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Sample records for homeodomain protein yox1p

  1. Homeodomain proteins: an update.

    PubMed

    Bürglin, Thomas R; Affolter, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Here, we provide an update of our review on homeobox genes that we wrote together with Walter Gehring in 1994. Since then, comprehensive surveys of homeobox genes have become possible due to genome sequencing projects. Using the 103 Drosophila homeobox genes as example, we present an updated classification. In animals, there are 16 major classes, ANTP, PRD, PRD-LIKE, POU, HNF, CUT (with four subclasses: ONECUT, CUX, SATB, and CMP), LIM, ZF, CERS, PROS, SIX/SO, plus the TALE superclass with the classes IRO, MKX, TGIF, PBC, and MEIS. In plants, there are 11 major classes, i.e., HD-ZIP (with four subclasses: I to IV), WOX, NDX, PHD, PLINC, LD, DDT, SAWADEE, PINTOX, and the two TALE classes KNOX and BEL. Most of these classes encode additional domains apart from the homeodomain. Numerous insights have been obtained in the last two decades into how homeodomain proteins bind to DNA and increase their specificity by interacting with other proteins to regulate cell- and tissue-specific gene expression. Not only protein-DNA base pair contacts are important for proper target selection; recent experiments also reveal that the shape of the DNA plays a role in specificity. Using selected examples, we highlight different mechanisms of homeodomain protein-DNA interaction. The PRD class of homeobox genes was of special interest to Walter Gehring in the last two decades. The PRD class comprises six families in Bilateria, and tinkers with four different motifs, i.e., the PAIRED domain, the Groucho-interacting motif EH1 (aka Octapeptide or TN), the homeodomain, and the OAR motif. Homologs of the co-repressor protein Groucho are also present in plants (TOPLESS), where they have been shown to interact with small amphipathic motives (EAR), and in yeast (TUP1), where we find an EH1-like motif in MATα2. PMID:26464018

  2. The Homeodomain Resource: a comprehensive collection of sequence, structure, interaction, genomic and functional information on the homeodomain protein family

    PubMed Central

    Moreland, R. Travis; Ryan, Joseph F.; Pan, Christopher; Baxevanis, Andreas D.

    2009-01-01

    The Homeodomain Resource is a curated collection of sequence, structure, interaction, genomic and functional information on the homeodomain family. The current version builds upon previous versions by the addition of new, complete sets of homeodomain sequences from fully sequenced genomes, the expansion of existing curated homeodomain information and the improvement of data accessibility through better search tools and more complete data integration. This release contains 1534 full-length homeodomain-containing sequences, 93 experimentally derived homeodomain structures, 101 homeodomain protein–protein interactions, 107 homeodomain DNA-binding sites and 206 homeodomain proteins implicated in human genetic disorders. Database URL: The Homeodomain Resource is freely available and can be accessed at http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/homeodomain/ PMID:20157477

  3. Karyopherins in nuclear transport of homeodomain proteins during development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenduo; Lin, Wenbo; Tartakoff, Alan M.; Tao, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Homeodomain proteins are crucial transcription factors for cell differentiation, cell proliferation and organ development. Interestingly, their homeodomain signature structure is important for both their DNA-binding and their nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. The accurate nucleocytoplasmic distribution of these proteins is essential for their functions. We summarize information on a) the roles of karyopherins for import and export of homeoproteins, b) the regulation of their nuclear transport during development, and c) the corresponding complexity of homeoprotein nucleocytoplasmic transport signals. PMID:21256166

  4. Sequence-specific targeting of nuclear signal transduction pathways by homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Grueneberg, D A; Simon, K J; Brennan, K; Gilman, M

    1995-01-01

    Cells translate extracellular signals into specific programs of gene expression that reflect their developmental history or identity. We present evidence that one way this interpretation may be performed is by cooperative interactions between serum response factor (SRF) and certain homeodomain proteins. We show that human and Drosophila homeodomain proteins of the paired class have the ability to recruit SRF to DNA sequences not efficiently recognized by SRF on its own, thereby imparting to a linked reporter gene the potential to respond to polypeptide growth factors. This activity requires both the DNA-binding activity of the homeodomain and putative protein-protein contact residues on the exposed surfaces of homeodomain helices 1 and 2. The ability of the homeodomain to impart signal responsiveness is DNA sequence specific, and this specificity differs from the simple DNA-binding specificity of the homeodomain in vitro. The homeodomain imparts response to a spectrum of signals characteristic of the natural SRF-binding site in the c-fos gene. Response to some of these signals is dependent on the secondary recruitment of SRF-dependent ternary complex factors, and we show directly that a homeodomain can promote the recruitment of one such factor, Elk1. We infer that SRF and homeodomains interact cooperatively on DNA and that formation of SRF-homeodomain complexes permits the recruitment of signal-responsive SRF accessory proteins. The ability to route extracellular signals to specific target genes is a novel activity of the homeodomain, which may contribute to the identity function displayed by many homeodomain genes. PMID:7760827

  5. AbdB-like Hox proteins stabilize DNA binding by the Meis1 homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W F; Montgomery, J C; Rozenfeld, S; Moskow, J J; Lawrence, H J; Buchberg, A M; Largman, C

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies show that Hox homeodomain proteins from paralog groups 1 to 10 gain DNA binding specificity and affinity through cooperative binding with the divergent homeodomain protein Pbx1. However, the AbdB-like Hox proteins from paralogs 11, 12, and 13 do not interact with Pbx1a, raising the possibility of different protein partners. The Meis1 homeobox gene has 44% identity to Pbx within the homeodomain and was identified as a common site of viral integration in myeloid leukemias arising in BXH-2 mice. These integrations result in constitutive activation of Meis1. Furthermore, the Hoxa-9 gene is frequently activated by viral integration in the same BXH-2 leukemias, suggesting a biological synergy between these two distinct classes of homeodomain proteins in causing malignant transformation. We now show that the Hoxa-9 protein physically interacts with Meis1 proteins by forming heterodimeric binding complexes on a DNA target containing a Meis1 site (TGACAG) and an AbdB-like Hox site (TTTTACGAC). Hox proteins from the other AbdB-like paralogs, Hoxa-10, Hoxa-11, Hoxd-12, and Hoxb-13, also form DNA binding complexes with Meis1b, while Hox proteins from other paralogs do not appear to interact with Meis1 proteins. DNA binding complexes formed by Meis1 with Hox proteins dissociate much more slowly than DNA complexes with Meis1 alone, suggesting that Hox proteins stabilize the interactions of Meis1 proteins with their DNA targets. PMID:9343407

  6. AbdB-like Hox proteins stabilize DNA binding by the Meis1 homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, W F; Montgomery, J C; Rozenfeld, S; Moskow, J J; Lawrence, H J; Buchberg, A M; Largman, C

    1997-11-01

    Recent studies show that Hox homeodomain proteins from paralog groups 1 to 10 gain DNA binding specificity and affinity through cooperative binding with the divergent homeodomain protein Pbx1. However, the AbdB-like Hox proteins from paralogs 11, 12, and 13 do not interact with Pbx1a, raising the possibility of different protein partners. The Meis1 homeobox gene has 44% identity to Pbx within the homeodomain and was identified as a common site of viral integration in myeloid leukemias arising in BXH-2 mice. These integrations result in constitutive activation of Meis1. Furthermore, the Hoxa-9 gene is frequently activated by viral integration in the same BXH-2 leukemias, suggesting a biological synergy between these two distinct classes of homeodomain proteins in causing malignant transformation. We now show that the Hoxa-9 protein physically interacts with Meis1 proteins by forming heterodimeric binding complexes on a DNA target containing a Meis1 site (TGACAG) and an AbdB-like Hox site (TTTTACGAC). Hox proteins from the other AbdB-like paralogs, Hoxa-10, Hoxa-11, Hoxd-12, and Hoxb-13, also form DNA binding complexes with Meis1b, while Hox proteins from other paralogs do not appear to interact with Meis1 proteins. DNA binding complexes formed by Meis1 with Hox proteins dissociate much more slowly than DNA complexes with Meis1 alone, suggesting that Hox proteins stabilize the interactions of Meis1 proteins with their DNA targets. PMID:9343407

  7. The conserved KNOX domain mediates specificity of tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, T; Nishimura, A; Tamaoki, M; Kuba, M; Tanaka, H; Iwahori, S; Matsuoka, M

    1999-01-01

    Overproduction of the tobacco KNOTTED1-type homeodomain proteins NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23 in transgenic tobacco plants causes mild, severe, and no morphological alterations, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the homeodomains and adjacent ELK domains are highly conserved, and the N-terminal KNOX domains also are moderately conserved. To investigate the contributions of both the conserved and divergent regions to the severity of morphological alterations, we generated chimeric proteins by exchanging different regions of NTH1, NTH15, and NTH23. The severity of the abnormal phenotype was dependent upon the synergistic action of both the N terminus, containing the KNOX domain, and the C terminus, containing the ELK homeodomain. Detailed analysis focusing on the C terminus revealed that the C-terminal half of the ELK domain is more effective in inducing the abnormal phenotypes than are the homeodomains. For the N terminus, severe morphological alterations were induced by exchanging a part of the KNOX domain of NTH1 with the corresponding region of NTH15. This limited region in the KNOX domain of all homeodomain proteins includes a predicted alpha-helical region, but only that in NTH15 is predicted to form a typical amphipathic structure. We discuss the possibility, based on these results, that the secondary structure of the KNOX domain is important for the induction of abnormal morphology in transgenic tobacco plants. PMID:10449577

  8. The molecular basis of Rieger syndrome. Analysis of Pitx2 homeodomain protein activities.

    PubMed

    Amendt, B A; Sutherland, L B; Semina, E V; Russo, A F

    1998-08-01

    Rieger syndrome is an autosomal-dominant developmental disorder that includes glaucoma and mild craniofacial dysmorphism in humans. Mutations in the Pitx2 homeobox gene have been linked to Rieger syndrome. We have characterized wild type and mutant Pitx2 activities using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, protein binding, and transient transfection assays. Pitx2 preferentially binds the bicoid homeodomain binding site and transactivates reporter genes containing this site. The combination of Pitx2 and another homeodomain protein, Pit-1, yielded a synergistic 55-fold activation of the prolactin promoter in transfection assays. Addition of Pit-1 increased Pitx2 binding to the bicoid element in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we demonstrate specific binding of Pit-1 to Pitx2 in vitro. Thus, wild type Pitx2 DNA binding activity is modulated by protein-protein interactions. We next studied two Rieger mutants. A threonine to proline mutation (T68P) in the second helix of the homeodomain retained DNA binding activity with the same apparent KD and only about a 2-fold reduction in the Bmax. However, this mutant did not transactivate reporter genes containing the bicoid site. The mutant Pitx2 protein binds Pit-1, but there was no detectable synergism on the prolactin promoter. A second mutation (L54Q) in a highly conserved residue in helix 1 of the homeodomain yielded an unstable protein. Our results provide insights into the potential mechanisms underlying the developmental defects in Rieger syndrome. PMID:9685346

  9. Did homeodomain proteins duplicate before the origin of angiosperms, fungi, and metazoa?

    PubMed Central

    Bharathan, Geeta; Janssen, Bart-Jan; Kellogg, Elizabeth A.; Sinha, Neelima

    1997-01-01

    Homeodomain proteins are transcription factors that play a critical role in early development in eukaryotes. These proteins previously have been classified into numerous subgroups whose phylogenetic relationships are unclear. Our phylogenetic analysis of representative eukaryotic sequences suggests that there are two major groups of homeodomain proteins, each containing sequences from angiosperms, metazoa, and fungi. This result, based on parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses of primary amino acid sequences, was supported by two additional features of the proteins. The two protein groups are distinguished by an insertion/deletion in the homeodomain, between helices I and II. In addition, an amphipathic alpha-helical secondary structure in the region N terminal of the homeodomain is shared by angiosperm and metazoan sequences in one group. These results support the hypothesis that there was at least one duplication of homeobox genes before the origin of angiosperms, fungi, and metazoa. This duplication, in turn, suggests that these proteins had diverse functions early in the evolution of eukaryotes. The shared secondary structure in angiosperm and metazoan sequences points to an ancient conserved functional domain. PMID:9391098

  10. Did homeodomain proteins duplicate before the origin of angiosperms, fungi, and metazoa?

    PubMed

    Bharathan, G; Janssen, B J; Kellogg, E A; Sinha, N

    1997-12-01

    Homeodomain proteins are transcription factors that play a critical role in early development in eukaryotes. These proteins previously have been classified into numerous subgroups whose phylogenetic relationships are unclear. Our phylogenetic analysis of representative eukaryotic sequences suggests that there are two major groups of homeodomain proteins, each containing sequences from angiosperms, metazoa, and fungi. This result, based on parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses of primary amino acid sequences, was supported by two additional features of the proteins. The two protein groups are distinguished by an insertion/deletion in the homeodomain, between helices I and II. In addition, an amphipathic alpha-helical secondary structure in the region N terminal of the homeodomain is shared by angiosperm and metazoan sequences in one group. These results support the hypothesis that there was at least one duplication of homeobox genes before the origin of angiosperms, fungi, and metazoa. This duplication, in turn, suggests that these proteins had diverse functions early in the evolution of eukaryotes. The shared secondary structure in angiosperm and metazoan sequences points to an ancient conserved functional domain. PMID:9391098

  11. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) phosphorylates the small SPOC family protein Spenito.

    PubMed

    Dewald, D N; Steinmetz, E L; Walldorf, U

    2014-12-01

    The Drosophila homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) is a versatile regulator involved in a variety of pathways, such as Notch and Wingless signalling, thereby acting in processes including the promotion of eye development or control of cell numbers in the nervous system. In vertebrates, extensive studies have related its homologue HIPK2 to important roles in the control of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumour suppression. Spenito (Nito) belongs to the group of small SPOC family proteins and has a role, amongst others, as a regulator of Wingless signalling downstream of Armadillo. In the present study, we show that both proteins have an enzyme-substrate relationship, adding a new interesting component to the broad range of Hipk interactions, and we map several phosphorylation sites of Nito. Furthermore, we were able to define a preliminary consensus motif for Hipk target sites, which will simplify the identification of new substrates of this kinase. PMID:25040100

  12. Homeodomain Protein Scr Regulates the Transcription of Genes Involved in Juvenile Hormone Biosynthesis in the Silkworm

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Meng; Liu, Chun; Peng, Jian; Qian, Wenliang; Qian, Heying; Tian, Ling; Li, Jiarui; Dai, Dandan; Xu, Anying; Li, Sheng; Xia, Qingyou; Cheng, Daojun

    2015-01-01

    The silkworm Dominant trimolting (Moltinism, M3) mutant undergoes three larval molts and exhibits precocious metamorphosis. In this study, we found that compared with the wild-type (WT) that undergoes four larval molts, both the juvenile hormone (JH) concentration and the expression of the JH-responsive gene Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) began to be greater in the second instar of the M3 mutant. A positional cloning analysis revealed that only the homeodomain transcription factor gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) is located in the genomic region that is tightly linked to the M3 locus. The expression level of the Scr gene in the brain-corpora cardiaca-corpora allata (Br-CC-CA) complex, which controls the synthesis of JH, was very low in the final larval instar of both the M3 and WT larvae, and exhibited a positive correlation with JH titer changes. Importantly, luciferase reporter analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that the Scr protein could promote the transcription of genes involved in JH biosynthesis by directly binding to the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) of homeodomain protein on their promoters. These results conclude that the homeodomain protein Scr is transcriptionally involved in the regulation of JH biosynthesis in the silkworm. PMID:26540044

  13. A Gamete-specific, Sex-limited Homeodomain Protein in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Kurvari, Venkatesh; Grishin, Nick V.; Snell, William J.

    1998-01-01

    During fertilization in Chlamydomonas, gametes of opposite mating types interact with each other through sex-specific adhesion molecules on their flagellar surfaces. Flagellar adhesion brings the cell bodies of the gametes into close contact and initiates a signal transduction pathway in preparation for cell–cell fusion. We have identified a cDNA, gsp1, whose transcript levels are upregulated during flagellar adhesion. The GSP1 polypeptide is a novel, gamete-specific homeodomain protein, the first to be identified in an alga. Its homeodomain shows significant identity with several higher plant homeodomain proteins. Although encoded by a single copy gene present in cells of both mating types, immunoblot analysis showed that GSP1 was expressed in mating type (mt)+ gametes, but was not detectable in mt− gametes or in vegetative cells of either mating type. Moreover, GSP1 appeared late during gametogenesis, suggesting that it may function during adhesion with mt− gametes or after zygote formation. GSP1 is expressed in imp11, mt− mutant gametes, which have a lesion in the mid gene involved in sex determination and exhibit many phenotypic characteristics of mt+ gametes. Thus, gsp1 is negatively regulated by mid and is the first molecule to be identified in Chlamydomonas that shows sex-limited expression. PMID:9864368

  14. Pbx Homeodomain Proteins: TALEnted regulators of Limb Patterning and Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Capellini, Terence D.; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Selleri, Licia

    2011-01-01

    Limb development has long provided an excellent model for understanding the genetic principles driving embryogenesis. Studies utilizing chick and mouse have led to new insights into limb patterning and morphogenesis. Recent research has centered on the regulatory networks underlying limb development. Here, we discuss the hierarchical, overlapping, and iterative roles of Pbx family members in appendicular development that have emerged from genetic analyses in the mouse. Pbx genes are essential in determining limb bud positioning, early bud formation, limb axes establishment and coordination, and patterning and morphogenesis of most elements of the limb and girdle. Pbx proteins directly regulate critical effectors of limb and girdle development, including morphogen-encoding genes like Shh in limb posterior mesoderm, and transcription factor-encoding genes like Alx1 in pre-scapular domains. Interestingly, at least in limb buds, Pbx appear to act not only as Hox cofactors, but also in the upstream control of 5' HoxA/D gene expression. PMID:21416555

  15. Complex regulation of CREB-binding protein by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Krisztián A; Steinmann, Myriam; Halfon, Olivier; Magistretti, Pierre J; Cardinaux, Jean-René

    2015-11-01

    CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are transcriptional coactivators involved in numerous biological processes that affect cell growth, transformation, differentiation, and development. In this study, we provide evidence of the involvement of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) in the regulation of CBP activity. We show that HIPK2 interacts with and phosphorylates several regions of CBP. We demonstrate that serines 2361, 2363, 2371, 2376, and 2381 are responsible for the HIPK2-induced mobility shift of CBP C-terminal activation domain. Moreover, we show that HIPK2 strongly potentiates the transcriptional activity of CBP. However, our data suggest that HIPK2 activates CBP mainly by counteracting the repressive action of cell cycle regulatory domain 1 (CRD1), located between amino acids 977 and 1076, independently of CBP phosphorylation. Our findings thus highlight a complex regulation of CBP activity by HIPK2, which might be relevant for the control of specific sets of target genes involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. PMID:26247811

  16. Threading analysis of prospero-type homeodomains.

    PubMed

    Banerjee-Basu, S; Landsman, D; Baxevanis, A D

    1999-01-01

    The homeodomain is a common structural motif found in many transcription factors involved in cell fate determination during development. We have used threading analysis techniques to predict whether the atypical homeodomain of prospero (pros) family members could form the three-helical homeodomain structural motif, even though these proteins are not statistically similar to canonical homeodomains as assessed by BLAST searches. Amino acid sequences of these divergent homeodomain proteins were threaded through the X-ray coordinates of the Drosophila engrailed homeodomain protein [23]. The analysis confirms that the prospero class of homeodomain proteins is indeed capable of forming the homeodomain structure despite its low degree of sequence identity to the canonical homeodomain. Energy calculations indicate that the homeodomain structure is stabilized primarily by hydrophobic interactions between residues at the helical interfaces. Although the atypical prospero-type homeodomain shows very little sequence similarity when compared to other homeodomain proteins, the critical amino acids responsible for maintaining the three-dimensional structure are highly conserved. A number of other homeodomain proteins, such as PHO2p from Saccharomyces and Pax6 from human, were also included in the threading analysis and were shown to be able to form the engrailed structure, indicating that there are no rigid overall sequence requirements for the formation of the homeodomain structural motif. Based on the threading experiments and the subsequent structural alignment, a new amino acid signature that unambiguously identifies the prospero-type proteins was deduced. PMID:11471237

  17. Phosphorylation of TCF proteins by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Hikasa, Hiroki; Sokol, Sergei Y

    2011-04-01

    Wnt pathways play essential roles in cell proliferation, morphogenesis, and cell fate specification during embryonic development. According to the consensus view, the Wnt pathway prevents the degradation of the key signaling component β-catenin by the protein complex containing the negative regulators Axin and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Stabilized β-catenin associates with TCF proteins and enters the nucleus to promote target gene expression. This study examines the involvement of HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2) in the regulation of different TCF proteins in Xenopus embryos in vivo. We show that the TCF family members LEF1, TCF4, and TCF3 are phosphorylated in embryonic ectoderm after Wnt8 stimulation and HIPK2 overexpression. We also find that TCF3 phosphorylation is triggered by canonical Wnt ligands, LRP6, and dominant negative mutants for Axin and GSK3, indicating that this process shares the same upstream regulators with β-catenin stabilization. HIPK2-dependent phosphorylation caused the dissociation of LEF1, TCF4, and TCF3 from a target promoter in vivo. This result provides a mechanistic explanation for the context-dependent function of HIPK2 in Wnt signaling; HIPK2 up-regulates transcription by phosphorylating TCF3, a transcriptional repressor, but inhibits transcription by phosphorylating LEF1, a transcriptional activator. Finally, we show that upon HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation, TCF3 is replaced with positively acting TCF1 at a target promoter. These observations emphasize a critical role for Wnt/HIPK2-dependent TCF phosphorylation and suggest that TCF switching is an important mechanism of Wnt target gene activation in vertebrate embryos. PMID:21285352

  18. Multifunctional role of the Pitx2 homeodomain protein C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Amendt, B A; Sutherland, L B; Russo, A F

    1999-10-01

    Pitx2 is a newly described bicoid-like homeodomain transcription factor that is defective in Rieger syndrome and shows a striking leftward developmental asymmetry. We have previously shown that Pitx2 (also called Ptx2 and RIEG) transactivates a reporter gene containing a bicoid enhancer and synergistically transactivates the prolactin promoter in the presence of the POU homeodomain protein Pit-1. In this report, we focused on the C-terminal region which is mutated in some Rieger patients and contains a highly conserved 14-amino-acid element. Deletion analysis of Pitx2 revealed that the C-terminal 39-amino-acid tail represses DNA binding activity and is required for Pitx2-Pit-1 interaction and Pit-1 synergism. Pit-1 interaction with the Pitx2 C terminus masks the inhibitory effect and promotes increased DNA binding activity. Interestingly, cotransfection of an expression vector encoding the C-terminal 39 amino acids of Pitx2 specifically inhibits Pitx2 transactivation activity. In contrast, the C-terminal 39-amino-acid peptide interacts with Pitx2 to increase its DNA binding activity. These data suggest that the C-terminal tail intrinsically inhibits the Pitx2 protein and that this inhibition can be overcome by interaction with other transcription factors to allow activation during development. PMID:10490637

  19. Multifunctional Role of the Pitx2 Homeodomain Protein C-Terminal Tail

    PubMed Central

    Amendt, Brad A.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Russo, Andrew F.

    1999-01-01

    Pitx2 is a newly described bicoid-like homeodomain transcription factor that is defective in Rieger syndrome and shows a striking leftward developmental asymmetry. We have previously shown that Pitx2 (also called Ptx2 and RIEG) transactivates a reporter gene containing a bicoid enhancer and synergistically transactivates the prolactin promoter in the presence of the POU homeodomain protein Pit-1. In this report, we focused on the C-terminal region which is mutated in some Rieger patients and contains a highly conserved 14-amino-acid element. Deletion analysis of Pitx2 revealed that the C-terminal 39-amino-acid tail represses DNA binding activity and is required for Pitx2-Pit-1 interaction and Pit-1 synergism. Pit-1 interaction with the Pitx2 C terminus masks the inhibitory effect and promotes increased DNA binding activity. Interestingly, cotransfection of an expression vector encoding the C-terminal 39 amino acids of Pitx2 specifically inhibits Pitx2 transactivation activity. In contrast, the C-terminal 39-amino-acid peptide interacts with Pitx2 to increase its DNA binding activity. These data suggest that the C-terminal tail intrinsically inhibits the Pitx2 protein and that this inhibition can be overcome by interaction with other transcription factors to allow activation during development. PMID:10490637

  20. Trimeric association of Hox and TALE homeodomain proteins mediates Hoxb2 hindbrain enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Y; Schnabel, C A; Cleary, M L

    1999-07-01

    Pbx/exd proteins modulate the DNA binding affinities and specificities of Hox proteins and contribute to the execution of Hox-dependent developmental programs in arthropods and vertebrates. Pbx proteins also stably heterodimerize and bind DNA with Meis and Pknox1-Prep1, additional members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) superclass of homeodomain proteins that function on common genetic pathways with a subset of Hox proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that Pbx and Meis bind DNA as heterotrimeric complexes with Hoxb1 on a genetically defined Hoxb2 enhancer, r4, that mediates the cross-regulatory transcriptional effects of Hoxb1 in vivo. The DNA binding specificity of the heterotrimeric complex for r4 is mediated by a Pbx-Hox site in conjunction with a distal Meis site, which we showed to be required for ternary complex formation and Meis-enhanced transcription. Formation of heterotrimeric complexes in which all three homeodomains bind their cognate DNA sites is topologically facilitated by the ability of Pbx and Meis to interact through their amino termini and bind DNA without stringent half-site orientation and spacing requirements. Furthermore, Meis site mutation in the Hoxb2 enhancer phenocopies Pbx-Hox site mutation to abrogate enhancer-directed expression of a reporter transgene in the murine embryonic hindbrain, demonstrating that DNA binding by all three proteins is required for trimer function in vivo. Our data provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for the combinatorial regulation of Hox and TALE protein functions that are mediated, in part, by their interdependent DNA binding activities as ternary complexes. As a consequence, Hoxb1 employs Pbx and Meis-related proteins, as a pair of essential cofactors in a higher-order molecular complex, to mediate its transcriptional effects on an endogenous Hox response element. PMID:10373562

  1. Trimeric Association of Hox and TALE Homeodomain Proteins Mediates Hoxb2 Hindbrain Enhancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Yakop; Schnabel, Catherine A.; Cleary, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    Pbx/exd proteins modulate the DNA binding affinities and specificities of Hox proteins and contribute to the execution of Hox-dependent developmental programs in arthropods and vertebrates. Pbx proteins also stably heterodimerize and bind DNA with Meis and Pknox1-Prep1, additional members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) superclass of homeodomain proteins that function on common genetic pathways with a subset of Hox proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that Pbx and Meis bind DNA as heterotrimeric complexes with Hoxb1 on a genetically defined Hoxb2 enhancer, r4, that mediates the cross-regulatory transcriptional effects of Hoxb1 in vivo. The DNA binding specificity of the heterotrimeric complex for r4 is mediated by a Pbx-Hox site in conjunction with a distal Meis site, which we showed to be required for ternary complex formation and Meis-enhanced transcription. Formation of heterotrimeric complexes in which all three homeodomains bind their cognate DNA sites is topologically facilitated by the ability of Pbx and Meis to interact through their amino termini and bind DNA without stringent half-site orientation and spacing requirements. Furthermore, Meis site mutation in the Hoxb2 enhancer phenocopies Pbx-Hox site mutation to abrogate enhancer-directed expression of a reporter transgene in the murine embryonic hindbrain, demonstrating that DNA binding by all three proteins is required for trimer function in vivo. Our data provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for the combinatorial regulation of Hox and TALE protein functions that are mediated, in part, by their interdependent DNA binding activities as ternary complexes. As a consequence, Hoxb1 employs Pbx and Meis-related proteins, as a pair of essential cofactors in a higher-order molecular complex, to mediate its transcriptional effects on an endogenous Hox response element. PMID:10373562

  2. Phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the KNOTTED class of plant homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed

    Bharathan, G; Janssen, B J; Kellogg, E A; Sinha, N

    1999-04-01

    Knotted-like (KNOX) proteins constitute a group of homeodomain proteins involved in pattern formation in developing tissues of angiosperms and other green plants. We conducted phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences of all known KNOX proteins in order to examine their evolution. Our analyses reveal two groups of KNOX proteins, classes I and II. Dicot and monocot sequences occur in both classes, indicating that the protein classes arose prior to the origin of the monocots. A conifer (Picea) sequence is nested within class I, suggesting that there are likely to be other copies of KNOX genes in this and other conifers. The orthology of several grass genes (including Zea Kn1, ZMKN1) is strongly supported by phylogenetic and synteny analyses. However, no compelling evidence supports the hypothesis of orthology previously proposed for several dicot genes and ZMKN1. Analysis of expression patterns suggests that the ancestral KNOX gene was expressed in all plant parts and that the propensity to be downregulated in roots and leaves evolved in the class I genes. PMID:10331280

  3. Contextual interactions determine whether the Drosophila homeodomain protein, Vnd, acts as a repressor or activator

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongxin; Syu, Li-Jyun; Mellerick, Dervla M.

    2005-01-01

    At the molecular level, members of the NKx2.2 family of transcription factors establish neural compartment boundaries by repressing the expression of homeobox genes specific for adjacent domains [Muhr et al. (2001) Cell, 104, 861–873; Weiss et al. (1998) Genes Dev., 12, 3591–3602]. The Drosophila homologue, vnd, interacts genetically with the high-mobility group protein, Dichaete, in a manner suggesting co-operative activation [Zhao and Skeath (2002) Development, 129, 1165–1174]. However, evidence for direct interactions and transcriptional activation is lacking. Here, we present molecular evidence for the interaction of Vnd and Dichaete that leads to the activation of target gene expression. Two-hybrid interaction assays indicate that Dichaete binds the Vnd homeodomain, and additional Vnd sequences stabilize this interaction. In addition, Vnd has two activation domains that are typically masked in the intact protein. Whether vnd can activate or repress transcription is context-dependent. Full-length Vnd, when expressed as a Gal4 fusion protein, acts as a repressor containing multiple repression domains. A divergent domain in the N-terminus, not found in vertebrate Vnd-like proteins, causes the strongest repression. The co-repressor, Groucho, enhances Vnd repression, and these two proteins physically interact. The data presented indicate that the activation and repression domains of Vnd are complex, and whether Vnd functions as a transcriptional repressor or activator depends on both intra- and inter-molecular interactions. PMID:15640442

  4. Human HOXA5 homeodomain enhances protein transduction and its application to vascular inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Kyoung sook; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Sang Ki; Lee, Sang Do; Park, Jin Bong; Chang, Seok Jong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} We have developed an E. coli protein expression vector including human specific gene sequences for protein cellular delivery. {yields} The plasmid was generated by ligation the nucleotides 770-817 of the homeobox A5 mRNA sequence. {yields} HOXA5-APE1/Ref-1 inhibited TNF-alpha-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. {yields} Human HOXA5-PTD vector provides a powerful research tools for uncovering cellular functions of proteins or for the generation of human PTD-containing proteins. -- Abstract: Cellular protein delivery is an emerging technique by which exogenous recombinant proteins are delivered into mammalian cells across the membrane. We have developed an Escherichia coli expression vector including human specific gene sequences for protein cellular delivery. The plasmid was generated by ligation the nucleotides 770-817 of the homeobox A5 mRNA sequence which was matched with protein transduction domain (PTD) of homeodomain protein A5 (HOXA5) into pET expression vector. The cellular uptake of HOXA5-PTD-EGFP was detected in 1 min and its transduction reached a maximum at 1 h within cell lysates. The cellular uptake of HOXA5-EGFP at 37 {sup o}C was greater than in 4 {sup o}C. For study for the functional role of human HOXA5-PTD, we purified HOXA5-APE1/Ref-1 and applied it on monocyte adhesion. Pretreatment with HOXA5-APE1/Ref-1 (100 nM) inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, compared with HOXA5-EGFP. Taken together, our data suggested that human HOXA5-PTD vector provides a powerful research tools for uncovering cellular functions of proteins or for the generation of human PTD-containing proteins.

  5. Homeodomain-Interacting Protein Kinase (HPK-1) regulates stress responses and ageing in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Slavica; Wood, Mallory; Llamosas, Estelle; Thaivalappil, Priya; Lee, Karen; Liao, Bing Mana; Chew, Yee Lian; Rhodes, Aaron; Yucel, Duygu; Crossley, Merlin; Nicholas, Hannah R

    2016-01-01

    Proteins of the Homeodomain-Interacting Protein Kinase (HIPK) family regulate an array of processes in mammalian systems, such as the DNA damage response, cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a single HIPK homologue called HPK-1. Previous studies have implicated HPK-1 in longevity control and suggested that this protein may be regulated in a stress-dependent manner. Here we set out to expand these observations by investigating the role of HPK-1 in longevity and in the response to heat and oxidative stress. We find that levels of HPK-1 are regulated by heat stress, and that HPK-1 contributes to survival following heat or oxidative stress. Additionally, we show that HPK-1 is required for normal longevity, with loss of HPK-1 function leading to a faster decline of physiological processes that reflect premature ageing. Through microarray analysis, we have found that HPK-1-regulated genes include those encoding proteins that serve important functions in stress responses such as Phase I and Phase II detoxification enzymes. Consistent with a role in longevity assurance, HPK-1 also regulates the expression of age-regulated genes. Lastly, we show that HPK-1 functions in the same pathway as DAF-16 to regulate longevity and reveal a new role for HPK-1 in development. PMID:26791749

  6. The Homeodomain Protein Ladybird Late Regulates Synthesis of Milk Proteins during Pregnancy in the Tsetse Fly (Glossina morsitans)

    PubMed Central

    Attardo, Geoffrey M.; Benoit, Joshua B.; Michalkova, Veronika; Patrick, Kevin R.; Krause, Tyler B.; Aksoy, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of tissue and development specific gene expression patterns underlies the functional specialization of organs in multi-cellular organisms. In the viviparous tsetse fly (Glossina), the female accessory gland is specialized to generate nutrients in the form of a milk-like secretion to support growth of intrauterine larva. Multiple milk protein genes are expressed specifically in the female accessory gland and are tightly linked with larval development. Disruption of milk protein synthesis deprives developing larvae of nutrients and results in extended larval development and/or in abortion. The ability to cause such a disruption could be utilized as a tsetse control strategy. Here we identify and delineate the regulatory sequence of a major milk protein gene (milk gland protein 1:mgp1) by utilizing a combination of molecular techniques in tsetse, Drosophila transgenics, transcriptomics and in silico sequence analyses. The function of this promoter is conserved between tsetse and Drosophila. In transgenic Drosophila the mgp1 promoter directs reporter gene expression in a tissue and stage specific manner orthologous to that of Glossina. Analysis of the minimal required regulatory region of mgp1, and the regulatory regions of other Glossina milk proteins identified putative homeodomain protein binding sites as the sole common feature. Annotation and expression analysis of Glossina homeodomain proteins identified ladybird late (lbl) as being accessory gland/fat body specific and differentially expressed between lactating/non-lactating flies. Knockdown of lbl in tsetse resulted in a significant reduction in transcript abundance of multiple milk protein genes and in a significant loss of fecundity. The role of Lbl in adult reproductive physiology is previously unknown. These results suggest that Lbl is part of a conserved reproductive regulatory system that could have implications beyond tsetse to other vector insects such as mosquitoes. This system is critical

  7. Inhibitory effects of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 on the aorta-gonad-mapharsen hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Naoki; Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Mochita, Miyuki; Taga, Tetsuya . E-mail: taga@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-01-01

    Definitive hematopoiesis starts in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mouse embryo. Our previous studies revealed that STAT3, a gp130 downstream transcription factor, is required for AGM hematopoiesis and that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) phosphorylates serine-727 of STAT3. HIPK2 is a serine/threonine kinase known to be involved in transcriptional repression and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the role of HIPK2 in hematopoiesis in mouse embryo. HIPK2 transcripts were found in fetal hematopoietic tissues such as the mouse AGM region and fetal liver. In cultured AGM cells, HIPK2 protein was detected in adherent cells. Functional analyses of HIPK2 were carried out by introducing wild-type and mutant HIPK2 constructs into AGM cultures. Production of CD45{sup +} hematopoietic cells was suppressed by forced expression of HIPK2 in AGM cultures. This suppression required the kinase domain and nuclear localization signals of HIPK2, but the kinase activity was dispensable. HIPK2-overexpressing AGM-derived nonadherent cells did not form cobblestone-like colonies in cultures with stromal cells. Furthermore, overexpression of HIPK2 in AGM cultures impeded the expansion of CD45{sup low}c-Kit{sup +} cells, which exhibit the immature hematopoietic progenitor phenotype. These data indicate that HIPK2 plays a negative regulatory role in AGM hematopoiesis in the mouse embryo.

  8. TALE homeodomain proteins regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression independently and via interactions with Oct-1.

