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Sample records for holmium silicates

  1. High-pressure synthesis and single-crystal structure refinement of gadolinium holmium silicate hydroxyapatite Gd{sub 4.33}Ho{sub 4.33}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chao; Liu Xiaoyang . E-mail: liuxy@jlu.edu.cn; Fleet, M.E.; Feng, Shouhua; Xu Ruren

    2006-07-15

    Single crystals of gadolinium holmium silicate hydroxyapatite Gd{sub 4.33}Ho{sub 4.33}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} have been synthesized at 2.0GPa and 1450 deg. C using a piston-cylinder-type high-pressure apparatus. The crystal symmetry by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis is hexagonal, space group P6{sub 3}/m (No. 176), with a=9.3142(5)A, c=6.7010(4)A, Z=1. Gadolinium and Ho are disordered over the two large cation positions, A(1) and A(2), and charge balance in this silicate apatite is maintained by cation vacancies in A(1). Two other apatite-structure crystals investigated have P3-bar and Imma symmetry, and represent either partially ordered Gd-Ho distributions or crystal strain induced during quenching.

  2. Holmium laser pumped with a neodymium laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.R.; Rabinovich, W.S.

    1991-07-30

    This patent describes a solid-state laser device. It comprises a holmium laser having a first host material doped with an amount of holmium ions sufficient to produce an output laser emission at about 3 {mu}m when the holmium ions in the holmium laser are pumped by a pump beam at a wavelength of about 1.1 {mu}m; and neodymium laser pump source means for supplying a pump beam to pump the holmium ions in the holmium laser at a wavelength of about 1.1 {mu}m.

  3. Metals fact sheet: Holmium/thulium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This article discusses the geology, exploitation, market, and applications of holmium and thulium. Holmium and thulium are important part in the development of specific laser technologies, x-ray film and high-temperature superconductors.

  4. Magnetic structure of holmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechan, M. J.; Stassis, C.

    1984-03-01

    The magnetic structure of high purity single crystals of holmium has been studied by neutron diffraction techniques. Although the general characteristics of the magnetic structure have been found to agree with earlier measurements, some discrepancies have been resolved and new features have been observed. The magnetic form factor has been measured and compared with relativistic atomic calculations. The low temperature structure (T<20 K) is that of a conical ferromagnet with wave vector (1/6)(2π/c) along the c axis. The basal plane moment is 9.7 μB and the c-axis ferromagnetic component is 1.6 μB at T=6 K. Bunching of the basal plane moments around the easy hexagonal direction has been observed below T=50 K. Evidence for asphericity in the magnetization density is presented and discussed. The wave vector of the basal plane modulation decreases monotonically with temperature in general accordance with the Elliott-Wedgewood theory. Several inflection points were observed, however, which correspond to commensurability with the chemical lattice. The measured temperature dependence of the c- and a-axis lattice constants shows significant magnetostriction. The possibility of a c-axis modulated moment is discussed.

  5. Early complications with the holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Stewart, Steven C.; Ruckle, Herbert C.; Poon, Michael W.

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to report early complications in our initial experience with the holmium laser in 133 patients. A retrospective study of patients undergoing endourological procedures with the holmium laser was performed. Complications included urinary tract infection (3), post-operative bradycardia (1), inverted T-waves (1), intractable flank pain (1), urinary retention (1), inability to access a lower pole calyx with a 365 micron fiber (9), stone migration (5), termination of procedure due to poor visualization (2). No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred. The holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. In our initial experience, the holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of genitourinary pathology. Use of laser fibers larger than 200 microns occasionally limit deflection into a lower pole or dependent calyx.

  6. Holmium:YAG surgical lasers.

    PubMed

    1995-03-01

    "Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG)" is the shorthand name for a family of solid-state lasers that use the doping element holmium in a laser crystal (e.g., YAG [yttrium-aluminum-garnet]) and that emit energy at approximately 2.1 microns. This wavelength is relatively new to medicine and has been used in laser surgery for only about the last six years. Like the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser when it was first used clinically, the Ho:YAG laser is poised for rapid and wide-spread use. Ho:YAG lasers, like CO2 lasers, offer precise cutting with minimal damage to adjacent tissue; however, unlike CO2 lasers, they also offer fiberoptic delivery (which is ideal for endoscopic use) and the ability to treat tissue in a liquid-filled environment (e.g., saline, blood). The initial specialty for which the Ho:YAG laser was used was arthroscopic surgery, especially diskectomy. Today, it is effectively used in many surgical specialties, including general surgery, urology, laparoscopy, neurosurgery, lithotripsy, angioplasty, orthopedic surgery (which includes procedures such as meniscectomy, bone sculpting [may also be performed in plastic surgery], and some experimental surgery, such as cartilage shrinking to tighten loose joints), and dentistry. Because of its broad range of potential applications, it has been called the "Swiss Army Knife" of lasers. High-powered Ho:YAG lasers, which enable surgeons to work more quickly and cut more smoothly, have been made available only within the last three years (units offering > 20 W) to 18 months (units offering > 60 W). Because of this rapid increase, high-powered units are still relatively expensive, and it is not yet clear whether maximum power outputs will continue to increase or whether the cost of higher-power units will begin to come down. Although low-power and high-power Ho:YAG lasers can be used for the same procedures, their different ranges of possible clinical techniques make them better suited to different applications: low-power units are

  7. Electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Yu M

    2000-06-30

    The electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms was studied by the method of extended crossing beams. The cross sections and the optical excitation functions were obtained for odd levels of Ho I, including the 22014 cm{sup -1} laser level. Over 99% of the atoms were shown to reside in the ground level prior to collisions with electrons. Also measured were the excitation cross sections for six even levels, which presumably participate in the formation of inversion population in a gas-discharge holmium vapour laser. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Spectrum of the holmium atom arising from bombardment of a tantalum surface by holmium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vasileva, E.K.; Morozov, S.N.

    1986-12-01

    The ion--photon emission spectrum of holmium has been recorded and investigated. It is shown that the appearance of so-called continuous radiation (CR) is due to excitation of the lower triplet system of terms.

  9. Holmium laser lithotripsy of bladder calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.

    1998-07-01

    Although the overall incidence of bladder calculi has been decreasing, it is still a significant disease affecting adults and children. Prior treatment options have included open cystolitholapaxy, blind lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and visual lithotripsy with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes. The holmium laser has been found to be extremely effective in the treatment of upper tract calculi. This technology has also been applied to the treatment of bladder calculi. We report our experience with the holmium laser in the treatment of bladder calculi. Twenty- five patients over a year and a half had their bladder calculi treated with the Holmium laser. This study was retrospective in nature. Patient demographics, stone burden, and intraoperative and post-operative complications were noted. The mean stone burden was 31 mm with a range of 10 to 60 mm. Preoperative diagnosis was made with either an ultrasound, plain film of the abdomen or intravenous pyelogram. Cystoscopy was then performed to confirm the presence and determine the size of the stone. The patients were then taken to the operating room and given a regional or general anesthetic. A rigid cystoscope was placed into the bladder and the bladder stone was then vaporized using the holmium laser. Remaining fragments were washed out. Adjunctive procedures were performed on 10 patients. These included transurethral resection of the prostate, transurethral incision of the prostate, optic internal urethrotomy, and incision of ureteroceles. No major complications occurred and all patients were rendered stone free. We conclude that the Holmium laser is an effective and safe modality for the treatment of bladder calculi. It was able to vaporize all bladder calculi and provides a single modality of treating other associated genitourinary pathology.

  10. Percutaneous holmium laser fulguration of calyceal diverticula.

    PubMed

    Alwaal, Amjad; Azhar, Raed A; Andonian, Sero

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Calyceal diverticular stones are uncommon findings that represent a challenge in their treatment, due to the technical difficulty in accessing the diverticulum, and the high risk of their recurrence. Current percutaneous technique for calyceal diverticular stones involves establishing a renal access, clearing the stone, and fulguration of the diverticular lining with a roller-ball cautery electrode using hypotonic irrigation solution such as sterile water or glycine solution which may be associated with the absorption of hypotonic fluids with its inherent electrolyte disturbances. Case Report. In this paper, we present for the first time percutaneous holmium laser fulguration of calyceal diverticula in 2 patients using normal saline. Their immediate postoperative sodium was unchanged and their follow-up imaging showed absence of stones. Both patients remain asymptomatic at 30 months post-operatively. Conclusion. This demonstrates that holmium laser is a safe alternative method to fulgurate the calyceal diverticulum after clearing the stone percutaneously. PMID:22606636

  11. Holmium laser for multifunctional use in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Graham M.; Shroff, Sunil; Thomas, Robert; Kellett, Michael

    1994-05-01

    The holmium laser pulsed at 350 microsecond cuts tissue and fragments calculi. It has been assessed for minimally invasive urological intervention. It is useful for partly excising and partly coagulating tumors, incising strictures and the obstructed PUJ. It partly drill and partly fragments urinary calculi however hard. Other lasers are more effective at any one particular application, but this laser is a useful compromise as a multifunctional device.

  12. Semiconductor disk laser-pumped subpicosecond holmium fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorovskiy, A Yu; Marakulin, A V; Leinonen, T; Kurkov, Andrei S; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2012-01-31

    The first passively mode-locked holmium fibre laser has been demonstrated, with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) as a mode locker. Semiconductor disk lasers have been used for the first time to pump holmium fibre lasers. We obtained 830-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 34 MHz with an average output power of 6.6 mW.

  13. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  14. Holmium fibre laser with record quantum efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Tsvetkov, V B; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A; Medvedkov, O I; Kosolapov, A F

    2011-06-30

    We report holmium-doped fibre lasers with a Ho{sup 3+} concentration of 1.6 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and lasing wavelengths of 2.02, 2.05, 2.07 and 2.1 {mu}m at a pump wavelength of 1.15 {mu}m. The slope efficiency of the lasers has been measured. The maximum efficiency, 0.455, has been obtained at a lasing wavelength of 2.05 {mu}m. The laser efficiency is influenced by both the optical loss in the wing of a vibrational absorption band of silica and active-ion clustering. (lasers)

  15. Holmium: YAG laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Bukala, B; Denstedt, J D

    1999-04-01

    The holmium laser is a relatively new multipurpose medical laser that recently became available for use in urology. There has been considerable interest in this device, as it seems to combine the cutting properties of the carbon dioxide laser with the coagulating properties of the neodymium:YAG laser, making it particularly appealing for many surgical applications. The last decade has seen enthusiasm for the use of laser energy for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this article, we review the technique of Ho:YAG laser resection of the prostate, including the essential equipment and perioperative patient care. PMID:10360503

  16. Holmium laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, K; Iida, S; Tomiyasu, K; Shimada, A; Suekane, S; Noda, S

    1998-06-01

    A total of 35 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were treated with the Ho: YAG laser using a new technique termed holmium laser resection of the prostate or HoLRP. The laser energy was applied directly to prostatic tissue exclusively through the use of a standard 550 micron end-firing fiber. A high-powered holmium laser was used and was set at 2.4 J per pulse at 25 pulses per second for an average power of 60 W. The mean preoperative AUA Symptom Score was 24. Postoperatively, the score dropped to 10.9, 8.2, 5.2, and 4.6 at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively. The peak urine flow rate improved from 6.3 mL/sec preoperatively to 15.1, 15.3 and 16 mL/sec at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. A foley catheter was removed within 24 hours of completion of the operation in 31 patients (89%), and voiding was improved. The HoLRP technique was bloodless, and the short-term results were satisfactory. Most importantly, the defect produced by HoLRP is identical to that of a conventional transurethral resection. These initial results demonstrate that HoLRP is a useful surgical alternative in the treatment of patients with obstructive BPH. PMID:9658303

  17. Perspectives of holmium laser resection of the prostate: cutting effects with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenauer, Rolf H.; Droege, Gerit; Brinkmann, Ralf; Neuss, Malte; Gafumbegete, Evariste; Jocham, Dieter

    1998-07-01

    Laser prostatectomy shows an improvement in peak urinary flow rates, in post-void residual urine volumes and also a symptomatic improvement when compared to the transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P). Time to achieve symptomatic improvement is delayed with many established laser procedures compared to standard resection. However, this disadvantage can be solved with a new resection technique using a pulsed holmium laser. Nevertheless, this advanced technique shows a few problems in a first clinical trial. Besides this clinical study, in vitro experiments were carried out in order to determine the optimal irradiation parameters with respect to resection rate, incision/ablation quality and handling. Prostate tissue of radical prostatectomies and chicken breast as model were irradiated with a pulsed holmium-laser in vitro with different laser parameters using a bare fiber in contact to tissue. The incision quality (depths and coagulation/vaporization effects) was analyzed with regard to pulse energy (speed of incision, angle of incision) and fiber diameter. Fast flash photography was performed to analyze thermo-mechanical side-effects. Fast flash photography reveals cavitation bubble up to 7 mm length in water and dissections in tissue. The ablation rate increases proportional to the laser pulse energy. The Holmium Laser Resection of the Prostate (HOLRP) in humans with available instrumentation right now shows equieffective results compared to the transurethral resection, no need for transfusion, no transurethral resection syndrome, short time for catheterization. Further technical approvement may significantly improve holmium laser prostate resection. We present a new application system for the laser resection.

  18. Midline Prostatic Cyst Marsupialization Using Holmium Laser.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Mehmet; Goger, Yunus Emre; Piskin, Mesut; Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Many of the prostatic cysts are asymptomatic and only 5% are symptomatic (Hamper et al., 1990; Higashi et al., 1990). These symptoms include pelvic pain, hematospermia, infertility, voiding dysfunction, prostatitis-like syndrome, and painful ejaculation. Treatment of prostatic cysts includes TRUSG guided drainage, endoscopic transurethral resection, and in some cases even open surgery. In the literature, endoscopic interventions use marsupialization of the midline prostatic cyst with transurethral resection (TUR) or transurethral incision with endoscopic urethrotomy (Dik et al., 1996; Terris, 1995). Holmium: YAG laser was employed for the marsupialization of the cyst wall in midline prostatic cyst treatment for the first time in the present study. Symptoms, treatment, and follow-up are presented in this paper. PMID:26101688

  19. Midline Prostatic Cyst Marsupialization Using Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Mehmet; Goger, Yunus Emre; Piskin, Mesut; Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Many of the prostatic cysts are asymptomatic and only 5% are symptomatic (Hamper et al., 1990; Higashi et al., 1990). These symptoms include pelvic pain, hematospermia, infertility, voiding dysfunction, prostatitis-like syndrome, and painful ejaculation. Treatment of prostatic cysts includes TRUSG guided drainage, endoscopic transurethral resection, and in some cases even open surgery. In the literature, endoscopic interventions use marsupialization of the midline prostatic cyst with transurethral resection (TUR) or transurethral incision with endoscopic urethrotomy (Dik et al., 1996; Terris, 1995). Holmium: YAG laser was employed for the marsupialization of the cyst wall in midline prostatic cyst treatment for the first time in the present study. Symptoms, treatment, and follow-up are presented in this paper. PMID:26101688

  20. Magneto-optical trapping of holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, J.; Hostetter, J.; Stratis, G.; Saffman, M.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate sub-Doppler laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the rare-earth element holmium. Atoms are loaded from an atomic beam source and captured in six-beam σ+-σ- molasses using a strong J =15/2↔J=17/2 cycling transition at λ =410.5 nm. Due to the small difference in hyperfine splittings and Landé g factors in the lower and upper levels of the cooling transition the MOT is self-repumped without additional repump light, and deep sub-Doppler cooling is achieved with the magnetic trap turned on. We measure the leakage out of the cycling transition to metastable states and find a branching ratio <10-5, which is adequate for state-resolved measurements on hyperfine encoded qubits.

  1. Quantum state control of trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James; Yip, Christopher; Milner, William; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey; Saffman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Neutral Holmium with its large number of hyperfine ground states provides a promising approach for collective encoding of a multi-qubit register. A prerequisite for collective encoding is the ability to prepare different states in the 128 state hyperfine ground manifold. We report progress towards optical pumping and control of the hyperfine Zeeman state of trapped Ho atoms. Atoms are transferred from a 410.5 nm MOT into a 455 nm optical dipole trap. The atoms can be optically pumped using light driving the ground 6s2 , F = 11 to 6 s 6 p ,F' = 11 transition together with a F = 10 to F' = 11 repumper. Microwave fields are then used to drive transitions to hyperfine levels with 4 <= F <= 11 . Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  2. Use of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Stefano

    1997-12-01

    The Holmium-YAG is a versatile laser with multiple soft- tissue applications including tissue incision and vaporization, and pulsed-laser applications such as lithotripsy. At 2140 nanometers, the wavelength is highly absorbed by tissue water. Further, like CO2 laser, the Holmium produces immediate tissue vaporization while minimizing deep thermal damage to surrounding tissues. It is an excellent instrument for endopyelotomy, internal urethrotomy, bladder neck incisions and it can be used to resect the prostate. The Holmium creates an acute TUR defect which gives immediate results like the TURP. More than 50 patients were treated from Jan. 1996 to Jan. 1997 for obstructive symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, bladder neck stricture, urethral stenosis, and superficial bladder tumors.

  3. Delayed stimulated afterglow from holmium ions in crystals with coactivators

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, M.V.; Tkachuk, A.M.

    1980-12-01

    Delayed stimulated afterglow from holmium ions in ..cap alpha beta..-SrF/sub 2/-YF/sub 3/ crystals was observed and investigated. This took the form of several series of emission spikes separated by dark intervals after the action of a single pump pulse. The effect is attributed to some features of the mechanism for population of the upper active level of the lasing holmium ion in the presence of sensitizer ions. It is found that in order to observe the effect, the system must incorporate a metastable level from which energy transfer to the active level provides an independent ''additional pumping'' system for the holmium ions acting over times much longer than the pump pulse duration.

  4. Gain and energy storage in holmium YLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.; Deyst, John P.

    1991-01-01

    It is demonstrated that Q-switched holmium lasers are capable of high-gain and high-energy operation at 300 K. Small-signal gain coefficients of 0.50 and 0.12/cm have been measured in YLF and YAG, respectively. Small-signal gains of 0.50/cm are comparable to those achievable in Nd:YAG and are not typical of low-gain materials. This large gain in the Ho:YLF material is made possible by operating the amplifier in the ground state depletion mode. The amplifier performance data and associated analysis presented demonstrate that efficient energy storage is possible with very high excited state ion densities of the Ho 5I7 upper laser level. This is an important result since upconversion can limit the 5I7 population. Although upconversion was still present in this experiment, it was possible to achieve efficient energy storage, demonstrating that the problem is manageable even at high excitation densities in YLF.

  5. Holmium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Hossain, A Z M Z; Khan, S A; Hossain, S; Salam, M A

    2004-08-01

    A prospective cross-sectional study was carried-out in the department of urology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) to evaluate the outcome of Laser urethrotomy for the treatment of urethral stricture. For this purpose, 30 male patients aged 15 to 60 years with short segment anterior urethral stricture (>2cm) were treated by HO:YAG Laser. The energy used for this purpose was 0.8 to 1.5 joules by LISA 80 Watt Holmium Laser machine. All patients were catheterized for less than 24 hours and were followed up for 6 to 12 months postoperatively by uroflowmetry and by retrograde with voiding cystourethrogram 3 monthly. The study revealed that out of 30 patients, 27(90%) showed good flow of urine (Qave>16.0 ml/sec) and adequate caliber urethra in retrograde urethrogram (RGU). Only 3(10%) patients showed narrow stream of urine (Qave<8.0 ml/sec) and recurrent stricture in RGU which were managed by optical internal urethrotomy (OIU) and clean intermittent self catheterization (CISC). The study showed satisfactory results in 90% cases with short term follow up. The study concludes that HO:YAG Laser urethrotomy for the treatment of short segment urethral stricture is highly effective. The study further reveals that the method is simple, safe and thus, it can be considered favorably as a new therapeutic option for the treatment of urethral stricture. However, long term follow up is necessary for making a final comment on this issue. PMID:15813486

  6. Holmium:YAG laser stapedotomy: preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubig, Ingrid M.; Reder, Paul A.; Facer, G. W.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-07-01

    This study investigated the use of a pulsed Holmium:YAG ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) laser- fiber microsurgical system for laser stapedotomy. This system ablates human stapes bones effectively with minimal thermal damage. The study was designed to determine the effectiveness of the Ho:YAG laser (Schwartz Electro Optics, Inc., Orlando, FL) for stapedotomy and to evaluate temperature changes within the cochlea during the ablation process. Human cadaveric temporal bones were obtained and the stapes portion of the ossicular chain was removed. A 200 micrometers diameter low OH quartz fiber was used to irradiate these stapes bones in an air environment. The laser was pulsed at 2 Hz, 250 microsecond(s) ec pulse width and an irradiance range of 100 - 240 J/cm2 was used to ablate holes in the stapes footplate. The resultant stapedotomies created had smooth 300 micrometers diameter holes with a minimum of circumferential charring. Animal studies in-vivo were carried out in chinchillas to determine the caloric spread within the cochlea. A 0.075 mm Type T thermocouple was placed in the round window. Average temperature change during irradiation of the stapes footplate recorded in the round window was 3.6 degree(s)C. The data suggest that stapedotomy using the Ho:YAG laser can result in a controlled ablation of the stapes footplate with minimal thermal damage to the surrounding stapes. Optical coupling using fiberoptic silica fibers is an ideal method for delivering laser energy to the stapes during stapedotomy.

