization, and pulsed-laser applications such as lithotripsy. At 2140 nanometers, the wavelength is highly absorbed by tissue water. Further, like CO2 laser, the Holmium produces immediate tissue vaporization while minimizing deep thermal damage to surrounding tissues. It is an excellent instrument for endopyelotomy, internal urethrotomy, bladder neck incisions and it can be used to resect the prostate. The Holmium creates an acute TUR defect which gives immediate results like the TURP. More than 50 patients were treated from Jan. 1996 to Jan. 1997 for obstructive symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, bladder neck stricture, urethral stenosis, and superficial bladder tumors.

  4. High gain holmium-doped fibre amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Nikita; Li, Zhihong; Jung, Yongmin; Daniel, Jae M O; Barua, Pranabesh; Shardlow, Peter C; Liang, Sijing; Sahu, Jayanta K; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W Andrew; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Richardson, David J

    2016-06-27

    We investigate the operation of holmium-doped fibre amplifiers (HDFAs) in the 2.1 µm spectral region. For the first time we demonstrate a diode-pumped HDFA. This amplifier provides a peak gain of 25 dB at 2040 nm with a 15 dB gain window spanning the wavelength range 2030 - 2100 nm with an external noise figure (NF) of 4-6 dB. We also compare the operation of HDFAs when pumped at 1950 nm and 2008 nm. The 1950 nm pumped HDFA provides 41 dB peak gain at 2060 nm with 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2120 nm and an external NF of 7-10 dB. By pumping at the longer wavelength of 2008 nm the gain bandwidth of the amplifier is shifted to longer wavelengths and using this architecture a HDFA was demonstrated with a peak gain of 39 dB at 2090 nm and 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2150 nm. The external NF over this wavelength range was 8-14 dB. PMID:27410557

  5. Holmium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Hossain, A Z M Z; Khan, S A; Hossain, S; Salam, M A

    2004-08-01

    A prospective cross-sectional study was carried-out in the department of urology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) to evaluate the outcome of Laser urethrotomy for the treatment of urethral stricture. For this purpose, 30 male patients aged 15 to 60 years with short segment anterior urethral stricture (>2cm) were treated by HO:YAG Laser. The energy used for this purpose was 0.8 to 1.5 joules by LISA 80 Watt Holmium Laser machine. All patients were catheterized for less than 24 hours and were followed up for 6 to 12 months postoperatively by uroflowmetry and by retrograde with voiding cystourethrogram 3 monthly. The study revealed that out of 30 patients, 27(90%) showed good flow of urine (Qave>16.0 ml/sec) and adequate caliber urethra in retrograde urethrogram (RGU). Only 3(10%) patients showed narrow stream of urine (Qave<8.0 ml/sec) and recurrent stricture in RGU which were managed by optical internal urethrotomy (OIU) and clean intermittent self catheterization (CISC). The study showed satisfactory results in 90% cases with short term follow up. The study concludes that HO:YAG Laser urethrotomy for the treatment of short segment urethral stricture is highly effective. The study further reveals that the method is simple, safe and thus, it can be considered favorably as a new therapeutic option for the treatment of urethral stricture. However, long term follow up is necessary for making a final comment on this issue. PMID:15813486

  6. Holmium:YAG laser stapedotomy: preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubig, Ingrid M.; Reder, Paul A.; Facer, G. W.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-07-01

    This study investigated the use of a pulsed Holmium:YAG ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) laser- fiber microsurgical system for laser stapedotomy. This system ablates human stapes bones effectively with minimal thermal damage. The study was designed to determine the effectiveness of the Ho:YAG laser (Schwartz Electro Optics, Inc., Orlando, FL) for stapedotomy and to evaluate temperature changes within the cochlea during the ablation process. Human cadaveric temporal bones were obtained and the stapes portion of the ossicular chain was removed. A 200 micrometers diameter low OH quartz fiber was used to irradiate these stapes bones in an air environment. The laser was pulsed at 2 Hz, 250 microsecond(s) ec pulse width and an irradiance range of 100 - 240 J/cm2 was used to ablate holes in the stapes footplate. The resultant stapedotomies created had smooth 300 micrometers diameter holes with a minimum of circumferential charring. Animal studies in-vivo were carried out in chinchillas to determine the caloric spread within the cochlea. A 0.075 mm Type T thermocouple was placed in the round window. Average temperature change during irradiation of the stapes footplate recorded in the round window was 3.6 degree(s)C. The data suggest that stapedotomy using the Ho:YAG laser can result in a controlled ablation of the stapes footplate with minimal thermal damage to the surrounding stapes. Optical coupling using fiberoptic silica fibers is an ideal method for delivering laser energy to the stapes during stapedotomy.

  7. Gain and energy storage in holmium YLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.; Deyst, John P.

    1991-01-01

    It is demonstrated that Q-switched holmium lasers are capable of high-gain and high-energy operation at 300 K. Small-signal gain coefficients of 0.50 and 0.12/cm have been measured in YLF and YAG, respectively. Small-signal gains of 0.50/cm are comparable to those achievable in Nd:YAG and are not typical of low-gain materials. This large gain in the Ho:YLF material is made possible by operating the amplifier in the ground state depletion mode. The amplifier performance data and associated analysis presented demonstrate that efficient energy storage is possible with very high excited state ion densities of the Ho 5I7 upper laser level. This is an important result since upconversion can limit the 5I7 population. Although upconversion was still present in this experiment, it was possible to achieve efficient energy storage, demonstrating that the problem is manageable even at high excitation densities in YLF.

  8. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Patients who sustain complicated acute myocardial infarction in whom thrombolytic agents either fail or are contraindicated often need mechanical revascularization other than PTCA. In 24 patients with acute infarction complicated by continuous chest pain and ischemia who either received lytics or with contraindication to lytics, a holmium:YAG laser (Eclipse Surgical Technologies, Palo Alto, CA) was utilized for thrombolysis and plaque ablation. Clinical success was achieved in 23/24 patients, with 23 patients (94%) surviving the acute infarction. Holmium:YAG laser is very effective and safe in thrombolysis and revascularization in this complicated clinical setting.

  9. Solvent extraction studies of holmium with acidic extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Gaikwad, A.G.; Damodaran, A.D. )

    1993-03-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction studies of holmium with 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester, naphthenic, and Versatic 10 acids have been carried out. The nature of the extracted species and the extraction equilibrium constants of these systems have been determined from aqueous nitrate solution. The extraction mechanism and complexation models have been proposed. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Spectral performance of monolithic holmium and thulium lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.

    1991-01-01

    Fabry-Perot resonators have been used to demonstrate single-mode lasing of holmium and neodymium YAG. The previous demonstration in the holmium laser required TE cooling the crystal to -15 C in order to achieve threshold. The present study extends that result, demonstrating +25 C operation in a 1-mm thick plano/plano resonator. The experimental configuration of lasing both the holmium and thulium lasers used a 500-mW diode laser which was collimated, circularized, and focused into a beam radius of 60 microns. The single-frequency lasing spectrum of the holmium laser is shown. By adjusting the mirror reflectivity, the ability to control the laser's wavelength is demonstrated. This laser operated with 11 mW of optical power, a 57-percent slope efficiency, and 120-mW threshold vs absorbed diode power laser for the 60-micron beam radius. The thulium laser operated very efficiently at room temperature, but on seven longitudinal modes. The Tm:TAG laser exhibits typical characteristics of spatial hole burning not seen in the Ho:Tm:YAG for flat/flat resonators.

  11. Percutaneous laser disc decompression with the holmium: YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Casper, G D; Hartman, V L; Mullins, L L

    1995-06-01

    This article discusses the evolution of the percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) method using a holmium:YAG laser. Advantages of using this wavelength and several techniques for its use in PLDD are reviewed. The article also discusses the current devices and delivery systems available for this application. PMID:10150646

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and neutron activation of holmium metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Cagle, D.W.; Thrash, T.P.; Wilson, L.J.; Alford, M.; Chibante, L.P.F.; Ehrhardt, G.J.

    1996-08-28

    Isolation of the first macroscopic quantities of endohedral holmium metallofullerenes (principally Ho@C{sub 82}, Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} by LD-TOF mass spectrometry) has been accomplished by carbon-arc and preparative HPLC methodologies. The detailed procedure for production and isolation of the metallofullerenes includes a new technique whereby holmium-impregnated electrodes are prepared simply by soaking porous graphite rods in an ethanolic solution of Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.xH{sub 2}O. Monoisotopic {sup 165}Ho offers a unique combination of advantages for neutron-activation studies of metallofullerenes, and purified samples containing {sup 165}Ho@C{sub 82}, {sup 165}Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and {sup 165}Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} have been activated by high-flux neutron irradiation ({Phi} = 4 x 10{sup 13}n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) to generate {sup 166}Ho metallofullerenes, which undergo {beta}{sup -} decay to produce stable {sup 166}Er. Chemical workup of the irradiated samples, followed by re-irradiation, has been used to demonstrate that observed decomposition of holmium metallofullerenes is due mainly to `fast` neutron damage rather than to holmium atom nuclear recoil (E{sub max} = 200 eV). This implies that metallofullerene damage can be minimized by using neutron fluxes with the highest possible thermal component. 60 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Discovery of dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, and ytterbium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-09-15

    Currently, thirty-one dysprosium, thirty-two holmium, thirty-two erbium, thirty-three thulium, and thirty-one ytterbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Hemangioma of the prostatic urethra: holmium laser treatment.

    PubMed

    de León, Javier Ponce; Arce, Jacobo; Gausa, Luís; Villavicencio, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    Urethral hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors that are found in perimontanal prostatic localization and less frequently in the urethra. Although different urethral procedures have been postulated for its treatment, the best results are achieved using lasers. A patient who underwent endoscopic holmium laser treatment for such hemangiomas is presented. Total disappearance of the lesions without any complications was achieved. PMID:18204245

  15. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  16. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  17. Silicate volcanism on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the nature of volcanic eruptions on Io, taking into account questions regarding the presence of silicates or sulfur as principal component. Attention is given to the generation of silicate magma, the viscous dissipation in the melt zone, thermal anomalies at eruption sites, and Ionian volcanism. According to the information available about Io, it appears that its volcanism and hence its surface materials are dominantly silicic. Several percent of volatile materials such as sulfur, but also including sodium- and potassium-rich materials, may also be present. The volatile materials at the surface are continually vaporized and melted as a result of the high rates of silicate volcanism.

  18. Resonance ionization of holmium for ion implantation in microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Chrysalidis, K.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Haas, R.; Kieck, T.; Mokry, C.; Naubereit, P.; Schmidt, S.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    The determination of the electron neutrino mass by calorimetric measurement of the 163 Ho electron capture spectrum requires ultra-pure samples. Several collaborations, like ECHo or HOLMES, intend to employ microcalorimeters into which 163 Ho is implanted as an ion beam. This makes a selective and additionally very efficient ion source for holmium mandatory. For this purpose, laser resonance ionization of stable holmium 165 Ho was studied, using a three step excitation scheme driven by pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers. Five measurements with sample sizes of 1014 and 1015 atoms were performed for the efficiency investigation. In average, an excellent ionization efficiency of 32(5) % could be shown, demonstrating the suitability for ion beam implantation.

  19. Standard thermodynamic functions and Gibbs energy of holmium tungstenates

    SciTech Connect

    Nadiradze, A.A.; Gvelesiani, G.G.; Abashidze, T.D.; Makharadze, I.A.

    1986-12-01

    The Gibbs free energy of meta- and normal holmium tungstenates was studied by the emf method with the solid oxygen-ion electrolyte. The standard values of the entropy and enthalpy of formation of holmium tungstenates Ho/sub 6/WO/sub 12/, Ho/sub 10/W/sub 2/O/sub 21/, Ho/sub 14/W/sub 4/O/sub 33/, Ho/sub 2/WO/sub 6/, and Ho/sub 2/(WO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ were calculated. Three-term equations for the Gibbs energy of formation of the indicated tungstenates from the oxides for a wide temperature range were constructed. It was shown that the values of the standard atomic entropies and enthalpies of formation of these compounds decrease as their WO/sub 3/ content increases.

  20. Development of high-power holmium-doped fibre amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, Alexander; Simakov, Nikita; Davidson, Alan; Oermann, Michael; Corena, Len; Stepanov, Dmitrii; Carmody, Neil; Haub, John; Swain, Robert; Carter, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Resonantly pumped holmium fibre lasers present a range of opportunities for the development of novel fibre laser and amplifier devices due to the availability of mature, efficient high power thulium fibre pump lasers. In this paper we describe the operation of a large mode area holmium-doped fibre amplifier. The master-oscillator is an all-fibre linearly polarised, core pumped single mode laser operating at 27 W at 2.11 μm. This laser was amplified in a large mode area fibre producing up to 265 W of output power. This system is the first demonstration of a resonantly pumped holmiumdoped fibre amplifier. It is also the highest power fibre amplifier that is capable of operating in an atmospheric transmission window <2.05 μm. This monolithic all-fibre system is able to address a wide range of remote sensing, scientific, medical and defence applications.

  1. Hard and fragile holmium-based bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Q.; Zhao, D.Q.; Pan, M.X.; Wang, R.J.; Wang, W.H.

    2006-05-01

    A family of holmium-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high glass-forming ability is obtained. The Ho-based BMGs exhibit much larger elastic moduli and high thermal stability in contrast to other known rare-earth (RE)-based BMGs. In particular, the BMGs show a large value of fragility. It is expected that the hard RE-based glasses with high glass-forming ability and fragile behaviors make them the appropriate candidate for glass transition study.

  2. Holmium YAG laser treatment of superficial bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Z; Khan, S A; Salam, M A; Hossain, S; Islam, R

    2005-01-01

    Holmium YAG laser is one of the new modalities of treatment of urinary bladder tumor. Thirty patients of superficial bladder carcinoma were selected from the Urology out patient department of Dhaka Medical College Hospital from January 2004 to July 2004. Among thirty cases, 18 were recurrent and 12 were primary superficial bladder carcinoma. Out of thirty patients, 24 were male and six were female. Patients were treated with Holmium YAG laser under spinal anesthesia. Before resection, cold cup biopsy were taken from the apex and after resection of the tumor, another cold cup biopsy were taken from the base of the tumor. Holmium YAG laser therapy was given with a 550 micron end firing quartz laser fiber through the working element of resectoscope. Small tumors (< 1 cm) were ablated and large tumors (1-4 cm) were resected. The initial laser setting was 0.5 to 0.8 J and 10 Hz. For resection of the tumor, a slightly higher energy of 1 to 1.2 J was used at 10 to 12 Hz. After resection, bleeding vessels were coagulated. The resected tumor was evacuated by Elik's evacuator. All cases were followed for 6 to 12 months by history, physical examination, urine analysis, sonogram and cystoscopy three monthly. Bleeding was minimum during the procedure and no transfusion was required. Complications like obturator jerk, clot retention or perforation were not developed. No recurrence was found during the 6 to 12 months follow up period. The procedure was found safe, effective, and acceptable. The study was conducted to evaluate the initial result of Holmium YAG laser for the treatment of superficial bladder carcinoma. We warrants further studies in this regard. PMID:15695945

  3. The structure of rare earth thin films: holmium and gadolinium on yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentall, M. J.; Cowley, R. A.; Ward, R. C. C.; Wells, M. R.; Stunault, A.

    2003-11-01

    Single-crystal holmium and gadolinium layers have been grown on yttrium substrates using the molecular beam epitaxy technique and their structures investigated using high resolution x-ray scattering. The experiments were performed using a Philips MRD diffractometer in Oxford, and with the XMaS facility at the ESRF. Holmium layers with a thickness below T_{\\mathrm {c}}'=115\

  4. Experimental studies on the usage possibilities of the holmium laser in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Tadeusz; Kecik, Dariusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Pratnicki, Antoni; Jankiewicz, Zdzislaw; Zajac, Andrzej

    1996-03-01

    The authors present initial investigations of used holmium laser during experimental cataract surgery. The investigations were performed 'in vitro' and 'in vivo.' The presented results of the experiments show that structure of the lens can be emulsified with the use of the holmium laser.

  5. Buckshot colic: utilizing holmium:yag laser for ureteroscopic removal of a bullet fragment within the proximal ureter.

    PubMed

    Ziegelmann, Matthew; Carrasco, Alonso; Knoedler, John; Krambeck, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Buckshot colic is a rare phenomenon, presenting as firearm-induced urinary tract obstruction. We present a case of gunshot-induced ureteral obstruction in a 49-year-old male, treated endoscopically with the holmium:YAG (holmium) laser. CT revealed a 1 cm bullet fragment within the left proximal ureter. A percutaneous nephrolithotomy was performed utilizing the holmium laser to fragment the metal into basket-retrievable pieces. At 4 month follow up the patient is without evidence of stricture. To our knowledge, this is the first reported utilization of the holmium laser to treat "buckshot colic". Endoscopy with holmium laser appears a feasible and safe treatment option. PMID:27347630

  6. Silicate Stardust in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2004-06-01

    One of the most exciting discoveries in cosmochemistry during the past 15 years is the presence of presolar grains in meteorites. They are identified by the unusual abundances of isotopes of oxygen, silicon, and other elements. Presolar grains, also called stardust, are exotic compounds such as diamond, graphite, aluminum oxide, and silicon carbide. Why are there no silicates? Spectroscopic observations of young stars show that silicates are abundant. This means that silicates are abundant in molecular clouds like the one in which the solar system formed. Cosmochemists wondered why do we not find silicates in the most primitive extraterrestrial materials: interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and primitive chondrites. These materials are the least altered since they formed and if any preserved presolar silicate grains, IDPs and chondrites would. Were they all destroyed as the solar system formed? Or was it that we were looking for stardust in all the wrong places? As we reported previously [see PSRD article A New Type of Stardust], Scott Messenger and colleagues have found silicates in IDPs. Now, researchers report finding presolar silicate grains in primitive chondritic meteorites. Ann Nguyen and Ernst Zinner (Washington University in St. Louis) and Kazuhide Nagashima and Hisayoshi Yurimoto (Tokyo Institute of Technology), with Alexander Krot (University of Hawaii) used advanced instrumentation to image the isotopic compositions of small regions of the Acfer 094 carbonaceous chondrite and found several silicate grains with isotopically anomalous oxygen isotopes, a clear indicator of presolar origin. Nagashima and his colleagues also investigated the primitive CR2 carbonaceous chondrite Northwest Africa 530, finding presolar grains in it as well. The grains will shed (star)light on the histories of the stars in which they formed. The relative abundances of presolar silicates in different types of meteorites will help cosmochemists understand the processes of heating

  7. Intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    A variety of devices are currently available for intracorporeal stone fragmentation. Recently a new wavelength of laser, the Holmium:YAG, has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications including ablation of soft tissue lesions as well as stone fragmentation. This laser has a wavelength of 2100 nm and operates in a pulsed mode. Energy is delivered through a 400 um quartz end-firing fiber. In this presentation we review our clinical experience with the Holmium:YAG laser for the treatment of renal and ureteral calculi. Over a 23 month period, 63 patients underwent 67 procedures. Seven procedures consisted of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy for large or staghorn renal calculi. Sixty procedures were performed for ureteral stones. Procedures for proximal ureteral stones (6) employed a retrograde approach using flexible ureteroscopes (8.5 or 9.8). Stones in the mid ureter (12) and distal ureter (42) were approached transurethrally using a 6.9 rigid ureteroscope. Complete stone fragmentation without the need for additional procedures was achieved in 82% of cases. Treatment failures included 1 stone migration into the renal pelvis during laser activation, 6 patients who had incomplete fragmentation and 3 patients in which laser malfunction precluded complete fragmentation. Stone analysis available in 23 patients revealed calcium oxalate monohydrate (15), calcium oxalate dihydrate (2), cystine (2), uric acid (3) and calcium phosphate (1). A single complication of ureteral perforation occurred when the laser was fired without direct visual guidance. Radiographic follow-up at an average of 16 weeks is available in 22 patients and has identified 2 patients with ureteral strictures that are not believed to be related to laser lithotripsy. In summary, we have found the Holmium:YAG laser to be a reliable and versatile device for intracorporeal lithotripsy. Its safety and efficacy make it a suitable alternative for performing intracorporeal lithotripsy of urinary

  8. Holmium laser lithotripsy for ureteral calculi: an outpatient procedure.

    PubMed

    Yip, K H; Lee, C W; Tam, P C

    1998-06-01

    A retrospective review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of ureteroscopic lithotripsy using the holmium laser with a semirigid endoscope in a newly established day surgery center. In 1996, 69 consecutive patients (40 male and 29 female) with a mean age of 46.7 (range 21-73) years and ASA status I or II underwent ureteroscopic lithotripsy for their ureteral calculi using the holmium laser (365-micron fiber; power setting 0.5-1.4 J/5 Hz) and 8.5F semirigid ureteroscope in a day surgery setting. Stone features, postoperative pain scores, readmissions, and complications were evaluated. Eighteen upper, 17 middle, and 34 lower ureteral stones were treated, with a mean size measuring 12.1 (5-45) mm. The mean operative time was 61 minutes including the anesthetic time (range 15-150 minutes), and the success rate was 91% (63/69). The complication rate was 10% (7/69) including four unscheduled readmissions (6%). Telephone follow-up on postoperative Day 1 and Day 3 revealed mean pain scores of 2 and 1, respectively (on a 0-10 scale) and an analgesic requirement of 1 tablet of Dologesic (containing 32.5 mg of dextropropoxyphene + 320 mg of paracetamol) four times a day on both days. Ureteroscopic lithotripsy using the holmium laser and a semirigid endoscope is highly successful and well tolerated and carries a low complication rate. It is indicated as an ambulatory and minimally invasive treatment modality in low-risk patients with ureteral stones. PMID:9658294

  9. Drug metabolism: Comparison of biodistribution profile of holmium in three different compositions in healthy Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira-Coutinho, Cristal; Vidal, Lluis Pascual; Pinto, Suyene Rocha; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    Radioisotope holmium is a candidate to be used in cancer treatment and diagnosis. There are different holmium salts and they present distinct solubility and consequently different biodistribution profiles. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the biodistribution profiles of two holmium salts (chloride and sulfate) and holmium nanoparticles (oxide) through an in vivo biodistribution assay using animal model. Samples were labeled with technetium-99m and administered in Wistar rats by retro-orbital route. Holmium chloride is highly soluble in water and it was quickly filtered by the kidneys while holmium sulfate that presents lower solubility in water was mainly found in the liver and the spleen. However, both the salts showed a similar biodistribution profile. On the other hand, holmium oxide showed a very different biodistribution profile since it seemed to interact with all organs. Due to its particle size range (approximately 100nm) it was not intensively filtered by the kidneys being found in high quantities in many organs, for this reason its use as a nanoradiopharmaceutical could be promising in the oncology field. PMID:26986812

  10. The studies on the aromaticity of fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bisheng; Peng, Rufang; Li, Hongbo; Wang, Bing; Jin, Bo; Chu, Shijin; Long, Xinping

    2011-02-01

    Density functional theory BLYP/DNP was employed to optimize a series of fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds, including C(20), Ho@C(20), Ho(3+)@C(20), C(60), Ho@C(60), Ho(3+)@C(60),C(70), Ho@C(70), Ho(3+)@C(70) C(78), Ho@C(78), Ho(3+)@C(78), C(82),Ho@C(82) and Ho(3+)@C(82). DFT semi core pseudospot approximation was taken into consideration in the calculations of the element holmium because of its particular electronic structure. Fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds' aromaticity were studied in terms of structural criteria, energetic criteria, and reactivity criteria. The results indicate that the aromaticity of fullerenes was reduced when a holmium atom was introduced into the carbon cage, and the endohedral fullerenes' reactive activity enhance; but the aromaticity of the carbon cage increased when a Ho(3+) cation was encapsulated into a fullerene. Calculations of aromaticity and stability indicate that two paths can lead to the similar aim of preparing holmium endohedral fullerenes; that is, they can form from either a holmium atom or a holmium cation (Ho(3+)) reacting with fullerenes, respectively, and the latter is more favorable. PMID:20443036

  11. Role of temperature in the theoretical analysis of holmium pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Purvee; Singh, Sadhna

    2016-01-01

    The high-pressure structural phase transition and associated properties of holmium pnictides (HoX; X = P, As, Sb and Bi) have been investigated in the present work. The Realistic Interaction Potential Approach (RIPA) including the effect of temperature has been applied. The occurrence of first order phase transition is evidenced from a sudden collapse in volume. These compounds transform from B1 to B2 structure under high pressure. The high temperature and pressure behaviour of elastic constants and bulk modulus are also reported. Our results are in general in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical results where available, and provide predictions where they are unavailable.

  12. Treatment of pulmonary diseases with Holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei-Jue; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo; Wang, Fu-Juan; Ke, Lin; Ma, Wei; Luo, Qun-Hua; Zhang, Yue-E.

    1998-11-01

    We report 5 cases of pulmonary disease treated with Holmium:YAG laser through fibrous bronchoscope. 1 inflammatory granuloma was cured after three times of treatment. Compared with conventional methods such as electrocautery and microwave treatment, laser has the merit of good hemostasis effect and quick recovery of the operation area. The other 4 patients who were suffered late lung cancer received 3-7 times of palliative treatment. After the treatment, the tumor tissues become smaller variably, and tact were unobstructed, symptoms of tract- obstructed obviously alleviated. We think that laser treatment has some practical significance in alleviating tract blocking of pulmonary diseases of late stage, and therefore raise the life quality.

  13. Holmium Nitrate Complexation with Tri-n-butyl Phosphate in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Robert V. Fox; R. Duane Ball; Peter de B. Harrington; Harry W. Rollins; Chien M. Wai

    2005-12-01

    Holmium nitrate pentahydrate was reacted with tri-n-butyl phosphate in supercritical carbon dioxide at 308 K. The products of the complexation reaction were measured under supercritical fluid conditions using UV-vis spectroscopy. The solubility of the metal complexes in the supercritical fluid phase was measured. The mole-ratio titration method was used to determine the stoichiometry of the soluble complexes. Conditional extraction coefficients were calculated from spectral data using least-squares regression and hard-equilibria models. Data indicate that the holmium nitrate-tributyl phosphate system forms 1:2 and 1:4 holmium-tributyl phosphate complexes.

  14. Effect of the active-ion concentration on the lasing dynamics of holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-12-09

    The lasing dynamics of fibre lasers with a core based on quartz glass doped with holmium ions to concentrations in the range of 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is investigated. It is shown that fibre lasers with a high concentration of active holmium ions generate pulses, but a decrease in the holmium concentration changes the lasing from pulsed to cw regime. At the same time, a decrease in the active-ion concentration and the corresponding increase in the fibre length in the cavity reduce the lasing efficiency. (lasers)

  15. Effect of active-ion concentration on holmium fibre laser efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-08-03

    We have measured the fraction of holmium ions that relax nonradiatively to the ground level as a result of interaction at a metastable level in optical fibres with a silica-based core doped with holmium ions to 2 x 10{sup 19} - 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The percentage of such ions has been shown to depend on the absolute active-ion concentration. The fibres have been used to make a number of 2.05-{mu}m lasers, and their slope efficiency has been measured. The laser efficiency decreases with increasing holmium concentration in the fibres (lasers)

  16. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  17. Holmium:YAG laser angioplasty: treatment of acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On

    1993-06-01

    We report our clinical experience with a group of 14 patients who presented with acute myocardial infarction. A holmium:YAG laser was applied to the infarct-related artery. This laser emits 250 - 600 mJ per pulse, with a pulse length of 250 microseconds and repetition rate of 5 Hz. Potential benefits of acute thrombolysis by lasers include the absence of systemic lytic state; a shortened thrombus clearing time relative to using thrombolytics; safe removal of the intracoronary thrombus and facilitation of adjunct balloon angioplasty. Potential clinical difficulties include targeting the obstructive clot and plaque, creation of debris and distal emboli and laser-tissue damage. It is conceivable that holmium:YAG laser can be a successful thrombolytic device as its wave length (2.1 microns) coincides with strong water absorption peaks. Since it is common to find an atherosclerotic plaque located under or distal to the thrombotic occlusion, this laser can also be applied for plaque ablation, and the patient presenting with acute myocardial infarction can clearly benefit from the combined function of this laser system.

  18. Dielectric and conducting behaviour of polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, Basharat; Zahoor Ahmad, Bhat; Bhat, Bilal Hamid

    2014-09-01

    Polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate spherulites have been obtained by using gel diffusion technique and characterized by different physio-chemical techniques. The surfaces of these spherulites are composed of nano-rod with an average diameter of about 80 nm. At room temperature the initial crystal structure is triclinic, space group P1. Thermal studies suggested a phase transition occurring in holmium octa-molybdate crystals at about 793 K. The electrical properties of the system have been studied as a function of frequency and temperature in the ranges of 20 Hz-3 MHz and 290-570 K, respectively. A giant dielectric constant and two loss peaks have been observed in the permittivity formalism. The conducting behaviour of the material is also discussed. The conductivity was found to be 1572 μ Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature and 3 MHz frequency. The conductivity of the polycrystalline material was attributed to the fact that it arises due to the migration of defects on the oxygen sub-lattice. Impedance studies were also performed in the frequency domain to infer the bulk and grain boundary contributions to the overall electric response of the material. The electrical responses have been attributed to the grain, grain-boundary, and interfacial effects.

  19. Composition and method of treatment of arthritis and related diseases with holmium-166 radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1991-10-29

    This patent describes a radioactive composition for the treatment of arthritis. It comprises a suspension containing particles having a minimum size of one micron, the suspension including particles containing holmium-166.

  20. Holmium laser use in the treatment of selected dry eye syndrome complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Dariusz; Kecik, Tadeusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Mariusz

    1996-03-01

    The authors present initial results of treatment selected complications of dry eye syndrome with holmium laser. The lacrimal puncta obliteration and coagulation of the corneal ulcer surface were done.

  1. Holmium-doped fibre amplifier operating at 2.1 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Kamynin, V A; Antipov, S O; Kurkov, A S; Baranikov, A V

    2014-02-28

    A small-signal holmium-doped fibre amplifier is demonstrated. The seed source is a cw holmium-doped fibre laser whose output power is modulated by an electro-optical modulator. The maximum gain reached (wavelength, 2.1 μm; power, 0.25 mW; pulse duration, 100 ns; pulse repetition rate, 1 μs) is 28.5 dB. (lasers)

  2. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  3. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  4. Energy upconversion in holmium doped lead-germano-tellurite glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kamma, Indumathi; Reddy, B. Rami

    2010-06-15

    Holmium doped lead-germano-tellurite glass was prepared by the melt quenching technique. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters were estimated as {Omega}{sub 2}=7.6x10{sup -20}, {Omega}{sub 4}=12.9x10{sup -20}, and {Omega}{sub 6}=2.5x10{sup -20} cm{sup 2}. Radiative transition probabilities and lifetimes were also determined for some of the levels. Room temperature upconversion emissions have been observed from Ho{sup 3+} at 497 nm under 532 nm laser excitation, and at 557 and 668 nm under 762 nm laser excitation. The upconversion emission mechanisms were found to be due to a step wise excitation process. Upconversion emission intensity enhanced in a heat treated glass.

  5. Combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratisto, Hans S.; Frenz, Martin; Koenz, Flurin; Altermatt, Hans J.; Weber, Heinz P.

    1996-05-01

    Erbium lasers emitting at 2.94 micrometers and holmium lasers emitting at 2.1 micrometers are interesting tools for cutting, drilling, smoothing and welding of water containing tissues. The high absorption coefficient of water at these wavelengths leads to their good ablation efficiency with controlled thermally altered zones around the ablation sites. Combination of pulses with both wavelengths transmitted through one fiber were used to perform incisions in soft tissue and impacts in bone disks. Histological results and scanning electron microscope evaluations reveal the strong influence of the absorption coefficient on tissue effects, especially on the ablation efficiency and the zone of thermally damaged tissue. It is demonstrated that the combination of high ablation rates and deep coagulation zones can be achieved. The results indicate that this laser system can be considered as a first step towards a multi-functional medical instrument.

  6. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber lasers for lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser is currently the most common laser lithotripter. However, recent experimental studies have demonstrated that the Thulium fiber laser is also capable of vaporizing urinary stones. The high-temperature water absorption coefficient for the Thulium wavelength (μa = 160 cm-1 at λ = 1908 nm) is significantly greater than for the Holmium wavelength (μa = 28 cm-1 at λ = 2120 nm). We hypothesize that this should translate into more efficient laser lithotripsy using the Thulium fiber laser. This study directly compares stone vaporization rates for Holmium and Thulium fiber lasers. Holmium laser radiation pulsed at 3 Hz with 70 mJ pulse energy and 220 μs pulse duration was delivered through a 100-μm-core silica fiber to human uric acid (UA) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones, ex vivo (n = 10 each). Thulium fiber laser radiation pulsed at 10 Hz with 70 mJ pulse energy and 1 ms pulse duration was also delivered through a 100-μm fiber for the same sets of 10 stones. For same number of pulses and total energy (126 J) delivered to each stone, mass loss averaged 2.4 +/- 0.6 mg (UA) and 0.7 +/- 0.2 mg (COM) for Holmium laser and 12.6 +/- 2.5 mg (UA) and 6.8 +/- 1.7 (COM) for Thulium fiber laser. UA and COM stone vaporization rates for Thulium fiber laser averaged 5-10 times higher than for Holmium laser at 70 mJ pulse energies. With further development, the Thulium fiber laser may represent an alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for more efficient laser lithotripsy.

  7. Safety and efficacy of holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy in patients with bleeding diatheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Cook, Anthony J.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Auge, Brian K.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser lithotripsy in the treatment of upper urinary tract calculi in patients with known and uncorrected bleeding diatheses. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review from 2 tertiary stone centers was performed to identify patients with known bleeding diatheses who were treated with holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for upper urinary tract calculi. Twenty-five patients with 29 upper urinary tract calculi were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. Bleeding diatheses identified were coumadin administration for various conditions (17), liver dysfunction (3), thrombocytopenia (4), and von Willebrand's disease (1). Mean international normalized ratio (INR), platelet count and bleeding time were 2.3, 50 x 109/L, and > 16 minutes, for patients receiving coumadin or with liver dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, or von Willebrand's disease, respectively. Results: Overall, the stone-free rate was 96% (27/28) and 29 of 30 procedures were completed successfully without significant complication. One patient who was treated concomitantly with electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) had a significant retroperitoneal hemorrhage that required blood transfusion. Conclusions: Treatment of upper tract urinary calculi in patients with uncorrected bleeding diatheses can be safely performed using contemporary small caliber ureteroscopes and holmium laser as the sole modality of lithotripsy. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy without preoperative correction of hemostatic parameters limits the risk of thromboembolic complications and costs associated with an extended hospital stay. Avoidance of the use of EHL is crucial in reducing bleeding complications in this cohort of patients.

  8. Evaluation of holmium laser for transurethral deroofing of severe and multiloculated prostatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan Ho; Ku, Ja Yoon; Park, Young Joo; Lee, Jeong Zoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to evaluate the use of a holmium laser for transurethral deroofing of a prostatic abscess in patients with severe and multiloculated prostatic abscesses. Materials and Methods From January 2011 to April 2014, eight patients who were diagnosed with prostatic abscesses and who underwent transurethral holmium laser deroofing at Pusan National University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Results Multiloculated or multifocal abscess cavities were found on the preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan in all eight patients. All patients who underwent transurethral holmium laser deroofing of a prostatic abscess had successful outcomes, without the need for secondary surgery. Of the eight patients, seven underwent holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for the removal of residual adenoma. Markedly reduced multiloculated abscess cavities were found in the follow-up CT in all patients. No prostatic abscess recurrence was found. Transient stress urinary incontinence was observed in three patients. The stress urinary incontinence subsided within 3 weeks in two patients and improved with conservative management within 2 months in the remaining patient. Conclusions Transurethral holmium laser deroofing of prostatic abscesses ensures successful drainage of the entire abscess cavity. Because we resolved the predisposing conditions of prostatic abscess, such as bladder outlet obstruction and prostatic calcification, by simultaneously conducting HoLEP, there was no recurrence of the prostatic abscesses after surgery. We recommend our method in patients requiring transurethral drainage. PMID:25685303

  9. [A Case of Holmium: YAG Laser Resection of Superficial Bladder Tumor (HoLRBT)].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yoshiko; Shitara, Toshiya; Hirayama, Takahiro; Fujita, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kubo, Seiichi; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of holmium : YAG laser resection of superficial bladder tumor (HoLRBT). A 73-year-old male was referred to our hospital with elevated prostatic specific antigen. Due to difficulty of urination, holmium : YAG laser enucleation of the prostate was performed under the diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia. During the surgery, superficial bladder tumor was incidentally identified, and HoLRBT was performed. After the operation, histopathological examination revealed urothelial carcinoma, G2 > G1, pTa. The patient has been subsequently followed up for 9 months, and there areno evidence of recurrence. Changing the holmium : YAG laser energy setting can potentially be effective and safe to approach a superficial bladder tumor. PMID:26563623

  10. Proximal fiber tip damage during Holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller fibers than possible during Holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared to Holmium laser multimodal beam. TFL beam at wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 50-500 Hz. For each pulse rate, 500,000 pulses were delivered. Magnified images of proximal fiber surfaces were taken before and after each trial. For comparison, 20 single-use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical Holmium laser lithotripsy procedures using standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output power was stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed after delivery of 500,000 pulses at settings up to 35 mJ, 500 Hz, and 17.5 W average power. In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after Holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation in all 20 fibers. The proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted 17.5 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of Holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially reduce costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  11. Thermal Properties of Holmium-Implanted Gold Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, K.; Alves, E.; Bagliani, D.; Yanardag, S. Basak; Biasotti, M.; Galeazzi, M.; Gatti, F.; Gomes, M. Ribeiro; Rocha, J.; Uprety, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The effective mass of the electron neutrino can be probed by studying the Ho electron capture decay with cryogenic microcalorimeters. The goal is to perform a calorimetric experiment, where all the energy released in the decay is measured except for the kinetic energy of the neutrino. To achieve such a goal, multiple approaches are being investigated to enclose the radioactive source in a microcalorimeter absorber without affecting the thermal properties of the absorber material. One such approach is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in similar applications. We measured the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70-300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future experiment. We also verified that the implant does not affect the crystal structure of the gold film.

  12. Non-radiative decay of holmium-doped laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Steven R.; O'Connor, Shawn; Condon, Nicholas J.; Friebele, E. Joseph; Kim, Woohong; Shaw, B.; Quimby, R. S.

    2013-03-01

    Anti-Stokes fluorescence cooling has been demonstrated in a number rare earth doped materials. Ytterbium doped oxides and fluorides, such as ZBLAN, YLF, and YAG, were the first materials to exhibit cooling.1,2,3 These materials were originally developed as laser gain media and fluorescence cooling was eventually incorporated into the 1μm lasers to reduce detrimental thermal loading.4 Anti-Stokes cooling can offset quantum defect heating allowing laser power to be scaled to very high average powers. Since the early work in ytterbium, fluorescence cooling has been demonstrated in both erbium and thulium doped materials.5,6 These materials were also initially developed as lasing media and their fluorescence cooling could be used to increase laser powers at 1.5μm and 2.0μm. In this study we examine the radiative efficiency of holmium and ask the question, "Can anti-Stokes fluorescence cooling be extended beyond 2μm?"

  13. Single crystal growth and characterization of holmium tartrate trihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, Basharat; Ahmad, Farooq; Kotru, P. N.

    2007-02-01

    The growth of holmium tartrate trihydrate (HTT) single crystals is achieved in organic (agar-agar) as well as in inorganic (silica) gels by single gel diffusion method. Results of the study on nucleation kinetics of crystals grown in silica gel are described. The crystals exhibit the morphological form of a tetragonal dipyramidal class with {0 0 1} and {1 1 1} as dominant faces. Elemental and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) supplemented by energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) support the suggested chemical formula of the grown crystals to be [Ho (C 4H 4O 6) (C 4H 5O 6)·3H 2O]. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicate that the crystals belong to tetragonal system with the cell parameters a=5.97 Å, c=36.09 Å, bearing the space group P4 1. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic study indicates the presence of tartrate ligands and suggests that one of the tartrate ions is singly ionized. TGA suggests that the material is thermally stable up to 220 °C.

  14. Magnetic field-dependent spin structures of nanocrystalline holmium

    PubMed Central

    Szary, Philipp; Kaiser, Daniel; Bick, Jens-Peter; Lott, Dieter; Heinemann, André; Dewhurst, Charles; Birringer, Rainer; Michels, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The results are reported of magnetic field-dependent neutron diffraction experiments on polycrystalline inert-gas condensed holmium with a nanometre crystallite size (D = 33 nm). At T = 50 K, no evidence is found for the existence of helifan(3/2) or helifan(2) structures for the nanocrystalline sample, in contrast with results reported in the literature for the single crystal. Instead, when the applied field H is increased, the helix pattern transforms progressively, most likely into a fan structure. It is the component of H which acts on the basal-plane spins of a given nanocrystallite that drives the disappearance of the helix; for nanocrystalline Ho, this field is about 1.3 T, and it is related to a characteristic kink in the virgin magnetization curve. For a coarse-grained Ho sample, concomitant with the destruction of the helix phase, the emergence of an unusual angular anisotropy (streak pattern) and the appearance of novel spin structures are observed. PMID:27047307

  15. An architecture for quantum computation with magnetically trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, Mark; Hostetter, James; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Outstanding challenges for scalable neutral atom quantum computation include correction of atom loss due to collisions with untrapped background gas, reduction of crosstalk during state preparation and measurement due to scattering of near resonant light, and the need to improve quantum gate fidelity. We present a scalable architecture based on loading single Holmium atoms into an array of Ioffe-Pritchard traps. The traps are formed by grids of superconducting wires giving a trap array with 40 μm period, suitable for entanglement via long range Rydberg gates. The states | F = 5 , M = 5 > and | F = 7 , M = 7 > provide a magic trapping condition at a low field of 3.5 G for long coherence time qubit encoding. The F = 11 level will be used for state preparation and measurement. The availability of different states for encoding, gate operations, and measurement, spectroscopically isolates the different operations and will prevent crosstalk to neighboring qubits. Operation in a cryogenic environment with ultra low pressure will increase atom lifetime and Rydberg gate fidelity by reduction of blackbody induced Rydberg decay. We will present a complete description of the architecture including estimates of achievable performance metrics. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  16. Holmium:YAG laser in dentistry: photoconditioning of dentinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1994-09-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to determine energy levels necessary to produce tubule closure and surface smoothing on dentinal surfaces of human teeth and their resultant temperature increases within the pulpal canals with the Holmium:YAG laser. An optimal working spot size and even absorption pattern were produced by defocusing the laser beam and evaluated by images produced on light exposed and developed photographic paper. The surface effects on dentin were examined by scanning electron microscopy. A thermocouple was positioned in the canals of fresh dissected dog jaws and attached to a recorder which produced a graph of the temperature changes. The in vitro research model for intrapulpal temperatures changes was verified by comparing premortem and postmortem temperature readings. The same protocol was used to evaluate temperature changes in fresh human extracted teeth. In vivo histological studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of HO:YAG laser energy on pulpal tissues. The results of these studies indicate the HO:YAG laser at a wavelength of 2.12 microns can be safely and effectively used for photoconditioning of the dentinal surfaces of teeth in clinical conditions.

  17. Clinical development of holmium:YAG laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser vaporization and resection of the prostate offers advantages in immediate tissue removal compared to the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser. Ongoing development of appropriate operative techniques and Ho:YAG laser delivery systems suitable for endoscopic prostate surgery, including side-firing optical delivery fibers, have facilitated this approach. We performed Ho:YAG laser prostatectomy in 20 human subjects, including 2 men treated immediately prior to radical prostatectomy to assess Ho:YAG laser effects in the prostate. A total of 18 men were treated in an initial clinical trial of Ho:YAG prostatectomy. Estimated excess hyperplastic prostate tissue averaged 24 g (range 5 - 50 g). A mean of 129 kj Ho:YAG laser energy was delivered, combined with a mean of 11 kj Nd:YAG energy to provide supplemental coagulation for hemostasis. We have observed no significant perioperative or late complications. No significant intraoperative changes in hematocrit or serum electrolytes were documented. In addition to providing acute removal of obstructing prostate tissue, Ho:YAG laser resection allowed tissue specimen to be obtained for histologic examination. A total of 16 of 18 patients (90%) underwent successful removal of their urinary catheter and voiding trial within 24 hours following surgery. Immediate improvement in voiding, comparable to classic transurethral electrocautery resection of the prostate (TURP), was reported by all patients. Ho:YAG laser resection of the prostate appears to be a viable surgical technique associated with minimal morbidity and immediate improvement in voiding.