    PubMed

    Rave-Harel, Naama; Givens, Marjory L; Nelson, Shelley B; Duong, Hao A; Coss, Djurdjica; Clark, Melody E; Hall, Sara Barth; Kamps, Mark P; Mellon, Pamela L

    2004-07-16

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the central regulator of reproductive function. Expression of the GnRH gene is confined to a rare population of neurons scattered throughout the hypothalamus. Restricted expression of the rat GnRH gene is driven by a multicomponent enhancer and an evolutionarily conserved promoter. Oct-1, a ubiquitous POU homeodomain transcription factor, was identified as an essential factor regulating GnRH transcription in the GT1-7 hypothalamic neuronal cell line. In this study, we conducted a two-hybrid interaction screen in yeast using a GT1-7 cDNA library to search for specific Oct-1 cofactors. Using this approach, we isolated Pbx1b, a TALE homeodomain transcription factor that specifically associates with Oct-1. We show that heterodimers containing Pbx/Prep1 or Pbx/Meis1 TALE homeodomain proteins bind to four functional elements within the GnRH regulatory region, each in close proximity to an Oct-1-binding site. Cotransfection experiments indicate that TALE proteins are essential for GnRH promoter activity in the GT1-7 cells. Moreover, Pbx1 and Oct-1, as well as Prep1 and Oct-1, form functional complexes that enhance GnRH gene expression. Finally, Pbx1 is expressed in GnRH neurons in embryonic as well as mature mice, suggesting that the associations between TALE homeodomain proteins and Oct-1 regulate neuron-specific expression of the GnRH gene in vivo. PMID:15138251

  9. The A alpha mating locus of Schizophyllum commune encodes two dissimilar multiallelic homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stankis, M M; Specht, C A; Yang, H; Giasson, L; Ullrich, R C; Novotny, C P

    1992-01-01

    The A alpha mating locus is one of four multiallelic loci that govern sexual development in the basidiomycete fungus Schizophyllum commune. We have determined the nucleotide sequence encoding three A alpha mating types, A alpha 1, A alpha 3, and A alpha 4. We have found that the locus for A alpha 3 and A alpha 4 consists of two genes: Y and Z. The locus for A alpha 1 encodes only one gene, Y. The Z polypeptides encoded by different alleles exhibit 42% identity. The Y polypeptides exhibit 49-54% identity. The finding that the deduced Z and Y polypeptides have homeodomain motifs suggests that these polypeptides may be DNA-binding regulatory proteins that control the expression of developmental genes. The deduced Z polypeptide also has acidic regions that might be functionally analogous to the acidic regions in yeast GAL4 and GCN4 that activate transcription. The Y polypeptide has a serine-rich region and a basic region that shows some identity to the lysine-rich region of H1 histones. PMID:1353886

  10. Superactivation of Pax6-mediated transactivation from paired domain-binding sites by dna-independent recruitment of different homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed

    Mikkola, I; Bruun, J A; Holm, T; Johansen, T

    2001-02-01

    The Pax6 genes encode evolutionary conserved transcription factors that act high up in the regulatory hierarchy controlling development of central organs such as the eyes and the central nervous system. These proteins contain two DNA-binding domains. The N-terminal paired domain is separated from a paired-type homeodomain by a linker region, and a transactivation domain is located C-terminal to the homeodomain. Vertebrate Pax6 genes express a paired-less isoform of Pax6 (Pax6DeltaPD) from an internal start codon in the coding region between the paired domain and homeodomain. We now provide evidence for an interaction between the full-length isoform and Pax6DeltaPD, which enhances the transactivation activity of Pax6 from paired domain-binding sites. The paired-like homeodomain protein Rax behaved similarly to Pax6DeltaPD. Both Pax6DeltaPD and Rax bound to the homeodomain of Pax6 in vitro in the absence of specific DNA binding. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments following cotransfection confirmed the existence of complexes between Pax6 and Pax6DeltaPD, Pax6 and Rax, and Pax6DeltaPD and Rax in vivo. Interestingly, the C-terminal subdomain of the paired domain and the homeodomain can interact with each other. The paired domain can also interact with itself. Surprisingly, GST pull-down assays revealed that the homeodomains of such diverse proteins as Chx10, Six3, Lhx2, En-1, Prep1, Prox1, and HoxB1 could all bind to Pax6, and several of these enhanced Pax6-mediated transactivation upon coexpression. Since many homeodomain proteins are coexpressed with Pax6 in several tissues during development, our results indicate the existence of novel regulatory interactions that may be important for fine tuning of gene regulation. PMID:11069920

  11. The LIM/homeodomain protein islet-1 modulates estrogen receptor functions.

    PubMed

    Gay, F; Anglade, I; Gong, Z; Salbert, G

    2000-10-01

    LIM/Homeodomain (HD) proteins are classically considered as major transcriptional regulators which, in cooperation with other transcription factors, play critical roles in the developing nervous system. Among LIM/HD proteins, Islet-1 (ISL1) is the earliest known marker of motoneuron differentiation and has been extensively studied in this context. However, ISL1 expression is not restricted to developing motoneurons. In both embryonic and adult central nervous system of rodent and fish, ISL1 is found in discrete brain areas known to express the estrogen receptor (ER). These observations led us to postulate the possible involvement of ISL1 in the control of brain functions by steroid hormones. Dual immunohistochemistry for ISL1 and ER provided evidence for ISL1-ER coexpression by the same neuronal subpopulation within the rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. The relationship between ER and ISL1 was further analyzed at the molecular level and we could show that 1) ISL1 directly interacts in vivo and in vitro with the rat ER, as well as with various other nuclear receptors; 2) ISL1-ER interaction is mediated, at least in part, by the ligand binding domain of ER and is significantly strengthened by estradiol; 3) as a consequence, ISL1 prevents ER dimerization in solution, thus leading to a strong and specific inhibition of ER DNA binding activity; 4) ISL1, via its N-terminal LIM domains, specifically inhibits the ER-driven transcriptional activation in some promoter contexts, while ER can serve as a coactivator for ISL1 in other promoter contexts. Taken together, these data suggest that ISL1-ER cross-talk could differentially regulate the expression of ER and ISL1 target genes. PMID:11043578

  12. The RHOX Homeodomain Proteins Regulate the Expression of Insulin and Other Metabolic Regulators in the Testis*

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, James A.; Hu, Zhiying; Welborn, Joshua P.; Song, Hye-Won; Rao, Manjeet K.; Wayne, Chad M.; Wilkinson, Miles F.

    2013-01-01

    Defects in cellular metabolism have been widely implicated in causing male infertility, but there has been little progress in understanding the underlying mechanism. Here we report that several key metabolism genes are regulated in the testis by Rhox5, the founding member of a large X-linked homeobox gene cluster. Among these Rhox5-regulated genes are insulin 2 (Ins2), resistin (Retn), and adiponectin (Adipoq), all of which encode secreted proteins that have profound and wide-ranging effects on cellular metabolism. The ability of Rhox5 to regulate their levels in the testis has the potential to dictate metabolism locally in this organ, given the existence of the blood-testes barrier. We demonstrate that Ins2 is a direct target of Rhox5 in Sertoli cells, and we show that this regulation is physiologically significant, because Rhox5-null mice fail to up-regulate Ins2 expression during the first wave of spermatogenesis and have insulin-signaling defects. We identify other Rhox family members that induce Ins2 transcription, define protein domains and homeodomain amino acid residues crucial for this property, and demonstrate that this regulation is conserved. Rhox5-null mice also exhibit altered expression of other metabolism genes, including those encoding the master transcriptional regulators of metabolism, PPARG and PPARGC1A, as well as SCD1, the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acid metabolism. These results, coupled with the known roles of RHOX5 and its target metabolism genes in spermatogenesis in vivo, lead us to propose a model in which RHOX5 is a central transcription factor that promotes the survival of male germ cells via its effects on cellular metabolism. PMID:24121513

  13. Members of the meis1 and pbx homeodomain protein families cooperatively bind a cAMP-responsive sequence (CRS1) from bovine CYP17.

    PubMed

    Bischof, L J; Kagawa, N; Moskow, J J; Takahashi, Y; Iwamatsu, A; Buchberg, A M; Waterman, M R

    1998-04-01

    The mammalian Pbx homeodomain proteins provide specificity and increased DNA binding affinity to other homeodomain proteins. A cAMP-responsive sequence (CRS1) from bovine CYP17 has previously been shown to be a binding site for Pbx1. A member of a second mammalian homeodomain family, Meis1, is now also demonstrated to be a CRS1-binding protein upon purification using CRS1 affinity chromatography. CRS1 binding complexes from Y1 adrenal cell nuclear extract contain both Pbx1 and Meis1. This is the first transcriptional regulatory element reported as a binding site for members of the Meis1 homeodomain family. Pbx1 and Meis1 bind cooperatively to CRS1, whereas neither protein can bind this element alone. Mutagenesis of the CRS1 element indicates a binding site for Meis1 adjacent to the Pbx site. All previously identified Pbx binding partners have Pbx interacting motifs that contain a tryptophan residue amino-terminal to the homeodomain that is required for cooperative binding to DNA with Pbx. Members of the Meis1 family contain one tryptophan residue amino-terminal to the homeodomain, but site-directed mutagenesis indicates that this residue is not required for cooperative CRS1 binding with Pbx. Thus, the Pbx-Meis1 interaction is unique among Pbx complexes. Meis1 also cooperatively binds CRS1 with the Pbx homologs extradenticle from Drosophila melanogaster and ceh-20 from Caenorhabditis elegans, indicating that this interaction is evolutionarily conserved. Thus, CYP17 CRS1 is a transcriptional regulatory element containing both Pbx and Meis1 binding sites, which permit these two homeodomain proteins to bind and potentially regulate cAMP-dependent transcription through this sequence. PMID:9525891

  14. Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 is phosphorylated by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 and contributes to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bracaglia, Giorgia; Conca, Barbara; Bergo, Anna; Rusconi, Laura; Zhou, Zhaolan; Greenberg, Michael E; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Soddu, Silvia; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) are associated with Rett syndrome and other neurological disorders. MeCP2 represses transcription mainly by recruiting various co-repressor complexes. Recently, MeCP2 phosphorylation at Ser 80, Ser 229 and Ser 421 was shown to occur in the brain and modulate MeCP2 silencing activities. However, the kinases directly responsible for this are largely unknown. Here, we identify the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a kinase that binds MeCP2 and phosphorylates it at Ser 80 in vitro and in vivo. HIPK2 modulates cell proliferation and apoptosis, and the neurological defects of Hipk2-null mice indicate its role in proper brain functions. We show that MeCP2 cooperates with HIPK2 in induction of apoptosis and that Ser 80 phosphorylation is required together with the DNA binding of MeCP2. These data are, to our knowledge, the first that describe a kinase associating with MeCP2, causing its specific phosphorylation in vivo and, furthermore, they reinforce the role of MeCP2 in regulating cell growth. PMID:19820693

  15. Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 is phosphorylated by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 and contributes to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bracaglia, Giorgia; Conca, Barbara; Bergo, Anna; Rusconi, Laura; Zhou, Zhaolan; Greenberg, Michael E; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Soddu, Silvia; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) are associated with Rett syndrome and other neurological disorders. MeCP2 represses transcription mainly by recruiting various co-repressor complexes. Recently, MeCP2 phosphorylation at Ser 80, Ser 229 and Ser 421 was shown to occur in the brain and modulate MeCP2 silencing activities. However, the kinases directly responsible for this are largely unknown. Here, we identify the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a kinase that binds MeCP2 and phosphorylates it at Ser 80 in vitro and in vivo. HIPK2 modulates cell proliferation and apoptosis, and the neurological defects of Hipk2-null mice indicate its role in proper brain functions. We show that MeCP2 cooperates with HIPK2 in induction of apoptosis and that Ser 80 phosphorylation is required together with the DNA binding of MeCP2. These data are, to our knowledge, the first that describe a kinase associating with MeCP2, causing its specific phosphorylation in vivo and, furthermore, they reinforce the role of MeCP2 in regulating cell growth. PMID:19820693

  16. Conserved homeodomain proteins interact with MADS box protein Mcm1 to restrict ECB-dependent transcription to the M/G1 phase of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Pramila, Tata; Miles, Shawna; GuhaThakurta, Debraj; Jemiolo, Dave; Breeden, Linda L.

    2002-01-01

    Two homeodomain proteins, Yox1 and Yhp1, act as repressors at early cell cycle boxes (ECBs) to restrict their activity to the M/G1 phase of the cell cycle in budding yeast. These proteins bind to Mcm1 and to a typical homeodomain binding site. The expression of Yox1 is periodic and directly correlated with its binding to, and repression of, ECB activity. The absence of Yox1 and Yhp1 or the constitutive expression of Yox1 leads to the loss of cell-cycle regulation of ECB activity. Therefore, the cell-cycle-regulated expression of these repressors defines the interval of ECB-dependent transcription. Twenty-eight genes, including MCM2-7, CDC6, SWI4, CLN3, and a number of genes required during late M phase have been identified that are coordinately regulated by this pathway. PMID:12464633

  17. A monomer-dimer equilibrium modulates the interaction of the sunflower homeodomain leucine-zipper protein Hahb-4 with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Palena, C M; Gonzalez, D H; Chan, R L

    1999-01-01

    We have analysed the interaction of the sunflower homeodomain leucine-zipper (Hd-Zip) protein Hahb-4 with DNA. The complete Hd-Zip domain from Hahb-4 was able to select specific sequences from a random oligonucleotide mixture that contained a 9-bp core with four fixed and five degenerate positions. Analysis of the binding of some of the selected sequences suggests that Hahb-4 preferentially binds the dyad-symmetrical sequence CAAT(A/T)ATTG. Single-nucleotide replacements at positions 1, 5 or 9 of this sequence produced a decrease in binding of 2-4-fold. DNA binding as a function of protein concentration was non-hyperbolic. This behaviour could be explained by an equation in which dimer formation is a pre-requisite for DNA binding. A global dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.31x10(-14) M2 could be calculated. The removal of the leucine zipper promoted a change in specificity and a decrease in binding affinity (Kd=5. 03x10(-5) M). Mutation of Phe-20 of the homeodomain into Leu completely abolished DNA binding. The mutant protein, however, was able to inhibit DNA binding by the non-mutant form, presumably through the formation of heterodimers. The analysis of this inhibitory effect at different mutant concentrations allowed the estimation of the Kd for the dimer-monomer equilibrium [about (2-4)x10(-6) M]; from this, a Kd of 3-6x10(-9) M for the dimer-DNA complex could be estimated. The results obtained indicate that the formation of dimers is the main factor influencing the interaction of Hahb-4 with DNA. It is proposed that shifts in a dimer-monomer equilibrium could be used within the cell to modulate the interaction of this protein with target genes. PMID:10377247

  18. Modulation of interferon expression by hepatitis C virus NS5A protein and human homeodomain protein PTX1.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Asish K; Majumder, Mainak; Steele, Robert; Ray, Ranjit; Ray, Ratna B

    2003-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A protein transcriptionally modulates a number of cellular genes. Since there is no evidence of binding of NS5A protein to DNA, it is likely to exert its activity in concert with cellular factor(s). In this study, we have identified a specific interaction of HCV NS5A with homeodomain protein PTX1 of human origin by a yeast two-hybrid interacting cloning system. The authenticity of this interaction was verified by mammalian two-hybrid assay, in vivo co-immunoprecipitation analysis, and from a colocalization study. Recently, murine PTX1 (mPTX1) has been shown to repress virus-induced murine interferonA4 promoter activity. Interferon-à alone or together with ribavirin is the only available therapy for HCV-infected patients. Therefore, we examined whether coexpression of NS5A and human PTX1 (hPTX1) proteins modulate human IFN-à promoter activity. An in vitro reporter assay by transfection of HepG2 cells with NS5A suggested an activation of IFN-à promoter to approximately 20-fold upon Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection. Under similar experimental conditions, hPTX1-activated IFN-à prompter to approximately sevenfold, unlike mPTX1. However, cotransfection of NS5A and hPTX1 displayed a lower interferon promoter activity, probably for physical association between these two proteins. Subsequent study demonstrated that activation of IFN promoter by NS5A is associated with an increased expression of IRF-3. Further analysis revealed that ectopic expression of NS5A in HepG2 cells enhances endogenous IFN-à secretion and MxA expression upon induction with NDV. However, exogenous expression of hPTX1 did not significantly alter NS5A-mediated function in the stable transfectants. Taken together, these results suggested that the level of endogenous hPTX1 is not sufficient to block the function of NS5A for augmentation of virus-mediated IFN activity in HepG2 cells. PMID:12620797

  19. Arabidopsis homeodomain-leucine zipper IV proteins promote stomatal development and ectopically induce stomata beyond the epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Kylee M.; Shyu, Christine; Burr, Christian A.; Horst, Robin J.; Kanaoka, Masahiro M.; Omae, Minami; Sato, Yutaka; Torii, Keiko U.

    2013-01-01

    The shoot epidermis of land plants serves as a crucial interface between plants and the atmosphere: pavement cells protect plants from desiccation and other environmental stresses, while stomata facilitate gas exchange and transpiration. Advances have been made in our understanding of stomatal patterning and differentiation, and a set of ‘master regulatory’ transcription factors of stomatal development have been identified. However, they are limited to specifying stomatal differentiation within the epidermis. Here, we report the identification of an Arabidopsis homeodomain-leucine zipper IV (HD-ZIP IV) protein, HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS2 (HDG2), as a key epidermal component promoting stomatal differentiation. HDG2 is highly enriched in meristemoids, which are transient-amplifying populations of stomatal-cell lineages. Ectopic expression of HDG2 confers differentiation of stomata in internal mesophyll tissues and occasional multiple epidermal layers. Conversely, a loss-of-function hdg2 mutation delays stomatal differentiation and, rarely but consistently, results in aberrant stomata. A closely related HD-ZIP IV gene, Arabidopsis thaliana MERISTEM LAYER1 (AtML1), shares overlapping function with HDG2: AtML1 overexpression also triggers ectopic stomatal differentiation in the mesophyll layer and atml1 mutation enhances the stomatal differentiation defects of hdg2. Consistently, HDG2 and AtML1 bind the same DNA elements, and activate transcription in yeast. Furthermore, HDG2 transactivates expression of genes that regulate stomatal development in planta. Our study highlights the similarities and uniqueness of these two HD-ZIP IV genes in the specification of protodermal identity and stomatal differentiation beyond predetermined tissue layers. PMID:23515473

  20. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-dependent repression of myogenic differentiation is relieved by its caspase-mediated cleavage.

    PubMed

    de la Vega, Laureano; Hornung, Juliane; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Milanovic, Maja; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2013-06-01

    Differentiation of skeletal muscle cells is accompanied by drastic changes in gene expression programs that depend on activation and repression of genes at defined time points. Here we identify the serine/threonine kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a corepressor that inhibits myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-dependent gene expression in undifferentiated myoblasts. Downregulation of HIPK2 expression by shRNAs results in elevated expression of muscle-specific genes, whereas overexpression of the kinase dampens transcription of these genes. HIPK2 is constitutively associated with a multi-protein complex containing histone deacetylase (HDAC)3 and HDAC4 that serves to silence MEF2C-dependent transcription in undifferentiated myoblasts. HIPK2 interferes with gene expression on phosphorylation and HDAC3-dependent deacetylation of MEF2C. Ongoing muscle differentiation is accompanied by elevated caspase activity, which results in caspase-mediated cleavage of HIPK2 following aspartic acids 916 and 977 and the generation of a C-terminally truncated HIPK2 protein. The short form of the kinase loses its affinity to the repressive multi-protein complex and its ability to bind HDAC3 and HDAC4, thus alleviating its repressive function for expression of muscle genes. This study identifies HIPK2 as a further protein that determines the threshold and kinetics of gene expression in proliferating myoblasts and during the initial steps of myogenesis. PMID:23620283

  1. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-dependent repression of myogenic differentiation is relieved by its caspase-mediated cleavage

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Laureano; Hornung, Juliane; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Milanovic, Maja; Schmitz, M. Lienhard

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of skeletal muscle cells is accompanied by drastic changes in gene expression programs that depend on activation and repression of genes at defined time points. Here we identify the serine/threonine kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a corepressor that inhibits myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-dependent gene expression in undifferentiated myoblasts. Downregulation of HIPK2 expression by shRNAs results in elevated expression of muscle-specific genes, whereas overexpression of the kinase dampens transcription of these genes. HIPK2 is constitutively associated with a multi-protein complex containing histone deacetylase (HDAC)3 and HDAC4 that serves to silence MEF2C-dependent transcription in undifferentiated myoblasts. HIPK2 interferes with gene expression on phosphorylation and HDAC3-dependent deacetylation of MEF2C. Ongoing muscle differentiation is accompanied by elevated caspase activity, which results in caspase-mediated cleavage of HIPK2 following aspartic acids 916 and 977 and the generation of a C-terminally truncated HIPK2 protein. The short form of the kinase loses its affinity to the repressive multi-protein complex and its ability to bind HDAC3 and HDAC4, thus alleviating its repressive function for expression of muscle genes. This study identifies HIPK2 as a further protein that determines the threshold and kinetics of gene expression in proliferating myoblasts and during the initial steps of myogenesis. PMID:23620283

  2. Identification of homeodomain proteins, PBX1 and PREP1, involved in the transcription of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Chao, Sheng-Hao; Walker, John R; Chanda, Sumit K; Gray, Nathanael S; Caldwell, Jeremy S

    2003-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) have been shown to block human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus. It is hypothesized that CDKIs block viral replication by inhibiting transcription of specific cellular genes. Here we find that three CDKIs, flavopiridol, purvalanol A, and methoxy-roscovitine, block Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) transcription events. Using gene expression microarray technology to examine the inhibitory effects of CDKIs, we observed a cellular gene, the pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 (Pbx1) gene, down-regulated by CDKI treatment. The PBX consensus element (PCE), TGATTGAC, is conserved in the long terminal repeats of several murine retroviruses, including Moloney MLV. Mutations in the PCE completely inhibited viral transcription whereas overexpression of PBX1 and a PBX1-associated protein, PREP1, enhanced viral transcription. The interaction between the PCE and PBX1-PREP1 proteins was confirmed by gel shift experiments. Blocking PBX1 protein synthesis resulted in a significant decrease in viral transcription. Collectively, our results represent the first work demonstrating that the homeodomain proteins PBX1 and PREP1 are cellular factors involved in Moloney MLV transcription regulation. PMID:12529389

  3. Lune/eye gone, a Pax-like protein, uses a partial paired domain and a homeodomain for DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Jun, S; Wallen, R V; Goriely, A; Kalionis, B; Desplan, C

    1998-11-10

    Pax proteins, characterized by the presence of a paired domain, play key regulatory roles during development. The paired domain is a bipartite DNA-binding domain that contains two helix-turn-helix domains joined by a linker region. Each of the subdomains, the PAI and RED domains, has been shown to be a distinct DNA-binding domain. The PAI domain is the most critical, but in specific circumstances, the RED domain is involved in DNA recognition. We describe a Pax protein, originally called Lune, that is the product of the Drosophila eye gone gene (eyg). It is unique among Pax proteins, because it contains only the RED domain. eyg seems to play a role both in the organogenesis of the salivary gland during embryogenesis and in the development of the eye. A high-affinity binding site for the Eyg RED domain was identified by using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment techniques. This binding site is related to a binding site previously identified for the RED domain of the Pax-6 5a isoform. Eyg also contains another DNA-binding domain, a Prd-class homeodomain (HD), whose palindromic binding site is similar to other Prd-class HDs. The ability of Pax proteins to use the PAI, RED, and HD, or combinations thereof, may be one mechanism that allows them to be used at different stages of development to regulate various developmental processes through the activation of specific target genes. PMID:9811867

  4. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 regulates DNA damage response through interacting with heterochromatin protein 1γ.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Y; Kuwano, Y; Nishida, K; Kurokawa, K; Kajita, K; Kano, S; Masuda, K; Rokutan, K

    2015-06-01

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a potential tumor suppressor that has a crucial role in the DNA damage response (DDR) by regulating cell-cycle checkpoint activation and apoptosis. However, it is unclear whether HIPK2 exerts distinct roles in DNA damage repair. The aim of this study was to identify novel target molecule(s) of HIPK2, which mediates HIPK2-dependent DNA damage repair. HIPK2-knockdown human colon cancer cells (HCT116) or hipk1/hipk2 double-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts could not remove histone H2A.X phosphorylated at Ser139 (γH2A.X) after irradiation with a sublethal dose (10 J/m(2)) of ultraviolet (UV)-C, resulting in apoptosis. Knockdown of HIPK2 in p53-null HCT116 cells similarly promoted the UV-C-induced γH2A.X accumulation and apoptosis. Proteomic analysis of HIPK2-associated proteins using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ) as a novel target for HIPK2. Immunoprecipitation experiments with HCT116 cells expressing FLAG-tagged HIPK2 and one of the HA-tagged HP1 family members demonstrated that HIPK2 specifically associated with HP1γ, but not with HP1α or HP1β, through its chromo-shadow domain. Mutation of the HP1box motif (883-PTVSV-887) within HIPK2 abolished the association. HP1γ knockdown also enhanced accumulation of γH2A.X and apoptosis after sublethal UV-C irradiation. In vitro kinase assay demonstrated an HP1γ-phosphorylating activity of HIPK2. Sublethal UV-C irradiation phosphorylated HP1γ. This phosphorylation was absent in endogenous HIPK2-silenced cells with HIPK2 3'UTR siRNA. Overexpression of FLAG-HIPK2, but not the HP1box-mutated or kinase-dead HIPK2 mutant, in the HIPK2-silenced cells increased HP1γ binding to trimethylated (Lys9) histone H3 (H3K9me3), rescued the UV-C-induced phosphorylation of HP1γ, triggered release of HP1γ from histone H3K9me3 and suppressed γH2A.X accumulation. Our results suggest that HIPK2-dependent

  5. Negative regulation of beta4 integrin transcription by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 and p53 impairs tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bon, Giulia; Di Carlo, Selene E; Folgiero, Valentina; Avetrani, Paolo; Lazzari, Chiara; D'Orazi, Gabriella; Brizzi, Maria Felice; Sacchi, Ada; Soddu, Silvia; Blandino, Giovanni; Mottolese, Marcella; Falcioni, Rita

    2009-07-15

    Increased expression of alpha(6)beta(4) integrin in several epithelial cancers promotes tumor progression; however, the mechanism underlying its transcriptional regulation remains unclear. Here, we show that depletion of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) activates beta(4) transcription that results in a strong increase of beta(4)-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt phosphorylation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasion. In contrast, stabilization of HIPK2 represses beta(4) expression in wild-type p53 (wtp53)-expressing cells but not in p53-null cells or cells expressing mutant p53, indicating that HIPK2 requires a wtp53 to inhibit beta(4) transcription. Consistent with our in vitro findings, a strong correlation between beta(4) overexpression and HIPK2 inactivation by cytoplasmic relocalization was observed in wtp53-expressing human breast carcinomas. Under loss of function of HIPK2 or p53, the p53 family members TAp63 and TAp73 strongly activate beta(4) transcription. These data, by revealing that beta(4) expression is transcriptionally repressed in tumors by HIPK2 and p53 to impair beta(4)-dependent tumor progression, suggest that loss of p53 function favors the formation of coactivator complex with the TA members of the p53 family to allow beta(4) transcription. PMID:19567674

  6. Interaction of Ets-1 and the POU-homeodomain protein GHF-1/Pit-1 reconstitutes pituitary-specific gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, A P; Wasylyk, C; Wasylyk, B; Gutierrez-Hartmann, A

    1997-01-01

    The pituitary-specific, POU-homeodomain factor GHF-1/Pit-1 is necessary, but not sufficient, for cell-specific expression of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and thyrotropin. Combinatorial interactions of GHF-1 with other factors are likely to be required; however, such factors and their mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated. Here we identify Ets-1 as a factor that functionally and physically interacts with GHF-1 to fully reconstitute proximal PRL promoter activity. In contrast, Ets-2 has no effect, and the alternatively spliced GHF-2/Pit-1beta variant fails to synergize with Ets-1. The Ets-1-GHF-1 synergy requires a composite Ets-1-GHF-1 cis element and is dependent on an Ets-1-specific protein domain. Furthermore, the ancestrally related and GHF-1-dependent GH promoter, which lacks this composite element, does not exhibit this response. Finally, Ets-1, but not Ets-2, binds directly to GHF-1 and GHF-2. These data show that a functional interaction of GHF-1 and Ets-1, acting via a composite DNA element, is required to establish lactotroph-specific PRL gene expression, thus providing a molecular mechanism by which GHF-1 can discriminate between the GH and PRL genes. These results underscore the importance of transcription factors that are distinct from, but interact with, homeobox proteins to establish lineage-specific gene expression. PMID:9032233

  7. The Alfin-like homeodomain finger protein AL5 suppresses multiple negative factors to confer abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Tao, Jian-Jun; Chen, Hao-Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Lin, Qing; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2015-03-01

    Plant homeodomain (PHD) finger proteins affect processes of growth and development by changing transcription and reading epigenetic histone modifications, but their functions in abiotic stress responses remain largely unclear. Here we characterized seven Arabidopsis thaliana Alfin1-like PHD finger proteins (ALs) in terms of the responses to abiotic stresses. ALs localized to the nucleus and repressed transcription. Except AL6, all the ALs bound to G-rich elements. Mutations of the amino acids at positions 34 and 35 in AL6 caused loss of ability to bind to G-rich elements. Expression of the AL genes responded differentially to osmotic stress, salt, cold and abscisic acid treatments. AL5-over-expressing plants showed higher tolerance to salt, drought and freezing stress than Col-0. Consistently, al5 mutants showed reduced stress tolerance. We used ChIP-Seq assays to identify eight direct targets of AL5, and found that AL5 binds to the promoter regions of these genes. Knockout mutants of five of these target genes exhibited varying tolerances to stresses. These results indicate that AL5 inhibits multiple signaling pathways to confer stress tolerance. Our study sheds light on mechanisms of AL5-mediated signaling in abiotic stress responses, and provides tools for improvement of stress tolerance in crop plants. PMID:25619813

  8. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets beta-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of beta-catenin and results in the accumulation of beta-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of beta-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates beta-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of beta-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of beta-catenin, thereby potentiated beta-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of beta-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of beta-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. PMID:20307497

  9. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets {beta}-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of {beta}-catenin and results in the accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of {beta}-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of {beta}-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin, thereby potentiated {beta}-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of {beta}-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of {beta}-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

  10. Functional characterization of the transactivation properties of the PDX-1 homeodomain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Peshavaria, M; Henderson, E; Sharma, A; Wright, C V; Stein, R

    1997-01-01

    Pancreas formation is prevented in mice carrying a null mutation in the PDX-1 homeoprotein, demonstrating a key role for this factor in development. PDX-1 can also bind to and activate transcription from cis-acting regulatory sequences in the insulin and somatostatin genes, which are expressed in pancreatic islet beta and delta cells, respectively. In this study, we compared the functional properties of PDX-1 with those of the closely related Xenopus homeoprotein XIHbox8. Analysis of chimeras between PDX-1, XIHbox8, and the DNA-binding domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor GAL4 revealed that their transactivation domain was contained within the N-terminal region (amino acids 1 to 79). Detailed mutagenesis of this region indicated that transactivation is mediated by three highly conserved sequences, spanning amino acids 13 to 22 (subdomain A), 32 to 38 (subdomain B), and 60 to 73 (subdomain C). These sequences were also required by PDX-1 to synergistically activate insulin enhancer-mediated transcription with another key insulin gene activator, the E2A-encoded basic helix-loop-helix E2-5 and E47 proteins. These results indicated that N-terminal sequences conserved between the mammalian PDX-1 and Xenopus XIHbox8 proteins are important in transcriptional activation. Stable expression of the PDX-1 deltaABC mutant in the insulin- and PDX-1-expressing betaTC3 cell line resulted in a threefold reduction in the rate of endogenous insulin gene transcription. Strikingly, the level of the endogenous PDX-1 protein was reduced to very low levels in these cells. These results suggest that PDX-1 is not absolutely essential for insulin gene expression in betaTC3 cells. We discuss the possible significance of these findings for insulin gene transcription in islet beta cells. PMID:9199333

  11. Homeodomain protein Dlx3 induces phosphorylation-dependent p63 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Di Costanzo, Antonella; Festa, Luisa; Duverger, Olivier; Vivo, Maria; Guerrlal, Luisa; La Mantia, Girolama; Morasso, Marla I.; Calabro, Viola

    2009-01-01

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium which develops depending on the transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is strongly expressed in the innermost basal layer where highly proliferative epithelial cells reside. p63 functions as a molecular switch that initiates epithelial stratification or cell fate determination while regulating proliferation and differentiation of developmentally mature keratinocytes. p63 acts upstream of Dlx3 homeobox gene in a transcriptional regulatory pathway relevant to ectodermal dysplasia. Here we show that Dlx3 triggers p63 protein degradation by a proteasome-dependent pathway. Mutant ΔNp63α in which Threonine397 and Serine383 were replaced with Alanine as well as C-terminal truncated versions of ΔNp63α are resistant to Dlx3-mediated degradation. Transient expression of Dlx3 is associated with Raft phosphorylation. Dlx3 is unable to promote p63 degradation in Raft depleted MEF cells or upon pharmacological knockdown of Raft. Our data support a previously unrecognized role for Dlx3 in posttranslational regulation of ΔNp63α protein level, a mechanism that may contribute to reduce the abundance of ΔNp63α during differentiation of stratified epithelia. PMID:19282665

  12. Homeodomain protein Dlx3 induces phosphorylation-dependent p63 degradation.

    PubMed

    Di Costanzo, Antonella; Festa, Luisa; Duverger, Olivier; Vivo, Maria; Guerrini, Luisa; La Mantia, Girolama; Morasso, Maria I; Calabrò, Viola

    2009-04-15

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium which develops depending on the transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is strongly expressed in the innermost basal layer where highly proliferative epithelial cells reside. p63 functions as a molecular switch that initiates epithelial stratification or cell fate determination while regulating proliferation and differentiation of developmentally mature keratinocytes. p63 acts upstream of Dlx3 homeobox gene in a transcriptional regulatory pathway relevant to ectodermal dysplasia. Here we show that Dlx3 triggers p63 protein degradation by a proteasome-dependent pathway. Mutant DeltaNp63alpha in which Threonine397 and Serine383 were replaced with Alanine as well as C-terminal truncated versions of DeltaNp63alpha are resistant to Dlx3-mediated degradation. Transient expression of Dlx3 is associated with Raf1 phosphorylation. Dlx3 is unable to promote p63 degradation in Raf1 depleted MEF cells or upon pharmacological knockdown of Raf1. Our data support a previously unrecognized role for Dlx3 in posttranslational regulation of DeltaNp63alpha protein level, a mechanism that may contribute to reduce the abundance of DeltaNp63alpha during differentiation of stratified epithelia. PMID:19282665

  13. The novel plant homeodomain protein rhinoceros antagonizes Ras signaling in the Drosophila eye.

    PubMed Central

    Voas, Matthew G; Rebay, Ilaria

    2003-01-01

    The sequential specification of cell fates in the Drosophila eye requires repeated activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/Ras/MAP kinase (MAPK) pathway. Equally important are the multiple layers of inhibitory regulation that prevent excessive or inappropriate signaling. Here we describe the molecular and genetic analysis of a previously uncharacterized gene, rhinoceros (rno), that we propose functions to restrict EGFR signaling in the eye. Loss of rno results in the overproduction of photoreceptors, cone cells, and pigment cells and a corresponding reduction in programmed cell death, all phenotypes characteristic of hyperactivated EGFR signaling. Genetic interactions between rno and multiple EGFR pathway components support this hypothesis. rno encodes a novel but evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein with a PHD zinc-finger domain, a motif commonly found in chromatin-remodeling factors. Future analyses of rno will help to elucidate the regulatory strategies that modulate EGFR signaling in the fly eye. PMID:14704181

  14. Identification and analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper homeostasis gene encoding a homeodomain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, S A; Tamai, K T; Kosman, D J; Thiele, D J

    1994-01-01

    Yeast metallothionein, encoded by the CUP1 gene, and its copper-dependent transcriptional activator ACE1 play a key role in mediating copper resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant of a yeast strain in which CUP1 and ACE1 were deleted, we isolated a gene, designated CUP9, which permits yeast cells to grow at high concentrations of environmental copper, most notably when lactate is the sole carbon source. Disruption of CUP9, which is located on chromosome XVI, caused a loss of copper resistance in strains which possessed CUP1 and ACE1, as well as in the cup1 ace1 deletion strain. Measurement of intracellular copper levels of the wild-type and cup9-1 mutant demonstrated that total intracellular copper concentrations were unaffected by CUP9. CUP9 mRNA levels were, however, down regulated by copper when yeast cells were grown with glucose but not with lactate or glycerol-ethanol as the sole carbon source. This down regulation was independent of the copper metalloregulatory transcription factor ACE1. The DNA sequence of CUP9 predicts an open reading frame of 306 amino acids in which a 55-amino-acid sequence showed 47% identity with the homeobox domain of the human proto-oncogene PBX1, suggesting that CUP9 is a DNA-binding protein which regulates the expression of important copper homeostatic genes. Images PMID:7969120

  15. Regulation of genotoxic stress response by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 through phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein at serine 271.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kensuke; Huang, Bo-Wen; Iwasaki, Kenta; Hailemariam, Kiros; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2010-08-15

    CREB (cyclic AMP response element-binding protein) is a stimulus-induced transcription factor that plays pivotal roles in cell survival and proliferation. The transactivation function of CREB is primarily regulated through Ser-133 phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and related kinases. Here we found that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), a DNA-damage responsive nuclear kinase, is a new CREB kinase for phosphorylation at Ser-271 but not Ser-133, and activates CREB transactivation function including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression. Ser-271 to Glu-271 substitution potentiated the CREB transactivation function. ChIP assays in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells demonstrated that CREB Ser-271 phosphorylation by HIPK2 increased recruitment of a transcriptional coactivator CBP (CREB binding protein) without modulation of CREB binding to the BDNF CRE sequence. HIPK2-/- MEF cells were more susceptible to apoptosis induced by etoposide, a DNA-damaging agent, than HIPK2+/+ cells. Etoposide activated CRE-dependent transcription in HIPK2+/+ MEF cells but not in HIPK2-/- cells. HIPK2 knockdown in SH-SY5Y cells decreased etoposide-induced BDNF mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that HIPK2 is a new CREB kinase that regulates CREB-dependent transcription in genotoxic stress. PMID:20573984