  7. High gain holmium-doped fibre amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Nikita; Li, Zhihong; Jung, Yongmin; Daniel, Jae M O; Barua, Pranabesh; Shardlow, Peter C; Liang, Sijing; Sahu, Jayanta K; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W Andrew; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Richardson, David J

    2016-06-27

    We investigate the operation of holmium-doped fibre amplifiers (HDFAs) in the 2.1 µm spectral region. For the first time we demonstrate a diode-pumped HDFA. This amplifier provides a peak gain of 25 dB at 2040 nm with a 15 dB gain window spanning the wavelength range 2030 - 2100 nm with an external noise figure (NF) of 4-6 dB. We also compare the operation of HDFAs when pumped at 1950 nm and 2008 nm. The 1950 nm pumped HDFA provides 41 dB peak gain at 2060 nm with 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2120 nm and an external NF of 7-10 dB. By pumping at the longer wavelength of 2008 nm the gain bandwidth of the amplifier is shifted to longer wavelengths and using this architecture a HDFA was demonstrated with a peak gain of 39 dB at 2090 nm and 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2150 nm. The external NF over this wavelength range was 8-14 dB. PMID:27410557

  8. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Patients who sustain complicated acute myocardial infarction in whom thrombolytic agents either fail or are contraindicated often need mechanical revascularization other than PTCA. In 24 patients with acute infarction complicated by continuous chest pain and ischemia who either received lytics or with contraindication to lytics, a holmium:YAG laser (Eclipse Surgical Technologies, Palo Alto, CA) was utilized for thrombolysis and plaque ablation. Clinical success was achieved in 23/24 patients, with 23 patients (94%) surviving the acute infarction. Holmium:YAG laser is very effective and safe in thrombolysis and revascularization in this complicated clinical setting.

  9. Discovery of dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, and ytterbium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-09-15

    Currently, thirty-one dysprosium, thirty-two holmium, thirty-two erbium, thirty-three thulium, and thirty-one ytterbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  10. Hemangioma of the prostatic urethra: holmium laser treatment.

    PubMed

    de León, Javier Ponce; Arce, Jacobo; Gausa, Luís; Villavicencio, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    Urethral hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors that are found in perimontanal prostatic localization and less frequently in the urethra. Although different urethral procedures have been postulated for its treatment, the best results are achieved using lasers. A patient who underwent endoscopic holmium laser treatment for such hemangiomas is presented. Total disappearance of the lesions without any complications was achieved. PMID:18204245

  11. Solvent extraction studies of holmium with acidic extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Gaikwad, A.G.; Damodaran, A.D. )

    1993-03-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction studies of holmium with 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester, naphthenic, and Versatic 10 acids have been carried out. The nature of the extracted species and the extraction equilibrium constants of these systems have been determined from aqueous nitrate solution. The extraction mechanism and complexation models have been proposed. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Spectral performance of monolithic holmium and thulium lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.

    1991-01-01

    Fabry-Perot resonators have been used to demonstrate single-mode lasing of holmium and neodymium YAG. The previous demonstration in the holmium laser required TE cooling the crystal to -15 C in order to achieve threshold. The present study extends that result, demonstrating +25 C operation in a 1-mm thick plano/plano resonator. The experimental configuration of lasing both the holmium and thulium lasers used a 500-mW diode laser which was collimated, circularized, and focused into a beam radius of 60 microns. The single-frequency lasing spectrum of the holmium laser is shown. By adjusting the mirror reflectivity, the ability to control the laser's wavelength is demonstrated. This laser operated with 11 mW of optical power, a 57-percent slope efficiency, and 120-mW threshold vs absorbed diode power laser for the 60-micron beam radius. The thulium laser operated very efficiently at room temperature, but on seven longitudinal modes. The Tm:TAG laser exhibits typical characteristics of spatial hole burning not seen in the Ho:Tm:YAG for flat/flat resonators.

  13. Percutaneous laser disc decompression with the holmium: YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Casper, G D; Hartman, V L; Mullins, L L

    1995-06-01

    This article discusses the evolution of the percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) method using a holmium:YAG laser. Advantages of using this wavelength and several techniques for its use in PLDD are reviewed. The article also discusses the current devices and delivery systems available for this application. PMID:10150646

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and neutron activation of holmium metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Cagle, D.W.; Thrash, T.P.; Wilson, L.J.; Alford, M.; Chibante, L.P.F.; Ehrhardt, G.J.

    1996-08-28

    Isolation of the first macroscopic quantities of endohedral holmium metallofullerenes (principally Ho@C{sub 82}, Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} by LD-TOF mass spectrometry) has been accomplished by carbon-arc and preparative HPLC methodologies. The detailed procedure for production and isolation of the metallofullerenes includes a new technique whereby holmium-impregnated electrodes are prepared simply by soaking porous graphite rods in an ethanolic solution of Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.xH{sub 2}O. Monoisotopic {sup 165}Ho offers a unique combination of advantages for neutron-activation studies of metallofullerenes, and purified samples containing {sup 165}Ho@C{sub 82}, {sup 165}Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and {sup 165}Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} have been activated by high-flux neutron irradiation ({Phi} = 4 x 10{sup 13}n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) to generate {sup 166}Ho metallofullerenes, which undergo {beta}{sup -} decay to produce stable {sup 166}Er. Chemical workup of the irradiated samples, followed by re-irradiation, has been used to demonstrate that observed decomposition of holmium metallofullerenes is due mainly to `fast` neutron damage rather than to holmium atom nuclear recoil (E{sub max} = 200 eV). This implies that metallofullerene damage can be minimized by using neutron fluxes with the highest possible thermal component. 60 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  16. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  17. Silicate volcanism on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the nature of volcanic eruptions on Io, taking into account questions regarding the presence of silicates or sulfur as principal component. Attention is given to the generation of silicate magma, the viscous dissipation in the melt zone, thermal anomalies at eruption sites, and Ionian volcanism. According to the information available about Io, it appears that its volcanism and hence its surface materials are dominantly silicic. Several percent of volatile materials such as sulfur, but also including sodium- and potassium-rich materials, may also be present. The volatile materials at the surface are continually vaporized and melted as a result of the high rates of silicate volcanism.

  18. Development of high-power holmium-doped fibre amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, Alexander; Simakov, Nikita; Davidson, Alan; Oermann, Michael; Corena, Len; Stepanov, Dmitrii; Carmody, Neil; Haub, John; Swain, Robert; Carter, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Resonantly pumped holmium fibre lasers present a range of opportunities for the development of novel fibre laser and amplifier devices due to the availability of mature, efficient high power thulium fibre pump lasers. In this paper we describe the operation of a large mode area holmium-doped fibre amplifier. The master-oscillator is an all-fibre linearly polarised, core pumped single mode laser operating at 27 W at 2.11 μm. This laser was amplified in a large mode area fibre producing up to 265 W of output power. This system is the first demonstration of a resonantly pumped holmiumdoped fibre amplifier. It is also the highest power fibre amplifier that is capable of operating in an atmospheric transmission window <2.05 μm. This monolithic all-fibre system is able to address a wide range of remote sensing, scientific, medical and defence applications.

  19. Resonance ionization of holmium for ion implantation in microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Chrysalidis, K.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Haas, R.; Kieck, T.; Mokry, C.; Naubereit, P.; Schmidt, S.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    The determination of the electron neutrino mass by calorimetric measurement of the 163 Ho electron capture spectrum requires ultra-pure samples. Several collaborations, like ECHo or HOLMES, intend to employ microcalorimeters into which 163 Ho is implanted as an ion beam. This makes a selective and additionally very efficient ion source for holmium mandatory. For this purpose, laser resonance ionization of stable holmium 165 Ho was studied, using a three step excitation scheme driven by pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers. Five measurements with sample sizes of 1014 and 1015 atoms were performed for the efficiency investigation. In average, an excellent ionization efficiency of 32(5) % could be shown, demonstrating the suitability for ion beam implantation.

  20. Standard thermodynamic functions and Gibbs energy of holmium tungstenates

    SciTech Connect

    Nadiradze, A.A.; Gvelesiani, G.G.; Abashidze, T.D.; Makharadze, I.A.

    1986-12-01

    The Gibbs free energy of meta- and normal holmium tungstenates was studied by the emf method with the solid oxygen-ion electrolyte. The standard values of the entropy and enthalpy of formation of holmium tungstenates Ho/sub 6/WO/sub 12/, Ho/sub 10/W/sub 2/O/sub 21/, Ho/sub 14/W/sub 4/O/sub 33/, Ho/sub 2/WO/sub 6/, and Ho/sub 2/(WO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ were calculated. Three-term equations for the Gibbs energy of formation of the indicated tungstenates from the oxides for a wide temperature range were constructed. It was shown that the values of the standard atomic entropies and enthalpies of formation of these compounds decrease as their WO/sub 3/ content increases.

  1. Hard and fragile holmium-based bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Q.; Zhao, D.Q.; Pan, M.X.; Wang, R.J.; Wang, W.H.

    2006-05-01

    A family of holmium-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high glass-forming ability is obtained. The Ho-based BMGs exhibit much larger elastic moduli and high thermal stability in contrast to other known rare-earth (RE)-based BMGs. In particular, the BMGs show a large value of fragility. It is expected that the hard RE-based glasses with high glass-forming ability and fragile behaviors make them the appropriate candidate for glass transition study.

  2. Holmium YAG laser treatment of superficial bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Z; Khan, S A; Salam, M A; Hossain, S; Islam, R

    2005-01-01

    Holmium YAG laser is one of the new modalities of treatment of urinary bladder tumor. Thirty patients of superficial bladder carcinoma were selected from the Urology out patient department of Dhaka Medical College Hospital from January 2004 to July 2004. Among thirty cases, 18 were recurrent and 12 were primary superficial bladder carcinoma. Out of thirty patients, 24 were male and six were female. Patients were treated with Holmium YAG laser under spinal anesthesia. Before resection, cold cup biopsy were taken from the apex and after resection of the tumor, another cold cup biopsy were taken from the base of the tumor. Holmium YAG laser therapy was given with a 550 micron end firing quartz laser fiber through the working element of resectoscope. Small tumors (< 1 cm) were ablated and large tumors (1-4 cm) were resected. The initial laser setting was 0.5 to 0.8 J and 10 Hz. For resection of the tumor, a slightly higher energy of 1 to 1.2 J was used at 10 to 12 Hz. After resection, bleeding vessels were coagulated. The resected tumor was evacuated by Elik's evacuator. All cases were followed for 6 to 12 months by history, physical examination, urine analysis, sonogram and cystoscopy three monthly. Bleeding was minimum during the procedure and no transfusion was required. Complications like obturator jerk, clot retention or perforation were not developed. No recurrence was found during the 6 to 12 months follow up period. The procedure was found safe, effective, and acceptable. The study was conducted to evaluate the initial result of Holmium YAG laser for the treatment of superficial bladder carcinoma. We warrants further studies in this regard. PMID:15695945

  3. Experimental studies on the usage possibilities of the holmium laser in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Tadeusz; Kecik, Dariusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Pratnicki, Antoni; Jankiewicz, Zdzislaw; Zajac, Andrzej

    1996-03-01

    The authors present initial investigations of used holmium laser during experimental cataract surgery. The investigations were performed 'in vitro' and 'in vivo.' The presented results of the experiments show that structure of the lens can be emulsified with the use of the holmium laser.

  4. The structure of rare earth thin films: holmium and gadolinium on yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentall, M. J.; Cowley, R. A.; Ward, R. C. C.; Wells, M. R.; Stunault, A.

    2003-11-01

    Single-crystal holmium and gadolinium layers have been grown on yttrium substrates using the molecular beam epitaxy technique and their structures investigated using high resolution x-ray scattering. The experiments were performed using a Philips MRD diffractometer in Oxford, and with the XMaS facility at the ESRF. Holmium layers with a thickness below T_{\\mathrm {c}}'=115\

  5. Buckshot colic: utilizing holmium:yag laser for ureteroscopic removal of a bullet fragment within the proximal ureter.

    PubMed

    Ziegelmann, Matthew; Carrasco, Alonso; Knoedler, John; Krambeck, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Buckshot colic is a rare phenomenon, presenting as firearm-induced urinary tract obstruction. We present a case of gunshot-induced ureteral obstruction in a 49-year-old male, treated endoscopically with the holmium:YAG (holmium) laser. CT revealed a 1 cm bullet fragment within the left proximal ureter. A percutaneous nephrolithotomy was performed utilizing the holmium laser to fragment the metal into basket-retrievable pieces. At 4 month follow up the patient is without evidence of stricture. To our knowledge, this is the first reported utilization of the holmium laser to treat "buckshot colic". Endoscopy with holmium laser appears a feasible and safe treatment option. PMID:27347630

  6. Silicate Stardust in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2004-06-01

    One of the most exciting discoveries in cosmochemistry during the past 15 years is the presence of presolar grains in meteorites. They are identified by the unusual abundances of isotopes of oxygen, silicon, and other elements. Presolar grains, also called stardust, are exotic compounds such as diamond, graphite, aluminum oxide, and silicon carbide. Why are there no silicates? Spectroscopic observations of young stars show that silicates are abundant. This means that silicates are abundant in molecular clouds like the one in which the solar system formed. Cosmochemists wondered why do we not find silicates in the most primitive extraterrestrial materials: interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and primitive chondrites. These materials are the least altered since they formed and if any preserved presolar silicate grains, IDPs and chondrites would. Were they all destroyed as the solar system formed? Or was it that we were looking for stardust in all the wrong places? As we reported previously [see PSRD article A New Type of Stardust], Scott Messenger and colleagues have found silicates in IDPs. Now, researchers report finding presolar silicate grains in primitive chondritic meteorites. Ann Nguyen and Ernst Zinner (Washington University in St. Louis) and Kazuhide Nagashima and Hisayoshi Yurimoto (Tokyo Institute of Technology), with Alexander Krot (University of Hawaii) used advanced instrumentation to image the isotopic compositions of small regions of the Acfer 094 carbonaceous chondrite and found several silicate grains with isotopically anomalous oxygen isotopes, a clear indicator of presolar origin. Nagashima and his colleagues also investigated the primitive CR2 carbonaceous chondrite Northwest Africa 530, finding presolar grains in it as well. The grains will shed (star)light on the histories of the stars in which they formed. The relative abundances of presolar silicates in different types of meteorites will help cosmochemists understand the processes of heating

  7. Intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    A variety of devices are currently available for intracorporeal stone fragmentation. Recently a new wavelength of laser, the Holmium:YAG, has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications including ablation of soft tissue lesions as well as stone fragmentation. This laser has a wavelength of 2100 nm and operates in a pulsed mode. Energy is delivered through a 400 um quartz end-firing fiber. In this presentation we review our clinical experience with the Holmium:YAG laser for the treatment of renal and ureteral calculi. Over a 23 month period, 63 patients underwent 67 procedures. Seven procedures consisted of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy for large or staghorn renal calculi. Sixty procedures were performed for ureteral stones. Procedures for proximal ureteral stones (6) employed a retrograde approach using flexible ureteroscopes (8.5 or 9.8). Stones in the mid ureter (12) and distal ureter (42) were approached transurethrally using a 6.9 rigid ureteroscope. Complete stone fragmentation without the need for additional procedures was achieved in 82% of cases. Treatment failures included 1 stone migration into the renal pelvis during laser activation, 6 patients who had incomplete fragmentation and 3 patients in which laser malfunction precluded complete fragmentation. Stone analysis available in 23 patients revealed calcium oxalate monohydrate (15), calcium oxalate dihydrate (2), cystine (2), uric acid (3) and calcium phosphate (1). A single complication of ureteral perforation occurred when the laser was fired without direct visual guidance. Radiographic follow-up at an average of 16 weeks is available in 22 patients and has identified 2 patients with ureteral strictures that are not believed to be related to laser lithotripsy. In summary, we have found the Holmium:YAG laser to be a reliable and versatile device for intracorporeal lithotripsy. Its safety and efficacy make it a suitable alternative for performing intracorporeal lithotripsy of urinary

  8. Holmium laser lithotripsy for ureteral calculi: an outpatient procedure.

    PubMed

    Yip, K H; Lee, C W; Tam, P C

    1998-06-01

    A retrospective review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of ureteroscopic lithotripsy using the holmium laser with a semirigid endoscope in a newly established day surgery center. In 1996, 69 consecutive patients (40 male and 29 female) with a mean age of 46.7 (range 21-73) years and ASA status I or II underwent ureteroscopic lithotripsy for their ureteral calculi using the holmium laser (365-micron fiber; power setting 0.5-1.4 J/5 Hz) and 8.5F semirigid ureteroscope in a day surgery setting. Stone features, postoperative pain scores, readmissions, and complications were evaluated. Eighteen upper, 17 middle, and 34 lower ureteral stones were treated, with a mean size measuring 12.1 (5-45) mm. The mean operative time was 61 minutes including the anesthetic time (range 15-150 minutes), and the success rate was 91% (63/69). The complication rate was 10% (7/69) including four unscheduled readmissions (6%). Telephone follow-up on postoperative Day 1 and Day 3 revealed mean pain scores of 2 and 1, respectively (on a 0-10 scale) and an analgesic requirement of 1 tablet of Dologesic (containing 32.5 mg of dextropropoxyphene + 320 mg of paracetamol) four times a day on both days. Ureteroscopic lithotripsy using the holmium laser and a semirigid endoscope is highly successful and well tolerated and carries a low complication rate. It is indicated as an ambulatory and minimally invasive treatment modality in low-risk patients with ureteral stones. PMID:9658294

  9. Drug metabolism: Comparison of biodistribution profile of holmium in three different compositions in healthy Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira-Coutinho, Cristal; Vidal, Lluis Pascual; Pinto, Suyene Rocha; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    Radioisotope holmium is a candidate to be used in cancer treatment and diagnosis. There are different holmium salts and they present distinct solubility and consequently different biodistribution profiles. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the biodistribution profiles of two holmium salts (chloride and sulfate) and holmium nanoparticles (oxide) through an in vivo biodistribution assay using animal model. Samples were labeled with technetium-99m and administered in Wistar rats by retro-orbital route. Holmium chloride is highly soluble in water and it was quickly filtered by the kidneys while holmium sulfate that presents lower solubility in water was mainly found in the liver and the spleen. However, both the salts showed a similar biodistribution profile. On the other hand, holmium oxide showed a very different biodistribution profile since it seemed to interact with all organs. Due to its particle size range (approximately 100nm) it was not intensively filtered by the kidneys being found in high quantities in many organs, for this reason its use as a nanoradiopharmaceutical could be promising in the oncology field. PMID:26986812

  10. The studies on the aromaticity of fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bisheng; Peng, Rufang; Li, Hongbo; Wang, Bing; Jin, Bo; Chu, Shijin; Long, Xinping

    2011-02-01

    Density functional theory BLYP/DNP was employed to optimize a series of fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds, including C(20), Ho@C(20), Ho(3+)@C(20), C(60), Ho@C(60), Ho(3+)@C(60),C(70), Ho@C(70), Ho(3+)@C(70) C(78), Ho@C(78), Ho(3+)@C(78), C(82),Ho@C(82) and Ho(3+)@C(82). DFT semi core pseudospot approximation was taken into consideration in the calculations of the element holmium because of its particular electronic structure. Fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds' aromaticity were studied in terms of structural criteria, energetic criteria, and reactivity criteria. The results indicate that the aromaticity of fullerenes was reduced when a holmium atom was introduced into the carbon cage, and the endohedral fullerenes' reactive activity enhance; but the aromaticity of the carbon cage increased when a Ho(3+) cation was encapsulated into a fullerene. Calculations of aromaticity and stability indicate that two paths can lead to the similar aim of preparing holmium endohedral fullerenes; that is, they can form from either a holmium atom or a holmium cation (Ho(3+)) reacting with fullerenes, respectively, and the latter is more favorable. PMID:20443036

  11. Treatment of pulmonary diseases with Holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei-Jue; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo; Wang, Fu-Juan; Ke, Lin; Ma, Wei; Luo, Qun-Hua; Zhang, Yue-E.