  18. Suppression of optical damage at 532 nm in Holmium doped congruent lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Eftihia; O'Connell, Nathan H; Balli, Nicolas R; Pokhrel, Madhab; Movsesyan, Anush; Kokanyan, Edvard; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2014-10-20

    Optical damage experiments were carried out in a series of Holmium doped congruent lithium niobate (Ho:cLN) crystals as a function of dopant concentration and laser intensity. The light induced beam distortion was recorded with a camera and a detector under the pseudo-Z-scan configuration. At 532 nm, strong suppression of the optical damage was observed for the 0.94 mol. % doped crystal. Increased resistance to optical damage was also observed at 488 nm. The suppression of the optical damage is predominantly attributed to the reduction of the Nb antisites due to the holmium doping. PMID:25401654

  19. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  20. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  1. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  2. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  3. THE BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MESOPOROUS SILICATES

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Sarah; Padera, Robert F.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    Micro- and nano- mesoporous silicate particles are considered potential drug delivery systems because of their ordered pore structures, large surface areas and the ease with which they can be chemically modified. However, few cytotoxicity or biocompatibility studies have been reported, especially when silicates are administered in the quantities necessary to deliver low-potency drugs. The biocompatibility of mesoporous silicates of particle sizes ~ 150 nm, ~ 800 nm and ~ 4 µm and pore sizes of 3 nm, 7 nm and 16 nm respectively are examined here. In vitro, mesoporous silicates showed a significant degree of toxicity at high concentrations with mesothelial cells. Following subcutaneous injection of silicates in rats, the amount of residual material decreased progressively over three months, with good biocompatibility on histology at all time points. In contrast, intra peritoneal and intra venous injections in mice resulted in death or euthanasia. No toxicity was seen with subcutaneous injection of the same particles in mice. Microscopic analysis of the lung tissue of the mice indicates that death may be due to thrombosis. Although local tissue reaction to mesoporous silicates was benign, they caused severe systemic toxicity. This toxicity could be mitigated by modification of the materials. PMID:18675454

  4. Measurement of cross sections for charge pickup by relativistic holmium ions on heavy targets

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A.J.; Guiru, J.; Price, P.B. Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California )

    1991-10-01

    We have measured the cross section for nuclear charge pickup by relativistic holmium on several targets of larger atomic number than have been studied previously. We find that although measurements made with most of the targets are consistent with a peripheral geometric scaling, one target, silver, shows an anomalously high cross section.

  5. Fiber-optic manipulation of urinary stone phantoms using holmium:YAG and thulium fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Case, Jason R.; Trammell, Susan R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-02-01

    Fiber-optic attraction of urinary stones during laser lithotripsy may be exploited to manipulate stone fragments inside the urinary tract without mechanical grasping tools, saving the urologist time and space in the ureteroscope working channel. We compare thulium fiber laser (TFL) high pulse rate/low pulse energy operation to conventional holmium:YAG low pulse rate/high pulse energy operation for fiber-optic suctioning of plaster-of-paris (PoP) stone phantoms. A TFL (wavelength of 1908 nm, pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500 μs, and pulse rate of 10 to 350 Hz) and a holmium laser (wavelength of 2120 nm, pulse energy of 35 to 360 mJ, pulse duration of 300 μs, and pulse rate of 20 Hz) were tested using 270-μm-core optical fibers. A peak drag speed of ˜2.5 mm/s was measured for both TFL (35 mJ and 150 to 250 Hz) and holmium laser (210 mJ and 20 Hz). Particle image velocimetry and thermal imaging were used to track water flow for all parameters. Fiber-optic suctioning of urinary stone phantoms is feasible. TFL operation at high pulse rates/low pulse energies is preferable to holmium operation at low pulse rates/high pulse energies for rapid and smooth stone pulling. With further development, this novel technique may be useful for manipulating stone fragments in the urinary tract.

  6. Holmium laser for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: old wine in a new bottle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelius, Thomas; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia affect 70% of men older than 70 years. Complications are common problems and a significant cause of morbidity in this population, placing a considerable burden on health services. In the early 1990s laser treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia became widely used after the introduction of the side-firing neodym: YAG laser. However, because of technical limitations and inferior results compared to classical transurethral resection of the prostate many Urologists became desinterested in this device. With the introduction of the holmium: YAG laser a new laser generation became available for use in Urology. Beside several other applications the holmium: YAG laser can be used for incision, ablation, resection, and more recently enucleation of the prostate. In this paper we reviewed the current literature regarding the holmium: YAG laser resection and enucleation of the prostate compared to transurethral resection of the prostate and open prostatectomy. The holmium: YAG laser technique is an effective and durable surgical alternative to standard transurethral resection of the prostate. Interestingly, enucleation of the prostate with this device seems to be a safe and effective procedure for large prostatic adenomas, it may become an attractive alternative to open prostatectomy.

  7. Preparation and complex characterization of silica holmium sol-gel monoliths.

    PubMed

    Cacaina, D; Areva, S; Laaksonen, H; Simon, S; Ylänen, H

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous, sol-gel derived SiO(2) are known to biocompatible and bioresorbable materials. Biodegradable and inert materials containing radioactive isotopes have potential application as delivery vehicles of the beta radiation to the cancer tumors inside the body. Incorporation of holmium in the sol-gel derived SiO(2) could lead to the formation of a biodegradable material which could be used as carrier biomaterial for the radiation of radioactive holmium to the various cancer sites. The homogeneity of the prepared sol-gel silica holmium monoliths was investigated by Back Scattered Electron Imaging of Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, X-ray Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. The biodegradation of the monoliths was investigated in Simulated Body Fluid and TRIS (Trizma pre-set Crystals) solution. The results show that by suitable tailoring of the sol-gel processing parameters holmium can be homogeneously incorporated in the silica matrix with a controlled biodegradation rate. PMID:21132520

  8. Fiber-optic manipulation of urinary stone phantoms using holmium:YAG and thulium fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Richard L; Case, Jason R; Trammell, Susan R; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-02-01

    Fiber-optic attraction of urinary stones during laser lithotripsy may be exploited to manipulate stone fragments inside the urinary tract without mechanical grasping tools, saving the urologist time and space in the ureteroscope working channel. We compare thulium fiber laser (TFL) high pulse rate/low pulse energy operation to conventional holmium:YAG low pulse rate/high pulse energy operation for fiber-optic suctioning of plaster-of-paris (PoP) stone phantoms. A TFL (wavelength of 1908 nm, pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500 μs, and pulse rate of 10 to 350 Hz) and a holmium laser (wavelength of 2120 nm, pulse energy of 35 to 360 mJ, pulse duration of 300 μs, and pulse rate of 20 Hz) were tested using 270-μm-core optical fibers. A peak drag speed of ~2.5 mm/s was measured for both TFL (35 mJ and 150 to 250 Hz) and holmium laser (210 mJ and 20 Hz). Particle image velocimetry and thermal imaging were used to track water flow for all parameters. Fiber-optic suctioning of urinary stone phantoms is feasible. TFL operation at high pulse rates/low pulse energies is preferable to holmium operation at low pulse rates/high pulse energies for rapid and smooth stone pulling. With further development, this novel technique may be useful for manipulating stone fragments in the urinary tract. PMID:23377013

  9. Histological evaluation of coagulation foci produced in the human lens with a holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Dariusz; Kecik, Tadeusz; Pratnicki, Antoni; Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Mariusz

    1997-10-01

    We present the results of histological evaluation of human lenses treated with the holmium laser. The lenses, extracted at the time of extracapsular surgery for cataract, were placed in containers filled with Ringer's solution. After treatment with laser-emitted radiation they were histologically evaluated. The formation of crater-like defects was found in the material studied.

  10. Femtosecond mode-locked holmium fiber laser pumped by semiconductor disk laser.

    PubMed

    Chamorovskiy, A; Marakulin, A V; Ranta, S; Tavast, M; Rautiainen, J; Leinonen, T; Kurkov, A S; Okhotnikov, O G

    2012-05-01

    We report on a 2085 nm holmium-doped silica fiber laser passively mode-locked by semiconductor saturable absorber mirror and carbon nanotube absorber. The laser, pumped by a 1.16 μm semiconductor disk laser, produces 890 femtosecond pulses with the average power of 46 mW and the repetition rate of 15.7 MHz. PMID:22555700

  11. Chiral holmium complex-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of silyloxyvinylindoles: stereoselective synthesis of hydrocarbazoles.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinji; Morikawa, Takahiro; Nishida, Atsushi

    2013-10-18

    The catalytic and asymmetric cycloaddition between 3-[1-(silyloxy)vinyl]indoles and electron-deficient olefins gave substituted hydrocarbazoles in up to 99% yield and 94% ee. This reaction was catalyzed by a novel chiral holmium(III) complex. Alkylation of the cycloadduct gave a tricyclic compound with four continuous chiral centers, one of which was a quaternary carbon. PMID:24079531

  12. Laser-assisted hair transplantation: histologic comparison between holmium:YAG and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Eugene A.; Rabinov, C. Rose; Wong, Brian J.; Krugman, Mark E.

    1999-06-01

    The histological effects of flash-scanned CO2 (λ=10.6μm) and pulsed Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG, λ=2.12μm) lasers were evaluated in human scalp following the creation of hair transplant recipient channels. Ho:YAG laser irradiation created larger zones of thermal injury adjacent to the laser channels than irradiation with the CO2 laser device. When the two lasers created recipient sites of nearly equal depth, the Holmium:YAG laser caused a larger region of lateral thermal damage (589.30μm) than the CO2 laser (118.07μm). In addition, Holmium:YAG irradiated specimens exhibited fractures or discontinuities beyond the region of clear thermal injury. This shearing effect is consistent with the photoacoustic mechanism of ablation associated with pulsed mid-IR laser irradiation. In contrast, channels created with the CO2 exhibited minimal epithelial disruption and significantly less lateral thermal damage. While the Holmium:YAG laser is a useful tool for ablation soft tissue with minimal char in select applications (sinus surgery, arthroscopic surgery), this study suggests that the use of the CO2 laser for the creation of transplantation recipient channels result in significantly less lateral thermal injury for the laser parameters employed.

  13. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  14. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  15. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  16. Combination of fiber-guided pulsed erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratisto, Hans; Frenz, Martin; Ith, Michael; Altermatt, Hans J.; Jansen, E. Duco; Weber, Heinz P.

    1996-07-01

    Because of the high absorption of near-infrared laser radiation in biological tissue, erbium lasers and holmium lasers emitting at 3 and 2 mu m, respectively, have been proven to have optimal qualities for cutting or welding and coagulating tissue. To combine the advantages of both wavelengths, we realized a multiwavelength laser system by simultaneously guiding erbium and holmium laser radiation by means of a single zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) fiber. Laser-induced channel formation in water and poly(acrylamide) gel was investigated by the use of a time-resolved flash-photography setup, while pressure transients were recorded simultaneously with a needle hydrophone. The shapes and depths of vapor channels produced in water and in a submerged gel after single erbium and after combination erbium-holmium radiation delivered by means of a 400- mu m ZrF4 fiber were measured. Transmission measurements were performed to determine the amount of pulse energy available for tissue ablation. The effects of laser wavelength and the delay time between pulses of different wavelengths on the photomechanical and photothermal responses of meniscal tissue were evaluated in vitro by the use of histology. It was observed that the use of a short (200- mu s, 100-mJ) holmium laser pulse as a prepulse to generate a vapor bubble through which the ablating erbium laser pulse can be transmitted (delay time, 100 mu s) increases the cutting depth in meniscus from 450 to 1120 mu m as compared with the depth following a single erbium pulse. The results indicate that a combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation precisely and efficiently cuts tissue under water with 20-50- mu m collateral tissue damage. wave, cavitation, channel formation, infrared-fiber-delivery system, tissue damage, cartilage.

  17. Comparative analysis of the optical spectra of the holmium atom excited by electron impact and ionic bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Vasileva, E.K.; Morozov, S.N.; Ryskin, B.V.

    1988-02-01

    A comparative analysis of the optical spectra of holmium excited by electron impact and ionic bombardment is given. It is shown that under ionic bombardment, the probability of excitation of screened transitions is significantly higher than under electron impact.

  18. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty: quantitative angiography and clinical results in a large experience of a single medical center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Clinical experience with the mid IR holmium:YAG laser in a single medical center (St. Paul Ramsey Medical Center, University of Minnesota Medical School, St. Paul, MN) includes 112 patients who underwent holmium laser coronary angioplasty. Utilizing a unique lasing technique; `pulse and retreat,' we applied this laser to thrombotic and nonthrombotic lesions in patients presenting with unstable angina, stable angina, and acute myocardial infarction. A very high clinical success and very low complication rates were achieved. Holmium:YAG laser is effective and safe therapy for patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. Unlike excimer lasers, the clinical success, efficacy and safety of holmium laser angioplasty is not compromised when thrombus is present.

  19. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  20. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula. PMID:15118720

  1. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers <5 microm were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. Likewise, Clinoptilolite, Phillipsite, Mordenite, Nonfibrous Japanese Zeolite, and synthetic Zeolites were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. These ingredients are not significantly toxic in oral acute or short-term oral or parenteral toxicity studies in animals. Inhalation toxicity, however, is readily demonstrated in animals. Particle size, fibrogenicity, concentration, and mineral composition had the greatest effect on toxicity. Larger particle size and longer and wider fibers cause more adverse effects. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate was a weak primary skin irritant in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. No gross effects were reported in any of these studies. Sodium Magnesium Silicate had no primary skin irritation in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. Hectorite was nonirritating to the skin of rabbits in a Draize primary skin

  2. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M.; Reinhardt, Frederick W.; Odinek, Judy G.

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  3. Microwave emission from granular silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental finding is that mass absorption coefficient is independent of frequency but highly dependent on moisture content; effective conductivity increases with frequency, and low tangent is independent of frequency. Computed values of electrical properties are in rough numerical agreement with extrapolated laboratory values on other silicate materials.

  4. Circumstellar Crystalline Silicates: Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, Josh; Speck, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the last 15 years was the discovery of crystalline silicate stardust by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board of ISO; discovery of the crystalline grains was indeed one of the biggest surprises of the ISO mission. Initially discovered around AGB stars (evolved stars in the range of 0.8 > M/M¤>8) at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths, crystalline silicates have since been seen in many astrophysical environments including young stellar objects (T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be), comets and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) comprise 95% of the contributors to the ISM, so study of the formation of crystalline silicates is critical to our understanding of the ISM, which is thought to be primarily amorphous (one would expect an almost exact match between the composition of AGB dust shells and the dust in the ISM). Whether the crystalline dust is merely undetectable or amorphized remains a mystery. The FORCAST instrument on SOFIA as well as the PACS instrument on Herschel will provide exciting observing opportunities for the further study of crystalline silicates.

  5. Silicates in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirocky, M. M.; Levenson, N. A.; Elitzur, M.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Armus, L.

    2008-05-01

    We analyze the mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph. Dust emission dominates the MIR spectra of ULIRGs, and the reprocessed radiation that emerges is independent of the underlying heating spectrum. Instead, the resulting emission depends sensitively on the geometric distribution of the dust, which we diagnose with comparisons of numerical simulations of radiative transfer. Quantifying the silicate emission and absorption features that appear near 10 and 18 μm requires a reliable determination of the continuum, and we demonstrate that including a measurement of the continuum at intermediate wavelength (between the features) produces accurate results at all optical depths. With high-quality spectra, we successfully use the silicate features to constrain the dust chemistry. The observations of the ULIRGs and local sight lines require dust that has a relatively high 18 μm/10 μm absorption ratio of the silicate features (around 0.5). Specifically, the cold dust of Ossenkopf et al. is consistent with the observations, while other dust models are not. We use the silicate feature strengths to identify two families of ULIRGs, in which the dust distributions are fundamentally different. Optical spectral classifications are related to these families. In ULIRGs that harbor an active galactic nucleus, the spectrally broad lines are detected only when the nuclear surroundings are clumpy. In contrast, the sources of lower ionization optical spectra are deeply embedded in smooth distributions of optically thick dust.

  6. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly

  7. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  9. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  13. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  14. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  15. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  16. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  17. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tricalcium silicate. 582.2906 Section 582.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  18. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tricalcium silicate. 182.2906 Section 182.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  19. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  20. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Tricalcium silicate. 182.2906 Section 182.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  1. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tricalcium silicate. 582.2906 Section 582.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  2. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  3. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  4. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  5. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  7. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  9. Influence of water environment on holmium laser ablation performance for hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Li, Zhengjia

    2012-05-01

    This study clarifies the ablation differences in air and in water for hard biological tissues, which are irradiated by fiber-guided long-pulsed holmium lasers. High-speed photography is used to record the dynamic characteristics of ablation plumes and vaporization bubbles induced by pulsed holmium lasers. The ablation morphologies and depth of hard tissues are quantitatively measured by optical coherence microscopy. Explosive vaporization effects in water play a positive role in the contact ablation process and are directly responsible for significant ablation enhancement. Furthermore, water layer depth can also contribute to ablation performance. Under the same laser parameters for fiber-tissue contact ablation in air and water, ablation performances are comparable for a single-laser pulse, but for more laser pulses the ablation performances in water are better than those in air. Comprehensive knowledge of ablation differences under various environments is important, especially in medical procedures that are performed in a liquid environment. PMID:22614434

  10. Solubility product and thermodynamic functions for the holmium trifluoride - water system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.P.; James, J.; Hill, T.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The total solubility, free ion concentrations in saturated solutions, solubility products and thermodynamic functions for the dissolution of holmium trifluoride hemihydrate together with the stability constants for the holmium mono- and diflouride complexes are reported in this paper. Conductometric and potentiometric methods were used to measure the solubilities for comparison of the results obtained therefrom. Our values for pK{sub SO}, the thermodynamic solubility product in terms of free ion concentrations of both ions, obtained from both methods are in agreement with one of the reported values. There are no values reported in the literature for the thermodynamic constants for the dissolution process to be compared with except for entropy change. Our values for the stability constants, measured by a simplified procedure, do not agree with those reported by previous authors.

  11. Thermal properties of holmium-implanted gold films for a neutrino mass experiment with cryogenic microcalorimeters.

    PubMed

    Prasai, K; Alves, E; Bagliani, D; Basak Yanardag, S; Biasotti, M; Galeazzi, M; Gatti, F; Ribeiro Gomes, M; Rocha, J; Uprety, Y

    2013-08-01

    In a microcalorimetric neutrino mass experiment using the radioactive decay of (163)Ho, the radioactive material must be fully embedded in the microcalorimeter absorber. One option that is being investigated is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in other applications. However, knowing the thermal properties at the working temperature of microcalorimeters is critical for choosing the absorber material and for optimizing the detector performance. In particular, it is paramount to understand if implanting the radioactive material in gold changes its heat capacity. We used a bolometric technique to measure the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the (163)Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70 mK-300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the gold films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future microcalorimeter holmium experiment. PMID:24007077

  12. Thermal properties of holmium-implanted gold films for a neutrino mass experiment with cryogenic microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Prasai, K.; Yanardag, S. Basak; Galeazzi, M.; Uprety, Y.; Alves, E.; Rocha, J.; Bagliani, D.; Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Gomes, M. Ribeiro

    2013-08-15

    In a microcalorimetric neutrino mass experiment using the radioactive decay of {sup 163}Ho, the radioactive material must be fully embedded in the microcalorimeter absorber. One option that is being investigated is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in other applications. However, knowing the thermal properties at the working temperature of microcalorimeters is critical for choosing the absorber material and for optimizing the detector performance. In particular, it is paramount to understand if implanting the radioactive material in gold changes its heat capacity. We used a bolometric technique to measure the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the {sup 163}Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70 mK–300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the gold films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future microcalorimeter holmium experiment.

  13. Effect of holmium and erbium laser action on the human lens: an in-vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Dariusz

    1997-10-01

    We investigated the holmium and erbium lasers operating at the medium IR range, used for cataract surgery. The main advantage of these lasers action on biological structures is total absorption of radiation by superficial layers. During the study of the lens emulsification process we found that the mechanical properties of the lens nucleus were of crucial importance for the rate of emulsification. The soft lenses were fragmented and emulsified after 200-700 pulses, while the hard lens required 5000 or more pulses while complete emulsification was not achieved. The results are promising and show that the holmium and erbium lasers can be used for human lens emulsification during ECCE. For clinical purposes, however, it is necessary to construct a suitable fiberoptic tip to be used in cataract removal. It seems that lasers whose beam is in the medium IR range could be used in many ophthalmic operations.

  14. Medium-energy ion-scattering study of strained holmium silicide nanoislands grown on silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, T. J.; Eames, C.; Bonet, C.; Reakes, M. B.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Bailey, P.; Tear, S. P.

    2008-07-01

    We have used medium-energy ion scattering (MEIS) to quantitatively analyze the structure of holmium silicide islands grown on the Si(100) surface. Structure fitting to the experimental data unambiguously shows that the tetragonal silicide phase is present and not the hexagonal phase, which is associated with the growth of nanowires at submonolayer coverages. Islands formed with a lower holmium coverage of 3 ML are also shown to be tetragonal, which suggests that the hexagonal structure is not a low coverage precursor to the growth of the tetragonal phase. MEIS simulations of large nanoislands, which include the effects of lateral strain relief, have been performed and these compare well with the experimental data.

  15. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  16. Separation of carrier-free holmium-166 from neutron-irradiated dysprosium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dadachova, E.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Hetherington, E.L. ); Mirzadeh, S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. )

    1994-12-01

    Holmium-166 ([sup 166]Ho, t[sub 1/2] = 26.4 h) is utilized in radiotherapeutic applications such as radioimmunospecific pharmaceuticals, bone marrow ablation, and radiation synovectomy. High specific activity [sup 166]Ho can be obtained from the decay of dysprosium-166 ([sup 166]Dy, t[sub 1/2] = 81.5 h). Dysprosium-166 is produced by the [sup 164]Dy[n,[gamma

  17. Mathematical modelling of dispersion-managed thulium/holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yarutkina, I A; Shtyrina, O V

    2013-11-30

    The mathematical model of a dispersion-managed thulium/holmium fibre laser is described; the results of numerical calculations and their comparison with the experimental data are presented. Qualitative agreement of the results of the mathematical modelling with those of the experiment is obtained. Using the methods of mathematical modelling, the variation in the characteristics of the optical pulses due to the change in the average cavity dispersion is analysed. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  18. Laser Prostatectomy: Holmium Laser Enucleation and Photoselective Laser Vaporization of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Bostanci, Yakup; Kazzazi, Amir; Djavan, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Historically, transurethral resection of the prostate has been the gold standard for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Laser technology has been used to treat BPH for > 15 years. Over the past decade, it has gained wide acceptance by experienced urologists. This review provides an evidence-based update on laser surgery for BPH with a focus on photoselective laser vaporization and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate surgeries and assesses the safety, efficacy, and durability of these techniques. PMID:23671400

  19. Successful treatment of recurrent vesicourethral stricture after radical prostatectomy with holmium laser: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tetsuo; Yoshinaga, Atsushi; Ohno, Rena; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Toru; Yamada, Takumi; Kihara, Kazunori

    2005-04-01

    We report three cases with severe anastomotic strictures, which recurred several times after radical prostatectomy despite repeated treatments of urethral dilation, internal urethrotomy and/or transurethral resection. All three cases were finally treated with holmium laser successfully without any intraoperative or postoperative complications after repeated failures of each treatment. There were two specific characteristics in these three cases: the early onset of the stricture and the pinhole opening located on the top (12-o'clock) of the stricture wall. PMID:15948734

  20. Obliterated urethra: holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet cut-to-light with urolume stenting.

    PubMed

    Monga, M; Gordon, Z; Alexandrescu, B

    2001-12-01

    Antegrade-retrograde urethrotomy, or the cut-to-light procedure, performed for obliterated urethra is associated with a high rate of recurrence of urethra] stricture. With the goal of reducing the stricture recurrence rate, we performed a modified cut-to-light procedure using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and UroLume stenting in a 76-year-old man with urethral obliteration. PMID:11763485

  1. Holmium:YAG laser-assisted otolaryngologic surgery: Lahey Clinic experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapshay, Stanley M.; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Pankratov, Michail M.

    1993-07-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser was used to assist in 36 rhinologic procedures including surgery for chronic sinus disease, chronic dacryocystitis, recurrent choanal stenosis, and a sphenoid sinus mucocele. There were no laser related complications. The laser permitted controlled ablation of bone and soft tissue in all cases with satisfactory results. The Ho:YAG laser can be used in otolaryngology to assist in cases where surgical access is difficult or when controlled, precise bone and soft tissue ablation is necessary.

  2. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a review of the clinical trial evidence.

    PubMed

    Cynk, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has remained the procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of bladder outflow obstruction for almost five decades, but holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is now emerging as a challenger as the gold standard procedure. This review summarizes the evidence base for HoLEP, with particular reference to randomized, controlled (level 1) evidence. PMID:24688602

  3. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a review of the clinical trial evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has remained the procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of bladder outflow obstruction for almost five decades, but holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is now emerging as a challenger as the gold standard procedure. This review summarizes the evidence base for HoLEP, with particular reference to randomized, controlled (level 1) evidence. PMID:24688602

  4. Efficient holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser longitudinally pumped by a semiconductor laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1987-01-01

    Optical pumping of a holmium:yttrium lithium floride (Ho:YLF) crystal with a 790-nm continuous-wave diode-laser array has generated 56 mW of 2.1-micron laser radiation with an optical-to-optical conversion slope efficiency of 33 percent while the crystal temperature is held at 77 K. The lasing threshold occurs at 7 mW of input power, and laser operation continues up to a crystal temperature of 124 K.

  5. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  6. Soft-tissue applications of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    The ideal surgical laser for the treatment of soft tissue pathology should possess both ablative and hemostatic abilities. As well, for use in urologic conditions the laser must also be suitable for endoscopic use. The Holmium:YAG laser possesses these qualities and in preliminary clinical use has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications. In this study we review our initial experience with the Holmium:YAG laser over a 18 month period. A total of 51 patients underwent 53 procedures for a variety of soft tissue conditions including: bladder tumor ablation (25), incision of ureteral stricture (15), incision of urethral stricture (6), treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (3), incision of bladder neck contracture (2), and ablation of a ureteral tumor (2). Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved in all cases. Procedures were considered successful (no further intervention being required to treat the condition) in 81% of the cases. Two patients with dense bladder neck contractures required electroincision under the same anesthetic for completion of the procedure. A single complication, that of urinary extravasation following incision of a urethral stricture resolved with conservative management. In summary, the Holmium:YAG laser has demonstrated safety and proficiency in the treatment of a variety of urologic soft tissue conditions.

  7. Effects of simultaneously fiber transmitted erbium and holmium radiation on the interaction with highly absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenz, Martin; Pratisto, Hans S.; Ith, Michael; Koenz, Flurin; Weber, Heinz P.

    1995-05-01

    Erbium and Holmium lasers have both been shown to be suitable for orthopedic surgery performed under water. Erbium lasers emitting in the 3 micrometers wavelength region corresponding to the maximum water absorption peak effectively ablated biological tissues with high precision and minimal thermal damage. Holmium laser radiation at 2 micrometers , due to a lower absorption coefficient, is characterized by a greater extent of thermal damage leading to hemostasis. To combine the special advantages of each system we simultaneously coupled their radiation into a zirconium fluoride fiber (ZrF4) which was protected with a quartz fiber tip. Pressure measurements performed in the liquid using a piezo electrical transducer, transmission measurements and video flash lamp schlieren imaging of the laser induced vapor bubble were used in order to determine optimum laser parameters. The cutting efficiency of the Erbium laser is drastically improved when a low energy Holmium laser pulse is additionally used which is just able to open a vapor channel through which the Erbium laser pulse can be transmitted. The dynamics of the channel formation, geometry and life time are measured as a function of the delay time between the two different laser pulses and the pulse energy applied. The combination of 2 micrometers and 3 micrometers radiation seems to be an ideal instrument for tissue treatment.

  8. Laser angioplasty with lensed fibers and a holmium:YAG laser in iliac artery occlusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Christopher J.; Ramee, Stephen R.; Mesa, Juan E.; Collins, Tyrone J.; Kotmel, Robert; Godfrey, Maureen A.

    1991-05-01

    Holmium-YAG (2.1 (mu) ) laser recanalization was attempted in 10 totally occluded miniature swine iliac arteries using a lensed fiber delivery system. The iliac artery occlusions were created in a Yucatan miniature swine model of atherosclerosis by means of a high cholesterol diet and balloon endothelial denudation. In order to increase the spot size, a spherical silica lens was attached to the distal end of a 300 micrometers core diameter silica optical fiber. The holmium-YAG laser was operated in the free-running mode with 250 microsecond(s) ec pulses at 4 Hz. The energy delivered was 225 mJ per pulse for the 1.0 mm lensed fiber and 200 mJ per pulse for the 1.3 mm lensed fiber. Laser energy was delivered in 2 to 5 second bursts. Successful recanalization was achieved in all 10 arteries attempted without perforation of the arterial wall. The average length of the occlusions was 5.0 +/- 1.8 cm. Following successful laser recanalization significant stenoses (>50%) remained in all of the arteries as judged by angiography. In conclusion, the lensed fibers coupled to the pulsed holmium-YAG laser were safe and effective in recanalizing these difficult lesions in relatively straight iliac arteries. There is potential clinical utility for this system as an adjunct to balloon angioplasty in patients with lesions which are unable to be crossed with guidewires.

  9. Selective determination of the holmium in rare earth mixtures by second derivative spectrophotometry with 2-isobutylformyl-1,3-dione-indan and octylphenol poly-(ethyleneglycol)ether

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Naixing; Si Zhikun; Jiang Wei

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the absorption spectra of 4f electron transitions of the system of holmium with 2-isobutylformyl-1,3-dione-indan and TX-100 have been studied by normal and derivative spectrophotometry. The molar absorptivities are 98 (at 450 nm) and 21 (at 460 nm) 1 {center_dot} mol{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}, respectively. The use of the second derivative spectra, eliminates the interference by other lanthanides and improves the sensitivity for holmium determination. The derivative molar absorptivity is 558 1 {center_dot} mol{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}. The calibration graph was linear up to 25{mu}g/ml of holmium. The relative standard deviation evaluated from ten independent determinations of 8.0 {mu}g/ml holmium is 1.0%. The detection limit, obtained from the sensitivity of the calibration graph and for 3 S{sub b} (S{sub b} = standard deviation of a blank without holmium, n = 11), was found to be 0.31 {mu}g/ml of holmium. The quantification limit, obtained for 10 S{sub b}, was 1.0 {mu}g/ml of holmium. A method has been developed for determining holmium in a mixture of lanthanides by means of the second derivative spectra and the analytical results obtained are satisfactory.

  10. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  11. Ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy: an emerging definitive management strategy for symptomatic ureteral calculi in pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Wollin, Timothy A.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: Symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy that does not respond to conservative measures has traditionally been managed with ureteral stent insertion or percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN). Holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser lithotripsy using state-of-the-art ureteroscopes represents an emerging strategy for definitive stone management in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to review the results of holmium laser lithotripsy in a cohort of patients who presented with symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted at 2 tertiary stone centers from January 1996 to August 2001 to identify pregnant patients who were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for symptomatic urolithiasis or encrusted stents. Eight patients with a total of 10 symptomatic ureteral calculi and 2 encrusted ureteral stents were treated. Mean gestational age at presentation was 22 weeks. Mean stone size was 8.1 mm. Stones were located in the proximal ureter/ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) (3), mid ureter (1), and distal ureter (6). Results: Complete stone fragmentation and/or removal of encrusted ureteral stents were achieved in all patients using the holmium:YAG laser. The overall procedural success rate was 91%. The overall stone-free rate was 89%. No obstetrical or urological complications were encountered. Conclusions: Ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy can be performed safely in all stages of pregnancy providing definitive management of symptomatic ureteral calculi. The procedure can be done with minimal or no fluoroscopy and avoids the undesirable features of stents or nephrostomy tubes.

  12. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure. PMID:23538050

  13. Silicate stabilization studies in propylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.A.

    1999-08-01

    In most North American and many European coolant formulations, the corrosion inhibition of heat-rejecting aluminum surfaces is provided by alkali metal silicates. But, their tendency towards polymerization, leading to gelation and/or precipitation, can reduce the effectiveness of a coolant. This paper presents the results of experiments which illustrate formulation-dependent behavior of inorganic silicate in propylene glycol compositions. Specific examples of the effects of glycol matrix, stabilizer type, and hard water on silicate stabilization are provided.

  14. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  15. Effect of silicate ions on electrode overvoltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gras, J. M.; Seite, C.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the addition of a silicate to a caustic solution (KOH) is studied in order to determine the degree to which silicates inhibit the corrosion of chrysotile under conditions of electrolysis at working temperatures of 100 C and above. In an alkaline solution containing various silicate concentrations, current density was increased and electrode overvoltage was measured. Results show that silicate ion concentrations in the electrolyte increase with temperature without effecting electrochemical performance up to 115 C at 700 MA/sqcm. At this point the concentration is about 0.5 g Si/100 g KOH. Beyond this limit, electrolytic performance rapidly degenerates due to severe oxidation of the electrodes.

  16. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  17. Retrograde flexible ureterorenoscopic holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy: the new gold standard.

    PubMed

    Gould, D L

    1998-03-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy of flexible retrograde ureterorenoscopic holmium-YAG intracorporeal laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal calculi, a total of 86 patients presenting to our hospital with renal calculi underwent flexible retrograde ureterorenoscopic holmium-YAG intracorporeal laser lithotripsy of their stones, and the data were collected prospectively. As extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is not available at our institution, all patients with renal calculi in this study were treated in a retrograde fashion using the Richard Wolf 6.0F semirigid ureteroscope, the 7.5F flexible ureterorenoscope, and the holmium-YAG laser by Coherent Inc. Except for inhospital consults or patients requiring admission secondary to infection, all cases were performed on an ambulatory basis. All renal calculi 3 cm or smaller were approached in a retrograde fashion. Where possible, the stones were initially debulked using the semirigid ureteroscope and the 550-microm fiber followed by the flexible ureterorenoscope in combination with the 360- or 200-microm laser fiber depending on stone position. Stones were fragmented until they were small enough to be removed by hydrocleansing. Using this technique, stone-free success rates for calculi 2.5 cm or smaller after a single treatment, regardless of stone composition or location, are superior to those of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. For calculi between 2.5 and 3 cm, the results also are noted to be superior. We conclude that for calculi larger than 3 cm or for partial staghorn calculi, the treatment of choice appears to be a percutaneous approach. PMID:9568772

  18. Percutaneous Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Management of Complicated Biliary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Kelly; Chamsuddin, Abbas; Spivey, James; Martin, Louis; Nieh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Advances in endoscopic techniques have transformed the management of urolithiasis. We sought to evaluate the role of such urological interventions for the treatment of complex biliary calculi. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients (n=9) undergoing percutaneous holmium laser lithotripsy for complicated biliary calculi over a 4-year period (12/2003 to 12/2007). All previously failed standard techniques include ERCP with sphincterotomy (n=6), PTHC (n=7), or both of these. Access to the biliary system was obtained via an existing percutaneous transhepatic catheter or T-tube tracts. Endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy was performed via a flexible cystoscope or ureteroscope. Stone clearance was confirmed intra- and postoperatively. A percutaneous transhepatic drain was left indwelling for follow-up imaging. Results: Mean patient age was 65.6 years (range, 38 to 92). Total stone burden ranged from 1.7 cm to 5 cm. All 9 patients had stones located in the CBD, with 2 patients also having additional stones within the hepatic ducts. All 9 patients (100%) were visually stone-free after one endoscopic procedure. No major perioperative complications occurred. Mean length of stay was 2.4 days. At a mean radiological follow-up of 5.4 months (range, 0.5 to 21), no stone recurrence was noted. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy is a minimally invasive alternative to open salvage surgery for complex biliary calculi refractory to standard approaches. This treatment is both safe and efficacious. Success depends on a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:19660213

  19. Optimization of dosimetry and safety using the holmium laser for urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Swol, Christiaan F. P.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; Zeijlemaker, Bram Y. W.; Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Boon, Tom A.

    1998-07-01

    The holmium laser has become accepted as a versatile instrument for urological applications, such as prostate resection, urethrotomy, tumor coagulation and lithotripsy. Presently, more powerful lasers have become available generating pulses up to 4 J at 80 W. The necessity of these high power systems in urology is ambiguous. In this study, the dosimetry as to efficacy and especially safety was investigated for various applications. The holmium laser ((lambda) equals 2.1 micrometer) emits its energy in 350 microsecond pulses which instantly turn water into vapor. Using high-speed photography explosive vapor bubbles with diameters over 10 mm were captured. The mechanical force of these bubbles, effectively fragments stones but may dilate and rupture a small lumen like the ureter. After implosion of the bubble, the energy of vaporization turns into heat. Depending on pulse energy and pulse repetition rate, tissue can be thermally affected up to 5 mm. For soft tissue applications, e.g., urethrotomy, prostatectomy or tumor coagulation, pulse energies of 0.5 - 1.5 J were applied at a high repetition rate (20 - 40 Hz) to provide sufficient coagulative and hemostatic effects. At higher pulse energies, the fiber tip was vibrating vigorously and the tissue was ripped to pieces decreasing hemostasis and visibility. For hard tissue applications, bursts of 0.5 J pulses at 5 Hz, proved to be sufficient to fragment all types of stones (including cystine) in the ureter and the bladder without mechanical or thermal damage to surrounding tissue. At higher settings, targeting the stone was less controlled and effective due to 'jumping' of the fiber tip with resulting mechanical and thermal trauma to the surrounding tissue. The holmium laser can be used effectively to coagulate and cut soft tissue and fragment stones at relatively low energy and power settings, thus minimizing the risk of complications.

  20. Silicate Glass Corrosion Mechanism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Lenting, Christoph; Dohmen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste borosilicate glasses is essential to predict their long-term aqueous durability in a geologic repository. Several observations have been made with compositionally different silicate glasses that cannot be explained by any of the established glass corrosion models. These models are based on diffusion-controlled ion exchange and subsequent structural reorganisation of a leached, hydrated residual glass, leaving behind a so-called gel layer. In fact, the common observation of lamellar to more complex pattern formation observed in experiment and nature, the porous structure of the corrosion layer, an atomically sharp boundary between the corrosion zone and the underlying pristine glass, as well as results of novel isotope tracer and in situ, real time experiments rather support an interface-coupled glass dissolution-silica reprecipitation model. In this model, the congruent dissolution of the glass is coupled in space and time to the precipitation and growth of amorphous silica at an inwardly moving reaction front. We suggest that these coupled processes have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  1. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate and Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula Treated by Superselective Arterial Embolization.

    PubMed

    Asimakopoulos, Anastasios D; Dutto, Lorenzo; Preziosi, Paolo; Spera, Enrico; Micali, Francesco; De Carolis, Andrea; Iorio, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic pelvic pseudoaneurysm with concomitant arteriovenous fistula has been described as a rare and challenging complication, which may occur during transurethral resection of the prostate. We provide the first report of this complication after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The attempt to control the bleeding by conversion to open surgery and placement of haemostatic stitches into the prostatic fossa failed. Angiography with superselective arterial embolization proved to be a modern, quick, safe, and efficient treatment of this uncommon complication. PMID:27022498

  2. Holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres for fluoroscopy-guided embolotherapy and multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Oerlemans, Chris; Seevinck, Peter R; Smits, Maarten L; Hennink, Wim E; Bakker, Chris J G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Nijsen, J Frank W

    2015-03-30

    Embolotherapy is a minimally invasive transcatheter technique aiming at reduction or complete obstruction of the blood flow by infusion of micro-sized particles in order to induce tumor regression. A major drawback of the current commercially available and clinically used microspheres is that they cannot be detected in vivo with medical imaging techniques, impeding intra- and post-procedural feedback. It can be expected that real-time monitoring of microsphere infusion and post-procedural imaging will result in better predictability and higher efficacy of the treatment. In this study, a novel microsphere formulation has been developed that can be visualized with fluoroscopy, X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The microspheres were prepared with the JetCutter technique and consist of alginate (matrix-forming polymer), holmium (cross-linking and MRI contrast agent), lipiodol (radiopaque contrast agent) and Pluronic F-68 (surfactant). The mean size (±SEM) of the hydrated holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres (Ho-lip-ams) was 570±12 μm with a holmium content of 0.38±0.01% (w/w). Stability studies showed that the microspheres remained intact during incubation for two weeks in fetal calf serum (FCS) at 37 °C. The inclusion of lipiodol in the microspheres rendered excellent visualization capabilities for fluoroscopy and CT, whereas the holmium ions, which keep the alginate network together, also allow MR imaging. In this study it was shown that single sphere detection was possible by fluoroscopy, CT and MRI. The Ho-lip-ams were visualized in real-time, during infusion in a porcine kidney using fluoroscopy, and post-procedural, the deposition of the microspheres was examined with fluoroscopy, (cone beam rotational) CT and MRI. The different imaging modalities showed similar deposition patterns of the microspheres within the organ. The combination of intra-procedural visualization, multimodality imaging for patient follow-up and the

  3. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate and Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula Treated by Superselective Arterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Dutto, Lorenzo; Preziosi, Paolo; Spera, Enrico; Micali, Francesco; De Carolis, Andrea; Iorio, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic pelvic pseudoaneurysm with concomitant arteriovenous fistula has been described as a rare and challenging complication, which may occur during transurethral resection of the prostate. We provide the first report of this complication after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The attempt to control the bleeding by conversion to open surgery and placement of haemostatic stitches into the prostatic fossa failed. Angiography with superselective arterial embolization proved to be a modern, quick, safe, and efficient treatment of this uncommon complication. PMID:27022498

  4. Endoscopic removal of a proximal urethral stent using a holmium laser: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Francisco; Thomas, Anil A.; Miocinovic, Ranko; Angermeier, Kenneth W.

    2012-01-01

    Urethral stents were initially developed for the management of urethral strictures and obstructive voiding disorders in select patients. Urethral stent complications are common and may require stent explantation, which is often quite challenging. We present our experience with endoscopic removal of an encrusted UroLume proximal urethral stent in a 72-year-old male using a holmium laser. The literature on various management options and outcomes for urethral stent removal is reviewed. Endoscopic removal of proximal urethral stents is feasible and safe and should be considered as the primary treatment option in patients requiring stent extraction. PMID:23248530

  5. Technical Aspects of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myong; Lee, Hahn-Ey

    2013-01-01

    Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is a minimally invasive procedure and a size-independent treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia with excellent long-term surgical outcome. HoLEP has become an alternative to conventional transurethral resection of the prostate or open prostatectomy owing to its efficacy and safety. Although HoLEP is known to have a steep learning curve, very few articles have addressed the technical aspects of HoLEP. Herein, we described detailed techniques and tips for HoLEP as performed at Seoul National University Hospital in a step-by-step manner with extensive review of the literature. PMID:24044089

  6. Spectroscopic properties, energy transfer dynamics, and laser performance of thulium-holmium doped laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalisky, Y.; Rotman, S.R.; Boulon, G.; Pedrini, C.; Brenier, A.

    1994-12-31

    Spectroscopic studies using laser induced fluorescence and numerical modeling of energy transfer and back transfer mechanism are reported in Er:Tm:Ho:YLF, Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG and Cr:Tm:YAG laser crystals at various temperatures (10 K-300 K). Direct energy transfer from Tm{sup 3+} excited states to Ho{sup 3+} {sup 5}I{sub 7} emitting level was observed and analyzed both in YAG and YLF. Further analysis of Cr{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} time-dependent emission curves indicate a strong correlation of chromium-thulium pairs. Pulsed operation of holmium laser at high temperature will be presented.

  7. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a paradigm shift in benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Holmium laser enucleation (HoLEP) was developed in the 1990s as a more efficient and cost effective method of benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery than laser vaporization and resection techniques. As a true anatomical enucleation it mimics open prostatectomy and is as durable. There is a significant body of level 1 evidence in support of HoLEP, including 2 meta-analyses and 14 randomized trials which compare HoLEP with a number of other procedures. This review describes the development of and summarizes the evidence for HoLEP. PMID:24082919

  8. Technical aspects of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong; Lee, Hahn-Ey; Oh, Seung-June

    2013-09-01

    Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is a minimally invasive procedure and a size-independent treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia with excellent long-term surgical outcome. HoLEP has become an alternative to conventional transurethral resection of the prostate or open prostatectomy owing to its efficacy and safety. Although HoLEP is known to have a steep learning curve, very few articles have addressed the technical aspects of HoLEP. Herein, we described detailed techniques and tips for HoLEP as performed at Seoul National University Hospital in a step-by-step manner with extensive review of the literature. PMID:24044089

  9. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a paradigm shift in benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery.