  16. Heterodimeric Pbx-Prep1 homeodomain protein binding to the glucagon gene restricting transcription in a cell type-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Herzig, S; Fuzesi, L; Knepel, W

    2000-09-01

    Homeodomain proteins specify developmental pathways and cell-specific gene transcription whereby proteins of the PBC subclass can direct target gene specificity of Hox proteins. Proteins encoded by nonclustered homeobox genes have been shown to be essential for cell lineage differentiation and gene expression in pancreatic islets. Using specific antiserum in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in vitro transcribed/translated proteins, the nuclear proteins binding domain B of the G3 enhancer-like element of the glucagon gene were identified in the present study as heterodimers consisting of the ubiquitously expressed homeodomain protein Prep1 and the also widely expressed PBC homeoprotein Pbx (isoform 1a, 1b, or 2). These heterodimeric complexes were found to bind also to the glucagon cAMP response element and to a newly identified element termed G5 (from -169 to -140). Whereas the expression of Prep1 or Pbx forms alone had no effect, coexpression of Pbx1a/1b-Prep1 inhibited the glucagon promoter when activated by cotransfected Pax6 or another transcription factor in non-glucagon-producing cells. In contrast, in glucagon-producing pancreatic islet cells, Pbx-Prep1 had no effect on GAL4-Pax6-induced mutant glucagon promoter activity or on Pax6-dependent wild-type glucagon promoter activity. Furthermore, 5'-deletion of G5 enhanced glucagon promoter activity in a non-glucagon-producing cell line but not in glucagon-producing islet cells. This study thus identifies a novel target and Hox-independent function of Pbx-Prep1 heterodimers that, through repression of glucagon gene transcription in non-glucagon-producing cells, may help to establish islet cell-specific expression of the glucagon gene. PMID:10869353

  17. The Homeodomain Transcription Factor Hoxa2 Interacts with and Promotes the Proteasomal Degradation of the E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase RCHY1

    PubMed Central

    Bergiers, Isabelle; Bridoux, Laure; Nguyen, Nathan; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Rezsöhazy, René

    2013-01-01

    Hox proteins are conserved homeodomain transcription factors known to be crucial regulators of animal development. As transcription factors, the functions and modes of action (co-factors, target genes) of Hox proteins have been very well studied in a multitude of animal models. However, a handful of reports established that Hox proteins may display molecular activities distinct from gene transcription regulation. Here, we reveal that Hoxa2 interacts with 20S proteasome subunits and RCHY1 (also known as PIRH2), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. We further show that Hoxa2 promotes proteasome-dependent degradation of RCHY1 in an ubiquitin-independent manner. Correlatively, Hoxa2 alters the RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and promotes p53 stabilization. Together, our data establish that Hoxa2 can regulate the proteasomal degradation of RCHY1 and stabilization of p53. PMID:24244684

  18. Homeodomain-Interacting Protein Kinase (HIPK)-1 Is Required for Splenic B Cell Homeostasis and Optimal T-Independent Type 2 Humoral Response

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Fiona M.; Gommerman, Jennifer L.; Corfe, Steven A.; Paige, Christopher J.; Rottapel, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (HIPK) family is comprised of four highly related serine/threonine kinases originally identified as co-repressors for various homeodomain-containing transcription factors. The HIPKs have been shown to be involved in growth regulation and apoptosis, with numerous studies highlighting HIPK regulation of the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we have discovered a B cell homeostatic defect in HIPK1-deficient (HIPK1−/−) mice. Lymphopoietic populations within the thymus and bone marrow of HIPK1−/− mice appeared normal based upon FACS analysis; however, the spleen exhibited a reduced number of total B cells with a significant loss of transitional-1 and follicular B cell populations. Interestingly, the marginal zone B cell population was expanded in HIPK1−/− mice, yielding an increased frequency of these cells. HIPK1−/− B cells exhibited impaired cell division in response to B cell receptor cross-linking in vitro based upon thymidine incorporation or CFSE dilution; however, the addition of CD40L rescued HIPK1−/− proliferation to wild-type levels. Despite the expanded MZ B cell population in the HIPK1−/− mice, the T-independent type 2 humoral response was impaired. These data identify HIPK1 as a novel kinase required for optimal B cell function in mice. PMID:22545114

  19. The transcriptional co-factor Chip acts with LIM-homeodomain proteins to set the boundary of the eye field in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Roignant, Jean-Yves; Legent, Kevin; Janody, Florence; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2010-01-01

    Development involves the establishment of boundaries between fields specified to differentiate into distinct tissues. The Drosophila larval eye-antennal imaginal disc must be subdivided into regions that differentiate into the adult eye, antenna and head cuticle. We have found that the transcriptional co-factor Chip is required for cells at the ventral eye-antennal disc border to take on a head cuticle fate; clones of Chip mutant cells in this region instead form outgrowths that differentiate into ectopic eye tissue. Chip acts independently of the transcription factor Homothorax, which was previously shown to promote head cuticle development in the same region. Chip and its vertebrate CLIM homologues have been shown to form complexes with LIM-homeodomain transcription factors, and the domain of Chip that mediates these interactions is required for its ability to suppress the eye fate. We show that two LIM-homeodomain proteins, Arrowhead and Lim1, are expressed in the region of the eye-antennal disc affected in Chip mutants, and that both require Chip for their ability to suppress photoreceptor differentiation when misexpressed in the eye field. Loss-of-function studies support the model that Arrowhead and Lim1 act redundantly, using Chip as a co-factor, to prevent retinal differentiation in regions of the eye disc destined to become ventral head tissue. PMID:20040493

  20. The Arabidopsis Zinc Finger-Homeodomain Genes Encode Proteins with Unique Biochemical Properties That Are Coordinately Expressed during Floral Development1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Queenie K.-G.; Irish, Vivian F.

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains approximately 100 homeobox genes, many of which have been shown to play critical roles in various developmental processes. Here we characterize the zinc finger-homeodomain (ZF-HD) subfamily of homeobox genes, consisting of 14 members in Arabidopsis. We demonstrate that the HDs of the ZF-HD proteins share some similarities with other known HDs in Arabidopsis, but they contain distinct features that cluster them as a unique class of plant HD-containing proteins. We have carried out mutational analyses to show that the noncanonical residues present in the HDs of this family of proteins are important for function. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid matrix analyses of the ZF-HD proteins reveal that these proteins both homo- and heterodimerize, which may contribute to greater selectivity in DNA binding. These assays also show that most of these proteins do not contain an intrinsic activation domain, suggesting that interactions with other factors are required for transcriptional activation. We also show that the family members are all expressed predominantly or exclusively in floral tissue, indicating a likely regulatory role during floral development. Furthermore, we have identified loss-of-function mutations for six of these genes that individually show no obvious phenotype, supporting the idea that the encoded proteins have common roles in floral development. Based on these results, we propose the ZF-HD gene family encodes a group of transcriptional regulators with unique biochemical activities that play overlapping regulatory roles in Arabidopsis floral development. PMID:16428600

  1. The alpha subunits of Gz and Gi interact with the eyes absent transcription cofactor Eya2, preventing its interaction with the six class of homeodomain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Brass, L F; Poncz, M; Spitz, F; Maire, P; Manning, D R

    2000-10-13

    Yeast two-hybrid techniques were used to identify possible effectors for the heterotrimeric G protein G(z) in human bone marrow cells. Eya2, a human homologue of the Drosophila Eya transcription co-activator, was identified. Eya2 interacts with activated Galpha(z) and at least one other member of the Galpha(i) family, Galpha(i2). Interactions were confirmed in mammalian two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase fusion protein pull-down assays. Regions of Eya2-mediating interaction were mapped to the C-terminal Eya consensus domain. Eya2 is an intrinsically cytosolic protein that is translocated to the nucleus by members of the Six homeodomain-containing family of proteins. Activated Galpha(z) and Galpha(i2) prevent Eya2 translocation and inhibit Six/Eya2-mediated activation of a reporter gene controlled through the MEF3/TATA promoter. Although G proteins are known to regulate the activity of numerous transcription factors, this regulation is normally achieved indirectly via one or more intermediates. We show here a novel functional regulation of a co-activator directly by G protein subunits. PMID:10906137

  2. Silk Gland Factor-2, Involved in Fibroin Gene Transcription, Consists of LIM Homeodomain, LIM-interacting, and Single-stranded DNA-binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Kaoru; Sawada, Jun-ichi; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kimoto, Mai; Matsumoto, Akiko; Tsubota, Takuya; Uchino, Keiro; Hui, Chi-chung; Sezutsu, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    SGF-2 binds to promoter elements governing posterior silk gland-specific expression of the fibroin gene in Bombyx mori. We purified SGF-2 and showed that SGF-2 contains at least four gene products: the silkworm orthologues of LIM homeodomain protein Awh, LIM domain-binding protein (Ldb), a sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein (Lcaf), and the silk protein P25/fibrohexamerin (fhx). Using co-expression of these factors in Sf9 cells, Awh, Ldb, and Lcaf proteins were co-purified as a ternary complex that bound to the enhancer sequence in vitro. Lcaf interacts with Ldb as well as Awh through the conserved regions to mediate transcriptional activation in yeast. Misexpression of Awh in transgenic silkworms induces ectopic expression of the fibroin gene in the middle silk glands, where Ldb and Lcaf are expressed. Taken together, this study demonstrates that SGF-2 is a multisubunit activator complex containing Awh. Moreover, our results suggest that the Ldb·Lcaf protein complex serves as a scaffold to facilitate communication between transcriptional control elements. PMID:24022586

  3. Msx1 Homeodomain Protein Represses the αGSU and GnRH Receptor Genes During Gonadotrope Development

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Huimin; Cherrington, Brian D.; Meadows, Jason D.; Witham, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple homeodomain transcription factors are crucial for pituitary organogenesis and cellular differentiation. A homeodomain repressor, Msx1, is expressed from the ventral aspect of the developing anterior pituitary and implicated in gonadotrope differentiation. Here, we find that Msx1 represses transcription of lineage-specific pituitary genes such as the common α-glycoprotein subunit (αGSU) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) promoters in the mouse gonadotrope-derived cell lines, αT3-1 and LβT2. Repression of the mouse GnRHR promoter by Msx1 is mediated through a consensus-binding motif in the downstream activin regulatory element (DARE). Truncation and mutation analyses of the human αGSU promoter map Msx1 repression to a site at −114, located at the junctional regulatory element (JRE). Dlx activators are closely related to the Msx repressors, acting through the same elements, and Dlx3 and Dlx2 act as transcriptional activators for GnRHR and αGSU, respectively. Small interfering RNA knockdown of Msx1 in αT3-1 cells increases endogenous αGSU and GnRHR mRNA expression. Msx1 gene expression reaches its maximal expression at the rostral edge at e13.5. The subsequent decline in Msx1 expression specifically coincides with the onset of expression of both αGSU and GnRHR. The expression levels of both αGSU and GnRHR in Msx1-null mice at e18.5 are higher compared with wild type, further confirming a role for Msx1 in the repression of αGSU and GnRHR. In summary, Msx1 functions as a negative regulator early in pituitary development by repressing the gonadotrope-specific αGSU and GnRHR genes, but a temporal decline in Msx1 expression alleviates this repression allowing induction of GnRHR and αGSU, thus serving to time the onset of gonadotrope-specific gene program. PMID:23371388

  4. Aberrant Development of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus and Circadian Rhythms in Mice Lacking the Homeodomain Protein Six6

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Daniel D.; Gorman, Michael R.; Hatori, Megumi; Meadows, Jason D.; Panda, Satchidananda; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus is the central pacemaker for peripheral and organismal circadian rhythms. The development of this hypothalamic structure depends on genetic programs throughout embryogenesis. We have investigated the role of the homeodomain transcription factor Six6 in the development of the SCN. We first showed that Six6 mRNA has circadian regulation in the mouse SCN. We then characterized the behavioral activity patterns of Six6-null mice under various photoperiod manipulations and stained their hypothalami using SCN-specific markers. Six6-null mice display abnormal patterns of circadian behavior indicative of SCN abnormalities. The ability of light exposure to reset rhythms correlates with the presence or absence of optic nerves, but all Six6-null mice show irregular rhythms. In contrast, wild-type mice with crushed optic nerves maintain regular rhythms regardless of light exposure. Using immunohistochemistry for arginine vasopressin (AVP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and β-galactosidase, we demonstrated the lack of these SCN markers in all Six6- null mice regardless of the presence of optic nerve or partial circadian rhythms. Therefore, Six6 is required for the normal development of the SCN, and the Six6-null mouse can mount independent, although irregular, circadian rhythms despite the apparent absence of a histochemically defined SCN. PMID:23382588

  5. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates nuclear import of the POU homeodomain protein Oct-1 and its repressive effect on the expression of Cdx-2

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ubiquitously expressed POU homeodomain protein Oct-1 serves as a sensor for stress induced by irradiation. We found recently that in pancreatic and intestinal endocrine cells, Oct-1 also functions as a sensor for cyclic AMP (cAMP). The caudal homeobox gene Cdx-2 is a transactivator of proglucagon (gcg) and pro-insulin genes. Oct-1 binds to Cdx-2 promoter and represses its expression. cAMP elevation leads to increased nuclear exclusion of Oct-1, associated with reduced recruitment of nuclear co-repressors to the Cdx-2 promoter and increased Cdx-2 expression. Results We show in this study that inducing oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) increased nuclear Oct-1 content in both pancreatic α and β cell lines, as well as in a battery of other cells. This increase was then attributed to accelerated nuclear import of Oct-1, assessed by Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) using green fluorescence protein (EGFP) tagged Oct-1 molecule. H2O2 treatment was then shown to stimulate the activities of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Finally, increased Oct-1 nuclear content upon H2O2 treatment in a pancreatic α cell line was associated with reduced Cdx-2 and gcg mRNA expression. Conclusion These observations suggest that Oct-1 functions as a sensor for both metabolic and stress/survival signaling pathways via altering its nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling. PMID:20637099

  6. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) promote Wnt/Wg signaling through stabilization of beta-catenin/Arm and stimulation of target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wendy; Swarup, Sharan; Chen, Joanna; Ishitani, Tohru; Verheyen, Esther M

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathway represents a conserved signaling cascade involved in diverse biological processes. Misregulation of Wnt/Wg signal transduction has profound effects on development. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) represent a novel family of serine/threonine kinases. Members of this group (in particular Hipk2) are implicated as important factors in transcriptional regulation to control cell growth, apoptosis and development. Here, we provide genetic and phenotypic evidence that the sole Drosophila member of this family, Hipk, functions as a positive regulator in the Wg pathway. Expression of hipk in the wing rescues loss of the Wg signal, whereas loss of hipk can enhance decreased wg signaling phenotypes. Furthermore, loss of hipk leads to diminished Arm protein levels, whereas overexpression of hipk promotes the Wg signal by stabilizing Arm, resulting in activation of Wg responsive targets. In Wg transcriptional assays, Hipk enhanced Tcf/Arm-mediated gene expression in a kinase-dependent manner. In addition, Hipk can bind to Arm and Drosophila Tcf, and phosphorylate Arm. Using both in vitro and in vivo assays, Hipk was found to promote the stabilization of Arm. We observe similar molecular interactions between Lef1/beta-catenin and vertebrate Hipk2, suggesting a direct and conserved role for Hipk proteins in promoting Wnt signaling. PMID:19088090

  7. Regulation of CCL2 expression by an upstream TALE homeodomain protein-binding site that synergizes with the site created by the A-2578G SNP.

    PubMed

    Page, Stephen H; Wright, Edward K; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E

    2011-01-01

    CC Chemokine Ligand 2 (CCL2) is a potent chemoattractant produced by macrophages and activated astrocytes during periods of inflammation within the central nervous system. Increased CCL2 expression is correlated with disease progression and severity, as observed in pulmonary tuberculosis, HCV-related liver disease, and HIV-associated dementia. The CCL2 distal promoter contains an A/G polymorphism at position -2578 and the homozygous -2578 G/G genotype is associated with increased CCL2 production and inflammation. However, the mechanisms that contribute to the phenotypic differences in CCL2 expression are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that the -2578 G polymorphism creates a TALE homeodomain protein binding site (TALE binding site) for PREP1/PBX2 transcription factors. In this study, we identified the presence of an additional TALE binding site 22 bp upstream of the site created by the -2578 G polymorphism and demonstrated the synergistic effects of the two sites on the activation of the CCL2 promoter. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we demonstrated increased binding of the TALE proteins PREP1 and PBX2 to the -2578 G allele, and binding of IRF1 to both the A and G alleles. The presence of TALE binding sites that form inverted repeats within the -2578 G allele results in increased transcriptional activation of the CCL2 distal promoter while the presence of only the upstream TALE binding site within the -2578 A allele exerts repression of promoter activity. PMID:21760952

  8. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 is the ionizing radiation-activated p53 serine 46 kinase and is regulated by ATM.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Ilka; Krüger, Jana; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2007-03-01

    Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(46) is important to activate the apoptotic program. The protein kinase that phosphorylates p53 Ser(46) in response to DNA double-strand breaks is currently unknown. The identification of this kinase is of particular interest because it may contribute to the outcome of cancer therapy. Here, we report that ionizing radiation (IR) provokes homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) accumulation, activation, and complex formation with p53. IR-induced HIPK2 up-regulation strictly correlates with p53 Ser(46) phosphorylation. Down-regulation of HIPK2 by RNA interference specifically inhibits IR-induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(46). Moreover, we show that HIPK2 activation after IR is regulated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Cells from ataxia telangiectasia patients show defects in HIPK2 accumulation. Concordantly, IR-induced HIPK2 accumulation is blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of ATM. Furthermore, ATM down-regulation by RNA interference inhibited IR-induced HIPK2 accumulation, whereas checkpoint kinase 2 deficiency showed no effect. Taken together, our findings indicate that HIPK2 is the IR-activated p53 Ser(46) kinase and is regulated by ATM. PMID:17332358

  9. The Tyrosine Kinase c-Abl Promotes Homeodomain-interacting Protein Kinase 2 (HIPK2) Accumulation and Activation in Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Reuven, Nina; Adler, Julia; Porat, Ziv; Polonio-Vallon, Tilman; Hofmann, Thomas G; Shaul, Yosef

    2015-07-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl is activated in response to DNA damage and induces p73-dependent apoptosis. Here, we investigated c-Abl regulation of the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), an important regulator of p53-dependent apoptosis. c-Abl phosphorylated HIPK2 at several sites, and phosphorylation by c-Abl protected HIPK2 from degradation mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase Siah-1. c-Abl and HIPK2 synergized in activating p53 on apoptotic promoters in a reporter assay, and c-Abl was required for endogenous HIPK2 accumulation and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(46) in response to DNA damage by γ- and UV radiation. Accumulation of HIPK2 in nuclear speckles and association with promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in response to DNA damage were also dependent on c-Abl activity. At high cell density, the Hippo pathway inhibits DNA damage-induced c-Abl activation. Under this condition, DNA damage-induced HIPK2 accumulation, phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(46), and apoptosis were attenuated. These data demonstrate a new mechanism for the induction of DNA damage-induced apoptosis by c-Abl and illustrate network interactions between serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases that dictate cell fate. PMID:25944899

  10. Regulation of CCL2 Expression by an Upstream TALE Homeodomain Protein-Binding Site That Synergizes with the Site Created by the A-2578G SNP

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stephen H.; Wright, Edward K.; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E.

    2011-01-01

    CC Chemokine Ligand 2 (CCL2) is a potent chemoattractant produced by macrophages and activated astrocytes during periods of inflammation within the central nervous system. Increased CCL2 expression is correlated with disease progression and severity, as observed in pulmonary tuberculosis, HCV-related liver disease, and HIV-associated dementia. The CCL2 distal promoter contains an A/G polymorphism at position -2578 and the homozygous -2578 G/G genotype is associated with increased CCL2 production and inflammation. However, the mechanisms that contribute to the phenotypic differences in CCL2 expression are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that the -2578 G polymorphism creates a TALE homeodomain protein binding site (TALE binding site) for PREP1/PBX2 transcription factors. In this study, we identified the presence of an additional TALE binding site 22 bp upstream of the site created by the -2578 G polymorphism and demonstrated the synergistic effects of the two sites on the activation of the CCL2 promoter. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we demonstrated increased binding of the TALE proteins PREP1 and PBX2 to the -2578 G allele, and binding of IRF1 to both the A and G alleles. The presence of TALE binding sites that form inverted repeats within the -2578 G allele results in increased transcriptional activation of the CCL2 distal promoter while the presence of only the upstream TALE binding site within the -2578 A allele exerts repression of promoter activity. PMID:21760952

  11. The Evolutionarily Conserved LIM Homeodomain Protein LIM-4/LHX6 Specifies the Terminal Identity of a Cholinergic and Peptidergic C. elegans Sensory/Inter/Motor Neuron-Type

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Kyoon; Huh, Yang Hoon; Fang, Zi; Park, Seo Jin; Kim, Myoung Ok; Ryoo, Zae Young; Kang, Kyeongjin; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Jeon, Won Bae; Li, Chris; Kim, Kyuhyung

    2015-01-01

    The expression of specific transcription factors determines the differentiated features of postmitotic neurons. However, the mechanism by which specific molecules determine neuronal cell fate and the extent to which the functions of transcription factors are conserved in evolution are not fully understood. In C. elegans, the cholinergic and peptidergic SMB sensory/inter/motor neurons innervate muscle quadrants in the head and control the amplitude of sinusoidal movement. Here we show that the LIM homeobox protein LIM-4 determines neuronal characteristics of the SMB neurons. In lim-4 mutant animals, expression of terminal differentiation genes, such as the cholinergic gene battery and the flp-12 neuropeptide gene, is completely abolished and thus the function of the SMB neurons is compromised. LIM-4 activity promotes SMB identity by directly regulating the expression of the SMB marker genes via a distinct cis-regulatory motif. Two human LIM-4 orthologs, LHX6 and LHX8, functionally substitute for LIM-4 in C. elegans. Furthermore, C. elegans LIM-4 or human LHX6 can induce cholinergic and peptidergic characteristics in the human neuronal cell lines. Our results indicate that the evolutionarily conserved LIM-4/LHX6 homeodomain proteins function in generation of precise neuronal subtypes. PMID:26305787

  12. Motor axon exit from the mammalian spinal cord is controlled by the homeodomain protein Nkx2.9 via Robo-Slit signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Ambrosio, Arlene; Mastick, Grant; Kaprielian, Zaven

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian motor circuits control voluntary movements by transmitting signals from the central nervous system (CNS) to muscle targets. To form these circuits, motor neurons (MNs) must extend their axons out of the CNS. Although exit from the CNS is an indispensable phase of motor axon pathfinding, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we present the first identification of a genetic pathway that regulates motor axon exit from the vertebrate spinal cord, utilizing spinal accessory motor neurons (SACMNs) as a model system. SACMNs are a homogeneous population of spinal MNs with axons that leave the CNS through a discrete lateral exit point (LEP) and can be visualized by the expression of the cell surface protein BEN. We show that the homeodomain transcription factor Nkx2.9 is selectively required for SACMN axon exit and identify the Robo2 guidance receptor as a likely downstream effector of Nkx2.9; loss of Nkx2.9 leads to a reduction in Robo2 mRNA and protein within SACMNs and SACMN axons fail to exit the spinal cord in Robo2-deficient mice. Consistent with short-range interactions between Robo2 and Slit ligands regulating SACMN axon exit, Robo2-expressing SACMN axons normally navigate through LEP-associated Slits as they emerge from the spinal cord, and fail to exit in Slit-deficient mice. Our studies support the view that Nkx2.9 controls SACMN axon exit from the mammalian spinal cord by regulating Robo-Slit signaling. PMID:22399681

  13. Msx1 homeodomain transcription factor and TATA-binding protein interact to repress the expression of the glycoprotein hormone α subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Sun; Kim, Kee K; Kim, Kyoon Eon

    Studying the regulatory mechanism of the glycoprotein hormone α subunit (αGSU) gene in thyrotropes is essential for understanding the synthesis of functional thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Here, we investigated the influence of a homeodomain transcription factor Msx1 (Msh homeobox 1) on αGSU expression in thyrotropes. The transient expression of Msx1 inhibited the activity of an αGSU reporter gene, as well as its endogenous mRNA level in thyrotrope-derived αTSH cells. Luciferase reporter assays with serial deletion constructs and a close examination of the sequences revealed that the putative Msx1 binding site (PMS) in the αGSU promoter is not responsible for Msx1-mediated transcriptional repression. We also identified the TATA-box binding protein (TBP) as an interacting protein in thyrotropes. Interaction of TBP with Msx1 attenuates the inhibitory effect of Msx1 on αGSU gene expression in a DNA binding-independent manner. Furthermore, transient transfection studies with mutant Msx1 revealed that the interaction of TBP and Msx1 is critical for Msx1-mediated transcriptional repression of the αGSU. These results suggest that Msx1 functions as a transcriptional repressor of αGSU and that its interaction with TBP is an integral part of the mechanism by which Msx1 regulates the inhibition of αGSU gene expression. PMID:26505791

  14. Activin regulation of the follicle-stimulating hormone beta-subunit gene involves Smads and the TALE homeodomain proteins Pbx1 and Prep1.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Janice S; Rave-Harel, Naama; McGillivray, Shauna M; Coss, Djurdjica; Mellon, Pamela L

    2004-05-01

    FSH is critical for normal reproductive function in both males and females. Activin, a member of the TGFbeta family of growth factors, is an important regulator of FSH expression, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms through which it acts. We used transient transfections into the immortalized gonadotrope cell line LbetaT2 to identify three regions (at -973/-962, -167, and -134) of the ovine FSH beta-subunit gene that are required for full activin response. All three regions contain homology to consensus binding sites for Smad proteins, the intracellular mediators of TGFbeta family signaling. Mutation of the distal site reduces activin responsiveness, whereas mutation of either proximal site profoundly disrupts activin regulation of the FSHbeta gene. These sites specifically bind LbetaT2 nuclear proteins in EMSAs, and the -973/-962 site binds Smad4 protein. Interestingly, the protein complex binding to the -134 site contains Smad4 in association with the homeodomain proteins Pbx1 and Prep1. Using glutathione S-transferase interaction assays, we demonstrate that Pbx1 and Prep1 interact with Smads 2 and 3 as well. The two proximal activin response elements are well conserved across species, and Pbx1 and Prep1 proteins bind to the mouse gene in vivo. Furthermore, mutation of either proximal site abrogates activin responsiveness of a mouse FSHbeta reporter gene as well, confirming their functional conservation. Our studies provide a basis for understanding activin regulation of FSHbeta gene expression and identify Pbx1 and Prep1 as Smad partners and novel mediators of activin action. PMID:14764653

  15. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) phosphorylates HMGA1a at Ser-35, Thr-52, and Thr-77 and modulates its DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2007-12-01

    The chromosomal high-mobility group A (HMGA) proteins, composed of HMGA1a, HMGA1b and HMGA2, play important roles in the regulation of numerous processes in eukaryotic cells, such as transcriptional regulation, DNA repair, RNA processing, and chromatin remodeling. The biological activities of HMGA1 proteins are highly regulated by their post-translational modifications (PTMs), including acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. Recently, it was found that the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2), a newly identified serine/threonine kinase, co-immunoprecipitated with, and phosphorylated, HMGA1 proteins. However, the sites and the biological significance of the phosphorylation have not been elucidated. Here, we found that HIPK2 phosphorylates HMGA1a at Ser-35, Thr-52, and Thr-77, and HMGA1b at Thr-41 and Thr-66. In addition, we demonstrated that cdc2, which is known to phosphorylate HMGA1 proteins, could induce the phosphorylation of HMGA1 proteins at the same Ser/Thr sites. The two kinases, however, exhibited different site preferences for the phosphorylation: The preference for HIPK2 phosphorylation followed the order of Thr-77 > Thr-52 > Ser-35, whereas the order for cdc2 phosphorylation was Thr-52 > Thr-77 > Ser-35. Moreover, we found that the HIPK2-phosphorylated HMGA1a reduced the binding affinity of HMGA1a to human germ line promoter, and the drop in binding affinity induced by HIPK2 phosphorylation was lower than that introduced by cdc2 phosphorylation, which is consistent with the notion that the second AT-hook in HMGA1a is more important for DNA binding than the third AT-hook. PMID:17960875

  16. Repression of the antiapoptotic molecule galectin-3 by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-activated p53 is required for p53-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cecchinelli, Barbara; Lavra, Luca; Rinaldo, Cinzia; Iacovelli, Stefano; Gurtner, Aymone; Gasbarri, Alessandra; Ulivieri, Alessandra; Del Prete, Fabrizio; Trovato, Maria; Piaggio, Giulia; Bartolazzi, Armando; Soddu, Silvia; Sciacchitano, Salvatore

    2006-06-01

    Galectin 3 (Gal-3), a member of the beta-galactoside binding lectin family, exhibits antiapoptotic functions, and its aberrant expression is involved in various aspects of tumor progression. Here we show that p53-induced apoptosis is associated with transcriptional repression of Gal-3. Previously, it has been reported that phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 is important for transcription of proapoptotic genes and induction of apoptosis and that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is specifically involved in these functions. We show that HIPK2 cooperates with p53 in Gal-3 repression and that this cooperation requires HIPK2 kinase activity. Gene-specific RNA interference demonstrates that HIPK2 is essential for repression of Gal-3 upon induction of p53-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, expression of a nonrepressible Gal-3 prevents HIPK2- and p53-induced apoptosis. These results reveal a new apoptotic pathway induced by HIPK2-activated p53 and requiring repression of the antiapoptotic factor Gal-3. PMID:16738336

  17. Drosophila homeodomain-interacting protein kinase inhibits the Skp1-Cul1-F-box E3 ligase complex to dually promote Wingless and Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Sharan; Verheyen, Esther M

    2011-06-14

    Drosophila Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) has been shown to regulate in vivo, the stability of Armadillo, the transcriptional effector of Wingless signaling. The Wingless pathway culminates in the stabilization of Armadillo that, in the absence of signaling, is sequentially phosphorylated, polyubiquitinated and degraded. Loss-of-function clones for hipk result in reduced stabilized Armadillo, whereas overexpression of hipk elevates Armadillo levels to promote Wingless-responsive target gene expression. Here, we show that overexpression of hipk can suppress the effects of negative regulators of Armadillo to prevent its degradation in the wing imaginal disc. Hipk acts to stabilize Armadillo by impeding the function of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF)(Slimb), thereby inhibiting Armadillo ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Vertebrate Hipk2 displays a similar ability to prevent β-catenin ubiquitination in a functionally conserved mechanism. We find that Hipk's ability to inhibit SCF(Slimb)-mediated ubiquitination is not restricted to Armadillo and extends to other substrates of SCF(Slimb), including the Hedgehog signaling effector Ci. Thus, similar to casein kinase 1 and glycogen synthase kinase 3, Hipk dually regulates both Wingless and Hedgehog signaling by controlling the stability of their respective signaling effectors, but it is the first kinase to our knowledge identified that promotes the stability of both Armadillo and Ci. PMID:21628596

  18. CFL1, a WW Domain Protein, Regulates Cuticle Development by Modulating the Function of HDG1, a Class IV Homeodomain Transcription Factor, in Rice and Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Renhong; Li, Shibai; He, Shan; Waßmann, Friedrich; Yu, Caihong; Qin, Genji; Schreiber, Lukas; Qu, Li-Jia; Gu, Hongya

    2011-01-01

    Plants have a chemically heterogeneous lipophilic layer, the cuticle, which protects them from biotic and abiotic stresses. The mechanisms that regulate cuticle development are poorly understood. We identified a rice (Oryza sativa) dominant curly leaf mutant, curly flag leaf1 (cfl1), and cloned CFL1, which encodes a WW domain protein. We overexpressed both rice and Arabidopsis CFL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana; these transgenic plants showed severely impaired cuticle development, similar to that in cfl1 rice. Reduced expression of At CFL1 resulted in reinforcement of cuticle structure. At CFL1 was predominantly expressed in specialized epidermal cells and in regions where dehiscence and abscission occur. Biochemical evidence showed that At CFL1 interacts with HDG1, a class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor. Suppression of HDG1 function resulted in similar defective cuticle phenotypes in wild-type Arabidopsis but much alleviated phenotypes in At cfl1-1 mutants. The expression of two cuticle development-associated genes, BDG and FDH, was downregulated in At CFL1 overexpressor and HDG1 suppression plants. HDG1 binds to the cis-element L1 box, which exists in the regulatory regions of BDG and FDH. Our results suggest that rice and Arabidopsis CFL1 negatively regulate cuticle development by affecting the function of HDG1, which regulates the downstream genes BDG and FDH. PMID:21954461

  19. The neuroprotective action of the mood stabilizing drugs lithium chloride and sodium valproate is mediated through the up-regulation of the homeodomain protein Six1

    SciTech Connect

    Plant, Kathryn E.; Anderson, Elizabeth; Simecek, Nicole; Brown, Richard; Forster, Sam; Spinks, Jenny; Toms, Nick; Gibson, G. Gordon; Lyon, Jon; Plant, Nick

    2009-02-15

    The mood stabilizing agents lithium chloride (LiCl) and sodium valproate (VPA) have recently gained interest as potential neuroprotective therapeutics. However, exploitation of these therapeutic applications is hindered by both a lack of molecular understanding of the mode of action, and a number of sub-optimal properties, including a relatively small therapeutic window and variable patient response. Human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) were exposed to 1 mM lithium chloride or 1 mM sodium valproate for 6 h or 72 h, and transcriptomes measured by Affymetrix U133A/B microarray. Statistically significant gene expression changes were identified using SAM software, with selected changes confirmed at transcript (TaqMan) and protein (Western blotting) levels. Finally, anti-apoptotic action was measured by an in vitro fluorescent assay. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to therapeutically relevant concentrations of either lithium chloride or sodium valproate elicited 936 statistically significant changes in gene expression. Amongst these changes we observed a large (maximal 31.3-fold) increase in the expression of the homeodomain protein Six1, and have characterized the time- and dose-dependent up-regulation of this gene in response to both drugs. In addition, we demonstrate that, like LiCl or VPA treatment, Six1 over-expression protects SH-SY5Y cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis via the blockade of caspsase-3 activation, whereas removal of Six1 protein via siRNA antagonises the ability of LiCl and VPA to protect SH-SY5Y cells from STS-induced apoptosis. These results provide a novel mechanistic rationale underlying the neuroprotective mechanism of LiCl and VPA, suggesting exciting possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic agents against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinsonism.

  20. Genetic ablation of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 selectively induces apoptosis of cerebellar Purkinje cells during adulthood and generates an ataxic-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Anzilotti, S; Tornincasa, M; Gerlini, R; Conte, A; Brancaccio, P; Cuomo, O; Bianco, G; Fusco, A; Annunziato, L; Pignataro, G; Pierantoni, G M

    2015-01-01

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is a multitalented coregulator of an increasing number of transcription factors and cofactors involved in cell death and proliferation in several organs and systems. As Hipk2−/− mice show behavioral abnormalities consistent with cerebellar dysfunction, we investigated whether Hipk2 is involved in these neurological symptoms. To this aim, we characterized the postnatal developmental expression profile of Hipk2 in the brain cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum of mice by real-time PCR, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Notably, we found that whereas in the brain cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, HIPK2 expression progressively decreased with age, that is, from postnatal day 1 to adulthood, it increased in the cerebellum. Interestingly, mice lacking Hipk2 displayed atrophic lobules and a visibly smaller cerebellum than did wild-type mice. More important, the cerebellum of Hipk2−/− mice showed a strong reduction in cerebellar Purkinje neurons during adulthood. Such reduction is due to the activation of an apoptotic process associated with a compromised proteasomal function followed by an unpredicted accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. In particular, Purkinje cell dysfunction was characterized by a strong accumulation of ubiquitinated β-catenin. Moreover, our behavioral tests showed that Hipk2−/− mice displayed muscle and balance impairment, indicative of Hipk2 involvement in cerebellar function. Taken together, these results indicate that Hipk2 exerts a relevant role in the survival of cerebellar Purkinje cells and that Hipk2 genetic ablation generates cerebellar dysfunction compatible with an ataxic-like phenotype. PMID:26633710

  1. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2, a novel autoimmune regulator interaction partner, modulates promiscuous gene expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rattay, Kristin; Claude, Janine; Rezavandy, Esmail; Matt, Sonja; Hofmann, Thomas G; Kyewski, Bruno; Derbinski, Jens

    2015-02-01

    Promiscuous expression of a plethora of tissue-restricted Ags (TRAs) by medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) plays an essential role in T cell tolerance. Although the cellular mechanisms by which promiscuous gene expression (pGE) imposes T cell tolerance have been well characterized, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is to date the only validated molecule known to regulate pGE. AIRE is part of higher-order multiprotein complexes, which promote transcription, elongation, and splicing of a wide range of target genes. How AIRE and its partners mediate these various effects at the molecular level is still largely unclear. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we searched for novel AIRE-interacting proteins and identified the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a novel partner. HIPK2 partially colocalized with AIRE in nuclear bodies upon cotransfection and in human mTECs in situ. Moreover, HIPK2 phosphorylated AIRE in vitro and suppressed the coactivator activity of AIRE in a kinase-dependent manner. To evaluate the role of Hipk2 in modulating the function of AIRE in vivo, we compared whole-genome gene signatures of purified mTEC subsets from TEC-specific Hipk2 knockout mice with control mice and identified a small set of differentially expressed genes. Unexpectedly, most differentially expressed genes were confined to the CD80(lo) mTEC subset and preferentially included AIRE-independent TRAs. Thus, although it modulates gene expression in mTECs and in addition affects the size of the medullary compartment, TEC-specific HIPK2 deletion only mildly affects AIRE-directed pGE in vivo. PMID:25552543

  2. Homeodomains, Hedgehogs, and Happiness.

    PubMed

    Scott, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Developmental biologists have had a spectacular quarter century of discoveries, building on many decades of work earlier, discovering molecular, cellular, and genetic mechanisms that underlie the magical process by which an egg becomes a plant or animal. Among the discoveries were homeodomains, DNA-binding domains that allow transcription factors to recognize their target genes, and the Hedgehog signaling pathway, which is used in many organs and tissues for communication among cells. The experience of unveiling the mechanisms and molecules connected to both of these findings has been remarkable, joyful, difficult, and a time of great teamwork and collaboration within and between laboratory groups. More than ever it is possible to discern the evolutionary processes, and their mechanisms, that led to the diversity of life on earth. A huge amount of work remains to be done to obtain a broad understanding of what happened and how development works. PMID:26969987

  3. Solution structure of CEH-37 homeodomain of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Sunjin; Lee, Yong Woo; Kim, Woo Taek; Lee, Weontae

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We have determined solution structures of CEH-37 homedomain. •CEH-37 HD has a compact α-helical structure with HTH DNA binding motif. •Solution structure of CEH-37 HD shares its molecular topology with that of the homeodomain proteins. •Residues in the N-terminal region and HTH motif are important in binding to Caenorhabditis elegans telomeric DNA. •CEH-37 could play an important role in telomere function via DNA binding. -- Abstract: The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans protein CEH-37 belongs to the paired OTD/OTX family of homeobox-containing homeodomain proteins. CEH-37 shares sequence similarity with homeodomain proteins, although it specifically binds to double-stranded C. elegans telomeric DNA, which is unusual to homeodomain proteins. Here, we report the solution structure of CEH-37 homeodomain and molecular interaction with double-stranded C. elegans telomeric DNA using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NMR structure shows that CEH-37 homeodomain is composed of a flexible N-terminal region and three α-helices with a helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA binding motif. Data from size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy reveal that CEH-37 homeodomain interacts strongly with double-stranded C. elegans telomeric DNA. NMR titration experiments identified residues responsible for specific binding to nematode double-stranded telomeric DNA. These results suggest that C. elegans homeodomain protein, CEH-37 could play an important role in telomere function via DNA binding.