    1998-11-01

    We report 5 cases of pulmonary disease treated with Holmium:YAG laser through fibrous bronchoscope. 1 inflammatory granuloma was cured after three times of treatment. Compared with conventional methods such as electrocautery and microwave treatment, laser has the merit of good hemostasis effect and quick recovery of the operation area. The other 4 patients who were suffered late lung cancer received 3-7 times of palliative treatment. After the treatment, the tumor tissues become smaller variably, and tact were unobstructed, symptoms of tract- obstructed obviously alleviated. We think that laser treatment has some practical significance in alleviating tract blocking of pulmonary diseases of late stage, and therefore raise the life quality.

  12. Role of temperature in the theoretical analysis of holmium pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Purvee; Singh, Sadhna

    2016-01-01

    The high-pressure structural phase transition and associated properties of holmium pnictides (HoX; X = P, As, Sb and Bi) have been investigated in the present work. The Realistic Interaction Potential Approach (RIPA) including the effect of temperature has been applied. The occurrence of first order phase transition is evidenced from a sudden collapse in volume. These compounds transform from B1 to B2 structure under high pressure. The high temperature and pressure behaviour of elastic constants and bulk modulus are also reported. Our results are in general in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical results where available, and provide predictions where they are unavailable.

  13. Holmium Nitrate Complexation with Tri-n-butyl Phosphate in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Robert V. Fox; R. Duane Ball; Peter de B. Harrington; Harry W. Rollins; Chien M. Wai

    2005-12-01

    Holmium nitrate pentahydrate was reacted with tri-n-butyl phosphate in supercritical carbon dioxide at 308 K. The products of the complexation reaction were measured under supercritical fluid conditions using UV-vis spectroscopy. The solubility of the metal complexes in the supercritical fluid phase was measured. The mole-ratio titration method was used to determine the stoichiometry of the soluble complexes. Conditional extraction coefficients were calculated from spectral data using least-squares regression and hard-equilibria models. Data indicate that the holmium nitrate-tributyl phosphate system forms 1:2 and 1:4 holmium-tributyl phosphate complexes.

  14. Effect of the active-ion concentration on the lasing dynamics of holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-12-09

    The lasing dynamics of fibre lasers with a core based on quartz glass doped with holmium ions to concentrations in the range of 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is investigated. It is shown that fibre lasers with a high concentration of active holmium ions generate pulses, but a decrease in the holmium concentration changes the lasing from pulsed to cw regime. At the same time, a decrease in the active-ion concentration and the corresponding increase in the fibre length in the cavity reduce the lasing efficiency. (lasers)

  15. Effect of active-ion concentration on holmium fibre laser efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-08-03

    We have measured the fraction of holmium ions that relax nonradiatively to the ground level as a result of interaction at a metastable level in optical fibres with a silica-based core doped with holmium ions to 2 x 10{sup 19} - 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The percentage of such ions has been shown to depend on the absolute active-ion concentration. The fibres have been used to make a number of 2.05-{mu}m lasers, and their slope efficiency has been measured. The laser efficiency decreases with increasing holmium concentration in the fibres (lasers)

  16. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  17. Holmium:YAG laser angioplasty: treatment of acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On

    1993-06-01

    We report our clinical experience with a group of 14 patients who presented with acute myocardial infarction. A holmium:YAG laser was applied to the infarct-related artery. This laser emits 250 - 600 mJ per pulse, with a pulse length of 250 microseconds and repetition rate of 5 Hz. Potential benefits of acute thrombolysis by lasers include the absence of systemic lytic state; a shortened thrombus clearing time relative to using thrombolytics; safe removal of the intracoronary thrombus and facilitation of adjunct balloon angioplasty. Potential clinical difficulties include targeting the obstructive clot and plaque, creation of debris and distal emboli and laser-tissue damage. It is conceivable that holmium:YAG laser can be a successful thrombolytic device as its wave length (2.1 microns) coincides with strong water absorption peaks. Since it is common to find an atherosclerotic plaque located under or distal to the thrombotic occlusion, this laser can also be applied for plaque ablation, and the patient presenting with acute myocardial infarction can clearly benefit from the combined function of this laser system.

  18. Dielectric and conducting behaviour of polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, Basharat; Zahoor Ahmad, Bhat; Bhat, Bilal Hamid

    2014-09-01

    Polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate spherulites have been obtained by using gel diffusion technique and characterized by different physio-chemical techniques. The surfaces of these spherulites are composed of nano-rod with an average diameter of about 80 nm. At room temperature the initial crystal structure is triclinic, space group P1. Thermal studies suggested a phase transition occurring in holmium octa-molybdate crystals at about 793 K. The electrical properties of the system have been studied as a function of frequency and temperature in the ranges of 20 Hz-3 MHz and 290-570 K, respectively. A giant dielectric constant and two loss peaks have been observed in the permittivity formalism. The conducting behaviour of the material is also discussed. The conductivity was found to be 1572 μ Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature and 3 MHz frequency. The conductivity of the polycrystalline material was attributed to the fact that it arises due to the migration of defects on the oxygen sub-lattice. Impedance studies were also performed in the frequency domain to infer the bulk and grain boundary contributions to the overall electric response of the material. The electrical responses have been attributed to the grain, grain-boundary, and interfacial effects.

  19. Holmium laser use in the treatment of selected dry eye syndrome complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Dariusz; Kecik, Tadeusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Mariusz

    1996-03-01

    The authors present initial results of treatment selected complications of dry eye syndrome with holmium laser. The lacrimal puncta obliteration and coagulation of the corneal ulcer surface were done.

  20. Composition and method of treatment of arthritis and related diseases with holmium-166 radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1991-10-29

    This patent describes a radioactive composition for the treatment of arthritis. It comprises a suspension containing particles having a minimum size of one micron, the suspension including particles containing holmium-166.

  1. Holmium-doped fibre amplifier operating at 2.1 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Kamynin, V A; Antipov, S O; Kurkov, A S; Baranikov, A V

    2014-02-28

    A small-signal holmium-doped fibre amplifier is demonstrated. The seed source is a cw holmium-doped fibre laser whose output power is modulated by an electro-optical modulator. The maximum gain reached (wavelength, 2.1 μm; power, 0.25 mW; pulse duration, 100 ns; pulse repetition rate, 1 μs) is 28.5 dB. (lasers)

  2. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  3. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  4. Energy upconversion in holmium doped lead-germano-tellurite glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kamma, Indumathi; Reddy, B. Rami

    2010-06-15

    Holmium doped lead-germano-tellurite glass was prepared by the melt quenching technique. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters were estimated as {Omega}{sub 2}=7.6x10{sup -20}, {Omega}{sub 4}=12.9x10{sup -20}, and {Omega}{sub 6}=2.5x10{sup -20} cm{sup 2}. Radiative transition probabilities and lifetimes were also determined for some of the levels. Room temperature upconversion emissions have been observed from Ho{sup 3+} at 497 nm under 532 nm laser excitation, and at 557 and 668 nm under 762 nm laser excitation. The upconversion emission mechanisms were found to be due to a step wise excitation process. Upconversion emission intensity enhanced in a heat treated glass.

  5. Combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratisto, Hans S.; Frenz, Martin; Koenz, Flurin; Altermatt, Hans J.; Weber, Heinz P.

    1996-05-01

    Erbium lasers emitting at 2.94 micrometers and holmium lasers emitting at 2.1 micrometers are interesting tools for cutting, drilling, smoothing and welding of water containing tissues. The high absorption coefficient of water at these wavelengths leads to their good ablation efficiency with controlled thermally altered zones around the ablation sites. Combination of pulses with both wavelengths transmitted through one fiber were used to perform incisions in soft tissue and impacts in bone disks. Histological results and scanning electron microscope evaluations reveal the strong influence of the absorption coefficient on tissue effects, especially on the ablation efficiency and the zone of thermally damaged tissue. It is demonstrated that the combination of high ablation rates and deep coagulation zones can be achieved. The results indicate that this laser system can be considered as a first step towards a multi-functional medical instrument.

  6. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber lasers for lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser is currently the most common laser lithotripter. However, recent experimental studies have demonstrated that the Thulium fiber laser is also capable of vaporizing urinary stones. The high-temperature water absorption coefficient for the Thulium wavelength (μa = 160 cm-1 at λ = 1908 nm) is significantly greater than for the Holmium wavelength (μa = 28 cm-1 at λ = 2120 nm). We hypothesize that this should translate into more efficient laser lithotripsy using the Thulium fiber laser. This study directly compares stone vaporization rates for Holmium and Thulium fiber lasers. Holmium laser radiation pulsed at 3 Hz with 70 mJ pulse energy and 220 μs pulse duration was delivered through a 100-μm-core silica fiber to human uric acid (UA) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones, ex vivo (n = 10 each). Thulium fiber laser radiation pulsed at 10 Hz with 70 mJ pulse energy and 1 ms pulse duration was also delivered through a 100-μm fiber for the same sets of 10 stones. For same number of pulses and total energy (126 J) delivered to each stone, mass loss averaged 2.4 +/- 0.6 mg (UA) and 0.7 +/- 0.2 mg (COM) for Holmium laser and 12.6 +/- 2.5 mg (UA) and 6.8 +/- 1.7 (COM) for Thulium fiber laser. UA and COM stone vaporization rates for Thulium fiber laser averaged 5-10 times higher than for Holmium laser at 70 mJ pulse energies. With further development, the Thulium fiber laser may represent an alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for more efficient laser lithotripsy.

  7. Evaluation of holmium laser for transurethral deroofing of severe and multiloculated prostatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan Ho; Ku, Ja Yoon; Park, Young Joo; Lee, Jeong Zoo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to evaluate the use of a holmium laser for transurethral deroofing of a prostatic abscess in patients with severe and multiloculated prostatic abscesses. Materials and Methods From January 2011 to April 2014, eight patients who were diagnosed with prostatic abscesses and who underwent transurethral holmium laser deroofing at Pusan National University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Results Multiloculated or multifocal abscess cavities were found on the preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan in all eight patients. All patients who underwent transurethral holmium laser deroofing of a prostatic abscess had successful outcomes, without the need for secondary surgery. Of the eight patients, seven underwent holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for the removal of residual adenoma. Markedly reduced multiloculated abscess cavities were found in the follow-up CT in all patients. No prostatic abscess recurrence was found. Transient stress urinary incontinence was observed in three patients. The stress urinary incontinence subsided within 3 weeks in two patients and improved with conservative management within 2 months in the remaining patient. Conclusions Transurethral holmium laser deroofing of prostatic abscesses ensures successful drainage of the entire abscess cavity. Because we resolved the predisposing conditions of prostatic abscess, such as bladder outlet obstruction and prostatic calcification, by simultaneously conducting HoLEP, there was no recurrence of the prostatic abscesses after surgery. We recommend our method in patients requiring transurethral drainage. PMID:25685303

  8. Safety and efficacy of holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy in patients with bleeding diatheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Cook, Anthony J.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Auge, Brian K.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser lithotripsy in the treatment of upper urinary tract calculi in patients with known and uncorrected bleeding diatheses. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review from 2 tertiary stone centers was performed to identify patients with known bleeding diatheses who were treated with holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for upper urinary tract calculi. Twenty-five patients with 29 upper urinary tract calculi were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. Bleeding diatheses identified were coumadin administration for various conditions (17), liver dysfunction (3), thrombocytopenia (4), and von Willebrand's disease (1). Mean international normalized ratio (INR), platelet count and bleeding time were 2.3, 50 x 109/L, and > 16 minutes, for patients receiving coumadin or with liver dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, or von Willebrand's disease, respectively. Results: Overall, the stone-free rate was 96% (27/28) and 29 of 30 procedures were completed successfully without significant complication. One patient who was treated concomitantly with electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) had a significant retroperitoneal hemorrhage that required blood transfusion. Conclusions: Treatment of upper tract urinary calculi in patients with uncorrected bleeding diatheses can be safely performed using contemporary small caliber ureteroscopes and holmium laser as the sole modality of lithotripsy. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy without preoperative correction of hemostatic parameters limits the risk of thromboembolic complications and costs associated with an extended hospital stay. Avoidance of the use of EHL is crucial in reducing bleeding complications in this cohort of patients.

  9. [A Case of Holmium: YAG Laser Resection of Superficial Bladder Tumor (HoLRBT)].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yoshiko; Shitara, Toshiya; Hirayama, Takahiro; Fujita, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kubo, Seiichi; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of holmium : YAG laser resection of superficial bladder tumor (HoLRBT). A 73-year-old male was referred to our hospital with elevated prostatic specific antigen. Due to difficulty of urination, holmium : YAG laser enucleation of the prostate was performed under the diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia. During the surgery, superficial bladder tumor was incidentally identified, and HoLRBT was performed. After the operation, histopathological examination revealed urothelial carcinoma, G2 > G1, pTa. The patient has been subsequently followed up for 9 months, and there areno evidence of recurrence. Changing the holmium : YAG laser energy setting can potentially be effective and safe to approach a superficial bladder tumor. PMID:26563623

  10. Proximal fiber tip damage during Holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller fibers than possible during Holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared to Holmium laser multimodal beam. TFL beam at wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 50-500 Hz. For each pulse rate, 500,000 pulses were delivered. Magnified images of proximal fiber surfaces were taken before and after each trial. For comparison, 20 single-use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical Holmium laser lithotripsy procedures using standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output power was stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed after delivery of 500,000 pulses at settings up to 35 mJ, 500 Hz, and 17.5 W average power. In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after Holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation in all 20 fibers. The proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted 17.5 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of Holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially reduce costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  11. Non-radiative decay of holmium-doped laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Steven R.; O'Connor, Shawn; Condon, Nicholas J.; Friebele, E. Joseph; Kim, Woohong; Shaw, B.; Quimby, R. S.

    2013-03-01

    Anti-Stokes fluorescence cooling has been demonstrated in a number rare earth doped materials. Ytterbium doped oxides and fluorides, such as ZBLAN, YLF, and YAG, were the first materials to exhibit cooling.1,2,3 These materials were originally developed as laser gain media and fluorescence cooling was eventually incorporated into the 1μm lasers to reduce detrimental thermal loading.4 Anti-Stokes cooling can offset quantum defect heating allowing laser power to be scaled to very high average powers. Since the early work in ytterbium, fluorescence cooling has been demonstrated in both erbium and thulium doped materials.5,6 These materials were also initially developed as lasing media and their fluorescence cooling could be used to increase laser powers at 1.5μm and 2.0μm. In this study we examine the radiative efficiency of holmium and ask the question, "Can anti-Stokes fluorescence cooling be extended beyond 2μm?"

  12. Single crystal growth and characterization of holmium tartrate trihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, Basharat; Ahmad, Farooq; Kotru, P. N.

    2007-02-01

    The growth of holmium tartrate trihydrate (HTT) single crystals is achieved in organic (agar-agar) as well as in inorganic (silica) gels by single gel diffusion method. Results of the study on nucleation kinetics of crystals grown in silica gel are described. The crystals exhibit the morphological form of a tetragonal dipyramidal class with {0 0 1} and {1 1 1} as dominant faces. Elemental and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) supplemented by energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) support the suggested chemical formula of the grown crystals to be [Ho (C 4H 4O 6) (C 4H 5O 6)·3H 2O]. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicate that the crystals belong to tetragonal system with the cell parameters a=5.97 Å, c=36.09 Å, bearing the space group P4 1. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic study indicates the presence of tartrate ligands and suggests that one of the tartrate ions is singly ionized. TGA suggests that the material is thermally stable up to 220 °C.

  13. Magnetic field-dependent spin structures of nanocrystalline holmium

    PubMed Central

    Szary, Philipp; Kaiser, Daniel; Bick, Jens-Peter; Lott, Dieter; Heinemann, André; Dewhurst, Charles; Birringer, Rainer; Michels, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The results are reported of magnetic field-dependent neutron diffraction experiments on polycrystalline inert-gas condensed holmium with a nanometre crystallite size (D = 33 nm). At T = 50 K, no evidence is found for the existence of helifan(3/2) or helifan(2) structures for the nanocrystalline sample, in contrast with results reported in the literature for the single crystal. Instead, when the applied field H is increased, the helix pattern transforms progressively, most likely into a fan structure. It is the component of H which acts on the basal-plane spins of a given nanocrystallite that drives the disappearance of the helix; for nanocrystalline Ho, this field is about 1.3 T, and it is related to a characteristic kink in the virgin magnetization curve. For a coarse-grained Ho sample, concomitant with the destruction of the helix phase, the emergence of an unusual angular anisotropy (streak pattern) and the appearance of novel spin structures are observed. PMID:27047307

  14. Thermal Properties of Holmium-Implanted Gold Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, K.; Alves, E.; Bagliani, D.; Yanardag, S. Basak; Biasotti, M.; Galeazzi, M.; Gatti, F.; Gomes, M. Ribeiro; Rocha, J.; Uprety, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The effective mass of the electron neutrino can be probed by studying the Ho electron capture decay with cryogenic microcalorimeters. The goal is to perform a calorimetric experiment, where all the energy released in the decay is measured except for the kinetic energy of the neutrino. To achieve such a goal, multiple approaches are being investigated to enclose the radioactive source in a microcalorimeter absorber without affecting the thermal properties of the absorber material. One such approach is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in similar applications. We measured the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70-300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future experiment. We also verified that the implant does not affect the crystal structure of the gold film.

  15. Clinical development of holmium:YAG laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser vaporization and resection of the prostate offers advantages in immediate tissue removal compared to the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser. Ongoing development of appropriate operative techniques and Ho:YAG laser delivery systems suitable for endoscopic prostate surgery, including side-firing optical delivery fibers, have facilitated this approach. We performed Ho:YAG laser prostatectomy in 20 human subjects, including 2 men treated immediately prior to radical prostatectomy to assess Ho:YAG laser effects in the prostate. A total of 18 men were treated in an initial clinical trial of Ho:YAG prostatectomy. Estimated excess hyperplastic prostate tissue averaged 24 g (range 5 - 50 g). A mean of 129 kj Ho:YAG laser energy was delivered, combined with a mean of 11 kj Nd:YAG energy to provide supplemental coagulation for hemostasis. We have observed no significant perioperative or late complications. No significant intraoperative changes in hematocrit or serum electrolytes were documented. In addition to providing acute removal of obstructing prostate tissue, Ho:YAG laser resection allowed tissue specimen to be obtained for histologic examination. A total of 16 of 18 patients (90%) underwent successful removal of their urinary catheter and voiding trial within 24 hours following surgery. Immediate improvement in voiding, comparable to classic transurethral electrocautery resection of the prostate (TURP), was reported by all patients. Ho:YAG laser resection of the prostate appears to be a viable surgical technique associated with minimal morbidity and immediate improvement in voiding.