    PubMed

    Aho, Tevita F

    2013-10-01

    Holmium laser enucleation (HoLEP) was developed in the 1990s as a more efficient and cost effective method of benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery than laser vaporization and resection techniques. As a true anatomical enucleation it mimics open prostatectomy and is as durable. There is a significant body of level 1 evidence in support of HoLEP, including 2 meta-analyses and 14 randomized trials which compare HoLEP with a number of other procedures. This review describes the development of and summarizes the evidence for HoLEP. PMID:24082919

  10. Silicate minerals and the interferon system

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N.; Booth, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    Natural-occurring minerals representative of six silicate classes were examined for their influence on interferon induction by influenza virus in Rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK/sub 2/) cell monolayers. Minerals within the classes nesosilicate, sorosilicate, cyclosilicate, and inosilicate exhibited either little or marked (50% or greater) inhibition of interferon induction. Within the inosilicate class, however, minerals of the pyroxenoid group (wollastonite, pectolite, and rhodonite) all significantly showed a two- to threefold increase in interferon production. Silicate materials in the phyllosilicate and tectosilicate classes all showed inhibitory activity for the induction process. When silicate minerals were coated with the polymer poly(4-vinylpyridine-N-oxide), the inhibitory activity of silicates on viral interferon induction was counteracted. Of nine randomly selected silicate minerals, which inhibited viral interferon induction, none adversely affected the ability of exogenous interferon to confer antiviral cellular resistance. Increased levels of influenza virus multiplication concomitant with decreased levels of interferon occurred in cell monolayers pretreated with silicates. The findings of this study demonstrate the diverse effects of minerals representative of different silicate classes on the interferon system and indicate that certain silicates in comprising the viral interferon induction process may increase susceptibility to viral infection.

  11. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2437 Magnesium silicate. (a) Product....

  12. Evaluation of holmium laser versus cold knife in optical internal urethrotomy for the management of short segment urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Kaza, Ram Chandra Murthy; Singh, Bipin Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Sachse cold knife is conventionally used for optical internal urethrotomy intended to manage urethral strictures and Ho: YAG laser is an alternative to it. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of urethral stricture treatment outcomes, efficacy, and complications using cold knife and Ho: YAG (Holmium laser) for optical internal urethrotomy Materials and Methods: In this prospective study included, 90 male patients age >18 years, with diagnosis of urethral stricture admitted for internal optical urethrotomy during April 2010 to March 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups containing 45 patients each using computer generated random number. In group A (Holmium group), internal urethrotomy was done with Holmium laser and in group B (Cold knife group) Sachse cold knife was used. Patients were followed up for 6 months after surgery in Out Patient Department on 15, 30 and 180 post-operative days. At each follow up visit physical examination, and uroflowmetry was performed along with noting complaints, if any. Results: The peak flow rates (PFR) were compared between the two groups on each follow up. At 180 days (6 month interval) the difference between mean of PFR for Holmium and Cold knife group was statistically highly significant (P < 0.001). Complications were seen in 12.22% of cases. Conclusion: Both modalities are effective in providing immediate relief to patients with single and short segment (<2 cm long) urethral strictures but more sustained response was attained with Cold knife urethrotomy. PMID:25371611

  13. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Melde, Brian J.; Johnson, Brandy J.; Charles, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through co-condensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  14. Treatment of Parapelvic Cyst by Internal Drainage Technology Using Ureteroscope and Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Q; Huang, S; Li, Q; Xu, L; Wei, X; Huang, S; Li, S; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The aim of parapelvic cyst treatment is to have complete drainage of cyst fluid and prevent its further compression of the kidney and collective system. This study explores the efficacy and safety of surgical approaches with holmium laser ureteroscopic internal drainage in the treatment of parapelvic cyst. Methods: The compression effect of parapelvic cyst on the renal collective system was observed by rigid ureteroscope using retrograde ureteroscopic technology. With direct vision, the cyst wall on the obvious parapelvic compression site was cut. The diameter of the cyst wall cut was about 1 cm. The internal drainage was obtained by double-J tubes. When the cyst was in the inferior pole of kidney or where the rigid ureteroscope could not reach, a flexible ureteroscope was used. Results: In 28 cases of operation, 27 cases were successful. The cyst treatment time was eight to 40 minutes (average 26 minutes). During the operation, no massive haemorrhage, damage of nearby organ and ureter, or other complications happened. Time of follow-up was 10–72 months (average 39 months). The results of follow-up showed that in 22 cases, the cyst disappeared; the diameter of the cyst in four cases was reduced by more than half, and one case recurred. Conclusion: The treatment of parapelvic cyst by internal drainage operation using holmium laser and ureteroscopy was effective. The operation was safe with few complications. PMID:26426175

  15. Posterior Urethral Polyp: First Holmium-YAG Laser Ablation on a 3-Month-Old Infant

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Ercument; Yapanoglu, Turgut; Adanur, Senol; Ziypak, Tevfik; Altay, Mehmet Sefa; Aksoy, Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Urethral polyps are rare benign pathologies seen in the male posterior urethra, more frequently originating from verumontanum. In this article, we aimed to discuss diagnosis and treatment of a urethral polyp causing hematuria and urinary infection in a 3-month-old male infant. This is the first case in the literature in which a urethral polyp is treated with Holmium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser. Case Presentation: The patient was a 3-month-old male infant, and complains were hematuria and crying during micturition. Ultrasonography and voiding cystourethrogram were used for diagnosis. Urethral polyp was observed on urethrocystoscopy. Ablation was performed with a newborn cystoscope. Conclusion: Urethral polyp can cause hematuria and urinary obstruction and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pathologies such as posterior urethral valve and cecoureterocele that could cause infravesical obstruction. Holmium-YAG laser is a good choice of treatment with easy application possibilities using a newborn cystoscope, especially for newborns and infants who have thin urethra. PMID:27579428

  16. Histologic comparison of needle, holmium:YAG, and erbium:YAG endoscopic goniotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Rivera, Brian K.; Hernandez, Eleut; Shetlar, Debra J.

    1995-05-01

    An endoscope allows visualization of the anterior chamber angle in porcine eyes despite the presence of cloudy corneas. The pectinate ligaments in the anterior chamber angle are a surgical model for primary infantile glaucoma. This study investigated the histologic results, one month after treating the anterior chamber angle with a goniotomy needle, the holmium:YAG laser, or the erbium:YAG laser coupled to a small endoscope. The anterior chambers were deepened with a viscoelastic material in one-month-old anesthetized pigs. An Olympus 0.8 mm diameter flexible endoscope was externally coupled to a 23 gauge needle or a 300 micron diameter fiber. The angle was treated for 120 degrees by one of the three methods, and the probe was removed. During the acute study, all three methods cut the pectinate ligaments. The histologic findings one month after healing demonstrated minimal surrounding tissue damage following goniotomy with a needle and the most surrounding tissue damage following treatment with the holmium:YAG laser.

  17. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  18. Optical and microhardness measurement of lead silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogad, Rashmi M.; Kumar, Rakesh; Krishna, P. S. R.; Jogad, M. S.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Mathad, R. D.

    2013-02-01

    Lead silicate glasses, PbO-SiO2, are interesting because these glasses exhibit thermal, optical, and mechanical properties different than other silicate glasses, and they form a thermally and chemically stable glass over a wide composition range. They are also interesting as PbO acts as glass modifier and as glass former depending on the concentration. In the present work we have prepared lead silicate glasses (xPbO-(1-x).SiO2) by melt quenching. We measured UV absorbance, Vickers hardness, and glass transition for these samples. It is found that band gap is proportional to glass transition.

  19. Properties of holmium implanted gold films and yttrium silicide to use as absorbers in microcalorimeters for a holmium neutrino mass experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Krishna P.

    In recent years, there has been huge improvement in microcalorimetric technology and its applications. Today's cryogenic microcalorimeter technology can be used in a large scale experiment with excellent energy and time resolutions. Transition Edge Sensor (TES) microcalorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for a wide range of applications including neutrino mass measurement. We are developing a source (163Ho) embedded TES microcalorimeter for neutrino mass measurement. Energy resolution, rise time of events, decay time, and read-out electronics must be considered carefully in designing a microcalorimeter for the application of neutrino mass experiments. Our research is particularly focused on the investigation of the properties of the 163Ho imbedded metallic absorber for the application of the Ho-neutrino mass experiment. In a microcalorimetric neutrino mass experiment using the radioactive decay of 163Ho, the radioactive material must be fully embedded in the microcalorimeter absorber. One option that is being investigated is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in other applications. However, knowing the thermal properties at the working temperature of microcalorimeters is critical for choosing the absorber material and for optimizing the detector performance. In particular, it is paramount to understand if implanting the radioactive material in gold changes its heat capacity. We used a bolometric technique to measure the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the 163Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70 mK to 300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the gold films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future microcalorimeter holmium experiment. Furthermore, most chemical processes to extract the Ho-163 isotope and insert it into a detector absorber involve yttrium based compounds

  20. Early Contributions To Silicate Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ted

    I have been asked to describe the early work concerning the palaeomagnetic signifi- cance of silicates. In his classic papers published half a century ago, Louis Néel put forward an elegant single-domain (SD) theory to explain the strength and enormous stability of remanent magnetization in rocks. The difficulty was that the predicted size for SD behaviour in magnetite was less than the wavelength of light. This led to the application of electron microscopy to this problem, the first images being obtained in 1969. As it happened, these involved tiny inclusions of magnetite in the pyroxene crystals of a Precambrian gabbro. The technique used in these early investigations was a metallurgical one wherein a carbon film replica of the polished and etched surface of the rock sample is prepared. This provides high spatial resolution but not much com- positional information. Furthermore, the experimental procedures involved are suffi- ciently labour-intensive that this type of work never achieved much popularity. Never- theless, Ssilicate inclusionS remanence has been identified in a variety of oceanic and ´ continental igneous rocks involving ShostS crystals of olivine, pyroxene and feldspar. ´ As far as this session is concerned, the so-called Scloudy feldsparsS found in basic ´ dykes are particularly relevant.

  1. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies. PMID:20847267

  2. Siliceous microfossil extraction from altered Monterey rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.O.; Casey, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    Samples of altered Monterey rocks of differing lithologies were processed by various methods to develop new techniques for extracting siliceous microfossils. The preliminary use of thin sections made from the same rocks reduced the number of probable samples (samples worth further processing) by about one-third. Most of the siliceous microfossils contained in altered Monterey rocks appear to be highly recrystallized and are extremely fragile; however, some contained silicified and silica-infilled radiolarians and planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, which are very tough. In general the most useful techniques were gently hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, monosodium glutamate, and regular siliceous microfossil extraction techniques. Unsuccessful techniques and a new siliceous microfossil flotation technique are also documented.

  3. Silicate production and availability for mineral carbonation.

    PubMed

    Renforth, P; Washbourne, C-L; Taylder, J; Manning, D A C

    2011-03-15

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestered as carbonates through the accelerated weathering of silicate minerals is proposed as a climate change mitigation technology with the potential to capture billions of tonnes of carbon per year. Although these materials can be mined expressly for carbonation, they are also produced by human activities (cement, iron and steel making, coal combustion, etc.). Despite their potential, there is poor global accounting of silicates produced in this way. This paper presents production estimates (by proxy) of various silicate materials including aggregate and mine waste, cement kiln dust, construction and demolition waste, iron and steel slag, and fuel ash. Approximately 7-17 billion tonnes are produced globally each year with an approximate annual sequestration potential of 190-332 million tonnes C. These estimates provide justification for additional research to accurately quantify the contemporary production of silicate minerals and to determine the location and carbon capture potential of historic material accumulations. PMID:21332128

  4. Peralkaline silicic volcanic rocks in northwestern nevada.

    PubMed

    Noble, D C; Chipman, D W; Giles, D L

    1968-06-21

    Late Tertiary silicic ashflow tuffs and lavas peralkaline in chemical character (atomic Na + K greater than Al), mainly comendites, occur over wide areas in northwestern Nevada and appear to be widespread in southeastern Oregon. Such peralkaline rocks-which are not uncommon in the western United States-and other chemically unusual silicic rocks are found near the margins rather than toward the center of the Great Basin. PMID:17800671

  5. Microscopic analysis of laser-induced proximal fiber tip damage during holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-04-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to the standard holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. The TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium-doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller (e.g., 50- to 150-μm core) fibers than possible during holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether the more uniform TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared with the holmium laser multimodal beam. Light and confocal microscopy images were taken of the proximal surface of each fiber to inspect for possible laser-induced damage. A TFL beam at a wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, and 500-μs pulse duration, and 100,000 pulses were delivered at each pulse rate setting of 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 Hz. For comparison, single use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical holmium laser lithotripsy procedures performed with standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output pulse energy and average power were stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed at settings up to 35 mJ, 400 Hz, and 14 W average power (n=5). In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation, indicated by small ablation craters on the scale of several micrometers in all fibers (n=20). In summary, the proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted up to 14 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially translate into lower costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  6. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  7. Silicate complexes of sugars in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Joseph B; Lu, Gang; Singer, Stephanie R; Kolb, Vera M

    2004-08-11

    Certain sugars react readily with basic silicic acid to form soluble 2/1 (sugar/silicic acid) silicate complexes. Failure of monohydroxy compounds to give soluble products under these conditions indicates that the sugar silicates are chelates: five-membered diolato rings. Only furanose forms react. Pyranose sugars are stable under these conditions. Because all glycosides fail to react with silicic acid under these conditions, reaction appears to involve the anomeric position (C1 in aldoses, C2 in ketoses), which has a more acidic hydroxy group. Reaction is completed only when the anomeric hydroxy group is cis to an adjacent hydroxy group. The appropriate furanose form must have sufficient natural abundance and solubility to provide an observable product, as measured by (29)Si and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. These structural and practical constraints rationalize the successful reaction of the monosaccharides ribose, xylose, lyxose, talose, psicose, fructose, sorbose, and tagatose and the disaccharides lactulose, maltulose, and palatinose. Glucose, mannose, galactose, and sucrose, among others, failed to form complexes. This high selectivity for formation of sugar silicates may have ramifications in prebiotic chemistry. PMID:15291565

  8. Synthesis and optical properties of antimony oxide glasses doped with holmium trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunatha, S.; Eraiah, B.

    2016-05-01

    Holmium doped lithium-antimony-lead borate glasses having 1mol% AgNO3 with composition 50B2O3-20PbO-25Sb2O3-5Li2O have been prepared using single step melt quenching technique. The XRD spectrum confirms amorphous nature of glasses. The optical absorbance studies were carried out on these glasses. The optical direct band gap energies were found to be in the range of 3.10 eV to 3.31 eV and indirect band gap energies were found to be in the range of 2.28 eV to 3.00 eV. The refractive indexes have been calculated by using Lorentz-Lorenz formula and the calculated values in the range of 2.31 to 2.37.

  9. Quantum theory of the anisotropy of the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic holmium iron garnet single crystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiehui; Ma, Shengcan; Xu, You

    2009-03-01

    The pronounced anisotropy of the magnetization caused by the Ho(3+) ions in the ferrimagnetic holmium iron garnet has been investigated based on quantum theory. The strong anisotropy of the magnetization of the Ho(3+) ions originates mainly from the effect of the crystal field upon the Ho(3+) ions and the anisotropic Ho(3+)-Fe(3+) superexchange interaction. Following the expression of the Yb(3+)-Fe(3+) exchange interaction used by Alben, the anisotropy of the Ho(3+)-Fe(3+) exchange interaction is defined by three principal values of the exchange tensor G. Because the six Ho(3+) sublattices are magnetically non-equivalent, we calculate the magnetic quantities of the Ho(3+) at the six sublattices and compare the average value of the so-obtained six quantities with the measured values. The calculated results are in good agreement with experiments. An interpretation on the anisotropy of the magnetic properties of HoIG is given. PMID:21817410

  10. Emission spectrum of holmium atoms excited during ionic sputtering of a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, S. S.; Braslavets, V. V.; Evdokimov, S. A.

    1988-08-01

    The article shows the fundamental possibility of using the bombardment of the surface of solids by kilo V ions for exciting the emission spectrum of particles of the target material and for obtaining spectroscopic data. The method is tested by studying the emission spectra of holmium as an example. It is shown that the sensitivity of the method can be substantially increased by using the so-called chemical effect, i.e., the effect of strengthening the spectral lines of sputtered excited metal atoms during bombardment of the target in the presence of oxygen. It is proposed that the chemical effect, which takes place only for atomic lines, in contrast to ionic ones, can also be used for simplifying the identification of atomic lines. It is noted that the proposed method is suitable for studying the atomic spectra of any solids, including refractory and chemically reactive substances.

  11. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate in a 400 cc Prostate: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gopee, Esha L; Hong, Matthew K H; Pham, Trung

    2016-01-01

    The modality of choice in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia for large prostates has traditionally been open prostatectomy. Advances in minimally invasive techniques have begun to challenge this notion with advantages such as lower bleeding and transfusion rates and shorter hospital stay. In this case report, we illustrate the use of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in a gland measuring more than 400 cc. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man with persistent voiding urinary symptoms despite two previous transurethral resections of his prostate. With greater experience in HoLEP and declining experience in open prostatectomy, there may be a shift toward HoLEP as the preferred treatment choice for large prostate glands. PMID:27579406

  12. Acute and chronic response of meniscal fibrocartilage to holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Patrick J.; Popovic, Neven A.; Islinger, Richard B.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Dick, Edward J.

    1997-05-01

    The acute and chronic (10 week) histological effects of the holmium:YAG laser during partial meniscectomy in an in vivo rabbit model were investigated. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral parapatellar medial knee arthrotomies. In the right knee, a partial medial meniscectomy was done through the avascular zone using a standard surgical blade. In the left knee, an anatomically similar partial medial meniscectomy was performed using a Ho:YAG laser (Coherent, USA). This study indicates that the laser creates two zones of damage in the meniscal fibrocartilage and that the zone of thermal change may act as a barrier to healing. The zone of thermal change which is eventually debrided was thought at the time of surgery to be viable. In the laser cut menisci, the synovium appears to have greater inflammation early and to be equivalent with the scalpel cut after three weeks. At all time periods there appeared more cellular damage in the laser specimens.

  13. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate in a 400 cc Prostate: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Matthew K.H.; Pham, Trung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The modality of choice in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia for large prostates has traditionally been open prostatectomy. Advances in minimally invasive techniques have begun to challenge this notion with advantages such as lower bleeding and transfusion rates and shorter hospital stay. In this case report, we illustrate the use of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in a gland measuring more than 400 cc. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man with persistent voiding urinary symptoms despite two previous transurethral resections of his prostate. With greater experience in HoLEP and declining experience in open prostatectomy, there may be a shift toward HoLEP as the preferred treatment choice for large prostate glands. PMID:27579406

  14. Application of 2-um wavelength holmium lasers for treatment of skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Ivan A.; Klimov, Igor V.; Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Nerobeev, Alexander I.; Sadovnikova, Lija B.; Eliseenko, Vladimir I.

    1994-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental analysis of the efficiency of application of 2 micrometers pulsed holmium laser for cosmetic and plastic surgery and dermatology is carried out. Preliminary experiments were carried out on rats. Solid state 2 micrometers pulsed laser was allowed to operate in free running mode with pulse energy up to 1.5 J and pulse repetition rate up to 5 Hz. To deliver emission to the object a flexible quartz fiber without further focusing of 2.5 m in length and 400 micrometers of the core diameter was used. The effect of the different power density emission on the skin was studied. The second stage was the study of the influence of 2 micrometers emission on human skin. The results of the removal of hemangioma, papilloma, telangiectasia, nevus, nevus acantholytic, xanthelasma palpebral, verruca, chloasma, pigmental spots, tattoos, etc. are presented. Precision, simplicity, efficiency, and the high cosmetic effect of these operations is noted.

  15. Cavitation effect of holmium laser pulse applied to ablation of hard tissue underwater.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Xia, Danqing; Ruan, Kai; Li, Zhengjia

    2010-01-01

    To overcome the inconsecutive drawback of shadow and schlieren photography, the complete dynamics of cavitation bubble oscillation or ablation products induced by a single holmium laser pulse [2.12 microm, 300 micros (FWHM)] transmitted in different core diameter (200, 400, and 600 microm) fibers is recorded by means of high-speed photography. Consecutive images from high-speed cameras can stand for the true and complete process of laser-water or laser-tissue interaction. Both laser pulse energy and fiber diameter determine cavitation bubble size, which further determines acoustic transient amplitudes. Based on the pictures taken by high-speed camera and scanned by an optical coherent microscopy (OCM) system, it is easily seen that the liquid layer at the distal end of the fiber plays an important role during the process of laser-tissue interaction, which can increase ablation efficiency, decrease heat side effects, and reduce cost. PMID:20799845

  16. Erbium:YAG and holmium:YAG laser root resection of extracted human teeth.

    PubMed

    Komori, T; Yokoyama, K; Matsumoto, Y; Matsumoto, K

    1997-02-01

    Root resection of extracted human teeth was performed using the erbium:YAG (Er:YAG) and holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser to investigate the clinical application of lasers on hard tissue. The CO2 laser and the mechanical drill were also used for comparison. After resection using these technologies, the morphological changes of the cut surface were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscope. Er:YAG laser irradiation produced smooth, clean resected surfaces without signs of thermal damages. Complete obturation of the root canal was maintained after Er:YAG laser irradiation. Ho:YAG laser irradiation, however, produced some signs of thermal damage. Relatively large voids between the gutta-percha and the canal walls were revealed after Ho:YAG laser irradiation. The sealing of the dentinal tubules was not completely attained as stipulated by original conditions of this study. PMID:9467336

  17. STM and ab initio study of holmium nanowires on a Ge(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, C.; Bonet, C.; Probert, M. I. J.; Tear, S. P.; Perkins, E. W.

    2006-11-01

    A nanorod structure has been observed on the Ho/Ge(111) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The rods do not require patterning of the surface or defects such as step edges in order to grow as is the case for nanorods on Si(111). At low holmium coverage the nanorods exist as isolated nanostructures while at high coverage they form a periodic 5×1 structure. We propose a structural model for the 5×1 unit cell and show using an ab initio calculation that the STM profile of our model structure compares favorably to that obtained experimentally for both filled and empty states sampling. The calculated local density of states shows that the nanorod is metallic in character.

  18. Operation of the nose using Nd-YAG and holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Zajac, Andrzej; Dudziec, Katarzyna

    2000-06-01

    During more than 5 years Nd:YAG and Holmium laser has been used in our ENT Department for the treatment of varies pathological changes. Most of our cases were previously treated many times because of recurrences of the nasal polyps. As a rule the treatment was given in one to three sessions. Each patient was very closely monitored. The time period between the session was 2-4 weeks. The consequent application of laser was dependent on healing process. All adults' patients were treated in local anesthesia using 1,5 percent of Cocaine and 10 percent Xylocaine applied in a spray; no other anesthetics were needed, although in some patients 10 mg Valium was administered before first session of laser application. We do not observe a severe bleeding needed sponge or a nose package. Among advantages we have to concentrate on two: the recurrences of nasal polyps are definitely much rare and patient may appear at work at the same day.

  19. High power operation of cladding pumped holmium-doped silica fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Hemming, Alexander; Bennetts, Shayne; Simakov, Nikita; Davidson, Alan; Haub, John; Carter, Adrian

    2013-02-25

    We report the highest power operation of a resonantly cladding-pumped, holmium-doped silica fibre laser. The cladding pumped all-glass fibre utilises a fluorine doped glass layer to provide low loss cladding guidance of the 1.95 µm pump radiation. The operation of both single mode and large-mode area fibre lasers was demonstrated, with up to 140 W of output power achieved. A slope efficiency of 59% versus launched pump power was demonstrated. The free running emission was measured to be 2.12-2.15 µm demonstrating the potential of this architecture to address the long wavelength operation of silica based fibre lasers with high efficiency. PMID:23481989

  20. Holmium:YAG laser: effect on pulpal tissues and root surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    The effects of the Holmium:YAG irradiation on the pulpal tissues and surface topography on root surface dentin in human teeth in vivo were studied. The exposed root surfaces of seventeen pre-immediate denture patients were scaled and root planed with a Gracey 3 - 4 curette apical to the dentinoenamel junction until smooth and hard. The prepared root surfaces of two teeth per patient were exposed with Holmium:YAG laser energy after an application of nonfilled resin/fluoride mixture. The laser exposed areas were below the dentinoenamel junction around one-half of each root surface. The opposing sides of each of the teeth received resin/fluoride but no laser energy. A third tooth was identified as a nontreated control. The HO:YAG at 2.12 microns wavelength with a defocused beam size of 3 mm was used. The amount of laser energy delivered per 3 X 5 mm area was 0.450 (+/- .05) joules with a fluence of 2.66 - 3.30 J/cm2. The teeth were extracted after periods of 45 - 120 days. The specimens were fixed in formalin and prepared for histological examination using hematoxylin and eosin stains. Microscopic evaluation of room surfaces showed increased smoothness on the laser treated sites compared to their opposing non-lased sides. Histological examination of the pulpal tissues exhibited no abnormal changes. No clinical symptoms of pulpal pathology were produced. HO:YAG laser energy proved safe for treating room surfaces of human teeth in vivo under conditions presented in this study.

  1. Risk factors of infectious complications following flexible ureteroscope with a holmium laser: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Song; Gong, Binbin; Hao, Zongyao; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yifei; Liang, Chaozhao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of flexible ureteroscope for treating kidney stones and the risk factors for infectious complications following flexible ureteroscope (FURS) with a holmium laser. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data of 227 patients with kidney stones who underwent flexible ureteroscope with a holmium laser at our hospital from January 2012 to September 2014, including gender, age, comorbidity, urine analysis results, urine culture results, blood test results, stone size, operative duration, and residual stones. Patients with and without infectious complications were assigned to groups A and B, respectively. The dependent variables were postoperative infectious complications, and the risk factors for infectious complications following FURS were assessed using Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: All the surgeries were successfully completed. The total stone-free rate was 81.9% (n = 186), and the incidence of infectious complications after FURS was 8.37% (n = 19). Fifteen patients (6.61%) developed fever postoperatively, 10 patients (4.41%) developed systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), 6 patients with fever were considered to have SIRS (2.64%), and 2 patients had sepsis (0.88%). Univariate analyses of groups A and B indicated that pyuria, stone size, operative duration, and infectious stones were risk factors for infectious complications after FURS (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that pyuria (P = 0.017), operative duration (P = 0.026), and infectious stones (P = 0.030) were independently related to infectious complications. Conclusion: Pyuria, operative duration, and infectious stones were risk factors for infectious complications following FURS. Hence, routine urinalysis findings should be carefully considered, particularly the finding of pyuria. PMID:26379932

  2. Influence of pulse duration on erbium and holmium laser ablation under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ith, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Pratisto, Hans S.; Weber, Heinz P.; Altermatt, Hans J.; Staeubli, Hans U.; Asshauer, Thomas; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Salathe, Rene-Paul; Gerber, Bruno E.

    1995-01-01

    Erbium and Holmium lasers are ideally suited for cutting and drilling biological tissue. This is due to the fact that their wavelengths (Er:YSGG at 2.79 micrometers and Ho:YAG at 2.12 micrometers ) are strongly absorbed in water which is present in all tissues. Combined with an optical fiber these lasers seem to be optimal instruments for endoscopic and/or minimal invasive applications in surgery. In this study we focused our interest on cutting of human meniscus in the knee where, besides a very limited operation field, the standard arthroscopic treatment is performed in a liquid, highly absorbing environment. The bubble formation process, therefore, has to be well understood because it mainly determines relevant aspects of tissue ablation. The influence of the laser parameters in general and the influence of pulse duration in particular are determined in this paper for two different laser wavelengths. The goal was to determine the optimum laser parameters in view of a high ablation efficiency, a high precision and a minimal destruction of the adjacent tissue. To determine the optimum pulse duration for ablating tissue under water and to obtain a better understanding of the channel formation process, transmission and pressure measurements together with video flash photography were performed. Additionally, we determined experimentally the ratio between initial laser pulse energy and energy available for tissue treatment under water. To prove the results obtained, cuts in human meniscus were performed, sectioned and evaluated. The comparison between the results obtained with the Erbium and Holmium laser revealed a strong influence of the absorption coefficients on the tissue effects, especially on the ablation efficiency and on the zone of thermally and mechanically damaged tissue.

  3. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-{mu}m holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive 'balloon push' (n = 4) and 'rendezvous' (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  4. Correlation of thermal and mechanical effects of the holmium laser for various clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; van Swol, Christiaan F. P.

    1998-05-01

    The Holmium laser has become established in orthopedic surgery and urology due to its unique combination of mechanical and thermal properties induced by explosive vapor bubbles. In a specialized setup, real-time high-speed and thermal images of dynamic vapor bubbles and thermal relaxation at a water tissue interface were obtained simultaneously. The thermal effects in the tissue model were correlated to the characteristics of the bubbles dependent on pulse energy (0.2 - 4 J), pulse repetition frequency (5 - 40 Hz), distance and angle of fiber delivery system (diameter 365 micrometer) to the tissue surface. Up to a fiber-to-tissue distance of 50% of the radius of the bubble, only a superficial tissue layer was heated. During bubble implosion, the tissue surface was attracted to the fiber, ripping of irregularities, and was effectively cooled by turbulence. In case of hard tissues, the bubble detached from the fiber imploding towards the hard surface. At closer distances (less than 50% of bubble radius), the tissue itself was vaporized resulting in mechanical damage and thermal relaxation into the tissue, especially above repetition rates of 5 Hz. There is a strong correlation between the path length of the free beam within the bubble and the degree of mechanical and thermal damage in the tissue directly irradiated by this beam. During clinical applications the surgeon should be aware of the size of the vapor bubble in relation to the distance and angle with the tissue for safe optimal use of the mechanical and thermal properties of the Holmium laser.

  5. Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Cystic Brain Tumors with Holmium-166-Chico : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Eun Jin; Rhee, Chang Hun; Youn, Sang Min; Choi, Chang-Woon; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intracavitary injection of beta-emitting radiation source for control of cystic tumors has been tried with a benefit of localized internal radiation. The authors treated cystic brain tumor patients with Holmium-166-chitosan complex (Ho-166-chico), composed of a beta-emitting radionuclide Holmium-166 and biodegradable chit polymer, and evaluated the safety and effective measurement for response. Methods Twenty-two patients with recurrent cystic brain tumor and/or located in a deep or eloquent area were enrolled in this pilot study. The cyst volume and wall thickness were determined on CT or MRI to assess radiological response. The activity of Ho-166-chico injected via Ommaya reservoir was prescribed to be 10-25 Gy to the cyst wall in a depth of 4 mm. Results There was neither complications related to systemic absorption nor leakage of Ho-166-chico in all 22 patients. But, two cases of oculomotor paresis were observed in patients with recurrent craniopharyngioma. Radiological response was seen in 14 of 20 available follow-up images (70%). Seven patients of 'evident' radiological response experienced more than 25% decrease of both cyst volume and wall thickness. Another 7 patients with 'suggestive' response showed decrease of cyst volume without definitive change of the wall thickness or vice versa. All patients with benign tumors or low grade gliomas experienced symptomatic improvement. Conclusion Ho-166-chico intracavitary radiation therapy for cystic tumor is a safe method of palliation without serious complications. The determination of both minimal effective dosage and time interval of repeated injection through phase 1 trial could improve the results in the future. PMID:24278644

  6. Steps toward interstellar silicate dust mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorschner, J.; Guertler, J.; Henning, TH.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most certain facts on interstellar dust is that it contains grains with silicon oxygen tetrahedra (SOT), the internal vibrations of which cause the well known silicate bands at 10 and 18 microns. The broad and almost structureless appearance of them demonstrates lack of translation symmetry in these solids that must be considered amorphous or glassy silicates. There is no direct information on the cations in these interstellar silicates and on the number of bridging oxygens per tetrahedron (NBO). Comparing experimental results gained on amorphous silicates, e.g., silicate glasses, of cosmically most abundant metals (Mg, Fe, Ca, Al) with the observations is the only way to investigate interstellar silicate dust mineralogy (cf, Dorschner and Henning, 1986). At Jena University Observatory IR spectra of submicrometer-sized grains of pyroxene glasses (SSG) were studied. Pyroxenes are common minerals in asteroids, meteorites, interplanetary, and supposedly also cometary dust particles. Pyroxenes consist of linearly connected SOT (NBO=2). In the vitreous state reached by quenching melted minerals, the SOT remain nearly undistorted (Si-O bond length unchanged); the Si-O-Si angles at the bridging oxygens of pyroxenes, however, scatter statistically. Therefore, the original cation oxygen symmetry of the crystal (octahedral and hexahedral coordination by O) is completely lost. The blended bands at 10 and 18 microns lose their diagnostic differences and become broad and structureless. This illustrates best the basic problem of interstellar silicate mineral diagnostics. Optical data of glasses of enstatite, bronzite, hypersthene, diopside, salite, and hedenbergite have been derived. Results of enstatite (E), bronzite (B), and hypersthene (H) show very good agreement with the observed silicate features in the IR spectra of evolutionarily young objects that show P-type silicate signature according to the classification by Gurtler and Henning (1986). Compositional

  7. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome as a complication of Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 1996, Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate was introduced and has been shown to be safe and highly effective. Case presentation We report a case of a rare complication that resulted in intra-abdominal compartment syndrome with prolonged intubation and intensive care, involving an 74-year-old male after holmium laser enucleation of prostate, with a massive irrigant fluid leakage into the retroperitoneal space. The elevated abdominal pressure was reduced by forced diuresis. The tracheal tube was removed 18 hours after the patient’s transfer to the ICU. The patient was discharged to home one week after the operation. Conclusion In rare cases when no obvious ruptures of the prostate capsule or the bladder occur during laser enucleation of prostate, knowledge regarding possible emersion of massive amounts of irrigant fluid into the retroperitoneal space leading to intra-abdominal compartment syndrome aids in the diagnosis and subsequent successful therapy of intra-abdominal hypertension. PMID:24910537

  8. Q-switching of a thulium-doped fibre laser using a holmium-doped fibre saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovnikova, Ya E; Kamynin, V A; Kurkov, A S; Medvedkov, O I; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2014-01-31

    We have proposed and demonstrated a new passively Q-switched thulium-doped fibre laser configuration. A distinctive feature of this configuration is the use of a heavily holmium-doped fibre for Q-switching. Lasing was obtained at 1.96 μm, with a pulse energy of 3 μJ and pulse duration of 600 ns. The highest pulse repetition rate was 80 kHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  9. Phosphorus Equilibria Among Mafic Silicate Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlin, Jana; Xirouchakis, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus incorporation in major rock-forming silicate minerals has the following implications: (1) Reactions between phosphorus-hosting major silicates and accessory phosphates, which are also major trace element carriers, may control the stability of the latter and thus may affect the amount of phosphorus and other trace elements released to the coexisting melt or fluid phase. (2) Less of a phosphate mineral is needed to account for the bulk phosphorus of planetaty mantles. (3) During partial melting of mantle mineral assemblages or equilibrium fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas, and in the absence or prior to saturation with a phosphate mineral, silicate melts may become enriched in phosphorus, especially in the geochemically important low melt fraction regime, Although the small differences in the ionic radii of IVp5+, IVSi4+, and IV Al3+ makes phosphoms incorporation into crystalline silicates perhaps unsurprising, isostructural silicate and phosphate crystalline solids do not readily form solutions, e.g., (Fe, Mg)2SiO4 vs. LiMgPO4, SiO)2 VS. AlPO4. Nonetheless, there are reports of, poorly characterized silico-phosphate phases in angrites , 2-4 wt% P2O5 in olivine and pyroxene grains in pallasites and reduced terestrial basalts which are little understood but potentially useful, and up to 17 wt% P2O5 in olivine from ancient slags. However, such enrichments are rare and only underscore the likelihood of phosphoms incorporation in silicate minerals. The mechanisms that allow phosphorus to enter major rock-forming silicate minerals (e.g., Oliv, Px, Gt) remain little understood and the relevant data base is limited. Nonetheless, old and new high-pressure (5-10 GPa) experimental data suggest that P2O5 wt% decreases from silica-poor to silica-rich compositions or from orthosilicate to chain silicate structures (garnet > olivine > orthopyroxene) which implies that phosphorus incorporation in silicates is perhaps more structure-than site-specific. The

  10. Efficacy of Holmium Laser Urethrotomy in Combination with Intralesional Triamcinolone in the Treatment of Anterior Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Ankur; Ganesamoni, Raguram; Nanjappa, Bhuvanesh; Sharma, Varun; Mete, Uttam K

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcome of visual internal urethrotomy with a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser along with intralesional triamcinolone injection. Materials and Methods Patients with an anterior urethral stricture less than 3 cm in length were evaluated by clinical history, physical examination, uroflowmetry, and retrograde urethrogram preoperatively. All patients were treated with holmium laser urethrotomy and intralesional triamcinolone (80 mg) injection under general or regional anesthesia. An 18 F urethral catheter was placed for 5 days. All patients were followed up for 12 months postoperatively by history, uroflowmetry, and if required, retrograde urethrogram or urethroscopy every 3 months. Results The mean age of the patients was 42.9 years (range, 14 to 70 years). The overall recurrence rate was 24%. The success rate in patients with strictures less than 1 cm in length was 95.8%, whereas that in patients with strictures of 1 to 3 cm in length was 57.7% (p=0.002). The outcome did not depend on age, duration of symptoms, etiology, or location of stricture. Conclusions Holmium laser urethrotomy with intralesional triamcinolone is a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for urethral strictures. This procedure has an encouraging success rate, especially in those with stricture segments of less than 1 cm in length. PMID:23060998

  11. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  12. Silicic magma generation at Askja volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2009-04-01

    Rate of magma differentiation is an important parameter for hazard assessment at active volcanoes. However, estimates of these rates depend on proper understanding of the underlying magmatic processes and magma generation. Differences in isotope ratios of O, Th and B between silicic and in contemporaneous basaltic magmas have been used to emphasize their origin by partial melting of hydrothermally altered metabasaltic crust in the rift-zones favoured by a strong geothermal gradient. An alternative model for the origin of silicic magmas in the Iceland has been proposed based on U-series results. Young mantle-derived mafic protolith is thought to be metasomatized and partially melted to form the silicic end-member. However, this model underestimates the compositional variations of the hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. New data on U-Th disequilibria and O-isotopes in basalts and dacites from Askja volcano reveal a strong correlation between (230Th/232Th) and delta 18O. The 1875 AD dacite has the lowest Th- and O isotope ratios (0.94 and -0.24 per mille, respectively) whereas tephra of evolved basaltic composition, erupted 2 months earlier, has significantly higher values (1.03 and 2.8 per mille, respectively). Highest values are observed in the most recent basalts (erupted in 1920 and 1961) inside the Askja caldera complex and out on the associated fissure swarm (Sveinagja basalt). This correlation also holds for older magma such as an early Holocene dacites, which eruption may have been provoked by rapid glacier thinning. Silicic magmas at Askja volcano thus bear geochemical signatures that are best explained by partial melting of extensively hydrothermally altered crust and that the silicic magma source has remained constant during the Holocene at least. Once these silicic magmas are formed they appear to erupt rapidly rather than mixing and mingling with the incoming basalt heat-source that explains lack of icelandites and the bi-modal volcanism at Askja

  13. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  14. Mafic silicates in the Orgueil carbonaceous meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Iron-bearing olivines and pyroxenes occurring in Orgueil may represent a separate population distinct from the magnesian varieties previously reported. Compositions of these iron-bearing silicates are inconsistent with an origin by direct equilibrium condensation in the nebula. Such an origin is more plausible for the magnesian silicates, but lacks conclusive evidence. An extra-solar system origin for either mafic population is possible, though similarly lacking in evidence. About 15% of the olivines, randomly distributed with respect to iron content, retain particle track evidence of a precompaction irradiation.

  15. [Critical evaluation of indications for the holmium:YAG laser and the neodymium:YAG laser in orthopedic surgery based on an in vitro study].

    PubMed

    Anders, J O; Pietsch, S; Staupendahl, G

    1999-04-01

    This is an in vitro study of the biophysical effects of holmium:YAG and neodymium-YAG lasers that was prompted by the poor clinical results obtained with lumbar percutaneous laser discus decompression (PLDD). In the absence of adequate cooling, ablation of tissue with the holmium:YAG laser causes thermal damage to the surrounding tissues. Utilizing the immediate colour-independent laser coupling effect, the holmium:YAG laser removes soft and hard tissue immediately. The low tissue penetrating power (max. 0.32 mm), together with the use of irrigation, avoids thermal problems, and this laser type with its high pulse energy and frequency is to be recommended for arthroscopic surgery. In contrast, the effects of the neodymium:YAG laser are highly dependent on tissue colour. Using this laser on light-coloured tissue only diffuse warming but no ablation of soft tissue was often seen. The depth of tissue penetration seen in our study was 0.58 mm, but is greatly dependent on the duration of application, and is much larger with long application times. In conclusion, we believe that the neodymium:YAG laser is more suitable for percutaneous intradiscal procedures than the holmium:YAG laser. For arthroscopic surgery, the holmium:YAG laser will be the better choice. The effect of each type of laser depends not only on its physical properties, but also on tissue properties (light or dark-coloured, thermal conductivity) and duration of application. PMID:10379068

  16. The evaluation of tissue mass loss in the incision line of prostate with benign hyperplasia performed using holmium laser and cutting electrode

    PubMed Central

    Szewczyk, Mariusz; Jesionek–Kupnicka, Dorota; Lipinski, Piotr; Różański, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to compare the changes in the incision line of prostatic adenoma using a monopolar cutting electrode and holmium laser, as well as the assessment of associated tissue mass and volume loss of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Material and methods The material used in this study consisted of 74 preparations of prostatic adenoma obtained via open retropubic adenomectomy, with an average volume of 120.7 ml. The material obtained cut in vitro before fixation in formaldehyde. One lobe was cut using holmium laser, the other using a monopolar cutting electrode. After the incision was made, tissue mass and volume loss were evaluated. Thermocoagulation changes in the incision line were examinedunder light microscope. Results In the case of the holmium laser incision, the average tissue mass loss was 1.73 g, tissue volume loss 3.57 ml and the depth of thermocoagulation was 1.17 mm. When the monopolar cutting electrode was used average tissue mass loss was 0.807 g, tissue volume loss 2.48 ml and the depth of thermocoagulation was 0.19 mm. Conclusions Where holmium laser was used, it was observed that the layer of tissue with thermocoagulation changes was deeper than in the case of the monopolar cutting electrode. Moreover, it was noticed that holmium laser caused bigger tissue mass and volume loss than the cutting electrode. PMID:25247088

  17. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-03-01

    II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  19. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  20. Synthesis of non-siliceous mesoporous oxides.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dong; Schüth, Ferdi

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous non-siliceous oxides have attracted great interest due to their unique properties and potential applications. Since the discovery of mesoporous silicates in 1990s, organic-inorganic assembly processes by using surfactants or block copolymers as soft templates have been considered as a feasible path for creating mesopores in metal oxides. However, the harsh sol-gel conditions and low thermal stabilities have limited the expansion of this method to various metal oxide species. Nanocasting, using ordered mesoporous silica or carbon as a hard template, has provided possibilities for preparing novel mesoporous materials with new structures, compositions and high thermal stabilities. This review concerns the synthesis, composition, and parameter control of mesoporous non-siliceous oxides. Four synthesis routes, i.e. soft-templating (surfactants or block copolymers as templates), hard-templating (mesoporous silicas or carbons as sacrificial templates), colloidal crystal templating (3-D ordered colloidal particles as a template), and super lattice routes, are summarized in this review. Mesoporous metal oxides with different compositions have different properties. Non-siliceous mesoporous oxides are comprehensively described, including a discussion of constituting elements, synthesis, and structures. General aspects concerning pore size control, atomic scale crystallinity, and phase control are also reviewed. PMID:23942521

  1. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  2. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  3. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  4. Lithium Manganese Silicate Positive Electrode Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiong

    As the fast development of the electronic portable devices and drastic fading of fossil energy sources. The need for portable secondary energy sources is increasingly urgent. As a result, lithium ion batteries are being investigated intensely to meet the performance requirements. Among various electrode materials, the most expensive and capacity limiting component is the positive materials. Based on this, researches have been mostly focused on the development of novel cathode materials with high capacity and energy density and the lithium transition metal orthosilicates have been identified as possible high performance cathodes. Here in, we report the synthesis of a kind of lithium transition metal orthosilicates electrode lithium manganese silicate. Lithium manganese silicate has the advantage of high theoretical capacity, low cost raw material and safety. In this thesis, lithium manganese silicate are prepared using different silicon sources. The structure of silicon sources preferred are examined. Nonionic block copolymers surfactant, P123, is tried as carbon source and mophology directing agent. Lithium manganese silicate's performances are improved by adding P123.