  4. An Endocrine-Exocrine Switch in the Activity of the Pancreatic Homeodomain Protein PDX1 through Formation of a Trimeric Complex with PBX1b and MRG1 (MEIS2)

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Galvin H.; Liu, Ying; Rose, Scott D.; Bischof, Larry J.; Steelman, Scott; Buchberg, Arthur M.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; MacDonald, Raymond J.

    1998-01-01

    HOX proteins and some orphan homeodomain proteins form complexes with either PBX or MEIS subclasses of homeodomain proteins. This interaction can increase the binding specificity and transcriptional effectiveness of the HOX partner. Here we show that specific members of both PBX and MEIS subclasses form a multimeric complex with the pancreatic homeodomain protein PDX1 and switch the nature of its transcriptional activity. The two activities of PDX1 are exhibited through the 10-bp B element of the transcriptional enhancer of the pancreatic elastase I gene (ELA1). In pancreatic acinar cells the activity of the B element requires other elements of the ELA1 enhancer; in β-cells the B element can activate a promoter in the absence of other enhancer elements. In acinar cell lines the activity is mediated by a complex comprising PDX1, PBX1b, and MRG1 (MEIS2). In contrast, β-cell lines are devoid of PBX1b and MRG1, so that a trimeric complex does not form, and the β-cell-type activity is mediated by PDX1 without PBX1b and MRG1. The presence of specific nuclear isoforms of PBX and MEIS is precisely regulated in a cell-type-specific manner. The β-cell-type activity can be detected in acinar cells if the B element is altered to retain binding of PDX1 but prevent binding of the PDX1-PBX1b-MRG1 complex. These observations suggest that association with PBX and MEIS partners controls the nature of the transcriptional activity of the organ-specific PDX1 transcription factor in exocrine versus endocrine cells. PMID:9710595

  5. The GLABRA2 homeodomain protein directly regulates CESA5 and XTH17 gene expression in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Iwata, Mineko; Sugiyama, Junji; Kotake, Toshihisa; Ishida, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Nishitani, Kazuhiko; Okada, Kiyotaka; Wada, Takuji

    2009-11-01

    Arabidopsis root hair formation is determined by the patterning genes CAPRICE (CPC), GLABRA3 (GL3), WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABRA2 (GL2), but little is known about the later changes in cell wall material during root hair formation. A combined Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy-principal components analysis (FTIR-PCA) method was used to detect subtle differences in the cell wall material between wild-type and root hair mutants in Arabidopsis. Among several root hair mutants, only the gl2 mutation affected root cell wall polysaccharides. Five of the 10 genes encoding cellulose synthase (CESA1-10) and 4 of 33 xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XTH1-33) genes in Arabidopsis are expressed in the root, but only CESA5 and XTH17 were affected by the gl2 mutation. The L1-box sequence located in the promoter region of these genes was recognized by the GL2 protein. These results indicate that GL2 directly regulates cell wall-related gene expression during root development. PMID:19619157

  6. Long-range transcriptional regulation by the p110 CUX1 homeodomain protein on the ENCODE array

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Overexpression of the Cut homeobox 1 gene, CUX1, inversely correlates with patient survival in breast cancers. Cell-based assays and molecular studies have revealed that transcriptional regulation by CUX1 involves mostly the proteolytically processed p110 isoform. As there is no antibody specific to p110 CUX1 only, an alternate strategy must be employed to identify its targets. Results We expressed physiological levels of a tagged-p110 CUX1 protein and performed chromatin affinity purification followed by hybridization on ENCODE and promoter arrays. Targets were validated by chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptional regulation by CUX1 was analyzed in expression profiling and RT-qPCR assays following CUX1 knockdown or p110 CUX1 overexpression. Approximately 47% and 14% of CUX1 binding sites were respectively mapped less than 4 Kbp, or more than 40 Kbp, away from a transcription start site. More genes exhibited changes in expression following CUX1 knockdown than p110 CUX1 overexpression. CUX1 directly activated or repressed 7.4% and 8.4% of putative targets identified on the ENCODE and promoter arrays respectively. This proportion increased to 11.2% for targets with 2 binding sites or more. Transcriptional repression was observed in a slightly higher proportion of target genes. The CUX1 consensus binding motif, ATCRAT, was found at 47.2% of the CUX1 binding sites, yet only 8.3% of the CUX1 consensus motifs present on the array were bound in vivo. The presence of a consensus binding motif did not have an impact on whether a target gene was repressed or activated. Interestingly, the distance between a binding site and a transcription start site did not significantly reduced the ability of CUX1 to regulate a target gene. Moreover, CUX1 not only was able to regulate the next adjacent gene, but also regulated the gene located beyond this one as well as the gene located further away in the opposite direction. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that p110

  7. Phosphorylation of Krüppel-like factor 3 (KLF3/BKLF) and C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2) by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) modulates KLF3 DNA binding and activity.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Vitri; Kwok, Alister; Lee, Stella; Lee, Ming Min; Tan, Yee Mun; Nicholas, Hannah R; Isono, Kyo-ichi; Wienert, Beeke; Mak, Ka Sin; Knights, Alexander J; Quinlan, Kate G R; Cordwell, Stuart J; Funnell, Alister P W; Pearson, Richard C M; Crossley, Merlin

    2015-03-27

    Krüppel-like factor 3 (KLF3/BKLF), a member of the Krüppel-like factor (KLF) family of transcription factors, is a widely expressed transcriptional repressor with diverse biological roles. Although there is considerable understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow KLF3 to silence the activity of its target genes, less is known about the signal transduction pathways and post-translational modifications that modulate KLF3 activity in response to physiological stimuli. We observed that KLF3 is modified in a range of different tissues and found that the serine/threonine kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) can both bind and phosphorylate KLF3. Mass spectrometry identified serine 249 as the primary phosphorylation site. Mutation of this site reduces the ability of KLF3 to bind DNA and repress transcription. Furthermore, we also determined that HIPK2 can phosphorylate the KLF3 co-repressor C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2) at serine 428. Finally, we found that phosphorylation of KLF3 and CtBP2 by HIPK2 strengthens the interaction between these two factors and increases transcriptional repression by KLF3. Taken together, our results indicate that HIPK2 potentiates the activity of KLF3. PMID:25659434

  8. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator (uPA) Promotes Angiogenesis by Attenuating Proline-rich Homeodomain Protein (PRH) Transcription Factor Activity and De-repressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Victoria; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Bdeir, Khalil; Kershaw, Rachael; Holman, Kelci R; Parfyonova, Yelena V; Semina, Ekaterina V; Beloglazova, Irina B; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A; Cines, Douglas B

    2016-07-15

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates angiogenesis and vascular permeability through proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix and intracellular signaling initiated upon its binding to uPAR/CD87 and other cell surface receptors. Here, we describe an additional mechanism by which uPA regulates angiogenesis. Ex vivo VEGF-induced vascular sprouting from Matrigel-embedded aortic rings isolated from uPA knock-out (uPA(-/-)) mice was impaired compared with vessels emanating from wild-type mice. Endothelial cells isolated from uPA(-/-) mice show less proliferation and migration in response to VEGF than their wild type counterparts or uPA(-/-) endothelial cells in which expression of wild type uPA had been restored. We reported previously that uPA is transported from cell surface receptors to nuclei through a mechanism that requires its kringle domain. Intranuclear uPA modulates gene transcription by binding to a subset of transcription factors. Here we report that wild type single-chain uPA, but not uPA variants incapable of nuclear transport, increases the expression of cell surface VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by translocating to the nuclei of ECs. Intranuclear single-chain uPA binds directly to and interferes with the function of the transcription factor hematopoietically expressed homeodomain protein or proline-rich homeodomain protein (HHEX/PRH), which thereby lose their physiologic capacity to repress the activity of vehgr1 and vegfr2 gene promoters. These studies identify uPA-dependent de-repression of vegfr1 and vegfr2 gene transcription through binding to HHEX/PRH as a novel mechanism by which uPA mediates the pro-angiogenic effects of VEGF and identifies a potential new target for control of pathologic angiogenesis. PMID:27151212

  9. Structural and Biophysical Insights into the Ligand-Free Pitx2 Homeodomain and a Ring Dermoid of the Cornea Inducing Homeodomain Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Doerdelmann, Thomas; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Baird-Titus, Jamie M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.; Rance, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The homeodomain-containing transcription factor Pitx2 (pituitary homeobox protein 2) is present in many developing embryonic tissues, including the heart. Its homeodomain is responsible for the recognition and binding to target DNA sequences and thus constitutes a major functional unit in the Pitx2 protein. NMR techniques were employed to determine the solution structure of the native Pitx2 homeodomain and a R24H mutant that causes the autosomal dominantly inherited ring dermoid of the cornea syndrome. The structures reveal that both isoforms possess the canonical homeodomain fold. However, the R24H mutation results in a 2-fold increase in DNA-binding affinity and a 5°C decrease in the thermal stability, while changing the dynamic environment of the homeodomain only locally. When introduced into full-length Pitx2c, the mutation results in only a 25% loss of transactivation activity. Our data correlate well with clinical observations suggesting a milder deficiency for the R24H mutation compared to other Pitx2 homeodomain mutations. PMID:22224469

  10. Dual Functions of the KNOTTED1 Homeodomain: Sequence-Specific DNA Binding and Regulation of Cell-to-Cell Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The homeodomain forms a trihelical structure, with the third helix conferring specific interactions with the DNA major groove. A specific class of plant homeodomain proteins, called KNOX [KNOTTED1 (KN1)-like homeobox], also has the ability to signal between cells by directly trafficking through inte...

  11. Cooperative interactions between paired domain and homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Jun, S; Desplan, C

    1996-09-01

    The Pax proteins are a family of transcriptional regulators involved in many developmental processes in all higher eukaryotes. They are characterized by the presence of a paired domain (PD), a bipartite DNA binding domain composed of two helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs,the PAI and RED domains. The PD is also often associated with a homeodomain (HD) which is itself able to form homo- and hetero-dimers on DNA. Many of these proteins therefore contain three HTH motifs each able to recognize DNA. However, all PDs recognize highly related DNA sequences, and most HDs also recognize almost identical sites. We show here that different Pax proteins use multiple combinations of their HTHs to recognize several types of target sites. For instance, the Drosophila Paired protein can bind, in vitro, exclusively through its PAI domain, or through a dimer of its HD, or through cooperative interaction between PAI domain and HD. However, prd function in vivo requires the synergistic action of both the PAI domain and the HD. Pax proteins with only a PD appear to require both PAI and RED domains, while a Pax-6 isoform and a new Pax protein, Lune, may rely on the RED domain and HD. We propose a model by which Pax proteins recognize different target genes in vivo through various combinations of their DNA binding domains, thus expanding their recognition repertoire. PMID:8787739

  12. Interaction and cooperation of the CCAAT-box enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) with the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (Hipk2).

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Simone; Coulibaly, Anna; Ohnheiser, Johanna; Jakobs, Anke; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2013-08-01

    CCAAT box/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is a bZip transcription factor that plays crucial roles in important cellular processes such as differentiation and proliferation of specific cell types. Previously, we showed that C/EBPβ cooperates with the coactivator p300 through a novel mechanism that involves the C/EBPβ-induced phosphorylation of multiple sites in the carboxyl-terminal domain of p300 by protein kinase Hipk2. We have now examined the interaction and cooperation of C/EBPβ, p300, and Hipk2 in more detail. We show that Hipk2 and C/EBPβ are direct physical binding partners whose interaction is mediated by sequences located in the amino-terminal and central domains of Hipk2 and the amino-terminal part of C/EBPβ. In addition to phosphorylating p300 recruited to C/EBPβ, Hipk2 also phosphorylates C/EBPβ at sites that have previously been shown to plays key roles in the regulation of C/EBPβ activity. Silencing of Hipk2 expression disrupts adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, a physiological C/EBPβ-dependent differentiation process indicating that the cooperation of C/EBPβ and Hipk2 is functionally relevant. Finally, we demonstrate that C/EBPα, a related C/EBP family member whose amino-terminal sequences differ significantly from that of C/EBPβ, is unable to interact and cooperate with Hipk2. Instead, our data suggest that C/EBPα cooperates with the protein kinase Jnk to induce phosphorylation of p300. Overall, our data identify Hipk2 as a novel regulator of C/EBPβ and implicate different protein kinases in the cooperation of p300 with C/EBPβ and C/EBPα. PMID:23782693

  13. Floral Induction in Arabidopsis by FLOWERING LOCUS T Requires Direct Repression of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE Genes by the Homeodomain Protein PENNYWISE1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, Fernando; Romera-Branchat, Maida; Martínez-Gallegos, Rafael; Patel, Vipul; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Jang, Seonghoe; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Coupland, George

    2015-01-01

    Flowers form on the flanks of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) in response to environmental and endogenous cues. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the photoperiodic pathway acts through FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) to promote floral induction in response to day length. A complex between FT and the basic leucine-zipper transcription factor FD is proposed to form in the SAM, leading to activation of APETALA1 and LEAFY and thereby promoting floral meristem identity. We identified mutations that suppress FT function and recovered a new allele of the homeodomain transcription factor PENNYWISE (PNY). Genetic and molecular analyses showed that ectopic expression of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2, which encode transcriptional coactivators, in the SAM during vegetative development, confers the late flowering of pny mutants. In wild-type plants, BOP1 and BOP2 are expressed in lateral organs close to boundaries of the SAM, whereas in pny mutants, their expression occurs in the SAM. This ectopic expression lowers FD mRNA levels, reducing responsiveness to FT and impairing activation of APETALA1 and LEAFY. We show that PNY binds to the promoters of BOP1 and BOP2, repressing their transcription. These results demonstrate a direct role for PNY in defining the spatial expression patterns of boundary genes and the significance of this process for floral induction by FT. PMID:26417007

  14. Floral Induction in Arabidopsis by FLOWERING LOCUS T Requires Direct Repression of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE Genes by the Homeodomain Protein PENNYWISE.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Fernando; Romera-Branchat, Maida; Martínez-Gallegos, Rafael; Patel, Vipul; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Jang, Seonghoe; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Coupland, George

    2015-11-01

    Flowers form on the flanks of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) in response to environmental and endogenous cues. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the photoperiodic pathway acts through FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) to promote floral induction in response to day length. A complex between FT and the basic leucine-zipper transcription factor FD is proposed to form in the SAM, leading to activation of APETALA1 and LEAFY and thereby promoting floral meristem identity. We identified mutations that suppress FT function and recovered a new allele of the homeodomain transcription factor PENNYWISE (PNY). Genetic and molecular analyses showed that ectopic expression of BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2, which encode transcriptional coactivators, in the SAM during vegetative development, confers the late flowering of pny mutants. In wild-type plants, BOP1 and BOP2 are expressed in lateral organs close to boundaries of the SAM, whereas in pny mutants, their expression occurs in the SAM. This ectopic expression lowers FD mRNA levels, reducing responsiveness to FT and impairing activation of APETALA1 and LEAFY. We show that PNY binds to the promoters of BOP1 and BOP2, repressing their transcription. These results demonstrate a direct role for PNY in defining the spatial expression patterns of boundary genes and the significance of this process for floral induction by FT. PMID:26417007

  15. Analysis of homeodomain function by structure-based design of a transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantz, J L; Pabo, C O; Sharp, P A

    1995-01-01

    The homeodomain is a 60-amino acid module which mediates critical protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions for a large family of regulatory proteins. We have used structure-based design to analyze the ability of the Oct-1 homeodomain to nucleate an enhancer complex. The Oct-1 protein regulates herpes simplex virus (HSV) gene expression by participating in the formation of a multiprotein complex (C1 complex) which regulates alpha (immediate early) genes. We recently described the design of ZFHD1, a chimeric transcription factor containing zinc fingers 1 and 2 of Zif268, a four-residue linker, and the Oct-1 homeodomain. In the presence of alpha-transinduction factor and C1 factor, ZFHD1 efficiently nucleates formation of the C1 complex in vitro and specifically activates gene expression in vivo. The sequence specificity of ZFHD1 recruits C1 complex formation to an enhancer element which is not efficiently recognized by Oct-1. ZFHD1 function depends on the recognition of the Oct-1 homeodomain surface. These results prove that the Oct-1 homeodomain mediates all the protein-protein interactions that are required to efficiently recruit alpha-transinduction factor and C1 factor into a C1 complex. The structure-based design of transcription factors should provide valuable tools for dissecting the interactions of DNA-bound domains in other regulatory circuits. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7568211

  16. Lock and Key Binding of the HOX YPWM Peptide to the PBX Homeodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Sprules, Tara; Green, N.; Featherstone, M.; Gehring, Kalle

    2003-01-10

    HOX homeodomain proteins bind short core DNA sequences to control very specific developmental processes. DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are increased by the formation of cooperative complexes with the PBX homeodomain protein. A conserved YPWM motif in the HOX protein is necessary for cooperative binding with PBX. We have determined the structure of a PBX homeodomain bound to a 14-mer DNA duplex. A relaxation-optimized procedure was developed to measure DNA residual dipolar couplings at natural abundance in the 20-kDa binary complex. When the PBX homeodomain binds to DNA, a fourth alpha-helix is formed in the homeodomain. This helix rigidifies the DNA recognition helix of PBX and forms a hydrophobic binding site for the HOX YPWM peptide. The HOX peptide itself shows some structure in solution and suggests that the interaction between PBX and HOX is an example of "lock and key" binding. The NMR structure explains the requirement of DNA for the PBX-HOX interaction and the increased affinity of DNA binding.

  17. Binding Polymorphism in the DNA Bound State of the Pdx1 Homeodomain

    PubMed Central

    Babin, Volodymyr; Wang, Dongli; Rose, Robert B.; Sagui, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    The subtle effects of DNA-protein recognition are illustrated in the homeodomain fold. This is one of several small DNA binding motifs that, in spite of limited DNA binding specificity, adopts crucial, specific roles when incorporated in a transcription factor. The homeodomain is composed of a 3-helix domain and a mobile N-terminal arm. Helix 3 (the recognition helix) interacts with the DNA bases through the major groove, while the N-terminal arm becomes ordered upon binding a specific sequence through the minor groove. Although many structural studies have characterized the DNA binding properties of homeodomains, the factors behind the binding specificity are still difficult to elucidate. A crystal structure of the Pdx1 homeodomain bound to DNA (PDB 2H1K) obtained previously in our lab shows two complexes with differences in the conformation of the N-terminal arm, major groove contacts, and backbone contacts, raising new questions about the DNA recognition process by homeodomains. Here, we carry out fully atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations both in crystal and aqueous environments in order to elucidate the nature of the difference in binding contacts. The crystal simulations reproduce the X-ray experimental structures well. In the absence of crystal packing constraints, the differences between the two complexes increase during the solution simulations. Thus, the conformational differences are not an artifact of crystal packing. In solution, the homeodomain with a disordered N-terminal arm repositions to a partially specific orientation. Both the crystal and aqueous simulations support the existence of different stable binding conformers identified in the original crystallographic data with different degrees of specificity. We propose that protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions favor a subset of the possible conformations. This flexibility in DNA binding may facilitate multiple functions for the same transcription factor. PMID:23950697

  18. Disordered tails of homeodomains facilitate DNA recognition by providing a trade-off between folding and specific binding.

    PubMed

    Tóth-Petróczy, Agnes; Simon, Istvan; Fuxreiter, Monika; Levy, Yaakov

    2009-10-28

    DNA binding specificity of homeodomain transcription factors is critically affected by disordered N-terminal tails (N-tails) that undergo a disorder-to-order transition upon interacting with DNA. The mechanism of the binding process and the molecular basis of selectivity are largely unknown. The coupling between folding and DNA binding of Antp and NK-2 homeodomains was investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations using the native protein-DNA complex. The disordered N-tails were found to decrease the stability of the free proteins by competing with the native intramolecular interactions and increasing the radius of gyration of the homeodomain cores. In the presence of DNA, however, the N-tails increase the stability of the homeodomains by reducing the coupling between folding and DNA binding. Detailed studies on Antp demonstrate that the N-tail anchors the homeodomain to DNA and accelerates formation of specific interactions all along the protein-DNA interface. The tidal electrostatic forces between the N-tail and DNA induce faster and tighter binding of the homeodomain core to the DNA; this mechanism conforms to a fly-casting mechanism. In agreement with experiments, the N-tail of Antp also improves the binding affinity for DNA, with a major contribution by the released waters. These results imply that varying the degree of folding upon binding and thereby modulating the size of the buried surface-disordered N-tails of homeodomains can fine-tune the binding strength for specific DNA sequences. Overall, both the kinetics and thermodynamics of specific DNA binding by homeodomains can be improved by N-tails using a mechanism that is inherent in their disordered state. PMID:19919153

  19. A Novel Gli3 Enhancer Controls the Gli3 Spatiotemporal Expression Pattern through a TALE Homeodomain Protein Binding Site ▿‡

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Sarah; Caamaño, Jorge H.; Carvajal, Jaime; Cleary, Michael L.; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor Gli3 is an essential mediator of hedgehog signaling. Gli3 has a dynamic expression pattern during embryonic development. In the neural tube, Gli3 transcripts are patterned along the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes such that the initial broad expression in the posterior neural tube becomes dorsally restricted as neurogenesis takes place. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate this dynamic expression. Here, we report on a phylogenetic analysis of the Gli3 locus that uncovered a novel regulatory element, HCNE1. HCNE1 contains a compound Pbx/Meis binding site that binds Pbx and Meis/Prep proteins in vitro and in vivo. We show that HCNE1 recapitulates Gli3 expression in the developing neural tube and that mutations in the Pbx/Meis binding site affect the spatiotemporal control of HCNE1 transcriptional activity. Ectopic expression or loss of function of Pbx and Meis/Prep proteins in the chick and mouse embryo results in aberrant expression of endogenous Gli3 transcripts. We propose a novel role for TALE proteins in establishing the correct spatiotemporal expression pattern of Gli3 in the vertebrate spinal cord, thus implicating TALE transcription factors in early embryonic patterning events controlled by Sonic hedgehog signaling. PMID:21262763

  20. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 stabilizes p27(kip1) by its phosphorylation at serine 10 and contributes to cell motility.

    PubMed

    Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Esposito, Francesco; Tornincasa, Mara; Rinaldo, Cinzia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Soddu, Silvia; Fusco, Alfredo

    2011-08-19

    HIPK2 is a serine/threonine kinase that acts as a coregulator of an increasing number of factors involved in cell survival and proliferation during development and in response to different types of stress. Here we report on a novel target of HIPK2, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1). HIPK2 phosphorylates p27(kip1) in vitro and in vivo at serine 10, an event that accounts for 80% of the total p27(kip1) phosphorylation and plays a crucial role in the stability of the protein. Indeed, HIPK2 depletion by transient or stable RNA interference in tumor cells of different origin was consistently associated with strong reduction of p27(kip1) phosphorylation at serine 10 and of p27(kip1) stability. An initial evaluation of the functional relevance of this HIPK2-mediated regulation of p27(kip1) revealed a contribution to cell motility, rather than to cell proliferation, but only in cells that do not express wild-type p53. PMID:21715331

  1. Crystal Structure of the Human NKX2.5 Homeodomain in Complex with DNA Target

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, Lagnajeet; Genis, Caroli; Scone, Peyton; Weinberg, Ellen O.; Kasahara, Hideko; Nam, Hyun-Joo

    2012-10-16

    NKX2.5 is a homeodomain containing transcription factor regulating cardiac formation and function, and its mutations are linked to congenital heart disease. Here we provide the first report of the crystal structure of the NKX2.5 homeodomain in complex with double-stranded DNA of its endogenous target, locating within the proximal promoter -242 site of the atrial natriuretic factor gene. The crystal structure, determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, demonstrates that NKX2.5 homeodomains occupy both DNA binding sites separated by five nucleotides without physical interaction between themselves. The two homeodomains show identical conformation despite the differences in the DNA sequences they bind, and no significant bending of the DNA was observed. Tyr54, absolutely conserved in NK2 family proteins, mediates sequence-specific interaction with the TAAG motif. This high resolution crystal structure of NKX2.5 protein provides a detailed picture of protein and DNA interactions, which allows us to predict DNA binding of mutants identified in human patients.

  2. The three-dimensional solution structure of the NK-2 homeodomain from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tsao, D H; Gruschus, J M; Wang, L H; Nirenberg, M; Ferretti, J A

    1995-08-11

    We describe the NMR determination of the three-dimensional structure of a 77 amino acid residue protein, which consists of the 60 residue NK-2 homeodomain from Drosophila melanogaster and adjacent amino acid residues. The NK-2 homeodomain protein is part of a 723 amino acid residue protein which is expressed early in embryonic development in part of the central nervous system. NK-2 was characterized using both a natural abundance and a uniformly 15N enriched sample by two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments. The average root-mean-square deviation for 30 structures for residues 8 to 53 is 0.40 A for the backbone heavy-atoms and 0.72 A for the backbone and side-chain heavy-atoms. These structures were obtained from 986 NOE-derived upper and lower bound restraints. The three-dimensional structure contains three helices which consist of homeodomain amino acid residues 10 to 22, 28 to 38 and 42 to 52, as well as a turn between helix II and III, characteristic of homeodomains. Residues 53 to 60 of the DNA recognition helix are not fully ordered in the absence of DNA. In the free state this segment adopts a flexible but helix-like structure between residues 53 and 56 and is disordered from residues 57 to 60 although, as shown previously, the helix elongates by eight residues upon binding to DNA. The role of variable residues 52, 54 and 56 in determining the structure and flexibility of the recognition helix, as well as the stability of the NK-2 homeodomain as manifested by its thermal denaturation, are discussed. PMID:7643404

  3. Dynamic Local Polymorphisms in the Gbx1 Homeodomain Induced by DNA Binding.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Wilson, Ian A; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    The Gastrulation Brain Homeobox 1 (Gbx1) gene encodes the Gbx1 homeodomain that targets TAATTA motifs in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Residues Glu17 and Arg52 in Gbx1 form a salt bridge, which is preserved in crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations of homologous homeodomain-DNA complexes. In contrast, our nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies show that DNA binding to Gbx1 induces dynamic local polymorphisms, which include breaking of the Glu17-Arg52 salt bridge. To study this interaction, we produced a variant with Glu17Arg and Arg52Glu mutations, which exhibited the same fold as the wild-type protein, but a 2-fold reduction in affinity for dsDNA. Analysis of the NMR structures of the Gbx1 homeodomain in the free form, the Gbx1[E17R,R52E] variant, and a Gbx1 homeodomain-DNA complex showed that stabilizing interactions of the Arg52 side chain with the DNA backbone are facilitated by transient breakage of the Glu17-Arg52 salt bridge in the DNA-bound Gbx1. PMID:27396829

  4. The homeodomain transcription factor Phox2 in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo pealei

    PubMed Central

    Burbach, J. Peter H.; Hellemons, Anita J. C. G. M.; Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Homeodomain transcription factors regulate development of embryos and cellular physiology in adult systems. Paired-type homeodomain genes constitute a subclass that has been particularly implicated in establishment of neuronal identity in the mammalian nervous system. We isolated fragments of eight homeodomain genes of this subclass expressed in the stellate ganglion of the North Atlantic long finned squid Loligo pealei (lp) [Note: Loligo pealei has been officially renamed Doryteuthis pealei. For reasons of uniformity and clarity Loligo pealei (lp) is used here]. Of the most abundant ones, we cloned a full length cDNA which encoded the squid ortholog of the paired-type homeodomain proteins Phox2a/b. The homology of lpPhox2 to invertebrate and mammalian Phox2 was limited to the homeodomain. In contrast to mouse Phox2b, lpPhox2 was unable to transactivate the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) promoter in a heterologous mammalian transfection system. In vivo, lpPhox2 was expressed in the developing stellate ganglion of stage 27 squid embryos and continued to be expressed in the adult stellate neurons where expression was confined to the giant fiber lobe containing the neurons that form the giant axons. The expression of lpPhox was similarly timed and distributed as the Fmrf gene. Furthermore, the Fmrf upstream region contained putative Phox2a/b binding sites. These results suggest a role of lpPhox2 in the developmental specification of neuronal identity and regulation of neurons of the squid giant axon. PMID:26116657

  5. The homeodomain transcription factor Phox2 in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo pealei.

    PubMed

    Burbach, J Peter H; Hellemons, Anita J C G M; Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2015-01-01

    Homeodomain transcription factors regulate development of embryos and cellular physiology in adult systems. Paired-type homeodomain genes constitute a subclass that has been particularly implicated in establishment of neuronal identity in the mammalian nervous system. We isolated fragments of eight homeodomain genes of this subclass expressed in the stellate ganglion of the North Atlantic long finned squid Loligo pealei (lp) [Note: Loligo pealei has been officially renamed Doryteuthis pealei. For reasons of uniformity and clarity Loligo pealei (lp) is used here]. Of the most abundant ones, we cloned a full length cDNA which encoded the squid ortholog of the paired-type homeodomain proteins Phox2a/b. The homology of lpPhox2 to invertebrate and mammalian Phox2 was limited to the homeodomain. In contrast to mouse Phox2b, lpPhox2 was unable to transactivate the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) promoter in a heterologous mammalian transfection system. In vivo, lpPhox2 was expressed in the developing stellate ganglion of stage 27 squid embryos and continued to be expressed in the adult stellate neurons where expression was confined to the giant fiber lobe containing the neurons that form the giant axons. The expression of lpPhox was similarly timed and distributed as the Fmrf gene. Furthermore, the Fmrf upstream region contained putative Phox2a/b binding sites. These results suggest a role of lpPhox2 in the developmental specification of neuronal identity and regulation of neurons of the squid giant axon. PMID:26116657

  6. Hox transcription factors influence motoneuron identity through the integrated actions of both homeodomain and non-homeodomain regions

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Mala; Sours, Emily; Lance-Jones, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Background Hox transcription factors play a critical role in the specification of motoneuron subtypes within the spinal cord. Our previous work showed that two orthologous members of this family, Hoxd10 and Hoxd11, exert opposing effects on motoneuron development in the lumbosacral (LS) spinal cord of the embryonic chick: Hoxd10 promotes the development of lateral motoneuron subtypes that project to dorsal limb muscles, while Hoxd11 represses the development of lateral subtypes in favor of medial subtypes that innervate ventral limb muscles and axial muscles. The striking degree of homology between the DNA-binding homeodomains of Hoxd10 and Hoxd11 suggested that non-homeodomain regions mediate their divergent effects. In the present study, we investigate the relative contributions of homeodomain and non-homeodomain regions of Hoxd10 and Hoxd11 to motoneuron specification. Results Using in ovo electroporation to express chimeric and mutant constructs in LS motoneurons, we find that both the homeodomain and non-homeodomain regions of Hoxd10 are necessary to specify lateral motoneurons. In contrast, non-homeodomain regions of Hoxd11 are sufficient to repress lateral motoneuron fates in favor of medial fates. Conclusions Together, our data demonstrate that even closely related Hox orthologues rely on distinct combinations of homeodomain-dependent and -independent mechanisms to specify motoneuron identity. PMID:22411553

  7. Control of cotton fibre elongation by a homeodomain transcription factor GhHOX3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Chun-Min; Shangguan, Xiao-Xia; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Xiu-Fang; Chao, Lu-men; Yang, Chang-Qing; Wang, Ling-Jian; Zhu, Hua-Yu; Zeng, Yan-Da; Guo, Wang-Zhen; Zhou, Bao-Liang; Hu, Guan-Jing; Guan, Xue-Ying; Chen, Z. Jeffrey; Wendel, Jonathan F.; Zhang, Tian-Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Cotton fibres are unusually long, single-celled epidermal seed trichomes and a model for plant cell growth, but little is known about the regulation of fibre cell elongation. Here we report that a homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factor, GhHOX3, controls cotton fibre elongation. GhHOX3 genes are localized to the 12th homoeologous chromosome set of allotetraploid cotton cultivars, associated with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fibre length. Silencing of GhHOX3 greatly reduces (>80%) fibre length, whereas its overexpression leads to longer fibre. Combined transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify target genes of GhHOX3 that also contain the L1-box cis-element, including two cell wall loosening protein genes GhRDL1 and GhEXPA1. GhHOX3 interacts with GhHD1, another homeodomain protein, resulting in enhanced transcriptional activity, and with cotton DELLA, GhSLR1, repressor of the growth hormone gibberellin (GA). GhSLR1 interferes with the GhHOX3–GhHD1 interaction and represses target gene transcription. Our results uncover a novel mechanism whereby a homeodomain protein transduces GA signal to promote fibre cell elongation. PMID:25413731

  8. DNA affinity cleaving analysis of homeodomain-DNA interaction: identification of homeodomain consensus sites in genomic DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Z; Ebright, Y W; Iler, N; Pendergrast, P S; Echelard, Y; McMahon, A P; Ebright, R H; Abate, C

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated the DNA-cleaving moiety o-phenanthroline-copper at amino acid 10 of the Msx-1 homeodomain, and we have analyzed site-specific DNA cleavage by the resulting Msx-1 derivative. We show that amino acid 10 of the Msx-1 homeodomain is close to the 5' end of the consensus DNA site 5'-(C/G)TAATTG-3' in the Msx-1-DNA complex. Our results indicate that the orientation of the Msx-1 homeodomain relative to DNA is analogous to the orientation of the engrailed and Antennapedia homeodomains. We show further that DNA affinity cleaving permits identification of consensus DNA sites for Msx-1 in kilobase DNA substrates. The specificity of the approach enabled us to identify an Msx-1 consensus DNA site within the transcriptional control region of the developmental regulatory gene Wnt-1. We propose that incorporation of o-phenanthroline-copper at amino acid 10 of a homeodomain may provide a generalizable strategy to determine the orientation of a homeodomain relative to DNA and to identify homeodomain consensus DNA sites in genomic DNA. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7904065

  9. The atypical homeodomain transcription factor Mohawk controls tendon morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjin; Watson, Spencer S; Lan, Yu; Keene, Douglas R; Ovitt, Catherine E; Liu, Han; Schweitzer, Ronen; Jiang, Rulang

    2010-10-01

    The Mohawk homeobox (Mkx) gene encodes a new atypical homeodomain-containing protein with transcriptional repressor activity. Mkx mRNA exhibited dynamic expression patterns during development of the palate, somite, kidney, and testis, suggesting that it may be an important regulator of multiple developmental processes. To investigate the roles of Mkx in organogenesis, we generated mice carrying a null mutation in this gene. Mkx(-/-) mice survive postnatally and exhibit a unique wavy-tail phenotype. Close examination revealed that the mutant mice had smaller tendons than wild-type littermates and that the rapid postnatal growth of collagen fibrils in tendons was disrupted in Mkx(-/-) mice. Defects in tendon development were detected in the mutant mouse embryos as early as embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5). Although collagen fibril assembly initially appeared normal, the tendons of Mkx(-/-) embryos expressed significantly reduced amounts of collagen I, fibromodulin, and tenomodulin in comparison with control littermates. We found that Mkx mRNA was strongly expressed in differentiating tendon cells during embryogenesis and in the tendon sheath cells in postnatal stages. In addition to defects in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis, Mkx(-/-) mutant mice exhibited abnormal tendon sheaths. These results identify Mkx as an important regulator of tendon development. PMID:20696843

  10. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies of the rat thyroid transcription factor 1 homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Esposito, G; Fogolari, F; Damante, G; Formisano, S; Tell, G; Leonardi, A; Di Lauro, R; Viglino, P

    1997-06-01

    The 1H NMR solution structure of the rat thyroid transcription factor 1 homeodomain (TTF-1 HD) showed that the molecule folds like classical homeodomains. The C-terminal extension of helix III (fragment 51-59) appeared to adopt a helical geometry, albeit not as rigid as the preceding portion, but the hydrogen-deuterium exchange of backbone amides and the NOE data provided evidence of a discontinuity between the two moieties of helix III at the highly conserved fragment Asn51-His52-Arg53. Analysis of quantitative measurements of isotope exchange rates allows one to recognize the general occurrence, in that region of HD motifs, of opposite effects to helix III stability. Asparagine, histidine and arginine residues occur most frequently at the beginning and end of protein helices. In TTF-1 HD a local fluctuation is observed in the fragment 51-53 which either kinks or tightens the alpha-helix. A search through the protein structure database reveals that the three most common variants of HD fragments 51-53 are often involved in helices and, frequently, in helix initiation or termination. For homeodomains in general, the nature of the fragment 51-53 may be related to the conformational dynamics of their DNA-recognition helix (helix III). Besides the specific results on fragment 51-53, the complete isotope exchange analysis of TTF-1 HD data shows that the partially solvent-exposed recognition helix is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions, like most of the structured regions of the molecule. Hydrophobic stabilization of the contacting regions meets the requirements of a DNA-interaction mechanism which, as shown with other DNA-protein complexes, should entail negative heat capacity variations due to changes in solvent exposure of the nonpolar protein surface. PMID:9255944

  11. Functional and cooperative interactions between the homeodomain PDX1, Pbx, and Prep1 factors on the somatostatin promoter.