  16. An architecture for quantum computation with magnetically trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, Mark; Hostetter, James; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Outstanding challenges for scalable neutral atom quantum computation include correction of atom loss due to collisions with untrapped background gas, reduction of crosstalk during state preparation and measurement due to scattering of near resonant light, and the need to improve quantum gate fidelity. We present a scalable architecture based on loading single Holmium atoms into an array of Ioffe-Pritchard traps. The traps are formed by grids of superconducting wires giving a trap array with 40 μm period, suitable for entanglement via long range Rydberg gates. The states | F = 5 , M = 5 > and | F = 7 , M = 7 > provide a magic trapping condition at a low field of 3.5 G for long coherence time qubit encoding. The F = 11 level will be used for state preparation and measurement. The availability of different states for encoding, gate operations, and measurement, spectroscopically isolates the different operations and will prevent crosstalk to neighboring qubits. Operation in a cryogenic environment with ultra low pressure will increase atom lifetime and Rydberg gate fidelity by reduction of blackbody induced Rydberg decay. We will present a complete description of the architecture including estimates of achievable performance metrics. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  17. Holmium:YAG laser in dentistry: photoconditioning of dentinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1994-09-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to determine energy levels necessary to produce tubule closure and surface smoothing on dentinal surfaces of human teeth and their resultant temperature increases within the pulpal canals with the Holmium:YAG laser. An optimal working spot size and even absorption pattern were produced by defocusing the laser beam and evaluated by images produced on light exposed and developed photographic paper. The surface effects on dentin were examined by scanning electron microscopy. A thermocouple was positioned in the canals of fresh dissected dog jaws and attached to a recorder which produced a graph of the temperature changes. The in vitro research model for intrapulpal temperatures changes was verified by comparing premortem and postmortem temperature readings. The same protocol was used to evaluate temperature changes in fresh human extracted teeth. In vivo histological studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of HO:YAG laser energy on pulpal tissues. The results of these studies indicate the HO:YAG laser at a wavelength of 2.12 microns can be safely and effectively used for photoconditioning of the dentinal surfaces of teeth in clinical conditions.

  18. Suppression of optical damage at 532 nm in Holmium doped congruent lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Eftihia; O'Connell, Nathan H; Balli, Nicolas R; Pokhrel, Madhab; Movsesyan, Anush; Kokanyan, Edvard; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2014-10-20

    Optical damage experiments were carried out in a series of Holmium doped congruent lithium niobate (Ho:cLN) crystals as a function of dopant concentration and laser intensity. The light induced beam distortion was recorded with a camera and a detector under the pseudo-Z-scan configuration. At 532 nm, strong suppression of the optical damage was observed for the 0.94 mol. % doped crystal. Increased resistance to optical damage was also observed at 488 nm. The suppression of the optical damage is predominantly attributed to the reduction of the Nb antisites due to the holmium doping. PMID:25401654

  19. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  20. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  1. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  2. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  3. THE BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MESOPOROUS SILICATES

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Sarah; Padera, Robert F.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    Micro- and nano- mesoporous silicate particles are considered potential drug delivery systems because of their ordered pore structures, large surface areas and the ease with which they can be chemically modified. However, few cytotoxicity or biocompatibility studies have been reported, especially when silicates are administered in the quantities necessary to deliver low-potency drugs. The biocompatibility of mesoporous silicates of particle sizes ~ 150 nm, ~ 800 nm and ~ 4 µm and pore sizes of 3 nm, 7 nm and 16 nm respectively are examined here. In vitro, mesoporous silicates showed a significant degree of toxicity at high concentrations with mesothelial cells. Following subcutaneous injection of silicates in rats, the amount of residual material decreased progressively over three months, with good biocompatibility on histology at all time points. In contrast, intra peritoneal and intra venous injections in mice resulted in death or euthanasia. No toxicity was seen with subcutaneous injection of the same particles in mice. Microscopic analysis of the lung tissue of the mice indicates that death may be due to thrombosis. Although local tissue reaction to mesoporous silicates was benign, they caused severe systemic toxicity. This toxicity could be mitigated by modification of the materials. PMID:18675454

  4. Histological evaluation of coagulation foci produced in the human lens with a holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Dariusz; Kecik, Tadeusz; Pratnicki, Antoni; Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Mariusz

    1997-10-01

    We present the results of histological evaluation of human lenses treated with the holmium laser. The lenses, extracted at the time of extracapsular surgery for cataract, were placed in containers filled with Ringer's solution. After treatment with laser-emitted radiation they were histologically evaluated. The formation of crater-like defects was found in the material studied.

  5. Holmium laser for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: old wine in a new bottle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelius, Thomas; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia affect 70% of men older than 70 years. Complications are common problems and a significant cause of morbidity in this population, placing a considerable burden on health services. In the early 1990s laser treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia became widely used after the introduction of the side-firing neodym: YAG laser. However, because of technical limitations and inferior results compared to classical transurethral resection of the prostate many Urologists became desinterested in this device. With the introduction of the holmium: YAG laser a new laser generation became available for use in Urology. Beside several other applications the holmium: YAG laser can be used for incision, ablation, resection, and more recently enucleation of the prostate. In this paper we reviewed the current literature regarding the holmium: YAG laser resection and enucleation of the prostate compared to transurethral resection of the prostate and open prostatectomy. The holmium: YAG laser technique is an effective and durable surgical alternative to standard transurethral resection of the prostate. Interestingly, enucleation of the prostate with this device seems to be a safe and effective procedure for large prostatic adenomas, it may become an attractive alternative to open prostatectomy.

  6. Preparation and complex characterization of silica holmium sol-gel monoliths.

    PubMed

    Cacaina, D; Areva, S; Laaksonen, H; Simon, S; Ylänen, H

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous, sol-gel derived SiO(2) are known to biocompatible and bioresorbable materials. Biodegradable and inert materials containing radioactive isotopes have potential application as delivery vehicles of the beta radiation to the cancer tumors inside the body. Incorporation of holmium in the sol-gel derived SiO(2) could lead to the formation of a biodegradable material which could be used as carrier biomaterial for the radiation of radioactive holmium to the various cancer sites. The homogeneity of the prepared sol-gel silica holmium monoliths was investigated by Back Scattered Electron Imaging of Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, X-ray Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. The biodegradation of the monoliths was investigated in Simulated Body Fluid and TRIS (Trizma pre-set Crystals) solution. The results show that by suitable tailoring of the sol-gel processing parameters holmium can be homogeneously incorporated in the silica matrix with a controlled biodegradation rate. PMID:21132520

  7. Fiber-optic manipulation of urinary stone phantoms using holmium:YAG and thulium fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Richard L; Case, Jason R; Trammell, Susan R; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-02-01

    Fiber-optic attraction of urinary stones during laser lithotripsy may be exploited to manipulate stone fragments inside the urinary tract without mechanical grasping tools, saving the urologist time and space in the ureteroscope working channel. We compare thulium fiber laser (TFL) high pulse rate/low pulse energy operation to conventional holmium:YAG low pulse rate/high pulse energy operation for fiber-optic suctioning of plaster-of-paris (PoP) stone phantoms. A TFL (wavelength of 1908 nm, pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500 μs, and pulse rate of 10 to 350 Hz) and a holmium laser (wavelength of 2120 nm, pulse energy of 35 to 360 mJ, pulse duration of 300 μs, and pulse rate of 20 Hz) were tested using 270-μm-core optical fibers. A peak drag speed of ~2.5 mm/s was measured for both TFL (35 mJ and 150 to 250 Hz) and holmium laser (210 mJ and 20 Hz). Particle image velocimetry and thermal imaging were used to track water flow for all parameters. Fiber-optic suctioning of urinary stone phantoms is feasible. TFL operation at high pulse rates/low pulse energies is preferable to holmium operation at low pulse rates/high pulse energies for rapid and smooth stone pulling. With further development, this novel technique may be useful for manipulating stone fragments in the urinary tract. PMID:23377013

  8. Measurement of cross sections for charge pickup by relativistic holmium ions on heavy targets

    SciTech Connect

    Westphal, A.J.; Guiru, J.; Price, P.B. Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California )

    1991-10-01

    We have measured the cross section for nuclear charge pickup by relativistic holmium on several targets of larger atomic number than have been studied previously. We find that although measurements made with most of the targets are consistent with a peripheral geometric scaling, one target, silver, shows an anomalously high cross section.

  9. Fiber-optic manipulation of urinary stone phantoms using holmium:YAG and thulium fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Case, Jason R.; Trammell, Susan R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-02-01

    Fiber-optic attraction of urinary stones during laser lithotripsy may be exploited to manipulate stone fragments inside the urinary tract without mechanical grasping tools, saving the urologist time and space in the ureteroscope working channel. We compare thulium fiber laser (TFL) high pulse rate/low pulse energy operation to conventional holmium:YAG low pulse rate/high pulse energy operation for fiber-optic suctioning of plaster-of-paris (PoP) stone phantoms. A TFL (wavelength of 1908 nm, pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500 μs, and pulse rate of 10 to 350 Hz) and a holmium laser (wavelength of 2120 nm, pulse energy of 35 to 360 mJ, pulse duration of 300 μs, and pulse rate of 20 Hz) were tested using 270-μm-core optical fibers. A peak drag speed of ˜2.5 mm/s was measured for both TFL (35 mJ and 150 to 250 Hz) and holmium laser (210 mJ and 20 Hz). Particle image velocimetry and thermal imaging were used to track water flow for all parameters. Fiber-optic suctioning of urinary stone phantoms is feasible. TFL operation at high pulse rates/low pulse energies is preferable to holmium operation at low pulse rates/high pulse energies for rapid and smooth stone pulling. With further development, this novel technique may be useful for manipulating stone fragments in the urinary tract.

  10. Femtosecond mode-locked holmium fiber laser pumped by semiconductor disk laser.

    PubMed

    Chamorovskiy, A; Marakulin, A V; Ranta, S; Tavast, M; Rautiainen, J; Leinonen, T; Kurkov, A S; Okhotnikov, O G

    2012-05-01

    We report on a 2085 nm holmium-doped silica fiber laser passively mode-locked by semiconductor saturable absorber mirror and carbon nanotube absorber. The laser, pumped by a 1.16 μm semiconductor disk laser, produces 890 femtosecond pulses with the average power of 46 mW and the repetition rate of 15.7 MHz. PMID:22555700

  11. Chiral holmium complex-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of silyloxyvinylindoles: stereoselective synthesis of hydrocarbazoles.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinji; Morikawa, Takahiro; Nishida, Atsushi

    2013-10-18

    The catalytic and asymmetric cycloaddition between 3-[1-(silyloxy)vinyl]indoles and electron-deficient olefins gave substituted hydrocarbazoles in up to 99% yield and 94% ee. This reaction was catalyzed by a novel chiral holmium(III) complex. Alkylation of the cycloadduct gave a tricyclic compound with four continuous chiral centers, one of which was a quaternary carbon. PMID:24079531

  12. Laser-assisted hair transplantation: histologic comparison between holmium:YAG and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Eugene A.; Rabinov, C. Rose; Wong, Brian J.; Krugman, Mark E.

    1999-06-01

    The histological effects of flash-scanned CO2 (λ=10.6μm) and pulsed Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG, λ=2.12μm) lasers were evaluated in human scalp following the creation of hair transplant recipient channels. Ho:YAG laser irradiation created larger zones of thermal injury adjacent to the laser channels than irradiation with the CO2 laser device. When the two lasers created recipient sites of nearly equal depth, the Holmium:YAG laser caused a larger region of lateral thermal damage (589.30μm) than the CO2 laser (118.07μm). In addition, Holmium:YAG irradiated specimens exhibited fractures or discontinuities beyond the region of clear thermal injury. This shearing effect is consistent with the photoacoustic mechanism of ablation associated with pulsed mid-IR laser irradiation. In contrast, channels created with the CO2 exhibited minimal epithelial disruption and significantly less lateral thermal damage. While the Holmium:YAG laser is a useful tool for ablation soft tissue with minimal char in select applications (sinus surgery, arthroscopic surgery), this study suggests that the use of the CO2 laser for the creation of transplantation recipient channels result in significantly less lateral thermal injury for the laser parameters employed.

  13. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  14. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  15. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  16. Combination of fiber-guided pulsed erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratisto, Hans; Frenz, Martin; Ith, Michael; Altermatt, Hans J.; Jansen, E. Duco; Weber, Heinz P.

    1996-07-01

    Because of the high absorption of near-infrared laser radiation in biological tissue, erbium lasers and holmium lasers emitting at 3 and 2 mu m, respectively, have been proven to have optimal qualities for cutting or welding and coagulating tissue. To combine the advantages of both wavelengths, we realized a multiwavelength laser system by simultaneously guiding erbium and holmium laser radiation by means of a single zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) fiber. Laser-induced channel formation in water and poly(acrylamide) gel was investigated by the use of a time-resolved flash-photography setup, while pressure transients were recorded simultaneously with a needle hydrophone. The shapes and depths of vapor channels produced in water and in a submerged gel after single erbium and after combination erbium-holmium radiation delivered by means of a 400- mu m ZrF4 fiber were measured. Transmission measurements were performed to determine the amount of pulse energy available for tissue ablation. The effects of laser wavelength and the delay time between pulses of different wavelengths on the photomechanical and photothermal responses of meniscal tissue were evaluated in vitro by the use of histology. It was observed that the use of a short (200- mu s, 100-mJ) holmium laser pulse as a prepulse to generate a vapor bubble through which the ablating erbium laser pulse can be transmitted (delay time, 100 mu s) increases the cutting depth in meniscus from 450 to 1120 mu m as compared with the depth following a single erbium pulse. The results indicate that a combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation precisely and efficiently cuts tissue under water with 20-50- mu m collateral tissue damage. wave, cavitation, channel formation, infrared-fiber-delivery system, tissue damage, cartilage.

  17. Comparative analysis of the optical spectra of the holmium atom excited by electron impact and ionic bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Vasileva, E.K.; Morozov, S.N.; Ryskin, B.V.

    1988-02-01

    A comparative analysis of the optical spectra of holmium excited by electron impact and ionic bombardment is given. It is shown that under ionic bombardment, the probability of excitation of screened transitions is significantly higher than under electron impact.

  18. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty: quantitative angiography and clinical results in a large experience of a single medical center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Clinical experience with the mid IR holmium:YAG laser in a single medical center (St. Paul Ramsey Medical Center, University of Minnesota Medical School, St. Paul, MN) includes 112 patients who underwent holmium laser coronary angioplasty. Utilizing a unique lasing technique; `pulse and retreat,' we applied this laser to thrombotic and nonthrombotic lesions in patients presenting with unstable angina, stable angina, and acute myocardial infarction. A very high clinical success and very low complication rates were achieved. Holmium:YAG laser is effective and safe therapy for patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. Unlike excimer lasers, the clinical success, efficacy and safety of holmium laser angioplasty is not compromised when thrombus is present.

  19. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  20. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula. PMID:15118720

  1. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers <5 microm were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. Likewise, Clinoptilolite, Phillipsite, Mordenite, Nonfibrous Japanese Zeolite, and synthetic Zeolites were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. These ingredients are not significantly toxic in oral acute or short-term oral or parenteral toxicity studies in animals. Inhalation toxicity, however, is readily demonstrated in animals. Particle size, fibrogenicity, concentration, and mineral composition had the greatest effect on toxicity. Larger particle size and longer and wider fibers cause more adverse effects. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate was a weak primary skin irritant in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. No gross effects were reported in any of these studies. Sodium Magnesium Silicate had no primary skin irritation in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. Hectorite was nonirritating to the skin of rabbits in a Draize primary skin

  2. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M.; Reinhardt, Frederick W.; Odinek, Judy G.

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  3. Silicates in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirocky, M. M.; Levenson, N. A.; Elitzur, M.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Armus, L.

    2008-05-01

    We analyze the mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph. Dust emission dominates the MIR spectra of ULIRGs, and the reprocessed radiation that emerges is independent of the underlying heating spectrum. Instead, the resulting emission depends sensitively on the geometric distribution of the dust, which we diagnose with comparisons of numerical simulations of radiative transfer. Quantifying the silicate emission and absorption features that appear near 10 and 18 μm requires a reliable determination of the continuum, and we demonstrate that including a measurement of the continuum at intermediate wavelength (between the features) produces accurate results at all optical depths. With high-quality spectra, we successfully use the silicate features to constrain the dust chemistry. The observations of the ULIRGs and local sight lines require dust that has a relatively high 18 μm/10 μm absorption ratio of the silicate features (around 0.5). Specifically, the cold dust of Ossenkopf et al. is consistent with the observations, while other dust models are not. We use the silicate feature strengths to identify two families of ULIRGs, in which the dust distributions are fundamentally different. Optical spectral classifications are related to these families. In ULIRGs that harbor an active galactic nucleus, the spectrally broad lines are detected only when the nuclear surroundings are clumpy. In contrast, the sources of lower ionization optical spectra are deeply embedded in smooth distributions of optically thick dust.

  4. Circumstellar Crystalline Silicates: Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, Josh; Speck, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the last 15 years was the discovery of crystalline silicate stardust by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board of ISO; discovery of the crystalline grains was indeed one of the biggest surprises of the ISO mission. Initially discovered around AGB stars (evolved stars in the range of 0.8 > M/M¤>8) at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths, crystalline silicates have since been seen in many astrophysical environments including young stellar objects (T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be), comets and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) comprise 95% of the contributors to the ISM, so study of the formation of crystalline silicates is critical to our understanding of the ISM, which is thought to be primarily amorphous (one would expect an almost exact match between the composition of AGB dust shells and the dust in the ISM). Whether the crystalline dust is merely undetectable or amorphized remains a mystery. The FORCAST instrument on SOFIA as well as the PACS instrument on Herschel will provide exciting observing opportunities for the further study of crystalline silicates.

  5. Microwave emission from granular silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental finding is that mass absorption coefficient is independent of frequency but highly dependent on moisture content; effective conductivity increases with frequency, and low tangent is independent of frequency. Computed values of electrical properties are in rough numerical agreement with extrapolated laboratory values on other silicate materials.

  6. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly

  7. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tricalcium silicate. 582.2906 Section 582.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  9. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tricalcium silicate. 182.2906 Section 182.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  10. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  11. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Tricalcium silicate. 182.2906 Section 182.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  12. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tricalcium silicate. 582.2906 Section 582.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  13. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  14. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  15. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  16. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  17. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  18. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  19. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  20. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  1. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  2. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  3. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  4. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  5. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  9. Effect of holmium and erbium laser action on the human lens: an in-vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Dariusz

    1997-10-01

    We investigated the holmium and erbium lasers operating at the medium IR range, used for cataract surgery. The main advantage of these lasers action on biological structures is total absorption of radiation by superficial layers. During the study of the lens emulsification process we found that the mechanical properties of the lens nucleus were of crucial importance for the rate of emulsification. The soft lenses were fragmented and emulsified after 200-700 pulses, while the hard lens required 5000 or more pulses while complete emulsification was not achieved. The results are promising and show that the holmium and erbium lasers can be used for human lens emulsification during ECCE. For clinical purposes, however, it is necessary to construct a suitable fiberoptic tip to be used in cataract removal. It seems that lasers whose beam is in the medium IR range could be used in many ophthalmic operations.

  10. Medium-energy ion-scattering study of strained holmium silicide nanoislands grown on silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, T. J.; Eames, C.; Bonet, C.; Reakes, M. B.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Bailey, P.; Tear, S. P.

    2008-07-01

    We have used medium-energy ion scattering (MEIS) to quantitatively analyze the structure of holmium silicide islands grown on the Si(100) surface. Structure fitting to the experimental data unambiguously shows that the tetragonal silicide phase is present and not the hexagonal phase, which is associated with the growth of nanowires at submonolayer coverages. Islands formed with a lower holmium coverage of 3 ML are also shown to be tetragonal, which suggests that the hexagonal structure is not a low coverage precursor to the growth of the tetragonal phase. MEIS simulations of large nanoislands, which include the effects of lateral strain relief, have been performed and these compare well with the experimental data.