  5. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  9. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  10. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  11. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  12. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  13. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  14. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  15. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  16. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  17. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  18. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  3. Grain Growth and Silicates in Dense Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendeleton, Yvonne J.; Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for visual extinction (Av) in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between Av and the depth of the 9.7 micron silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well 'mixed. In the di&se ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233,321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5 146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. Our data set spans an Av range between 2 and 35 magnitudes. All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. The Serpens data appear to follow the diffuse ISM correlation line whereas the data for the other clouds show a non-linear correlation between the depth of the silicate feature relative to Av, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. In fact, it appears that for visual extinctions greater than about 10 mag, tau(9.7) begins to level off. This decrease in the growth of the depth of the 9.7 micron feature with increasing Av could indicate the effects of grain growth in dense clouds. In this poster, we explore the possibility that grain growth causes an increase in opacity (Av) without causing a corresponding increase in tau(9.7).

  4. Kidney stone ablation times and peak saline temperatures during Holmium:YAG and Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy, in vitro, in a ureteral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. The Holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150-500 Hz, and 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate / 40% calcium phosphate), of uniform mass and diameter (4-5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 ml/min and 13.7 ml/min for the TFL and Holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from tube's center and 1 mm above mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded during experiments. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. Holmium laser time measured 167 +/- 41 s (n = 12). TFL times measured 111 +/- 49 s, 39 +/- 11 s, and 23 +/- 4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz (n = 12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24 +/- 1 °C for Holmium, and 33 +/- 3 °C, 33 +/- 7 °C, and 39 +/- 6 °C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and reduced stone retropulsion, and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  5. Solvent extraction of holmium and yttrium with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizuka, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Baba, Y.; Inoue, K. ); Nakashio, F. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper discusses a kinetic study on the solvent extraction of holmium(III) and yttrium(III) with bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) from nitrate media conducted at 303 K using a hollow fiber membrane extractor. Also studied were the distribution equilibria of these metals and interfacial adsorption equilibria of D2EHPA and its metal complexes between the organic and aqueous phases. It was found that the metals (M{sup 3+}) were extracted with D2EHPA (HR) ad MR{sub 3} {center dot} 3HR into the organic phase, and the extraction equilibrium constants were evaluated. Furthermore, it was established that dimeric D2EHPA can be adsorbed at the interface between the organic and aqueous phases, while the interfacial activities of D2EHPA-metal complexes were negligibly small. The apparent orders 2, 1, and 2 of the permeabilities for the extraction of both metals were found with respect to the pH of the aqueous solution and the concentrations of the metal ion and dimeric D2EHPA, while the orders 1, 1, and {minus}1 of the permeabilities for the stripping of both metals were found with respect to the hydrogen ion activity and the concentrations of the metal complex and dimeric D2EHPA, respectively. The diffusional effects were reasonably explained by the diffusion model accompanied by an interfacial reaction, taking into account the velocity distributions of the aqueous and organic phases through the inner and outer sides of a hollow fiber.

  6. Laboratory investigation of the efficacy of holmium:YAG laser irradiation in removing intracanal debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Gutknecht, Norbert; Sailer, Hermann F.; Hering, Peter; Prettl, Wilhelm

    1997-05-01

    Current endodontic therapy involves debridement and disinfection of the root canal by means of mechanical instrumentation and chemical irrigation. However, several studies have shown that these techniques fail to achieve complete cleansing. Recently, lasers have been suggested for use within root canals. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of Holmium:YAG laser irradiation in removing intracanal debris and smear layer. Root canal surfaces of freshly-extracted human teeth were exposed to pulsed Ho:YAG laser radiation. Subsequently, laser induced structural changes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Temperature measurements during irradiation were performed by means of thermocouples. The result of this survey give a preliminary indication of the ability of the Ho:YAG laser to improve current endodontic treatment survey give a preliminary indication of the ability of the Ho:YAG laser to improve current endodontic treatment modalities. However, limitations exist with regard to circumscribed and well-quantified irradiation of root canal surfaces, due to the lack of perpendicular delivery of the laser beam. Additional studies will be required to develop suitable optical transmission systems, in order to achieve complete cleansing and to avoid damage to the periradicular tissues, respectively.

  7. Changes in corneal collagen induced by holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberlake, George T.; Reinke, Martin H.; Miller, Alvin

    1996-05-01

    Holmium:YAG laser thermokeratoplasty corrects hyperopia (farsightedness) by producing small areas of corneal collagen shrinkage that cause the central cornea to bulge outward, increasing optical power. Collagen shrinkage is probably caused by laser-heated corneal water, but details of the shrinkage mechanism are not known. We investigated the shrinkage mechanism by measuring changes in corneal ultrastructure, surface shrinkage, water content, and strength following Ho:YAG laser exposures. Morphological changes in collagen were documented by measurements from electron micrographs. Corneal adhesive strength was determined by measuring tearing force in a plane parallel to the corneal surface. Laser-induced water loss was measured by weighing corneal samples before and after exposure. Corneal surface shrinkage was assessed by photographing the movement of particles on the cornea. Lasered collagen fibrils increased in diameter, lost their orderly arrangement, and appeared `frayed.' The corneal surface contracted toward lasered areas with a maximal shift of approximately 190 micrometers , more than could be explained by a model based on collagen fibril changes. Water loss plays a minor role in corneal shrinkage since corneal samples lost about only about 1.4% of their weight after massive laser exposure. Despite marked changes in collagen structure, corneal adhesive force was unchanged.

  8. Effectiveness and Safety of Ureteroscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Upper Urinary Tract Calculi in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Takashi; Otsuki, Hideo; Uehara, Shinya; Shimizu, Toshihiro; Murao, Wataru; Fujio, Koji; Fujio, Kei; Wada, Koichiro; Araki, Motoo; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-06-01

    Upper urinary tract calculi are common; however, there is no recommended treatment selection for elderly patients. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (URS lithotripsy) is minimally invasive, and it provides a high stone-free rate (SFR) treatment for upper urinary tract calculi. Here, we retrospectively evaluated the surgical outcomes of URS lithotripsy after dividing the 189 cases into 3 groups by patient age: the '<65 group' (<65 years old, n=108), the '65-74 group' (65-74 years old, n=42), and the ' 75 group' ( 75 years old, n=39). The patients' characteristics, stone status, and perioperative outcomes were assessed. The 65-74 group and the 75 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension compared to the<65 group. Compared to the<65 group, the 65-74 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hyperlipidemia, and the 75 group had significantly higher the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores. Despite these preoperative risk factors, SFR and postoperative pyelonephritis in the 65-74 group and the 75 group were similar to those of the<65 group. In conclusion, URS lithotripsy is the preferred treatment for upper urinary tract calculi, even for elderly patients who have multiple preoperative risk factors. PMID:27339204

  9. An Improved Morcellation Procedure for Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Chen, Yan-Bo; Zheng, Da-Chao; Cai, Zhi-Kang; Li, Wen-Ji; Zhou, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose We modified the conventional morcellation procedure for holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP), and its outcomes are presented in this article. Materials and Methods As 395 patients were included, the conventional morcellation procedure was performed in the first 100 cases (group 1, cases 1–100), and an improved procedure was used in the last 100 cases (group 2, cases 296–395). The improved morcellation process has three steps to execute. The morcellation time, collected tissue weight, morcellation rate, and associated complications were recorded. Results The tissue-resected weight was similar between group 1 (60.7±33.9 g) and group 2 (62.4±36.8 g). The mean morcellation time in group 1 was greater than that in group 2 (11.3±7.1 and 8.3±4.1 minutes, respectively), and the mean morcellation rate was better in group 2 than in group 1 (5.75±1.7 g/minutes in group 1 v 7.3±1.1 g/minutes in group 2). Complications, such as bladder injury, were similar in both groups. Conclusion The improved morcellation procedure described in this article can be used in various situations of suction and can be performed in a more fluent manner and with better efficiency. PMID:22788738

  10. Efficacy of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate Based on Patient Preoperative Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yoon Seok; Kim, Tae Heon; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Jeong, Jeongyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in relation to prostate size and urodynamic parameters, including bladder outlet obstruction index (BOOI), presence of detrusor overactivity, and detrusor contractility, and to investigate factors predictive of HoLEP success. Methods: This retrospective analysis of prospective data included 174 consecutive patients treated with HoLEP at Samsung Medical Center from 2009 to 2013. Prostate-specific antigen, prostate size, urodynamic parameters, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS)/quality of life (QoL) were evaluated preoperatively, while prostate-specific antigen, uroflowmetry/postvoid residual (PVR) urine, and IPSS were measured six months after HoLEP. Two definitions of treatment success were established based on the following three variables: IPSS, maximum flow rate (Qmax), and QoL index. Factors predictive of HoLEP success were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: IPSS/QoL, Qmax, and PVR improved significantly following HoLEP. Improvements in IPSS and PVR were more significant in the BOOI≥40 group compared to the BOOI<40 group, with overall success rates of 93.7% and 73.6%, respectively. Thus, the BOOI≥40 group had a significantly higher success rate, and BOOI≥40 was a significant predictor of HoLEP success based on the multivariate analyses. Conclusions: We found good surgical outcomes after HoLEP, and specifically patients with a higher BOOI had a greater chance of surgical success. PMID:26739183

  11. Electron transfer behavior and water photodecomposition ability of calcined material from a cerium-S-phenylene-O-holmium-O-phenylene-S hybrid copolymer.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hideo; Otsuki, Keigo; Yamada, Hiroyoshi; Kawahara, Tetsuro; Yoshihara, Masakuni

    2006-05-15

    Calcination of a cerium-S-phenylene-O-holmium-O-phenylene-S hybrid copolymer under a vacuum gave cerium oxide-carbon cluster-holmium oxide composite material. The material calcined at 600 degrees C loaded with Pt particles could decompose water to H2 and O2 with a H2/O2 ratio of 2 under visible light irradiation. ESR spectral examinations of the calcined materials revealed the possibility of a two-step electron transfer in the process of CeO2 --> carbon cluster --> Ho2O3 --> Pt with an oxidation site at CeO2 particles and a reduction site at Pt particles. PMID:16313919

  12. Mineralogy of amphiboles and 1:1 layer silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Veblen, D.R.; Wylie, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    This article reviews briefly the ways in which mineralogists and crystal chemist represent complex silicate structures: the basic nomenclature for amphiboles, and the 1:1 layer silicates; the geological occurrences of these minerals; their crystal structures and defect structures; the various morphologies, or habits, of amphibole and 1:1 layer silicate crystals; and the potentially active surface sites and dissolution kinetics of such particles. Also included is a discussion of how 1:1 layer silicates, amphiboles, and other chain silicates related to amphiboles are identified in the laboratory. 225 refs., 28 figs.

  13. Amorphous Silicates in Primitive Meteoritic Materials: Acfer 094 and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of presolar grains is one measure of the primitive nature of meteoritic materials. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites whose matrices are dominated by amorphous silicates such as the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Presolar silicates are even more abundant in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Amorphous silicates in the form of GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of CP IDPs. We are studying amorphous silicates in Acfer 094 matrix in order to determine whether they are related to the GEMS grains in CPIDPs

  14. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  15. Silicate Feature Variation in LPV Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creech-Eakman, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    Silicate dust, found around oxygen-rich stars, produces a hallmark mid-infrared spectral feature resulting from the bend or stretch in the SiO_4 tetrahedron. Long Period Variable (LPV) stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch produce copious quantities of silicate dust over this short stage of their stellar evolution. A study of 31 oxygen-rich LPVs was conducted over a sixteen month period using the University of Denver's TNTCAM. The study has been supplemented with spectral data from UKIRT CGS3 service observations and IRAS LRS archives. Observations of the silicate features in the circumstellar environment indicate a possible evolutionary sequence for the stars, inferred from the changes of the dust spectra. These new observations suggest a relationship between the dust spectral signature and the stage of the dust formation process. There is evidence that acoustic shocks from the LPV are a catalyst in the dust formation process. Follow-on work is already occuring in the form of ISO SWS data on a selected subgroup of LPVs. To enhance this study, a mid-infrared, cross-dispersed spectrometer, TGIRS, was built. TGIRS covers a wavelength range of 7 to 14 microns at a resolving power of 750. The instrument utilizes a Boeing-Rockwell Si:As BIB HFPA as its detector. It is cooled using a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler, eliminating the need for liquid cryogens. All of the optics in the system are aluminum, permitting ambient alignment and focusing with a laser. A description of the design and building phases of TGIRS is presented. Brief descriptions concerning the evolution of LPVs, theories of dust formation, and the signatures of the silicate dust are given. Data acquisition and reduction are described, including a new method for removing telluric attenuation from the data. Spectral energy distributions are shown, including graphs of the silicate features with respect to stellar phase. Finally, results of the statistical analysis of the sample and conclusions are drawn

  16. Probabilities for nonradiative intermultiplet transitions in the holmium ion in lithium-yttrium double fluoride crystals and stimulated emission

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachuk, A.M.; Khilko, A.V.; Petrov, M.V.

    1985-02-01

    Nonradiative transition probabilities have been studied as functions of the energy difference between the closest-lying multiplets of the Ho/sup 3 +/ ion in the LiYF/sub 4/ crystal. The efficiencies of emission from terms of the holmium ion have been determined. The cross sections for stimulated emission for emission lines corresponding to the transition /sup 5/S/sub 2/ ..-->.. /sup 5/I/sub 7/ have also been determined. Some characteristics of the stimulated emission of LiYF/sub 4/:Ho/sup 3 +/ crystals are reported for several wavelengths in the 0.75--3.9-..mu..m spectral interval.

  17. Bipolar, Monopolar, Photovaporization of the Prostate, or Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate: How to Choose What's Best?

    PubMed

    Cornu, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Endoscopic management of benign prostatic obstruction is based on resection, vaporization, or enucleation. Enucleation provides the best efficacy and long-term outcome. Lasers have advantages in patients at high risk of bleeding. Holmium enucleation is the best evaluated technique, but has a steep learning curve. Greenlight photovaporization is a safe alternative to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in prostates of less than 100 mL, especially in patients at high risk of bleeding. Bipolar devices can be used for resection, vaporization, and enucleation and provides efficacy results similar to TURP in the short term with better safety. PMID:27476130

  18. Sub-100 fs passively mode-locked holmium-doped fiber oscillator operating at 2.06 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Ruehl, Axel; Grosse-Wortmann, Uwe; Hartl, Ingmar

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple and compact Holmium-doped fiber (HDF) femtosecond oscillator with 35 MHz repetition rate. The oscillator is pumped by a Tm-doped fiber laser. A dispersion compensating fiber was utilized to set the net-intracavity dispersion to zero at 2.06 μm. The output pulses had an maximum average power of 40 mW and 160 fs FWHM pulse duration. To further shorten the pulse duration, we implemented a nonlinear compressor consisting of a solid core highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) for SPM broadening and single mode fiber (SMF) for pulse compression. Sub-100 fs pulses were achieved.

  19. Aggregation of Calcium Silicate Hydrate Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Delhorme, Maxime; Labbez, Christophe; Turesson, Martin; Lesniewska, Eric; Woodward, Cliff E; Jönsson, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We study the aggregation of calcium silicate hydrate nanoplatelets on a surface by means of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main component formed in cement and is responsible for the strength of the material. The hydrate is formed in early cement paste and grows to form platelets on the nanoscale, which aggregate either on dissolving cement particles or on auxiliary particles. The general result is that the experimentally observed variations in these dynamic processes generically called growth can be rationalized from interaction free energies, that is, from pure thermodynamic arguments. We further show that the surface charge density of the particles determines the aggregate structures formed by C-S-H and thus their growth modes. PMID:26859614

  20. Conductimetric determination of decomposition of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, C.; Lieck, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a procedure is given to detect decomposition of silicate systems in the liquid state by conductivity measurements. Onset of decomposition can be determined from the temperature curves of resistances measured on two pairs of electrodes, one above the other. Degree of decomposition can be estimated from temperature and concentration dependency of conductivity of phase boundaries. This procedure was tested with systems PbO-B2O3 and PbO-B2O3-SiO2.

  1. Structure and properties of ITQ-8: a hydrous layer silicate with microporous silicate layers.

    PubMed

    Marler, Bernd; Müller, Melanie; Gies, Hermann

    2016-06-21

    ITQ-8 is a new hydrous layer silicate (HLS) with a chemical composition of [C4H8(C7H13N)2]8 [Si64O128(OH)16]·48H2O per unit cell. The synthesis of ITQ-8 was first described in 2002 by Díaz-Cabañas et al., the structure of this material, however, remained unsolved at that time. Physico-chemical characterization using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM, TG-DTA, and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that ITQ-8 is a layer silicate. The XRD powder pattern was indexed in the monoclinic system with lattice parameters of a0 = 35.5168(5) Å, b0 = 13.3989(2) Å, c0 = 16.0351(2) Å, β = 106.74(2)°. The crystal structure was solved by simulated annealing. Rietveld refinement of the structure in space group C2/c converged to residual values of RBragg = 0.023, RF = 0.022 and chi(2) = 2.3 confirming the structure model. The structure of ITQ-8 contains silicate layers with a topology that resembles a (11-1) section of the framework of zeolite levyne. So far, this layer topology is unique among layer silicates. The layer can be regarded as made up of 4-, 6-, double-six and 8-rings which are interconnected to form cup-like "half-cages". Unlike other HLSs, which possess impermeable silicate layers, ITQ-8 contains 8-rings pores with a free diameter of 3.5 Å × 3.4 Å and can be regarded as a "small-pore layer silicate". In the crystal structure, the organic cations, 1,4-diquiniclidiniumbutane, used as structure directing agents during synthesis are intercalated between the silicate layers. Clusters (bands) of water molecules which are hydrogen bonded to each other and to the terminal Si-OH/Si-O(-) groups are located between the organic cations and interconnect the silicate layers. ITQ-8 is a very interesting material as precursor for the synthesis of microporous framework silicates by topotactic condensation or interlayer expansion reactions leading to 3D micro-pore systems which may be useful in applications as e.g. catalysts, catalyst supports and adsorbents of for separation. PMID

  2. Isotopic zonations in silicic magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.M. )

    1989-12-01

    Many ash-flow tuffs are zoned in radiogenic isotope ratios, indicating that roofward assimilation of crust occurs in ash-flow magma chambers prior to eruption. Cases where relatively well constrained calculations may be made regarding the percentage of assimilation in the roof zone indicate that the percentage of assimilation often exceeds the percentage of phenocrysts in the tuffs. This relation, in addition to the fact that assimilation gradients are opposite to that of the percentage of phenocrysts, suggests that assimilation and crystallization in the silicic roof zones of crustal magma chambers are separated in time and space, and that these processes are best modeled as two-component mixing; true assimilation-fractional crystallization is probably restricted to the lower mafic parts. Most phenocrysts in the silicic upper parts of magma chambers crystallized after assimilation, providing minimum estimates of time between assimilation and eruption (1-100 yr). Preservation of monotonic isotopic gradients suggests that convection is minor in the upper parts of silicic magma chambers during the late stages of evolution.

  3. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei; Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto; Farrell, Gerald; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-02-01

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 105 (single-stem) and 7 × 106 (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  4. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  5. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pengfei; Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle Nic; Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto; Farrell, Gerald

    2015-02-09

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 10{sup 5} (single-stem) and 7 × 10{sup 6} (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  6. Anisotropy of Silicate-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, G. R.; Feinberg, J. M.; Renne, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic properties is a hallmark of silicate crystals with oriented iron-oxide inclusions. Strongly magnetic magnetite-bearing silicates (10-1 A m-1) are common components of gabbros and layered intrusions, contributing to local and regional magnetic anomalies. Additionally, these iron-oxide silicates hold the promise of being exceptional paleomagnetic recorders owing to their features of: physical/chemical isolation from altering fluids, chemical equilibrium with their silicate host, and long relaxation times (enhanced coercivity). However, anisotropy of remanence must be understood before these advantageous features can be utilized. Measurements of single crystals of clinopyroxene and plagioclase (10-4 g) show anisotropy in direction and intensity that directly reflect the crystallography of the silicate host. The host controls both the crystallographic orientation of the magnetite (magnetocrystalline anisotropy) and the elongation direction of the magnetite inclusion (shape anisotropy). We have found another source of anisotropy that involves an internal exsolution of ulvöspinel within titanomagnetite inclusions. This also reflects a host control as this second exsolution occurs along the magnetite \\{100\\}. This fixed wall shape anisotropy creates an array of interacting single domain magnetite parallelepipeds, parallel to \\{100\\}. Each of these anisotropies contributes to enhanced coercivity of remanence, which significantly exceeds the IRM saturation magnetization for magnetite (300 mT). The anisotropy of IRM (aIRM@ 1.1 T) of magnetite-bearing clinopyroxene and plagioclase shows clustering of directions, reflecting the mixture of variables that include: inclusion elongation direction and abundance, orientation of magnetite easy axes relative to the applied field, inclusion aspect ratio and diameter, and pre-existing magnetic domain structure. For pyroxene (monoclinic) with two arrays of needle-shaped magnetite inclusions, the aIRM is

  7. Excitation functions for the helium-ion-induced fission of holmium and erbium

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.H.; Pandey, A.K.; Kalsi, P.C.; Sharma, R.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Excitation functions for the helium-ion-induced fission of holmium ({ital Z}=67) and erbium ({ital Z}=68) in the energy range 34--70 MeV were measured using lexan polycarbonate plastic as the fission fragment track detector. By analyzing the data in terms of the statistical model expression for {Gamma}{sub {ital f}}/{Gamma}{sub {ital n}}, the ratio of the fission width to neutron emission width, the fission barriers of the compound nuclei {sup 1}{sub 69}{sup 69}Tm and {sup 17}{sub 70}{sup 1.3}Yb were determined to be 29.8{plus minus}3 and 27.8{plus minus}3 MeV, respectively. The corresponding values for the fission level density parameter were found to be {ital a}{sub {ital f}}={ital A}/12 and {ital A}/13, respectively. The uncertainties shown in the fission barriers allow for inclusion of other values derived from reasonable upper and lower limits of {ital a}{sub {ital f}} values of {ital A}/8 to {ital A}/20. The measured fission barriers compare very well with the shell-corrected liquid-drop barriers of Myers and Swiatecki. The present measurements extend the range of low-{ital Z} elements which are away from the closed-shell region and which are studied at these medium energies. The results are compared with similar data available in the literature which bring out some interesting correlations and trends in the fission properties, viz., fission barriers and level density parameters of low-{ital Z} elements.

  8. Holmium Laser Enucleation of Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Seoul National University Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jungbum; Choo, Minsoo; Park, Ji Hyun; Oh, Jin Kyu; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to report the experience acquired at the Seoul National University Hospital with Holmium Laser Enucleation of Prostate (HoLEP), combined with mechanical morcellation for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods A retrospective review was performed on the clinical data of 309 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP at our institution between July 2008 and June 2010. All patients were evaluated preoperatively for prostate volume by transrectal ultrasound, maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) and quality of life (QoL) score. Peri- and postoperative parameters were evaluated and patients were followed-up at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12- months with the aforementioned investigations. Results The patients' mean age was 68.3 (±6.5) years and mean prostate volume was 55.6 (±23.6) mL. Mean enucleation time was 56.2 (±25.1) minutes, mean morcellation time was 11.3 (±9.5) minutes, and the mean resected weight of the prostate was 20.8 (±16.9) g. The mean catheter indwelling period was 1.9 (±1.7) days and mean hospital stay was 2.9 (±1.5) days. Significant improvement was noted in Qmax, IPSS, and QoL at the 1-year follow-up compared with baseline (P<0.01). At 1 month 17.2% of patients complained of irritative urinary symptoms, which were typically self-limiting within 3 months. Transient stress incontinence was reported in 15.2% of patients. No patient experienced persistent obstructive symptoms that required reoperation. Conclusions Our study showed that HoLEP is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for BPH. PMID:21468284

  9. Risk Factors for Transient Urinary Incontinence after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jong Kil; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Han, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jeong Zoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the factors associated with the occurrence of and recovery from transient urinary incontinence (TUI) after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). Materials and Methods From March 2009 to December 2012, 391 consecutive patients treated with HoLEP for benign prostatic hyperplasia were enrolled. Information regarding age, prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, Overactive Bladder Symptom Score, peak urinary flow rate, postvoid residual urine, and operation time was collected. TUI was defined as a patient complaint of urine leakage, regardless of type. Logistic regression was used to investigate the factors associated with the occurrence of TUI, and the Kaplan-Meier test was used to analyze the TUI recovery period. Results TUI after HoLEP occurred in 65 patients (16.6%), 52 patients of whom (80.0%) showed recovery within three months. Stress and urge urinary incontinence and postvoid dribbling occurred in 16 patients (4.1%), 29 patients (7.4%), and 33 patients (8.4%), respectively. Age (odds ratio [OR]=3.494; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.565~7.803; p=0.002) and total operation time (OR=3.849; 95% CI=1.613~9.185; p=0.002) were factors that significantly affected the occurrence of TUI. Conclusions TUI, defined as any type of urine leakage, occurred after HoLEP in some patients, most of whom recovered within three months. Stress urinary incontinence occurred in only 4% of patients after HoLEP. Age and total operation time were associated with the occurrence of postoperative TUI. PMID:26331125

  10. Salvage Holmium laser enucleation of prostate to treat residual benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jin Kyu; Bae, Jungbum; Jeong, Chang Wook; Paick, Jae-Seung; Oh, Seung-June

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) technique to remove residual adenoma has not been reported. Salvage HoLEP enables anatomical enucleation of residual adenoma in patients who have previously undergone surgical treatment. We describe not only anatomical insights into the frequent location of adenoma recurrence, but also the feasibility of the salvage HoLEP technique. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a database containing HoLEP video records for 35 patients out of a total of 535 individuals on whom HoLEP was performed by 2 surgeons (SJO & JSP) between July 2008 and June 2011. Group 1 consisted of patients who underwent salvage HoLEP due to recurring adenoma and Group 2 of patients who underwent HoLEP as an initially surgical management to treat benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We compared the dataset of pre-, intra- and postoperative parameters between Groups 1 and 2. Results: In the analysis of the video records of Group 1 (n = 35), there was significant remnant tissue around the verumontanum and the lateral lobes were also incompletely removed by previous conventional procedures. When we compared pre-, intra- and postoperative parameters between the 2 groups, there were no significant differences, including operation time, duration of hospital stay. However, the duration of the catheterization of Group 1 was shorter than that of Group 2 (1.38 ± 0.55 vs. 1.90 ± 1.81 days, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Even for cases of residual BPH, salvage HoLEP is a feasible and effective procedure for treating residual adenoma along the anatomical plane. PMID:24839489

  11. Diseases associated with exposure to silica and nonfibrous silicate minerals. Silicosis and Silicate Disease Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Silicosis, a disease of historical importance, continues to occur cryptically today. Its pathogenesis is under ongoing study as new concepts of pathobiology evolve. In this article, the gross and microscopic features of the disease in the lungs and the lesions in lymph nodes and other viscera are described. These tissue changes are then discussed in the context of clinical disease and other possible or established complications of silica exposure (ie, scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and bronchogenic carcinoma). Silicates are members of a large family of common minerals, some of which have commercial importance. Silicates are less fibrogenic than silica when inhaled into the lungs, but cause characteristic lesions after heavy prolonged exposure. The features of these disease conditions are described herein. Various aspects of the mineralogy and tissue diagnosis of silicosis and lung disease due to silicates are reviewed. An overview of contemporary regulatory considerations is provided.204 references.

  12. An Evaluation of Ethyl Silicate-Based Grouts for Weathered Silicate Stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolph, Brittany Helen

    Culturally significant monuments made of weathered siliceous stone often display sub-surface condition issues such as cracks and voids. These issues require grouts that are ideally compatible with the composition and properties of the substrate. Based on the successful application of ethyl silicates as consolidants in recent literature, this study examines possible formulation pathways for the development of a grout incorporating ethyl silicate. Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTL) as a catalyst, silicone oil (PDMS), various grades of ground quartz, sepiolite, and hollow glass spheres were used in differing concentrations to create samples. These were visually and physically assessed on workability, separation, shrinkage, cracking, strength, and flexibility. Quantitative analysis was performed on selected formulations using UV-Vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy in coordination with a weight loss experiment to investigate kinetics, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Successful formulations tended to include oligomeric TEOS, crushed quartz of mixed grades, sepiolite powder, and PDMS, and show promise for future investigations.

  13. Novel inorganic ion exchange materials based on silicates; synthesis, structure and analytical applications of magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate sorbents.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Ibrahim M; Abou-Mesalam, Mamdouh M

    2007-11-19

    Two novel inorganic ion exchange materials magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate have been synthesized under identical conditions. The structure of these materials was established by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, thermogravemetric and differential thermal analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence analysis. Magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate were found to have the formulas MgSi(5.59)O(12.18).5.93H(2)O and MgAl(2.32)Si(5.2)O(14.88).18.23H(2)O, respectively. The structure of both sorbents was arranged and predict according to the ChemDraw Ultra program. The ion exchange capacities of these materials for some radionuclides and heavy metals Cs(+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) were investigated and the data obtained showed that magnesium alumino-silicate has a higher capacity for these cations compared to magneso-silicate. Distribution coefficients in nitric acid medium have been evaluated to explore the separation potentiality of magneso-silicate and magnesium alumino-silicate for Cs(+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(3+) ions. Sorption isotherms for all cations were investigated and the data showed the applicability of Freundlich isotherm for all cases. PMID:17532565

  14. Determination of some trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation with holmium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, Sibel; Soylak, Mustafa; Cabuk, Dilek; Topalak, Zeynep; Karagozlu, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    The determination of trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry was investigated. A coprecipitation procedure with holmium hydroxide was used for separation-preconcentration of trace elements. Trace amounts of copper(II), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(ll), chromium(lll), iron(Ill), cadmium(ll), and lead(ll) ions were coprecipitated with holmium hydroxide in 2.0 M NaOH medium. The optimum conditions for the coprecipitation process were investigated for several commonly tested experimental parameters, such as amount of coprecipitant, effect of standing time, centrifugation rate and time, and sample volume. The precision, based on replicate analysis, was lower than 10% for the analytes. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, the certified reference materials BCR 141 R calcareous loam soil and CRM 025-050 soil were analyzed. The procedure was successfully applied for separation and preconcentration of the investigated ions in various food and soil samples. An amount of the solid samples was decomposed with 15 mL concentrated hydrochloric acid-concentrated nitric acid (3 + 1). The preconcentration procedure was then applied to the final solutions. The concentration of trace elements in samples was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. PMID:22816279

  15. Use of the holmium:YAG laser for percutaneous photothermal ablation of cervical invertebral disks in dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochat, Mark; Henry, George A.; Campbell, Gregory A.; Stair, Ernest L.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Dickey, Tom

    1999-06-01

    Holmium:YAG laser ablation of thoracolumbar disks in dogs has been shown to be an effective alternative to standard surgical fenestration techniques. Our hypothesis was the Holmium:YAG laser could be equally effective and safe when used to ablate cervical intervertebral disks. Six normal chondrodystrophoid breed dogs were used. A sterile, cleaved, 320 micrometers , low-OH quartz optical fiber was inserted into each needle and the laser activated for 40 s at 2 W mean power and a 15 Hz pulse repetition rate for a total of 80 J. Dogs were observed in pain, neurological deficits, or other complications for 24 weeks. At 24 weeks, dogs were euthanatized and cervical disks collected and placed in 10 percent neutral buffered formalin. Disks were decalcified, sectioned at 5 micrometers , and stained with H and E. No problems were encountered during the procedure except occasional difficulties passing the needle by the shoulder to enter the C6-7 disk space. No complications, including neurologic deficits or pain were observe during the 24 weeks. Histologic examination revealed varying degrees of necrosis and defects created in the nucleus pulposus by laser irradiation. In some instances there was evidence of mild adjacent annular and bony thermal injury. On the basis of these result, the Ho:YAG laser appears to be a safe and efficacious method for ablation of canine cervical disks.

  16. Gamma spectrometry and chemical characterization of ceramic seeds with samarium-153 and holmium-166 for brachytherapy proposal.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo S; Campos, Tarcísio P R

    2010-12-01

    Ceramic seeds were synthesized by the sol-gel technique with Si:Sm:Ca and Si:Ho:Ca. One set of seeds was irradiated in the TRIGA type nuclear reactor IPR-R1 and submitted to instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), K(0) method, to determine mass percentage concentration of natural samarium and holmium in the seed as well as to determine all existing radionuclides and their activities. Attention was paid to discrimination of Si-31, Ca-40, Ca-45, Ca-47, Ca-49, Sm-145, Sm-155, Sm-153 and Ho-166. A second sample was submitted to atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) also to determine samarium and holmium concentrations in weight. A third sample was submitted to X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to qualitatively determine chemical composition. The measured activity was due to Sm-153 and Ho-166 with a well-characterized gamma spectrum. The X-ray fluorescence spectrum demonstrated that there is no discrepancy in seed composition. The maximum ranges in the water of beta particles from Sm-153 and Ho-166 decay were evaluated, as well as the dose rate and total dose delivered within the volume delimited by the range of the beta particles. The results are relevant for investigation of the viability of producing Sm-153 and Ho-166 radioactive seeds for use in brachytherapy. PMID:20685128

  17. Adsorption of β-carotene on modified magnesium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shanshan; Guo, Ning; Fu, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Modified flocculation magnesium silicate is prepared by a hydrothermal process at 120°C for 18 h after adding Al2(SO4)3 into the magnesium silicate gel. Compared with standard magnesium silicate with 328.116 m2 g-1 surface area, this modified magnesium silicate has a bigger BET surface area of 536.803 m2 g-1 and a lower interlayer water content. Modified magnesium silicate exhibits high β-carotene adsorption with a maximum adsorption capacity of 364.96 mg g-1. It is shown that when suspended in organic solvent, this material can be used effectively for carotenoid separation. Furthermore, our results suggest that modified magnesium silicate may be a promising candidate as an absorbent in the decoloring of oil.

  18. Natural Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    Silicates constitute more than 90% of the rocks exposed at Earth's land surface (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). Most primary minerals comprising these rocks are thermodynamically unstable at surface pressure/temperature conditions and are therefore susceptible to chemical weathering. Such weathering has long been of interest in the natural sciences. Hartt (1853) correctly attributed chemical weathering to "the efficacy of water containing carbonic acid in promoting the decomposition of igneous rocks." Antecedent to the recent interest in the role of vegetation on chemical weathering, Belt (1874) observed that the most intense weathering of rocks in tropical Nicaragua was confined to forested regions. He attributed this effect to "the percolation through rocks of rain water charged with a little acid from decomposing vegetation." Chamberlin (1899) proposed that the enhanced rates of chemical weathering associated with major mountain building episodes in Earth's history resulted in a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 that led to periods of global cooling. Many of the major characteristics of chemical weathering had been described when Merrill (1906) published the groundbreaking volume Rocks, Rock Weathering, and Soils.The major advances since that time, particularly during the last several decades, have centered on understanding the fundamental chemical, hydrologic, and biologic processes that control weathering and in establishing quantitative weathering rates. This research has been driven by the importance of chemical weathering to a number environmentally and economically important issues. Undoubtedly, the most significant aspect of chemical weathering is the breakdown of rocks to form soils, a process that makes life possible on the surface of the Earth. The availability of many soil macronutrients such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, and PO4 is directly related to the rate at which primary minerals weather. Often such nutrient balances are upset by anthropogenic

  19. Experiments of Water Formation on Warm Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-01

    When dust grains have a higher temperature than they would have in dense clouds, and when H, H2, and O2 have a negligible residence time on grains, the formation of water should still be possible via the hydrogenation of OH and Eley-Rideal-type reactions. We determined that the OH desorption energy from an amorphous silicate surface is at least 143 meV (1656 K). This is 400 K higher than the value previously used in chemical models of the interstellar medium and is possibly as high as 410 meV (4760 K). This extends the temperature range for the efficient formation of water on grains from about 30 K to at least 50 K, and possibly over 100 K. We do not find evidence that water molecules leave the surface upon formation. Instead, through a thermal programmed desorption experiment, we find that water formed on the surface of an amorphous silicate desorbs at around 160 K. We also measured the cross-sections for the reaction of H and D with an O3 layer on an amorphous silicate surface at 50 K. The values of the cross-sections, σH = 1.6 ± 0.27 Å2 and σD = 0.94 ± 0.09 Å2, respectively, are smaller than the size of an O3 molecule, suggesting the reaction mechanism is more likely Eley-Rideal than hot-atom. Information obtained through these experiments should help theorists evaluate the relative contribution of water formation on warm grains versus in the gas phase.

  20. Experiments of water formation on warm silicates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-10

    When dust grains have a higher temperature than they would have in dense clouds, and when H, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} have a negligible residence time on grains, the formation of water should still be possible via the hydrogenation of OH and Eley-Rideal-type reactions. We determined that the OH desorption energy from an amorphous silicate surface is at least 143 meV (1656 K). This is 400 K higher than the value previously used in chemical models of the interstellar medium and is possibly as high as 410 meV (4760 K). This extends the temperature range for the efficient formation of water on grains from about 30 K to at least 50 K, and possibly over 100 K. We do not find evidence that water molecules leave the surface upon formation. Instead, through a thermal programmed desorption experiment, we find that water formed on the surface of an amorphous silicate desorbs at around 160 K. We also measured the cross-sections for the reaction of H and D with an O{sub 3} layer on an amorphous silicate surface at 50 K. The values of the cross-sections, σ{sub H} = 1.6 ± 0.27 Å{sup 2} and σ{sub D} = 0.94 ± 0.09 Å{sup 2}, respectively, are smaller than the size of an O{sub 3} molecule, suggesting the reaction mechanism is more likely Eley-Rideal than hot-atom. Information obtained through these experiments should help theorists evaluate the relative contribution of water formation on warm grains versus in the gas phase.

  1. Lithium metaborate flux in silicate analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingamells, C.O.

    1970-01-01

    Lithium metaborate is an effective flux for silicates and other rock-forming minerals. The glass resulting from fusion is mechanically strong, reasonably nonhygroscopic, and is readily soluble in dilute acids. These characteristics lead to its use in X-ray spectrography and in methods which require whole-rock solutions, such as atomic absorption and emission spectrometry. Difficulties have been encountered in the use of such techniques : a high-quality reagent has been difficult to obtain ; fusion conditions must be rather closely controlled; graphite crucibles used in the fusions need special treatment. Methods for overcoming these difficulties are outlined. Selected procedures for various instrumental methods of analysis are described. ?? 1970.

  2. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  3. Microbial dissolution of silicate materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, D.

    1996-03-26

    The objective of this research was to better understand the role of selected thermophilic bacteria in the colonization and dissolution of silicate minerals, with potential applications to the HDR Project. The demonstration of enhanced dissolution from microbial effects is critically dependent on providing a mineral bait within a media deficient in the critical nutrient found in the mineral (e.g., Fe). Reproducible experimental conditions in batch experiments require agitation to expose mineral powders, as well as nearly similar initial conditions for both inoculated cultures and controls. It is difficult, but not impossible to ensure reproducible conditions with microbes favoring filamentous growth habits.

  4. Noble gas diffusion in silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, J.; Burnard, P.; Laporte, D.

    2013-12-01

    Fractionated noble gas relative abundances (Ne/Ar, Kr/Ar and Xe/Ar) and isotopic compositions (40Ar/36Ar, 38Ar/36Ar, 20Ne/22Ne, 21Ne/22Ne) are found in volcanic materials, notably in pumices (1-3). This has generally been interpreted as fractionation resulting from diffusion. However, there is some disagreement as to whether this fractionation occurs during high temperature magmatic processes (3) or due to diffusion of air into solidified pyroclastic deposits (2). We show that differences in relative noble gas diffusivities (e.g. D4He vs D40Ar, where D is the diffusivity) and isotopic diffusivities (e.g. D40Ar vs D36Ar) reduce at high temperatures (Fig). These results predict minimal fractionation of noble gases during magmatic processes. However, it is important to note that these diffusivities were measured in silicate glasses; the relative noble diffusivities in silicate liquids are poorly known. We have developed a new experimental protocol which will to determine the diffusivities of the noble gases and their isotopes in the liquid state. A graphite crucible c. 0.3 mm diameter and c. 20mm deep is filled with powdered glass of the desired composition, heated to 1773 K for 15 minutes and quenched to form a glass cylinder within the crucible. The crucible is then placed in a low pressure (1 bar) controlled atmosphere vertical furnace and heated at high temperatures (1673-1773K) for 2 hours in a pure N2 atmosphere. At this point noble gases (He and Ar) are introduced into the furnace and allowed to diffuse into the cylinder of liquid for durations of between 30 and 90. After quenching, the glass cylinder, preserving its' diffusion profile, is sawed into c. 1mm thick discs which are measured by conventional noble gas mass spectrometry for noble gas abundances (He, Ar) and isotopes (40,38,36Ar). The results will be presented at the conference. References 1 Kaneoka, I. Earth Planet Sci Letts 48, 284-292 (1980). 2 Pinti, D. L., Wada, N. & Matsuda, J. J. Volcan

  5. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  6. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Chen, James M.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  7. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-02-28

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  8. Histological changes and wound healing response following noncontact holmium: YAG laser thermal keratoplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, D D

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate acute histological changes and the induced wound healing response in corneal tissue following noncontact holmium:YAG laser thermal keratoplasty (LTK). METHODS: LTK using 10 pulses and a range of radiant energies was performed on 3 human corneas one day prior ro their removal at penetrating keratoplasty. Rabbit corneas were treated with 10-pulse and 5-pulse LTK and followed for up to 3 months. Tissues were studies with light and transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The amount of acute tissue injury increased with increasing pulse radiant energy. In human corneas, changes in the irradiated zones included epithelial cell injury and death loss of fine filamentous structure in Bowman's layer, disruption of stromal lamallae, and keratocyte injury and death. In the rabbit corneas, similar acute changes were noted. By 3 weeks, epithelial hyperplasia and stromal contraction were present. Wound healing in the rabbit corneas included repair of the epithelial attachment complex, keratocyte activation, synthesis of type I collagen, partial restoration of stromal keratan sulfate and type VI collagen, and retrocorneal membrane formation. Compared to 10-pulse treatments, 5-pulse treatments produced less acute tissue injury and had more rapid restoration of normal stromal architecture. CONCLUSION: Noncontact LTK produces acute epithelial and stromal tissue changes and in rabbit corneas stimulates a brisk wound healing response. These changes could contribute to postoperative regression of induced refractive correction. Further work is required to determine if reductions in the magnitude of acute tissue injury and induced wound healing response will enhance the efficacy and stability of LTK. Images FIGURE 1A FIGURE 1B FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4A FIGURE 4B FIGURE 4C FIGURE 4D FIGURE 5A FIGURE 5B FIGURE 5C FIGURE 5D FIGURE 6A FIGURE 6B FIGURE 6C FIGURE 6D FIGURE 7A FIGURE 7B FIGURE 8A FIGURE 8B FIGURE 8C FIGURE

  9. Factors Affecting De Novo Urinary Retention after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Han; Yoo, Changwon; Choo, Minsoo; Paick, Jae-Seung; Oh, Seung-June

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients can experience urinary retention (UR) after Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) that requires bladder distension during the procedure. The aim of this retrospective study is to identify factors affecting the UR after HoLEP. Materials and Methods 336 patients, which underwent HoLEP for a symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia between July 2008 and March 2012, were included in this study. Urethral catheters were routinely removed one or two days after surgery. UR was defined as the need for an indwelling catheter placement following a failure to void after catheter removal. Demographic and clinical parameters were compared between the UR (n = 37) and the non-urinary retention (non-UR; n = 299) groups. Results The mean age of patients was 68.3 (±6.5) years and the mean operative time was 75.3 (±37.4) min. Thirty seven patients (11.0%) experienced a postoperative UR. UR patients voided catheter free an average of 1.9 (±1.7) days after UR. With regard to the causes of UR, 24 (7.1%) and 13 (3.9%) patients experienced a blood clot-related UR and a non-clot related UR respectively. Using multivariate analysis (p<0.05), we found significant differences between the UR and the non-UR groups with regard to a morcellation efficiency (OR 0.701, 95% CI 0.498–0.988) and a bleeding-related complication, such as, a reoperation for bleeding (OR 0.039, 95% CI 0.004–0.383) or a transfusion (OR 0.144, 95% CI 0.027–0.877). Age, history of diabetes, prostate volume, pre-operative post-void residual, bladder contractility index, learning curve, and operative time were not significantly associated with the UR (p>0.05). Conclusions De novo UR after HoLEP was found to be self-limited and it was not related to learning curve, patient age, diabetes, or operative time. Efficient morcellation and careful control of bleeding, which reduces clot formation, decrease the risk of UR after HoLEP. PMID:24465454

  10. Single-frequency, single-polarization holmium-doped ZBLAN fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Zong, J.; Miller, A.; Wiersma, K.; Norwood, R. A.; Prasad, N. S.; Chavez-Pirson, A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2013-02-01

    We present the performance of a single frequency, single-polarization holmium (Ho3+)-doped ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3- AlF3-NaF) fiber laser at 1200 nm. This distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser was developed by splicing a 22 mm long highly Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber to a pair of silica fiber Bragg gratings (FBG). The successful fusion splicing of silica fiber to ZBLAN fiber, with their very different melting temperatures, was accomplished by using NP Photonics proprietary splicing technique. The 3 mol% Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber had a core diameter of 6.5 μm and a cladding diameter of 125 μm. The threshold of this laser was seen to be about 260 mW, and when the pump power was 520 mW, the output power was about 10 mW. The efficiency of the 1200 nm single-frequency fiber laser, i.e. the ratio of the output power to the launched pump power, was about 3.8%. The linewidth of the 1200 nm single-frequency fiber laser was estimated to be about 100 kHz by comparing the measured frequency noise of the 1200 nm single-frequency fiber laser with that of 1 μm NP Photonics single-frequency fiber lasers whose linewidths have been measured to be in the 1- 10 kHz range. The relative intensity noise of this DBR all-fiber laser was measured to be < 110 dB/Hz at the relaxation oscillation peak and the polarization extinction ratio was measured to be > 19 dB. Due to its low phonon energy and long radiative lifetimes, rare-earth-doped ZBLAN allows various transitions that are typically terminated in silica glass, resulting in ultraviolet, visible, and infrared rare-earth doped ZBLAN lasers. Therefore, our results highlight the exciting prospect that the accessible wavelength range of single-frequency DBR fiber lasers can be expanded significantly by using rare-earth-doped ZBLAN fibers.