    PubMed

    Goudet, G; Delhalle, S; Biemar, F; Martial, J A; Peers, B

    1999-02-12

    Expression of the somatostatin gene in endocrine pancreatic cells is controlled by several regulatory cis-elements located in the promoter region. Among these, the adjacent UE-A and TSEI elements, located from -113 to -85 relative to the transcription initiation site, function in combination and act as a pancreas-specific mini-enhancer. The TSEI element is recognized by the pancreatic homeodomain factor PDX1. In the present study, we show that the UE-A element binds a heterodimeric complex composed of a Pbx factor and the Prep1 protein, both belonging to the atypical three-amino acid loop extension homeodomain family. Recombinant Pbx1 and Prep1 proteins bind cooperatively to the UE-A site, whereas neither protein can bind this site alone. Transient transfection experiments reveal that both Pbx1 and Prep1 are required to generate a strong transcriptional activation from the UE-A element when this element is inserted close to the TATA box. In contrast, in the context of the intact somatostatin promoter or mini-enhancer, Pbx1 and Prep1 alone have no effect, but they produce a drastic activation when the pancreatic homeodomain factor PDX1 is also coexpressed. Thus, the activity of the somatostatin mini-enhancer is mediated by a cooperative interaction between the Pbx-Prep1 heterodimeric complex and the pancreatic factor PDX1. PMID:9933599

  12. Three-amino-acid-loop-extension homeodomain factor Meis3 regulates cell survival via PDK1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangying; Wang, You; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Stoffers, Doris A.

    2010-01-01

    Three-amino-acid-loop-extension (TALE) homeodomain proteins including Meis and Pbx families are generally recognized for their roles in growth and differentiation during vertebrate embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. Whereas genetic studies indicate that Pbx1 regulates the development and function of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells, the role of Meis family members in β-cells is still unknown. Here we show that Meis3 is abundantly expressed in pancreatic islets and β-cells and that it regulates β-cell survival. We further identify the 3-phosphoinositide–dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1), a well-known kinase involved in the PI3K–Akt signaling pathway, as a direct Meis3 target, which mediates its role in β-cell survival. This regulatory module appears to function broadly as we also identify Meis3 regulation of cell survival and PDK1 expression in ovarian carcinoma cells, suggesting a unique function for Meis3 beyond the traditional roles for TALE homeodomain factors during embryogenesis. PMID:21059917

  13. Dlx5 Homeodomain:DNA Complex: Structure, Binding and Effect of Mutations Related to Split Hand and Foot Malformation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L; Geralt, Michael; Fletterick, Robert J; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Deacon, Ashley M; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-03-27

    The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including split hand and foot malformation 1 in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain:(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A Q186H mutation linked to split hand and foot malformation 1 likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and they likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes. PMID:26829219

  14. Refolding the Engrailed Homeodomain: Structural Basis for the Accumulation of a Folding Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    McCully, Michelle E.; Beck, David A.C.; Fersht, Alan R.; Daggett, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    The ultrafast folding pathway of the engrailed homeodomain has been exceptionally well characterized by experiment and simulation. Helices II and III of the three-helix bundle protein form the native helix-turn-helix motif as an on-pathway intermediate within a few microseconds. The slow step is then the proper docking of the helices in ∼15 μs. However, there is still the unexplained puzzle of why helix docking is relatively slow, which is part of the more general question as to why rearrangements of intermediates occur slowly. To address this problem, we performed 46 all-atom molecular dynamics refolding simulations in explicit water, for a total of 15 μs of simulation time. The simulations started from an intermediate state structure that was generated in an unfolding simulation at 498 K and was then quenched to folding-permissive temperatures. The protein refolded successfully in only one of the 46 simulations, and in that case the refolding pathway mirrored the unfolding pathway at high temperature. In the 45 simulations in which the protein did not fully fold, nonnative salt bridges trapped the protein, which explains why the protein folds relatively slowly from the intermediate state. PMID:20816076

  15. Dlx5 Homeodomain: DNA Complex: Structure, Binding and Effect of Mutations Related to Split Hand and Foot Malformation Syndrome

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Geralt, Michael; Fletterick, Robert J.; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Deacon, Ashley M.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-01-29

    The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila Distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including Split Hand and Foot Malformation-1 (SHFM-1) in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain–(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85 Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A remarkably subtle mutation, Q186H, is linked to SHFM-1;more » this change likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes.« less

  16. Homeodomain-Leucine zipper II family of transcription factors to the limelight

    PubMed Central

    Carabelli, Monica; Turchi, Luana; Ruzza, Valentino; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome encodes 10 Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip) II transcription factors that can be subdivided into 4 clades (α–δ). All the γ (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX 2 [ATHB2], HOMEOBOX ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA 1 [HAT1], HAT2) and δ (HAT3, ATHB4) genes are regulated by light quality changes (Low Red [R]/Far-Red [FR]) that induce the shade avoidance response in most of the angiosperms. HD-Zip IIγ and HD-Zip IIδ transcription factors function as positive regulators of shade avoidance, and there is evidence that at least ATHB2 is directly positively regulated by the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PIF5. Recent evidence demonstrate that, in addition to their function in shade avoidance, HD-Zip IIγ and HD-Zip IIδ proteins play an essential role in plant development from embryogenesis onwards in a white light environment. PMID:23838958

  17. A molecular code dictates sequence-specific DNA recognition by homeodomains.

    PubMed Central

    Damante, G; Pellizzari, L; Esposito, G; Fogolari, F; Viglino, P; Fabbro, D; Tell, G; Formisano, S; Di Lauro, R

    1996-01-01

    Most homeodomains bind to DNA sequences containing the motif 5'-TAAT-3'. The homeodomain of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1HD) binds to sequences containing a 5'-CAAG-3' core motif, delineating a new mechanism for differential DNA recognition by homeodomains. We investigated the molecular basis of the DNA binding specificity of TTF-1HD by both structural and functional approaches. As already suggested by the three-dimensional structure of TTF-1HD, the DNA binding specificities of the TTF-1, Antennapedia and Engrailed homeodomains, either wild-type or mutants, indicated that the amino acid residue in position 54 is involved in the recognition of the nucleotide at the 3' end of the core motif 5'-NAAN-3'. The nucleotide at the 5' position of this core sequence is recognized by the amino acids located in position 6, 7 and 8 of the TTF-1 and Antennapedia homeodomains. These data, together with previous suggestions on the role of amino acids in position 50, indicate that the DNA binding specificity of homeodomains can be determined by a combinatorial molecular code. We also show that some specific combinations of the key amino acid residues involved in DNA recognition do not follow a simple, additive rule. Images PMID:8890172

  18. Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper II family of transcription factors to the limelight: central regulators of plant development.

    PubMed

    Carabelli, Monica; Turchi, Luana; Ruzza, Valentino; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2013-09-01

    The Arabidopsis genome encodes 10 Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip) II transcription factors that can be subdivided into 4 clades (α-δ). All the γ (ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX 2 [ATHB2], HOMEOBOX ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA 1 [HAT1], HAT2) and δ (HAT3, ATHB4) genes are regulated by light quality changes (Low Red [R]/Far-Red [FR]) that induce the shade avoidance response in most of the angiosperms. HD-Zip IIγ and HD-Zip IIδ transcription factors function as positive regulators of shade avoidance, and there is evidence that at least ATHB2 is directly positively regulated by the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PIF5. Recent evidence demonstrate that, in addition to their function in shade avoidance, HD-Zip IIγ and HD-Zip IIδ proteins play an essential role in plant development from embryogenesis onwards in a white light environment. PMID:23838958

  19. Genetic characterization of the homeodomain-independent activity of the Drosophila fushi tarazu gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Hyduk, D.; Percival-Smith, A.

    1996-02-01

    The gene products of fushi tarazu (FTZ) has a homeodomain (HD)-independent activity. Ectopic expression of a FTZ protein that lacks half the HD in embryos results in the anti-ftz phenotype. We have characterized this FTZ HD-independent activity further. Ectopic expression of the HD-independent FTZ activity, in the absence of FTZ activity expressed from the endogenous ftz gene, was sufficient to result in the anti-ftz phenotype. Since the anti-ftz phenotype is first instar larvae composed nearly entirely of FTZ-dependent cuticular structures derived from the even-numbered parasegments, this result suggests that expression of the HD-independent FTZ activity is sufficient to establish FTZ-dependent cuticle. Activation of FTZ-dependent Engrailed (EN) expression and activation of the ftz enhancer were HD-independent. The ftz enhancer element, AE-1, was activated by the HD-independent FTZ activity; however, the ftz enhancer element, AE-BS2CCC, which is the same as AE-1 except for the inactivation of two FTZ HD DNA-binding sites, was not. Activation of the ftz enhancer by ectopic expression of FTZ activity was effective only during gastrulation and germ band extension. In the discussion, we propose an explanation for these results. 42 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Molecular Insights into Inhibition of the Methylated Histone-Plant Homeodomain Complexes by Calixarenes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muzaffar; Daze, Kevin D; Strongin, Daniel E; Rothbart, Scott B; Rincon-Arano, Hector; Allen, Hillary F; Li, Janessa; Strahl, Brian D; Hof, Fraser; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2015-09-18

    Plant homeodomain (PHD) finger-containing proteins are implicated in fundamental biological processes, including transcriptional activation and repression, DNA damage repair, cell differentiation, and survival. The PHD finger functions as an epigenetic reader that binds to posttranslationally modified or unmodified histone H3 tails, recruiting catalytic writers and erasers and other components of the epigenetic machinery to chromatin. Despite the critical role of the histone-PHD interaction in normal and pathological processes, selective inhibitors of this association have not been well developed. Here we demonstrate that macrocyclic calixarenes can disrupt binding of PHD fingers to methylated lysine 4 of histone H3 in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitory activity relies on differences in binding affinities of the PHD fingers for H3K4me and the methylation state of the histone ligand, whereas the composition of the aromatic H3K4me-binding site of the PHD fingers appears to have no effect. Our approach provides a novel tool for studying the biological roles of methyllysine readers in epigenetic signaling. PMID:26229108

  1. Expression of paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2c (PITX2c) in epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Ge; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Choi, Tae-Young; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Sin; Ou, Bai-sheng; Kim, Sooil; Lee, Young Ho; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Young; Seo, Young-Joon; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Chang Deok

    2010-11-15

    Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) has been implicated as one of the genes responsible for Rieger syndrome. It has been also shown to play a central role during development. In this study, we investigated the functional role of PITX2 in keratinocyte differentiation. RT-PCR analysis showed that PITX2c isoform was predominantly expressed in a differentiation-dependent manner. Consistent with, immunohistochemical staining showed that PITX2 expression was increased in the upper layer of epidermis. When PITX2c was overexpressed in cultured keratinocytes by a recombinant adenovirus, the differentiation markers such as involucrin and loricrin were significantly increased at both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, PITX2c overexpression led to the decrease of cell growth, concomitantly with the upregulation of cell cycle-related genes p21. To investigate the effect of PITX2c in vivo, we microinjected PITX2c expression vector into zebrafish embryo. Interestingly, overexpression of PITX2c in zebrafish embryo led to the formation of horn-like structure and thickening of epidermis, together with the increase of keratin 8 (K8) expression. These results suggest that PITX2c has a role in proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes.

  2. Functional analysis of mouse Hoxa-7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: sequences outside the homeodomain base contact zone influence binding and activation.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, M K; Gruss, P

    1994-01-01

    The murine developmental control gene product, Hoxa-7, was shown to function as a DNA-binding transactivator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The importance of the ATTA core, the preference for antp class flanking nucleotides, the importance of Asn-51 of the homeodomain (HD), and the synergism of multiple binding sites all reflect properties that have previously been described for HOM or Hox proteins in tissue culture systems. A comparison of contact positions among genes of paralog groups and classes of mammalian HDs points to a lack of diversity in positions that make base contact, suggesting that besides the combination of HD amino acid-base pair contacts, another means of recognizing differences between targets must exist if Hox genes select different targets. The HD of antennapedia is identical to the Hoxa-7 HD. The interaction of Hoxa-7 with the exact sequence used in the nuclear magnetic resonance three-dimensional structural analysis on the antennapedia HD was studied. Hoxa-7 binding and transactivation was influenced by sequences outside of the known base contact zone of this site. We conclude that Hoxa-7 protein has a second means to interact with DNA or/and that the sequences flanking the base contact zone influence HD interactions by distorting DNA within the contact zone (base or backbone). This result is discussed in terms of DNA flexure and two modes of transcription used in S. cerevisiae. Images PMID:8264592

  3. Alanine Expansions Associated with Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome Impair PHOX2B Homeodomain-mediated Dimerization and Nuclear Import*

    PubMed Central

    Di Lascio, Simona; Belperio, Debora

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the human PHOX2B gene, a key regulator of autonomic nervous system development, lead to congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a failure in the autonomic control of breathing. Polyalanine expansions in the 20-residues region of the C terminus of PHOX2B are the major mutations responsible for CCHS. Elongation of the alanine stretch in PHOX2B leads to a protein with altered DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and nuclear localization and the possible formation of cytoplasmic aggregates; furthermore, the findings of various studies support the idea that CCHS is not due to a pure loss of function mechanism but also involves a dominant negative effect and/or toxic gain of function for PHOX2B mutations. Because PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimers with its paralogue PHOX2A in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that the dominant negative effects of the mutated proteins are due to non-functional interactions with the wild-type protein or PHOX2A using a co-immunoprecipitation assay and the mammalian two-hybrid system. Our findings show that PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimerizes weakly with mutated proteins, exclude the direct involvement of the polyalanine tract in dimer formation, and indicate that mutated proteins retain partial ability to form heterodimers with PHOX2A. Moreover, in this study, we investigated the effects of the longest polyalanine expansions on the homeodomain-mediated nuclear import, and our data clearly show that the expanded C terminus interferes with this process. These results provide novel insights into the effects of the alanine tract expansion on PHOX2B folding and activity. PMID:27129232

  4. Alanine Expansions Associated with Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome Impair PHOX2B Homeodomain-mediated Dimerization and Nuclear Import.

    PubMed

    Di Lascio, Simona; Belperio, Debora; Benfante, Roberta; Fornasari, Diego

    2016-06-17

    Heterozygous mutations of the human PHOX2B gene, a key regulator of autonomic nervous system development, lead to congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a failure in the autonomic control of breathing. Polyalanine expansions in the 20-residues region of the C terminus of PHOX2B are the major mutations responsible for CCHS. Elongation of the alanine stretch in PHOX2B leads to a protein with altered DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and nuclear localization and the possible formation of cytoplasmic aggregates; furthermore, the findings of various studies support the idea that CCHS is not due to a pure loss of function mechanism but also involves a dominant negative effect and/or toxic gain of function for PHOX2B mutations. Because PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimers with its paralogue PHOX2A in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that the dominant negative effects of the mutated proteins are due to non-functional interactions with the wild-type protein or PHOX2A using a co-immunoprecipitation assay and the mammalian two-hybrid system. Our findings show that PHOX2B forms homodimers and heterodimerizes weakly with mutated proteins, exclude the direct involvement of the polyalanine tract in dimer formation, and indicate that mutated proteins retain partial ability to form heterodimers with PHOX2A. Moreover, in this study, we investigated the effects of the longest polyalanine expansions on the homeodomain-mediated nuclear import, and our data clearly show that the expanded C terminus interferes with this process. These results provide novel insights into the effects of the alanine tract expansion on PHOX2B folding and activity. PMID:27129232

  5. Diversity, Phylogeny and Expression Patterns of Pou and Six Homeodomain Transcription Factors in Hydrozoan Jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi

    PubMed Central

    Hroudova, Miluse; Vojta, Petr; Strnad, Hynek; Krejcik, Zdenek; Ridl, Jakub; Paces, Jan; Vlcek, Cestmir; Paces, Vaclav

    2012-01-01

    Formation of all metazoan bodies is controlled by a group of selector genes including homeobox genes, highly conserved across the entire animal kingdom. The homeobox genes from Pou and Six classes are key members of the regulation cascades determining development of sensory organs, nervous system, gonads and muscles. Besides using common bilaterian models, more attention has recently been targeted at the identification and characterization of these genes within the basal metazoan phyla. Cnidaria as a diploblastic sister group to bilateria with simple and yet specialized organs are suitable models for studies on the sensory organ origin and the associated role of homeobox genes. In this work, Pou and Six homeobox genes, together with a broad range of other sensory-specific transcription factors, were identified in the transcriptome of hydrozoan jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi. Phylogenetic analyses of Pou and Six proteins revealed cnidarian-specific sequence motifs and contributed to the classification of individual factors. The majority of the Craspedacusta sowerbyi Pou and Six homeobox genes are predominantly expressed in statocysts, manubrium and nerve ring, the tissues with sensory and nervous activities. The described diversity and expression patterns of Pou and Six factors in hydrozoan jellyfish highlight their evolutionarily conserved functions. This study extends the knowledge of the cnidarian genome complexity and shows that the transcriptome of hydrozoan jellyfish is generally rich in homeodomain transcription factors employed in the regulation of sensory and nervous functions. PMID:22558464

  6. Diversity, phylogeny and expression patterns of Pou and Six homeodomain transcription factors in hydrozoan jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi.

    PubMed

    Hroudova, Miluse; Vojta, Petr; Strnad, Hynek; Krejcik, Zdenek; Ridl, Jakub; Paces, Jan; Vlcek, Cestmir; Paces, Vaclav

    2012-01-01

    Formation of all metazoan bodies is controlled by a group of selector genes including homeobox genes, highly conserved across the entire animal kingdom. The homeobox genes from Pou and Six classes are key members of the regulation cascades determining development of sensory organs, nervous system, gonads and muscles. Besides using common bilaterian models, more attention has recently been targeted at the identification and characterization of these genes within the basal metazoan phyla. Cnidaria as a diploblastic sister group to bilateria with simple and yet specialized organs are suitable models for studies on the sensory organ origin and the associated role of homeobox genes. In this work, Pou and Six homeobox genes, together with a broad range of other sensory-specific transcription factors, were identified in the transcriptome of hydrozoan jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi. Phylogenetic analyses of Pou and Six proteins revealed cnidarian-specific sequence motifs and contributed to the classification of individual factors. The majority of the Craspedacusta sowerbyi Pou and Six homeobox genes are predominantly expressed in statocysts, manubrium and nerve ring, the tissues with sensory and nervous activities. The described diversity and expression patterns of Pou and Six factors in hydrozoan jellyfish highlight their evolutionarily conserved functions. This study extends the knowledge of the cnidarian genome complexity and shows that the transcriptome of hydrozoan jellyfish is generally rich in homeodomain transcription factors employed in the regulation of sensory and nervous functions. PMID:22558464

  7. A Homeodomain Transcription Factor Gene, PfMSX, Activates Expression of Pif Gene in the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mi; He, Maoxian; Huang, Xiande; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We reported pearl oyster Pinctada fucata cDNA and genomic characterization of a new homeobox-containing protein, PfMSX. The PfMSX gene encodes a transcription factor that was localized to the nucleus. Analyses of PfMSX mRNA in tissues and developmental stages showed high expressions in mantle or D-shaped larvae. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) PfMSX binded to MSX consensus binding sites in the 5′ flanking region of the Pif promoter. In co-transfection experiment PfMSX transactivated reporter constructs containing Pif promoter sequences, and mutation of the MSX-binding sites attenuated transactivation. A knockdown experiment using PfMSX dsRNA showed decreased Pif mRNA and unregular crystallization of the nacreous layer using scanning electron microscopy. Our results suggested that PfMSX was a conserved homeodomain transcription factor gene, which can activate Pif gene expression through MSX binding site, and was then involved in the mineralization process in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Our data provided important clues about mechanisms regulating biomineralization in pearl oyster. PMID:25099698

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Homeodomain Leucine Zipper Subfamily IV (HDZ IV) Gene Family from Musa accuminata.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Misra, Prashant; Alok, Anshu; Kaur, Navneet; Sharma, Shivani; Lakhwani, Deepika; Asif, Mehar H; Tiwari, Siddharth; Trivedi, Prabodh K

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain zipper family (HD-ZIP) of transcription factors is present only in plants and plays important role in the regulation of plant-specific processes. The subfamily IV of HDZ transcription factors (HD-ZIP IV) has primarily been implicated in the regulation of epidermal structure development. Though this gene family is present in all lineages of land plants, members of this gene family have not been identified in banana, which is one of the major staple fruit crops. In the present work, we identified 21 HDZIV encoding genes in banana by the computational analysis of banana genome resource. Our analysis suggested that these genes putatively encode proteins having all the characteristic domains of HDZIV transcription factors. The phylogenetic analysis of the banana HDZIV family genes further confirmed that after separation from a common ancestor, the banana, and poales lineages might have followed distinct evolutionary paths. Further, we conclude that segmental duplication played a major role in the evolution of banana HDZIV encoding genes. All the identified banana HDZIV genes expresses in different banana tissue, however at varying levels. The transcript levels of some of the banana HDZIV genes were also detected in banana fruit pulp, suggesting their putative role in fruit attributes. A large number of genes of this family showed modulated expression under drought and salinity stress. Taken together, the present work lays a foundation for elucidation of functional aspects of the banana HDZIV encoding genes and for their possible use in the banana improvement programs. PMID:26870050

  9. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Homeodomain Leucine Zipper Subfamily IV (HDZ IV) Gene Family from Musa accuminata

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Misra, Prashant; Alok, Anshu; Kaur, Navneet; Sharma, Shivani; Lakhwani, Deepika; Asif, Mehar H.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Trivedi, Prabodh K.

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain zipper family (HD-ZIP) of transcription factors is present only in plants and plays important role in the regulation of plant-specific processes. The subfamily IV of HDZ transcription factors (HD-ZIP IV) has primarily been implicated in the regulation of epidermal structure development. Though this gene family is present in all lineages of land plants, members of this gene family have not been identified in banana, which is one of the major staple fruit crops. In the present work, we identified 21 HDZIV encoding genes in banana by the computational analysis of banana genome resource. Our analysis suggested that these genes putatively encode proteins having all the characteristic domains of HDZIV transcription factors. The phylogenetic analysis of the banana HDZIV family genes further confirmed that after separation from a common ancestor, the banana, and poales lineages might have followed distinct evolutionary paths. Further, we conclude that segmental duplication played a major role in the evolution of banana HDZIV encoding genes. All the identified banana HDZIV genes expresses in different banana tissue, however at varying levels. The transcript levels of some of the banana HDZIV genes were also detected in banana fruit pulp, suggesting their putative role in fruit attributes. A large number of genes of this family showed modulated expression under drought and salinity stress. Taken together, the present work lays a foundation for elucidation of functional aspects of the banana HDZIV encoding genes and for their possible use in the banana improvement programs. PMID:26870050

  10. Characterization of PREP2, a paralog of PREP1, which defines a novel sub-family of the MEINOX TALE homeodomain transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Fognani, C; Kilstrup-Nielsen, C; Berthelsen, J; Ferretti, E; Zappavigna, V; Blasi, F

    2002-05-01

    TALE (three amino acid loop extension) homeodomain proteins include the PBC and the MEINOX sub-families. MEINOX proteins form heterodimer complexes with PBC proteins. Heterodimerization is crucial to DNA binding and for nuclear localization. PBC-MEINOX heterodimers bind DNA also in combination with HOX proteins, thereby modulating their DNA-binding specificity. TALE proteins therefore play crucial roles in multiple developmental and differentiation pathways in vivo. We report the identification and characterization of a novel human gene homologous to PREP1, called PREP2. Sequence comparisons indicate that PREP1 and PREP2 define a novel sub-family of MEINOX proteins, distinct from the MEIS sub-family. PREP2 is expressed in a variety of human adult tissues and displays a more restricted expression pattern than PREP1. PREP2 is capable of heterodimerizing with PBC proteins. Heterodimerization with PBX1 appears to be essential for nuclear localization of both PREP2 and PBX1. A comparison between the functional properties of PREP1 and PREP2 reveals that PREP2-PBX display a faster DNA-dissociation rate than PREP1-PBX heterodimers, suggesting different roles in controlling gene expression. Like PREP1, PREP2-PBX heterodimers are capable of forming ternary complexes with HOXB1. The analysis of some PREP2 in vitro properties suggests a functional diversification among PREP and between PREP and MEIS MEINOX proteins. PMID:11972344

  11. Mechanism of Histone H3K4me3 Recognition by the Plant Homeodomain of Inhibitor of Growth 3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sophia; Natesan, Senthil; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Carlson, Samuel; Tonelli, Marco; McClurg, Urszula L; Binda, Olivier; Robson, Craig N; Markley, John L; Balaz, Stefan; Glass, Karen C

    2016-08-26

    Aberrant access to genetic information disrupts cellular homeostasis and can lead to cancer development. One molecular mechanism that regulates access to genetic information includes recognition of histone modifications, which is carried out by protein modules that interact with chromatin and serve as landing pads for enzymatic activities that regulate gene expression. The ING3 tumor suppressor protein contains a plant homeodomain (PHD) that reads the epigenetic code via recognition of histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3), and this domain is lost or mutated in various human cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms targeting ING3 to histones and the role of this interaction in the cell remain elusive. Thus, we employed biochemical and structural biology approaches to investigate the interaction of the ING3 PHD finger (ING3PHD) with the active transcription mark H3K4me3. Our results demonstrate that association of the ING3PHD with H3K4me3 is in the sub-micromolar range (KD ranging between 0.63 and 0.93 μm) and is about 200-fold stronger than with the unmodified histone H3. NMR and computational studies revealed an aromatic cage composed of Tyr-362, Ser-369, and Trp-385 that accommodate the tri-methylated side chain of H3K4. Mutational analysis confirmed the critical importance of Tyr-362 and Trp-385 in mediating the ING3PHD-H3K4me3 interaction. Finally, the biological relevance of ING3PHD-H3K4me3 binding was demonstrated by the failure of ING3PHD mutant proteins to enhance ING3-mediated DNA damage-dependent cell death. Together, our results reveal the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 selection by the ING3PHD and suggest that this interaction is important for mediating ING3 tumor suppressive activities. PMID:27281824

  12. Mechanism of Histone H3K4me3 Recognition by the Plant Homeodomain of Inhibitor of Growth 3*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sophia; Natesan, Senthil; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Carlson, Samuel; Tonelli, Marco; McClurg, Urszula L.; Binda, Olivier; Robson, Craig N.; Markley, John L.; Balaz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant access to genetic information disrupts cellular homeostasis and can lead to cancer development. One molecular mechanism that regulates access to genetic information includes recognition of histone modifications, which is carried out by protein modules that interact with chromatin and serve as landing pads for enzymatic activities that regulate gene expression. The ING3 tumor suppressor protein contains a plant homeodomain (PHD) that reads the epigenetic code via recognition of histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3), and this domain is lost or mutated in various human cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms targeting ING3 to histones and the role of this interaction in the cell remain elusive. Thus, we employed biochemical and structural biology approaches to investigate the interaction of the ING3 PHD finger (ING3PHD) with the active transcription mark H3K4me3. Our results demonstrate that association of the ING3PHD with H3K4me3 is in the sub-micromolar range (KD ranging between 0.63 and 0.93 μm) and is about 200-fold stronger than with the unmodified histone H3. NMR and computational studies revealed an aromatic cage composed of Tyr-362, Ser-369, and Trp-385 that accommodate the tri-methylated side chain of H3K4. Mutational analysis confirmed the critical importance of Tyr-362 and Trp-385 in mediating the ING3PHD-H3K4me3 interaction. Finally, the biological relevance of ING3PHD-H3K4me3 binding was demonstrated by the failure of ING3PHD mutant proteins to enhance ING3-mediated DNA damage-dependent cell death. Together, our results reveal the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 selection by the ING3PHD and suggest that this interaction is important for mediating ING3 tumor suppressive activities. PMID:27281824

  13. Molecular cloning of LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lhx2 as a transcription factor of porcine follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit (FSHβ) gene.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takako; Ishikawa, Akio; Yoshida, Saishu; Sano, Yoshiya; Kitahara, Kousuke; Nakayama, Michie; Susa, Takao; Kato, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    We cloned the LIM-homeodomain protein LHX2 as a transcription factor for the porcine follicle-stimulating hormone β subunit gene (Fshβ) by the Yeast One-Hybrid Cloning System using the upstream region of -852/-746 bases (b) from the transcription start site, called Fd2, as a bait sequence. The reporter assay in LβT2 and CHO cells revealed the presence of an LHX2-responsive region other than Fd2. A potential LHX2 binding sequence was confirmed as AATTAAT containing a consensus homeodomain binding core sequence AATT by Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment analysis. DNase I footprinting demonstrated three AATTAAT sequences located at regions -835/-829, -818/-812 and -806/-800 b in the Fd2 region and 12 binding sites in the distal and proximal regions mostly containing an AATT-core sequence. RT-PCR analysis of Lhx2 expression during porcine fetal and postnatal pituitary development showed a gradual increase from fetal day (f) 40 to postnatal day (p) 8 followed by a slight decrease to p230, suggesting that LHX2 may play its role largely in the late fetal and postnatal periods. The analyses of Lhx2 expression in pituitary tumor-derived cell lines showed their expressions in cell lines including αT31, LβT2 and others. Since LHX2 was previously identified as a transcription factor for Cga and the in vitro experiments in the present study suggested that LHX2 regulated the expression of Fshβ, it is possible that LHX2 controls the synthesis of FSH at the transcription level. PMID:22134063

  14. DNA-binding and regulation mechanisms of the SIX family of retinal determination proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengyong; Mamedova, Aygun; Hegde, Rashmi S

    2008-03-18

    The Six/sine oculis proteins are homeodomain transcription factors that are part of the Pax/Eya/Six/Dach retinal determination cascade involved in embryonic cell fate determination. There are six mammalian Six homologues, divided into three classes on the basis of sequence homology. In the present study we examined the DNA-binding specificity and mechanisms of Six2 and Six6 toward the Trex/MEF3 consensus sequence and the core tetranucleotide ATTA commonly recognized by homeodomain proteins. The results suggest that the Six homeodomain does not bind DNA owing to the absence of a key structural feature, the basic N-terminal arm, implicated in canonical homeodomain-DNA binding. Furthermore, the DNA-binding mechanisms and DNA sequence specificity differ among these Six proteins despite the complete conservation of predicted DNA-contacting residues in their homeodomains. Inclusion of 14 amino acid residues immediately C-terminal to the homeodomain of Six6 yields a protein construct able to bind both DNA sequences tested with nanomolar affinity. However, an analogous Six2 construct remains unable to bind DNA. Furthermore, we show that the DNA-binding affinity of Six2 is increased nearly 12-fold by complex formation with the Eyes Absent tyrosine phosphatase, while Six6-DNA binding is not similarly enhanced. This phenomenon could contribute to the synergy observed between Six2 and Eyes Absent in transcriptional activation and in eye development. PMID:18293925

  15. KNOX Lost the OX: The Arabidopsis KNATM Gene Defines a Novel Class of KNOX Transcriptional Regulators Missing the Homeodomain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we identify and characterize the Arabidopsis thaliana KNATM gene, which encodes a MEINOX domain but not a homeodomain. Phylogenetic analysis of the KNOX family places KNATM in a new class and shows conservation in dicotyledons. We demonstrate that KNATM selectively interacts with Arab...

  16. The LIM Homeodomain Factor Lhx2 Is Required for Hypothalamic Tanycyte Specification and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Juan; Lee, Daniel A.; Zibetti, Cristina; Duran-Moreno, Maria; Yoo, Sooyeon; Newman, Elizabeth A.; Wang, Hong; Bedont, Joseph L.; de Melo, Jimmy; Miranda-Angulo, Ana L.; Gil-Perotin, Sara; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic tanycytes, a radial glial-like ependymal cell population that expresses numerous genes selectively enriched in embryonic hypothalamic progenitors and adult neural stem cells, have recently been observed to serve as a source of adult-born neurons in the mammalian brain. The genetic mechanisms that regulate the specification and maintenance of tanycyte identity are unknown, but are critical for understanding how these cells can act as adult neural progenitor cells. We observe that LIM (Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3)-homeodomain gene Lhx2 is selectively expressed in hypothalamic progenitor cells and tanycytes. To test the function of Lhx2 in tanycyte development, we used an intersectional genetic strategy to conditionally delete Lhx2 in posteroventral hypothalamic neuroepithelium, both embryonically and postnatally. We observed that tanycyte development was severely disrupted when Lhx2 function was ablated during embryonic development. Lhx2-deficient tanycytes lost expression of tanycyte-specific genes, such as Rax, while also displaying ectopic expression of genes specific to cuboid ependymal cells, such as Rarres2. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that mutant tanycytes exhibited a hybrid identity, retaining radial morphology while becoming multiciliated. In contrast, postnatal loss of function of Lhx2 resulted only in loss of expression of tanycyte-specific genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we further showed that Lhx2 directly regulated expression of Rax, an essential homeodomain factor for tanycyte development. This study identifies Lhx2 as a key intrinsic regulator of tanycyte differentiation, sustaining Rax-dependent activation of tanycyte-specific genes while also inhibiting expression of ependymal cell-specific genes. These findings provide key insights into the transcriptional regulatory network specifying this still poorly characterized cell type. PMID:25505333

  17. Cardiac expression of the Drosophila Sulphonylurea receptor gene is regulated by an intronic enhancer dependent upon the NK homeodomain factor Tinman

    PubMed Central

    Hendren, Jill D.; Shah, Ankita P.; Arguelles, Alicia M.; Cripps, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac development proceeds via the activation of a complex network of regulatory factors which both directly and indirectly impact downstream cardiac structural genes. In Drosophila, the NK homeodomain transcription factor Tinman is critical to cardiac specification and development via the activation of a number of key regulatory genes which mediate heart development. In this manuscript we demonstrate that Tinman also functions in Drosophila to directly activate transcription of the ATP binding cassette gene Sulphonylurea receptor (Sur). Cardiac expression of Sur is regulated by Tinman via an intronic enhancer which first becomes active at stage 12 of embryogenesis and whose function is restricted to the Tin cardial cells by the end of embryogenesis. Cardiac Sur enhancer activity subsequently persists through larval and adult development, but interestingly becomes modulated in several unique subsets of Tin-expressing cardial cells. The cardiac enhancer contains four binding sites for Tinman protein; mutation of two of these sites significantly reduces enhancer activity at all stages of development, and activation of the wild-type enhancer by ectopic Tinman protein confirms Sur is a direct target of Tinman transcriptional activation. These findings delineate at the molecular level specific sub-types of Tin cardial cells, and define an important regulatory pathway between two Drosophila genes for which mutations in human homologs have been shown to result in cardiac disease. PMID:17433632

  18. The homeodomain transcription factor TaHDZipI-2 from wheat regulates frost tolerance, flowering time and spike development in transgenic barley.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Chew, William; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Borisjuk, Nikolai; Yang, Nannan; Singh, Rohan; Bazanova, Natalia; Shavrukov, Yuri; Guendel, Andre; Munz, Eberhard; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2016-07-01

    Homeodomain leucine zipper class I (HD-Zip I) transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in the regulation of plant growth and development under stresses. Functions of the TaHDZipI-2 gene isolated from the endosperm of developing wheat grain were revealed. Molecular characterization of TaHDZipI-2 protein included studies of its dimerisation, protein-DNA interactions and gene activation properties using pull-down assays, in-yeast methods and transient expression assays in wheat cells. The analysis of TaHDZipI-2 gene functions was performed using transgenic barley plants. It included comparison of developmental phenotypes, yield components, grain quality, frost tolerance and the levels of expression of potential target genes in transgenic and control plants. Transgenic TaHDZipI-2 lines showed characteristic phenotypic features that included reduced growth rates, reduced biomass, early flowering, light-coloured leaves and narrowly elongated spikes. Transgenic lines produced 25-40% more seeds per spike than control plants, but with 50-60% smaller grain size. In vivo lipid imaging exposed changes in the distribution of lipids between the embryo and endosperm in transgenic seeds. Transgenic lines were significantly more tolerant to frost than control plants. Our data suggest the role of TaHDZipI-2 in controlling several key processes underlying frost tolerance, transition to flowering and spike development. PMID:26990681

  19. Centrosome movements in vivo correlate with specific neurite formation downstream of LIM homeodomain transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Erica F; Halloran, Mary C

    2012-10-01

    Neurons must develop complex structure to form proper connections in the nervous system. The initiation of axons in defined locations on the cell body and their extension to synaptic targets are critical steps in neuronal morphogenesis, yet the mechanisms controlling axon formation in vivo are poorly understood. The centrosome has been implicated in multiple aspects of neuronal morphogenesis; however, its function in axon development is under debate. Conflicting results from studies of centrosome function in axonogenesis suggest that its role is context dependent and underscore the importance of studying centrosome function as neurons develop in their natural environment. Using live imaging of zebrafish Rohon-Beard (RB) sensory neurons in vivo, we discovered a spatiotemporal relationship between centrosome position and the formation of RB peripheral, but not central, axons. We tested centrosome function by laser ablation and found that centrosome disruption inhibited peripheral axon outgrowth. In addition, we show that centrosome position and motility are regulated by LIM homeodomain transcription factor activity, which is specifically required for the development of RB peripheral axons. Furthermore, we show a correlation between centrosome mislocalization and ectopic axon formation in bashful (laminin alpha 1) mutants. Thus, both intrinsic transcription factor activity and extracellular cues can influence centrosome position and axon formation in vivo. This study presents the first positive association between the centrosome and axon formation in vivo and suggests that the centrosome is important for differential neurite formation in neurons with complex axonal morphologies. PMID:22899847

  20. Loss of the Homeodomain Transcription Factor Prep1 Perturbs Adult Hematopoiesis in the Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Kentaro; Oda, Akihisa; Notsu, Chihiro; Ohtsuka, Takafumi; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Sadafumi; Nakamura, Takuro; Mabuchi, Yo; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Prep1, a TALE-family homeodomain transcription factor, has been demonstrated to play a critical role in embryonic hematopoiesis, as its insufficiency caused late embryonic lethality associated with defective hematopoiesis and angiogenesis. In the present study, we generated hematopoietic- and endothelial cell-specific Prep1-deficient mice and demonstrated that expression of Prep1 in the hematopoietic cell compartment is not essential for either embryonic or adult hematopoiesis, although its absence causes significant hematopoietic abnormalities in the adult bone marrow. Loss of Prep1 promotes cell cycling of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC), leading to the expansion of the HSPC pool. Prep1 deficiency also results in the accumulation of lineage-committed progenitors, increased monocyte/macrophage differentiation and arrested erythroid maturation. Maturation of T cells and B cells is also perturbed in Prep-deficient mice. These findings provide novel insight into the pleiotropic roles of Prep1 in adult hematopoiesis that were unrecognized in previous studies using germline Prep1 hypomorphic mice. PMID:26285139

  1. Loss of the Homeodomain Transcription Factor Prep1 Perturbs Adult Hematopoiesis in the Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Kentaro; Oda, Akihisa; Notsu, Chihiro; Ohtsuka, Takafumi; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Sadafumi; Nakamura, Takuro; Mabuchi, Yo; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Prep1, a TALE-family homeodomain transcription factor, has been demonstrated to play a critical role in embryonic hematopoiesis, as its insufficiency caused late embryonic lethality associated with defective hematopoiesis and angiogenesis. In the present study, we generated hematopoietic- and endothelial cell-specific Prep1-deficient mice and demonstrated that expression of Prep1 in the hematopoietic cell compartment is not essential for either embryonic or adult hematopoiesis, although its absence causes significant hematopoietic abnormalities in the adult bone marrow. Loss of Prep1 promotes cell cycling of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC), leading to the expansion of the HSPC pool. Prep1 deficiency also results in the accumulation of lineage-committed progenitors, increased monocyte/macrophage differentiation and arrested erythroid maturation. Maturation of T cells and B cells is also perturbed in Prep-deficient mice. These findings provide novel insight into the pleiotropic roles of Prep1 in adult hematopoiesis that were unrecognized in previous studies using germline Prep1 hypomorphic mice. PMID:26285139

  2. Crystal Structure and DNA Binding of the Homeodomain of the Stem Cell Transcription Factor Nanog

    SciTech Connect

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Stevens, Raymond C.; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.