  11. Influence of water environment on holmium laser ablation performance for hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Li, Zhengjia

    2012-05-01

    This study clarifies the ablation differences in air and in water for hard biological tissues, which are irradiated by fiber-guided long-pulsed holmium lasers. High-speed photography is used to record the dynamic characteristics of ablation plumes and vaporization bubbles induced by pulsed holmium lasers. The ablation morphologies and depth of hard tissues are quantitatively measured by optical coherence microscopy. Explosive vaporization effects in water play a positive role in the contact ablation process and are directly responsible for significant ablation enhancement. Furthermore, water layer depth can also contribute to ablation performance. Under the same laser parameters for fiber-tissue contact ablation in air and water, ablation performances are comparable for a single-laser pulse, but for more laser pulses the ablation performances in water are better than those in air. Comprehensive knowledge of ablation differences under various environments is important, especially in medical procedures that are performed in a liquid environment. PMID:22614434

  12. Solubility product and thermodynamic functions for the holmium trifluoride - water system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.P.; James, J.; Hill, T.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The total solubility, free ion concentrations in saturated solutions, solubility products and thermodynamic functions for the dissolution of holmium trifluoride hemihydrate together with the stability constants for the holmium mono- and diflouride complexes are reported in this paper. Conductometric and potentiometric methods were used to measure the solubilities for comparison of the results obtained therefrom. Our values for pK{sub SO}, the thermodynamic solubility product in terms of free ion concentrations of both ions, obtained from both methods are in agreement with one of the reported values. There are no values reported in the literature for the thermodynamic constants for the dissolution process to be compared with except for entropy change. Our values for the stability constants, measured by a simplified procedure, do not agree with those reported by previous authors.

  13. Thermal properties of holmium-implanted gold films for a neutrino mass experiment with cryogenic microcalorimeters.

    PubMed

    Prasai, K; Alves, E; Bagliani, D; Basak Yanardag, S; Biasotti, M; Galeazzi, M; Gatti, F; Ribeiro Gomes, M; Rocha, J; Uprety, Y

    2013-08-01

    In a microcalorimetric neutrino mass experiment using the radioactive decay of (163)Ho, the radioactive material must be fully embedded in the microcalorimeter absorber. One option that is being investigated is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in other applications. However, knowing the thermal properties at the working temperature of microcalorimeters is critical for choosing the absorber material and for optimizing the detector performance. In particular, it is paramount to understand if implanting the radioactive material in gold changes its heat capacity. We used a bolometric technique to measure the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the (163)Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70 mK-300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the gold films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future microcalorimeter holmium experiment. PMID:24007077

  14. Thermal properties of holmium-implanted gold films for a neutrino mass experiment with cryogenic microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Prasai, K.; Yanardag, S. Basak; Galeazzi, M.; Uprety, Y.; Alves, E.; Rocha, J.; Bagliani, D.; Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Gomes, M. Ribeiro

    2013-08-15

    In a microcalorimetric neutrino mass experiment using the radioactive decay of {sup 163}Ho, the radioactive material must be fully embedded in the microcalorimeter absorber. One option that is being investigated is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in other applications. However, knowing the thermal properties at the working temperature of microcalorimeters is critical for choosing the absorber material and for optimizing the detector performance. In particular, it is paramount to understand if implanting the radioactive material in gold changes its heat capacity. We used a bolometric technique to measure the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the {sup 163}Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70 mK–300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the gold films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future microcalorimeter holmium experiment.

  15. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  16. Mathematical modelling of dispersion-managed thulium/holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yarutkina, I A; Shtyrina, O V

    2013-11-30

    The mathematical model of a dispersion-managed thulium/holmium fibre laser is described; the results of numerical calculations and their comparison with the experimental data are presented. Qualitative agreement of the results of the mathematical modelling with those of the experiment is obtained. Using the methods of mathematical modelling, the variation in the characteristics of the optical pulses due to the change in the average cavity dispersion is analysed. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  17. Laser Prostatectomy: Holmium Laser Enucleation and Photoselective Laser Vaporization of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Bostanci, Yakup; Kazzazi, Amir; Djavan, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Historically, transurethral resection of the prostate has been the gold standard for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Laser technology has been used to treat BPH for > 15 years. Over the past decade, it has gained wide acceptance by experienced urologists. This review provides an evidence-based update on laser surgery for BPH with a focus on photoselective laser vaporization and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate surgeries and assesses the safety, efficacy, and durability of these techniques. PMID:23671400

  18. Successful treatment of recurrent vesicourethral stricture after radical prostatectomy with holmium laser: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tetsuo; Yoshinaga, Atsushi; Ohno, Rena; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Toru; Yamada, Takumi; Kihara, Kazunori

    2005-04-01

    We report three cases with severe anastomotic strictures, which recurred several times after radical prostatectomy despite repeated treatments of urethral dilation, internal urethrotomy and/or transurethral resection. All three cases were finally treated with holmium laser successfully without any intraoperative or postoperative complications after repeated failures of each treatment. There were two specific characteristics in these three cases: the early onset of the stricture and the pinhole opening located on the top (12-o'clock) of the stricture wall. PMID:15948734

  19. Obliterated urethra: holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet cut-to-light with urolume stenting.

    PubMed

    Monga, M; Gordon, Z; Alexandrescu, B

    2001-12-01

    Antegrade-retrograde urethrotomy, or the cut-to-light procedure, performed for obliterated urethra is associated with a high rate of recurrence of urethra] stricture. With the goal of reducing the stricture recurrence rate, we performed a modified cut-to-light procedure using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and UroLume stenting in a 76-year-old man with urethral obliteration. PMID:11763485

  20. Separation of carrier-free holmium-166 from neutron-irradiated dysprosium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dadachova, E.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Hetherington, E.L. ); Mirzadeh, S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. )

    1994-12-01

    Holmium-166 ([sup 166]Ho, t[sub 1/2] = 26.4 h) is utilized in radiotherapeutic applications such as radioimmunospecific pharmaceuticals, bone marrow ablation, and radiation synovectomy. High specific activity [sup 166]Ho can be obtained from the decay of dysprosium-166 ([sup 166]Dy, t[sub 1/2] = 81.5 h). Dysprosium-166 is produced by the [sup 164]Dy[n,[gamma

  1. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a review of the clinical trial evidence.

    PubMed

    Cynk, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has remained the procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of bladder outflow obstruction for almost five decades, but holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is now emerging as a challenger as the gold standard procedure. This review summarizes the evidence base for HoLEP, with particular reference to randomized, controlled (level 1) evidence. PMID:24688602

  2. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a review of the clinical trial evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has remained the procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of bladder outflow obstruction for almost five decades, but holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is now emerging as a challenger as the gold standard procedure. This review summarizes the evidence base for HoLEP, with particular reference to randomized, controlled (level 1) evidence. PMID:24688602

  3. Holmium:YAG laser-assisted otolaryngologic surgery: Lahey Clinic experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapshay, Stanley M.; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Pankratov, Michail M.

    1993-07-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser was used to assist in 36 rhinologic procedures including surgery for chronic sinus disease, chronic dacryocystitis, recurrent choanal stenosis, and a sphenoid sinus mucocele. There were no laser related complications. The laser permitted controlled ablation of bone and soft tissue in all cases with satisfactory results. The Ho:YAG laser can be used in otolaryngology to assist in cases where surgical access is difficult or when controlled, precise bone and soft tissue ablation is necessary.

  4. Efficient holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser longitudinally pumped by a semiconductor laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1987-01-01

    Optical pumping of a holmium:yttrium lithium floride (Ho:YLF) crystal with a 790-nm continuous-wave diode-laser array has generated 56 mW of 2.1-micron laser radiation with an optical-to-optical conversion slope efficiency of 33 percent while the crystal temperature is held at 77 K. The lasing threshold occurs at 7 mW of input power, and laser operation continues up to a crystal temperature of 124 K.

  5. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  6. Soft-tissue applications of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    The ideal surgical laser for the treatment of soft tissue pathology should possess both ablative and hemostatic abilities. As well, for use in urologic conditions the laser must also be suitable for endoscopic use. The Holmium:YAG laser possesses these qualities and in preliminary clinical use has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications. In this study we review our initial experience with the Holmium:YAG laser over a 18 month period. A total of 51 patients underwent 53 procedures for a variety of soft tissue conditions including: bladder tumor ablation (25), incision of ureteral stricture (15), incision of urethral stricture (6), treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (3), incision of bladder neck contracture (2), and ablation of a ureteral tumor (2). Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved in all cases. Procedures were considered successful (no further intervention being required to treat the condition) in 81% of the cases. Two patients with dense bladder neck contractures required electroincision under the same anesthetic for completion of the procedure. A single complication, that of urinary extravasation following incision of a urethral stricture resolved with conservative management. In summary, the Holmium:YAG laser has demonstrated safety and proficiency in the treatment of a variety of urologic soft tissue conditions.

  7. Effects of simultaneously fiber transmitted erbium and holmium radiation on the interaction with highly absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenz, Martin; Pratisto, Hans S.; Ith, Michael; Koenz, Flurin; Weber, Heinz P.

    1995-05-01

    Erbium and Holmium lasers have both been shown to be suitable for orthopedic surgery performed under water. Erbium lasers emitting in the 3 micrometers wavelength region corresponding to the maximum water absorption peak effectively ablated biological tissues with high precision and minimal thermal damage. Holmium laser radiation at 2 micrometers , due to a lower absorption coefficient, is characterized by a greater extent of thermal damage leading to hemostasis. To combine the special advantages of each system we simultaneously coupled their radiation into a zirconium fluoride fiber (ZrF4) which was protected with a quartz fiber tip. Pressure measurements performed in the liquid using a piezo electrical transducer, transmission measurements and video flash lamp schlieren imaging of the laser induced vapor bubble were used in order to determine optimum laser parameters. The cutting efficiency of the Erbium laser is drastically improved when a low energy Holmium laser pulse is additionally used which is just able to open a vapor channel through which the Erbium laser pulse can be transmitted. The dynamics of the channel formation, geometry and life time are measured as a function of the delay time between the two different laser pulses and the pulse energy applied. The combination of 2 micrometers and 3 micrometers radiation seems to be an ideal instrument for tissue treatment.

  8. Laser angioplasty with lensed fibers and a holmium:YAG laser in iliac artery occlusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Christopher J.; Ramee, Stephen R.; Mesa, Juan E.; Collins, Tyrone J.; Kotmel, Robert; Godfrey, Maureen A.

    1991-05-01

    Holmium-YAG (2.1 (mu) ) laser recanalization was attempted in 10 totally occluded miniature swine iliac arteries using a lensed fiber delivery system. The iliac artery occlusions were created in a Yucatan miniature swine model of atherosclerosis by means of a high cholesterol diet and balloon endothelial denudation. In order to increase the spot size, a spherical silica lens was attached to the distal end of a 300 micrometers core diameter silica optical fiber. The holmium-YAG laser was operated in the free-running mode with 250 microsecond(s) ec pulses at 4 Hz. The energy delivered was 225 mJ per pulse for the 1.0 mm lensed fiber and 200 mJ per pulse for the 1.3 mm lensed fiber. Laser energy was delivered in 2 to 5 second bursts. Successful recanalization was achieved in all 10 arteries attempted without perforation of the arterial wall. The average length of the occlusions was 5.0 +/- 1.8 cm. Following successful laser recanalization significant stenoses (>50%) remained in all of the arteries as judged by angiography. In conclusion, the lensed fibers coupled to the pulsed holmium-YAG laser were safe and effective in recanalizing these difficult lesions in relatively straight iliac arteries. There is potential clinical utility for this system as an adjunct to balloon angioplasty in patients with lesions which are unable to be crossed with guidewires.

  9. Selective determination of the holmium in rare earth mixtures by second derivative spectrophotometry with 2-isobutylformyl-1,3-dione-indan and octylphenol poly-(ethyleneglycol)ether

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Naixing; Si Zhikun; Jiang Wei

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the absorption spectra of 4f electron transitions of the system of holmium with 2-isobutylformyl-1,3-dione-indan and TX-100 have been studied by normal and derivative spectrophotometry. The molar absorptivities are 98 (at 450 nm) and 21 (at 460 nm) 1 {center_dot} mol{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}, respectively. The use of the second derivative spectra, eliminates the interference by other lanthanides and improves the sensitivity for holmium determination. The derivative molar absorptivity is 558 1 {center_dot} mol{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}. The calibration graph was linear up to 25{mu}g/ml of holmium. The relative standard deviation evaluated from ten independent determinations of 8.0 {mu}g/ml holmium is 1.0%. The detection limit, obtained from the sensitivity of the calibration graph and for 3 S{sub b} (S{sub b} = standard deviation of a blank without holmium, n = 11), was found to be 0.31 {mu}g/ml of holmium. The quantification limit, obtained for 10 S{sub b}, was 1.0 {mu}g/ml of holmium. A method has been developed for determining holmium in a mixture of lanthanides by means of the second derivative spectra and the analytical results obtained are satisfactory.

  10. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  11. Ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy: an emerging definitive management strategy for symptomatic ureteral calculi in pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Wollin, Timothy A.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: Symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy that does not respond to conservative measures has traditionally been managed with ureteral stent insertion or percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN). Holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser lithotripsy using state-of-the-art ureteroscopes represents an emerging strategy for definitive stone management in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to review the results of holmium laser lithotripsy in a cohort of patients who presented with symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted at 2 tertiary stone centers from January 1996 to August 2001 to identify pregnant patients who were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for symptomatic urolithiasis or encrusted stents. Eight patients with a total of 10 symptomatic ureteral calculi and 2 encrusted ureteral stents were treated. Mean gestational age at presentation was 22 weeks. Mean stone size was 8.1 mm. Stones were located in the proximal ureter/ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) (3), mid ureter (1), and distal ureter (6). Results: Complete stone fragmentation and/or removal of encrusted ureteral stents were achieved in all patients using the holmium:YAG laser. The overall procedural success rate was 91%. The overall stone-free rate was 89%. No obstetrical or urological complications were encountered. Conclusions: Ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy can be performed safely in all stages of pregnancy providing definitive management of symptomatic ureteral calculi. The procedure can be done with minimal or no fluoroscopy and avoids the undesirable features of stents or nephrostomy tubes.

  12. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure. PMID:23538050

  13. Silicate stabilization studies in propylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.A.

    1999-08-01

    In most North American and many European coolant formulations, the corrosion inhibition of heat-rejecting aluminum surfaces is provided by alkali metal silicates. But, their tendency towards polymerization, leading to gelation and/or precipitation, can reduce the effectiveness of a coolant. This paper presents the results of experiments which illustrate formulation-dependent behavior of inorganic silicate in propylene glycol compositions. Specific examples of the effects of glycol matrix, stabilizer type, and hard water on silicate stabilization are provided.

  14. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  15. Effect of silicate ions on electrode overvoltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gras, J. M.; Seite, C.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the addition of a silicate to a caustic solution (KOH) is studied in order to determine the degree to which silicates inhibit the corrosion of chrysotile under conditions of electrolysis at working temperatures of 100 C and above. In an alkaline solution containing various silicate concentrations, current density was increased and electrode overvoltage was measured. Results show that silicate ion concentrations in the electrolyte increase with temperature without effecting electrochemical performance up to 115 C at 700 MA/sqcm. At this point the concentration is about 0.5 g Si/100 g KOH. Beyond this limit, electrolytic performance rapidly degenerates due to severe oxidation of the electrodes.

  16. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  17. Retrograde flexible ureterorenoscopic holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy: the new gold standard.

    PubMed

    Gould, D L

    1998-03-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy of flexible retrograde ureterorenoscopic holmium-YAG intracorporeal laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal calculi, a total of 86 patients presenting to our hospital with renal calculi underwent flexible retrograde ureterorenoscopic holmium-YAG intracorporeal laser lithotripsy of their stones, and the data were collected prospectively. As extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is not available at our institution, all patients with renal calculi in this study were treated in a retrograde fashion using the Richard Wolf 6.0F semirigid ureteroscope, the 7.5F flexible ureterorenoscope, and the holmium-YAG laser by Coherent Inc. Except for inhospital consults or patients requiring admission secondary to infection, all cases were performed on an ambulatory basis. All renal calculi 3 cm or smaller were approached in a retrograde fashion. Where possible, the stones were initially debulked using the semirigid ureteroscope and the 550-microm fiber followed by the flexible ureterorenoscope in combination with the 360- or 200-microm laser fiber depending on stone position. Stones were fragmented until they were small enough to be removed by hydrocleansing. Using this technique, stone-free success rates for calculi 2.5 cm or smaller after a single treatment, regardless of stone composition or location, are superior to those of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. For calculi between 2.5 and 3 cm, the results also are noted to be superior. We conclude that for calculi larger than 3 cm or for partial staghorn calculi, the treatment of choice appears to be a percutaneous approach. PMID:9568772

  18. Percutaneous Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Management of Complicated Biliary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Kelly; Chamsuddin, Abbas; Spivey, James; Martin, Louis; Nieh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Advances in endoscopic techniques have transformed the management of urolithiasis. We sought to evaluate the role of such urological interventions for the treatment of complex biliary calculi. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients (n=9) undergoing percutaneous holmium laser lithotripsy for complicated biliary calculi over a 4-year period (12/2003 to 12/2007). All previously failed standard techniques include ERCP with sphincterotomy (n=6), PTHC (n=7), or both of these. Access to the biliary system was obtained via an existing percutaneous transhepatic catheter or T-tube tracts. Endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy was performed via a flexible cystoscope or ureteroscope. Stone clearance was confirmed intra- and postoperatively. A percutaneous transhepatic drain was left indwelling for follow-up imaging. Results: Mean patient age was 65.6 years (range, 38 to 92). Total stone burden ranged from 1.7 cm to 5 cm. All 9 patients had stones located in the CBD, with 2 patients also having additional stones within the hepatic ducts. All 9 patients (100%) were visually stone-free after one endoscopic procedure. No major perioperative complications occurred. Mean length of stay was 2.4 days. At a mean radiological follow-up of 5.4 months (range, 0.5 to 21), no stone recurrence was noted. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy is a minimally invasive alternative to open salvage surgery for complex biliary calculi refractory to standard approaches. This treatment is both safe and efficacious. Success depends on a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:19660213

  19. Optimization of dosimetry and safety using the holmium laser for urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Swol, Christiaan F. P.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; Zeijlemaker, Bram Y. W.; Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Boon, Tom A.

    1998-07-01

    The holmium laser has become accepted as a versatile instrument for urological applications, such as prostate resection, urethrotomy, tumor coagulation and lithotripsy. Presently, more powerful lasers have become available generating pulses up to 4 J at 80 W. The necessity of these high power systems in urology is ambiguous. In this study, the dosimetry as to efficacy and especially safety was investigated for various applications. The holmium laser ((lambda) equals 2.1 micrometer) emits its energy in 350 microsecond pulses which instantly turn water into vapor. Using high-speed photography explosive vapor bubbles with diameters over 10 mm were captured. The mechanical force of these bubbles, effectively fragments stones but may dilate and rupture a small lumen like the ureter. After implosion of the bubble, the energy of vaporization turns into heat. Depending on pulse energy and pulse repetition rate, tissue can be thermally affected up to 5 mm. For soft tissue applications, e.g., urethrotomy, prostatectomy or tumor coagulation, pulse energies of 0.5 - 1.5 J were applied at a high repetition rate (20 - 40 Hz) to provide sufficient coagulative and hemostatic effects. At higher pulse energies, the fiber tip was vibrating vigorously and the tissue was ripped to pieces decreasing hemostasis and visibility. For hard tissue applications, bursts of 0.5 J pulses at 5 Hz, proved to be sufficient to fragment all types of stones (including cystine) in the ureter and the bladder without mechanical or thermal damage to surrounding tissue. At higher settings, targeting the stone was less controlled and effective due to 'jumping' of the fiber tip with resulting mechanical and thermal trauma to the surrounding tissue. The holmium laser can be used effectively to coagulate and cut soft tissue and fragment stones at relatively low energy and power settings, thus minimizing the risk of complications.