  11. Radiosynoviorthesis of knees by means of 166Ho-holmium-boro-macroaggregates.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Otakar; Kaspárek, Richard; Ullmann, Vojtech; Melichar, Frantisek; Kropácek, Martin; Mirzajevova, Marcela

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse and therapeutic effects of applicated holmium-boro-macroaggregates (HBMAs) in the radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) of knees in patients suffering from chronic synovitis. We started RSO of the knees by means of a new radiopharmaceutical (RF) HBMA in patients with gonarthrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic synovitis, psoriatic arthritis, and gout arthropathy. Seventeen (17) intra-articular injections were performed in 15 patients who were receiving a mean activity of 972 MBq (range, 904-1057) of 166Ho-HBMA. Patient inclusion to the study followed a series of inclusion and exclusion criterions. The patients were hospitalized for 3 days. Side-effects were evaluated during their hospital stay and again after 6-8 weeks. Static scintigraphy of knee joints and measurements of blood radioactivity were performed. Therapeutic effects were evaluated after 6-8 weeks and at 6 months. In 2 hours and 2 days following the application, we proved, by means of knee and inguinal scintigraphy, only insignificant radiopharmaceutical leakage from the joint cavity to the inguinal lymph nodes in 4 patients. In the treated patients, no serious adverse effects occurred. Nine (9) patients were without complaints, 4 patients had slight knee exudation, and 2 patients had great exudation. Therapeutic effects were as follows: 2 patients were without pain, 9 were with lower pain, 3 were with the same pain, and 1 patient was with increased pain. Joint motion was improved in 7 patients, remained the same in 7 patients, and was impaired in 1 patient. Analgesics consumption was lower in 5 patients, the same in 9 patients, and greater in 1 patient. Knee exudation was absent in 2 patients, lower in 4 patients, the same in 6 patients, and greater in 3 patients. In 3 patients it was necessary to do surgical RSO. This RF can extend the range of clinically used radiopharmaceuticals for RSO and to supplement space between 90Y with high energy and 186Re with 169Er with

  12. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate is Safe for Patients Above 80 Years: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of age on the efficacy and safety of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: A total of 579 patients underwent HoLEP procedure performed by a single surgeon (SJO) between December 2009 and May 2013. The perioperative and functional outcomes of patients in the age groups of 50–59 (group A, n=44), 60–69 (group B, n=253), 70–79 (group C, n=244), and ≥80 years (group D, n=38) were compared. The Clavien-Dindo system was used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, and urinary continence were used to assess functional outcomes. Results: In this study, the patients ≥80 years had significantly higher presence of hypertension (P=0.007), total prostate volumes (P=0.024), transitional zone volume (P=0.002), American Society of Anesthesiologists scores (P=0.006), urinary retention (P=0.032), and anticoagulation use (P=0.008) at preoperative period. Moreover, the mean values of operation time, enucleation time, morcellation time, and enucleation weight were higher in group D compared with other group patients (P=0.002, P=0.010, P<0.01, and P=0.009, respectively). Patients aged ≥80 years had a longer hospital stay time (2.9±1.8 days) than other groups (group A, 2.3±0.7 days; group B, 2.3±0.7 days vs. group C, 2.4±0.7 days; P=0.001). All groups were similar in regard to the incidence of complications (Clavien-Dindo grade) post operatively (P>0.05). All the patients in the present study showed improvement in functional outcomes after HoLEP. By the sixth month, there were no significant differences in IPSS, quality of life, Qmax, and PVR among the groups (P>0.05). Conclusions: Compared with younger patients, the patients aged ≥80 years had a similar overall morbidity and 6-month functional outcomes of HoLEP. HoLEP is a safe and

  13. Evidence for seismogenic fracture of silicic magma.

    PubMed

    Tuffen, Hugh; Smith, Rosanna; Sammonds, Peter R

    2008-05-22

    It has long been assumed that seismogenic faulting is confined to cool, brittle rocks, with a temperature upper limit of approximately 600 degrees C (ref. 1). This thinking underpins our understanding of volcanic earthquakes, which are assumed to occur in cold rocks surrounding moving magma. However, the recent discovery of abundant brittle-ductile fault textures in silicic lavas has led to the counter-intuitive hypothesis that seismic events may be triggered by fracture and faulting within the erupting magma itself. This hypothesis is supported by recent observations of growing lava domes, where microearthquake swarms have coincided with the emplacement of gouge-covered lava spines, leading to models of seismogenic stick-slip along shallow shear zones in the magma. But can fracturing or faulting in high-temperature, eruptible magma really generate measurable seismic events? Here we deform high-temperature silica-rich magmas under simulated volcanic conditions in order to test the hypothesis that high-temperature magma fracture is seismogenic. The acoustic emissions recorded during experiments show that seismogenic rupture may occur in both crystal-rich and crystal-free silicic magmas at eruptive temperatures, extending the range of known conditions for seismogenic faulting. PMID:18497823

  14. Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.

    1989-06-30

    Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

  15. SPM nanolithography of hydroxy-silicates.

    PubMed

    Valdrè, G; Moro, D; Hounsome, C M; Antognozzi, M

    2012-09-28

    Bio-nanopatterning of surfaces is becoming a crucial technique with applications ranging from molecular and cell biology to medicine. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is one of the most useful tools for nanopatterning of flat surfaces. However, these patterns are usually built on homogeneous surfaces and require chemical functionalization to ensure specific affinity. Layered magnesium-aluminum hydroxide-silicates have already shown unique self-assembly properties on DNA molecules, due to their peculiar crystal chemistry based on alternating positive and negative crystal layers. However, patterns on these surfaces tend to be randomly organized. Here we show etching and oxidation at the nanometer scale of magnesium-aluminum hydroxide-silicates using the same SPM probe for the creation of organized nanopatterns. In particular, it is possible to produce three-dimensional structures in a reproducible way, with a depth resolution of 0.4 nm, lateral resolution of tens of nm, and a speed of about 10 μm s(-1). We report, as an example, the construction of an atomically flat charged pattern, designed to guide DNA deposition along predetermined directions without the need of any chemical functionalization of the surface. PMID:22948182

  16. Tip-induced nanoreactor for silicate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming; Ma, Liran; Liang, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale scientific issues have attracted an increasing amount of research interest due to their specific size-effect and novel structure-property. From macro to nano, materials present some unique chemical reactivity that bulk materials do not own. Here we introduce a facile method to generate silicate with nanoscale control based on the establishment of a confined space between a meso/nanoscale tungsten tip and a smooth silica/silicon substrate. During the process, local water-like droplets deposition can be obviously observed in the confinement between the Si/SiO2 surfaces and the KOH-modified tungsten tip. By the combination of in-situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we were able to take a deep insight of both the product composition and the underlying mechanism of such phenomena. It was indicated that such nanoreactor for silicate could be quite efficient as a result of the local capillarity and electric field effect, with implications at both nano and meso scales. PMID:26364882

  17. Crystalline-amorphous transition in silicate perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, M.; Chizmeshya, A.; Wolf, G.H.; Poole, P.H.; Shao, J.; Angell, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    CaSiO{sub 3} and MgSiO{sub 3} perovskites are known to undergo solid-state crystal to amorphous transitions near ambient pressure when decompressed from their high-pressure stability fields. In order to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of this transition we have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations and lattice-dynamical calculations on model silicate perovskite systems using empirical rigid-ion pair potentials. In the simulations at low temperatures, the model perovskite systems transform under tension to a low-density glass composed of corner shared chains of tetrahedral silicon. The amorphization is initiated by a thermally activated step involving a soft polar optic mode in the perovskite phase at the Brillouin zone center. Progression of the system along this reaction coordinate triggers, in succession, multiple barrierless modes of instability ultimately producing a catastrophic decohesion of the lattice. An important intermediary along the reaction path is a crystalline phase where silicon is in a five-coordinate site and the alkaline-earth metal atom is in eightfold coordination. At the onset pressure, this transitory phase is itself dynamically unstable to a number of additional vibrational modes, the most relevant being those which result in transformation to a variety of tetrahedral chain silicate motifs. These results support the conjecture that stress-induced amorphization arises from the near simultaneous accessibility of multiple modes of instability in the highly metastable parent crystalline phase.

  18. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  19. The infrared characteristics of circumstellar silicate grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, W.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical study of the infrared emission from circumstellar shells around late-type giants is made, with the aim of deriving the infrared characteristics of the silicate grains condensing in these shells. A large grid of models has been compared with observations of optically visible Miras, IRC sources and OH/IR stars. From fitting the observed relation between the color temperature and the strength of the 10-micron feature, it is concluded that the ratio of the 3.5 to 10-micron absorption efficiencies of the dust is about 0.25, a factor of 2 less than a previous determination. Detailed modeling of the 2 to 13-micron spectrum of OH 26.5 + 0.6, IRC + 10011 and R Cas yielded a similar ratio. These detailed models also show that the shape of the 10-micron feature, particularly around 8 and 13 microns, varies from source to source. The derived 10-micron feature is narrower for larger dust column densities. These observed differences in the intrinsic shape of the 10-micron feature are not due to differences in size of the condensing particles. Probably they are related to structural or compositional differences in the condensing silicates.

  20. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  1. SILICATES FOR CORROSION CONTROL IN BUILDING POTABLE WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicates have been used to control the corrosion of drinking water distribution system materials. Previous work has shown that they are particularly useful in reducing the release of zinc from galvanized materials in hot water systems. Negatively charged silicate species were re...

  2. The pulse of large silicic magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    Large silicic volcanic fields (LSVFs) are considered windows into the tops of upper crustal batholiths that are the foundations of the continental crust. The space-time-volume records of volcanism in LSVFs are therefore assumed to mirror the accumulation record of the associated upper crustal batholith. However, key questions about the link between the volcanic and plutonic realms remain to be addressed if this view is to be substantiated. Among these are: 1) What does the surface pattern of volcanism really tell us about the development of the plutonic system below? Do these eruptions represent evacuation from a distinct batch of magma that formed just prior to eruption or do they represent the periodic tapping of a long lived regional magma body? 2) What does the cyclicity of the large caldera systems and the regional concordance of eruptions tell us about the development of the magmatic systems beneath? Does the repose period represent the time scale of development of the next magma batch or does the erupted magma develop in a timescale much shorter than the repose period? 3) What does the self-organization of single batholithic scale magmatic systems, for instance the development of a zoned system, tell us about the dynamics and time scales over which these systems differentiate and evolve? We are addressing some of these questions in the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex of the Central Andes. Here, time scales of assembly and organization of batholith-scale silicic magma systems investigated using 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb in zircon connote: 1) Supereruptions in the APVC evacuated distinct magma batches that accumulated within a few hundred thousand years prior to eruption 2) The repose period of cyclic supervolcanic systems is considerably longer than the time scale to develop the next eruptible magma batch 3) Batholith scale-silicic magma chambers can develop significant zonations in time scales of a few hundred thousand years. Additionally, our data suggest quasi

  3. On the Filling Process Forming Silicic Segregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, K.; Marsh, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    Interdigitating silicic lenses are particularly well developed and well exposed in the Ferrar Dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Silicic segregations are texturally splotchy, have sharp upper contacts, and diffuse lower contacts that grade into normal dolerite. What is unusual about these 1- 2 m lenses is that the background sill shows very little compositional variation and yet the silicic segregations show wide compositional variation. In particular, silica content varies between 47 and 68%, and thus produces for the sill overall a bimodal composition. We have analyzed over 100 segregation samples in order to investigate the nature of the filling process. Previous work (Zavala & Marsh, 1999) has shown that segregations have compositions that correspond to interstitial liquid present at crystallinities between 59 and 63 % and temperatures between 1135° and 1115° . Additionally, it was noted that the large segregation lenses are not homogeneous and exhibit cyclic variations in silica content. This observation lead to the current study, in which new samples from the Peneplain Sill (235 to 241) show remarkable correlations between segregation texture, stratigraphic position and silica enrichment. Incompatibles like Zr indicate relatively low 35 to 40% concentrations of melt at the point of segregation extraction, which supports the notion that segregations formed by withdrawal of interstitial melt into tears as the solidification front (SF) became gravitationally unstable. The details of the filling process can also be gauged using chemical profiles normalized to segregation thickness. One group shows distinct multiple smaller cycles of silica enrichment versus depth, which suggests successive stages of opening. The other group shows a strong enrichment in silica followed by a steady decay to the base. The general form of this latter pattern measures the gradient in melt composition immediately below the segregation at the time of infilling. From

  4. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Uhoya, Walter; Tsoi, Georgiy; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2012-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Neel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  5. Holmium-doped 2.1 μm waveguide chip laser with an output power > 1 W.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, D G; Stevens, V J; Michaud-Belleau, V; Gross, S; Fuerbach, A; Monro, T M

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrate the increasing applicability of compact ultra-fast laser inscribed glass guided-wave lasers and report the highest-power glass waveguide laser with over 1.1 W of output power in monolithic operation in the short-infrared near 2070 nm achieved (51% incident slope efficiency). The holmium doped ZBLAN chip laser is in-band pumped by a 1945 nm thulium fiber laser. When operated in an extended-cavity configuration, over 1 W of output power is realized in a linearly polarized beam. Broad and continuous tunability of the extended-cavity laser is demonstrated from 2004 nm to 2099 nm. Considering its excellent beam quality of M² = 1.08, this laser shows potential as a flexible master oscillator for single frequency and mode-locking applications. PMID:26699055

  6. Thulium/holmium-doped fiber laser passively mode locked by black phosphorus nanoplatelets-based saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Zheng, Xin; Yin, Ke; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Jiang, Tian

    2015-12-01

    By coupling black phosphorus (BP) nanoplatelets (NPs) with a fiber-taper evanescent light field, a saturable absorber (SA) based on the BP NPs has been successfully fabricated and used in a thulium/holmium-doped fiber laser as the mode locker. The SA had a modulation depth of ∼9.8% measured at 1.93 μm. A stable mode-locking operation at 1898 nm was achieved with a pulse width of 1.58 ps and a fundamental mode-lock repetition rate of 19.2 MHz. By increasing the pump intensity, phenomena of multi-pulsing operations, including harmonic mode-locked states and soliton bunches, were obtained in the experiment, showing that the BP NPs possess an ultrafast optical response time. This work suggests that the BP NPs-based SA is potentially useful for ultrashort, pulsed laser operations in the eye-safe region of 2 μm. PMID:26836690

  7. Holmium YLF amplifier performance and the prospects for multi-Joule energies using diode-laser pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    Laser studies were performed to examine the amplifier characteristics of holmium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (YLF) at 300 K. An inversion ratio of 0.37 was reached resulting in a measured small-signal gain coefficient of 0.50/cm. In a flashlamp pumping experiment, an output energy of 240 mJ was achieved for 38.5 mJ of input energy resulting in a large gain of 6.2. An amplifier model was developed for diode laser pumping and adapted to consider this flashlamp-pumped case. There is good agreement between the theory and experiment. Multipass amplifier calculations using the model suggest that the Ho: Tm: YLF laser crystal can support a 12 percent electrical to optical efficiency at 300 K even in the presence of upconversion.

  8. Self-quenching of luminescence in concentrated lithium--erbium and lithium--holmium double fluoride crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachuk, A.M.; Klokishner, S.I.; Petrov, M.V.

    1985-10-01

    For the radiative terms of holmium and erbium ions in concentrated LiErF/sub 4/ and LiHoF/sub 4/ crystals, numerical estimates were made of the microparameters and transfer rates on the basis of known experimental data on the structure of luminescence centers, probabilities of intracenter transitions, phonon spectrum of the crystals, and electron--phonon interaction. The schemes of the most important processes of cross-relaxation quenching and nonlinear (in excitation intensity) interaction have been determined. On the basis of an analysis of numerical values of the rates of intracenter relaxation and interionic transfer of energy, conclusions are reached concerning the processes which significantly affect the radiative characteristics of concentrated crystals. The role of the processes of cross-relaxation quenching and nonlinear interaction in the formation of an inverse population of excited multiplets and the influences of these processes on the characteristics of stimulated emission are discussed.

  9. [Investigation of changes in sexual and ejaculatory functions after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP)].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryuta; Shitara, Toshiya; Hirayama, Takahiro; Wakatabe, Yoji; Dobashi, Masato; Sugita, Yoshiko; Kubo, Seiichi; Fujita, Tetsuo; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Baba, Shiro

    2014-06-01

    Changes in sexual function and ejaculatory function in patients who had undergone holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) were investigated using questionnaires. In this study, 77 patients on whom HoLEP was performed at our department from July 2010 to December 2010 were included. Of the 77 patients, the number of patients who could achieve an erection increased from 36 (46.8%) preoperatively to 52 (67.5%) postoperatively after HoLEP. Although postoperative ejaculatory dysfunction was found in 38 (73%) of 52 patients, 47 (90%) experienced orgasms, regardless of ejaculation, which is a high rate. With respect to ejaculatory satisfaction, patients who experienced an ejaculation had significantly higher satisfaction levels than those who did not. These results suggest that changes in postoperative ejaculatory function might affect satisfaction levels of ejaculation. PMID:25001640

  10. Ex vivo pyelotomy, nephroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy of a staghorn stone in a donor kidney prior to renal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Dariusz; Bolanowska, Barbara; Jankowski, Paweł; Dorobisz, Tadeusz; Dorobisz, Karolina; Chabowski, Mariusz; Janczak, Dawid

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents the diagnostic and treatment procedures of stone removal from the kidney of a 67-year-old donor, the transplantation of the kidney to a 65-year-old recipient, and the postoperative course until the end of hospitalization. Computed tomography performed before collecting the organ showed a staghorn stone in the renal pelvis and lower calyces in the right donor kidney. The stones were removed ex-vivo using a rigid ureteroscope and a holmium laser prior to transplantation. Then the organ was transplanted to the left iliac fossa of a 65-year-old man with end-stage renal failure. The authors think there is a possibility of increasing the kidney pool, by using organs containing large calculi. In such cases stones should be removed before the operation and the patient should be monitored regularly, especially in the first months after the transplant. PMID:26240630

  11. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates in the Far-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A,; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Henry, Ross M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Silverberg, Robert f.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies heavily on understanding the properties of silicate dust as a function of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. We introduce the QPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project to address the need for high fidelity optical characterization data on the various forms of astronomical dust. We use two spectrometers to provide extinction data for silicate samples across a wide wavelength range (from the near infrared to the millimeter). New experiments are in development that will provide complementary information on the emissivity of our samples, allowing us to complete the optical characterization of these dust materials. In this paper, we present initial results from several materials including amorphous iron silicate, magnesium silicate and silica smokes, over a wide range of temperatures, and discuss the design and operation of our new experiments.

  12. The identification of crystalline olivine in cometary silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campins, Humberto; Ryan, Eileen V.

    1989-01-01

    An intermediate-resolution spectrum of the 8-13 micron region in comet Halley is obtained which shows a prominent silicate emission feature with structure not observed before in other comets or in interstellar silicates. The presence of a strong 11.3 micron peak reported by Bregman and coworkers is confirmed, and evidence is found for additional structure in the band. By comparison with spectra of interplanetary dust particles and laboratory silicates, it is concluded that small crystalline olivine particles are a major component of the silicates in this comet; other silicates (e.g., amorphous or hydrated) must also be present. The identification of crystalline olivine in this part of the spectrum is supported by the observation of four peaks in 20-50 micron airborne spectra of this comet which have also been attributed to olivine.

  13. Surface charge and wetting characteristics of layered silicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xihui; Gupta, Vishal; Du, Hao; Wang, Xuming; Miller, Jan D

    2012-11-01

    The surface characteristics, including surface charge and wettability, of layered silicates are reviewed based on experimental results and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) results. The surface charge features of important layered silicates including mica, talc, and kaolinite are described from atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, electrophoresis measurements, and/or results from potentiometric titration. In addition, the wetting characteristics of the silica tetrahedral surface which is common to all layered silicates are examined with different experimental techniques and results are discussed. The wettability of trilayer silicates and bilayer silicates is discussed, particularly the wettability of the silica tetrahedral face and alumina octahedral face of kaolinite based on MDS results as well as recent AFM results. PMID:22809732

  14. The identification of crystalline olivine in cometary silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campins, H.; Ryan, E. V.

    1989-06-01

    An intermediate-resolution spectrum of the 8-13 micron region in comet Halley is obtained which shows a prominent silicate emission feature with structure not observed before in other comets or in interstellar silicates. The presence of a strong 11.3 micron peak reported by Bregman and coworkers is confirmed, and evidence is found for additional structure in the band. By comparison with spectra of interplanetary dust particles and laboratory silicates, it is concluded that small crystalline olivine particles are a major component of the silicates in this comet; other silicates (e.g., amorphous or hydrated) must also be present. The identification of crystalline olivine in this part of the spectrum is supported by the observation of four peaks in 20-50 micron airborne spectra of this comet which have also been attributed to olivine.

  15. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-01-01

    Silicate inclusions in iron meteorites display an astonishing chemical and mineralogical variety, ranging from chondritic to highly fractionated, silica- and alkali-rich assemblages. In spite of this, their origin is commonly considered to be a simple one: mixing of silicates, fractionated or unfractionated, with metal. The latter had to be liquid in order to accommodate the former in a pore-free way which all models accomplish by assuming shock melting. II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions, including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. They also pose a formidable conundrum: young silicates are enclosed by very old metal. This and many other incompatibilities between models and reality forced the formulation of an alternative genetic model for irons. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  16. Radiotherapeutic bandage based on electrospun polyacrylonitrile containing holmium-166 iron garnet nanoparticles for the treatment of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Munaweera, Imalka; Levesque-Bishop, Daniel; Shi, Yi; Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Balkus, Kenneth J

    2014-12-24

    Radiation therapy is used as a primary treatment for inoperable tumors and in patients that cannot or will not undergo surgery. Radioactive holmium-166 ((166)Ho) is a viable candidate for use against skin cancer. Nonradioactive holmium-165 ((165)Ho) iron garnet nanoparticles have been incorporated into a bandage, which, after neutron-activation to (166)Ho, can be applied to a tumor lesion. The (165)Ho iron garnet nanoparticles ((165)HoIG) were synthesized and introduced into polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymer solutions. The polymer solutions were then electrospun to produce flexible nonwoven bandages, which are stable to neutron-activation. The fiber mats were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The bandages are stable after neutron-activation at a thermal neutron-flux of approximately 3.5 × 10(12) neutrons/cm(2)·s for at least 4 h and 100 °C. Different amounts of radioactivity can be produced by changing the amount of the (165)HoIG nanoparticles inside the bandage and the duration of neutron-activation, which is important for different stages of skin cancer. Furthermore, the radioactive bandage can be easily manipulated to irradiate only the tumor site by cutting the bandage into specific shapes and sizes that cover the tumor prior to neutron-activation. Thus, exposure of healthy cells to high energy β-particles can be avoided. Moreover, there is no leakage of radioactive material after neutron activation, which is critical for safe handling by healthcare professionals treating skin cancer patients. PMID:25396281

  17. Ion-implantation damage in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, G. W.

    Ion implantation is a rapid technique for simulating damage induced by alpha recoil nuclei in nuclear waste forms. The simulation has been found to be quite good in TEM comparisons with natural alpha decay damage in minerals, but leach rate differences have been observed in glass studies and were attributed to dose rate differences. The similarities between ion implantation and recoil nuclei as a means of producing damage suggest that insights into the long term behavior of glass waste forms can be obtained by examination of what is known about ion implantation damage in silicate glasses. This paper briefly reviews these effects and shows that leaching results in certain nuclear waste glasses can be understood as resulting from plastic flow and track overlap. Phase separation is also seen to be a possible consequence of damage induced compositional changes.

  18. Raman spectra of rings in silicate material

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Bunker, B.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Balfe, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic studies on gel-derived silicates have confirmed that narrow bands near 607 cm-1 and 492 cm-1, first observed in the Raman spectrum of fused silica, are associated with three- and four-fold siloxane rings. Using these results, we have identified three- and four-fold siloxane rings in other high-surface-area silica materials, including leached glasses and Cab-O-Sil. This Raman spectroscopic evidence not only shows that small siloxane rings are a common characteristic of a number of silica materials but also suggests that they form preferentially at silica surfaces. This paper reviews the Raman spectroscopic evidence that led to the identification of the vibrational frequencies of the small siloxane rings and presents the results of Raman experiments on high-surface-area silica materials in which the concentration of small siloxane rings is enhanced compared to fused silica.

  19. Organics Synthesized Using Iron-Grain Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. M.; Cody, G. D.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2003-01-01

    We use Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) synthesis to produce hydrocarbons by hydrogenating carbon monoxide via catalytic reactions. The products of these reactions have been studied using 'natural' catalysts and calculations of the efficiency of FTT synthesis in the Solar Nebula suggest that these types of reactions could make significant contributions to the composition of material near three AU. We coat Fe-silicate grains with organic material using FTT synthesis to simulate the chemistry in the early Solar Nebula. In our experimental setup, we roughly model a nebular environment where grains are successively transported from hot to cold regions of the nebula. In other words, the starting gases and FTT products are continuously circulated through the grains at high temperature with intervals of cooling. Organics generated in this manner could represent the carbonaceous material incorporated in comets and meteorites. We analyze the resulting organics and present the results.

  20. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  1. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  2. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, Mari L.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 Si.sub.4 O.sub.13 pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs.sub.2 O and TiO.sub.2 loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO.sub.2 and Cs.sub.2 that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass.

  3. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, M.L.

    1997-01-07

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 13} pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs{sub 2}O and TiO{sub 2} loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass. 10 figs.

  4. A water-ethanol mixed-solution hydrothermal route to silicates nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xun . E-mail: wangxun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhuang Jing; Peng Qing; Li Yadong . E-mail: ydli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2005-07-15

    In this manuscript, series of silicates nanowires, such as calcium silicate, strontium silicate, barium silicate, zinc silicate and cadmium silicate, etc., have been successfully prepared from a water-ethanol mixed solution system through a hydrothermal synthetic way. The formation process of these silicates nanowires has been studied in detail. Due to their rich sources and possible novel properties from reduced dimensionalities, we believe that the synthesis of these silicates nanowires may bring some new opportunity in the solid state chemistry and nanoscience and technology fields, etc.

  5. DISORDERED SILICATES IN SPACE: A STUDY OF LABORATORY SPECTRA OF 'AMORPHOUS' SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Speck, Angela K.; Whittington, Alan G.; Hofmeister, Anne M.

    2011-10-20

    We present a laboratory study of silicate glasses of astrophysically relevant compositions including olivines, pyroxenes, and melilites. With emphasis on the classic Si-O stretching feature near 10 {mu}m, we compare infrared spectra of our new samples with laboratory spectra on ostensibly similar compositions, and also with synthetic silicate spectral data commonly used in dust modeling. Several different factors affect spectral features including sample chemistry (e.g., polymerization, Mg/Fe ratio, oxidation state, and Al-content) whereas different sample preparation techniques lead to variations in porosity, density, and water content. The convolution of chemical and physical effects makes it difficult to attribute changes in spectral parameters to any given variable. It is important that detailed chemical and structural characterization be provided along with laboratory spectra. In addition to composition and density, we measured the glass transition temperatures for the samples which place upper limits on the formation and/or processing temperatures of these solids in space. Popular synthetically generated optical functions do not have spectral features that match any of our glass samples. However, the {approx}10 {mu}m feature generated by the synthetic data rarely exactly matches the shape and peak position of astronomically observed silicate features. Our comparison with the synthetic spectra allows astronomers to determine likely candidates among our glass samples for matching astronomical observations.

  6. [Experimental liver and kidney surgery with CO2, CO, holmium, and neodym lasers. Cutting effect, hemostasis, histopathology, and healing (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Karbe, E; Königsmann, G; Beck, R

    1980-01-01

    Various laser devices (CO2, CO, Nd: YAG, and holmium: YAG lasers) have been used on pig livers and on dog kidneys for comparison with conventional surgical instruments (electroscalpel, cryoscalpel, and scalpel). CO2 and CO lasers caused the least tissue damage, followed by the holmium laser; severe damage was caused by the Nd: YAG laser. The order was reverse for coagulative effect. The conventional reference instruments showed a weaker hemostatic effect. Surfaces cut by laser healed in four to eight weeks without complications. Remnants of charred tissue in various quantities could still be detected after eight weeks in all cases where CO2, CO, and Nd: YAG lasers had been used. This obviously did not affect scar formation. PMID:6779065

  7. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  8. New framework hydrous silicate K{sub 3}Sc[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] {center_dot} H{sub 2}O related to the high-temperature anhydrous silicate K{sub 3}Ho[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] and symmetry analysis of a phase transition with prediction of structures

    SciTech Connect

    Belokoneva, E. L. Zorina, A. P.; Dimitrova, O. V.

    2013-07-15

    Crystals of a new framework silicate K{sub 3}Sc[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, space group Pm2{sub 1}n (nonstandard setting of space group Pmn2{sub 1} = C{sub 2v}{sup 7}), are obtained under hydrothermal conditions. The structure is determined without preliminary knowledge of the chemical formula. The absolute configuration is determined. The structure is close to that of the high-temperature K{sub 3}Ho[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] phase, which was obtained upon the heating of K{sub 3}HoSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2}. This structural similarity is due to the specific conditions of synthesis and an analogous formula, where holmium is replaced by scandium. A symmetry analysis shows that the high local symmetry of a block (rod) is responsible for the first-order phase transition of both the order-disorder (OD) and displacement type. The number of structures in which the simplest and high-symmetry layers are multiplied by different symmetry elements are predicted.

  9. Holmium laser transurethral incision of the prostate: Can prostate size predict the long-term outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Elkoushy, Mohamed A.; Elshal, Ahmed M.; Elhilali, Mostafa M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We determine the impact of prostate size on the long-term outcome of holmium laser transurethral incision of the prostate (Ho-TUIP) for bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) secondary to benign prostate enlargement (BPE). Methods: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was performed for patients undergoing Ho-TUIP by a single surgeon for patients presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to BOO. Patients were stratified into 2 groups: Group 1 included patients with prostate ≤30 cc and Group 2 included patients with prostate >30 cc. Demographic, operative and follow-up data were recorded and analyzed. In addition, intraoperative and long-term adverse events were included. Results: In total, 82 patients underwent surgery between March 1998 and March 2013, including 9 (11%) reoperated patients. Only prostate size independently predicted reoperation after Ho-TUIP (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.12 [2.92–9.14], p = 0.01). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed an optimal cutoff value of prostate volume of 29 cc to characterize long-term reoperation after TUIP, with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.96, sensitivity of 89.7 and specificity of 88.9. Group 1 included 51 patients and Group 2 included 31 patients. The international prostate symptoms score (IPSS) and peak flow rate (Qmax) significantly improved in both groups at different follow-up points. At the 12-month follow-up, the percent change in IPSS and Qmax were comparable between both groups. However, after 12 months, the degree of improvement in all voiding parameters was significantly higher in Group 1 (p < 0.001 at all points of follow-up). After a median follow-up of 5.3 years (range: 1–13), both groups had comparable early and late adverse events with significantly higher reoperation rate in Group 2 (3.9% vs. 22.6%, p = 0.02). Overall retrograde ejaculation was detected in 25.6% of sexually active men and it was

  10. Lattice thermal conductivity of dense silicate glass at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    The layered structure of the Earth's interior is generally believed to develop through the magma ocean differentiation in the early Earth. Previous seismic studies revealed the existence of ultra low velocity zones above the core mantle boundary (CMB) which was inferred to be associated with the remnant of a deep magma ocean. The heat flux through the core mantle boundary therefore would strongly depend on the thermal conductivity, both lattice (klat) and radiative (krad) of dense silicate melts and major constituent minerals of the lower mantle. Recent experimental results on the radiative thermal conductivity of dense silicate glasses and lower-mantle minerals suggest that krad of dense silicate glasses could be remarkably lower than krad of the surrounding solid mantle phases. In this case, the dense silicate melts will act as a trap for heat from the Earth's outer core. However, this conclusion remains uncertain because of the lack of direct measurements on lattice thermal conductivities of silicate glasses/melts under lower mantle pressures up to date. Here we report experimental results on lattice thermal conductivities of dense silicate glass with basaltic composition under pressures relevant to the Earth's lower mantle in a diamond-anvil cell using time-domain thermoreflectance method. The study will assist the comprehension of thermal transport properties of silicate melts in the Earth's deep interior and is crucial for understanding the dynamic and thermal evolution of the Earth's internal structure.

  11. Layer silicates in a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; MacKinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-11-01

    Analytical electron microscopy on individual grains from a portion of a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (aggregate W7029C1 from the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection) shows that layer silicates compose 50 percent of the silicate fraction examined. These layer silicates can be classified into two distinct crystallochemical groups: (1) fine-grained, polycrystalline smectite minerals; and (2) well-ordered, single crystals of kaolinite and Mg-poor talc. The layer silicates in this portion of sample W7029(asterisk)A are dissimilar to those described in other chondritic porous aggregates. The predominant layer silicate assemblage in W7029(asterisk)A indicates that heating of the aggregate during atmospheric entry was brief and probably to a temperature less than 300 C. Comparison with terrestrial phyllosilicate occurrences suggests that some layer silicates in aggregate W7029(asterisk)A may have been formed by alteratiton from preexisting silicate minerals at low temperatures (less than 25 C) after aggregate formation.

  12. Characterization of chitin-metal silicates as binding superdisintegrants.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Iyad; Daraghmeh, Nidal; Al-Remawi, Mayyas; Leharne, Stephen A; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Badwan, Adnan

    2009-12-01

    When chitin is used in pharmaceutical formulations, processing of chitin with metal silicates is advantageous, from both an industrial and pharmaceutical perspective, compared to processing using silicon dioxide. Unlike the use of acidic and basic reagents for the industrial preparation of chitin-silica particles, coprecipitation of metal silicates is dependent upon a simple replacement reaction between sodium silicate and metal chlorides. When coprecipitated onto chitin particles, aluminum, magnesium, or calcium silicates result in nonhygroscopic, highly compactable/disintegrable compacts. Disintegration and hardness parameters for coprocessed chitin compacts were investigated and found to be independent of the particle size. Capillary action appears to be the major contributor to both water uptake and the driving force for disintegration of compacts. The good compaction and compression properties shown by the chitin-metal silicates were found to be strongly dependent upon the type of metal silicate coprecipitated onto chitin. In addition, the inherent binding and disintegration abilities of chitin-metal silicates are useful in pharmaceutical applications when poorly compressible and/or highly nonpolar drugs need to be formulated. PMID:19691098

  13. Steps toward interstellar silicate mineralogy. 1: Laboratory results of a silicate glass of mean cosmic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, C.; Mutschke, H.; Begemann, B.; Dorschner, J.; Henning, Th.

    1994-12-01

    Although extrasolar silicates were detected more than 25 years ago, important questions concerning chemical composition, material properties, and grain structure are still without reliable answers. The most important of these questions are listed at the beginning of this paper because they play decisive roles as guide-posts for the silicate research program of the Jena laboratory astrophysics group. This paper communicates the first results of this program aimed at a closer mineralogical characterization of the interstellar/circumstellar silicates that have been observed in different types of objects. In this first approach, pyroxene glass samples, the cation content of which reflects mean cosmic proportions of the four most abundant metals, have been prepared and analytically characterized. They are expected to be good candidates for matching the silicate spectra of star-forming regions and young stellar objects (YSOs). For the pyroxene glass, optical constants from 250 nm to 500 micrometers have been determined. Particles having sizes within the Rayleigh limit show broad bands peaking at 9.5 and 18.8 micrometers. For the sake of comparison, a crystalline sample of the same composition was also measured. Its narrow bands are positioned at 9.4, 10.5, 11.1, 13.7, 15.6, 18.1, 19.5, 26.5, 29.5, 37.5, and 49 micrometers in agreement with expectations for a chemical composition corresponding to hypersthene. In addition to the vibration bands weak crystal field bands at 1 and 2 micrometers due to Fe(2+) have also been detected for the pyroxene glass. If these bands were detectable in interstellar and circumstellar sources they would offer a unique possibility of discriminating the pyroxene-type from the olivine-type silicates. The FIR absorption coefficient measured for the glass sample turned out to be proportional to lambda-2. The centroids of the 10 and 19 micrometer bands of the pyroxene glass satisfactorily match those observed in the Orion Trapezium and massive

  14. Treatment of Urethral/Bladder Neck Stricture After High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Prostate Cancer With Holmium: Yttrium-Aluminium-Garnet Laser

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Jin; Kim, Tae Heon; Lee, Hyo Serk; Chung, Jin Woo; Lee, Ha Na

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Holmium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet (YAG) laser for the treatment of urethral/bladder neck strictures after high-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer. Methods Between February 2007 and July 2010, Holmium: YAG laser urethrotomies were performed in eleven patients for bladder neck strictures or prostatic urethral strictures. The laser was used with a 550-µm fiber at 2 J and frequency 30 to 50 Hz. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed for medical history, perioperative and postoperative data, uroflowmetry, International Prostate Symptoms Score/quality of life, and stricture recurrence. Results At a median follow-up of 12.0 months (range, 4 to 35 months), the mean postoperative maximal flow rate and residual volume were improved significantly (P<0.05). The mean postoperative total, voiding and quality of life of international prostate symptom score were improved significantly (P<0.05). Of the 11 patients, 7 patients required one treatment, 4 patients two treatment, and 1 patients three treatment. 2 patients who had a documented urinary incontinence prior to the laser treatment subsequently required artificial urinary sphincter implantation and reported satisfaction without developing any recurrent strictures or artificial urinary sphincter erosion. All patients exhibited well-healed strictures and could void without difficulty. Conclusions Holmium: YAG laser therapy represents a safe, effective and minimally invasive treatment for urethral/bladder neck strictures occurring secondary to high-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer. PMID:23610708

  15. Sialoendoscopy with and without holmium:YAG laser-assisted lithotripsy in the management of obstructive sialadenitis of major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Sionis, S; Caria, R A; Trucas, M; Brennan, P A; Puxeddu, R

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sialadenitis is a major cause of dysfunction of the salivary glands, and increasingly sialoendoscopy is used in both diagnosis and treatment. At present the limit of the endoscopic approach is the size of the stone as only stones of less than 4mm can be removed. Endoscopic laser lithotripsy has the potential to treat many stones larger than this with minimal complications and preservation of a functional salivary gland. The holmium:YAG laser has been widely and safely used in urology, and its use has been recently proposed in salivary lithotripsy for the removal of bigger stones. We describe our experience with sialoendoscopy for stones in the parotid and submandibular glands and assess the feasibility and the efficacy of holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy. We have used the procedure 50 times for 43 patients with obstructive sialadenitis; 31 patients had sialolithiasis, 15 of whom (48%) had stones with diameters between 4 and 15mm (mean 7). Total extraction after fragmentation was possible in 14 of the 15 patients without complications. Intraductal holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy is effective and safe, and allows the treatment of large stones in Stensen's and Wharton's ducts. PMID:24280118

  16. Silicate nephrolithiasis after ingestion of supplements containing silica dioxide.

    PubMed

    Flythe, Jennifer E; Rueda, Jose F; Riscoe, Michael K; Watnick, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Silicate calculi are common in some mammals, such as dogs and sheep, but extremely rare in humans. We report a case of silicate calculi in a woman using oral over-the-counter Uncaria tomentosa, Digestive Advantage and FlexProtex supplements. All 3 contained the excipient silica dioxide. Stone analysis showed composition of 100% silicate. The nephrolithiasis promptly abated after discontinuation of the products containing silica, then returned when the patient restarted her supplements. This case emphasizes the importance of stone analysis when obvious causes of nephrolithiasis are unclear and highlights the concerns of using over-the-counter supplements without substantial oversight. PMID:19100669

  17. Microstructures of Rare Silicate Stardust from Nova and Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S

    2011-01-01

    Most silicate stardust analyzed in the laboratory and observed around stellar environments derives from O-rich red giant and AGB stars [1,2]. Supernova (SN) silicates and oxides are comparatively rare, and fewer than 10 grains from no-va or binary star systems have been identified to date. Very little is known about dust formation in these stellar environments. Mineralogical studies of only three O-rich SN [3-5] and no nova grains have been performed. Here we report the microstructure and chemical makeup of two SN silicates and one nova grain.

  18. The Mineralogy of Circumstellar Silicates Preserved in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2010-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula. Cometary IDPs have remained relatively unaltered since their accretion because of the lack of parent body thermal and aqueous alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these particles because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars. Five circumstellar grains have been identified including three amorphous silicate grains and two polycrystalline aggregates. All of these grains are between 0.2 and 0.5 micrometers in size. The isotopic compositions of all five presolar silicate grains fall within the range of presolar oxides and silicates, having large (17)O-enrichments and normal (18)O/(16)O ratios (Group 1 grains from AGB and RG stars). The amorphous silicates are chemically heterogeneous and contain nanophase FeNi metal and FeS grains in a Mg-silicate matrix. Two of the amorphous silicate grains are aggregates with subgrains showing variable Mg/Si ratios in chemical maps. The polycrystalline grains show annealed textures (equilibrium grains boundaries, uniform Mg/Fe ratios), and consist of 50-100 nm enstatite and pyrrhotite grains with lesser forsterite. One of the polycrystalline aggregates contains a subgrain of diopside. The polycrystalline aggregates form by subsolidus annealing of amorphous precursors. The bulk compositions of the five grains span a wide range in Mg/Si ratios from 0.4 to 1.2 (avg. 0.86). The average Fe/Si (0.40) and S/Si (0.21) ratios show a much narrower range of values and are approximately 50% of their solar

  19. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  20. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  1. Molecular aggregation of rhodamine dyes in dispersions of layered silicates: influence of dye molecular structure and silicate properties.