    2010-02-08

    The transcription factor Nanog is an upstream regulator in early mammalian development and a key determinant of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Nanog binds to promoter elements of hundreds of target genes and regulates their expression by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure of the murine Nanog homeodomain (HD) and analysis of its interaction with a DNA element derived from the Tcf3 promoter. Two Nanog amino acid pairs, unique among HD sequences, appear to affect the mechanism of nonspecific DNA recognition as well as maintain the integrity of the structural scaffold. To assess selective DNA recognition by Nanog, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using a panel of modified DNA binding sites and found that Nanog HD preferentially binds the TAAT(G/T)(G/T) motif. A series of rational mutagenesis experiments probing the role of six variant residues of Nanog on its DNA binding function establish their role in affecting binding affinity but not binding specificity. Together, the structural and functional evidence establish Nanog as a distant member of a Q50-type HD despite having considerable variation at the sequence level.

  3. The LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Islet2a promotes angioblast migration.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Ryan E; Wu, Chang-Yi; Ryu, Jae-Ryeon; Vu, Wendy; Davari, Paniz; Sobering, Ryan E; Kennedy, Regan M; Munsie, Nicole M; Childs, Sarah J

    2016-06-15

    Angioblasts of the developing vascular system require many signaling inputs to initiate their migration, proliferation and differentiation into endothelial cells. What is less studied is which intrinsic cell factors interpret these extrinsic signals. Here, we show the Lim homeodomain transcription factor islet2a (isl2a) is expressed in the lateral posterior mesoderm prior to angioblast migration. isl2a deficient angioblasts show disorganized migration to the midline to form axial vessels and fail to spread around the tailbud of the embryo. Isl2a morphants have fewer vein cells and decreased vein marker expression. We demonstrate that isl2a is required cell autonomously in angioblasts to promote their incorporation into the vein, and is permissive for vein identity. Knockout of isl2a results in decreased migration and proliferation of angioblasts during intersegmental artery growth. Since Notch signaling controls both artery-vein identity and tip-stalk cell formation, we explored the interaction of isl2a and Notch. We find that isl2a expression is negatively regulated by Notch activity, and that isl2a positively regulates flt4, a VEGF-C receptor repressed by Notch during angiogenesis. Thus Isl2a may act as an intermediate between Notch signaling and genetic programs controlling angioblast number and migration, placing it as a novel transcriptional regulator of early angiogenesis. PMID:27126199

  4. Homeodomain transcription factor and tumor suppressor Prep1 is required to maintain genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Iotti, Giorgio; Longobardi, Elena; Masella, Silvia; Dardaei, Leila; De Santis, Francesca; Micali, Nicola; Blasi, Francesco

    2011-07-19

    Prep1 is a homeodomain transcription factor that is essential in embryonic development and functions in the adult as a tumor suppressor. We show here that Prep1 is involved in maintaining genomic stability and preventing neoplastic transformation. Hypomorphic homozygous Prep1(i/i) fetal liver cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit increased basal DNA damage and normal DNA damage response after γ-irradiation compared with WT. Cytogenetic analysis shows the presence of numerous chromosomal aberrations and aneuploidy in very early-passage Prep1(i/i) MEFs. In human fibroblasts, acute Prep1 down-regulation by siRNA induces DNA damage response, like in Prep1(i/i) MEFs, together with an increase in heterochromatin-associated modifications: rapid increase of histone methylation and decreased transcription of satellite DNA. Ectopic expression of Prep1 rescues DNA damage and heterochromatin methylation. Inhibition of Suv39 activity blocks the chromatin but not the DNA damage phenotype. Finally, Prep1 deficiency facilitates cell immortalization, escape from oncogene-induced senescence, and H-Ras(V12)-dependent transformation. Importantly, the latter can be partially rescued by restoration of Prep1 level. The results show that the tumor suppressor role of Prep1 is associated with the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:21715654

  5. Establishing a framework for the Ad/abaxial regulatory network of Arabidopsis: ascertaining targets of class III homeodomain leucine zipper and KANADI regulation.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Brenda J; Liu, Tie; Newell, Nicole R; Magnani, Enrico; Huang, Tengbo; Kerstetter, Randall; Michaels, Scott; Barton, M Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    The broadly conserved Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) and KANADI transcription factors have opposing and transformational effects on polarity and growth in all tissues and stages of the plant's life. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of how these factors work, we have identified transcripts that change in response to induced HD-ZIPIII or KANADI function. Additional criteria used to identify high-confidence targets among this set were presence of an adjacent HD-ZIPIII binding site, expression enriched within a subdomain of the shoot apical meristem, mutant phenotype showing defect in polar leaf and/or meristem development, physical interaction between target gene product and HD-ZIPIII protein, opposite regulation by HD-ZIPIII and KANADI, and evolutionary conservation of the regulator-target relationship. We find that HD-ZIPIII and KANADI regulate tissue-specific transcription factors involved in subsidiary developmental decisions, nearly all major hormone pathways, and new actors (such as indeterminate domain4) in the ad/abaxial regulatory network. Multiple feedback loops regulating HD-ZIPIII and KANADI are identified, as are mechanisms through which HD-ZIPIII and KANADI oppose each other. This work lays the foundation needed to understand the components, structure, and workings of the ad/abaxial regulatory network directing basic plant growth and development. PMID:24076978

  6. Establishing a Framework for the Ad/Abaxial Regulatory Network of Arabidopsis: Ascertaining Targets of Class III HOMEODOMAIN LEUCINE ZIPPER and KANADI Regulation[W

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Brenda J.; Liu, Tie; Newell, Nicole R.; Magnani, Enrico; Huang, Tengbo; Kerstetter, Randall; Michaels, Scott; Barton, M. Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The broadly conserved Class III HOMEODOMAIN LEUCINE ZIPPER (HD-ZIPIII) and KANADI transcription factors have opposing and transformational effects on polarity and growth in all tissues and stages of the plant's life. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of how these factors work, we have identified transcripts that change in response to induced HD-ZIPIII or KANADI function. Additional criteria used to identify high-confidence targets among this set were presence of an adjacent HD-ZIPIII binding site, expression enriched within a subdomain of the shoot apical meristem, mutant phenotype showing defect in polar leaf and/or meristem development, physical interaction between target gene product and HD-ZIPIII protein, opposite regulation by HD-ZIPIII and KANADI, and evolutionary conservation of the regulator–target relationship. We find that HD-ZIPIII and KANADI regulate tissue-specific transcription factors involved in subsidiary developmental decisions, nearly all major hormone pathways, and new actors (such as INDETERMINATE DOMAIN4) in the ad/abaxial regulatory network. Multiple feedback loops regulating HD-ZIPIII and KANADI are identified, as are mechanisms through which HD-ZIPIII and KANADI oppose each other. This work lays the foundation needed to understand the components, structure, and workings of the ad/abaxial regulatory network directing basic plant growth and development. PMID:24076978

  7. Molecular interactions of the γ-clade homeodomain-leucine zipper class I transcription factors during the wheat response to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Harris, John C; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Taylor, Mathew; Bazanova, Natalia; Baumann, Ute; Lovell, Ben; Langridge, Peter; Lopato, Sergiy; Hrmova, Maria

    2016-03-01

    The γ-clade of class I homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip I) transcription factors (TFs) constitute members which play a role in adapting plant growth to conditions of water deficit. Given the importance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as a global food crop and the impact of water deficit upon grain yield, we focused on functional aspects of wheat drought responsive HD-Zip I TFs. While the wheat γ-clade HD-Zip I TFs share significant sequence similarities with homologous genes from other plants, the clade-specific features in transcriptional response to abiotic stress were detected. We demonstrate that wheat TaHDZipI-3, TaHDZipI-4, and TaHDZipI-5 genes respond differentially to a variety of abiotic stresses, and that proteins encoded by these genes exhibit pronounced differences in oligomerisation, strength of DNA binding, and trans-activation of an artificial promoter. Three-dimensional molecular modelling of the protein-DNA interface was conducted to address the ambiguity at the central nucleotide in the pseudo-palindromic cis-element CAATNATTG that is recognised by all three HD-Zip I proteins. The co-expression of these genes in the same plant tissues together with the ability of HD-Zip I TFs of the γ-clade to hetero-dimerise suggests a role in the regulatory mechanisms of HD-Zip I dependent transcription. Our findings highlight the complexity of TF networks involved in plant responses to water deficit. A better understanding of the molecular complexity at the protein level during crop responses to drought will enable adoption of efficient strategies for production of cereal plants with enhanced drought tolerance. PMID:26803501

  8. Regulation of dorsal gene expression in Xenopus by the ventralizing homeodomain gene Vox.

    PubMed

    Melby, A E; Clements, W K; Kimelman, D

    1999-07-15

    Patterning in the vertebrate embryo is controlled by an interplay between signals from the dorsal organizer and the ventrally expressed BMPs. Here we examine the function of Vox, a homeodomain-containing gene that is activated by the ventralizing signal BMP-4. Inhibition of BMP signaling using a dominant negative BMP receptor (DeltaBMPR) leads to the ectopic activation of dorsal genes in the ventral marginal zone, and this activation is prevented by co-injection of Vox. chordin is the most strongly activated of those genes that are up-regulated by DeltaBMPR and is the gene most strongly inhibited by Vox expression. We demonstrate that Vox acts as a transcriptional repressor, showing that the activity of native Vox is mimicked by a Vox-repressor fusion (VoxEnR) and that a Vox-activator fusion (VoxG4A) acts as an antimorph, causing the formation of a partial secondary axis when expressed on the ventral side of the embryo. Although Vox can ectopically activate BMP-4 expression in whole embryos, we see no activation of BMP-4 by VoxG4A, demonstrating that this activation is indirect. Using a hormone-inducible version of VoxG4A, we find that a critical time window for Vox function is during the late blastula period. Using this construct, we demonstrate that only a subset of dorsal genes is directly repressed by Vox, revealing that there are different modes of regulation for organizer genes. Since the major direct target for Vox repression is chordin, we propose that Vox acts in establishing a BMP-4 morphogen gradient by restricting the expression domain of chordin. PMID:10395789

  9. The homeodomain complement of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi suggests that Ctenophora and Porifera diverged prior to the ParaHoxozoa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The much-debated phylogenetic relationships of the five early branching metazoan lineages (Bilateria, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Placozoa and Porifera) are of fundamental importance in piecing together events that occurred early in animal evolution. Comparisons of gene content between organismal lineages have been identified as a potentially useful methodology for phylogenetic reconstruction. However, these comparisons require complete genomes that, until now, did not exist for the ctenophore lineage. The homeobox superfamily of genes is particularly suited for these kinds of gene content comparisons, since it is large, diverse, and features a highly conserved domain. Results We have used a next-generation sequencing approach to generate a high-quality rough draft of the genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and subsequently identified a set of 76 homeobox-containing genes from this draft. We phylogenetically categorized this set into established gene families and classes and then compared this set to the homeodomain repertoire of species from the other four early branching metazoan lineages. We have identified several important classes and subclasses of homeodomains that appear to be absent from Mnemiopsis and from the poriferan Amphimedon queenslandica. We have also determined that, based on lineage-specific paralog retention and average branch lengths, it is unlikely that these missing classes and subclasses are due to extensive gene loss or unusually high rates of evolution in Mnemiopsis. Conclusions This paper provides a first glimpse of the first sequenced ctenophore genome. We have characterized the full complement of Mnemiopsis homeodomains from this species and have compared them to species from other early branching lineages. Our results suggest that Porifera and Ctenophora were the first two extant lineages to diverge from the rest of animals. Based on this analysis, we also propose a new name - ParaHoxozoa - for the remaining group that

  10. The homeodomain Pbx2-Prep1 complex modulates hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha-mediated activation of the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B17 gene.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Philip A; Mackenzie, Peter I

    2002-07-01

    UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are expressed in a wide range of tissues in which their levels of expression and distribution are dependent on cell-type specific regulatory mechanisms. The presence of a hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 1 binding site in the proximal promoters of several UGT2B genes has been shown to contribute to their expression in liver cells and possibly other HNF1-containing cell types. In some of these UGT2B genes, a putative pre-B cell homeobox (Pbx) transcription factor binding site is found directly adjacent to the functional HNF1 site. To determine whether this putative Pbx site contributes to the regulation of UGT2B expression, we chose the UGT2B17 gene and investigated the capacity of its Pbx site to bind specific transcription factors and alter promoter activity. The UGT2B17 Pbx site matches a consensus Pbx site known to bind members of the Pbx, Hox, Meis, and Prep1 families of homeodomain-containing proteins and has previously been shown to bind nuclear proteins in DNaseI footprint assays. In this study, we used gel shift and functional assays to show that a Pbx2-Prep1 heterodimer can bind to the UGT2B17 Pbx site and interfere with the binding of HNF1alpha to its site adjacent to the Pbx site. This interaction of Pbx2-Prep1 and HNF1alpha results in down-regulation of HNF1alpha-mediated activation of the UGT2B17 promoter. Modulation of transcription by restricting the binding of transcriptional effectors to their target site is a novel role for Pbx2-Prep1 complexes. PMID:12065766

  11. A mouse model of human congenital heart disease: high incidence of diverse cardiac anomalies and ventricular noncompaction produced by heterozygous Nkx2-5 homeodomain missense mutation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eileen I.; Terada, Ryota; Ryan, Nicole J.; Briggs, Laura E.; Chowdhury, Rajib; Zárate, Miguel A.; Sugi, Yukiko; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Benson, D. Woodrow; Anderson, Robert H.; Kasahara, Hideko

    2014-01-01

    Background Heterozygous human mutations of NKX2-5 are highly penetrant and associated with varied congenital heart defects. The heterozygous knockout of murine Nkx2-5, in contrast, manifests less profound cardiac malformations, with low disease penetrance. We sought to study this apparent discrepancy between human and mouse genetics. Since missense mutations in the NKX2-5 homeodomain (DNA binding domain) are the most frequently reported type of human mutation, we replicated this genetic defect in a murine knock-in model. Methods and Results We generated a murine model in a 129/Sv genetic background by knocking-in an Nkx2-5 homeodomain missense mutation previously identified in humans. The mutation was located at homeodomain position 52Arg→Gly (R52G). All the heterozygous neonatal Nkx2-5+/R52G mice demonstrated a prominent trabecular layer in the ventricular wall, so called noncompaction, along with diverse cardiac anomalies, including atrioventricular septal defects, Ebstein’s malformation of the tricuspid valve, and perimembranous and/or muscular ventricular septal defects. In addition, P10 Nkx2-5+/R52G mice demonstrated atrial septal anomalies, with significant increase in the size of the inter-atrial communication and fossa ovalis, and decrease in the length of the flap valve compared to control Nkx2-5+/+ or Nkx2-5+/− mice. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrate that heterozygous missense mutation in the murine Nkx2-5 homeodomain (R52G) are highly penetrant, and result in pleiotropic cardiac effects. Thus, in contrast to heterozygous Nkx2-5 knockout mice, the effects of the heterozygous knock-in mimic findings in humans with heterozygous missense mutation in NKX2-5 homeodomain. PMID:25028484

  12. LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Awh is a key component activating all three fibroin genes, fibH, fibL and fhx, in the silk gland of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Mai; Tsubota, Takuya; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Takiya, Shigeharu

    2015-01-01

    In the silkworm Bombyx mori, three fibroin genes, fibroin-heavy-chain (fibH), fibroin-light-chain (fibL) and fibrohexamerin (fhx), are coexpressed only in the posterior silk gland (PSG) cells, while the sericin genes encoding silk glue proteins are expressed in the middle silk gland (MSG) cells. Silk gland factor-2 (SGF-2) is a PSG-specific activator complex of fibH, composed of a LIM-homeodomain protein, Awh, and its cofactors, Ldb and Lcaf. We investigated whether SGF-2 can activate other fibroin genes using transgenic silkworms. The genes for Ldb and Lcaf were expressed ubiquitously in various tissues, while the gene for Awh was expressed strictly specific in PSG of the wild type silkworms. Misexpression of Awh in transgenic silkworms induced ectopic expression of fibL and fhx as well as fibH in MSG. Coincidently with the induction of fibL and fhx by Awh, binding of SGF-2 to the promoter of fibL and fhx was detected in vitro, and SGF-2 binds directly to the fhx core promoter. Ectopic expression of the fibroin genes was observed at high levels in the middle part of MSG. Moreover, fibL and fhx were induced in the anterior silk gland (ASG) of the transgenic silkworms, but fibH was not. These results indicate that Awh is a key activator of all three fibroin genes, and the activity is probably regulated in conjunction with additional factors. PMID:25449130

  13. POU proteins bend DNA via the POU-specific domain.

    PubMed Central

    Verrijzer, C P; van Oosterhout, J A; van Weperen, W W; van der Vliet, P C

    1991-01-01

    POU proteins constitute a family of ubiquitous as well as cell type-specific transcription factors that share the conserved POU DNA binding domain. This domain consists of two distinct subdomains, a POU-specific domain and a POU homeodomain, that are both required for high affinity sequence-specific DNA binding. In a circular permutation assay, several POU proteins, including Oct-1, Oct-2A, Oct-6 and Pit-1, demonstrated a position dependent mobility of the protein-DNA complexes, suggesting induction of DNA bending. This was confirmed by detection of relative bend direction, using pre-bent DNA, and by enhanced ligase mediated cyclization. Bending was caused by interaction with the POU domain. By contrast, binding of the POU homeodomain did not distort the DNA structure, indicating that the POU-specific domain confers DNA bending. Images PMID:1915275

  14. A petunia homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, PhHD-Zip, plays an important role in flower senescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flower senescence is mediated in part by changes of plant hormones, such as ethylene, cytokinin and abscisic acid (ABA). Ethylene is known to control flower senescence in many species, especially ethylene sensitive flowers, like petunia, carnation and rose. During flower senescence in petunia and ot...

  15. The three-dimensional NMR-solution structure of the polypeptide fragment 195-286 of the LFB1/HNF1 transcription factor from rat liver comprises a nonclassical homeodomain.

    PubMed Central

    Leiting, B; De Francesco, R; Tomei, L; Cortese, R; Otting, G; Wüthrich, K

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional backbone fold of a polypeptide fragment from the rat LFB1/HNF1 transcription factor was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in solution. This fragment contains an amino acid sequence that is approximately 22% homologous to the well known homeodomains, but which contains 81 amino acid residues as compared with 60 residues in 'typical' homeodomains. For the present studies we used a recombinant 99 amino acid polypeptide containing this sequence in positions 10-90, which was uniformly labelled with 15N and also doubly labelled with 15N and 13C. The NMR structure of this polypeptide contains three alpha-helices comprising the residues 18-29, 36-50 and 71-84, a loop formed by residues 30-35, and a long stretch of non-regular secondary structure linking the second and third helices. The relative location and orientation of the helices is very similar to that in the Antennapedia (Antp) homeodomain structure, despite the fact that helix II is elongated by about one turn. This confirms a recently advanced hypothesis based on sequence comparisons that this polypeptide segment of LFB1/HNF1 might represent a homeodomain-like structural element. The helix-turn-helix motif, which has been shown to comprise the DNA recognition helix in the Antp homeodomain, can readily be recognized in the LFB1/HNF1 homeodomain, in spite of an extensive modification of the primary structure. The two residues of the tight turn in the Antp homeodomain are replaced by a 23 residue linker region between the two helices in LFB1/HNF1, which bulges out from the rest of the molecule and thus enables the formation of a non-classical helix--turn--helix motif. Images PMID:8491172

  16. HMG1 interacts with HOX proteins and enhances their DNA binding and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Zappavigna, V; Falciola, L; Helmer-Citterich, M; Mavilio, F; Bianchi, M E

    1996-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMG1) is a non-histone, chromatin-associated nuclear protein with a proposed role in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. We show that HMG1 interacts with proteins encoded by the HOX gene family by establishing protein-protein contacts between the HMG box domains and the HOX homeodomain. The functional role of these interactions was studied using the transcriptional activity of the human HOXD9 protein as a model. HMG1 enhances, in a dose-dependent fashion, the sequence-specific DNA binding activity in vitro, and the transcriptional activation in a co-transfection assay in vivo, of the HOXD9 protein. Functional interaction between HMG1 and HOXD9 is dependent on the DNA binding activity of the homeodomain, and requires the HOXD9 transcriptional activation domain. HMG1 enhances activation by HOXD9, but not by HOXD8, of the HOXD9-controlled element. Specific target recognition and functional interaction with HMG1 can be transferred to HOXD8 by homeodomain swapping. We propose that HMG1-like proteins might be general co-factors in HOX-mediated transcriptional activation, which facilitate access of HOX proteins to specific DNA targets, and/or introduce architectural constraints in the assembly of HOX-containing transcriptional complexes. Images PMID:8890171

  17. Prep1, a novel functional partner of Pbx proteins.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, J; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F; Blasi, F

    1998-03-01

    The human transcription factor, UEF3, is important in regulating the activity of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) gene enhancer. The UEF3 DNA target site is a regulatory element in the promoters of several growth factor and protease genes. We reported previously that purified UEF3 is a complex of several subunits. In this paper we report the cloning of the cDNA of one of the subunits which encodes for a novel human homeodomain protein, which we have termed Prep1. The Prep1 homeodomain belongs to the TALE class of homeodomains, is most closely related to those of the TGIF and Meis1 proteins, and like these, recognizes a TGACAG motif. We further identify the other UEF3 subunit as a member of the Pbx protein family. Unlike other proteins known to interact with Pbx, Prep1 forms a stable complex with Pbx independent of DNA binding. Heterodimerization of Prep1 and Pbx results in a strong DNA binding affinity towards the TGACAG target site of the uPA promoter. Overall, these data indicate that Prep1 is a stable intracellular partner of Pbx in vivo. PMID:9482739

  18. The PAX3 paired domain and homeodomain function as a single binding module in vivo to regulate subnuclear localization and mobility by a mechanism that requires base-specific recognition.

    PubMed

    Corry, Gareth N; Raghuram, Nikhil; Missiaen, Kristal K; Hu, Ninghe; Hendzel, Michael J; Underhill, D Alan

    2010-09-10

    The transcription factor PAX3 is essential for myogenesis and neural crest development, and is one of several genes mutated in human Waardenburg syndrome. Analysis of disease-causing missense mutations in PAX3 has established the interdependence of its two DNA-binding domains, the paired domain (PD) and the homeodomain (HD), as well as defects in localization and mobility. Paradoxically, mutants that retained DNA binding activity exhibited the greatest defects in localization and mobility, regardless of the domain in which they reside. In the present study, structure-function analyses were used to determine the mechanistic basis of this effect. In the context of the isolated DNA-binding domains, HD mutants adopted an increase in mobility proportional to their loss in DNA binding, while PD mutants continued to display the inverse relationship observed in the full-length protein. At the structural level, this reflected an unexpected dependence on base-specific contacts in the PD, whereas HD mobility was more severely affected by loss of backbone contacts, as has been observed with other DNA-binding proteins. This requires that the HD switch to a base-specific mode in the full-length protein. Moreover, both domains underwent substantial reduction in mobility and altered localization when in a contiguous polypeptide with the endogenous linker segment. Notably, although the HD conferred localization to heterochromatin, this activity was masked when linked to the PD, despite the absence of determinants for subnuclear compartmentalization in the PD or linker. Last, the propensity for PAX3 heterochromatin localization was modulated by sequences at the amino and carboxy termini, supporting a model in which alternate conformations lead to unmasking of the HD. These data indicate that the PD and the HD functionally interact in vivo and behave as a single binding module whose mobility and localization are dependent on sequence-specific contacts. PMID:20643146

  19. Multifaceted Histone H3 Methylation and Phosphorylation Readout by the Plant Homeodomain Finger of Human Nuclear Antigen Sp100C.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Dan; Xiong, Xiaozhe; He, Zhimin; Li, Haitao

    2016-06-10

    The decoding of histone post-translational modifications by chromatin-binding modules ("readers") constitutes one major mechanism of epigenetic regulation. Nuclear antigen Sp100 (SPECKLED, 100 kDa), a constitutive component of the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, plays key roles in intrinsic immunity and transcriptional repression. Sp100C, a splicing isoform specifically up-regulated upon interferon stimulation, harbors a unique tandem plant homeodomain (PHD) finger and bromodomain at its C terminus. Combining structural, quantitative binding, and cellular co-localization studies, we characterized Sp100C PHD finger as an unmethylated histone H3 Lys(4) (H3K4me0) reader that tolerates histone H3 Thr(3) phosphorylation (H3T3ph), histone H3 Lys(9) trimethylation (H3K9me3), and histone H3 Ser(10) phosphorylation (H3S10ph), hallmarks associated with the mitotic chromosome. In contrast, whereas H3K4me0 reader activity is conserved in Sp140, an Sp100C paralog, the multivalent tolerance of H3T3ph, H3K9me3, and H3S10ph was lost for Sp140. The complex structure determined at 2.1 Å revealed a highly coordinated lysine ϵ-amine recognition sphere formed by an extended N-terminal motif for H3K4me0 readout. Interestingly, reader pocket rigidification by disulfide bond formation enhanced H3K4me0 binding by Sp100C. An additional complex structure solved at 2.7 Å revealed that H3T3ph is recognized by the arginine residue, Arg(713), that is unique to the PHD finger of Sp100C. Consistent with a restrictive cellular role of Sp100C, these results establish a direct chromatin targeting function of Sp100C that may regulate transcriptional gene silencing and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body-mediated intrinsic immunity in response to interferon stimulation. PMID:27129259

  20. The identification of Cucumis sativus Glabrous 1 (CsGL1) required for the formation of trichomes uncovers a novel function for the homeodomain-leucine zipper I gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Cao, Chenxing; Zhang, Cunjia; Zheng, Shuangshuang; Wang, Zenghui; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2015-05-01

    The spines and bloom of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) fruit are two important quality traits related to fruit market value. However, until now, none of the genes involved in the formation of cucumber fruit spines and bloom trichomes has been identified. Here, the characterization of trichome development in wild-type (WT) cucumber and a spontaneous mutant, glabrous 1 (csgl1) controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene, with glabrous aerial organs, is reported. Via map-based cloning, CsGL1 was isolated and it was found that it encoded a member of the homeodomain-leucine zipper I (HD-Zip I) proteins previously identified to function mainly in the abiotic stress responses of plants. Tissue-specific expression analysis indicated that CsGL1 was strongly expressed in trichomes and fruit spines. In addition, CsGL1 was a nuclear protein with weak transcriptional activation activity in yeast. A comparative analysis of the digital gene expression (DGE) profile between csgl1 and WT leaves revealed that CsGL1 had a significant influence on the gene expression profile in cucumber, especially on genes related to cellular process, which is consistent with the phenotypic difference between csgl1 and the WT. Moreover, two genes, CsMYB6 and CsGA20ox1, possibly involved in the formation of cucumber trichomes and fruit spines, were characterized. Overall, the findings reveal a new function for the HD-Zip I gene subfamily, and provide some candidate genes for genetic engineering approaches to improve cucumber fruit external quality. PMID:25740926

  1. Mining protein sequences for motifs.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Giri; Bu, Changsong; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Xuning; Xu, Ning; Mathee, Kalai

    2002-01-01

    We use methods from Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery to design an algorithm for detecting motifs in protein sequences. The algorithm assumes that a motif is constituted by the presence of a "good" combination of residues in appropriate locations of the motif. The algorithm attempts to compile such good combinations into a "pattern dictionary" by processing an aligned training set of protein sequences. The dictionary is subsequently used to detect motifs in new protein sequences. Statistical significance of the detection results are ensured by statistically determining the various parameters of the algorithm. Based on this approach, we have implemented a program called GYM. The Helix-Turn-Helix motif was used as a model system on which to test our program. The program was also extended to detect Homeodomain motifs. The detection results for the two motifs compare favorably with existing programs. In addition, the GYM program provides a lot of useful information about a given protein sequence. PMID:12487759

  2. PBX and MEIS as Non-DNA-Binding Partners in Trimeric Complexes with HOX Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Kandavel; Green, Nancy C.; Rambaldi, Isabel; Saragovi, H. Uri; Featherstone, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    HOX, PBX, and MEIS transcription factors bind DNA through a homeodomain. PBX proteins bind DNA cooperatively as heterodimers with MEIS family members and also with HOX proteins from paralog groups 1 to 10. MEIS proteins cooperatively bind DNA with ABD-B class HOX proteins of groups 9 and 10. Here, we examine aspects of dimeric and higher-order interactions between these three homeodomain classes. The most significant results can be summarized as follows. (i) Most of PBX N terminal to the homeodomain is required for efficient cooperative binding with HOXD4 and HOXD9. (ii) MEIS and PBX proteins form higher-order complexes on a heterodimeric binding site. (iii) Although MEIS does not cooperatively bind DNA with ANTP class HOX proteins, it does form a trimer as a non-DNA-binding partner with DNA-bound PBX-HOXD4. (iv) The N terminus of HOXD4 negatively regulates trimer formation. (v) MEIS forms a similar trimer with DNA-bound PBX-HOXD9. (vi) A related trimer (where MEIS is a non-DNA-binding partner) is formed on a transcriptional promoter within the cell. (vii) We observe an additional trimer class involving non-DNA-bound PBX and DNA-bound MEIS-HOXD9 or MEIS-HOXD10 heterodimers that is enhanced by mutation of the PBX homeodomain. (viii) In this latter trimer, PBX is likely to contact both MEIS and HOXD9/D10. (ix) The stability of DNA binding by all trimers is enhanced relative to the heterodimers. These findings suggest novel functions for PBX and MEIS in modulating the function of DNA-bound MEIS-HOX and PBX-HOX heterodimers, respectively. PMID:10523646

  3. The WD-Repeat Protein CsTTG1 Regulates Fruit Wart Formation through Interaction with the Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper I Protein Mict.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhua; Yin, Shuai; Liu, Xingwang; Liu, Bin; Yang, Sen; Xue, Shudan; Cai, Yanling; Black, Kezia; Liu, Huiling; Dong, Mingming; Zhang, Yaqi; Zhao, Binyu; Ren, Huazhong

    2016-06-01

    The cucumber (Cucumis sativus) fruit is covered with bloom trichomes and warts (composed of spines and tubercules), which have an important impact on the commercial value of the crop. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism underlying their formation. Here, we reported that the cucumber WD-repeat homolog CsTTG1, which is localized in the nucleus and cytomembrane, plays an important role in the formation of cucumber fruit bloom trichomes and warts. Functional characterization of CsTTG1 revealed that it is mainly expressed in the epidermis of cucumber ovary and that its overexpression in cucumber alters the density of fruit bloom trichomes and spines, thereby promoting the warty fruit trait. Conversely, silencing CsTTG1 expression inhibits the initiation of fruit spines. Molecular and genetic analyses showed that CsTTG1 acts in parallel to Mict/CsGL1, a key trichome formation factor, to regulate the initiation of fruit trichomes, including fruit bloom trichomes and spines, and that the further differentiation of fruit spines and formation of tubercules regulated by CsTTG1 is dependent on Mict Using yeast two-hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, we determined that CsTTG1 directly interacts with Mict. Collectively, our results indicate that CsTTG1 is an important component of the molecular network that regulates fruit bloom trichome and wart formation in cucumber. PMID:27208299

  4. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  5. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  6. Characterization of quail Pax-6 (Pax-QNR) proteins expressed in the neuroretina.