  20. Silicate Glass Corrosion Mechanism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Lenting, Christoph; Dohmen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste borosilicate glasses is essential to predict their long-term aqueous durability in a geologic repository. Several observations have been made with compositionally different silicate glasses that cannot be explained by any of the established glass corrosion models. These models are based on diffusion-controlled ion exchange and subsequent structural reorganisation of a leached, hydrated residual glass, leaving behind a so-called gel layer. In fact, the common observation of lamellar to more complex pattern formation observed in experiment and nature, the porous structure of the corrosion layer, an atomically sharp boundary between the corrosion zone and the underlying pristine glass, as well as results of novel isotope tracer and in situ, real time experiments rather support an interface-coupled glass dissolution-silica reprecipitation model. In this model, the congruent dissolution of the glass is coupled in space and time to the precipitation and growth of amorphous silica at an inwardly moving reaction front. We suggest that these coupled processes have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  1. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate and Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula Treated by Superselective Arterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Dutto, Lorenzo; Preziosi, Paolo; Spera, Enrico; Micali, Francesco; De Carolis, Andrea; Iorio, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic pelvic pseudoaneurysm with concomitant arteriovenous fistula has been described as a rare and challenging complication, which may occur during transurethral resection of the prostate. We provide the first report of this complication after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The attempt to control the bleeding by conversion to open surgery and placement of haemostatic stitches into the prostatic fossa failed. Angiography with superselective arterial embolization proved to be a modern, quick, safe, and efficient treatment of this uncommon complication. PMID:27022498

  2. Endoscopic removal of a proximal urethral stent using a holmium laser: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Francisco; Thomas, Anil A.; Miocinovic, Ranko; Angermeier, Kenneth W.

    2012-01-01

    Urethral stents were initially developed for the management of urethral strictures and obstructive voiding disorders in select patients. Urethral stent complications are common and may require stent explantation, which is often quite challenging. We present our experience with endoscopic removal of an encrusted UroLume proximal urethral stent in a 72-year-old male using a holmium laser. The literature on various management options and outcomes for urethral stent removal is reviewed. Endoscopic removal of proximal urethral stents is feasible and safe and should be considered as the primary treatment option in patients requiring stent extraction. PMID:23248530

  3. Technical Aspects of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myong; Lee, Hahn-Ey

    2013-01-01

    Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is a minimally invasive procedure and a size-independent treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia with excellent long-term surgical outcome. HoLEP has become an alternative to conventional transurethral resection of the prostate or open prostatectomy owing to its efficacy and safety. Although HoLEP is known to have a steep learning curve, very few articles have addressed the technical aspects of HoLEP. Herein, we described detailed techniques and tips for HoLEP as performed at Seoul National University Hospital in a step-by-step manner with extensive review of the literature. PMID:24044089

  4. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate and Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula Treated by Superselective Arterial Embolization.

    PubMed

    Asimakopoulos, Anastasios D; Dutto, Lorenzo; Preziosi, Paolo; Spera, Enrico; Micali, Francesco; De Carolis, Andrea; Iorio, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic pelvic pseudoaneurysm with concomitant arteriovenous fistula has been described as a rare and challenging complication, which may occur during transurethral resection of the prostate. We provide the first report of this complication after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The attempt to control the bleeding by conversion to open surgery and placement of haemostatic stitches into the prostatic fossa failed. Angiography with superselective arterial embolization proved to be a modern, quick, safe, and efficient treatment of this uncommon complication. PMID:27022498

  5. Holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres for fluoroscopy-guided embolotherapy and multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Oerlemans, Chris; Seevinck, Peter R; Smits, Maarten L; Hennink, Wim E; Bakker, Chris J G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Nijsen, J Frank W

    2015-03-30

    Embolotherapy is a minimally invasive transcatheter technique aiming at reduction or complete obstruction of the blood flow by infusion of micro-sized particles in order to induce tumor regression. A major drawback of the current commercially available and clinically used microspheres is that they cannot be detected in vivo with medical imaging techniques, impeding intra- and post-procedural feedback. It can be expected that real-time monitoring of microsphere infusion and post-procedural imaging will result in better predictability and higher efficacy of the treatment. In this study, a novel microsphere formulation has been developed that can be visualized with fluoroscopy, X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The microspheres were prepared with the JetCutter technique and consist of alginate (matrix-forming polymer), holmium (cross-linking and MRI contrast agent), lipiodol (radiopaque contrast agent) and Pluronic F-68 (surfactant). The mean size (±SEM) of the hydrated holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres (Ho-lip-ams) was 570±12 μm with a holmium content of 0.38±0.01% (w/w). Stability studies showed that the microspheres remained intact during incubation for two weeks in fetal calf serum (FCS) at 37 °C. The inclusion of lipiodol in the microspheres rendered excellent visualization capabilities for fluoroscopy and CT, whereas the holmium ions, which keep the alginate network together, also allow MR imaging. In this study it was shown that single sphere detection was possible by fluoroscopy, CT and MRI. The Ho-lip-ams were visualized in real-time, during infusion in a porcine kidney using fluoroscopy, and post-procedural, the deposition of the microspheres was examined with fluoroscopy, (cone beam rotational) CT and MRI. The different imaging modalities showed similar deposition patterns of the microspheres within the organ. The combination of intra-procedural visualization, multimodality imaging for patient follow-up and the

  6. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a paradigm shift in benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Holmium laser enucleation (HoLEP) was developed in the 1990s as a more efficient and cost effective method of benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery than laser vaporization and resection techniques. As a true anatomical enucleation it mimics open prostatectomy and is as durable. There is a significant body of level 1 evidence in support of HoLEP, including 2 meta-analyses and 14 randomized trials which compare HoLEP with a number of other procedures. This review describes the development of and summarizes the evidence for HoLEP. PMID:24082919

  7. Technical aspects of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong; Lee, Hahn-Ey; Oh, Seung-June

    2013-09-01

    Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is a minimally invasive procedure and a size-independent treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia with excellent long-term surgical outcome. HoLEP has become an alternative to conventional transurethral resection of the prostate or open prostatectomy owing to its efficacy and safety. Although HoLEP is known to have a steep learning curve, very few articles have addressed the technical aspects of HoLEP. Herein, we described detailed techniques and tips for HoLEP as performed at Seoul National University Hospital in a step-by-step manner with extensive review of the literature. PMID:24044089

  8. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a paradigm shift in benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery.

    PubMed

    Aho, Tevita F

    2013-10-01

    Holmium laser enucleation (HoLEP) was developed in the 1990s as a more efficient and cost effective method of benign prostatic hyperplasia surgery than laser vaporization and resection techniques. As a true anatomical enucleation it mimics open prostatectomy and is as durable. There is a significant body of level 1 evidence in support of HoLEP, including 2 meta-analyses and 14 randomized trials which compare HoLEP with a number of other procedures. This review describes the development of and summarizes the evidence for HoLEP. PMID:24082919

  9. Spectroscopic properties, energy transfer dynamics, and laser performance of thulium-holmium doped laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalisky, Y.; Rotman, S.R.; Boulon, G.; Pedrini, C.; Brenier, A.

    1994-12-31

    Spectroscopic studies using laser induced fluorescence and numerical modeling of energy transfer and back transfer mechanism are reported in Er:Tm:Ho:YLF, Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG and Cr:Tm:YAG laser crystals at various temperatures (10 K-300 K). Direct energy transfer from Tm{sup 3+} excited states to Ho{sup 3+} {sup 5}I{sub 7} emitting level was observed and analyzed both in YAG and YLF. Further analysis of Cr{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} time-dependent emission curves indicate a strong correlation of chromium-thulium pairs. Pulsed operation of holmium laser at high temperature will be presented.

  10. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2437 Magnesium silicate. (a) Product....

  11. Silicate minerals and the interferon system

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N.; Booth, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    Natural-occurring minerals representative of six silicate classes were examined for their influence on interferon induction by influenza virus in Rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK/sub 2/) cell monolayers. Minerals within the classes nesosilicate, sorosilicate, cyclosilicate, and inosilicate exhibited either little or marked (50% or greater) inhibition of interferon induction. Within the inosilicate class, however, minerals of the pyroxenoid group (wollastonite, pectolite, and rhodonite) all significantly showed a two- to threefold increase in interferon production. Silicate materials in the phyllosilicate and tectosilicate classes all showed inhibitory activity for the induction process. When silicate minerals were coated with the polymer poly(4-vinylpyridine-N-oxide), the inhibitory activity of silicates on viral interferon induction was counteracted. Of nine randomly selected silicate minerals, which inhibited viral interferon induction, none adversely affected the ability of exogenous interferon to confer antiviral cellular resistance. Increased levels of influenza virus multiplication concomitant with decreased levels of interferon occurred in cell monolayers pretreated with silicates. The findings of this study demonstrate the diverse effects of minerals representative of different silicate classes on the interferon system and indicate that certain silicates in comprising the viral interferon induction process may increase susceptibility to viral infection.

  12. Evaluation of holmium laser versus cold knife in optical internal urethrotomy for the management of short segment urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Kaza, Ram Chandra Murthy; Singh, Bipin Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Sachse cold knife is conventionally used for optical internal urethrotomy intended to manage urethral strictures and Ho: YAG laser is an alternative to it. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of urethral stricture treatment outcomes, efficacy, and complications using cold knife and Ho: YAG (Holmium laser) for optical internal urethrotomy Materials and Methods: In this prospective study included, 90 male patients age >18 years, with diagnosis of urethral stricture admitted for internal optical urethrotomy during April 2010 to March 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups containing 45 patients each using computer generated random number. In group A (Holmium group), internal urethrotomy was done with Holmium laser and in group B (Cold knife group) Sachse cold knife was used. Patients were followed up for 6 months after surgery in Out Patient Department on 15, 30 and 180 post-operative days. At each follow up visit physical examination, and uroflowmetry was performed along with noting complaints, if any. Results: The peak flow rates (PFR) were compared between the two groups on each follow up. At 180 days (6 month interval) the difference between mean of PFR for Holmium and Cold knife group was statistically highly significant (P < 0.001). Complications were seen in 12.22% of cases. Conclusion: Both modalities are effective in providing immediate relief to patients with single and short segment (<2 cm long) urethral strictures but more sustained response was attained with Cold knife urethrotomy. PMID:25371611

  13. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Melde, Brian J.; Johnson, Brandy J.; Charles, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through co-condensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  14. Treatment of Parapelvic Cyst by Internal Drainage Technology Using Ureteroscope and Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Q; Huang, S; Li, Q; Xu, L; Wei, X; Huang, S; Li, S; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The aim of parapelvic cyst treatment is to have complete drainage of cyst fluid and prevent its further compression of the kidney and collective system. This study explores the efficacy and safety of surgical approaches with holmium laser ureteroscopic internal drainage in the treatment of parapelvic cyst. Methods: The compression effect of parapelvic cyst on the renal collective system was observed by rigid ureteroscope using retrograde ureteroscopic technology. With direct vision, the cyst wall on the obvious parapelvic compression site was cut. The diameter of the cyst wall cut was about 1 cm. The internal drainage was obtained by double-J tubes. When the cyst was in the inferior pole of kidney or where the rigid ureteroscope could not reach, a flexible ureteroscope was used. Results: In 28 cases of operation, 27 cases were successful. The cyst treatment time was eight to 40 minutes (average 26 minutes). During the operation, no massive haemorrhage, damage of nearby organ and ureter, or other complications happened. Time of follow-up was 10–72 months (average 39 months). The results of follow-up showed that in 22 cases, the cyst disappeared; the diameter of the cyst in four cases was reduced by more than half, and one case recurred. Conclusion: The treatment of parapelvic cyst by internal drainage operation using holmium laser and ureteroscopy was effective. The operation was safe with few complications. PMID:26426175

  15. Histologic comparison of needle, holmium:YAG, and erbium:YAG endoscopic goniotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Rivera, Brian K.; Hernandez, Eleut; Shetlar, Debra J.

    1995-05-01

    An endoscope allows visualization of the anterior chamber angle in porcine eyes despite the presence of cloudy corneas. The pectinate ligaments in the anterior chamber angle are a surgical model for primary infantile glaucoma. This study investigated the histologic results, one month after treating the anterior chamber angle with a goniotomy needle, the holmium:YAG laser, or the erbium:YAG laser coupled to a small endoscope. The anterior chambers were deepened with a viscoelastic material in one-month-old anesthetized pigs. An Olympus 0.8 mm diameter flexible endoscope was externally coupled to a 23 gauge needle or a 300 micron diameter fiber. The angle was treated for 120 degrees by one of the three methods, and the probe was removed. During the acute study, all three methods cut the pectinate ligaments. The histologic findings one month after healing demonstrated minimal surrounding tissue damage following goniotomy with a needle and the most surrounding tissue damage following treatment with the holmium:YAG laser.

  16. Posterior Urethral Polyp: First Holmium-YAG Laser Ablation on a 3-Month-Old Infant

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Ercument; Yapanoglu, Turgut; Adanur, Senol; Ziypak, Tevfik; Altay, Mehmet Sefa; Aksoy, Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Urethral polyps are rare benign pathologies seen in the male posterior urethra, more frequently originating from verumontanum. In this article, we aimed to discuss diagnosis and treatment of a urethral polyp causing hematuria and urinary infection in a 3-month-old male infant. This is the first case in the literature in which a urethral polyp is treated with Holmium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser. Case Presentation: The patient was a 3-month-old male infant, and complains were hematuria and crying during micturition. Ultrasonography and voiding cystourethrogram were used for diagnosis. Urethral polyp was observed on urethrocystoscopy. Ablation was performed with a newborn cystoscope. Conclusion: Urethral polyp can cause hematuria and urinary obstruction and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pathologies such as posterior urethral valve and cecoureterocele that could cause infravesical obstruction. Holmium-YAG laser is a good choice of treatment with easy application possibilities using a newborn cystoscope, especially for newborns and infants who have thin urethra. PMID:27579428

  17. Optical and microhardness measurement of lead silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogad, Rashmi M.; Kumar, Rakesh; Krishna, P. S. R.; Jogad, M. S.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Mathad, R. D.

    2013-02-01

    Lead silicate glasses, PbO-SiO2, are interesting because these glasses exhibit thermal, optical, and mechanical properties different than other silicate glasses, and they form a thermally and chemically stable glass over a wide composition range. They are also interesting as PbO acts as glass modifier and as glass former depending on the concentration. In the present work we have prepared lead silicate glasses (xPbO-(1-x).SiO2) by melt quenching. We measured UV absorbance, Vickers hardness, and glass transition for these samples. It is found that band gap is proportional to glass transition.

  18. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  19. Properties of holmium implanted gold films and yttrium silicide to use as absorbers in microcalorimeters for a holmium neutrino mass experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Krishna P.

    In recent years, there has been huge improvement in microcalorimetric technology and its applications. Today's cryogenic microcalorimeter technology can be used in a large scale experiment with excellent energy and time resolutions. Transition Edge Sensor (TES) microcalorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for a wide range of applications including neutrino mass measurement. We are developing a source (163Ho) embedded TES microcalorimeter for neutrino mass measurement. Energy resolution, rise time of events, decay time, and read-out electronics must be considered carefully in designing a microcalorimeter for the application of neutrino mass experiments. Our research is particularly focused on the investigation of the properties of the 163Ho imbedded metallic absorber for the application of the Ho-neutrino mass experiment. In a microcalorimetric neutrino mass experiment using the radioactive decay of 163Ho, the radioactive material must be fully embedded in the microcalorimeter absorber. One option that is being investigated is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in other applications. However, knowing the thermal properties at the working temperature of microcalorimeters is critical for choosing the absorber material and for optimizing the detector performance. In particular, it is paramount to understand if implanting the radioactive material in gold changes its heat capacity. We used a bolometric technique to measure the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the 163Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70 mK to 300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the gold films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future microcalorimeter holmium experiment. Furthermore, most chemical processes to extract the Ho-163 isotope and insert it into a detector absorber involve yttrium based compounds

  20. Early Contributions To Silicate Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ted

    I have been asked to describe the early work concerning the palaeomagnetic signifi- cance of silicates. In his classic papers published half a century ago, Louis Néel put forward an elegant single-domain (SD) theory to explain the strength and enormous stability of remanent magnetization in rocks. The difficulty was that the predicted size for SD behaviour in magnetite was less than the wavelength of light. This led to the application of electron microscopy to this problem, the first images being obtained in 1969. As it happened, these involved tiny inclusions of magnetite in the pyroxene crystals of a Precambrian gabbro. The technique used in these early investigations was a metallurgical one wherein a carbon film replica of the polished and etched surface of the rock sample is prepared. This provides high spatial resolution but not much com- positional information. Furthermore, the experimental procedures involved are suffi- ciently labour-intensive that this type of work never achieved much popularity. Never- theless, Ssilicate inclusionS remanence has been identified in a variety of oceanic and ´ continental igneous rocks involving ShostS crystals of olivine, pyroxene and feldspar. ´ As far as this session is concerned, the so-called Scloudy feldsparsS found in basic ´ dykes are particularly relevant.

  1. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies. PMID:20847267

  2. Siliceous microfossil extraction from altered Monterey rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.O.; Casey, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    Samples of altered Monterey rocks of differing lithologies were processed by various methods to develop new techniques for extracting siliceous microfossils. The preliminary use of thin sections made from the same rocks reduced the number of probable samples (samples worth further processing) by about one-third. Most of the siliceous microfossils contained in altered Monterey rocks appear to be highly recrystallized and are extremely fragile; however, some contained silicified and silica-infilled radiolarians and planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, which are very tough. In general the most useful techniques were gently hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, monosodium glutamate, and regular siliceous microfossil extraction techniques. Unsuccessful techniques and a new siliceous microfossil flotation technique are also documented.

  3. Silicate production and availability for mineral carbonation.

    PubMed

    Renforth, P; Washbourne, C-L; Taylder, J; Manning, D A C

    2011-03-15

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestered as carbonates through the accelerated weathering of silicate minerals is proposed as a climate change mitigation technology with the potential to capture billions of tonnes of carbon per year. Although these materials can be mined expressly for carbonation, they are also produced by human activities (cement, iron and steel making, coal combustion, etc.). Despite their potential, there is poor global accounting of silicates produced in this way. This paper presents production estimates (by proxy) of various silicate materials including aggregate and mine waste, cement kiln dust, construction and demolition waste, iron and steel slag, and fuel ash. Approximately 7-17 billion tonnes are produced globally each year with an approximate annual sequestration potential of 190-332 million tonnes C. These estimates provide justification for additional research to accurately quantify the contemporary production of silicate minerals and to determine the location and carbon capture potential of historic material accumulations. PMID:21332128

  4. Peralkaline silicic volcanic rocks in northwestern nevada.

    PubMed

    Noble, D C; Chipman, D W; Giles, D L

    1968-06-21

    Late Tertiary silicic ashflow tuffs and lavas peralkaline in chemical character (atomic Na + K greater than Al), mainly comendites, occur over wide areas in northwestern Nevada and appear to be widespread in southeastern Oregon. Such peralkaline rocks-which are not uncommon in the western United States-and other chemically unusual silicic rocks are found near the margins rather than toward the center of the Great Basin. PMID:17800671

  5. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  6. Silicate complexes of sugars in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Joseph B; Lu, Gang; Singer, Stephanie R; Kolb, Vera M

    2004-08-11

    Certain sugars react readily with basic silicic acid to form soluble 2/1 (sugar/silicic acid) silicate complexes. Failure of monohydroxy compounds to give soluble products under these conditions indicates that the sugar silicates are chelates: five-membered diolato rings. Only furanose forms react. Pyranose sugars are stable under these conditions. Because all glycosides fail to react with silicic acid under these conditions, reaction appears to involve the anomeric position (C1 in aldoses, C2 in ketoses), which has a more acidic hydroxy group. Reaction is completed only when the anomeric hydroxy group is cis to an adjacent hydroxy group. The appropriate furanose form must have sufficient natural abundance and solubility to provide an observable product, as measured by (29)Si and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. These structural and practical constraints rationalize the successful reaction of the monosaccharides ribose, xylose, lyxose, talose, psicose, fructose, sorbose, and tagatose and the disaccharides lactulose, maltulose, and palatinose. Glucose, mannose, galactose, and sucrose, among others, failed to form complexes. This high selectivity for formation of sugar silicates may have ramifications in prebiotic chemistry. PMID:15291565

  7. Microscopic analysis of laser-induced proximal fiber tip damage during holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-04-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to the standard holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. The TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium-doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller (e.g., 50- to 150-μm core) fibers than possible during holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether the more uniform TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared with the holmium laser multimodal beam. Light and confocal microscopy images were taken of the proximal surface of each fiber to inspect for possible laser-induced damage. A TFL beam at a wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, and 500-μs pulse duration, and 100,000 pulses were delivered at each pulse rate setting of 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 Hz. For comparison, single use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical holmium laser lithotripsy procedures performed with standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output pulse energy and average power were stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed at settings up to 35 mJ, 400 Hz, and 14 W average power (n=5). In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation, indicated by small ablation craters on the scale of several micrometers in all fibers (n=20). In summary, the proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted up to 14 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially translate into lower costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  8. STM and ab initio study of holmium nanowires on a Ge(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, C.; Bonet, C.; Probert, M. I. J.; Tear, S. P.; Perkins, E. W.