    PubMed

    Bujdák, Juraj; Iyi, Nobuo

    2006-02-01

    The molecular aggregation of six rhodamine dyes (rhodamine 560, B, 3B, 19, 6G, 123) in layered silicate (saponite and fluorohectorite) dispersions was investigated by using visible (vis) spectroscopy. The dye molecular aggregation was influenced by the properties of both the silicates and the dyes themselves. The layer charge of the silicates enhanced the molecular aggregation of the hydrophilic, cationic dyes. The presence of a carboxyl acid group in the dye molecules inhibited adsorption of the dyes on the surface of fluorohectorite, a silicate with a high charge density. A lower or no adsorption could be observed by vis spectroscopy. Strong association of the dyes to the silicate surface led to remarkable changes in the dye spectra, mainly due to the molecular aggregation. Dye assemblies initially formed after mixing the dye solutions with silicate dispersions were unstable. Decomposition of the dye molecular assemblies, and the formation of new species or molecular aggregate rearrangements, were studied on the bases of time-difference spectra. The reaction pathways were specific, not only for the dyes, depending upon their molecular structure and properties, but also on the silicate substrates. PMID:16471802

  2. Interstellar Silicate Dust: Modeling and Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Indrajit

    We examine some aspects of the alignment of silicate dust grains with respect to the interstellar magnetic field. First, we consider possible observational constraints on the magnetic properties of the grains. Second, we investigate the role of collisions with gas atoms and the production of H2 molecules on the grain surface in the alignment process when the grain is drifting in the gaseous medium. Paramagnetism associated with Fe content in the dust is thought to play a critical role in alignment. Min et al (2007) claimed that the Fe content of the silicate dust can be constrained by the shape of the 10 μm extinction feature. They found low Fe abundances, potentially posing problems for grain alignment theories. We revisit this analysis modeling the grains with irregularly shaped Gaussian Random Sphere (GRS). We give a comprehensive review of all the relevant constraints researchers apply and discuss their effects on the inferred mineralogy. Also, we extend this analysis to examine whether constraints can be placed on the presence of Fe-rich inclusions which could yield "super-paramagnetism". This possibility has long been speculated, but so far observational constraints are lacking. Every time a gas atom collides with a grain, the grain's angular momentum is slightly modified. Likewise when an H2 molecule forms on the surface and is ejected. Here also we model the grain with GRS shape and considered various scenarios about how the colliding gas particles depart the grain. We develop theoretical and computational tools to estimate the torques associated with these aforementioned events for a range of grain drift speeds---from low subsonic to high supersonic speeds. Code results were verified with spherical grain for which analytical results were available. Finally, the above torque results were used to study the grain rotational dynamics. Solving dynamical equations we examine how these torques influence the grain alignment process. Our analysis suggests that

  3. A Silicic Shield Volcano in Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, P. R.; Greeley, R.

    1985-01-01

    Volcan Quemado and its environs provides an excellent site to study the radar signature of a silicic volcanic construct. This feature differs from basaltic terrains primarily by the evidence of explosive eruptions associated with silica-rich magmas. These explosions produced a complex of distinctive craters that are visible on radar because of their steep inner walls and exposed bedrock units. Explosive events also generated surface deposits of fine (1 mm to 10 cm) material that mantles the region around the volcano to a distance of 20 to 30 km from its center. These features are very different from those observed on basaltic flows, which typically lack violet, explosive events. In these terrains, the surface is dominated by radar-rough flows with steep, lobate flow fronts. Craters are less common, although maars are found in some regions. These comparisons suggest that spaceborne radar may be able to distinguish surface characteristics that can be used to identify volcanic eruptive styles on Venus, Mars, and other solar-system bodies.

  4. Lithologic mapping of silicate rocks using TIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Common rock-forming minerals have thermal infrared spectral features that are measured in the laboratory to infer composition. An airborne Daedalus scanner (TIMS) that collects six channels of thermal infrared radiance data (8 to 12 microns), may be used to measure these same features for rock identification. Previously, false-color composite pictures made from channels 1, 3, and 5 and emittance spectra for small areas on these images were used to make lithologic maps. Central wavelength, standard deviation, and amplitude of normal curves regressed on the emittance spectra are related to compositional information for crystalline igneous silicate rocks. As expected, the central wavelength varies systematically with silica content and with modal quartz content. Standard deviation is less sensitive to compositional changes, but large values may result from mixed admixture of vegetation. Compression of the six TIMS channels to three image channels made from the regressed parameters may be effective in improving geologic mapping from TIMS data, and these synthetic images may form a basis for the remote assessment of rock composition.

  5. Selective silicate-directed motility in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Bondoc, Karen Grace V; Heuschele, Jan; Gillard, Jeroen; Vyverman, Wim; Pohnert, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are highly abundant unicellular algae that often dominate pelagic as well as benthic primary production in the oceans and inland waters. Being strictly dependent on silica to build their biomineralized cell walls, marine diatoms precipitate 240 × 10(12) mol Si per year, which makes them the major sink in the global Si cycle. Dissolved silicic acid (dSi) availability frequently limits diatom productivity and influences species composition of communities. We show that benthic diatoms selectively perceive and behaviourally react to gradients of dSi. Cell speed increases under dSi-limited conditions in a chemokinetic response and, if gradients of this resource are present, increased directionality of cell movement promotes chemotaxis. The ability to exploit local and short-lived dSi hotspots using a specific search behaviour likely contributes to micro-scale patch dynamics in biofilm communities. On a global scale this behaviour might affect sediment-water dSi fluxes and biogeochemical cycling. PMID:26842428

  6. Selective silicate-directed motility in diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Bondoc, Karen Grace V.; Heuschele, Jan; Gillard, Jeroen; Vyverman, Wim; Pohnert, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are highly abundant unicellular algae that often dominate pelagic as well as benthic primary production in the oceans and inland waters. Being strictly dependent on silica to build their biomineralized cell walls, marine diatoms precipitate 240 × 1012 mol Si per year, which makes them the major sink in the global Si cycle. Dissolved silicic acid (dSi) availability frequently limits diatom productivity and influences species composition of communities. We show that benthic diatoms selectively perceive and behaviourally react to gradients of dSi. Cell speed increases under dSi-limited conditions in a chemokinetic response and, if gradients of this resource are present, increased directionality of cell movement promotes chemotaxis. The ability to exploit local and short-lived dSi hotspots using a specific search behaviour likely contributes to micro-scale patch dynamics in biofilm communities. On a global scale this behaviour might affect sediment–water dSi fluxes and biogeochemical cycling. PMID:26842428

  7. Metal-Silicate Segregation in Asteroidal Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrin, Jason S.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental process of planetary differentiation is the segregation of metal-sulfide and silicate phases, leading eventually to the formation of a metallic core. Asteroidal meteorites provide a glimpse of this process frozen in time from the early solar system. While chondrites represent starting materials, iron meteorites provide an end product where metal has been completely concentrated in a region of the parent asteroid. A complimentary end product is seen in metal-poor achondrites that have undergone significant igneous processing, such as angrites, HED's and the majority of aubrites. Metal-rich achondrites such as acapulcoite/lodranites, winonaites, ureilites, and metal-rich aubrites may represent intermediate stages in the metal segregation process. Among these, acapulcoite-lodranites and ureilites are examples of primary metal-bearing mantle restites, and therefore provide an opportunity to observe the metal segregation process that was captured in progress. In this study we use bulk trace element compositions of acapulcoites-lodranites and ureilites for this purpose.

  8. Study of thermal effects of silicate-containing hydroxyapatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Zaits, A. V.; Berdinskaya, N. V.; Mylnikova, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of modifications of hydroxyapatite silicate ions, from the extracellular fluid prototype solution under near-physiological conditions has been studied. Formation of silicon-structured hydroxyapatite with different extent of substitution of phosphate groups in the silicate group has been established through chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results obtained are in agreement and suggest the possibility of substitution of phosphate groups for silicate groups in the hydroxyapatite structure when introducing different sources of silica, tetraethoxysilane and sodium silicate, in the reaction mixture. Growth in the amount of silicon in Si-HA results in the increase in the thermal stability of the samples. The greatest mass loss occurs at temperatures in the range of 25-400 0C that is caused by the removal of the crystallization and adsorption water and volatile impurities. It is shown that the modified apatites are of imperfect structure and crystallize in a nanocrystalline state.

  9. Silicic Volcanism Identified by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotch, T. D.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Hagerty, J. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Ashley, J. W.; Williams, J.-P.; Petro, N. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has mapped and characterized a number of silicic volcanic constructs on the lunar surface. Here, we summarize Diviner's contributions to our understanding of these features.

  10. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A.

    2010-03-01

    We have identified two presolar silicate grains as polycrystalline assemblages, or equilibrated aggregates. These grains occur in a stardust-rich interplanetary dust particle (IDP). We propose these grains were annealed in the solar nebula.

  11. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be the best preserved remnants of primordial solar system materials, in part because they were not affected by parent body hydrothermal alteration. Their primitive characteristics include fine grained, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, enrichment in volatile elements, and abundant molecular cloud material and silicate stardust. However, while the majority of CP-IDP materials likely derived from the Solar System, their formation processes and provenance are poorly constrained. Stardust abundances provide a relative measure of the extent of processing that the Solar System starting materials has undergone in primitive materials. For example, among primitive meteorites silicate stardust abundances vary by over two orders of magnitude (less than 10-200 ppm). This range of abundances is ascribed to varying extents of aqueous processing in the meteorite parent bodies. The higher average silicate stardust abundances among CP-IDPs (greater than 375 ppm) are thus attributable to the lack of aqueous processing of these materials. Yet, silicate stardust abundances in IDPs also vary considerably. While the silicate stardust abundance in IDPs having anomalous N isotopic compositions was reported to be 375 ppm, the abundance in IDPs lacking N anomalies is less than 10 ppm. Furthermore, these values are significantly eclipsed among some IDPs with abundances ranging from 2,000 ppm to 10,000 ppm. Given that CP-IDPs have not been significantly affected by parent body processes, the difference in silicate stardust abundances among these IDPs must reflect varying extents of nebular processing. Here we present recent results of a systematic coordinated mineralogical/isotopic study of large cluster IDPs aimed at (1) characterizing the mineralogy of presolar silicates and (2) delineating the mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of IDPs with differing silicate stardust abundances. One of the goals of this study is

  12. H-Bond interactions between silicates and water during zeolite pre-nucleation.

    PubMed

    Mora-Fonz, Miguel J; Catlow, C Richard A; Lewis, Dewi W

    2008-11-21

    The relative strength of water-water, water-silicate and silicate-silicate interactions are studied, in order to explain the low solubility of the monomer (Si(OH)(4)), and determine the degree of dispersion of silicate clusters in solution during the hydrothermal synthesis of zeolites. We will show how the hydrogen bond interactions between water and monomeric silicate species are similar to that in pure water, whilst monomer-monomer interactions are stronger. However, when larger silicate species are also considered we find the relative hydrogen-bonding strength to follow: water-water < silicate-water < silicate-silicate. The effects of pH are also considered. The implications of the relative strength of these interactions on the formation of larger silicate species, leading to zeolite pre-nucleation, are discussed. PMID:18979042

  13. LOW-TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION OF AMORPHOUS SILICATE IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of an amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reactions {tau}. The crystallization conditions are given by Q>Q{sub min} and {tau} < {tau}{sub cool} regardless of details of the reactions and grain structure, where {tau}{sub cool} is the cooling timescale of the grains heated by exothermic reactions, and Q{sub min} is minimum stored energy density determined by the activation energy of crystallization. Our results suggest that silicate crystallization occurs in wider astrophysical conditions than hitherto considered.

  14. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  15. Silicate-melt inclusions in magmatic rocks: applications to petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria-Luce

    2001-01-01

    Silicate-melt inclusions in igneous rocks provide important information on the composition and evolution of magmatic systems. Such inclusions represent accidentally trapped silicate melt (±immiscible H 2O and/or CO 2 fluids) that allow one to follow the evolution of magmas through snapshots, corresponding to specific evolution steps. This information is available on condition that they remained isolated from the enclosing magma after their entrapment. The following steps of investigation are discussed: (a) detailed petrographic studies to characterise silicate-melt inclusion primary characters and posttrapping evolution, including melt crystallisation; (b) high temperature studies to rehomogenise the inclusion content and select chemically representative inclusions: chemical compositions should be compared to relevant phase diagrams. Silicate-melt inclusion studies allow us to concentrate on specific topics; inclusion studies in early crystallising phases allow the characterisation of primary magmas, while in more differentiated rocks, they unravel the subsequent chemical evolution. The distribution of volatile species (i.e., H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl) in inclusion glass can provide information on the degassing processes and on recycling of subducted material. In intrusive rocks, silicate melt inclusions may preserve direct evidence of magmatic stage evolution (e.g., immiscibility phenomena). Melt inclusions in mantle xenoliths indicate that high-silica melts can coexist with mantle peridotites and give information on the presence of carbonate melt within the upper mantle. Thus, combining silicate-melt inclusion data with conventional petrological and geochemical information and experimental petrology can increase our ability to model magmatic processes.

  16. The application of silicon and silicates in dentistry: a review.

    PubMed

    Lührs, A-K; Geurtsen, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Silicates and silicate-based compounds are frequently used materials in dentistry. One of their major applications is their use as fillers in different dental filling materials such as glass-ionomer cements, compomers, composites, and adhesive systems. In these materials, the fillers react with acids during the setting process or they improve the mechanical properties by increasing physical resistance, thermal expansion coefficient and radiopacity in acrylic filling materials. They also reduce polymerization shrinkage, and increase esthetics as well as handling properties. Furthermore, silicates are used for the tribochemical silication of different surfaces such as ceramics or alloys. The silicate layer formed in this process is the chemical basis for silanes that form a bond between this layer and the organic composite matrix. It also provides a micromechanical bond between the surface of the material and the composite matrix. Silicates are also a component of dental ceramics, which are frequently used in dentistry, for instance for veneers, inlays, and onlays, for denture teeth, and for full-ceramic crowns or as crown veneering materials. PMID:19198786

  17. Effects of solvent structure on the distribution of silicate anions in mixed aqueous/organic solutions of alkaline tetramethylammonium silicate

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, W.M.; Bell, A.T.; Radke, C.J. )

    1991-11-14

    Interest in the physical-chemical processes occurring during zeolite synthesis has stimulated the study of dissolved silicate oligomers in aqueous alkaline solution and their possible link to zeolite nucleation and crystal growth. Effects of solvent structure on the equilibrium distribution of silicate oligomers in mixed organic/aqueous solutions of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) have been investigated by using {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the presence of organic molecules leads to condensation of the silicates, particularly to double-ring structures. Equilibrium calculations indicate that the observed extent of silicate condensation exceeds what would be expected from mass action. The variety of organic solvents used allowed elucidation of structure effects due to the following: carbon chain length, carbon chain morphology, functional group, and placement of the functional group. The structural effects of organic solvents can be attributed to the ordering of water around the solvent molecules.

  18. Holmium-166 radioembolization for the treatment of patients with liver metastases: design of the phase I HEPAR trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Intra-arterial radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres ( 90Y-RE) is an increasingly used therapy for patients with unresectable liver malignancies. Over the last decade, radioactive holmium-166 poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres ( 166Ho-PLLA-MS) have been developed as a possible alternative to 90Y-RE. Next to high-energy beta-radiation, 166Ho also emits gamma-radiation, which allows for imaging by gamma scintigraphy. In addition, Ho is a highly paramagnetic element and can therefore be visualized by MRI. These imaging modalities are useful for assessment of the biodistribution, and allow dosimetry through quantitative analysis of the scintigraphic and MR images. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety of 166Ho-PLLA-MS radioembolization ( 166Ho-RE) in animals. The aim of this phase I trial is to assess the safety and toxicity profile of 166Ho-RE in patients with liver metastases. Methods The HEPAR study (Holmium Embolization Particles for Arterial Radiotherapy) is a non-randomized, open label, safety study. We aim to include 15 to 24 patients with liver metastases of any origin, who have chemotherapy-refractory disease and who are not amenable to surgical resection. Prior to treatment, in addition to the standard technetium-99m labelled macroaggregated albumin ( 99mTc-MAA) dose, a low radioactive safety dose of 60-mg 166Ho-PLLA-MS will be administered. Patients are treated in 4 cohorts of 3-6 patients, according to a standard dose escalation protocol (20 Gy, 40 Gy, 60 Gy, and 80 Gy, respectively). The primary objective will be to establish the maximum tolerated radiation dose of 166Ho-PLLA-MS. Secondary objectives are to assess tumour response, biodistribution, performance status, quality of life, and to compare the 166Ho-PLLA-MS safety dose and the 99mTc-MAA dose distributions with respect to the ability to accurately predict microsphere distribution. Discussion This will be the first clinical study on 166Ho-RE. Based on preclinical studies

  19. Study of the line intensity in the optical and magnetooptical spectra in holmium-containing paramagnetic garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, Uygun V.; Gruber, John B.; Burdick, Gary W.; Pelenovich, Vasiliy O.; Fu, Dejun; Dzhuraev, Davron R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of line intensity in the optical and magneto-optical spectra in the holmium-containing paramagnetic garnet Ho3+:YAG were carried out within the visible spectrum at T = 85 K. Detailed investigation of the magnetic circularly polarized luminescence spectra at 85 and 300 K on 5S2 → 5I8 emission transition in Ho3+:YAG was carried out. A quasi-doublet state in the energy spectrum of the Ho3+ ions was observed, characterized by a significant magneto-optical activity, which is caused by a large Zeeman splitting of the quasi-doublet. The measurement of the magnetic circular polarized luminescence spectrum carried out within one of the emission lines of the luminescence band 5S2 → 5I8 in Ho3+:YAG at 85 K shows significant magneto-optical effects of the intensity change of the emitted light, compared to that measured for the other emission lines in the same luminescent band.

  20. Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for the management of urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halland, Spring K.; House, John K.; George, Lisle

    2001-05-01

    Obstructive urolithiasis is a common problem in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The most common site of urinary tract obstruction in these species is the urethra. Surgical procedures developed to relieve obstructions, in our experience have been effective in approximately 75% of cases. Urethral stricture is a common complication if the mucosa of the urethra is disrupted. The objective of this project was to evaluate endoscopy guided laser lithotripsy as a therapeutic modality to relieve urethral obstructions in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The study population consisted of patients presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California Davis with obstructive urolithiasis. Lithotripsy was performed using a Holmium:YAG laser via a 200-micron low water quartz fiber passed through a flexible mini-endoscope. Two types of urinary calculi were managed with this technique, calcium carbonate and calcium hydroxyphosphate. Laser lithotripsy was effective at relieving obstructions caused by both types of calculi when conventional methods had failed. Laser lithotripsy performed via urethral endoscopy is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for management of obstructive urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs and reduces the risk of post procedural urethral stricture.

  1. Predictive risk factors of postoperative urinary incontinence following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate during the initial learning period

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Yano, Masataka; Nakayama, Takayuki; Kitahara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the predictive factors for postoperative urinary incontinence (UI) following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) during the initial learning period. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 127 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia who underwent HoLEP between January 2011 and December 2013. We recorded clinical variables, including blood loss, serum prostate-specific antigen levels, and the presence or absence of UI. Blood loss was estimated as a decline in postoperative hemoglobin levels. The predictive factors for postoperative UI were determined using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results: Postoperative UI occurred in 31 patients (24.4%), but it cured in 29 patients (93.5%) after a mean duration of 12 weeks. Enucleation time >100 min (p=0.043) and blood loss >2.5g/dL (p=0.032) were identified as significant and independent risk factors for postoperative UI. Conclusions: Longer enucleation time and increased blood loss were independent predictors of postoperative UI in patients who underwent HoLEP during the initial learning period. Surgeons in training should take care to perform speedy enucleation maneuver with hemostasis. PMID:27564285

  2. The Impact of Increased Bladder Blood Flow on Storage Symptoms after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keisuke; Hisasue, Shin-ichi; Ide, Hisamitsu; Aoki, Hiroaki; Muto, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Raizo; Tsujimura, Akira; Horie, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate how holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) improves urinary storage symptoms, we assessed blood flow in the urinary bladder mucosa of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) before and after laser surgery. Seventy-four consecutive patients with BPH (median age 69 years, range; 53-88) underwent HoLEP at our institution and are included in this study. We prospectively assessed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), IPSS-QOL Score, the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), uroflowmetry, and blood flow in the urinary bladder, before and after surgery. Blood flow in the bladder mucosa was measured using the OMEGA FLOW (OMEGAWAVE, Tokyo, Japan) laser Doppler flowmeter. The median volume of the enucleated adenomas was 45.0 g (range: 25.0 to 83.2). The median IPSS improved significantly from 20 (range: 6-35) to 3 (0-22) (p < 0.001; Wilcoxon signed-rank test), as did the storage symptoms score, which decreased from 13 (2-20) to 3 (1-8) (p < 0.001). Median bladder blood flow increased at the trigone from 9.57 ± 0.83 ml/sec to 17.60 ± 1.08 ml/sec. Multiple regression analysis for the improved storage symptom score eliminated all explanatory variables except increased bladder perfusion. The data suggest that HoLEP improves blood flow in the bladder mucosa, which independently leads to the improvement of storage symptoms. PMID:26090819

  3. The Impact of Increased Bladder Blood Flow on Storage Symptoms after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Hisamitsu; Aoki, Hiroaki; Muto, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Raizo; Tsujimura, Akira; Horie, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate how holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) improves urinary storage symptoms, we assessed blood flow in the urinary bladder mucosa of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) before and after laser surgery. Seventy-four consecutive patients with BPH (median age 69 years, range; 53–88) underwent HoLEP at our institution and are included in this study. We prospectively assessed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), IPSS-QOL Score, the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), uroflowmetry, and blood flow in the urinary bladder, before and after surgery. Blood flow in the bladder mucosa was measured using the OMEGA FLOW (OMEGAWAVE, Tokyo, Japan) laser Doppler flowmeter. The median volume of the enucleated adenomas was 45.0 g (range: 25.0 to 83.2). The median IPSS improved significantly from 20 (range: 6–35) to 3 (0–22) (p<0.001; Wilcoxon signed-rank test), as did the storage symptoms score, which decreased from 13 (2–20) to 3 (1–8) (p<0.001). Median bladder blood flow increased at the trigone from 9.57±0.83 ml/sec to 17.60±1.08 ml/sec. Multiple regression analysis for the improved storage symptom score eliminated all explanatory variables except increased bladder perfusion. The data suggest that HoLEP improves blood flow in the bladder mucosa, which independently leads to the improvement of storage symptoms. PMID:26090819

  4. Comment on "The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains"

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J P; Ishii, H

    2007-09-27

    In the paper entitled 'The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains' (A & A, 462, 667-676 (2007)), Min et al. explore non-spherical grain shape and composition in modeling the interstellar 10 and 20 {micro}m extinction features. This progression towards more realistic models is vitally important to enabling valid comparisons between dust observations and laboratory measurements. Min et al. proceed to compare their model results with GEMS (glass with embedded metals and sulfides) from IDPs (interplanetary dust particles) and to discuss the nature and origin of GEMS. Specifically, they evaluate the hypothesis of Bradley (1994) that GEMS are interstellar (IS) amorphous silicates. From a comparison of the mineralogy, chemical compositions, and infrared (IR) spectral properties of GEMS with their modeling results, Min et al. conclude: 'GEMS are, in general, not unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM'. This conclusion is based, however, on erroneous and incomplete GEMS data. It is important to clarify first that Bradley (1994) never proposed that GEMS are unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM, nor did he suggest that individual subnanogram mass GEMS are a representative sampling of the enormous mass of silicates in the diffuse ISM. Bradley (1994) simply showed that GEMS properties are consistent with those of IS amorphous silicates. It is widely accepted that circumstellar outflows are important sources of IS silicates, and whether GEMS are processed or not, the circumstellar heritage of some has been rigorously confirmed through measurements of non-solar oxygen (O) isotope abundances (Messenger et al., 2003; Floss et al., 2006). Keller et al. (2000) assert that even GEMS without detectable O isotope anomalies are probably also extrasolar IS silicates because they are embedded in carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H isotopic composition. (Much of the silicate dust in the ISM may be isotopically homogenized (Zhukovska et al., 2007)). Recent

  5. Preparation and Insulation Properties of Epoxy-Layered Silicate Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takahiro; Sawa, Fumio; Ozaki, Tamon; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshio; Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo

    Recent rapid progress in nanotechnology has focused research and development efforts on new high performance materials. Organic-inorganic hybrid materials such as nylon-layered silicate nanocomposites have attracted special interest and various studies continue to be conducted on thermoplastic resins. In this study, we found out the best organic modifier of layered silicate that contributed to an affinity for epoxy resin (thermosetting resin), and succeeded in creating an intercalated-type epoxy-layered silicate nanocomposite. This nanocomposite realized some improvements by the addition of 5 or 6 weight percentage of organically modified layered silicates, which have 20oC higher thermal resistance, 60% higher fracture toughness, 19% higher flexural strength and 10% higher insulation breakdown strength than these of an epoxy resin without layered silicate fillers. An electrical treeing growth was observed in the nanocomposite. The electrical treeing progress with many branches in the nanocomposite seemed to result in an increase in the insulation breakdown strength. These results suggest the possibility of practical use as an insulating material in heavy apparatuses.

  6. Behavior of Np(VII, VI, V) in Silicate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Shilov, V P.; Fedoseev, A M.; Yusov, A B.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2004-11-30

    Spectrophotometric methods were used to investigate the properties of neptunium(VII), (VI), and (V) in silicate solution. The transition of cationic neptunium(VII) to anionic species in non-complexing environments proceeds in the range of ?? 5.5 to 7.5. In the presence of carbonate, this transition occurs at ?? 10.0 to 11.5 and in silicate solutions at ?? 10.5-12.0. These findings show that cationic neptunium(VII) forms complexes with both carbonate and silicate and that the silicate complex is stronger than that of the carbonate. The competition of complex formation reactions for neptunium(VI) with carbonate and silicate and on the known complex stability constant of NpO2(CO3)34- allowed the NpO2SiO3 complex stability constant, log ? = 16.5, to be estimated. Determination of the formation constant of Np(V) complexes with SiO32- was not possible using similar methods.

  7. Source of silicate and carbonate cements during deep burial diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.

    1986-05-01

    Detrital silicate minerals and silicate cements (formed during shallow burial) of siliciclastic sandstones commonly dissolve during deep burial diagenesis. Quartz, feldspars, mica, and garnet among detrital silicate minerals, and quartz and kaolinite among authigenic silicate minerals show extensive dissolution features during deep burial diagenesis of siliciclastic sandstones of the Gondwana Supergroup, India. No dissolution features were observed in zircon, tourmalene, and rutile among detrital minerals or in chlorite and smectite among early formed authigenic minerals. Dissolution enriched the pore fluids in silica, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, iron, and aluminum. Authigenic cements formed during this stage are illite, quartz, feldspar, iron oxide, and carbonates of calcium, magnesium, and iron. Mass-balance calculations show that the source of all silicate cements formed during deep burial diagenesis was internally derived from the dissolution of both detrital and early formed authigenic cements. However, a considerable gap exists between the amounts of cations (calcium, magnesium, and iron) derived internally and the respective amounts of these cations needed to form the various carbonate cements at this stage. Therefore, an outside source for these cations is needed to explain the formation of carbonate cements. A large mass transfer of cations from outside the sediment source seems remote since ground-water movement, which probably carried cement from an external source, is extremely restricted at great burial depths. Therefore, carbonate cements may have been major constituents during shallow burial diagenesis in Gondwana sandstones. Subsequently, these early formed carbonates were completely dissolved and remobilized as late-stage carbonate cement.

  8. Properties of cometary crystalline silicate before and after perihelion passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline silicate is sometimes observed in comets as an 11.3-micron resonant emission feature, and may be used for probing the early solar nebula. Because the formation of the crystalline silicate requires high temperature, they are thought to be born from amorphous silicate at the inner region, and then transported toward the outer regions where comets were born. This transportation can produce the difference in the crystalline fraction in the cometary silicate dust between two dynamical types of comets, Oort-cloud comets (OCs) and Ecliptic comets (ECs), due to the different heliocentric distances of their birth places. The study of peak wavelengths in crystalline features is important to investigate the conditions of the crystalline silicate formation as well. Thus far, we don't have enough OC samples, while we have observed several ECs. Fortunately, we can observe three comets in this semester. In particular, C/2012 S1 (ISON) is a bright sungrazing comet, and we might expect possible splitting and exposing of pristine materials inside the nucleus after its perihelion passage. Observations at pre- and post-perihelion provide us precious information on the dust evolution of the comet. The comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), along with two other comets, is an unparalleled target for this study.

  9. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Protein Crystals on Fluorinated Layered Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Ino, Keita; Udagawa, Itsumi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kubota, Munehiro; Kurosaka, Keiichi; Arai, Kazuhito; Seki, Yasutaka; Nogawa, Masaya; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Taguchi, Hayao; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface. PMID:21818343

  10. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    PubMed

    Ino, Keita; Udagawa, Itsumi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kubota, Munehiro; Kurosaka, Keiichi; Arai, Kazuhito; Seki, Yasutaka; Nogawa, Masaya; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Taguchi, Hayao; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface. PMID:21818343

  11. Impact of holmium fibre laser radiation (λ = 2.1 μm) on the spinal cord dura mater and adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatova, S. A.; Kamynin, V. A.; Ryabova, A. V.; Loshchenov, V. B.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Kurkov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of holmium fibre laser radiation on the samples of biologic tissues (dura mater of spinal cord and adipose tissue with interlayers of muscle) is studied. The experimental results are evaluated by the size of carbonisation and coagulation necrosis zones. The experiment shows that in the case of irradiation of the spinal cord dura mater samples the size of carbonisation and coagulation necrosis zones is insignificant. In the adipose tissue the carbonisation zone is also insignificant, but the region of cellular structure disturbance is large. In the muscle tissue the situation is opposite. The cw laser operation provides clinically acceptable degree of destruction in tissue samples with a minimal carbonisation zone.

  12. Wideband thulium-holmium-doped fiber source with combined forward and backward amplified spontaneous emission at 1600-2300  nm spectral band.

    PubMed

    Honzatko, Pavel; Baravets, Yauhen; Kasik, Ivan; Podrazky, Ondrej

    2014-06-15

    We have experimentally demonstrated two extremely wideband amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) sources. High bandwidth is achieved by combining the backward and forward ASEs generated in thulium-holmium-doped fiber using appropriate wideband couplers. The ASE source optimized for flat spectral power density covers a spectral range from 1527 to 2171 nm at a -10  dB level. The ASE source optimized for spectroscopy features an enhancement with respect to single-mode fiber (SMF) coupled halogen lamps within the spectral range from 1540 nm to more than 2340 nm covering the 800 nm bandwidth. PMID:24978559

  13. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.; Jain, H.

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  14. Origin of silicic magma in Iceland revealed by Th isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmarsson, O.; Condomines, M. ); Hemond, C. ); Fourcade, S. ); Oskarsson, N. )

    1991-06-01

    Th, Sr, Nd, and O isotopes have been determined in a suite of volcanic rocks from Hekla and in a few samples from Askja and Krafla volcanic centers in Iceland. Although {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios are nearly the same for all compositions at Hekla, the ({sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th) ratios differ and thus clearly show that the silicic rocks cannot be derived from fractional crystallization of a more primitive magma. Similar results are obtained for the Krafla and Askja volcanic centers, where the {delta}{sup 18}O values are much lower in the silicic magma than in the mafic magma. These data suggest that large volumes of silicic rocks in central volcanoes of the neovolcanic zones in Iceland are produced by partial melting of the underlying crust.

  15. The Elga meteorite - Silicate inclusions and shock metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchii, E. G.; Novikov, G. V.; Baryshnikova, G. V.

    The present investigation is concerned with the silicate inclusions in the Elga meteorite which was found in Yakutia in 1959. Microscopic studies of the silicate inclusions indicate five distinct types with respect to structure, mineralogy, and petrology. Most of the silicate inclusions in the Elga meteorite contain nearly equal amounts of clinopyroxene and K-Na feldspar. The transparent minerals are considered, taking into account K-Na feldspar, alkali glasses, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, olivine, whitlockite, fluorapatite, phosphate glasses, tridymite, and rutile. Opaque minerals and alloys found include schreibersite, Fe-Ni-P alloy, Fe-Ni-P-S alloy, troilite, magnetite, and chromite. Structural characteristics related to impact melting are investigated. The mineralogy and structure of the Elga meteorite are found to indicate that it must have had at least two impact events of different intensity early in its history.

  16. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND OZONE ON AMORPHOUS SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Dapeng; He Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco; Brucato, John Robert; Tozzetti, Lorenzo; De Sio, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Oxygen in the interstellar medium is seen in the gas phase, in ices (incorporated in H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2}), and in grains such as (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} )SiO{sub 3} or (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} ){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, 0 < x < 1. In this investigation, we study the diffusion of oxygen atoms and the formation of oxygen molecules and ozone on the surface of an amorphous silicate film. We find that ozone is formed at low temperature (<30 K), and molecular oxygen forms when the diffusion of oxygen atoms becomes significant, at around 60 K. This experiment, besides being the first determination of the diffusion energy barrier (1785 {+-} 35 K) for oxygen atoms on a silicate surface, suggests bare silicates as a possible storage place for oxygen atoms in low-A{sub v} environments.

  17. Redox equilibria of multivalent ions in silicate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental studies were made on the compositional dependence of the redox equilibrium of Eu in synthetic silicate liquids, together with an empirical model describing the observed compositional dependence. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to measure the concentration ratio of Eu(2+) to Eu(3+) in various glasses formed by rapidly quenching silicate liquids. The compositional field studied comprised mixtures of SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, and Na2O. The proposed model describes the Eu(2+)/Eu(3+) ratio over the entire compositional field in terms of parameters easily related to each glass composition. The general applicability and utility of the model is further demonstrated by its application to the Fe(2+)-Fe(3+), Ce(3+)-Ce(4+), and Cr(3+)-Cr(6+) redox reactions in binary alkali oxide silicate glasses of Li, Na, and K.

  18. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  19. Characterization of silicate based cathodes for Li Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Nazri, Gholam-Abbas; Nazri, Maryam; Nail, Vaman; Vaishnava, Prem; Naik, Ratna; Energy Group Collaboration; Energy Group Collaboration; Energy Group Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    The silicate compounds Li2MSiO4, where M = Mn, Fe, Co and Ni have gained interest as electrode materials for Lithium ion batteries due to their high theoretical capacity (>330mAh/g), high thermal stability due to strong Si-O covalent bonds, environmental friendliness, and low cost. However, these materials intrinsically have low electrical conductivity. To improve conductivity of these classes of electrode materials, we synthesized Li2MnSiO4 and Li2FeSiO4 by solid state reaction in an argon atmosphere. The lithium transition metal silicates were compounded with graphene nano-sheets and the composites were used as positive electrode in a coin cell configuration.. The materials structure-composition, morphology, conductivity and electrochemical performance were characterized by XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM and electrochemical techniques.The detail structure-composition analysis and electrochemical performance of the silicate electrodes will be reported.

  20. Treatability of manganese by sodium silicate and chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, F.B.; Ronk, S.K. )

    1987-11-01

    Manganese sequestering by nearly simultaneous additions of sodium silicate and sodium hypochlorite was studied in laboratory-prepared waters. Under conditions of near-neutral pH and 150-250 mg/liter of alkalinity as CaCO{sub 3}, 1-2 mg manganese/liter could be sequestered for up to one day. Less effective manganese treatability was found at pH 8 than at pH 7. Additionally, at pH 7 the best results were obtained when neither silicate nor hypochlorite was added because of the slow manganese oxidation rate by oxygen alone. Aging of diluted stock silicate solutions prior to dosing also resulted in poor treatment; the presence of background silica increased the treatment effectiveness only slightly. Overall, manganese was less treatable by this method than iron under the same treatment conditions.

  1. Composition of the Silicates around Evolved Stars and Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyk, K.; Dartois, E.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Jones, A.; D'Hendecourt, L.; Jourdain de Muizon, M.; Heras, A. M.

    2000-11-01

    We present a study of the composition of the silicates around five evolved stars and three high-mass protostars. Around evolved stars, the oxygen-rich dust is composed of amorphous olivine, crystalline silicates (enstatite, forsterite, diopside) and some oxides (FeO, Al2O3). Using a radiative transfer code we have modelled the SED of two OH/IR stars. We estimate that the amount of crystalline silicates in these objects is of the order of 20%. Around protostars, the dust is composed of porous pyroxene and/or aluminosilicate grains containing iron oxide. We calculate that at most 1-2% of the dust mass is crystalline. The newly formed dust around evolved stars has a different structure and composition from the old dust found around protostars. This implies that some mechanism, which remains to be found, occurs during the grain lifetime and alters the chemical composition and structure of the grains.

  2. Interaction of silicic acid with sulfurous acid scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    The solubility of amorphous silica and the inhibition of silica polymerization in the presence of sulfurous acid and sulfite salts has been investigated to 260{degrees}C. Investigations of inhibition of silica scaling from geothermal brines by sulfurous acid have produced unusual results. Bisulfite/sulfite increases amorphous silica solubility by {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} effects resulting from apparent complexation. Silica-sulfite complexes are postulated to form via hydrogen bonding, and appear to be much stronger than silica-sulfate complexes. Treatment of brines with sulfurous acid inhibits silica scaling by (1) retarding the kinetics of silicic acid polymerization, and (2) forming soluble sulfito-silicate complexes. Sulfurous acid offers several advantages over sulfuric acid in controlling scale deposition-reduced corrosion potential, reduced by-product scale formation potential, oxygen scavenging and inhibition of certain metal silicate scales.

  3. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Silicate Grains by Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G Q M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2007-03-28

    While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has a crystalline structure, in the interstellar medium nearly all of it is amorphous. One possible explanation for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively 'low' energy, heavy ion cosmic rays. Here we present the results of multiple laboratory experiments showing that single-crystal synthetic forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) amorphizes when irradiated by 10 MeV Xe{sup ++} ions at large enough fluences. Using modeling, we extrapolate these results to show that 0.1-5.0 GeV heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium.

  4. MG Isotopic Measurement of FIB-Isolated Presolar Silicate Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Nguyen, A.; Ito, M.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of presolar oxide and silicate grains are ascribed to origins in low-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars based on their O isotopic ratios. However, a minor population of these grains (< 10%) has O isotopic ratios incompatible with these sources. Two principle alternative sources are higher-than-solar metallicity (Z) stars or, more likely, supernovae (SN) [1-3]. These rare (Group 4) grains [3] are characterized by enrichments in O-18, and typically also enrichments in O-17. An even rarer subset of grains with extremely large enrichments in O-17 and smaller depletions in O-18 were suggested to come from binary star systems [2]. To establish the origins of these isotopically unusual grains, it is necessary to examine isotopic systems in addition to O. Presolar silicates offer several elements diagnostic of their stellar sources and nuclear processes, including O, Si, Mg, Fe and Ca. However, the database for minor element isotopic compositions in silicates is seriously lacking. To date only two silicate grains have been analyzed for Mg [4] or Fe [5]. One major complicating factor is their small size (average 230 nm), which greatly limits the number of measurements that can be performed on any one grain and makes it more difficult to obtain statistically relevant data. This problem is compounded because the grains are identified among isotopically solar silicates, which contribute a diluting signal in isotopic measurements [1]. Thus, relatively small isotopic anomalies are missed due to this dilution effect. By applying focused ion beam (FIB) milling, we obtain undiluted Mg isotopic ratios of isolated rare presolar silicate grains to investigate their sources.

  5. Mesoporous silicates: Materials science and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggers, Robert Anthony

    This thesis dissertation presents the collective research into the advancement of mesoporous silicate particles as biointerface devices, the development of new materials and the application of these particles as solid supports for heterogeneous catalysis. Mesoporous silica has been utilized in the aforementioned applications due to several reasons; the first being the ability to achieve high surface areas (500 - 1000 m2 g-1) with controlled pore sizes and particle morphology. Another reason for their popularity is their robustness in applications of heterogeneous catalysis and the ability to functionalize the surface with a wide variety of organic functional groups. In the field of biointerface devices, mesoporous silica nanoparticles represent a class of materials that exhibit high biocompatibility. In addition, the ability to functionalize the surfaces (outer surface and pore interiors) allows the particles to be targeted to specific cell types as well as the ability to release many different therapeutic molecules under specific stimuli. A unique particle coating consisting of a chemically cleavable lipid bilayer that allows for the encapsulation of a fluorescent molecule and increases the biocompatibility of the particle has been developed. The lipid bilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (LB-MSN) was characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen `sorption isotherms. The finished LB-MSN was then incubated with mammalian cells in order to prove their biocompatibility. Confocal micrographs demonstrate the endocytosis of the particles into the cells. In addition the micrographs also show that the LB-MSNs are separate from the endosomal compartments, however due to the lipophilic nature of the dye used to label the endosome there is some debate regarding this conclusion. The lipid bilayer coating was then applied to a large pore MSN (l-MSN) which had been previously shown to cause lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) at low

  6. The Lassell Massif - a Silicic Lunar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Hawke, B. R.; Lawrence, S. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lunar volcanic processes were dominated by mare-producing basaltic extrusions. However, limited occurrences of non-mare, geochemically evolved (Si-enriched) volcanic deposits have long been suspected on the basis of spectral anomalies (red spots), landform morphologies, and the occurrence of minor granitic components in Apollo sample suites [e.g., 1-5]. The LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (Diviner) measured thermal emission signatures considered diagnostic of highly silicic rocks in several red spot areas [6,7], within the Marius domes [8], and from the Compton-Belkovich feature on the lunar farside [9]. The present study focuses on the Lassell massif red spot (14.73°S, 350.97°E) located in northeastern Mare Nubium near the center of Alphonsus A crater. Here we use Diviner coverage co-projected with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images [10] and digital elevation models to characterize the Lassell massif geomorphology and composition. Localized Diviner signatures indicating relatively high silica contents correlate with spatially distinct morphologic features across the Lassell massif. These features include sub-kilometer scale deposits with clear superposing relationships between units of different silica concentrations. The zone with the strongest signal corresponds to the southern half of the massif and the Lassell G and K depressions (formerly thought to be impact craters [11]). These steep-walled pits lack any obvious raised rims or ejecta blankets that would identify them as impact craters; they are likely explosive volcanic vents or collapse calderas. This silica-rich area is contained within the historic red spot area [4], but does not appear to fully overlap with it, implying compositionally distinct deposits originating from the same source region. Low-reflectance deposits, exposed by impact craters and mass wasting across the massif, suggest either basaltic pyroclastics or minor late-stage extrusion of basaltic lavas through vents

  7. Mantle Mineral/Silicate Melt Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, E. A.; Drake, M. J.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction: The partitioning of elements among mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. It has been proposed that the elevated Mg/Si ratio of the upper mantle of the Earth is a consequence of the flotation of olivine into the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). Agee and Walker (1988) have generated a model via mass balance by assuming average mineral compositions to generate upper mantle peridotite. This model determines that upper mantle peridotite could result from the addition of 32.7% olivine and 0.9% majorite garnet into the upper mantle, and subtraction of 27.6% perovskite from the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). The present contribution uses experimental data to examine the consequences of such multiple phase fractionations enabling an independent evaluation of the above mentioned model. Here we use Mg-perovskite/melt partition coefficients from both a synthetic and a natural system (KLB-1) obtained from this laboratory. Also used are partition coefficient values for majorite garnet/melt, beta spinel/melt and olivine/melt partitioning (McFarlane et al., 1991b; McFarlane et al., 1992). Multiple phase fractionations are examined using the equilibrium crystallization equation and partition coefficient values. The mineral proportions determined by Agee and Walker (1988) are converted into weight fractions and used to compute a bulk partition coefficient value. Discussion: There has been a significant debate concerning whether measured values of trace element partition coefficients permit large-scale fractionation of liquidus phases from an early terrestrial magma ocean (Kato et al., 1988a,b; Walker and Agee, 1989; Drake, 1989; Drake et al., 1991; McFarlane et al., 1990, 1991). It should be noted that it is unclear which, if any, numerical values of partition coefficients are appropriate for examining this question, and certainly the assumptions for the current model must be more fully

  8. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  9. Development of interfaces in oxide and silicate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.H.; Cain, M.G.; Doleman, P.

    1995-12-01

    Silicate and oxide matrix CMCs are being developed for application in advanced gas turbines. High-performance Silicate/Nicalon CMCs have been characterised mainly as materials for interface, process and mechanical modelling due to their limited thermal and oxidative stability. Saphikon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) monofilaments have been used in the development of interphase chemistry and processing via vapour and liquid-precursor methods. Prototype Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-matrix CMCs have been fabricated and exploration of alternative fibre/interphase chemistries conducted via reactivity studies up to 1600{degrees}C.