    PubMed Central

    Carriere, C; Plaza, S; Martin, P; Quatannens, B; Bailly, M; Stehelin, D; Saule, S

    1993-01-01

    After differential screening of a cDNA library constructed from quail neuroretina cells (QNR) infected with the v-myc-containing avian retrovirus MC29, we have isolated a cDNA clone, Pax-QNR, homologous to the murine Pax-6, which is mutated in the autosomal dominant mutation small eye of mice and in the disorder aniridia in humans. Here we report the characterization of the Pax-QNR proteins expressed in the avian neuroretina. From bacterially expressed Pax-QNR peptides, we obtained rabbit antisera directed against different domains of the protein: paired domain (serum 11), domain between the paired domain and homeodomain (serum 12), homeodomain (serum 13), and carboxyl-terminal part (serum 14). Sera 12, 13, and 14 were able to specifically recognize five proteins (48, 46, 43, 33, and 32 kDa) in the neuroretina. In contrast to proteins of 48, 46, and 43 kDa, proteins of 33 and 32 kDa were not recognized by the paired antiserum (serum 11). Paired-less and paired-containing proteins exhibited the same half-life (6 h) and were phosphorylated mostly on serine residues. Immunoprecipitations performed with subcellular fractions of neuroretinas showed that the paired-containing proteins were located in the nucleus, whereas the 33- and 32-kDa proteins were found essentially in the cytoplasmic compartment. However, immunofluorescence experiments performed after transient transfections showed that p46 and p33/32 were also located in vivo into the nucleus. Thus, the Pax-QNR/Pax-6 gene can produce proteins with two DNA-binding domains as well as proteins containing only the DNA-binding homeodomain. Images PMID:8246948

  7. Arabidopsis Enhanced Drought Tolerance1/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 Confers Drought Tolerance in Transgenic Rice without Yield Penalty1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linhui; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Shimei; Wang, Yuping; Zhu, Qisheng; Li, Shigui; Xiang, Chengbin

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing drought tolerance without yield decrease has been a great challenge in crop improvement. Here, we report the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor Enhanced Drought Tolerance/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (EDT1/HDG11) was able to confer drought tolerance and increase grain yield in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The improved drought tolerance was associated with a more extensive root system, reduced stomatal density, and higher water use efficiency. The transgenic rice plants also had higher levels of abscisic acid, proline, soluble sugar, and reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme activities during stress treatments. The increased grain yield of the transgenic rice was contributed by improved seed setting, larger panicle, and more tillers as well as increased photosynthetic capacity. Digital gene expression analysis indicated that AtEDT1/HDG11 had a significant influence on gene expression profile in rice, which was consistent with the observed phenotypes of transgenic rice plants. Our study shows that AtEDT1/HDG11 can improve both stress tolerance and grain yield in rice, demonstrating the efficacy of AtEDT1/HDG11 in crop improvement. PMID:23735506

  8. The Bicoid Class Homeodomain Factors ceh-36/OTX and unc-30/PITX Cooperate in C. elegans Embryonic Progenitor Cells to Regulate Robust Development

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Travis; Preston, Elicia; Nair, Gautham; Zacharias, Amanda L.; Raj, Arjun; Murray, John Isaac

    2015-01-01

    While many transcriptional regulators of pluripotent and terminally differentiated states have been identified, regulation of intermediate progenitor states is less well understood. Previous high throughput cellular resolution expression studies identified dozens of transcription factors with lineage-specific expression patterns in C. elegans embryos that could regulate progenitor identity. In this study we identified a broad embryonic role for the C. elegans OTX transcription factor ceh-36, which was previously shown to be required for the terminal specification of four neurons. ceh-36 is expressed in progenitors of over 30% of embryonic cells, yet is not required for embryonic viability. Quantitative phenotyping by computational analysis of time-lapse movies of ceh-36 mutant embryos identified cell cycle or cell migration defects in over 100 of these cells, but most defects were low-penetrance, suggesting redundancy. Expression of ceh-36 partially overlaps with that of the PITX transcription factor unc-30. unc-30 single mutants are viable but loss of both ceh-36 and unc-30 causes 100% lethality, and double mutants have significantly higher frequencies of cellular developmental defects in the cells where their expression normally overlaps. These factors are also required for robust expression of the downstream developmental regulator mls-2/HMX. This work provides the first example of genetic redundancy between the related yet evolutionarily distant OTX and PITX families of bicoid class homeodomain factors and demonstrates the power of quantitative developmental phenotyping in C. elegans to identify developmental regulators acting in progenitor cells. PMID:25738873

  9. The novel homeoprotein Prep1 modulates Pbx-Hox protein cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, J; Zappavigna, V; Ferretti, E; Mavilio, F; Blasi, F

    1998-03-01

    The products of the mammalian Pbx and Drosophila exd genes are able to interact with Hox proteins specifically and to increase their DNA binding affinity and selectivity. In the accompanying paper we show that Pbx proteins exist as stable heterodimers with a novel homeodomain protein, Prep1. Here we show that Prep1-Pbx interaction presents novel structural features: it is independent of DNA binding and of the integrity of their respective homeodomains, and requires sequences in the N-terminal portions of both proteins. The Prep1-Pbx protein-protein interaction is essential for DNA-binding activity. Prep1-Pbx complexes are present in early mouse embryos at a time when Pbx is also interacting with Hox proteins. The use of different interaction surfaces could allow Pbx to interact with Prep1 and Hox proteins simultaneously. Indeed, we observe the formation of a ternary Prep1-Pbx1-HOXB1 complex on a HOXB1-responsive target in vitro. Interaction with Prep1 enhances the ability of the HOXB1-Pbx1 complex to activate transcription in a cooperative fashion from the same target. Our data suggest that Prep1 is an additional component in the transcriptional regulation by Hox proteins. PMID:9482740

  10. Theria-Specific Homeodomain and cis-Regulatory Element Evolution of the Dlx3–4 Bigene Cluster in 12 Different Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    SUMIYAMA, KENTA; MIYAKE, TSUTOMU; GRIMWOOD, JANE; STUART, ANDREW; DICKSON, MARK; SCHMUTZ, JEREMY; RUDDLE, FRANK H.; MYERS, RICHARD M.; AMEMIYA, CHRIS T.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian Dlx3 and Dlx4 genes are configured as a bigene cluster, and their respective expression patterns are controlled temporally and spatially by cis-elements that largely reside within the intergenic region of the cluster. Previous work revealed that there are conspicuously conserved elements within the intergenic region of the Dlx3–4 bigene clusters of mouse and human. In this paper we have extended these analyses to include 12 additional mammalian taxa (including a marsupial and a monotreme) in order to better define the nature and molecular evolutionary trends of the coding and non-coding functional elements among morphologically divergent mammals. Dlx3–4 regions were fully sequenced from 12 divergent taxa of interest. We identified three theria-specific amino acid replacements in homeodomain of Dlx4 gene that functions in placenta. Sequence analyses of constrained nucleotide sites in the intergenic non-coding region showed that many of the intergenic conserved elements are highly conserved and have evolved slowly within the mammals. In contrast, a branchial arch/craniofacial enhancer I37-2 exhibited accelerated evolution at the branch between the monotreme and therian common ancestor despite being highly conserved among therian species. Functional analysis of I37-2 in transgenic mice has shown that the equivalent region of the platypus fails to drive transcriptional activity in branchial arches. These observations, taken together with our molecular evolutionary data, suggest that theria-specific episodic changes in the I37-2 element may have contributed to craniofacial innovation at the base of the mammalian lineage. PMID:22951979

  11. Theria-specific homeodomain and cis-regulatory element evolution of the Dlx3-4 bigene cluster in 12 different mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Sumiyama, Kenta; Miyake, Tsutomu; Grimwood, Jane; Stuart, Andrew; Dickson, Mark; Schmutz, Jeremy; Ruddle, Frank H; Myers, Richard M; Amemiya, Chris T

    2012-12-01

    The mammalian Dlx3 and Dlx4 genes are configured as a bigene cluster, and their respective expression patterns are controlled temporally and spatially by cis-elements that largely reside within the intergenic region of the cluster. Previous work revealed that there are conspicuously conserved elements within the intergenic region of the Dlx3-4 bigene clusters of mouse and human. In this paper we have extended these analyses to include 12 additional mammalian taxa (including a marsupial and a monotreme) in order to better define the nature and molecular evolutionary trends of the coding and non-coding functional elements among morphologically divergent mammals. Dlx3-4 regions were fully sequenced from 12 divergent taxa of interest. We identified three theria-specific amino acid replacements in homeodomain of Dlx4 gene that functions in placenta. Sequence analyses of constrained nucleotide sites in the intergenic non-coding region showed that many of the intergenic conserved elements are highly conserved and have evolved slowly within the mammals. In contrast, a branchial arch/craniofacial enhancer I37-2 exhibited accelerated evolution at the branch between the monotreme and therian common ancestor despite being highly conserved among therian species. Functional analysis of I37-2 in transgenic mice has shown that the equivalent region of the platypus fails to drive transcriptional activity in branchial arches. These observations, taken together with our molecular evolutionary data, suggest that theria-specific episodic changes in the I37-2 element may have contributed to craniofacial innovation at the base of the mammalian lineage. PMID:22951979

  12. The homeodomain transcription factor Prep1 (pKnox1) is required for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell activity.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Patrizia; Villaescusa, J Carlos; Longobardi, Elena; Iotti, Giorgio; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Diaz, Victor M; Miccio, Annarita; Ferrari, Giuliana; Blasi, Francesco

    2007-11-15

    Most of the hypomorphic Prep1(i/i) embryos (expressing 3-10% of the Prep1 protein), die between E17.5 and P0, with profound anemia, eye malformations and angiogenic anomalies [Ferretti, E., Villaescusa, J.C., Di Rosa, P., Fernandez-Diaz, L.-C., Longobardi, E., Mazzieri, R., Miccio, A., Micali, N., Selleri, L., Ferrari G., Blasi, F. (2006). Hypomorphic mutation of the TALE gene Prep1 (pKnox1) causes a major reduction of Pbx and Meis proteins and a pleiotropic embryonic phenotype. Mol. Cell. Biol. 26, 5650-5662]. We now report on the hematopoietic phenotype of these embryos. Prep1(i/i) fetal livers (FL) are hypoplastic, produce less common myeloid progenitors colonies (CFU-GEMM) in cytokine-supplemented methylcellulose and have an increased number of B-cells precursors that differentiate poorly. Prep1(i/i) FL is able to protect lethally irradiated mice only at high cell doses but the few protected mice show major anomalies in all hematopoietic lineages in both bone marrow (BM) and peripheral organs. Prep1(i/i) FL cells compete inefficiently with wild type bone marrow in competitive repopulation experiments, suggesting that the major defect lies in long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LTR-HSC). Indeed, wt embryonic expression of Prep1 in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, fetal liver (FL), cKit(+)Sca1(+)Lin(-)AA4.1(+) (KSLA) cells and B-lymphocytes precursors agrees with the observed phenotype. We therefore conclude that Prep1 is required for a correct and complete hematopoiesis. PMID:17904118

  13. TTF1, a homeodomain containing transcription factor, contributes to regulating periodic oscillations in GnRH gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Matagne, Valerie; Kim, Jae Geun; Ryu, Byung Jun; Hur, Min Kyu; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Kyungjin; Park, Byong Seo; Damante, Giuseppe; Smiley, Gregory; Lee, Byung Ju; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), a member of the NK family of transcription factors required for basal forebrain morphogenesis, functions in the postnatal hypothalamus as a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding neuromodulators and hypophysiotrophic peptides. One of these peptides is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Here we show that Ttf1 mRNA abundance vary in a diurnal and melatonin-dependent fashion in the preoptic area (POA) of the rat, with maximal Ttf1 expression attained during the dark phase of the light/dark cycle, preceding the nocturnal peak in GnRH mRNA content. GnRH promoter activity oscillates in a circadian manner in GT1-7 cells, and this pattern is enhanced by TTF1 and blunted by siRNA-mediated Ttf1 gene silencing. TTF1 trans-activates GnRH transcription by binding to two sites in the GnRH promoter. Rat GnRH neurons in situ contain key proteins components of the positive (BMAL1, CLOCK) and negative (PER1) limbs of the circadian oscillator, and these proteins repress Ttf1 promoter activity in vitro. In contrast, Ttf1 transcription is activated by CRY1, a clock component required for circadian rhythmicity. In turn, TTF1 represses transcription of Rev-erbα, a heme receptor that controls circadian transcription within the positive limb of the circadian oscillator. These findings suggest that TTF1 is a component of the molecular machinery controlling circadian oscillations in GnRH gene transcription. PMID:22356123

  14. Affinity regression predicts the recognition code of nucleic acid binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pelossof, Raphael; Singh, Irtisha; Yang, Julie L.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the affinity profiles of nucleic acid-binding proteins directly from the protein sequence is a major unsolved problem. We present a statistical approach for learning the recognition code of a family of transcription factors (TFs) or RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from high-throughput binding assays. Our method, called affinity regression, trains on protein binding microarray (PBM) or RNA compete experiments to learn an interaction model between proteins and nucleic acids, using only protein domain and probe sequences as inputs. By training on mouse homeodomain PBM profiles, our model correctly identifies residues that confer DNA-binding specificity and accurately predicts binding motifs for an independent set of divergent homeodomains. Similarly, learning from RNA compete profiles for diverse RBPs, our model can predict the binding affinities of held-out proteins and identify key RNA-binding residues. More broadly, we envision applying our method to model and predict biological interactions in any setting where there is a high-throughput ‘affinity’ readout. PMID:26571099

  15. Zinc Finger Homeodomain Factor Zfhx3 Is Essential for Mammary Lactogenic Differentiation by Maintaining Prolactin Signaling Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Ma, Gui; Zhang, Xiaolin; He, Yuan; Li, Mei; Han, Xueying; Fu, Liya; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Nagy, Tamas; Zhao, Qiang; Fu, Li; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2016-06-10

    The zinc finger homeobox 3 (ZFHX3, also named ATBF1 for AT motif binding factor 1) is a transcription factor that suppresses prostatic carcinogenesis and induces neuronal differentiation. It also interacts with estrogen receptor α to inhibit cell proliferation and regulate pubertal mammary gland development in mice. In the present study, we examined whether and how Zfhx3 regulates lactogenic differentiation in mouse mammary glands. At different stages of mammary gland development, Zfhx3 protein was expressed at varying levels, with the highest level at lactation. In the HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cell line, an in vitro model of lactogenesis, knockdown of Zfhx3 attenuated prolactin-induced β-casein expression and morphological changes, indicators of lactogenic differentiation. In mouse mammary tissue, knock-out of Zfhx3 interrupted lactogenesis, resulting in underdeveloped glands with much smaller and fewer alveoli, reduced β-casein expression, accumulation of large cytoplasmic lipid droplets in luminal cells after parturition, and failure in lactation. Mechanistically, Zfhx3 maintained the expression of Prlr (prolactin receptor) and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity, whereas knockdown and knock-out of Zfhx3 in HC11 cells and mammary tissues, respectively, decreased Prlr expression, Stat5 phosphorylation, and the expression of Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 target genes. These findings indicate that Zfhx3 plays an essential role in proper lactogenic development in mammary glands, at least in part by maintaining Prlr expression and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity. PMID:27129249

  16. Genetic variants and effects on milk traits of the caprine paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) gene in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyu; Wu, Xianfeng; Cai, Hanfang; Pan, Chuanying; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2013-12-15

    The paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) gene plays a critical role in cell proliferation, differentiation, hematopoiesis and organogenesis. This gene regulates several genes' expressions in the Wnt/beta-catenin and POU1F1 pathways, thereby probably affecting milk performance. The goal of this study was to characterize the genetic variants of the PITX2 gene and test their associations with milk traits in dairy goats. Herein, four novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), AC_000163:g.18117T>C, g.18161C>G, g.18322C>A and g.18353T>C, within the caprine PITX2 gene, were found in two famous Chinese dairy goat breeds. These SNPs mapping at Cys28Arg, Pro42Pro, IVS1+79C>A and IVS1+110T>C, were genotyped by the MvaI, SmaI, MspI and RsaI aCRS-RFLP or PCR-RFLP methods, respectively. Accordingly, two main haplotypes (CGCT and CGCC) were identified among the specimens. Association testing revealed that the SmaI and RsaI polymorphisms were significantly associated with the milk fat content, milk lactose content and milk density (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in the Guanzhong (GZ) dairy goats, respectively. At the same time, the RsaI locus was also found to significantly link to the second lactation milk yield, milk fat content, milk lactose content, milk density and milk total solid content (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in the Xinong Saanen (XNSN) dairy goats, respectively. These results indicated that the caprine PITX2 gene had the significant effects on milk traits. Hence, the RsaI and SmaI loci could be regarded as two DNA markers for selecting superior milk performance in dairy goats. These preliminary findings not only would extend the spectrum of genetic variation of the goat PITX2 gene, but also would contribute to implementing marker-assisted selection (MAS) in breeding and genetics in dairy goats. PMID:24076438

  17. Functional characterization of the homeodomain leucine zipper I transcription factor AtHB13 reveals a crucial role in Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Ribone, Pamela A; Capella, Matías; Chan, Raquel L

    2015-09-01

    AtHB13 is a homeodomain leucine zipper I transcription factor whose function in development is largely unknown. AtHB13 and AtHB23 mutant and silenced lines were characterized by expression studies, reciprocal crosses, complementation, molecular analyses, and developmental phenotypes. The athb13-1 and athb13-2 mutants, athb23 silenced, and athb13/athb23 double-silenced plants exhibited faster elongation rates of their inflorescence stems, whereas only athb13-1 and the double-knockdown athb13/athb23 exhibited shorter siliques, fewer seeds, and unfertilized ovules compared with the wild type (WT). The cell sizes of mutant and WT plants were similar, indicating that these transcription factors probably affect cell division. Reciprocal crosses between athb13-1 and the WT genotype indicated that the silique defect was male specific. Pollen hydration assays indicated that the pollen grains of the athb13-1 mutant were unable to germinate on stigmas. AtHB23-silenced plants exhibited normal siliques, whereas double-knockdown athb13/athb23 plants were similar to athb13-1 plants. Both AtHB13 and AtHB23 were able to rescue the abnormal silique phenotype. AtHB23 was upregulated in athb13-2 plants, whereas its transcript levels in athb13-1 mutants were not significantly increased. Transcriptome analysis comparing athb13-1 and WT inflorescences revealed that a large number of genes, including several involved in pollen coat formation, are regulated by AtHB13. Finally, athb13-1 complementation with mutated versions of AtHB13 confirmed that two different tryptophans in its C terminus are essential. We conclude that AtHB13 and AtHB23 play independent, negative developmental roles in stem elongation, whereas only AtHB13 is crucial for pollen germination. Furthermore, AtHB23, which does not normally exert a functional role in pollen, can act as a substitute for AtHB13. PMID:26136262

  18. HD-Zip Proteins GL2 and HDG11 Have Redundant Functions in Arabidopsis Trichomes, and GL2 Activates a Positive Feedback Loop via MYB23[W

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Aashima; Paper, Janet M.; Boehler, Allison P.; Bradley, Amanda M.; Neumann, Titus R.; Schrick, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    The class IV homeodomain leucine zipper transcription factor GLABRA2 (GL2) acts in a complex regulatory circuit that regulates the differentiation of trichomes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We describe a genetic interaction with HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (HDG11), previously identified as a negative regulator of trichome branching. gl2 hdg11 double mutants display enhanced trichome cell-type differentiation defects. Transgenic expression of HDG11 using the GL2 promoter partially suppresses gl2 trichome phenotypes. Vice versa, expression of GL2 under the control of its native promoter partially complements hdg11 ectopic branching. Since gl2 hdg11 and gl2 myb23 double mutants and the triple mutant display similar trichome differentiation defects, we investigated a connection to the R2R3-MYB transcription factor MYB23. We show that MYB23 transcript levels are significantly reduced in shoots from gl2 mutants and that GL2 can drive the expression of a MYB23-promoter fusion to green fluorescent protein. Yeast one-hybrid, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and in planta reporter gene experiments indicate that an L1-box in the MYB23 promoter acts as a GL2 binding site. Taken together, our findings reveal a functional redundancy between GL2 and HDG11, two homeodomain leucine zipper transcription factors previously thought to mediate opposing functions in trichome morphogenesis. A model is proposed in which GL2 transcript levels are maintained through a positive feedback loop involving GL2 activation of MYB23. PMID:24824485

  19. Development of protein mimics for intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    deRonde, Brittany M; Tew, Gregory N

    2015-07-01

    Designing delivery agents for therapeutics is an ongoing challenge. As treatments and desired cargoes become more complex, the need for improved delivery vehicles becomes critical. Excellent delivery vehicles must ensure the stability of the cargo, maintain the cargo's solubility, and promote efficient delivery and release. In order to address these issues, many research groups have looked to nature for design inspiration. Proteins, such as HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription (TAT) and Antennapedia homeodomain protein, are capable of crossing cellular membranes. However, due to the complexities of their structures, they are synthetically challenging to reproduce in the laboratory setting. Being able to incorporate the key features of these proteins that enable cell entry into simpler scaffolds opens up a wide range of opportunities for the development of new delivery reagents with improved performance. This review charts the development of protein mimics based on cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and how structure-activity relationships (SARs) with these molecules and their protein counterparts ultimately led to the use of polymeric scaffolds. These scaffolds deviate from the normal peptide backbone, allowing for simpler, synthetic procedures to make carriers and tune chemical compositions for application specific needs. Successful design of polymeric protein mimics would allow researchers to further understand the key features in proteins and peptides necessary for efficient delivery and to design the next generation of more efficient delivery reagents. PMID:25858701

  20. Computational design of co-assembling protein-DNA nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Yun; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Wannier, Timothy M.; Guo, Chin-Lin; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular self-assemblies are of great interest to nanotechnologists because of their functional versatility and their biocompatibility. Over the past decade, sophisticated single-component nanostructures composed exclusively of nucleic acids, peptides and proteins have been reported, and these nanostructures have been used in a wide range of applications, from drug delivery to molecular computing. Despite these successes, the development of hybrid co-assemblies of nucleic acids and proteins has remained elusive. Here we use computational protein design to create a protein-DNA co-assembling nanomaterial whose assembly is driven via non-covalent interactions. To achieve this, a homodimerization interface is engineered onto the Drosophila Engrailed homeodomain (ENH), allowing the dimerized protein complex to bind to two double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules. By varying the arrangement of protein-binding sites on the dsDNA, an irregular bulk nanoparticle or a nanowire with single-molecule width can be spontaneously formed by mixing the protein and dsDNA building blocks. We characterize the protein-DNA nanowire using fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray crystallography, confirming that the nanowire is formed via the proposed mechanism. This work lays the foundation for the development of new classes of protein-DNA hybrid materials. Further applications can be explored by incorporating DNA origami, DNA aptamers and/or peptide epitopes into the protein-DNA framework presented here.

  1. Evolution of Ftz protein function in insects.

    PubMed

    Alonso, C R; Maxton-Kuechenmeister, J; Akam, M

    2001-09-18

    The Drosophila gene fushi tarazu (ftz) encodes a homeodomain-containing transcriptional regulator (Ftz) required at several stages during development. Drosophila melanogaster ftz (Dm-ftz) is first expressed in seven stripes defining alternate parasegments of the embryo--a "pair-rule" segmentation function [1, 2]. It is then expressed in specific neural precursor cells in the central nervous system and finally in the developing hindgut [3]. An Orthopteran ortholog of ftz (Sg-ftz, formally Dax) has been isolated from the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria [4]. The pattern of Sg-ftz expression in Schistocerca embryos suggests that some developmental roles of the ftz gene are likely to be conserved between these two species (e.g., CNS functions) while others may have diverged (e.g., segmentation functions). To test whether the function of the Ftz protein itself differs between these two species, here we compare the functions of Sg-Ftz and Dm-Ftz proteins by expressing both in Drosophila embryos. Sg-ftz mimics only poorly several segmentation roles of Dm-ftz (engrailed activation, wingless repression, and embryonic cuticle transformation). However, the two proteins are similarly active in the rescue of a CNS-specific ftz mutant. These findings argue that this ftz CNS function is mediated by conserved parts of the protein, while efficient pair-rule function requires sequences present specifically in the Drosophila protein. PMID:11566109

  2. Tumor Protein 53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 Enhances p53 Function and Represses Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Jeyran; Lock, Richard; Liu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) is a stress-induced p53-target gene whose expression is modulated by transcription factors such as p53, p73, and E2F1. TP53INP1 gene encodes two isoforms of TP53INP1 proteins, TP53INP1α and TP53INP1β, both of which appear to be key elements in p53 function. In association with homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2), TP53INP1 phosphorylates p53 protein at Serine-46. This enhances p53 protein stability and its transcriptional activity, leading to transcriptional activation of p53-target genes such as p21 and PIG3, cell growth arrest and apoptosis upon DNA damage stress. The anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of TP53INP1 indicate that TP53INP1 has an important role in cellular homeostasis and DNA damage response. Deficiency in TP53INP1 expression results in increased tumorigenesis, whereas TP53INP1 expression is repressed during early stages of cancer by factors such as miR-155. This review aims to summarize the roles of TP53INP1 in blocking tumor progression through p53-dependant and p53-independent pathways, as well as the elements which repress TP53INP1 expression, hence highlighting its potential as a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. PMID:23717325

  3. PREP1, MEIS1 homolog protein, regulates PF4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshiaki; Matsuura, Eri; Nagai, Ryohei; Sato, Takahiro; Watanabe, Ayako; Morita, Ikuo; Doi, Takefumi

    2003-05-23

    We have previously demonstrated that homeodomain proteins, MEIS1 and PBXs, transactivate the PF4 gene through the novel regulatory element termed TME. This study focuses on Pbx regulating protein 1 (PREP1), a MEIS1 homolog protein, for its transcriptional activity in the PF4 promoter. PREP1 binds to the TME in HEL cells. PREP1 was expressed in human megakaryocytes that differentiated from CD34(+) cells. EMSA shows that either PREP1 by itself or PREP1/PBX complexes bind to the two TGACAG motifs in the TME and activate the PF4 promoter. Furthermore, PREP1 and PREP1/PBX complexes synergistically activate the PF4 promoter with GATA-1 and ETS-1. These data demonstrate that PREP1 is also an important transcription factor that regulates PF4 gene expression such as MEIS1. Additionally, these data imply functional similarities and differences between PREP1 and MEIS1 in the regulation of PF4 gene expression. PMID:12732210

  4. Control of neuronal subtype identity by the C. elegans ARID protein CFI-1.

    PubMed

    Shaham, Shai; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2002-04-15

    The Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite nervous system is composed of 302 neurons that fall into at least 118 diverse classes. Here we describe cfi-1, a gene that contributes to the development of neuronal diversity. cfi-1 promotes appropriate differentiation of the URA sensory neurons and inhibits URA from expressing the male-specific CEM neuronal fate. The UNC-86 POU homeodomain protein is present in CEM and URA neurons, and can promote expression of CEM-specific genes in both CEM and URA, but CFI-1 inhibits expression of these genes in the URA cells. cfi-1 also promotes appropriate differentiation and glutamate receptor expression in the AVD and PVC interneurons. cfi-1 encodes a conserved neuron- and muscle-restricted DNA-binding protein containing an A/T rich interaction domain (ARID). ARID proteins regulate early patterning and muscle fate in Drosophila, but they have not previously been implicated in the control of neuronal subtype identity. PMID:11959845

  5. Mutations in the pho2 (bas2) transcription factor that differentially affect activation with its partner proteins bas1, pho4, and swi5.

    PubMed

    Bhoite, Leena T; Allen, Jason M; Garcia, Emily; Thomas, Lance R; Gregory, I David; Voth, Warren P; Whelihan, Kristen; Rolfes, Ronda J; Stillman, David J

    2002-10-01

    The yeast PHO2 gene encodes a homeodomain protein that exemplifies combinatorial control in transcriptional activation. Pho2 alone binds DNA in vitro with low affinity, but in vivo it activates transcription with at least three disparate DNA-binding proteins: the zinc finger protein Swi5, the helix-loop-helix factor Pho4, and Bas1, an myb-like activator. Pho2 + Swi5 activates HO, Pho2 + Pho4 activates PHO5, and Pho2 + Bas1 activates genes in the purine and histidine biosynthesis pathways. We have conducted a genetic screen and identified 23 single amino acid substitutions in Pho2 that differentially affect its ability to activate its specific target genes. Analysis of the mutations suggests that the central portion of Pho2 serves as protein-protein interactive surface, with a requirement for distinct amino acids for each partner protein. PMID:12145299

  6. The PBX-regulating protein PREP1 is present in different PBX-complexed forms in mouse.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, E; Schulz, H; Talarico, D; Blasi, F; Berthelsen, J

    1999-05-01

    Human PREP1, a novel homeodomain protein of the TALE super-family, forms a stable DNA-binding complex with PBX proteins in solution, a ternary complex with PBX and HOXB1 on DNA, and is able to act as a co-activator in the transcription of PBX-HOXB1 activated promoters (Berthelsen, J., Zappavigna, V., Ferretti, E., Mavilio, F., Blasi, F. , 1998b. The novel homeoprotein Prep1 modulates Pbx-Hox protein cooperatity. EMBO J. 17, 1434-1445; Berthelsen, J., Zappavigna, V., Mavilio, F., Blasi, F., 1998c. Prep1, a novel functional partner of Pbx proteins. EMBO J. 17, 1423-1433). Here we demonstrate the presence of DNA-binding PREP1-PBX complexes also in murine cells. In vivo, PREP1 is a predominant partner of PBX proteins in various murine tissues. However, the choice of PBX family member associated with PREP1 is largely tissue-type specific. We report the cloning and expression domain of murine Prep1 gene. Murine PREP1 shares 100% identity with human PREP1 in the homeodomain and 95% similarity throughout the whole protein. In the adult mouse, PREP1 is expressed ubiquitously, with peaks in testis and thymus. We further demonstrate the presence of murine Prep1 mRNA and protein, and of different DNA-binding PREP1-PBX complexes, in mouse embryos from at least 9.5 days p.c. Moreover, we show that PREP1 is present in all embryonic tissues from at least 7.5-17.5 days p.c with a predominantly nuclear staining. PREP1 is able to super-activate the PBX-HOXB-1 autoregulated Hoxb-1 promoter, and we show that all three proteins, PREP1, PBX and HOXB-1, are present together in the mouse rhombomere 4 domain in vivo, compatible with a role of PREP1 as a regulator of PBX and HOXB-1 proteins activity during development. PMID:10381567

  7. Expression of a Truncated ATHB17 Protein in Maize Increases Ear Weight at Silking

    PubMed Central

    Creelman, Robert A.; Griffith, Cara; Ahrens, Jeffrey E.; Taylor, J. Philip; Murphy, Lesley R.; Manjunath, Siva; Thompson, Rebecca L.; Lingard, Matthew J.; Back, Stephanie L.; Larue, Huachun; Brayton, Bonnie R.; Burek, Amanda J.; Tiwari, Shiv; Adam, Luc; Morrell, James A.; Caldo, Rico A.; Huai, Qing; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K.; Kuehn, Rosemarie; Sant, Anagha M.; Wingbermuehle, William J.; Sala, Rodrigo; Foster, Matt; Kinser, Josh D.; Mohanty, Radha; Jiang, Dongming; Ziegler, Todd E.; Huang, Mingya G.; Kuriakose, Saritha V.; Skottke, Kyle; Repetti, Peter P.; Reuber, T. Lynne; Ruff, Thomas G.; Petracek, Marie E.; Loida, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    ATHB17 (AT2G01430) is an Arabidopsis gene encoding a member of the α-subclass of the homeodomain leucine zipper class II (HD-Zip II) family of transcription factors. The ATHB17 monomer contains four domains common to all class II HD-Zip proteins: a putative repression domain adjacent to a homeodomain, leucine zipper, and carboxy terminal domain. However, it also possesses a unique N-terminus not present in other members of the family. In this study we demonstrate that the unique 73 amino acid N-terminus is involved in regulation of cellular localization of ATHB17. The ATHB17 protein is shown to function as a transcriptional repressor and an EAR-like motif is identified within the putative repression domain of ATHB17. Transformation of maize with an ATHB17 expression construct leads to the expression of ATHB17Δ113, a truncated protein lacking the first 113 amino acids which encodes a significant portion of the repression domain. Because ATHB17Δ113 lacks the repression domain, the protein cannot directly affect the transcription of its target genes. ATHB17Δ113 can homodimerize, form heterodimers with maize endogenous HD-Zip II proteins, and bind to target DNA sequences; thus, ATHB17Δ113 may interfere with HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional activity via a dominant negative mechanism. We provide evidence that maize HD-Zip II proteins function as transcriptional repressors and that ATHB17Δ113 relieves this HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional repression activity. Expression of ATHB17Δ113 in maize leads to increased ear size at silking and, therefore, may enhance sink potential. We hypothesize that this phenotype could be a result of modulation of endogenous HD-Zip II pathways in maize. PMID:24736658

  8. Origins and Evolution of WUSCHEL-Related Homeobox Protein Family in Plant Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Gaibin; Ding, Zhiwen; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Dabing; Xu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) is a large group of transcription factors specifically found in plants. WOX members contain the conserved homeodomain essential for plant development by regulating cell division and differentiation. However, the evolutionary relationship of WOX members in plant kingdom remains to be elucidated. In this study, we searched 350 WOX members from 50 species in plant kingdom. Linkage analysis of WOX protein sequences demonstrated that amino acid residues 141–145 and 153–160 located in the homeodomain are possibly associated with the function of WOXs during the evolution. These 350 members were grouped into 3 clades: the first clade represents the conservative WOXs from the lower plant algae to higher plants; the second clade has the members from vascular plant species; the third clade has the members only from spermatophyte species. Furthermore, among the members of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, we observed ubiquitous expression of genes in the first clade and the diversified expression pattern of WOX genes in distinct organs in the second clade and the third clade. This work provides insight into the origin and evolutionary process of WOXs, facilitating their functional investigations in the future. PMID:24511289

  9. The Drosophila homeodomain transcription factor, Vnd, associates with a variety of co-factors, is extensively phosphorylated and forms multiple complexes in embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanqing; Syu, Li-Jyun; Modica, Vicky; Yu, Zhongxin; Von Ohlen, Tonia; Mellerick, Dervla M

    2008-10-01

    Vnd is a dual transcriptional regulator that is essential for Drosophila dorsal-ventral patterning. Yet, our understanding of the biochemical basis for its regulatory activity is limited. Consistent with Vnd's ability to repress target expression in embryos, endogenously expressed Vnd physically associates with the co-repressor, Groucho, in Drosophila Kc167 cells. Vnd exists as a single complex in Kc167 cells, in contrast with embryonic Vnd, which forms multiple high-molecular-weight complexes. Unlike its vertebrate homolog, Nkx2.2, full-length Vnd can bind its target in electrophoretic mobility shift assay, suggesting that co-factor availability may influence Vnd's weak regulatory activity in transient transfections. We identify the high mobility group 1-type protein, D1, and the novel helix-loop-helix protein, Olig, as novel Vnd-interacting proteins using co-immunoprecipitation assays. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both D1 and Olig are co-expressed with Vnd during Drosophila embryogenesis, consistent with a biological basis for this interaction. We also suggest that the phosphorylation state of Vnd influences its ability to interact with co-factors, because Vnd is extensively phosphorylated in embryos and can be phosphorylated by activated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vitro. These results highlight the complexities of Vnd-mediated regulation. PMID:18795949

  10. Meis proteins are major in vivo DNA binding partners for wild-type but not chimeric Pbx proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C P; Jacobs, Y; Nakamura, T; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G; Cleary, M L

    1997-01-01

    The Pbx1 and Meis1 proto-oncogenes code for divergent homeodomain proteins that are targets for oncogenic mutations in human and murine leukemias, respectively, and implicated by genetic analyses to functionally collaborate with Hox proteins during embryonic development and/or oncogenesis. Although Pbx proteins have been shown to dimerize with Hox proteins and modulate their DNA binding properties in vitro, the biochemical compositions of endogenous Pbx-containing complexes have not been determined. In the present study, we demonstrate that Pbx and Meis proteins form abundant complexes that comprise a major Pbx-containing DNA binding activity in nuclear extracts of cultured cells and mouse embryos. Pbx1 and Meis1 dimerize in solution and cooperatively bind bipartite DNA sequences consisting of directly adjacent Pbx and Meis half sites. Pbx1-Meis1 heterodimers display distinctive DNA binding specificities and cross-bind to a subset of Pbx-Hox sites, including those previously implicated as response elements for the execution of Pbx-dependent Hox programs in vivo. Chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 is unable to bind DNA with Meis1, due to the deletion of amino-terminal Pbx1 sequences following fusion with E2a. We conclude that Meis proteins are preferred in vivo DNA binding partners for wild-type Pbx1, a relationship that is circumvented by its oncogenic counterpart E2a-Pbx1. PMID:9315626

  11. The TALE face of Hox proteins in animal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Merabet, Samir; Galliot, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are major regulators of embryonic development. One of their most conserved functions is to coordinate the formation of specific body structures along the anterior-posterior (AP) axis in Bilateria. This architectural role was at the basis of several morphological innovations across bilaterian evolution. In this review, we traced the origin of the Hox patterning system by considering the partnership with PBC and Meis proteins. PBC and Meis belong to the TALE-class of homeodomain-containing transcription factors and act as generic cofactors of Hox proteins for AP axis patterning in Bilateria. Recent data indicate that Hox proteins acquired the ability to interact with their TALE partners in the last common ancestor of Bilateria and Cnidaria. These interactions relied initially on a short peptide motif called hexapeptide (HX), which is present in Hox and non-Hox protein families. Remarkably, Hox proteins can also recruit the TALE cofactors by using specific PBC Interaction Motifs (SPIMs). We describe how a functional Hox/TALE patterning system emerged in eumetazoans through the acquisition of SPIMs. We anticipate that interaction flexibility could be found in other patterning systems, being at the heart of the astonishing morphological diversity observed in the animal kingdom. PMID:26347770

  12. Computational design and experimental verification of a symmetric protein homodimer.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yun; Huang, Po-Ssu; Hsu, Fang-Ciao; Huang, Shing-Jong; Mayo, Stephen L

    2015-08-25

    Homodimers are the most common type of protein assembly in nature and have distinct features compared with heterodimers and higher order oligomers. Understanding homodimer interactions at the atomic level is critical both for elucidating their biological mechanisms of action and for accurate modeling of complexes of unknown structure. Computation-based design of novel protein-protein interfaces can serve as a bottom-up method to further our understanding of protein interactions. Previous studies have demonstrated that the de novo design of homodimers can be achieved to atomic-level accuracy by β-strand assembly or through metal-mediated interactions. Here, we report the design and experimental characterization of a α-helix-mediated homodimer with C2 symmetry based on a monomeric Drosophila engrailed homeodomain scaffold. A solution NMR structure shows that the homodimer exhibits parallel helical packing similar to the design model. Because the mutations leading to dimer formation resulted in poor thermostability of the system, design success was facilitated by the introduction of independent thermostabilizing mutations into the scaffold. This two-step design approach, function and stabilization, is likely to be generally applicable, especially if the desired scaffold is of low thermostability. PMID:26269568

  13. Cooperative DNA Recognition Modulated by an Interplay between Protein-Protein Interactions and DNA-Mediated Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Felipe; Bouvier, Benjamin; Cojocaru, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    Highly specific transcriptional regulation depends on the cooperative association of transcription factors into enhanceosomes. Usually, their DNA-binding cooperativity originates from either direct interactions or DNA-mediated allostery. Here, we performed unbiased molecular simulations followed by simulations of protein-DNA unbinding and free energy profiling to study the cooperative DNA recognition by OCT4 and SOX2, key components of enhanceosomes in pluripotent cells. We found that SOX2 influences the orientation and dynamics of the DNA-bound configuration of OCT4. In addition SOX2 modifies the unbinding free energy profiles of both DNA-binding domains of OCT4, the POU specific and POU homeodomain, despite interacting directly only with the first. Thus, we demonstrate that the OCT4-SOX2 cooperativity is modulated by an interplay between protein-protein interactions and DNA-mediated allostery. Further, we estimated the change in OCT4-DNA binding free energy due to the cooperativity with SOX2, observed a good agreement with experimental measurements, and found that SOX2 affects the relative DNA-binding strength of the two OCT4 domains. Based on these findings, we propose that available interaction partners in different biological contexts modulate the DNA exploration routes of multi-domain transcription factors such as OCT4. We consider the OCT4-SOX2 cooperativity as a paradigm of how specificity of transcriptional regulation is achieved through concerted modulation of protein-DNA recognition by different types of interactions. PMID:26067358

  14. Phosphorylation-dependent control of Pc2 SUMO E3 ligase activity by its substrate protein HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Roscic, Ana; Möller, Andreas; Calzado, Marco A; Renner, Florian; Wimmer, Verena C; Gresko, Ekaterina; Lüdi, Katharina Schmid; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2006-10-01

    Sumoylation serves to control key cellular functions, but the regulation of SUMO E3 ligase activity is largely unknown. Here we show that the polycomb group protein Pc2 binds to and colocalizes with homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) and serves as a SUMO E3 ligase for this kinase. DNA damage-induced HIPK2 directly phosphorylates Pc2 at multiple sites, which in turn controls Pc2 sumoylation and intranuclear localization. Inducible phosphorylation of Pc2 at threonine 495 is required for its ability to increase HIPK2 sumoylation in response to DNA damage, thereby establishing an autoregulatory feedback loop between a SUMO substrate and its cognate E3 ligase. Sumoylation enhances the ability of HIPK2 to mediate transcriptional repression, thus providing a mechanistic link for DNA damage-induced transcriptional silencing. PMID:17018294

  15. Hox proteins drive cell segregation and non-autonomous apical remodelling during hindbrain segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Prin, Fabrice; Serpente, Patricia; Itasaki, Nobue; Gould, Alex P.