    2006-11-01

    A nanorod structure has been observed on the Ho/Ge(111) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The rods do not require patterning of the surface or defects such as step edges in order to grow as is the case for nanorods on Si(111). At low holmium coverage the nanorods exist as isolated nanostructures while at high coverage they form a periodic 5×1 structure. We propose a structural model for the 5×1 unit cell and show using an ab initio calculation that the STM profile of our model structure compares favorably to that obtained experimentally for both filled and empty states sampling. The calculated local density of states shows that the nanorod is metallic in character.

  9. Acute and chronic response of meniscal fibrocartilage to holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Patrick J.; Popovic, Neven A.; Islinger, Richard B.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Dick, Edward J.

    1997-05-01

    The acute and chronic (10 week) histological effects of the holmium:YAG laser during partial meniscectomy in an in vivo rabbit model were investigated. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral parapatellar medial knee arthrotomies. In the right knee, a partial medial meniscectomy was done through the avascular zone using a standard surgical blade. In the left knee, an anatomically similar partial medial meniscectomy was performed using a Ho:YAG laser (Coherent, USA). This study indicates that the laser creates two zones of damage in the meniscal fibrocartilage and that the zone of thermal change may act as a barrier to healing. The zone of thermal change which is eventually debrided was thought at the time of surgery to be viable. In the laser cut menisci, the synovium appears to have greater inflammation early and to be equivalent with the scalpel cut after three weeks. At all time periods there appeared more cellular damage in the laser specimens.

  10. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate in a 400 cc Prostate: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Matthew K.H.; Pham, Trung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The modality of choice in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia for large prostates has traditionally been open prostatectomy. Advances in minimally invasive techniques have begun to challenge this notion with advantages such as lower bleeding and transfusion rates and shorter hospital stay. In this case report, we illustrate the use of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in a gland measuring more than 400 cc. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man with persistent voiding urinary symptoms despite two previous transurethral resections of his prostate. With greater experience in HoLEP and declining experience in open prostatectomy, there may be a shift toward HoLEP as the preferred treatment choice for large prostate glands. PMID:27579406

  11. Synthesis and optical properties of antimony oxide glasses doped with holmium trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunatha, S.; Eraiah, B.

    2016-05-01

    Holmium doped lithium-antimony-lead borate glasses having 1mol% AgNO3 with composition 50B2O3-20PbO-25Sb2O3-5Li2O have been prepared using single step melt quenching technique. The XRD spectrum confirms amorphous nature of glasses. The optical absorbance studies were carried out on these glasses. The optical direct band gap energies were found to be in the range of 3.10 eV to 3.31 eV and indirect band gap energies were found to be in the range of 2.28 eV to 3.00 eV. The refractive indexes have been calculated by using Lorentz-Lorenz formula and the calculated values in the range of 2.31 to 2.37.

  12. Quantum theory of the anisotropy of the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic holmium iron garnet single crystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiehui; Ma, Shengcan; Xu, You

    2009-03-01

    The pronounced anisotropy of the magnetization caused by the Ho(3+) ions in the ferrimagnetic holmium iron garnet has been investigated based on quantum theory. The strong anisotropy of the magnetization of the Ho(3+) ions originates mainly from the effect of the crystal field upon the Ho(3+) ions and the anisotropic Ho(3+)-Fe(3+) superexchange interaction. Following the expression of the Yb(3+)-Fe(3+) exchange interaction used by Alben, the anisotropy of the Ho(3+)-Fe(3+) exchange interaction is defined by three principal values of the exchange tensor G. Because the six Ho(3+) sublattices are magnetically non-equivalent, we calculate the magnetic quantities of the Ho(3+) at the six sublattices and compare the average value of the so-obtained six quantities with the measured values. The calculated results are in good agreement with experiments. An interpretation on the anisotropy of the magnetic properties of HoIG is given. PMID:21817410

  13. Emission spectrum of holmium atoms excited during ionic sputtering of a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, S. S.; Braslavets, V. V.; Evdokimov, S. A.

    1988-08-01

    The article shows the fundamental possibility of using the bombardment of the surface of solids by kilo V ions for exciting the emission spectrum of particles of the target material and for obtaining spectroscopic data. The method is tested by studying the emission spectra of holmium as an example. It is shown that the sensitivity of the method can be substantially increased by using the so-called chemical effect, i.e., the effect of strengthening the spectral lines of sputtered excited metal atoms during bombardment of the target in the presence of oxygen. It is proposed that the chemical effect, which takes place only for atomic lines, in contrast to ionic ones, can also be used for simplifying the identification of atomic lines. It is noted that the proposed method is suitable for studying the atomic spectra of any solids, including refractory and chemically reactive substances.

  14. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate in a 400 cc Prostate: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gopee, Esha L; Hong, Matthew K H; Pham, Trung

    2016-01-01

    The modality of choice in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia for large prostates has traditionally been open prostatectomy. Advances in minimally invasive techniques have begun to challenge this notion with advantages such as lower bleeding and transfusion rates and shorter hospital stay. In this case report, we illustrate the use of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in a gland measuring more than 400 cc. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man with persistent voiding urinary symptoms despite two previous transurethral resections of his prostate. With greater experience in HoLEP and declining experience in open prostatectomy, there may be a shift toward HoLEP as the preferred treatment choice for large prostate glands. PMID:27579406

  15. Operation of the nose using Nd-YAG and holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Zajac, Andrzej; Dudziec, Katarzyna

    2000-06-01

    During more than 5 years Nd:YAG and Holmium laser has been used in our ENT Department for the treatment of varies pathological changes. Most of our cases were previously treated many times because of recurrences of the nasal polyps. As a rule the treatment was given in one to three sessions. Each patient was very closely monitored. The time period between the session was 2-4 weeks. The consequent application of laser was dependent on healing process. All adults' patients were treated in local anesthesia using 1,5 percent of Cocaine and 10 percent Xylocaine applied in a spray; no other anesthetics were needed, although in some patients 10 mg Valium was administered before first session of laser application. We do not observe a severe bleeding needed sponge or a nose package. Among advantages we have to concentrate on two: the recurrences of nasal polyps are definitely much rare and patient may appear at work at the same day.

  16. Erbium:YAG and holmium:YAG laser root resection of extracted human teeth.

    PubMed

    Komori, T; Yokoyama, K; Matsumoto, Y; Matsumoto, K

    1997-02-01

    Root resection of extracted human teeth was performed using the erbium:YAG (Er:YAG) and holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser to investigate the clinical application of lasers on hard tissue. The CO2 laser and the mechanical drill were also used for comparison. After resection using these technologies, the morphological changes of the cut surface were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscope. Er:YAG laser irradiation produced smooth, clean resected surfaces without signs of thermal damages. Complete obturation of the root canal was maintained after Er:YAG laser irradiation. Ho:YAG laser irradiation, however, produced some signs of thermal damage. Relatively large voids between the gutta-percha and the canal walls were revealed after Ho:YAG laser irradiation. The sealing of the dentinal tubules was not completely attained as stipulated by original conditions of this study. PMID:9467336

  17. Application of 2-um wavelength holmium lasers for treatment of skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Ivan A.; Klimov, Igor V.; Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Nerobeev, Alexander I.; Sadovnikova, Lija B.; Eliseenko, Vladimir I.

    1994-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental analysis of the efficiency of application of 2 micrometers pulsed holmium laser for cosmetic and plastic surgery and dermatology is carried out. Preliminary experiments were carried out on rats. Solid state 2 micrometers pulsed laser was allowed to operate in free running mode with pulse energy up to 1.5 J and pulse repetition rate up to 5 Hz. To deliver emission to the object a flexible quartz fiber without further focusing of 2.5 m in length and 400 micrometers of the core diameter was used. The effect of the different power density emission on the skin was studied. The second stage was the study of the influence of 2 micrometers emission on human skin. The results of the removal of hemangioma, papilloma, telangiectasia, nevus, nevus acantholytic, xanthelasma palpebral, verruca, chloasma, pigmental spots, tattoos, etc. are presented. Precision, simplicity, efficiency, and the high cosmetic effect of these operations is noted.

  18. Cavitation effect of holmium laser pulse applied to ablation of hard tissue underwater.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Xia, Danqing; Ruan, Kai; Li, Zhengjia

    2010-01-01

    To overcome the inconsecutive drawback of shadow and schlieren photography, the complete dynamics of cavitation bubble oscillation or ablation products induced by a single holmium laser pulse [2.12 microm, 300 micros (FWHM)] transmitted in different core diameter (200, 400, and 600 microm) fibers is recorded by means of high-speed photography. Consecutive images from high-speed cameras can stand for the true and complete process of laser-water or laser-tissue interaction. Both laser pulse energy and fiber diameter determine cavitation bubble size, which further determines acoustic transient amplitudes. Based on the pictures taken by high-speed camera and scanned by an optical coherent microscopy (OCM) system, it is easily seen that the liquid layer at the distal end of the fiber plays an important role during the process of laser-tissue interaction, which can increase ablation efficiency, decrease heat side effects, and reduce cost. PMID:20799845

  19. High power operation of cladding pumped holmium-doped silica fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Hemming, Alexander; Bennetts, Shayne; Simakov, Nikita; Davidson, Alan; Haub, John; Carter, Adrian

    2013-02-25

    We report the highest power operation of a resonantly cladding-pumped, holmium-doped silica fibre laser. The cladding pumped all-glass fibre utilises a fluorine doped glass layer to provide low loss cladding guidance of the 1.95 µm pump radiation. The operation of both single mode and large-mode area fibre lasers was demonstrated, with up to 140 W of output power achieved. A slope efficiency of 59% versus launched pump power was demonstrated. The free running emission was measured to be 2.12-2.15 µm demonstrating the potential of this architecture to address the long wavelength operation of silica based fibre lasers with high efficiency. PMID:23481989

  20. Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Cystic Brain Tumors with Holmium-166-Chico : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Eun Jin; Rhee, Chang Hun; Youn, Sang Min; Choi, Chang-Woon; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intracavitary injection of beta-emitting radiation source for control of cystic tumors has been tried with a benefit of localized internal radiation. The authors treated cystic brain tumor patients with Holmium-166-chitosan complex (Ho-166-chico), composed of a beta-emitting radionuclide Holmium-166 and biodegradable chit polymer, and evaluated the safety and effective measurement for response. Methods Twenty-two patients with recurrent cystic brain tumor and/or located in a deep or eloquent area were enrolled in this pilot study. The cyst volume and wall thickness were determined on CT or MRI to assess radiological response. The activity of Ho-166-chico injected via Ommaya reservoir was prescribed to be 10-25 Gy to the cyst wall in a depth of 4 mm. Results There was neither complications related to systemic absorption nor leakage of Ho-166-chico in all 22 patients. But, two cases of oculomotor paresis were observed in patients with recurrent craniopharyngioma. Radiological response was seen in 14 of 20 available follow-up images (70%). Seven patients of 'evident' radiological response experienced more than 25% decrease of both cyst volume and wall thickness. Another 7 patients with 'suggestive' response showed decrease of cyst volume without definitive change of the wall thickness or vice versa. All patients with benign tumors or low grade gliomas experienced symptomatic improvement. Conclusion Ho-166-chico intracavitary radiation therapy for cystic tumor is a safe method of palliation without serious complications. The determination of both minimal effective dosage and time interval of repeated injection through phase 1 trial could improve the results in the future. PMID:24278644

  1. Risk factors of infectious complications following flexible ureteroscope with a holmium laser: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Song; Gong, Binbin; Hao, Zongyao; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yifei; Liang, Chaozhao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of flexible ureteroscope for treating kidney stones and the risk factors for infectious complications following flexible ureteroscope (FURS) with a holmium laser. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data of 227 patients with kidney stones who underwent flexible ureteroscope with a holmium laser at our hospital from January 2012 to September 2014, including gender, age, comorbidity, urine analysis results, urine culture results, blood test results, stone size, operative duration, and residual stones. Patients with and without infectious complications were assigned to groups A and B, respectively. The dependent variables were postoperative infectious complications, and the risk factors for infectious complications following FURS were assessed using Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: All the surgeries were successfully completed. The total stone-free rate was 81.9% (n = 186), and the incidence of infectious complications after FURS was 8.37% (n = 19). Fifteen patients (6.61%) developed fever postoperatively, 10 patients (4.41%) developed systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), 6 patients with fever were considered to have SIRS (2.64%), and 2 patients had sepsis (0.88%). Univariate analyses of groups A and B indicated that pyuria, stone size, operative duration, and infectious stones were risk factors for infectious complications after FURS (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that pyuria (P = 0.017), operative duration (P = 0.026), and infectious stones (P = 0.030) were independently related to infectious complications. Conclusion: Pyuria, operative duration, and infectious stones were risk factors for infectious complications following FURS. Hence, routine urinalysis findings should be carefully considered, particularly the finding of pyuria. PMID:26379932

  2. Influence of pulse duration on erbium and holmium laser ablation under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ith, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Pratisto, Hans S.; Weber, Heinz P.; Altermatt, Hans J.; Staeubli, Hans U.; Asshauer, Thomas; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Salathe, Rene-Paul; Gerber, Bruno E.

    1995-01-01

    Erbium and Holmium lasers are ideally suited for cutting and drilling biological tissue. This is due to the fact that their wavelengths (Er:YSGG at 2.79 micrometers and Ho:YAG at 2.12 micrometers ) are strongly absorbed in water which is present in all tissues. Combined with an optical fiber these lasers seem to be optimal instruments for endoscopic and/or minimal invasive applications in surgery. In this study we focused our interest on cutting of human meniscus in the knee where, besides a very limited operation field, the standard arthroscopic treatment is performed in a liquid, highly absorbing environment. The bubble formation process, therefore, has to be well understood because it mainly determines relevant aspects of tissue ablation. The influence of the laser parameters in general and the influence of pulse duration in particular are determined in this paper for two different laser wavelengths. The goal was to determine the optimum laser parameters in view of a high ablation efficiency, a high precision and a minimal destruction of the adjacent tissue. To determine the optimum pulse duration for ablating tissue under water and to obtain a better understanding of the channel formation process, transmission and pressure measurements together with video flash photography were performed. Additionally, we determined experimentally the ratio between initial laser pulse energy and energy available for tissue treatment under water. To prove the results obtained, cuts in human meniscus were performed, sectioned and evaluated. The comparison between the results obtained with the Erbium and Holmium laser revealed a strong influence of the absorption coefficients on the tissue effects, especially on the ablation efficiency and on the zone of thermally and mechanically damaged tissue.

  3. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-{mu}m holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive 'balloon push' (n = 4) and 'rendezvous' (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  4. Correlation of thermal and mechanical effects of the holmium laser for various clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; van Swol, Christiaan F. P.

    1998-05-01

    The Holmium laser has become established in orthopedic surgery and urology due to its unique combination of mechanical and thermal properties induced by explosive vapor bubbles. In a specialized setup, real-time high-speed and thermal images of dynamic vapor bubbles and thermal relaxation at a water tissue interface were obtained simultaneously. The thermal effects in the tissue model were correlated to the characteristics of the bubbles dependent on pulse energy (0.2 - 4 J), pulse repetition frequency (5 - 40 Hz), distance and angle of fiber delivery system (diameter 365 micrometer) to the tissue surface. Up to a fiber-to-tissue distance of 50% of the radius of the bubble, only a superficial tissue layer was heated. During bubble implosion, the tissue surface was attracted to the fiber, ripping of irregularities, and was effectively cooled by turbulence. In case of hard tissues, the bubble detached from the fiber imploding towards the hard surface. At closer distances (less than 50% of bubble radius), the tissue itself was vaporized resulting in mechanical damage and thermal relaxation into the tissue, especially above repetition rates of 5 Hz. There is a strong correlation between the path length of the free beam within the bubble and the degree of mechanical and thermal damage in the tissue directly irradiated by this beam. During clinical applications the surgeon should be aware of the size of the vapor bubble in relation to the distance and angle with the tissue for safe optimal use of the mechanical and thermal properties of the Holmium laser.

  5. Holmium:YAG laser: effect on pulpal tissues and root surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    The effects of the Holmium:YAG irradiation on the pulpal tissues and surface topography on root surface dentin in human teeth in vivo were studied. The exposed root surfaces of seventeen pre-immediate denture patients were scaled and root planed with a Gracey 3 - 4 curette apical to the dentinoenamel junction until smooth and hard. The prepared root surfaces of two teeth per patient were exposed with Holmium:YAG laser energy after an application of nonfilled resin/fluoride mixture. The laser exposed areas were below the dentinoenamel junction around one-half of each root surface. The opposing sides of each of the teeth received resin/fluoride but no laser energy. A third tooth was identified as a nontreated control. The HO:YAG at 2.12 microns wavelength with a defocused beam size of 3 mm was used. The amount of laser energy delivered per 3 X 5 mm area was 0.450 (+/- .05) joules with a fluence of 2.66 - 3.30 J/cm2. The teeth were extracted after periods of 45 - 120 days. The specimens were fixed in formalin and prepared for histological examination using hematoxylin and eosin stains. Microscopic evaluation of room surfaces showed increased smoothness on the laser treated sites compared to their opposing non-lased sides. Histological examination of the pulpal tissues exhibited no abnormal changes. No clinical symptoms of pulpal pathology were produced. HO:YAG laser energy proved safe for treating room surfaces of human teeth in vivo under conditions presented in this study.