  10. Polymer layered silicate nanocomposites: Structure, morphology, and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawani, Pranav

    Layered silicates are important fillers for improving various mechanical, flame retardant, and barrier properties of polymers, which can be attributed to their sheet-like morphology. Layered silicates can be modified with organic surfactants to render them compatible with polymer matrices. Organically modified silicates (organoclays) having large surface areas are very cost-efficient non-toxic nanofillers effective at very low loads and are readily available. Upon amalgamation of organoclays with polymer matrix nanocomposites, polymer chains can penetrate in between the silicate layers and result in an intercalated structure where the clay stack remains intact but the interlayer spacing is increased. When penetration becomes more severe, disintegration of clay stacks can occur, resulting in an exfoliated structure. It has often been observed that exfoliation is not complete down to the level of isolated silicate layers; rather, the large clay stacks are broken up into shorter stacks termed 'tactoids' together with a few individual silicate layers, resulting in a kind of mixed intercalated-exfoliated structure. Organoclay particles are mostly intercalated, having a preferred orientation with the clay gallery planes being preferentially parallel to the plane of the pressed film. Preferential orientation of organoclays affects the barrier properties of polymer membranes. Additional fillers like carbon black can induce a change in the orientation of organoclays. The effect of carbon black on the orientation of organoclays was elucidated and a relationship between orientation and permeability of air through such membranes was established. We have also investigated the flammability properties of a series of polymer nanocomposites, containing various Transition Metal Ion (TMI) modified organoclays. The improved fire retardation in nanocomposites with TMI-modified organoclays can be attributed to enhanced carbonaceous char formation during combustion, i.e., charring

  11. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  12. Polymerization of silicate on hematite surfaces and its influence on arsenic sorption.

    PubMed

    Christl, Iso; Brechbühl, Yves; Graf, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2012-12-18

    Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides are important sorbents for arsenic in soils, sediments, and water treatment systems, but their long-term potential for arsenic retention may be diminished by the formation of polymeric silicate on their surfaces. To study these interactions, we first investigated the sorption of silicate to colloidal hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) in short-term (48 h) and long-term (210 days) batch experiments. The polymerization of silicate on the hematite surface was monitored by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The pH dependence of silicate sorption exhibited a maximum between pH 9.0 and 9.5. The condensation of silicate on hematite surfaces adsorbed from monomeric silicate solutions steadily continued over the 210 day period, whereby surface polymerization was slower at pH 3 than at pH 6. The effect of silicate surface polymerization on arsenate and arsenite sorption was studied by use of hematite pre-equilibrated with silicate for different time periods of up to 210 days. The competitive effect of silicate on arsenate and arsenite sorption increased with increasing silicate pre-equilibration time. Only under strongly acidic conditions (pH 3), where silicate sorption was weakest and surface polymerization was slowest, was arsenate and arsenite sorption not affected by the presence of silicate. We conclude that the long-term exposure to dissolved silicate can decrease the potential of natural iron (oxyhydr)oxides for adsorbing inorganic arsenic. PMID:23163533

  13. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Effectiveness, Safety, and Overcoming of the Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin Chul; Park, Sang Myung

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine the efficacy and safety of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and to estimate the time to overcome the learning curve. Materials and Methods From May 2008 to October 2009, 164 consecutive patients treated with HoLEP were enrolled in this study. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), peak urinary flow rate (Qmax), and postvoid residual urine (PVR) were documented preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months postoperatively. The 164 study subjects were divided into 3 groups (group 1 the first 50 patients treated, group 2 the second 50, and group 3 the third 64), and perioperative data and complications were analyzed in these groups to determine the learning curve. In addition, the inverse and upward techniques were compared in terms of the effects and the stability of morcellation. Results The mean patient age was 69 years, and the average operation time was 62 minutes (range, 20-208 minutes). Mean prostate volume was 54.2 ml and mean resected tissue weight was 18.6 g. Postoperatively, IPSS and PVR decreased and Qmax increased significantly. Postoperative complications were transient incontinence (8.5%), urinary retention (4.3%), hematuria (3.0%), urinary tract infection (1.2%), and urethral stricture (0.6%), and intraoperative complications were minor capsular perforation (4%) and bladder injury (8%). Conclusions HoLEP was found to be effective and safe regardless of prostate size. We recommend that a systematic educational program be established to reduce the learning curve. PMID:20856646

  14. Expanding rare-earth oxidation state chemistry to molecular complexes of holmium(II) and erbium(II).

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Matthew R; Bates, Jefferson E; Fieser, Megan E; Ziller, Joseph W; Furche, Filipp; Evans, William J

    2012-05-23

    The first molecular complexes of holmium and erbium in the +2 oxidation state have been generated by reducing Cp'(3)Ln [Cp' = C(5)H(4)SiMe(3); Ln = Ho (1), Er (2)] with KC(8) in the presence of 18-crown-6 in Et(2)O at -35 °C under argon. Purification and crystallization below -35 °C gave isomorphous [(18-crown-6)K][Cp'(3)Ln] [Ln = Ho (3), Er (4)]. The three Cp' ring centroids define a trigonal-planar geometry around each metal ion that is not perturbed by the location of the potassium crown cation near one ring with K-C(Cp') distances of 3.053(8)-3.078(2) Å. The metrical parameters of the three rings are indistinguishable within the error limits. In contrast to Ln(2+) complexes of Eu, Yb, Sm, Tm, Dy, and Nd, 3 and 4 have average Ln-(Cp' ring centroid) distances only 0.029 and 0.021 Å longer than those of the Ln(3+) analogues 1 and 2, a result similar to that previously reported for the 4d(1) Y(2+) complex [(18-crown-6)K][Cp'(3)Y] (5) and the 5d(1) La(2+) complex [K(18-crown-6)(Et(2)O)][Cp″(3)La] [Cp″ = 1,3-(Me(3)Si)(2)C(5)H(3)]. Surprisingly, the UV-vis spectra of 3 and 4 are also very similar to that of 5 with two broad absorptions in the visible region, suggesting that 3-5 have similar electron configurations. Density functional theory calculations on the Ho(2+) and Er(2+) species yielded HOMOs that are largely 5d(z(2)) in character and supportive of 4f(10)5d(1) and 4f(11)5d(1) ground-state configurations, respectively. PMID:22583320

  15. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern.

  16. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Richard L; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (∼10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J∕cm(2), respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern. PMID:21806249

  17. A comparison of efficacies of holmium YAG laser, and pneumatic lithotripsy in the endoscopic treatment of ureteral stones

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Ekrem; İrkılata, Lokman; Demirel, Hüseyin Cihan; Saylık, Acun; Bolat, Mustafa Suat; Şahinkaya, Necmettin; Zengin, Mehmet; Atilla, Mustafa Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to compare the effectiveness of holmium YAG laser and pneumatic lithotripsy in the treatment of ureteral stones. Material and methods: A total of 216 patients who had established indications of ureteroscopy between November 2011 and June 2012 were included in this study. Patients’ files were retrospectively reviewed by dividing cases as groups that underwent pneumatic (PL) or laser lithotripsy (LL) procedures. Age, sex, stone burden and localization, duration of follow-up, operative times were evaluated. Stone-free rates were evaluated by ureteroscopical examination, postoperative scout films and ultrasonography. Results: Group PL consisted of 109 and group LL of 107 patients. Median age was 43.93±15.94 years in Group PL and 46.15±14.54 years in Group LL. Male to female ratio, stone burden and localization were similar for both groups. Overall success rate was 89.9% in Group PL and 87.9% in Group LL, respectively (p<0.791). With the aid of additional procedures, success rate was 100% for both groups at the end of the first month. Groups were not different as for operative time, rate of insertion of an ureteral catheter and its removal time. Hospitalization period was apparently somewhat shorter in Group LL (p=0.00). Conclusion: Pneumatic lithotripsy can be as efficacious as laser lithotripsy and be used safely in the endoscopic management of ureteral stone. In comparison of both methods, we detected no differences as to operative time, success of operation and the time to removal of the catheter, however, hospitalization period was shorter in Group LL. PMID:26328167

  18. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: surgical, functional, and quality-of-life outcomes upon extended follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Ilter; Ozveri, Hakan; Akin, Yigit; Ipekci, Tumay; Alican, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the long-term surgical, functional, and quality-of-life (QoL) outcomes after Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed recorded data on patients who underwent HoLEP between June 2002 and February 2005. Ninety-six patients were enrolled. Demographic, perioperative, and postoperative data were recorded. On follow-up, International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSSs), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, QoL scores, peak uroflowmetric data (Qmax values), and post-voiding residual urine volumes (PVR volumes), were recorded. Complications were scored using the Clavien system. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: The mean follow-up time was 41.8±34.6 months and the mean patient age 73.2±8.7 years. The mean prostate volume was 74.6±34.3mL. Significant improvements in Qmax values, QoL, and IPSSs and decreases in PSA levels and PVR volumes were noted during follow-up (all p values=0.001). The most common complication was a requirement for re-catheterisation because of urinary retention. Two patients had concomitant bladder tumours that did not invade the muscles. Eight patients (8.3%) required re-operations; three had residual adenoma, three urethral strictures, and two residual prostate tissue in the bladder. Stress incontinence occurred in one patient (1%). All complications were of Clavien Grade 3a. We noted no Clavien 3b, 4, or 5 complications during follow-up. Conclusions: HoLEP improved IPSSs, Qmax values, PVR volumes, and QoL and was associated with a low complication rate, during extended follow-up. Thus, HoLEP can be a viable option to transurethral resection of the prostate. PMID:27256184

  19. Semiempirical quantum chemistry model for the lanthanides: RM1 (Recife Model 1) parameters for dysprosium, holmium and erbium.

    PubMed

    Filho, Manoel A M; Dutra, José Diogo L; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M; Freire, Ricardo O

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of dysprosium, holmium, and erbium find many applications as single-molecule magnets, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, as anti-cancer agents, in optical telecommunications, etc. Therefore, the development of tools that can be proven helpful to complex design is presently an active area of research. In this article, we advance a major improvement to the semiempirical description of lanthanide complexes: the Recife Model 1, RM1, model for the lanthanides, parameterized for the trications of Dy, Ho, and Er. By representing such lanthanide in the RM1 calculation as a three-electron atom with a set of 5 d, 6 s, and 6 p semiempirical orbitals, the accuracy of the previous sparkle models, mainly concentrated on lanthanide-oxygen and lanthanide-nitrogen distances, is extended to other types of bonds in the trication complexes' coordination polyhedra, such as lanthanide-carbon, lanthanide-chlorine, etc. This is even more important as, for example, lanthanide-carbon atom distances in the coordination polyhedra of the complexes comprise about 30% of all distances for all complexes of Dy, Ho, and Er considered. Our results indicate that the average unsigned mean error for the lanthanide-carbon distances dropped from an average of 0.30 Å, for the sparkle models, to 0.04 Å for the RM1 model for the lanthanides; for a total of 509 such distances for the set of all Dy, Ho, and Er complexes considered. A similar behavior took place for the other distances as well, such as lanthanide-chlorine, lanthanide-bromine, lanthanide, phosphorus and lanthanide-sulfur. Thus, the RM1 model for the lanthanides, being advanced in this article, broadens the range of application of semiempirical models to lanthanide complexes by including comprehensively many other types of bonds not adequately described by the previous models. PMID:24497945

  20. Preoperative Factors Affecting Postoperative Early Quality of Life During the Learning Curve of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Jun; Kim, Hyo Sin; Koh, Jun Sung; Han, Seung Bum; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the preoperative factors related to early quality of life (QoL) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) during the surgeon's learning curve. Methods The medical records of 82 patients with a follow-up period of at least 3 months who were treated with HoLEP during the time of a surgeon's learning curve were analyzed retrospectively. We divided the patients into two groups on the basis of the QoL component of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) 3 months after HoLEP: the high QoL group (IPSS/QoL≤3) and the low QoL group (IPSS/QoL≥4). Preoperative factors in each group were compared, including prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen, history of acute urinary retention (AUR), urgency incontinence, IPSS, and urodynamic parameters. Detrusor underactivity was defined as a bladder contractility index less than 100 on urodynamic study. Results A total of 61 patients (74.3%) had a high QoL, whereas 21 (25.7%) had a low QoL. A history of AUR, detrusor pressure on maximal flow (PdetQmax), bladder outlet obstruction grade, bladder contractility index, and detrusor underactivity were associated with postoperative QoL in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, a history of AUR and PdetQmax were independent factors affecting postoperative QoL. Conclusions A history of AUR and bladder contractility affect early QoL, and preoperative urodynamic study plays an important role in the proper selection of patients during the HoLEP learning curve. PMID:23869273

  1. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate: Comparison of Immediate Postoperative Outcomes in Patients with and without Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Conrad V.; Liddell, Heath; Ischia, Joseph; Paul, Eldho; Appu, Sree; Frydenberg, Mark; Pham, Trung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the immediate postoperative outcomes of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia undergoing Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HOLEP) with and without full anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy at the time of surgery. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed on a series of consecutive patients undergoing HOLEP at our institution by a single surgeon from February 2004 to September 2010. Demographic, surgical, pathological and outcome data were collected. Two cohorts were identified on the basis of antithrombotic therapy at the time of surgery. Patients who continued on aspirin, aspirin/dipyridamole, clopidogrel and warfarin throughout the surgery were included in the antithrombotic cohort. Univariate analysis was performed to determine differences in outcomes between the 2 cohorts. Results Total 125 consecutive patients underwent HOLEP with 52 patients on antithrombotic therapy at the time of surgery and 73 patients were not on antithrombotic therapy during surgery. Patients in the antithrombotic group were older (75.1 ±7.5 vs. 71.7 ± 8.3 years; p = 0.02) and had a higher median ASA physical status (3 (3-3) vs. 2 (2-3), p < 0.0001). The mean operating time and median specimen volume were not significantly different between the 2 cohorts. The median length of stay (2 (1-3) vs. 1 (1-2) d, p = 0.014) was longer in the antithrombotic cohort. The transfusion rate (7.7 vs. 0%, p = 0.028) was predictably higher in the antithrombotic cohort. No patients required re-operation for bleeding. Conclusions The use of HOLEP in patients on antithrombotic therapy is safe despite the higher surgical risk profile of that particular patient population and the potential increased risk for significant bleeding. PMID:24917753

  2. Relationship of Postoperative Recatheterization and Intraoperative Bladder Distention Volume in Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon Jun; Lee, Han Yi; Song, Sang Hun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors for recatheterization after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). Materials and Methods A total of 166 consecutive patients treated with HoLEP by a single surgeon from January 2010 to June 2011 were enrolled in this study. We collected data on preoperative and intraoperative parameters, including intraoperative bladder distention volume. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included patients who voided successfully after removal of the catheter, and group 2 included patients who required recatheterization. Analysis and comparison of the perioperative parameters of both groups was performed for identification of risk factors for recatheterization. Results Recatheterization was required in 9 of 166 (5.4%) patients. No significant differences in age or preoperative parameters, including prostate-specific antigen, prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, peak flow rate, postvoid residual urine, maximal bladder capacity, and Abrahams Griffiths number, were observed between the two groups. Of the intraoperative parameters, intraoperative bladder distention volume was significantly smaller in group 1 than in group 2 (700.65 mL vs. 897.78 mL, p<0.001). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for other variables, intraoperative bladder distention volume was found to be a statistically significant risk factor for postoperative recatheterization (hazard ratio, 1.006; confidence interval, 1.002 to 1.010; p=0.002). Conclusions Nine of 166 (5.4%) patients failed to void after HoLEP and required catheterization. Intraoperative bladder distention volume was found to be a statistically significant risk factor for recatheterization in this patient group. PMID:23549294

  3. Postoperative Infectious Complications in Our Early Experience With Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazushi; Haraguchi, Takahiro; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Muramaki, Mototsugu; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate postoperative infectious complications (PICs) in our early experience with holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) followed by mechanical morcellation for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of the clinical data for 90 consecutive patients who underwent HoLEP at our institution between February 2008 and March 2011. All patients were evaluated for the emergence of PICs, including prophylactic antibiotic administration (PAA) and the influence of the kind or duration of PAA on PIC. The details of cases with PICs were also examined. Results The patients' mean age was 71 years (range, 50 to 95 years), and their mean prostate volume was 60 mL (range, 2 to 250 mL). There were 7 cases (7.78%) with PICs; in detail, 3 patients were diagnosed with prostatitis, 2 with pyelonephritis, and 2 with epididymitis. Three patients had positive urine cultures: 1 had Serratia marcescens/Proteus mirabilis, 1 had S. marcescens, and 1 had Klebsiella pneumonia; only one case had urological sepsis. Our statistical data showed no significant differences between 2 or fewer days and 3 or more days of PAA and PIC occurrence. There was also no significant effect on PIC occurrence of sulbactam/ampicillin compared with other antibiotics. Conclusions The results of this retrospective study showed that PIC occurrence did not depend on the duration or the kind of PAA. Further prospective study is necessary for the evaluation and establishment of prophylactic measures for PICs. PMID:23526729

  4. Semiempirical Quantum Chemistry Model for the Lanthanides: RM1 (Recife Model 1) Parameters for Dysprosium, Holmium and Erbium

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Manoel A. M.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.; Freire, Ricardo O.

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of dysprosium, holmium, and erbium find many applications as single-molecule magnets, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, as anti-cancer agents, in optical telecommunications, etc. Therefore, the development of tools that can be proven helpful to complex design is presently an active area of research. In this article, we advance a major improvement to the semiempirical description of lanthanide complexes: the Recife Model 1, RM1, model for the lanthanides, parameterized for the trications of Dy, Ho, and Er. By representing such lanthanide in the RM1 calculation as a three-electron atom with a set of 5 d, 6 s, and 6 p semiempirical orbitals, the accuracy of the previous sparkle models, mainly concentrated on lanthanide-oxygen and lanthanide-nitrogen distances, is extended to other types of bonds in the trication complexes’ coordination polyhedra, such as lanthanide-carbon, lanthanide-chlorine, etc. This is even more important as, for example, lanthanide-carbon atom distances in the coordination polyhedra of the complexes comprise about 30% of all distances for all complexes of Dy, Ho, and Er considered. Our results indicate that the average unsigned mean error for the lanthanide-carbon distances dropped from an average of 0.30 Å, for the sparkle models, to 0.04 Å for the RM1 model for the lanthanides; for a total of 509 such distances for the set of all Dy, Ho, and Er complexes considered. A similar behavior took place for the other distances as well, such as lanthanide-chlorine, lanthanide-bromine, lanthanide, phosphorus and lanthanide-sulfur. Thus, the RM1 model for the lanthanides, being advanced in this article, broadens the range of application of semiempirical models to lanthanide complexes by including comprehensively many other types of bonds not adequately described by the previous models. PMID:24497945

  5. Clinical and Pathological Characteristics of Hard Nodules Resistant to Morcellation During Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Songzhe; Choo, Min Soo; Wang, Yue; Lee, Young Ju; Bae, Jungbum; Oh, Seung-June

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the clinical and pathological characteristics of hard nodules resistant to morcellation (HNRM) during holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: Between July 2008 and October 2011, 246 patients underwent HoLEP for symptomatic BPH. The first 30 patients were excluded from the analysis due to the learning curve of the procedure. The remaining patients were divided into HNRM (n=29) and non-HNRM groups (n=187), and comparative analysis of the clinical parameters of the two groups was performed. International prostate symptom score analysis and urodynamic studies were performed preoperatively. Histological analysis was performed after hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson trichrome staining of the HNRM specimens. Results: Twenty-nine patients (13.4%) had HNRM. The patients in the HNRM group had significantly higher proportions of advanced age (≥65 years, P=0.029), total prostate volume ≥65 mL (P<0.001), transition zone volume ≥35 mL (P<0.001), serum prostate-specific antigen levels ≥10 ng/mL (P=0.007), and functional urethral length ≥70 mm (P=0.009); larger enucleation weight (P<0.001); longer operation (P=0.001), enucleation (P=0.042), and morcellation times (P<0.001); and higher enucleation ratio (P=0.028) and enucleation efficacy (P=0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age ≥65 years and total prostate volume ≥65 mL were independent risk factors for HNRM. Pathological examination did not reveal any malignant cells, with mainly dense fibrous tissue found in the HNRM. Conclusions: HNRM can make morcellation cumbersome and time-consuming, and older patients with larger prostates have a higher incidence of HNRM. However, the histopathology of HNRM revealed mainly fibrotic tissue. PMID:26126438

  6. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Jin Bong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusion Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume. PMID:27227564

  7. Management of impacted proximal ureteral stone: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy versus ureteroscopy with holmium: YAG laser lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Prospective evaluation of the efficacy and safety of the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureteroscopy with Holmium: YAG laser lithotripsy (URSL) as a primary treatment for impacted stone in the proximal ureter. Patients and Methods: A total of 82 patients with a single impacted stone in the proximal ureter were included in the study. Patients were allocated into two groups according to patient preference for either procedure. The first group included 37 patients who were treated by SWL and the second group included 45 patients treated by URSL. The preoperative data and treatment outcomes of both procedures were compared and analyzed. Results: There was no difference as regards to patient and stone characters between the two groups. There was significantly higher mean session number and re-treatment rate in the SWL group in comparison to URSL group (1.5 ± 0.8 vs. 1.02 ± 0.15 session, and 43.2% vs. 2.2%, respectively). At one month, the stone-free rate of the URSL group was statistically significantly higher than that of the SWL group (80% vs. 67.6%, respectively). The stone-free rate at three months was still higher in the URSL group, but without statistically significant difference (80.2% vs. 78.4%, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications between the SWL and URSL (24.3% vs. 15.6%, respectively). Conclusion: Both procedures can be used effectively and safely as a primary treatment for impacted stone in the proximal ureter; however, the URSL has a significantly higher initial stone-free rate and lower re-treatment rate. PMID:23798864

  8. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANIC/INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS - SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicate Technology Corporation's (STC's) technology for treating hazardous waste utilizes silicate compounds to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents in contaminated soils and sludges. STC has developed two groups of reagents: SOILSORB HM for treating wastes with inorgan...

  9. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  10. Mesoporous silicates: Materials science and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggers, Robert Anthony

    This thesis dissertation presents the collective research into the advancement of mesoporous silicate particles as biointerface devices, the development of new materials and the application of these particles as solid supports for heterogeneous catalysis. Mesoporous silica has been utilized in the aforementioned applications due to several reasons; the first being the ability to achieve high surface areas (500 - 1000 m2 g-1) with controlled pore sizes and particle morphology. Another reason for their popularity is their robustness in applications of heterogeneous catalysis and the ability to functionalize the surface with a wide variety of organic functional groups. In the field of biointerface devices, mesoporous silica nanoparticles represent a class of materials that exhibit high biocompatibility. In addition, the ability to functionalize the surfaces (outer surface and pore interiors) allows the particles to be targeted to specific cell types as well as the ability to release many different therapeutic molecules under specific stimuli. A unique particle coating consisting of a chemically cleavable lipid bilayer that allows for the encapsulation of a fluorescent molecule and increases the biocompatibility of the particle has been developed. The lipid bilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (LB-MSN) was characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen `sorption isotherms. The finished LB-MSN was then incubated with mammalian cells in order to prove their biocompatibility. Confocal micrographs demonstrate the endocytosis of the particles into the cells. In addition the micrographs also show that the LB-MSNs are separate from the endosomal compartments, however due to the lipophilic nature of the dye used to label the endosome there is some debate regarding this conclusion. The lipid bilayer coating was then applied to a large pore MSN (l-MSN) which had been previously shown to cause lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) at low

  11. Sialendoscopy with holmium:YAG laser treatment for multiple large sialolithiases of the Wharton duct: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Ting; Lee, Kuo-Sheng; Hung, Shih-Han; Su, Chin-Hui

    2014-12-01

    Sialolithiasis is defined as calcified stone(s) in the salivary duct or glands. Submandibular gland sialolithiasis is the most common (80 to 90%), followed by parotid gland sialolithiasis (5 to 15%). The typical clinical presentation is salivary gland swelling after eating. As the swelling persists, symptoms owing to local inflammation, such as pain and trismus, emerge. In severe cases, cellulitis and even abscess formation occur and subsequently lead to salivary gland atrophy or fistula formation if the sialolithiasis remains untreated. The most common treatment is complete excision of the affected gland together with the stone(s). In some cases, intraoral sialolithotomy is performed when the stone is solitary and easily palpable through the oral cavity. Sialendoscopy is increasingly performed because of its minimal invasiveness. The major limitation of endoscopic laser lithotripsy of the salivary glands is the size of the stone. Often, for a stone larger than 4 mm, multiple fragmentations of the stone into small pieces is necessary before the pieces can be removed by wire basket or grasping forceps. Recently, the holmium:YAG laser has been reported as quite effective in removing larger salivary gland stones. However, sialoendoscopic laser lithotripsy is a very time-consuming procedure and in most cases, when there are multiple large stones in a single gland, entire gland excision is recommended. This report describes a male patient diagnosed with multiple large stones in his left submandibular gland who was successfully treated under sialendoscopy with holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy. PMID:25216563

  12. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independentl...

  13. In vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of five calcium silicates.

    PubMed Central

    Skaug, V; Davies, R; Gylseth, B

    1984-01-01

    Five calcium silicate minerals (two naturally occurring and three synthetic compounds) with defined morphology and chemical composition were compared for their cytotoxic and lysosomal enzyme releasing effects on unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. One synthetic material, a fibrous tobermorite, was cytotoxic towards the cells, and two naturally occurring wollastonites induced selective release of beta-glucuronidase from the cells. Images PMID:6318798

  14. Comparative FeNi and Silicate Chronology in Portales Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2000-01-01

    Re-Os and U-Pb data on Portales Valley suggest an early formation for the metal and silicates. These two chronometers and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd require a young disturbance. This is inconsistent with the 39 Ar-40 Ar age and in need of clarification.

  15. Determination of boron in silicates after ion exchange separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1955-01-01

    Existing methods for the determination of boron in silicates are not entirely satisfactory. Separation as the methyl ester is lengthy and frequently erratic. An accurate and rapid method applicable to glass, mineral, ore, and water samples uses ion exchange to remove interfering cations, and boron is determined titrimetrically in the presence of mannitol, using a pH meter to indicate the end point.

  16. Fate of silicate minerals in a peat bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Philip C.; Siegel, Donald I.; Hill, Barbara M.; Glaser, Paul H.

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of silicate weathering in a Minnesota mire indicates that quartz and aluminosilicates rapidly dissolve in anoxic, organic-rich, neutral- pH environments. Vertical profiles of pH, dissolved silicon, and major cations were obtained at a raised bog and a spring fen and compared. Profiles of readily extractable silicon, diatom abundance, ash mineralogy, and silicate surface texture were determined from peat cores collected at each site. In the bog, normally a recharge mound, dissolved silicon increases with depth as pH increases, exceeding the background silicon concentration by a factor of two. Silicate grain surfaces, including quartz, are chemically etched at this location, despite being in contact with pore water at neutral pH with dissolved silicon well above the equilibrium solubility of quartz. The increasing silica concentrations at circum-neutral pH are consistent with a system where silicate solubility is influenced by silica-organic-acid complexes. Silica-organic-acid complexes therefore may be the cause of the almost complete absence of diatoms in decomposed peat and contribute to the formation of silica-depleted underclays commonly found beneath coal.

  17. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    PubMed

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life. PMID:22035594

  18. Differentiate Precursor for Silicate Inclusions In the Elga Iron Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplyakova, S. N.; Kostitsyn, Y. A.; Kononkova, N. N.

    2010-03-01

    We studied 17 silicate inclusions in IIE Elga irons by electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS. The bulk compositions of the Elga SIs are enriched in Si, K, Na, and Rb, Nb and could be formed during intensive differentiation process.

  19. Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.

    1992-07-01

    Efforts are reported in the following areas: laboratory equipment (multianvils for high P/T work, pressure media, SERC/DL sychrotron), liquid-state thermal diffusion (silicate liquids, O isotopic fractionation, volatiles, tektites, polymetallic sulfide liquids, carbonate liquids, aqueous sulfate solutions), and liquid-state isothermal diffusion (self-diffusion, basalt-rhyolite interdiffusion, selective contamination, chemical diffusion).

  20. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature. he nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C, where sintering progresses rapidly. The kinetics of the...

  1. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  2. Thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of silicate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, I.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Report on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of nonmetallic materials evaluates the mechanisms of heat transfer in evacuated silicate powders and establishes the complex dielectric constant of these materials. Experimental measurements and results are related to postulated lunar surface materials.

  3. Oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Accepting that oxygen, rather than gigantic gems or gold, is likely to make the Moon's Klondike, the extraction of oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis has chosen to be investigated. Process theory and proposed lunar factory are addressed.

  4. Annealing of Silicate Dust by Nebular Shocks at 10 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, David E.; Desch, Steven J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium are known to be mostly amorphous, yet crystalline silicate grains have been observed in many long-period comets and in protoplanetary disks. Annealing of amorphous silicate grains into crystalline grains requires temperatures greater than or approximately equal to 1000 K, but exposure of dust grains in comets to such high temperatures is apparently incompatible with the generally low temperatures experienced by comets. This has led to the proposal of models in which dust grains were thermally processed near the protoSun, then underwent considerable radial transport until they reached the gas giant planet region where the long-period comets originated. We hypothesize instead that silicate dust grains were annealed in situ, by shock waves triggered by gravitational instabilities. We assume a shock speed of 5 km/s, a plausible value for shocks driven by gravitational instabilities. We calculate the peak temperatures of pyroxene grains under conditions typical in protoplanetary disks at 5-10 AU. We show that in situ annealing of micron-sized dust grains can occur, obviating the need for large-scale radial transport.

  5. Potassium silicate-zinc oxide solution for metal finishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    Examples of zinc dust formulations, which are not subject to cracking or crazing, are fire retardant, and have high adhesive qualities, are listed. The potassium silicate in these formulations has mol ratios of dissolved silica potassium oxide in the range 4.8 to 1 - 5.3 to 1.

  6. 77 FR 21676 - Silicic Acid, Sodium Salt etc.; Tolerance Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ...This regulation establishes an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Silicic acid, sodium salt, reaction products with chlorotrimethylsilane and iso-propyl alcohol, reaction with poly(oxypropylene)-poly(oxyethylene) glycol; when used as an inert ingredient in a pesticide chemical formulation. Dow Corning Corporation submitted a petition to EPA under the Federal Food,......

  7. RADIATION EFFECTS ON TRANSPORT AND BUBBLE FORMATION IN SILICATE GLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the research is to discover the molecular details of chemistry induced by -, γ-, and neutron-irradiation of silicate glasses. The ionization and ballistic effects of radiation will be studied from the viewpoint of defect formation and transport properties. D...

  8. The Silicate-Extinction Relationship in Filament L673

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni; Allen, Lori; Bary, Jeff; Boogert, Adwin; Huard, Tracy; Knez, Claudia; Leisenring, Jarron; Pontoppidan, Klaus

    2008-03-01

    We propose to obtain Spitzer IRS spectra of 18 background stars toward two cores within the isolated dense filament L673. These stars were carefully selected to probe a wide range of extinctions in the starless core L673-SMM4 and the cluster-forming core L673-SMM1/2 in order to further investigate the silicate-extinction relationship in dense, isolated environments. With the primary goal of characterizing this relationship in different core environments, a previous program (PID 40928) included 63 background stars sampling a wide range of extinctions through four cores: a starless core, single-star-forming core, cluster-forming core, and a core apparently exhibiting an anomalous relationship. The additional observations proposed here would serve to (1) provide a more robust characterization of differences between the silicate-extinction relationship in starless and star-forming cores, and (2) enable us to address whether this relationship is similar for cores of similar star-formation rates. We have shown previously that the silicate-extinction relationship is a sensitive probe of grain evolution, providing constraints on the carbon-to-silicate composition and grain sizes, especially when combined with 1-1000 micron observations.

  9. Molecular orientation of rhodamine dyes on surfaces of layered silicates.

    PubMed

    Bujdák, Juraj; Iyi, Nobuo

    2005-03-17

    Films of the layered silicates fluorohectorite (FH) and saponite (Sap) with various rhodamine dyes were prepared. The dyes with acidic as well as large hydrophobic groups in their molecule were not adsorbed on the surface of FH, which was interpreted in terms of high charge density on the surface of this silicate. All adsorbed dyes formed similar forms, such as isolated cations and H-type molecular aggregates, which were characterized by different spectral properties. Polarized ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the molecular orientation of dye chromophores on the silicate surface. The isolated dye cations and species, which absorbed light at the low energy part of the spectra, were only slightly tilted with respect to the plane of the silicate surface. The cations forming H-aggregates and absorbing light at low wavelengths were oriented in a nearly perpendicular fashion. The nearly perpendicular orientation was observed as a strong increase of dichroic ratio with film tilting. The orientation of the cations in H-aggregates depends partially on the structure of the dye molecule, namely, on the type of amino group (primary, secondary, or tertiary) in the dye molecule. The type of amino groups probably plays a role in the suitable orientation of dye cations for effective electrostatic interaction between the cations and the negatively charged siloxane surface. X-ray powder diffraction could not distinguish dye phases of dye monomers and molecular aggregates. PMID:16851539

  10. PREFACE: 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezinskis, G.; Bragina, L.; Colombo, P.; Frischat, G. H.; Grabis, J.; Greil, P.; Deja, J.; Kaminskas, R.; Kliava, J.; Medvids, A.; Nowak, I.; Siauciunas, R.; Valancius, Z.; Zalite, I.

    2011-12-01

    Logo This Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of the contributions to the 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials (BaltSilica2011) held at Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia from 23-25 May 2011. The conference was organized by Riga Technical University (Latvia) and Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania). The series of Baltic conferences on silicate materials was started since 2004: the first conference was held in Riga, Latvia, 2004; the second conference was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2005; the third was held again in Riga, Latvia, 2007, and the fourth was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2009. BaltSilica 2011 was attended by around 50 participants from Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Germany, Poland, Italy, France, Ukraine and Russia. In comparison with previous silicate materials conferences, the broadening of participating countries is an indication of the interest of scientists, engineers and students to exchange research ideas, latest results, and to find new research topics for cooperation in the fields of silicate, high temperature materials, and inorganic nanomaterials. The scientific programme included 8 invited plenary lectures 23 oral presentations and 25 posters [1]. Scientific themes covered in the conference and in this special issue: Natural and Artificial Stone Materials; Traditional and New Ceramic and Glass-Like Materials; Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials. This volume consists of 23 selected proceeding papers. The Editor of this special issue is grateful to all the contributors to BaltSilica 2011. I am also very grateful to the scientific committee, the local organizing committee, the session chairs, the referees who refereed the submitted articles to this issue, and to students from the Department of Silicate, High Temperature and Inorganic Nanomaterials Technology of the Riga Technical University who ensured the smooth running of the conference. Particular thanks goes to eight plenary

  11. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  15. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products...

  1. Synthesis and structure of nanocrystalline mixed Ce–Yb silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Małecka, Małgorzata A. Kępiński, Leszek

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • New method of synthesis of nanocrystalline mixed lanthanide silicates is proposed. • Formation of A-type (Ce{sub 1−y}Yb{sub y}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} in well dispersed Ce{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2−(x/2)}–SiO{sub 2} system. • Formation of Yb{sub y}Ce{sub 9.33−y}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} in agglomerated Ce{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2−(x/2)}–SiO{sub 2} system. - Abstract: This work presents results of studies on synthesis and structure of mixed, nanocrystalline Ce–Yb silicates. Using TEM, XRD and FTIR we showed that heat treatment of nanocrystalline Ce{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2−(x/2)} (x = 0.3, 0.5) mixed oxide supported on amorphous silica in reducing atmosphere, results in formation of Ce–Yb mixed silicates. Dispersion of the oxide on the silica surface and thus a local lanthanide/Si atomic ratio determines the stoichiometry of the silicate. Oxide crystallites uniformly dispersed on the silica surface transformed into A-(Ce{sub 1−y}Yb{sub y}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} disilicate, while the agglomerated nanoparticles converted into Yb{sub y}Ce{sub 9.33−y}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} oxyapatite silicate as an intermediate phase.

  2. Reactions for yttrium silicate high-k dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, James Joseph

    The continued scaling of metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs) will require replacing the silicon dioxide gate dielectric with an alternate high dielectric constant (high-k) material. We have exploited the high reactivity of yttrium with both silicon and oxygen to form yttrium silicate high-k dielectrics. Yttrium silicate films with composition of (Y 2O3)x ·(SiO2)1-x and x = 0.32 to 0.87 are formed by oxidizing yttrium on silicon where yttrium reacts concurrently with silicon and oxygen. The competition between silicon and oxygen for yttrium is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). The initial yttrium thickness mediates the silicon consumption, and a critical thickness (˜40--80 A) exists below which silicon is consumed to form yttrium silicate and above which Y2O3 forms without silicon incorporation. Engineered interfaces modify the silicon consumption, and a nitrided silicon interface results in film with composition close to Y2O3. The silicon consumption also depends on the oxidation temperature, and oxidation at higher temperature generally results in greater silicon incorporation with an activation energy of 0.3--0.5 eV. Yttrium silicate films (˜40 A) formed by oxidation of yttrium on silicon have an amorphous microstructure and an equivalent silicon dioxide thickness of ˜12 A with leakage current <1 A/cm2. Yttrium silicate formation on silicon is also demonstrated using plasma oxidation of yttrium on silicon, reactive sputtering of yttrium and annealing/oxidation of yttrium on thermal SiO 2. The interface reactions described here for yttrium are expected to be active during both physical and chemical vapor deposition of other high-k dielectrics containing Hf, Zr and La.

  3. X-ray spectral diagnostics of synthetic lanthanide silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. N.; Guda, A. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Goettlicher, J.; Taroev, V. K.; Kashaev, A. A.; Suvorova, L. F.; Tauson, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Potassium and rare-earth (Eu, Sm, Yb, Ce) silicate and aluminosilicate crystals are hydrothermally synthesized under isothermal conditions at 500°C and a pressure of 100 MPa. The chemical and structural formulas of the synthesized compounds HK6Eu[Si10O25], K7Sm3[Si12O32], K2Sm[AlSi4O12] · 0.375H2O, K4Yb2[Si8O21], and K4Ce2[Al2Si8O24] are determined. In addition, a synthesis product with Eu, in which the dominant phase is assumed to be K3Eu3+[Si6O15] · 2H2O, is studied. The oxidation state of lanthanides in the silicates under study is determined based on X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The Eu L 3-, Sm L 3-, Yb L 3-, and Ce L 3-edge X-ray absorption spectra of the studied silicates and reference samples are recorded using a Rigaku R-XAS laboratory spectrometer. As reference samples, Eu2+S, Eu3+F3, Eu 2 3+ O3, Sm 2 3+ O3, Yb 2 3+ O3, Yb3+F3, Yb3+Cl3, Ce 2 3+ O3, and Ce4+O2 are used. Comparison of the absorption edge energies of lanthanide silicates and reference samples shows that Eu, Sm, Yb, and Ce in all the samples studied are in the oxidation state 3+. The synthesized silicates will supplement our knowledge of possible rare-earth minerals existing in hydrothermal systems, which is important for analyzing the distribution spectra of rare elements, which are widely used for diagnostics of geochemical processes and determination of sources of ore materials.

  4. Laboratory Analysis of Silicate Stardust Grains of Diverse Stellar Origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Silicate dust is ubiquitous in a multitude of environments across the cosmos, including evolved oxygen-rich stars, interstellar space, protoplanetary disks, comets, and asteroids. The identification of bona fide silicate stardust grains in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, micrometeorites, and dust returned from comet Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft has revolutionized the study of stars, interstellar space, and the history of dust in the Galaxy. These stardust grains have exotic isotopic compositions that are records of nucleosynthetic processes that occurred in the depths of their now extinct parent stars. Moreover, the chemical compositions and mineralogies of silicate stardust are consequences of the physical and chemical nature of the stellar condensation environment, as well as secondary alteration processes that can occur in interstellar space, the solar nebula, and on the asteroid or comet parent body in which they were incorporated. In this talk I will discuss our use of advanced nano-scale instrumentation in the laboratory to conduct coordinated isotopic, chemical, and mineralogical analyses of silicate stardust grains from AGB stars, supernovae, and novae. By analyzing the isotopic compositions of multiple elements in individual grains, we have been able to constrain their stellar sources, explore stellar nucleosynthetic and mixing processes, and Galactic chemical evolution. Through our mineralogical studies, we have found these presolar silicate grains to have wide-ranging chemical and mineral characteristics. This diversity is the result of primary condensation characteristics and in some cases secondary features imparted by alteration in space and in our Solar System. The laboratory analysis of actual samples of stars directly complements astronomical observations and astrophysical models and offers an unprecedented level of detail into the lifecycles of dust in the Galaxy.

  5. Metal/Silicate Partitioning at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G.; Campbell, A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of siderophile elements during metal-silicate segregation, and their resulting distributions provide insight into core formation processes. Determination of partition coefficients allows the calculation of element distributions that can be compared to established values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Moderately siderophile elements, including W, are particularly useful in constraining core formation conditions because they are sensitive to variations in T, P, oxygen fugacity (fO2), and silicate composition. To constrain the effect of pressure on W metal/silicate partitioning, we performed experiments at high pressures and temperatures using a multi anvil press (MAP) at NASA Johnson Space Center and laser-heated diamond anvil cells (LHDAC) at the University of Maryland. Starting materials consisted of natural peridotite mixed with Fe and W metals. Pressure conditions in the MAP experiments ranged from 10 to 16 GPa at 2400 K. Pressures in the LHDAC experiments ranged from 26 to 58 GPa, and peak temperatures ranged up to 5000 K. LHDAC experimental run products were sectioned by focused ion beam (FIB) at NASA JSC. Run products were analyzed by electron microprobe using wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients for W were calculated from element abundances determined by microprobe analyses, and corrected to a common fO2 condition of IW-2 assuming +4 valence for W. Within analytical uncertainties, W partitioning shows a flat trend with increasing pressure from 10 to 16 GPa. At higher pressures, W becomes more siderophile, with an increase in partition coefficient of approximately 0.5 log units.

  6. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4), as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K), the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel), silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide), and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4) in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation)-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources. PMID:23298332

  7. Effect of silicate modulus and metakaolin incorporation on the carbonation of alkali silicate-activated slags

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Susan A.; Mejia de Gutierrez, Ruby; Provis, John L.; Rose, Volker

    2010-06-15

    Accelerated carbonation is induced in pastes and mortars produced from alkali silicate-activated granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS)-metakaolin (MK) blends, by exposure to CO{sub 2}-rich gas atmospheres. Uncarbonated specimens show compressive strengths of up to 63 MPa after 28 days of curing when GBFS is used as the sole binder, and this decreases by 40-50% upon complete carbonation. The final strength of carbonated samples is largely independent of the extent of metakaolin incorporation up to 20%. Increasing the metakaolin content of the binder leads to a reduction in mechanical strength, more rapid carbonation, and an increase in capillary sorptivity. A higher susceptibility to carbonation is identified when activation is carried out with a lower solution modulus (SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O ratio) in metakaolin-free samples, but this trend is reversed when metakaolin is added due to the formation of secondary aluminosilicate phases. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffractometry of uncarbonated paste samples shows that the main reaction products in alkali-activated GBFS/MK blends are C-S-H gels, and aluminosilicates with a zeolitic (gismondine) structure. The main crystalline carbonation products are calcite in all samples and trona only in samples containing no metakaolin, with carbonation taking place in the C-S-H gels of all samples, and involving the free Na{sup +} present in the pore solution of the metakaolin-free samples. Samples containing metakaolin do not appear to have the same availability of Na{sup +} for carbonation, indicating that this is more effectively bound in the presence of a secondary aluminosilicate gel phase. It is clear that claims of exceptional carbonation resistance in alkali-activated binders are not universally true, but by developing a fuller mechanistic understanding of this process, it will certainly be possible to improve performance in this area.