  6. Steps toward interstellar silicate dust mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorschner, J.; Guertler, J.; Henning, TH.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most certain facts on interstellar dust is that it contains grains with silicon oxygen tetrahedra (SOT), the internal vibrations of which cause the well known silicate bands at 10 and 18 microns. The broad and almost structureless appearance of them demonstrates lack of translation symmetry in these solids that must be considered amorphous or glassy silicates. There is no direct information on the cations in these interstellar silicates and on the number of bridging oxygens per tetrahedron (NBO). Comparing experimental results gained on amorphous silicates, e.g., silicate glasses, of cosmically most abundant metals (Mg, Fe, Ca, Al) with the observations is the only way to investigate interstellar silicate dust mineralogy (cf, Dorschner and Henning, 1986). At Jena University Observatory IR spectra of submicrometer-sized grains of pyroxene glasses (SSG) were studied. Pyroxenes are common minerals in asteroids, meteorites, interplanetary, and supposedly also cometary dust particles. Pyroxenes consist of linearly connected SOT (NBO=2). In the vitreous state reached by quenching melted minerals, the SOT remain nearly undistorted (Si-O bond length unchanged); the Si-O-Si angles at the bridging oxygens of pyroxenes, however, scatter statistically. Therefore, the original cation oxygen symmetry of the crystal (octahedral and hexahedral coordination by O) is completely lost. The blended bands at 10 and 18 microns lose their diagnostic differences and become broad and structureless. This illustrates best the basic problem of interstellar silicate mineral diagnostics. Optical data of glasses of enstatite, bronzite, hypersthene, diopside, salite, and hedenbergite have been derived. Results of enstatite (E), bronzite (B), and hypersthene (H) show very good agreement with the observed silicate features in the IR spectra of evolutionarily young objects that show P-type silicate signature according to the classification by Gurtler and Henning (1986). Compositional

  7. Acute abdominal compartment syndrome as a complication of Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 1996, Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate was introduced and has been shown to be safe and highly effective. Case presentation We report a case of a rare complication that resulted in intra-abdominal compartment syndrome with prolonged intubation and intensive care, involving an 74-year-old male after holmium laser enucleation of prostate, with a massive irrigant fluid leakage into the retroperitoneal space. The elevated abdominal pressure was reduced by forced diuresis. The tracheal tube was removed 18 hours after the patient’s transfer to the ICU. The patient was discharged to home one week after the operation. Conclusion In rare cases when no obvious ruptures of the prostate capsule or the bladder occur during laser enucleation of prostate, knowledge regarding possible emersion of massive amounts of irrigant fluid into the retroperitoneal space leading to intra-abdominal compartment syndrome aids in the diagnosis and subsequent successful therapy of intra-abdominal hypertension. PMID:24910537

  8. Q-switching of a thulium-doped fibre laser using a holmium-doped fibre saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovnikova, Ya E; Kamynin, V A; Kurkov, A S; Medvedkov, O I; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2014-01-31

    We have proposed and demonstrated a new passively Q-switched thulium-doped fibre laser configuration. A distinctive feature of this configuration is the use of a heavily holmium-doped fibre for Q-switching. Lasing was obtained at 1.96 μm, with a pulse energy of 3 μJ and pulse duration of 600 ns. The highest pulse repetition rate was 80 kHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  9. Phosphorus Equilibria Among Mafic Silicate Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlin, Jana; Xirouchakis, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus incorporation in major rock-forming silicate minerals has the following implications: (1) Reactions between phosphorus-hosting major silicates and accessory phosphates, which are also major trace element carriers, may control the stability of the latter and thus may affect the amount of phosphorus and other trace elements released to the coexisting melt or fluid phase. (2) Less of a phosphate mineral is needed to account for the bulk phosphorus of planetaty mantles. (3) During partial melting of mantle mineral assemblages or equilibrium fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas, and in the absence or prior to saturation with a phosphate mineral, silicate melts may become enriched in phosphorus, especially in the geochemically important low melt fraction regime, Although the small differences in the ionic radii of IVp5+, IVSi4+, and IV Al3+ makes phosphoms incorporation into crystalline silicates perhaps unsurprising, isostructural silicate and phosphate crystalline solids do not readily form solutions, e.g., (Fe, Mg)2SiO4 vs. LiMgPO4, SiO)2 VS. AlPO4. Nonetheless, there are reports of, poorly characterized silico-phosphate phases in angrites , 2-4 wt% P2O5 in olivine and pyroxene grains in pallasites and reduced terestrial basalts which are little understood but potentially useful, and up to 17 wt% P2O5 in olivine from ancient slags. However, such enrichments are rare and only underscore the likelihood of phosphoms incorporation in silicate minerals. The mechanisms that allow phosphorus to enter major rock-forming silicate minerals (e.g., Oliv, Px, Gt) remain little understood and the relevant data base is limited. Nonetheless, old and new high-pressure (5-10 GPa) experimental data suggest that P2O5 wt% decreases from silica-poor to silica-rich compositions or from orthosilicate to chain silicate structures (garnet > olivine > orthopyroxene) which implies that phosphorus incorporation in silicates is perhaps more structure-than site-specific. The

  10. Efficacy of Holmium Laser Urethrotomy in Combination with Intralesional Triamcinolone in the Treatment of Anterior Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Ankur; Ganesamoni, Raguram; Nanjappa, Bhuvanesh; Sharma, Varun; Mete, Uttam K

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcome of visual internal urethrotomy with a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser along with intralesional triamcinolone injection. Materials and Methods Patients with an anterior urethral stricture less than 3 cm in length were evaluated by clinical history, physical examination, uroflowmetry, and retrograde urethrogram preoperatively. All patients were treated with holmium laser urethrotomy and intralesional triamcinolone (80 mg) injection under general or regional anesthesia. An 18 F urethral catheter was placed for 5 days. All patients were followed up for 12 months postoperatively by history, uroflowmetry, and if required, retrograde urethrogram or urethroscopy every 3 months. Results The mean age of the patients was 42.9 years (range, 14 to 70 years). The overall recurrence rate was 24%. The success rate in patients with strictures less than 1 cm in length was 95.8%, whereas that in patients with strictures of 1 to 3 cm in length was 57.7% (p=0.002). The outcome did not depend on age, duration of symptoms, etiology, or location of stricture. Conclusions Holmium laser urethrotomy with intralesional triamcinolone is a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for urethral strictures. This procedure has an encouraging success rate, especially in those with stricture segments of less than 1 cm in length. PMID:23060998

  11. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  12. Silicic magma generation at Askja volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2009-04-01

    Rate of magma differentiation is an important parameter for hazard assessment at active volcanoes. However, estimates of these rates depend on proper understanding of the underlying magmatic processes and magma generation. Differences in isotope ratios of O, Th and B between silicic and in contemporaneous basaltic magmas have been used to emphasize their origin by partial melting of hydrothermally altered metabasaltic crust in the rift-zones favoured by a strong geothermal gradient. An alternative model for the origin of silicic magmas in the Iceland has been proposed based on U-series results. Young mantle-derived mafic protolith is thought to be metasomatized and partially melted to form the silicic end-member. However, this model underestimates the compositional variations of the hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. New data on U-Th disequilibria and O-isotopes in basalts and dacites from Askja volcano reveal a strong correlation between (230Th/232Th) and delta 18O. The 1875 AD dacite has the lowest Th- and O isotope ratios (0.94 and -0.24 per mille, respectively) whereas tephra of evolved basaltic composition, erupted 2 months earlier, has significantly higher values (1.03 and 2.8 per mille, respectively). Highest values are observed in the most recent basalts (erupted in 1920 and 1961) inside the Askja caldera complex and out on the associated fissure swarm (Sveinagja basalt). This correlation also holds for older magma such as an early Holocene dacites, which eruption may have been provoked by rapid glacier thinning. Silicic magmas at Askja volcano thus bear geochemical signatures that are best explained by partial melting of extensively hydrothermally altered crust and that the silicic magma source has remained constant during the Holocene at least. Once these silicic magmas are formed they appear to erupt rapidly rather than mixing and mingling with the incoming basalt heat-source that explains lack of icelandites and the bi-modal volcanism at Askja

  13. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  14. Mafic silicates in the Orgueil carbonaceous meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Iron-bearing olivines and pyroxenes occurring in Orgueil may represent a separate population distinct from the magnesian varieties previously reported. Compositions of these iron-bearing silicates are inconsistent with an origin by direct equilibrium condensation in the nebula. Such an origin is more plausible for the magnesian silicates, but lacks conclusive evidence. An extra-solar system origin for either mafic population is possible, though similarly lacking in evidence. About 15% of the olivines, randomly distributed with respect to iron content, retain particle track evidence of a precompaction irradiation.

  15. [Critical evaluation of indications for the holmium:YAG laser and the neodymium:YAG laser in orthopedic surgery based on an in vitro study].

    PubMed

    Anders, J O; Pietsch, S; Staupendahl, G

    1999-04-01

    This is an in vitro study of the biophysical effects of holmium:YAG and neodymium-YAG lasers that was prompted by the poor clinical results obtained with lumbar percutaneous laser discus decompression (PLDD). In the absence of adequate cooling, ablation of tissue with the holmium:YAG laser causes thermal damage to the surrounding tissues. Utilizing the immediate colour-independent laser coupling effect, the holmium:YAG laser removes soft and hard tissue immediately. The low tissue penetrating power (max. 0.32 mm), together with the use of irrigation, avoids thermal problems, and this laser type with its high pulse energy and frequency is to be recommended for arthroscopic surgery. In contrast, the effects of the neodymium:YAG laser are highly dependent on tissue colour. Using this laser on light-coloured tissue only diffuse warming but no ablation of soft tissue was often seen. The depth of tissue penetration seen in our study was 0.58 mm, but is greatly dependent on the duration of application, and is much larger with long application times. In conclusion, we believe that the neodymium:YAG laser is more suitable for percutaneous intradiscal procedures than the holmium:YAG laser. For arthroscopic surgery, the holmium:YAG laser will be the better choice. The effect of each type of laser depends not only on its physical properties, but also on tissue properties (light or dark-coloured, thermal conductivity) and duration of application. PMID:10379068

  16. The evaluation of tissue mass loss in the incision line of prostate with benign hyperplasia performed using holmium laser and cutting electrode

    PubMed Central

    Szewczyk, Mariusz; Jesionek–Kupnicka, Dorota; Lipinski, Piotr; Różański, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to compare the changes in the incision line of prostatic adenoma using a monopolar cutting electrode and holmium laser, as well as the assessment of associated tissue mass and volume loss of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Material and methods The material used in this study consisted of 74 preparations of prostatic adenoma obtained via open retropubic adenomectomy, with an average volume of 120.7 ml. The material obtained cut in vitro before fixation in formaldehyde. One lobe was cut using holmium laser, the other using a monopolar cutting electrode. After the incision was made, tissue mass and volume loss were evaluated. Thermocoagulation changes in the incision line were examinedunder light microscope. Results In the case of the holmium laser incision, the average tissue mass loss was 1.73 g, tissue volume loss 3.57 ml and the depth of thermocoagulation was 1.17 mm. When the monopolar cutting electrode was used average tissue mass loss was 0.807 g, tissue volume loss 2.48 ml and the depth of thermocoagulation was 0.19 mm. Conclusions Where holmium laser was used, it was observed that the layer of tissue with thermocoagulation changes was deeper than in the case of the monopolar cutting electrode. Moreover, it was noticed that holmium laser caused bigger tissue mass and volume loss than the cutting electrode. PMID:25247088

  17. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-03-01

    II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  18. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  20. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  1. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  2. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  3. Synthesis of non-siliceous mesoporous oxides.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dong; Schüth, Ferdi

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous non-siliceous oxides have attracted great interest due to their unique properties and potential applications. Since the discovery of mesoporous silicates in 1990s, organic-inorganic assembly processes by using surfactants or block copolymers as soft templates have been considered as a feasible path for creating mesopores in metal oxides. However, the harsh sol-gel conditions and low thermal stabilities have limited the expansion of this method to various metal oxide species. Nanocasting, using ordered mesoporous silica or carbon as a hard template, has provided possibilities for preparing novel mesoporous materials with new structures, compositions and high thermal stabilities. This review concerns the synthesis, composition, and parameter control of mesoporous non-siliceous oxides. Four synthesis routes, i.e. soft-templating (surfactants or block copolymers as templates), hard-templating (mesoporous silicas or carbons as sacrificial templates), colloidal crystal templating (3-D ordered colloidal particles as a template), and super lattice routes, are summarized in this review. Mesoporous metal oxides with different compositions have different properties. Non-siliceous mesoporous oxides are comprehensively described, including a discussion of constituting elements, synthesis, and structures. General aspects concerning pore size control, atomic scale crystallinity, and phase control are also reviewed. PMID:23942521

  4. Lithium Manganese Silicate Positive Electrode Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiong

    As the fast development of the electronic portable devices and drastic fading of fossil energy sources. The need for portable secondary energy sources is increasingly urgent. As a result, lithium ion batteries are being investigated intensely to meet the performance requirements. Among various electrode materials, the most expensive and capacity limiting component is the positive materials. Based on this, researches have been mostly focused on the development of novel cathode materials with high capacity and energy density and the lithium transition metal orthosilicates have been identified as possible high performance cathodes. Here in, we report the synthesis of a kind of lithium transition metal orthosilicates electrode lithium manganese silicate. Lithium manganese silicate has the advantage of high theoretical capacity, low cost raw material and safety. In this thesis, lithium manganese silicate are prepared using different silicon sources. The structure of silicon sources preferred are examined. Nonionic block copolymers surfactant, P123, is tried as carbon source and mophology directing agent. Lithium manganese silicate's performances are improved by adding P123.

  5. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  6. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  10. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  11. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  12. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  13. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  14. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  15. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  16. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  17. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  18. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  19. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  3. Grain Growth and Silicates in Dense Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendeleton, Yvonne J.; Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for visual extinction (Av) in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between Av and the depth of the 9.7 micron silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well 'mixed. In the di&se ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233,321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5 146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. Our data set spans an Av range between 2 and 35 magnitudes. All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. The Serpens data appear to follow the diffuse ISM correlation line whereas the data for the other clouds show a non-linear correlation between the depth of the silicate feature relative to Av, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. In fact, it appears that for visual extinctions greater than about 10 mag, tau(9.7) begins to level off. This decrease in the growth of the depth of the 9.7 micron feature with increasing Av could indicate the effects of grain growth in dense clouds. In this poster, we explore the possibility that grain growth causes an increase in opacity (Av) without causing a corresponding increase in tau(9.7).

  4. Kidney stone ablation times and peak saline temperatures during Holmium:YAG and Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy, in vitro, in a ureteral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. The Holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150-500 Hz, and 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate / 40% calcium phosphate), of uniform mass and diameter (4-5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 ml/min and 13.7 ml/min for the TFL and Holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from tube's center and 1 mm above mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded during experiments. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. Holmium laser time measured 167 +/- 41 s (n = 12). TFL times measured 111 +/- 49 s, 39 +/- 11 s, and 23 +/- 4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz (n = 12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24 +/- 1 °C for Holmium, and 33 +/- 3 °C, 33 +/- 7 °C, and 39 +/- 6 °C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and reduced stone retropulsion, and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  5. Changes in corneal collagen induced by holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberlake, George T.; Reinke, Martin H.; Miller, Alvin

    1996-05-01

    Holmium:YAG laser thermokeratoplasty corrects hyperopia (farsightedness) by producing small areas of corneal collagen shrinkage that cause the central cornea to bulge outward, increasing optical power. Collagen shrinkage is probably caused by laser-heated corneal water, but details of the shrinkage mechanism are not known. We investigated the shrinkage mechanism by measuring changes in corneal ultrastructure, surface shrinkage, water content, and strength following Ho:YAG laser exposures. Morphological changes in collagen were documented by measurements from electron micrographs. Corneal adhesive strength was determined by measuring tearing force in a plane parallel to the corneal surface. Laser-induced water loss was measured by weighing corneal samples before and after exposure. Corneal surface shrinkage was assessed by photographing the movement of particles on the cornea. Lasered collagen fibrils increased in diameter, lost their orderly arrangement, and appeared `frayed.' The corneal surface contracted toward lasered areas with a maximal shift of approximately 190 micrometers , more than could be explained by a model based on collagen fibril changes. Water loss plays a minor role in corneal shrinkage since corneal samples lost about only about 1.4% of their weight after massive laser exposure. Despite marked changes in collagen structure, corneal adhesive force was unchanged.

  6. Effectiveness and Safety of Ureteroscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Upper Urinary Tract Calculi in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Takashi; Otsuki, Hideo; Uehara, Shinya; Shimizu, Toshihiro; Murao, Wataru; Fujio, Koji; Fujio, Kei; Wada, Koichiro; Araki, Motoo; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-06-01

    Upper urinary tract calculi are common; however, there is no recommended treatment selection for elderly patients. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (URS lithotripsy) is minimally invasive, and it provides a high stone-free rate (SFR) treatment for upper urinary tract calculi. Here, we retrospectively evaluated the surgical outcomes of URS lithotripsy after dividing the 189 cases into 3 groups by patient age: the '<65 group' (<65 years old, n=108), the '65-74 group' (65-74 years old, n=42), and the ' 75 group' ( 75 years old, n=39). The patients' characteristics, stone status, and perioperative outcomes were assessed. The 65-74 group and the 75 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension compared to the<65 group. Compared to the<65 group, the 65-74 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hyperlipidemia, and the 75 group had significantly higher the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores. Despite these preoperative risk factors, SFR and postoperative pyelonephritis in the 65-74 group and the 75 group were similar to those of the<65 group. In conclusion, URS lithotripsy is the preferred treatment for upper urinary tract calculi, even for elderly patients who have multiple preoperative risk factors. PMID:27339204

  7. Solvent extraction of holmium and yttrium with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizuka, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Baba, Y.; Inoue, K. ); Nakashio, F. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper discusses a kinetic study on the solvent extraction of holmium(III) and yttrium(III) with bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) from nitrate media conducted at 303 K using a hollow fiber membrane extractor. Also studied were the distribution equilibria of these metals and interfacial adsorption equilibria of D2EHPA and its metal complexes between the organic and aqueous phases. It was found that the metals (M{sup 3+}) were extracted with D2EHPA (HR) ad MR{sub 3} {center dot} 3HR into the organic phase, and the extraction equilibrium constants were evaluated. Furthermore, it was established that dimeric D2EHPA can be adsorbed at the interface between the organic and aqueous phases, while the interfacial activities of D2EHPA-metal complexes were negligibly small. The apparent orders 2, 1, and 2 of the permeabilities for the extraction of both metals were found with respect to the pH of the aqueous solution and the concentrations of the metal ion and dimeric D2EHPA, while the orders 1, 1, and {minus}1 of the permeabilities for the stripping of both metals were found with respect to the hydrogen ion activity and the concentrations of the metal complex and dimeric D2EHPA, respectively. The diffusional effects were reasonably explained by the diffusion model accompanied by an interfacial reaction, taking into account the velocity distributions of the aqueous and organic phases through the inner and outer sides of a hollow fiber.

  8. Laboratory investigation of the efficacy of holmium:YAG laser irradiation in removing intracanal debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Gutknecht, Norbert; Sailer, Hermann F.; Hering, Peter; Prettl, Wilhelm

    1997-05-01

    Current endodontic therapy involves debridement and disinfection of the root canal by means of mechanical instrumentation and chemical irrigation. However, several studies have shown that these techniques fail to achieve complete cleansing. Recently, lasers have been suggested for use within root canals. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of Holmium:YAG laser irradiation in removing intracanal debris and smear layer. Root canal surfaces of freshly-extracted human teeth were exposed to pulsed Ho:YAG laser radiation. Subsequently, laser induced structural changes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Temperature measurements during irradiation were performed by means of thermocouples. The result of this survey give a preliminary indication of the ability of the Ho:YAG laser to improve current endodontic treatment survey give a preliminary indication of the ability of the Ho:YAG laser to improve current endodontic treatment modalities. However, limitations exist with regard to circumscribed and well-quantified irradiation of root canal surfaces, due to the lack of perpendicular delivery of the laser beam. Additional studies will be required to develop suitable optical transmission systems, in order to achieve complete cleansing and to avoid damage to the periradicular tissues, respectively.

  9. Efficacy of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate Based on Patient Preoperative Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yoon Seok; Kim, Tae Heon; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Jeong, Jeongyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in relation to prostate size and urodynamic parameters, including bladder outlet obstruction index (BOOI), presence of detrusor overactivity, and detrusor contractility, and to investigate factors predictive of HoLEP success. Methods: This retrospective analysis of prospective data included 174 consecutive patients treated with HoLEP at Samsung Medical Center from 2009 to 2013. Prostate-specific antigen, prostate size, urodynamic parameters, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS)/quality of life (QoL) were evaluated preoperatively, while prostate-specific antigen, uroflowmetry/postvoid residual (PVR) urine, and IPSS were measured six months after HoLEP. Two definitions of treatment success were established based on the following three variables: IPSS, maximum flow rate (Qmax), and QoL index. Factors predictive of HoLEP success were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: IPSS/QoL, Qmax, and PVR improved significantly following HoLEP. Improvements in IPSS and PVR were more significant in the BOOI≥40 group compared to the BOOI<40 group, with overall success rates of 93.7% and 73.6%, respectively. Thus, the BOOI≥40 group had a significantly higher success rate, and BOOI≥40 was a significant predictor of HoLEP success based on the multivariate analyses. Conclusions: We found good surgical outcomes after HoLEP, and specifically patients with a higher BOOI had a greater chance of surgical success. PMID:26739183

  10. An Improved Morcellation Procedure for Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Chen, Yan-Bo; Zheng, Da-Chao; Cai, Zhi-Kang; Li, Wen-Ji; Zhou, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose We modified the conventional morcellation procedure for holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP), and its outcomes are presented in this article. Materials and Methods As 395 patients were included, the conventional morcellation procedure was performed in the first 100 cases (group 1, cases 1–100), and an improved procedure was used in the last 100 cases (group 2, cases 296–395). The improved morcellation process has three steps to execute. The morcellation time, collected tissue weight, morcellation rate, and associated complications were recorded. Results The tissue-resected weight was similar between group 1 (60.7±33.9 g) and group 2 (62.4±36.8 g). The mean morcellation time in group 1 was greater than that in group 2 (11.3±7.1 and 8.3±4.1 minutes, respectively), and the mean morcellation rate was better in group 2 than in group 1 (5.75±1.7 g/minutes in group 1 v 7.3±1.1 g/minutes in group 2). Complications, such as bladder injury, were similar in both groups. Conclusion The improved morcellation procedure described in this article can be used in various situations of suction and can be performed in a more fluent manner and with better efficiency. PMID:22788738