  8. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  9. Holmium laser enucleation versus simple prostatectomy for treating large prostates: Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patrick; Alzweri, Laith; Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Somani, Bhaskar K.; Bates, Chris; Aboumarzouk, Omar M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare and evaluate the safety and efficacy of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) and simple prostatectomy for large prostate burdens, as discussion and debate continue about the optimal surgical intervention for this common pathology. Materials and methods A systematic search was conducted for studies comparing HoLEP with simple prostatectomy [open (OP), robot-assisted, laparoscopic] using a sensitive strategy and in accordance with Cochrane collaboration guidelines. Primary parameters of interest were objective measurements including maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) and post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and subjective outcomes including International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and quality of life (QoL). Secondary outcomes of interest included volume of tissue retrieved, catheterisation time, hospital stay, blood loss and serum sodium decrease. Data on baseline characteristics and complications were also collected. Where possible, comparable data were combined and meta-analysis was conducted. Results In all, 310 articles were identified and after screening abstracts (114) and full manuscripts (14), three randomised studies (263 patients) were included, which met our pre-defined inclusion criteria. All these compared HoLEP with OP. The mean transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) volume was 113.9 mL in the HoLEP group and 119.4 mL in the OP group. There was no statistically significant difference in Qmax, PVR, IPSS and QoL at 12 and 24 months between the two interventions. OP was associated with a significantly shorter operative time (P = 0.01) and greater tissue retrieved (P < 0.001). However, with HoLEP there was significantly less blood loss (P < 0.001), patients had a shorter hospital stay (P = 0.03), and were catheterised for significantly fewer hours (P = 0.01). There were no significant differences in the total number of complications recorded amongst HoLEP and OP (P = 0.80). Conclusion The results of the meta

  10. Introducing holmium laser enucleation of the prostate alongside transurethral resection of the prostate improves outcomes of each procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, N; Acher, P; Lodge, R; Young, A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is recognised as an alternative to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). HoLEP has been demonstrated to be at least as effective as TURP with less morbidity but its introduction to practice has been limited in part by the learning curve of a novel procedure. This study examined the effects of introducing HoLEP alongside an established practice of TURP on early morbidity and length of hospital stay (LOS). Methods A retrospective review of all patients who underwent HoLEP and TURP between April 2007 and July 2011 was undertaken. HoLEP was introduced in April 2008; patients undergoing TURP before this were considered as a historical control group. Data were collected concerning resection/enucleation weight, blood transfusions and LOS. Results Overall, 772 patients underwent HoLEP or TURP within the 52-month study period: 164 underwent TURP prior to the introduction of HoLEP (TURP-A), 425 had TURP after the introduction of HoLEP (TURP-B) and 183 underwent HoLEP. The mean removed weight was 24g (standard deviation [SD]: 21g) for TURP-A, 19g for TURP-B (SD: 16g) and 38g (SD: 32g) for HoLEP (p<0.005). Blood transfusion rates were 5.5%, 2.2% and 1.6% for the TURP-A, TURP-B and HoLEP groups respectively (p<0.05). For TURP-A patients, the mean LOS was 5.6 days (SD: 3.5 days, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3–6.0 days). The mean LOS for TURP-B patients was 4.4 days (SD: 4.4 days, 95% CI: 4.2–4.8 days). HoLEP patients had a mean LOS of 3.0 days (SD: 3.0 days, 95% CI: 2.6–3.4 days). Conclusions The introduction of HoLEP alongside TURP is associated with lower rates of blood transfusion and shorter LOS for all patients. This is likely to be due to the use of HoLEP rather than TURP in patients with larger prostates, who are more likely to have complications. PMID:23838502

  11. Modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi: A single-surgeon experience of 382 cases

    PubMed Central

    YAN, ZEJUN; XIE, GUOHAI; YUAN, HESHENG; CHENG, YUE

    2015-01-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi, a retrospective chart review of a single surgeon's 3-year modular flexible ureteroscopy experience was performed. All of the patients were treated with modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy by a single surgeon. Stone-free status was defined as no fragments or a single fragment ≤4 mm in diameter at the 3-month follow-up. The procedure number, operative time, stone-free rates, repeat usage of the multilumen catheter, and perioperative complications were documented. The present study included 215 male patients and 167 female patients, with an average age of 48.5±13.7 years (range, 17–84 years). The mean stone size was 11.5±4.1 mm (range, 4–28 mm), and the mean total stone burden was 17.5±5.7 mm (range 15–46 mm). A total of 305 patients (79.8%) had a stone burden ≤20 mm, and 77 patients (20.2%) had a stone burden >20 mm. The mean number of primary procedures was 1.3±0.2 (range, 1–3). The stone-free rate following the first and the second procedure was 73.4 and 86.9%, respectively. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 3.1±1.2 days (range, 2–6 days). The highest clearance rates were observed for proximal ureteral stones (100%) and renal pelvic stones (88.7%), whereas the lowest clearance rates were observed for lower calyx stones (76.7%) and multiple calyx stones (77.8%). The higher the initial stone burden, the lower the postoperative stone-free rate (≤20 vs. >20 mm; 89.8 vs. 75.3%). The overall complication rate was 8.1%. The results of the present study suggest that modular flexible ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy may be considered the primary method for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi in select patients, due to its acceptable efficacy, low morbidity, and relatively low maintenance costs. PMID:26622508

  12. The solubility of gold in silicate melts: First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, A.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of oxygen fugacity and temperature on the solubility of Au in silicate melts were determined. Pd-Au alloys were equilibrated with silicate of anorthite-diopside eutectic composition at different T-fO2 conditions. The behavior of Au was found to be similar to that of Pd reported recently. Au solubilities for alloys with 30 to 40 at. percent Au decrease at 1400 C from 12 ppm in air to 160 ppb at a log fO2 = -8.7. The slope of the log(Me-solubility) vs. log(fO2) curve is close to 1/4 for Au and the simultaneously determined Pd suggesting a formal valence of Au and Pd of 1+. Near the IW buffer Pd and Au solubilities become even less dependent on fO2 perhaps reflecting the presence of some metallic Au and Pd.

  13. LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

  14. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-02-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal.

  15. EXAFS studies of uranium sorption on layer-silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Viani, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    The local structure of uranium sorbed on mineral surfaces was investigated by uranium L{sub 3}-edge EXAFS. Solutions of uranyl chloride, UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, were exposed to vermiculite, an expansible layer silicate mineral, under conditions which favor sorption by either cation exchange or surface complexation. EXAFS of the resulting mineral samples indicates a larger distortion of the uranyl equatorial shell for cation exchange, possibly due to steric effects of interlayer sorption. The uranyl U-O axial bond distance is greater for surface complexation than for ion exchange. Uranyl sorption on talc and pyrophyllite, layer silicate minerals with essentially no cation-exchange capacity, gives results which generally support the trends for surface complexation on vermiculite.

  16. Electroosmotic Pumps with Frits Synthesized from Potassium Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumps employing silica frits synthesized from potassium silicate as a stationary phase show strong electroosmotic flow velocity and resistance to pressure-driven flow. We characterize these pumps and measure an electroosmotic mobility of 2.5×10-8 m2/V s and hydrodynamic resistance per unit length of 70 ×1017 Pa s/m4 with a standard deviation of less than 2% even when varying the amount of water used in the potassium silicate mixture. Furthermore, we demonstrate the simple integration of these pumps into a proof-of-concept PDMS lab-on-a-chip device fabricated from a 3D-printed template. PMID:26629907

  17. Hydrous alteration of amorphous silicate smokes - First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Donn, B.; Deseife, R.; Donn, A.; Nelson, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results of the initial studies of the hydrous alteration of amorphous Mg-SiO smokes indicate that, although these materials readily adsorb water, the silicate structure is much more stable at 360 K than expected. Drastic changes in the relative absorption strengths of the 10- and 20-micron 'silicate' features that appear quite rapidly at 750 K were observed; these observations might have important implications for the interpretation of cometary dust spectra. Observations of the development of 3.4-3.5 micron features possibly due to hydrocarbons in the spectra of processed Mg-SiO smokes have raised the exciting possibility that these amorphous condensates could act as Fischer-Tropsch type catalysts to produce hydrocarbons in the primitive solar nebula.

  18. Loss of halogens from crystallized and glassy silicic volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, D.C.; Smith, V.C.; Peck, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-four F and Cl analyses of silicic welded tuffs and lavas and glass separates are presented. Comparison of the F and Cl contents of crystallized rocks with those of nonhydrated glass and hydrated glassy rocks from the same rock units shows that most of the halogens originally present were lost on crystallization. An average of about half of the F and four-fifths of the Cl originally present was lost. Analyses of hydrated natural glasses and of glassy rocks indicate that in some cases significant amounts of halogens may be removed from or added to hydrated glass through prolonged contact with ground water. The data show that the original halogen contents of the groundmass of a silicic volcanic rock can be reliably determined only from nonhydrated glass. ?? 1967.

  19. Carbon and silicate dust formation in V1280 Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Sako, S.; Oanaka, T.; Nozawa, T.; Kimura, Y.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Shimonishi, T.; Usui, F.; Takahashi, H.; Ohsawa, R.; Arai, A.; Uemura, M.; Nagayama, T.; Koo, B.-C.; Kozasa, T.

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the temporal evolution of the infrared emission from the dusty nova V1280 Sco over 2000 days from the outburst. We have revealed that the infrared spectral energy distributions at 1272, 1616 and 1947 days are explained by the emissions produced by amorphous carbon dust of mass (6.6-8.7) × 10-8 Mʘ with a representative grain size of 0.01 µm and astronomical silicate dust of mass (3.4-4.3) × 10-7 Mʘ with a representative grain size of 0.3-0.5 µm. Both of carbon and silicate dust travel farther away from the white dwarf without an apparent mass evolution throughout those later epochs.

  20. Structural characterization of gel-derived calcium silicate systems.

    PubMed

    Meiszterics, Anikó; Rosta, László; Peterlik, Herwig; Rohonczy, János; Kubuki, Shiro; Henits, Péter; Sinkó, Katalin

    2010-09-30

    The main aim of this study is to synthesize calcium silicate ceramics that exhibit suitable properties to be used for biomedical applications. In the present work, attention was paid to the understanding of processing-structure relationships. A particular effort was made to clarify the identification of Ca-O-Si bonds by means of spectroscopy. The calcium silicate systems were prepared via a sol-gel route, varying the chemical compositions, the catalyst concentration, and the temperature and time of aging and heat treatment. The processes and the phases evolved during the sol-gel procedure were determined. The bond systems were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and (29)Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and the aggregate structures by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. PMID:20828114

  1. Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms of Polymer-Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcup, Jason; Yee, Albert

    1998-03-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of a series of nanocomposites comprising polyamide, silicate and in some cases rubber has been studied. Mechanical properties including Young modulus and fracture toughness were measured and it was found that compared to conventional composites, the nanocomposites exhibited far greater improvement in properties over the neat matrix for a given silicate fraction. It was also found that the addition of the rubber phase produced an increase in toughness. The arrested crack tip process zone was obtained using the Double Notch Four Point Bend test geometry and the process zone morphology was studied using TEM and TOM. Fracture surfaces were probed with XEDS and SEM. The use of these techniques enabled the mechanisms which occur during fracture to be studied and related to the mechanical properties and toughening of these materials.

  2. Metal silicate mixtures - Spectral properties and applications to asteroid taxonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutis, Edward A.; Smith, Dorian G. W.; Lambert, Richard St. J.; Gaffey, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of combinations of olivine, orthopyroxene, and iron meteorite metal are experimentally studied, and the obtained variations in spectral properties are used to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the assemblages. The presence of metal most noticeably affects band area ratios, peak-to-peak and peak-to-minimum reflectance ratios, and band widths. Band width and band areas are useful for determining metal abundance in olivine and metal and orthopyroxene and metal assemblages, respectively. Mafic silicate grain size variations are best determined using band depth criteria. Band centers are most useful for determining mafic silicate composition. An application of these parameters to the S-class asteroid Flora is presented.

  3. Silicic acid biogeochemistry in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-05-01

    Silicon is an essential nutrient for the growth of siliceous phytoplankton, which accounts for a significant amount of marine primary production. Constraints on silicic acid limit primary production and carbon export, so biogeochemical silicon cycling influences the carbon cycle and climate. Silicon cycling has been studied mostly in iron-limited regions of the ocean, and not much is known about the effects of iron availability on silicon cycling in coastal upwelling systems. Pichevin et al. investigated nutrient profiles and sedimentary records from the Gulf of California, which is not limited by iron year-round. They found that iron limitation even in this type of setting is an important factor in silicon cycling in coastal upwelling regions. (Paleoceanography, doi:10.1029/2011PA002237, 2012)

  4. Calc-silicate mineralization in active geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; McDowell, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    The detailed study of calc-silicate mineral zones and coexisting phase relations in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system were used as examples for thermodynamic evaluation of phase relations among minerals of variable composition and to calculate the chemical characteristics of hydrothermal solutions compatible with the observed calc-silicate assemblages. In general there is a close correlation between calculated and observed fluid compositions. Calculated fugacities of O{sub 2} at about 320{degrees}C in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system are about five orders of magnitude less than that at the nearby Salton Sea geothermal system. This observation is consistent with the occurrence of Fe{sup 3+} rich epidotes in the latter system and the presence of prehnite at Cerro Prieto.

  5. Osmium Solubility in Silicate Melts: New Efforts and New Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, A.; Walker, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a recent paper, Borisov and Palme reported the first experimental results on the partitioning of Os between metal (Ni-rich OsNi alloys) and silicate melt of anorthite-diopside eutectic composition at 1400 C and 1 atm total pressure and and at function of O2 from 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -12) atm. Experiments were done by equilibrating OsNi metal loops with silicate melt. Metal and glass were analyzed separately by INAA. D(sup 0s) ranged from 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7), which is inconsistent with core/ mantle equilibrium for HSEs and favors the late veneer hypothesis. Unfortunately, there was practically no function of O2 dependence of Os partitioning, and the scatter of experimental results was quite serious, so the formation of Os nuggets was suspected. This new set of experiments was specifically designed to avoid of at least minimize the nugget problem

  6. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers

    PubMed Central

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal. PMID:25695377

  7. Analysis of the Barrier Properties of Polyimide-Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi; Johnston, J. Chris; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda; Silverman, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Montmorillonite clay was organically modified and dispersed into a thermoplastic (BPADA-BAPP) and a thermosetting (PMR-15) polyimide matrix. The barrier properties of the neat resins and the nanocomposites were evaluated. Reductions in gas permeability and water absorption were observed in thermoplastic polyimide nanocomposites. The thermosetting polyimide showed a reduction in weight loss during isothermal aging at 288 C. Carbon fabric (T650-35, 8 HS, 8 ply) composites were prepared using both the BPADE-BAPP and PMR-15 based nanocomposites. Dispersion of the layered silicate in the BPADA-BAPP matrix reduced helium permeability by up to 70 percent. The PMR-15/ silicate nanocomposite matrix had an increase in thermal oxidative stability of up to 25 percent.

  8. Thermochemistry of Rare Earth Silicates for Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are promising candidates as environmental protective coatings (EBCs) for silica-forming ceramics and composites in combustion environments since they are predicted to have lower reactivity with the water vapor combustion products. The reactivity of rare earth silicates is assessed by the thermodynamic activity of the silica component which is best measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). Here, we discuss a novel method based on a reducing agent to increase the partial pressure of SiO(g) which is then used to calculate thermodynamic activity of silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems. After the KEMS measurements, samples were probed by X-ray diffraction and their phase content was calculated from Rietveld refinement.

  9. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers.

    PubMed

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal. PMID:25695377

  10. Siliceous sedimentary rock-hosted ores and petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Geological, biological, oceanographic, and geochemical principles involved in forming mineral deposits associated with siliceous rocks are integrated in this collection. The book emerged from a decade of research by 142 scientists from 33 countries who worked with the International Geological Correlations Project under editor James R. Hein. It reveals how several economic ores and petroleum were formed in siliceous sediments in coastal ocean basins. This collection places each ore-deposit type into a genetic model emphasizing coastal upwelling; displays all chert occurrences on paleographic maps for each period of the Phanerozoic; covers phosphate, uranium, diatomite, manganese, iron, barite, and petroleum deposits; and gives the first evidence of a bacterially mediated, diagenetic origin for manganese deposits.

  11. An experimental investigation of the condensation of silicate grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, K. L.; Donn, B.

    1978-01-01

    Amorphous magnesium silicate smoke particles were condensed from hydrogen and argon atmospheres containing Mg and Si0. A wide range of initial compositions were observed but all particles could be recrystallized into forsterite (Mg2Si04), by heating to 1000 C in vacuum. The amount of smoke formed decreased rapidly with temperatures between 300 and 800 K at reactant partial pressures of about 1 torr.

  12. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  13. Optical properties of silicates in the far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamy, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Near-normal incidence reflectance measurements in the interval 1026-1640 A were performed on four silicates already studied in the visible and infrared. A Kramers-Kronig analysis of these data is used to calculate the complex index of refraction m = n - ik. New transmission measurements improve the determination of k in the interval 2500-4500 A, except for andesite, which is more opaque than had been previously observed.

  14. DIRECT LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF SILICATE STARDUST FROM RED GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, Christian; Hoppe, Peter; Brenker, Frank E.

    2009-07-20

    We performed combined focused ion beam/transmission electron microscopy studies to investigate the chemistry and structure of eight presolar silicate grains that were previously detected by NanoSIMS oxygen isotope mapping of the carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. The analyzed presolar silicates belong to the O isotope Groups I/II ({sup 17}O-enriched and {sup 18}O-depleted) and therefore come from 1-2.5 M{sub sun} asymptotic giant branch stars of close-to-solar or slightly lower-than-solar metallicity. Three grains are amorphous, Mg-rich, and show a variable, but more pyroxene-like composition. Most probably, these grains have formed under circumstellar low-temperature conditions below the crystallization temperature. Three grains are Fe-bearing glasses similar to the 'glass with embedded metal and sulfides' (GEMS) grains found in interplanetary dust particles. However, two of the meteorite GEMS grains from this study lack comparatively large ({approx}>20 nm) Fe-rich inclusions and have sulfur contents <1 at.%, which is different than observed for the majority of GEMS grains. These grains likely condensed under strong non-equilibrium conditions from an Si-enriched gas. One olivine is characterized by a crystalline core and an amorphous, more Fe-rich rim, which is probably the result of interstellar medium sputtering combined with Mg removal. The detection of another olivine with a relatively high Fe content (Mg no. 0.9) shows that circumstellar crystalline silicates are more Fe-rich than astrophysical models usually suggest. The overall predominance of olivine among the crystalline silicate stardust population compared to pyroxene indicates preferential formation or survival of this type of mineral. As pyroxene is indeed detected in circumstellar outflows, it remains to be seen how this result is compatible with astrophysical observations and experimental data.

  15. Sulfur Solubility In Silicate Melts: A Thermochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, R.; Ottonello, G.

    A termochemical model for calculating sulfur solubility of simple and complex silicate melts has been developed in the framework of the Toop-Samis polymeric approach combined with a Flood - Grjotheim theoretical treatment of silicate slags [1,2]. The model allows one to compute sulfide and sulfate content of silicate melts whenever fugacity of gaseous sulphur is provided. "Electrically equivalent ion fractions" are needed to weigh the contribution of the various disproportion reactions of the type: MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas MSmelt+1/2O2 ,gas (1) MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas + 3/2O2 ,gas MSO4 ,melt (2) Eqs. 1 and 2 account for the oxide-sulfide and the oxide-sulfate disproportiona- tion in silicate melt. Electrically equivalent ion fractions are computed, in a fused salt Temkin notation, over the appropriate matrixes (anionic and cationic). The extension of such matrixes is calculated in the framework of a polymeric model previously developed [1,2,3] and based on a parameterization of acid-base properties of melts. No adjustable parameters are used and model activities follow the raoultian behavior implicit in the ion matrix solution of the Temkin notation. The model is based on a huge amount of data available in literature and displays a high heuristic capability with virtually no compositional limits, as long as the structural role assigned to each oxide holds. REFERENCES: [1] Ottonello G., Moretti R., Marini L. and Vetuschi Zuccolini M. (2001), Chem. Geol., 174, 157-179. [2] Moretti R. (2002) PhD Thesis, University of Pisa. [3] Ottonello G. (2001) J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 282, 72-85.

  16. Effect of mechanical treatment on the silicate lattice of kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulumyan, N. H.; Papakhchyan, L. R.; Isahakyan, A. R.; Beglaryan, H. A.; Aloyan, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray diffraction, differential thermal and chemical analysis have been used to investigate the effect of mechanical treatment on the crystalline lattice of kaolinite. It was established that mechanical treatment leads to amorphization of the mineral and the release of hydroxyl water, but the continuity of kaolinite's silicate lattice remains intact despite certain deformations, and the phase transformations of the mineral thus occur without any noticeable change in temperature.

  17. Lead silicate microstructured optical fibres for electro-optical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen Qi; Manning, Sean; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Monro, Tanya M

    2013-12-16

    We report progress towards the realization of optical modulators based on electro-optic effects in soft glass fibres. A hybrid fabrication procedure was developed for producing microstructured lead silicate glass fibres with internal electrodes. Electro-optical characterization confirms experimentally that the enhanced nonlinear properties and superior isolation between the optical field and the electrodes make these fibres an ideal candidate platform for efficient electro-optical devices. PMID:24514705

  18. Rapid determination of nanogram amounts of tellurium in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1976-01-01

    A hydride-generation flameless atomic-absorption technique is used to determine as little as 5 ng g-1 tellurium in 0.25 g of silicate rock. After acid decomposition of the sample, tellurium hydride is generated with sodium borohydride and the vapor passed directly to a resistance-heated quartz cell mounted in an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer. Analyses of 11 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks are presented. ?? 1976.

  19. Method 366.0 Determination of Dissolved Silicate in Estuarine and Coastal Watersby Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides a procedure for the determination of dissolved silicate concentration in estuarine and coastal waters. The dissolved silicate is mainly in the form of silicic acid, H SiO , in estuarine and 4 4 coastal waters. All soluble silicate, including colloidal silici...

  20. Silicate bonding properties: Investigation through thermal conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzini, M.; Cesarini, E.; Cagnoli, G.; Campagna, E.; Haughian, K.; Hough, J.; Losurdo, G.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I.; Piergiovanni, F.; Reid, S.; Rowan, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vetrano, F.

    2010-05-01

    A direct approach to reduce the thermal noise contribution to the sensitivity limit of a GW interferometric detector is the cryogenic cooling of the mirrors and mirrors suspensions. Future generations of detectors are foreseen to implement this solution. Silicon has been proposed as a candidate material, thanks to its very low intrinsic loss angle at low temperatures and due to its very high thermal conductivity, allowing the heat deposited in the mirrors by high power lasers to be efficiently extracted. To accomplish such a scheme, both mirror masses and suspension elements must be made of silicon, then bonded together forming a quasi-monolithic stage. Elements can be assembled using hydroxide-catalysis silicate bonding, as for silica monolithic joints. The effect of Si to Si bonding on suspension thermal conductance has therefore to be experimentally studied. A measurement of the effect of silicate bonding on thermal conductance carried out on 1 inch thick silicon bonded samples, from room temperature down to 77 K, is reported. In the explored temperature range, the silicate bonding does not seem to affect in a relevant way the sample conductance.

  1. Translational dynamics of water in a nanoporous layered silicate

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Sankar; Chowdhuri, Zema; Peral, Inmaculada; Neumann, Dan A.; Dickinson, L. Charles; Tompsett, Geoffrey; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Neutron time-of-flight and backscattering spectroscopy have been used to study the translational diffusion of water molecules in the unusual layered material AMH-3, which consists of (zeolitelike) three-dimensionally nanoporous silicate layers spaced by (claylike) interlayer regions. The synthesis of AMH-3 and its characterization by {sup 29}Si NMR, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy, are described. An analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra using the random jump diffusion model reveals two translational diffusive motions clearly separated in time scales: a fast process (D{approx}10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s at 300 K), and a much slower process (D{approx}10{sup -11} m{sup 2}/s at 300 K). Considering the structural model of AMH-3 and the transport properties extracted from the QENS data, it is suggested that the slower motion corresponds to diffusion by water molecules in the interlayer spaces whereas the fast process involves diffusion in the silicate layer. This first investigation of transport phenomena in nanoporous layered silicates like AMH-3 indicates that they have the potential to offer mass transport properties different from zeolite materials and layered clays.

  2. Grasslands, silicate weathering and diatoms: Cause and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.K. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Diatoms are silica-limited, photosynthetic, single-celled eukaryotes that today occupy a wide variety of habitats both in freshwater and marine environments. Ultimately the silica they use is derived from the weathering of silicates on land. Although marine diatoms first appear in the Jurassic, the fossil record shows a remarkable correlation between the Mid-Miocene appearance of widespread grasslands and the drastic increase in diatom-rich deposits in freshwater, as well as in marine environments throughout the world. Grasses actively weather silicates, accumulating soluble silica into their leaves. Decomposing grasses release this soluble silica into the soil from whence it is transported into lakes and oceans and made available to diatoms. Grasses also probably increased chemical weathering, and hence the release of soluble silica, in previously weakly vegetated semi-arid areas. Increased weathering of silicates also led to cooler climates as evidenced by the Mid-Miocene [delta][sup 18]O record. The author suggests that the Tertiary expansion of grasslands is responsible for the explosive increase in diversity and abundance of diatoms in the oceans and freshwaters of the Mid-Miocene.

  3. Contrasting siliceous replacement mineralization, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.D.; Ilchik, R.P. . Dept. of Geosciences); Seedorff, C.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Fine-grained siliceous replacement of carbonate-bearing rocks (jasperoid) occurs in most mineral districts in east-central Nevada. In most of these occurrences, jasperoid contains Au and(or) Ag and little or no base metals, although concentrations and ratios vary significantly. Broadly, two end-members are distinguished: (1) silicification as an intermediate- to late-stage part of complex alteration associated with igneous centers, and (2) jasperoids lacking other associated alteration and having few or no associated igneous rocks. Within this region, siliceous replacements are found with all metallic ([+-] magmatic) suites. No single factor in these occurrences relates the distribution, metal contents, fluid geochemistry, igneous rocks and associated alteration. Summarizing these characteristics: geochemical and fluid inclusion evidence shows that fluids in igneous-related jasperoids can be high-salinity magmatic (Ely), low-salinity magmatic (McCullough Butte), or metoric (Ward). Fluids in igneous-poor systems are low-salinity, exchanged meteoric waters from which a minor magmatic component can not be excluded. At this level of detail, the best predictor of Ag:Au are the district-scale alteration characteristics. Siliceous replacement takes place in many kinds systems and probably requires no more than a cooling, mildly acidic hydrothermal fluid. Metal suites, other fluid characteristics, and geological environment all need to be considered in evaluating the significance of any jasperoid.

  4. Proton tunneling in low dimensional cesium silicate LDS-1.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Kei; Mochizuki, Dai; Osada, Shimon; Asakura, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2015-07-14

    In low dimensional cesium silicate LDS-1 (monoclinic phase of CsHSi2O5), anomalous infrared absorption bands observed at 93, 155, 1210, and 1220 cm(-1) are assigned to the vibrational mode of protons, which contribute to the strong hydrogen bonding between terminal oxygen atoms of silicate chain (O-O distance = 2.45 Å). The integrated absorbance (oscillator strength) for those modes is drastically enhanced at low temperatures. The analysis of integrated absorbance employing two different anharmonic double-minimum potentials makes clear that proton tunneling through the potential barrier yields an energy splitting of the ground state. The absorption bands at 93 and 155 cm(-1), which correspond to the different vibrational modes of protons, are attributed to the optical transition between the splitting levels (excitation from the ground state (n = 0) to the first excited state (n = 1)). Moreover, the absorption bands at 1210 and 1220 cm(-1) are identified as the optical transition from the ground state (n = 0) to the third excited state (n = 3). Weak Coulomb interactions in between the adjacent protons generate two types of vibrational modes: symmetric mode (93 and 1210 cm(-1)) and asymmetric mode (155 and 1220 cm(-1)). The broad absorption at 100-600 cm(-1) reveals an emergence of collective mode due to the vibration of silicate chain coupled not only with the local oscillation of Cs(+) but also with the proton oscillation relevant to the second excited state (n = 2). PMID:26178114

  5. Translational dynamics of water in a nanoporous layered silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Sankar; Chowdhuri, Zema; Peral, Inmaculada; Neumann, Dan A.; Dickinson, L. Charles; Tompsett, Geoffrey; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Neutron time-of-flight and backscattering spectroscopy have been used to study the translational diffusion of water molecules in the unusual layered material AMH-3, which consists of (zeolitelike) three-dimensionally nanoporous silicate layers spaced by (claylike) interlayer regions. The synthesis of AMH-3 and its characterization by Si29 NMR, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy, are described. An analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra using the random jump diffusion model reveals two translational diffusive motions clearly separated in time scales: a fast process ( Dtilde 10-9m2/s at 300 K), and a much slower process ( Dtilde 10-11m2/s at 300 K). Considering the structural model of AMH-3 and the transport properties extracted from the QENS data, it is suggested that the slower motion corresponds to diffusion by water molecules in the interlayer spaces whereas the fast process involves diffusion in the silicate layer. This first investigation of transport phenomena in nanoporous layered silicates like AMH-3 indicates that they have the potential to offer mass transport properties different from zeolite materials and layered clays.

  6. In vitro studies of calcium phosphate silicate bone cements.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuxin; Ma, Jingzhi; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Ruse, N Dorin; Yang, Quanzu; Troczynski, Tom

    2013-02-01

    A novel calcium phosphate silicate bone cement (CPSC) was synthesized in a process, in which nanocomposite forms in situ between calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel and hydroxyapatite (HAP). The cement powder consists of tricalcium silicate (C(3)S) and calcium phosphate monobasic (CPM). During cement setting, C(3)S hydrates to produce C-S-H and calcium hydroxide (CH); CPM reacts with the CH to precipitate HAP in situ within C-S-H. This process, largely removing CH from the set cement, enhances its biocompatibility and bioactivity. The testing results of cell culture confirmed that the biocompatibility of CPSC was improved as compared to pure C(3)S. The results of XRD and SEM characterizations showed that CPSC paste induced formation of HAP layer after immersion in simulated body fluid for 7 days, suggesting that CPSC was bioactive in vitro. CPSC cement, which has good biocompatibility and low/no cytotoxicity, could be a promising candidate as biomedical cement. PMID:23114635

  7. Laboratory studies of actinide metal-silicate fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Actinide and Sm partition coefficients between silicate melt and several metallic phases have been measured. Under reducing conditions Si, Th, U and Pu can be reduced to metals from silicate melts and alloyed with a platinum-gold alloy. U and Pu enter a molten Pt-Si alloy with roughly equal affinity but U strongly partitions into the solid Pt. Th behaves qualitatively the same as Pu but is much less readily reduced than U, and Sm appears to remain unreduced. Experiments with Fe metal have shown that the partition coefficients of the actinides between Fe and silicate liquid are extremely low, suggesting a very low actinide concentration in planetary cores. Experiments show that platinum metals can efficiently fractionate actinides and fractionate actinides from lanthanides and this process may be relevant to the condensation behavior of these elements from the solar nebula. Pt-metal grains in Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions appear to be U-poor, although the sub-class of Zr-bearing Pt metals may have high U contents.

  8. Electrochemical Studies on Silicate and Bicarbonate Ions for Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohorich, Michael E.; Lamb, Joshua; Chandra, Dhanesh; Daemen, Jaak; Rebak, Raul B.

    2010-10-01

    Several types of carbon and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels are being considered for use in the underground reinforcement of the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. In this study, potentiodynamic polarization under reducing conditions was used to determine the corrosion rates (CRs) and passivity behavior of AISI 4340 steel using different combinations of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), in both pure water (PW) and simulated seawater (SW, 3.5 pct NaCl). These experiments were carried out to examine the potential inhibiting properties of the silicate or bicarbonate ions on the surface of the steel. The addition of sodium silicate to solution reduced the observed CR at room temperature to 19 μm/y at 0.005 M concentration and 7 μm/y at 0.025 M concentration in PW. The addition of sodium bicarbonate increased the CR from 84 μm/y (C = 0.1 M) to 455 μm/y (C = 1 M). These same behaviors were also observed at higher temperatures.

  9. (Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The first year of this three year renewal award has been used to continue data collection and analysis of thermal (Soret) diffusion in silicate liquid and explore the related process of thermal migration in subliquidus magmas and isothermal interdiffusion. Data collection efforts have been materially aided by advances in thermal insulation in the pressure media outside our pressurized cylindrical heaters. BaCO{sub 3} is very effective in protecting the pressure vessel core from thermal deterioration with the result that the heater inside and outside diameters can be substantially increased. This permits several charges to be run simultaneously in an axisymmetric cluster around a double or triple junction thermocouple which can measure axial thermal gradients in situ. Research during the past year has concentrated in four major areas: Modelling thermal diffusion in multi-component silicate liquids, Soret fractionation of major and minor chemical components, characterization of thermal diffusion in naturally-occurring magmas with an emphasis on volatile bearing rhyolitic melts, and the effects of thermal gradients on silicate magma in the melting interval.

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION BY MECHANOCHEMICAL CARBONATION OF MINERAL SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Nelson

    2004-04-01

    The University of Utah and the University of Idaho investigated the carbonation of silicate minerals by mechanochemical processing. This method uses intense grinding, and has the potential of being much less expensive than other methods of mineral sequestration. Tests were conducted in three types of grinding devices. In these tests, natural and synthetic silicate compounds were ground for varying times in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. A significant change takes place in the lizardite variety of serpentine after 15 to 20 minutes of intense grinding in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. The X-ray diffraction spectrum of lizardite thus treated was much different than that of the untreated mineral. This spectrum could not be identified as that of any natural or synthetic material. Laboratory analyses showed that small amounts of carbon are fixed by grinding lizardite, forsterite, and wollastonite (all naturally-occurring minerals), and synthetic magnesium silicate, in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. It was thus concluded that further investigation was warranted, and a follow-up proposal was submitted to the Department of Energy under solicitation number.

  11. Silicic Magma Genesis in Neogene Central Volcanoes in Northeast Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, S. E.; Troll, V. R.; Riishuus, M. S.; Burchardt, S.; Krumbholz, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report on a geological expedition to NE Iceland in August 2011. A comprehensive sample suite of intrusive and extrusive rocks, ranging from basaltic to silicic compositions, was collected from the Neogene silicic central volcanic complexes in the region between Borgarfjörður eystri and Loðmundarfjörður. The area contains the second-most voluminous occurrence of silicic rocks in Iceland, including caldera structures, inclined sheet swarms, extensive ignimbrite sheets, sub-volcanic rhyolites and silicic lava flows. Yet it is one of Iceland's geologically least known areas (c.f. Gústafsson, 1992; Martin & Sigmarsson, 2010; Burchardt et al., 2011). The voluminous occurrence of evolved rocks in Iceland (10-12 %) is very unusual for an ocean island or a mid-oceanic ridge, with a typical signal of magmatic bimodality, often called "Bunsen-Daly" compositional gap (e.g. Bunsen, 1851; Daly, 1925; Barth et al., 1939). The Bunsen-Daly Gap is a long-standing fundamental issue in petrology and difficult to reconcile with continuous fractional crystallization as a dominant process in magmatic differentiation (Bowen, 1928), implying that hydrothermal alteration and crustal melting may play a significant role. Our aim is to contribute to a solution of this issue by unravelling the occurrence of voluminous evolved rhyolites in NE Iceland. We will use a combined petrological, textural, experimental and in-situ isotope approach. We plan to perform major, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-He-O isotope geochemistry, as well as U/Pb and Ar/Ar geochronology on rocks and mineral separates. In addition, high pressure-temperature partial melting experiments aim to reproduce and further constrain natural processes. Using the combined data set we intend to produce a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of rhyolite petrogenesis, and of the temporal, structural and geochemical evolution of the silicic volcanism in NE Iceland. The chosen field area serves as a good analogue for active

  12. Compositional dependence of in vitro response to commercial silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlicka, Amy B.

    Materials are often incorporated into the human body, interacting with surrounding fluids, cells and tissues. The reactions that occur between a material and this surrounding biological system are not fundamentally understood. Basic knowledge of material biocompatibility and the controlling processes is lacking. This thesis examines material biocompatibility of a series of silicate-based glasses on a primary level determining cell response to material composition and durability. The silicate glass system studied included two BioglassRTM compositions with known biologically favorable response, two fiberglass compositions, with demonstrated 'not-unfavorable' in vitro response, a ternary soda-lime-silicate glass, a binary alkali silicate glass, and pure silica. Chemical durability was analyzed in three different fluids through solution analysis and material characterization. In vitro response to the substrates was observed. Cell behavior was then directly correlated to the material behavior in cell culture medium under the same conditions as the in vitro test, yet in the absence of cells. The effect of several physical and chemical surface treatments on substrates with predetermined biocompatible behavior was subsequently determined. The chemically durable glasses with no added B2O3 elicited similar cell response as the control polystyrene substrate. The addition of B2O3 resulted in polygonal cell shape and restricted cell proliferation. The non-durable glasses presented a dynamic surface to the cells, which did not adversely affect in vitro response. Extreme dissolution of the binary alkali silicate glass in conjunction with increased pH resulted in unfavorable cell response. Reaction of the Bioglass RTM compositions, producing a biologically favorable calcium-phosphate surface film, caused enhanced cell attachment and spreading. Surface energy increase due to sterilization procedures did not alter cellular response. Surface treatment procedures influencing substrate

  13. ON THE 10 mum SILICATE FEATURE IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Nikutta, Robert; Elitzur, Moshe; Lacy, Mark E-mail: moshe@pa.uky.ed

    2009-12-20

    The 10 mum silicate feature observed with Spitzer in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals some puzzling behavior. It (1) has been detected in emission in type 2 sources, (2) shows broad, flat-topped emission peaks shifted toward long wavelengths in several type 1 sources, and (3) is not seen in deep absorption in any source observed so far. We solve all three puzzles with our clumpy dust radiative transfer formalism. Addressing (1), we present the spectral energy distribution (SED) of SST1721+6012, the first type 2 quasar observed to show a clear 10 mum silicate feature in emission. Such emission arises in models of the AGN torus easily when its clumpy nature is taken into account. We constructed a large database of clumpy torus models and performed extensive fitting of the observed SED. We find that the cloud radial distribution varies as r {sup -1.5} and the torus contains 2-4 clouds along radial equatorial rays, each with optical depth at visual approx60-80. The source bolometric luminosity is approx3 x 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}. Our modeling suggests that approx<35% of objects with tori sharing these characteristics and geometry would have their central engines obscured. This relatively low obscuration probability can explain the clear appearance of the 10 mum emission feature in SST1721+6012 together with its rarity among other QSO2. Investigating (2), we also fitted the SED of PG1211+143, one of the first type 1 QSOs with a 10 mum silicate feature detected in emission. Together with other similar sources, this QSO appears to display an unusually broadened feature whose peak is shifted toward longer wavelengths. Although this led to suggestions of non-standard dust chemistry in these sources, our analysis fits such SEDs with standard galactic dust; the apparent peak shifts arise from simple radiative transfer effects. Regarding (3), we find additionally that the distribution of silicate feature strengths among clumpy torus models closely resembles the observed

  14. Development of 166Holmium-1,2 Propylene Di-amino Tetra (Methy1enephosphonicacid) as a Possible Bone Palliation Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zolghadri, Samaneh; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Yousefnia, Hassan; Bahrami-Samani, Ali; Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    166Holmium-1,2-propylene di-amino tetra (methy1enephosphonicacid) (166 Ho-PDTMP) complex was prepared successfully using an in-house synthesized PDTMP ligand and 166 HoCl 3 . Ho-166 chloride was obtained by thermal neutron irradiation (1 × 10 13 n/cm 2 /s) of natural Ho (NO 3 ) 3 samples (specific activity = 3-5 GBq/mg), dissolved in acidic media. Radiochemical purity of 166 Ho-PDTMP was checked by instant thin layer chromatography (>99%). Stability studies of the complex in the final preparation and in the presence of human serum were performed up to 72 h. The biodistribution of 166 Ho-PDTMP and 166 HoCl 3 in wild-type rats was checked in animal tissues up to 48 h. The produced 166 Ho-PDTMP properties suggest a possible new bone palliative therapeutic to overcome the metastatic bone pains. PMID:25191109

  15. Sub-100  fs passively mode-locked holmium-doped fiber oscillator operating at 2.06  μm.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Ruehl, Axel; Grosse-Wortmann, Uwe; Hartl, Ingmar

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate a simple and compact Holmium-doped fiber femtosecond oscillator, in-band pumped by a commercial Tm-doped fiber laser. The oscillator operates in the dispersion managed soliton regime at net zero intracavity dispersion and delivers >1  nJ pulse energy at 35 MHz repetition rate. The pulse duration directly at the oscillator output is 160 fs FWHM, close to the Fourier-limit of 145 fs FWHM. Using an additional nonlinear compressor stage, sub-100 fs FWHM pulse durations could be achieved. The nonlinear fiber compressor is implemented by a solid core highly nonlinear fiber for spectral broadening and a single mode fiber for pulse compression. PMID:25503015

  16. Enhanced cathodoluminescence from an amorphous AlN:holmium phosphor by co-doped Gd{sup +3} for optical devices applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maqbool, Muhammad; Kordesch, Martin E.; Kayani, A.

    2009-05-15

    Sputter-deposited thin films of amorphous AlN:Ho (1 at. %) emits in the green (549 nm) region of the visible spectrum under electron excitation. The addition of Gd (1 at. %) in the film enhances the green emission linearly after thermal activation at 900 deg. C for 40 min in a nitrogen atmosphere. The luminescence enhancement saturates when the gadolinium concentration reaches four times the holmium concentration. The optical bandgap of amorphous AlN is about 210 nm, so that the film is transparent in the ultraviolet, allowing us to observe the ultraviolet emission at 313 nm from Gd. No significant quenching of the Gd emission is observed. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra confirm the increasing concentration of Gd. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows no peaks other than those arising from the Si (111) substrate, confirming that the films are amorphous. The enhanced luminescence can be used to make high-efficiency optical devices.

  17. Holmium laser core through internal urethrotomy with explantation of UroLume stent. An ideal approach for a complicated posterior urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N P; Ansari, M S

    2004-05-01

    Although the UroLume wallstent has been proven effective in the treatment of recurrent urethral stricture, obstruction may recur in some cases. A likely cause of obstruction is hyperplastic tissue reaction, which may necessitate the removal of the stent. The hyperplastic tissue reaction may be severe, resulting in a completely obliterative stricture. Stent removal with a completely obliterative stricture and the stent in situ is a tedious job, as there is no lumen in which to place the laser fiber to cut the stent wires. We report on a patient in whom a UroLume urethral stent was placed one year ago for post-traumatic recurrent bulbomembranous urethral stricture. The stricture recurred in spite of the stent in place and the lumen was finally completely obliterated. A holmium laser was used for core through internal urethrotomy and the explantation of the stent. PMID:15147555

  18. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate With Percutaneous Nephrostomy Into the Transplanted Kidney in Patient With Severe Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia With Vesicoureteral Reflux - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nohara, Takahiro; Matsuyama, Satoko; Shima, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Seto, Chikashi

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old male, who had received renal transplantation 10 years before, was admitted to our hospital with urinary retention. The prostate volume was 169.2 ml. Furthermore, grade 5 vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was shown in the cystography. Holmium laser enucleation of prostate (HoLEP) was performed, and percutaneous nephrostomy to the transplanted kidney was performed simultaneously to prevent from severe perioperative infection. After that, renal graft function improved and no urinary retention reoccurred, although surgical repair against VUR was necessary 10 months after HoLEP. We conclude that surgical treatment for BPH after kidney transplantation should be strongly considered with care for infections. PMID:26793574

  19. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate With Percutaneous Nephrostomy Into the Transplanted Kidney in Patient With Severe Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia With Vesicoureteral Reflux – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nohara, Takahiro; Matsuyama, Satoko; Shima, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Seto, Chikashi

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old male, who had received renal transplantation 10 years before, was admitted to our hospital with urinary retention. The prostate volume was 169.2 ml. Furthermore, grade 5 vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was shown in the cystography. Holmium laser enucleation of prostate (HoLEP) was performed, and percutaneous nephrostomy to the transplanted kidney was performed simultaneously to prevent from severe perioperative infection. After that, renal graft function improved and no urinary retention reoccurred, although surgical repair against VUR was necessary 10 months after HoLEP. We conclude that surgical treatment for BPH after kidney transplantation should be strongly considered with care for infections. PMID:26793574

  20. Structural properties of a holmium iron carbide interstitial compound, Ho[sub 2]Fe[sub 17]C[sub 3-x

    SciTech Connect

    Bocelli, G.; Calestani, G. ); Leccabue, F.; Watts, B.E. ); Sanchez, J.L. )

    1993-01-01

    X-ray diffractometric studies were performed on a single-crystalline specimen of the Ho[sub 2]Fe[sub 17]C[sub 3-x] intermetallic alloy. Its crystal data (for x > 2) are a = 8.521 (2), c = 8.309 (2) [angstrom], V = 522.5 [angstrom][sup 3], hexagonal space group P6[sub 3]/mmc. The crystal structure, solved by direct methods, was refined to a final agreement factor R of 0.045. The atoms are distributed in two layers perpendicular to the z axis: while one is composed only of iron atoms forming regular hexagonal nets, the insertion of carbons in the second layer deforms the hexagonal nets which contain holmium atoms in their centers. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.