    2014-01-01

    Hox genes encode a conserved family of homeodomain transcription factors regulating development along the major body axis. During embryogenesis, Hox proteins are expressed in segment-specific patterns and control numerous different segment-specific cell fates. It has been unclear, however, whether Hox proteins drive the epithelial cell segregation mechanism that is thought to initiate the segmentation process. Here, we investigate the role of vertebrate Hox proteins during the partitioning of the developing hindbrain into lineage-restricted units called rhombomeres. Loss-of-function mutants and ectopic expression assays reveal that Hoxb4 and its paralogue Hoxd4 are necessary and sufficient for cell segregation, and for the most caudal rhombomere boundary (r6/r7). Hox4 proteins regulate Eph/ephrins and other cell-surface proteins, and can function in a non-cell-autonomous manner to induce apical cell enlargement on both sides of their expression border. Similarly, other Hox proteins expressed at more rostral rhombomere interfaces can also regulate Eph/ephrins, induce apical remodelling and drive cell segregation in ectopic expression assays. However, Krox20, a key segmentation factor expressed in odd rhombomeres (r3 and r5), can largely override Hox proteins at the level of regulation of a cell surface target, Epha4. This study suggests that most, if not all, Hox proteins share a common potential to induce cell segregation but in some contexts this is masked or modulated by other transcription factors. PMID:24574009

  16. High mobility group protein 2 functionally interacts with the POU domains of octamer transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Zwilling, S; König, H; Wirth, T

    1995-01-01

    The octamer transcription factors Oct1 and Oct2 are involved in the transcriptional regulation of both lymphoid-specific and ubiquitously expressed genes. Their activity depends critically on their interaction with distinct cellular cofactors. Therefore, we have isolated cDNAs encoding proteins that physically interact with Oct2. Here we describe the analysis of one such clone, representing the murine homologue of high mobility group (HMG) protein 2. We have mapped the interaction domains for both proteins and have shown that HMG2 and Oct2 interact via their HMG domains and POU homeodomains, respectively. This interaction is not restricted to Oct2, as other members of the octamer transcription factor family like Oct1 and Oct6 also interact with HMG2. The interaction with HMG2 results in a marked increase in the sequence-specific DNA binding activity of the Oct proteins. Interestingly, the HMG2 protein is not present in the protein-DNA complex detected by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The Oct and HMG2 proteins also interact in vivo. A chimeric protein, in which the strong transactivation domain of VP16 was fused directly to the HMG domains of HMG2, stimulated the activity of an octamer-dependent reporter construct upon cotransfection. Furthermore, the expression of antisense RNA for HMG2 specifically reduces octamer-dependent transcription. These results suggest that one of the functions of HMG2 is to support the octamer transcription factors in their role as transcriptional activators. Images PMID:7720710

  17. WDR11, a WD Protein that Interacts with Transcription Factor EMX1, Is Mutated in Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Goo; Ahn, Jang-Won; Kurth, Ingo; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Kulharya, Anita; Ha, Kyung-Soo; Itokawa, Yasuhide; Meliciani, Irene; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Lee, Deresa; Rosenberger, Georg; Ozata, Metin; Bick, David P.; Sherins, Richard J.; Nagase, Takahiro; Tekin, Mustafa; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Gusella, James F.; Kalscheuer, Vera; Choi, Cheol Yong; Layman, Lawrence C.

    2010-01-01

    By defining the chromosomal breakpoint of a balanced t(10;12) translocation from a subject with Kallmann syndrome and scanning genes in its vicinity in unrelated hypogonadal subjects, we have identified WDR11 as a gene involved in human puberty. We found six patients with a total of five different heterozygous WDR11 missense mutations, including three alterations (A435T, R448Q, and H690Q) in WD domains important for β propeller formation and protein-protein interaction. In addition, we discovered that WDR11 interacts with EMX1, a homeodomain transcription factor involved in the development of olfactory neurons, and that missense alterations reduce or abolish this interaction. Our findings suggest that impaired pubertal development in these patients results from a deficiency of productive WDR11 protein interaction. PMID:20887964

  18. Ovate family protein1 interaction with BLH3 regulates transition timing from vegetative to reproductive phase in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liguo; Zhang, Xiaofei; Ju, Hanxun; Chen, Jingui; Wang, Shucai; Wang, Hemeng; Zhao, Yuanling; Chang, Ying

    2016-02-12

    Three-Amino-acid-Loop-Extension(TALE) homeodomain transcription factor BLH3 regulates timing of transition from vegetative to reproductive phase. Previous preliminary results obtained using large-scale yeast two-hybrids indicate that BLH3 protein possibly interact with Ovate Family Proteins(OFPs) transcription co-regulators. Nevertheless, it is uncertain whether OFP1-BLH3 complex is involved in regulation of timing of transition from vegetative to reproductive phase in Arabidopsis. The interaction between BLH3 and OFP1 was re-tested and verified by a yeast two-hybrid system. We found that the BLH3-OFP1 interaction was mainly mediated through the BLH3 homeodomain. Meanwhile, this interaction was further confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) in vivo. Further, by establishing protoplast transient expression, we discovered that BLH3 acts as a transcriptional activator, whereas OFP1 functioned as a repressor. The interactions between OFP1 and BLH3 can reduce BLH3 transcriptional activity. The ofp1 mutant lines and blh3 mutant lines, OFP1 overexpress lines and BLH3 overexpress lines can both influence timing of transition from vegetative to reproductive phase. Furthermore, 35s:OFP1/blh3 plants exhibited flowering and leaf quantity similar to that of the wild-type controls. 35s:BLH3/ofp1 plants flowered earlier and had less leaves than wild-type controls, indicating that OFP1 protein might depend partially on BLH3 in its function to regulate the timing of transition from vegetative to reproductive phase. These results support our assumption that, by interacting with OFP1, BLH3 forms a functional protein complex that controls timing of progression from vegetative to reproductive phase, and OFP1 might negatively regulate BLH3 or the BLH-KNOX complex, an important interaction for sustaining the normal transition from vegetative to reproductive phase. PMID:26809096

  19. The HOXC13-controlled expression of early hair keratin genes in the human hair follicle does not involve TALE proteins MEIS and PREP as cofactors.

    PubMed

    Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Schweizer, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    We previously showed that the homeodomain protein HOXC13 is involved in the expression control of the early human hair keratin genes hHa5 and hHa2, which contain specific HOXC13 binding sites in their proximal promoters. Hox specificity is generally thought to be enhanced by the interaction with members of the TALE superclass of homeodomain proteins Pbx, Meis, and Prep. Using reverse transcription PCR with total human hair follicle RNA, we demonstrated transcripts of the major TALE proteins PBX1-4, MEIS1, 2 and PREP1, 2 in the human hair follicle. In view of the presence of MEIS/PREP responsive elements in close vicinity to the HOXC13 binding sites of the hHa5 and hHa2 promoters, we determined the expression sites of these TALE proteins in the human hair follicle. We found that MEIS1, MEIS2, PREP1 and PREP2 were differentially expressed in the three layers of the inner root sheath. In addition, MEIS2 and PREP1 exhibited expression in the mid-to upper hair cortex, with PREP1 being also expressed in the dermal papilla and the connective tissue sheath of the hair follicle. In virtually all cases, the expression of these TALE proteins was exclusively cytoplasmic. Considering that in contrast, HOXC13 is expressed in the nuclei of matrix, precortex and lower cuticle cells of the hair follicle, our data suggest that despite the presence of MEIS/PREP binding sites in the hHa5 and hHa2 promoters, the HOXC13-controlled activation of these genes in the hair follicle does not seem to involve these TALE proteins as cofactors. PMID:16292560

  20. The WD40-repeat protein Han11 functions as a scaffold protein to control HIPK2 and MEKK1 kinase functions

    PubMed Central

    Ritterhoff, Stefanie; Farah, Carla M; Grabitzki, Julia; Lochnit, Günter; Skurat, Alexander V; Schmitz, Michael Lienhard

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases are organized in hierarchical networks that are assembled and regulated by scaffold proteins. Here, we identify the evolutionary conserved WD40-repeat protein Han11 as an interactor of the kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2). In vitro experiments showed the direct binding of Han11 to HIPK2, but also to the kinases DYRK1a, DYRK1b and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1). Han11 was required to allow coupling of MEKK1 to DYRK1 and HIPK2. Knockdown experiments in Caenorhabditis elegans showed the relevance of the Han11 orthologs Swan-1 and Swan-2 for the osmotic stress response. Downregulation of Han11 in human cells lowered the threshold and amplitude of HIPK2- and MEKK1-triggered signalling events and changed the kinetics of kinase induction. Han11 knockdown changed the amplitude and time dependence of HIPK2-driven transcription in response to DNA damage and also interfered with MEKK1-triggered gene expression and stress signalling. Impaired signal transmission also occurred upon interference with stoichiometrically assembled signalling complexes by Han11 overexpression. Collectively, these experiments identify Han11 as a novel scaffold protein regulating kinase signalling by HIPK2 and MEKK1. PMID:20940704

  1. DPF2 regulates OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Dijuan; Shen, Yuxian; Tao, Xiaofang; Liu, Lihua; Zhong, Yongwang; Fang, Shengyun

    2015-12-01

    The amount of transcription factor OCT4 is strictly regulated. A tight regulation of OCT4 levels is crucial for mammalian embryonic development and oncogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying regulation of OCT4 protein expression and nuclear distribution are largely unknown. Here, we report that DPF2, a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein, is upregulated during H9 cell differentiation induced by retinoic acid. Endogenous interaction between DPF2 and OCT4 in P19 cells was revealed by an immunoprecipitation assay. GST-pull down assay proved that OCT4 protein in H9 cells and recombinant OCT4 can precipitate with DPF2 in vitro. In vitro ubiquitination assay demonstrated DPF2 might serve as an E3 ligase. Knock down of dpf2 using siRNA increased OCT4 protein level and stability in P19 cells. DPF2 siRNAs also up-regulates OCT4 but not NANOG in H9 cells. However, RA fails to downregulates OCT4 protein level in cells infected by lenitviruses containing DPF2 siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of both DPF2 and OCT4 in 293 cells proved the DPF2-OCT4 interaction. DPF2 but not PHD2 mutant DPF2 enhanced ubiquitination and degradation of OCT4 in 293 cells co-expressed DPF2 and OCT4. Both wild type DPF2 and PHD2 mutant DPF2 redistributes nuclear OCT4 without affecting DPF2-OCT4 interaction. Further analysis indicated that DPF2 decreases monomeric and mono-ubiquitinated OCT4, assembles poly-ubiquitin chains on OCT4 mainly through Ub-K48 linkage. These findings contribute to an understanding of how OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution is regulated by its associated protein. PMID:26417682

  2. Grow-ING, Age-ING and Die-ING: ING proteins link cancer, senescence and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Michael; Berardi, Philip; Gong Wei; Riabowol, Karl . E-mail: karl@ucalgary.ca

    2006-04-15

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) family of plant homeodomain (PHD) proteins induce apoptosis and regulate gene expression through stress-inducible binding of phospholipids with subsequent nuclear and nucleolar localization. Relocalization occurs concomitantly with interaction with a subset of nuclear proteins, including PCNA, p53 and several regulators of acetylation such as the p300/CBP and PCAF histone acetyltransferases (HATs), as well as the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and hSir2. These interactions alter the localized state of chromatin compaction, subsequently affecting the expression of subsets of genes, including those associated with the stress response (Hsp70), apoptosis (Bax, MDM2) and cell cycle regulation (p21{sup WAF1}, cyclin B) in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. The expression levels and subcellular localization of ING proteins are altered in a significant number of human cancer types, while the expression of ING isoforms changes during cellular aging, suggesting that ING proteins may play a role in linking cellular transformation and replicative senescence. The variety of functions attributed to ING proteins suggest that this tumor suppressor serves to link the disparate processes of cell cycle regulation, cell suicide and cellular aging through epigenetic regulation of gene expression. This review examines recent findings in the ING field with a focus on the functions of protein-protein interactions involving ING family members and the mechanisms by which these interactions facilitate the various roles that ING proteins play in tumorigenesis, apoptosis and senescence.

  3. Hipk proteins dually regulate Wnt/Wingless signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Esther M; Swarup, Sharan; Lee, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling system that is used reiteratively, both spatially and temporally, to control the development of multicellular animals. The stability of cytoplasmic β-catenin/Armadillo, the transcriptional effector of the pathway, is controlled by sequential N-terminal phosphorylation and ubiquitination that targets it for proteasome-mediated degradation. Orthologous members of the Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase family from Drosophila to vertebrates have been implicated in the regulation of Wnt/Wingless signaling. In Drosophila, as a consequence of Hipk activity, cells accumulate stabilized Armadillo that directs the expression of Wg-specific target genes. Hipk promotes the stabilization of Armadillo by inhibiting its ubiquitination (and hence subsequent degradation) by the SCF(Slimb) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Vertebrate Hipk2 impedes β-catenin ubiquitination to promote its stability and the Wnt signal in a mechanism that is functionally conserved. Moreover, we describe here that Hipk proteins have a role independent of their effect on β-catenin/Armadillo stability to enhance Wnt/Wingless signaling. PMID:22634475

  4. Segmental expression of Hoxb2 in r4 requires two separate sites that integrate cooperative interactions between Prep1, Pbx and Hox proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, E; Marshall, H; Pöpperl, H; Maconochie, M; Krumlauf, R; Blasi, F

    2000-01-01

    Direct auto- and cross-regulatory interactions between Hox genes serve to establish and maintain segmentally restricted patterns in the developing hindbrain. Rhombomere r4-specific expression of both Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 depends upon bipartite cis Hox response elements for the group 1 paralogous proteins, Hoxal and Hoxbl. The DNA-binding ability and selectivity of these proteins depend upon the formation of specific heterodimeric complexes with members of the PBC homeodomain protein family (Pbx genes). The r4 enhancers from Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 have the same activity, but differ with respect to the number and organisation of bipartite Pbx/Hox (PH) sites required, suggesting the intervention of other components/sequences. We report here that another family of homeodomain proteins (TALE, Three-Amino acids-Loop-Extension: Prep1, Meis, HTH), capable of dimerizing with Pbx/EXD, is involved in the mechanisms of r4-restricted expression. We show that: (1) the r4-specific Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 enhancers are complex elements containing separate PH and Prep/Meis (PM) sites; (2) the PM site of the Hoxb2, but not Hoxb1, enhancer is essential in vivo for r4 expression and also influences other sites of expression; (3) both PM and PH sites are required for in vitro binding of Prepl-Pbx and formation and binding of a ternary Hoxbl-Pbxla (or 1b)-Prepl complex. (4) A similar ternary association forms in nuclear extracts from embryonal P19 cells, but only upon retinoic acid induction. This requires synthesis of Hoxbl and also contains Pbx with either Prepl or Meisl. Together these findings highlight the fact that PM sites are found in close proximity to bipartite PH motifs in several Hox responsive elements shown to be important in vivo and that such sites play an essential role in potentiating regulatory activity in combination with the PH motifs. PMID:10654609

  5. Identification of a Protein Network Interacting with TdRF1, a Wheat RING Ubiquitin Ligase with a Protective Role against Cellular Dehydration1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Davide; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria; Lopez-Torrejon, Gema; Marzin, Stephan; Schweizer, Patrick; Stanca, Antonio Michele; del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Cattivelli, Luigi; Mazzucotelli, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Plants exploit ubiquitination to modulate the proteome with the final aim to ensure environmental adaptation and developmental plasticity. Ubiquitination targets are specifically driven to degradation through the action of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Genetic analyses have indicated wide functions of ubiquitination in plant life; nevertheless, despite the large number of predicted E3s, only a few of them have been characterized so far, and only a few ubiquitination targets are known. In this work, we characterized durum wheat (Triticum durum) RING Finger1 (TdRF1) as a durum wheat nuclear ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, its barley (Hordeum vulgare) homolog was shown to protect cells from dehydration stress. A protein network interacting with TdRF1 has been defined. The transcription factor WHEAT BEL1-TYPE HOMEODOMAIN1 (WBLH1) was degraded in a TdRF1-dependent manner through the 26S proteasome in vivo, the mitogen-activated protein kinase TdWNK5 [for Triticum durum WITH NO LYSINE (K)5] was able to phosphorylate TdRF1 in vitro, and the RING-finger protein WHEAT VIVIPAROUS-INTERACTING PROTEIN2 (WVIP2) was shown to have a strong E3 ligase activity. The genes coding for the TdRF1 interactors were all responsive to cold and/or dehydration stress, and a negative regulative function in dehydration tolerance was observed for the barley homolog of WVIP2. A role in the control of plant development was previously known, or predictable based on homology, for wheat BEL1-type homeodomain1(WBLH1). Thus, TdRF1 E3 ligase might act regulating the response to abiotic stress and remodeling plant development in response to environmental constraints. PMID:22167118

  6. In planta localisation patterns of MADS domain proteins during floral development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Urbanus, Susan L; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna V; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Immink, Richard GH; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background MADS domain transcription factors play important roles in various developmental processes in flowering plants. Members of this family play a prominent role in the transition to flowering and the specification of floral organ identity. Several studies reported mRNA expression patterns of the genes encoding these MADS domain proteins, however, these studies do not provide the necessary information on the temporal and spatial localisation of the proteins. We have made GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP) translational fusions with the four MADS domain proteins SEPALLATA3, AGAMOUS, FRUITFULL and APETALA1 from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and analysed the protein localisation patterns in living plant tissues by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results We unravelled the protein localisation patterns of the four MADS domain proteins at a cellular and subcellular level in inflorescence and floral meristems, during development of the early flower bud stages, and during further differentiation of the floral organs. The protein localisation patterns revealed a few deviations from known mRNA expression patterns, suggesting a non-cell autonomous action of these factors or alternative control mechanisms. In addition, we observed a change in the subcellular localisation of SEPALLATA3 from a predominantly nuclear localisation to a more cytoplasmic localisation, occurring specifically during petal and stamen development. Furthermore, we show that the down-regulation of the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL in ovular tissues is preceded by the occurrence of both AGAMOUS and SEPALLATA3 proteins, supporting the hypothesis that both proteins together suppress WUSCHEL expression in the ovule. Conclusion This approach provides a highly detailed in situ map of MADS domain protein presence during early and later stages of floral development. The subcellular localisation of the transcription factors in the cytoplasm, as observed at certain stages during

  7. Conservation and diversification of Msx protein in metazoan evolution.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Kamiya, Akiko; Ishiguro, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi C; Saitou, Naruya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Aruga, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Msx (/msh) family genes encode homeodomain (HD) proteins that control ontogeny in many animal species. We compared the structures of Msx genes from a wide range of Metazoa (Porifera, Cnidaria, Nematoda, Arthropoda, Tardigrada, Platyhelminthes, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Annelida, Echiura, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, and Chordata) to gain an understanding of the role of these genes in phylogeny. Exon-intron boundary analysis suggested that the position of the intron located N-terminally to the HDs was widely conserved in all the genes examined, including those of cnidarians. Amino acid (aa) sequence comparison revealed 3 new evolutionarily conserved domains, as well as very strong conservation of the HDs. Two of the three domains were associated with Groucho-like protein binding in both a vertebrate and a cnidarian Msx homolog, suggesting that the interaction between Groucho-like proteins and Msx proteins was established in eumetazoan ancestors. Pairwise comparison among the collected HDs and their C-flanking aa sequences revealed that the degree of sequence conservation varied depending on the animal taxa from which the sequences were derived. Highly conserved Msx genes were identified in the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, Hemichordata, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, and Anthozoa. The wide distribution of the conserved sequences in the animal phylogenetic tree suggested that metazoan ancestors had already acquired a set of conserved domains of the current Msx family genes. Interestingly, although strongly conserved sequences were recovered from the Vertebrata, Cephalochordata, and Anthozoa, the sequences from the Urochordata and Hydrozoa showed weak conservation. Because the Vertebrata-Cephalochordata-Urochordata and Anthozoa-Hydrozoa represent sister groups in the Chordata and Cnidaria, respectively, Msx sequence diversification may have occurred differentially in the course of evolution. We speculate that selective loss of the conserved domains in Msx family

  8. PHF6 Degrees of Separation: The Multifaceted Roles of a Chromatin Adaptor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Matthew A.M.; Ivanochko, Danton; Picketts, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of chromatin regulation to human disease is highlighted by the growing number of mutations identified in genes encoding chromatin remodeling proteins. While such mutations were first identified in severe developmental disorders, or in specific cancers, several genes have been implicated in both, including the plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) gene. Indeed, germline mutations in PHF6 are the cause of the Börjeson–Forssman–Lehmann X-linked intellectual disability syndrome (BFLS), while somatic PHF6 mutations have been identified in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studies from different groups over the last few years have made a significant impact towards a functional understanding of PHF6 protein function. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of PHF6 with particular emphasis on how it interfaces with a distinct set of interacting partners and its functional roles in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus. Overall, PHF6 is emerging as a key chromatin adaptor protein critical to the regulation of neurogenesis and hematopoiesis. PMID:26103525

  9. Hipk2 and PP1c cooperate to maintain Dvl protein levels required for Wnt signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Ishitani, Shizuka; Sato, Atsushi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Ishitani, Tohru

    2014-09-11

    The phosphoprotein Dishevelled (Dvl) is a common essential component of Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathways. However, the regulation and significance of Dvl phosphorylation are not fully understood. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (Hipk2) facilitates protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1c)-mediated dephosphorylation of Dvl via its C-terminal domain and that this dephosphorylation blocks ubiquitination and consequent degradation mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, which targets the phosphorylated form of Dvl proteins. Inhibition of Hipk2 or PP1c function reduces Dvl protein levels and suppresses Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/PCP pathway-dependent events in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos, suggesting that Hipk2 and PP1c are essential for maintaining Dvl protein levels that are sufficient to activate Wnt signaling. We also show that Wnt-3a, a Wnt/β-catenin ligand, induces dissociation of the Dvl-Hipk2-PP1c complex and Dvl degradation under high-cell-density conditions. This regulation may be a negative feedback mechanism that fine-tunes Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:25159144

  10. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis. PMID:27031510

  11. Pax-3, a novel murine DNA binding protein expressed during early neurogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, M D; Chalepakis, G; Deutsch, U; Erselius, J R; Gruss, P

    1991-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of Pax-3, a novel murine paired box gene expressed exclusively during embryogenesis. Pax-3 encodes a 479 amino acid protein with an Mr of 56 kd containing both a paired domain and a paired-type homeodomain. The Pax-3 protein is a DNA binding protein that specifically recognizes the e5 sequence present upstream of the Drosophila even-skipped gene. Pax-3 transcripts are first detected in 8.5 day mouse embryos where they are restricted to the dorsal part of the neuroepithelium and to the adjacent segmented dermomyotome. During early neurogenesis, Pax-3 expression is limited to mitotic cells in the ventricular zone of the developing spinal cord and to distinct regions in the hindbrain, midbrain and diencephalon. In 10-12 day embryos, expression of Pax-3 is also seen in neural crest cells of the developing spinal ganglia, the craniofacial mesectoderm and in limb mesenchyme of 10 and 11 day embryos. Images PMID:2022185

  12. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  13. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  14. Chromatin-dependent repression of the Arabidopsis floral integrator genes involves plant specific PHD-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    López-González, Leticia; Mouriz, Alfonso; Narro-Diego, Laura; Bustos, Regla; Martínez-Zapater, José Miguel; Jarillo, Jose A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    The interplay among histone modifications modulates the expression of master regulatory genes in development. Chromatin effector proteins bind histone modifications and translate the epigenetic status into gene expression patterns that control development. Here, we show that two Arabidopsis thaliana paralogs encoding plant-specific proteins with a plant homeodomain (PHD) motif, SHORT LIFE (SHL) and EARLY BOLTING IN SHORT DAYS (EBS), function in the chromatin-mediated repression of floral initiation and play independent roles in the control of genes regulating flowering. Previous results showed that repression of the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) requires EBS. We establish that SHL is necessary to negatively regulate the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO1 (SOC1), another floral integrator. SHL and EBS recognize di- and trimethylated histone H3 at lysine 4 and bind regulatory regions of SOC1 and FT, respectively. These PHD proteins maintain an inactive chromatin conformation in SOC1 and FT by preventing high levels of H3 acetylation, bind HISTONE DEACETYLASE6, and play a central role in regulating flowering time. SHL and EBS are widely conserved in plants but are absent in other eukaryotes, suggesting that the regulatory module mediated by these proteins could represent a distinct mechanism for gene expression control in plants. PMID:25281686

  15. Meis family proteins are required for hindbrain development in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Choe, Seong-Kyu; Vlachakis, Nikolaos; Sagerström, Charles G

    2002-02-01

    Meis homeodomain proteins function as Hox-cofactors by binding Pbx and Hox proteins to form multimeric complexes that control transcription of genes involved in development and differentiation. It is not known what role Meis proteins play in these complexes, nor is it clear which Hox functions require Meis proteins in vivo. We now show that a divergent Meis family member, Prep1, acts as a Hox co-factor in zebrafish. This suggests that all Meis family members have at least one shared function and that this function must be carried out by a conserved domain. We proceed to show that the Meinox domain, an N-terminal conserved domain shown to mediate Pbx binding, is sufficient to provide Meis activity to a Pbx/Hox complex. We find that this activity is separable from Pbx binding and resides within the M1 subdomain. This finding also presents a rational strategy for interfering with Meis activity in vivo. We accomplish this by expressing the Pbx4/Lzr N-terminus, which sequesters Meis proteins in the cytoplasm away from the nuclear transcription complexes. Sequestering Meis proteins in the cytoplasm leads to extensive loss of rhombomere (r) 3- and r4-specific gene expression, as well as defective rhombomere boundary formation in this region. These changes in gene expression correlate with impaired neuronal differentiation in r3 and r4, e.g. the loss of r3-specific nV branchiomotor neurons and r4-specific Mauthner neurons. We conclude that Meis family proteins are essential for the specification of r3 and r4 of the hindbrain. PMID:11830560

  16. Protein Inhibitors of Activated STAT (Pias1 and Piasy) Differentially Regulate Pituitary Homeobox 2 (PITX2) Transcriptional Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbo; Sun, Zhao; Zhang, Zichao; Saadi, Irfan; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiao; Gao, Shan; Engle, Jamison J.; Kuburas, Adisa; Fu, Xueyao; Yu, Wenjie; Klein, William H.; Russo, Andrew F.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein inhibitors of activated STAT (Pias) proteins can act independent of sumoylation to modulate the activity of transcription factors and Pias proteins interacting with transcription factors can either activate or repress their activity. Pias proteins are expressed in many tissues and cells during development and we asked if Pias proteins regulated the pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) homeodomain protein, which modulates developmental gene expression. Piasy and Pias1 proteins are expressed during craniofacial/tooth development and directly interact and differentially regulate PITX2 transcriptional activity. Piasy and Pias1 are co-expressed in craniofacial tissues with PITX2. Yeast two-hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments demonstrate Piasy and Pias1 interactions with the PITX2 protein. Piasy interacts with the PITX2 C-terminal tail to attenuate its transcriptional activity. In contrast, Pias1 interacts with the PITX2 C-terminal tail to increase PITX2 transcriptional activity. The E3 ligase activity associated with the RING domain in Piasy is not required for the attenuation of PITX2 activity, however, the RING domain of Pias1 is required for enhanced PITX2 transcriptional activity. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays reveal PITX2 interactions with Piasy and Pias1 in the nucleus. Piasy represses the synergistic activation of PITX2 with interacting co-factors and Piasy represses Pias1 activation of PITX2 transcriptional activity. In contrast, Pias1 did not affect the synergistic interaction of PITX2 with transcriptional co-factors. Last, we demonstrate that Pias proteins form a complex with PITX2 and Lef-1, and PITX2 and β-catenin. Lef-1, β-catenin, and Pias interactions with PITX2 provide new molecular mechanisms for the regulation of PITX2 transcriptional activity and the activity of Pias proteins. PMID:23515314

  17. AtLa1 protein initiates IRES-dependent translation of WUSCHEL mRNA and regulates the stem cell homeostasis of Arabidopsis in response to environmental hazards.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuchao; Rao, Shaofei; Chang, Beibei; Wang, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Kaidian; Hou, Xueliang; Zhu, Xueyi; Wu, Haijun; Tian, Zhaoxia; Zhao, Zhong; Yang, Chengwei; Huang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Plant stem cells are hypersensitive to environmental hazards throughout their life cycle, but the mechanism by which plants safeguard stem cell homeostasis in response to environmental hazards is largely unknown. The homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) protein maintains the stem cell pool in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that the translation of WUS mRNA is directed by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) located in the 5'-untranslated region. The AtLa1 protein, an RNA-binding factor, binds to the 5'-untranslated region and initiates the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA. Knockdown of AtLa1 expression represses the WUS IRES-dependent translation and leads to the arrest of growth and development. The AtLa1 protein is mainly located in the nucleoplasm. However, environmental hazards promote the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of the AtLa1 protein, which further enhances the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA. Genetic evidence indicates that the WUS protein increases the tolerance of the shoot apical meristem to environmental hazards. Based on these results, we conclude that the stem cell niche in Arabidopsis copes with environmental hazards by enhancing the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA under the control of the AtLa1 protein. PMID:25764476

  18. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  19. Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toru; Nambara, Eiji; Yamagishi, Kazutoshi; Goto, Derek B.; Naito, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Plants accumulate storage substances such as starch, lipids and proteins in certain phases of development. Storage proteins accumulate in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and serve as a reservoir to be used in later stages of plant development. The accumulation of storage protein is thus beneficial for the survival of plants. Storage proteins are also an important source of dietary plant proteins. Here, we summarize the genome organization and regulation of gene expression of storage protein genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303197

  20. Ovate family protein1 interaction with BLH3 regulates transition timing from vegetative to reproductive phase in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Liguo; Zhang, Xiaofei; Ju, Hanxun; Chen, Jingui; Wang, Shucai; Wang, Hemeng; Zhao, Yuanling; Chang, Ying

    2016-01-23

    We study the Three-Amino-acid-Loop-Extension(TALE) homeodomain transcription factor BLH3 that regulates timing of transition from vegetative to reproductive phase. Previous preliminary results obtained using large-scale yeast two-hybrids indicate that BLH3 protein possibly interact with Ovate Family Proteins(OFPs) transcription co-regulators. Nevertheless, it is uncertain whether OFP1–BLH3 complex is involved in regulation of timing of transition from vegetative to reproductive phase in Arabidopsis. The interaction between BLH3 and OFP1 was re-tested and verified by a yeast two-hybrid system. We found that the BLH3–OFP1 interaction was mainly mediated through the BLH3 homeodomain. Meanwhile, this interaction was further confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) inmore » vivo. In addition, by establishing protoplast transient expression, we discovered that BLH3 acts as a transcriptional activator, whereas OFP1 functioned as a repressor. The interactions between OFP1 and BLH3 can reduce BLH3 transcriptional activity. The ofp1 mutant lines and blh3 mutant lines, OFP1 overexpress lines and BLH3 overexpress lines can both influence timing of transition from vegetative to reproductive phase. Furthermore, 35s:OFP1/blh3 plants exhibited flowering and leaf quantity similar to that of the wild-type controls. 35s:BLH3/ofp1 plants flowered earlier and had less leaves than wild-type controls, indicating that OFP1 protein might depend partially on BLH3 in its function to regulate the timing of transition from vegetative to reproductive phase. In conclusion, these results support our assumption that, by interacting with OFP1, BLH3 forms a functional protein complex that controls timing of progression from vegetative to reproductive phase, and OFP1 might negatively regulate BLH3 or the BLH-KNOX complex, an important interaction for sustaining the normal transition from vegetative to reproductive phase.« less

  1. Quinalizarin as a potent, selective and cell-permeable inhibitor of protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Cozza, Giorgio; Mazzorana, Marco; Papinutto, Elena; Bain, Jenny; Elliott, Matthew; di Maira, Giovanni; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Pagano, Mario A; Sarno, Stefania; Ruzzene, Maria; Battistutta, Roberto; Meggio, Flavio; Moro, Stefano; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2009-08-01

    Emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methyl-anthraquinone) is a moderately potent and poorly selective inhibitor of protein kinase CK2, one of the most pleiotropic serine/threonine protein kinases, implicated in neoplasia and in other global diseases. By virtual screening of the MMS (Molecular Modeling Section) database, we have now identified quinalizarin (1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone) as an inhibitor of CK2 that is more potent and selective than emodin. CK2 inhibition by quinalizarin is competitive with respect to ATP, with a Ki value of approx. 50 nM. Tested at 1 microM concentration on a panel of 75 protein kinases, quinalizarin drastically inhibits only CK2, with a promiscuity score (11.1), which is the lowest ever reported so far for a CK2 inhibitor. Especially remarkable is the ability of quinalizarin to discriminate between CK2 and a number of kinases, notably DYRK1a (dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and -regulated kinase), PIM (provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukaemia virus) 1, 2 and 3, HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2), MNK1 [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-interacting kinase 1], ERK8 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 8) and PKD1 (protein kinase D 1), which conversely tend to be inhibited as drastically as CK2 by commercially available CK2 inhibitors. The determination of the crystal structure of a complex between quinalizarin and CK2alpha subunit highlights the relevance of polar interactions in stabilizing the binding, an unusual characteristic for a CK2 inhibitor, and disclose other structural features which may account for the narrow selectivity of this compound. Tested on Jurkat cells, quinalizarin proved able to inhibit endogenous CK2 and to induce apoptosis more efficiently than the commonly used CK2 inhibitors TBB (4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzotriazole) and DMAT (2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole). PMID:19432557

  2. The gene encoding the VP16-accessory protein HCF (HCFC1) resides in human Xq28 and is highly expressed in fetal tissues and the adult kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.C.; Herr, W.; Parrish, J.E.; Massa, H.F.

    1995-01-20

    After herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, the viral regulatory protein VP16 activates transcription of the HSV immediate-early promoters by directing complex formation with two cellular proteins, the POU-homeodomain transcription factor Oct-1 and the host cell factor HCF. The function of HCF in uninfected cells is unknown. Here we show by fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis that the gene encoding human HCF, HCFC1, maps to the q28 region of the X chromosome. Yeast artificial chromosome and cosmid mapping localizes the HCFC1 gene within 100 kb distal of the renal vasopressin type-2 receptor (V2R) gene and adjacent to the renin-binding protein gene (RENBP). The HCFC1 gene is apparently unique. HCF transcripts and protein are most abundant in fetal and placental tissues and cell lines, suggesting a role in cell proliferation. In adults, HCF protein is abundant in the kidney, but not in the brain, a site of latent HSV infection and where HCF levels may influence progression of HSV infection. 42 refs., 3 figs.

  3. The V(D)J recombination activating protein RAG2 consists of a six-bladed propeller and a PHD fingerlike domain, as revealed by sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, I; Mornon, J P

    1998-08-01

    The RAG1 and RAG2 proteins play a crucial role in V(D)J recombination by cooperating to make specific double-stranded DNA breaks at a pair of recombination signal sequences (RSSs). However, the exact function they perform has heretofore remained elusive. Using a combination of sensitive methods of sequence analysis, we show here that the active core region of the RAG2 protein, confined to the first three quarters of its sequence, is in fact composed of a six-fold repeat of a 50-residue motif which is related to the kelch/mipp motif. This motif, which forms a four-stranded twisted antiparallel beta sheet, is arranged in a circular formation like blades of a propeller or turbine. Given the known properties of the beta-propeller fold in mediating protein-protein interactions, it is proposed that this six-laded propeller structure of the RAG2 active core would play a crucial role in the tight complex formed by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins and RSSs. Moreover, the presence of a plant homeodomain finger-like motif in the last quarter of the RAG2 sequence suggests a potential interaction of this domain with chromatin components. PMID:9760994

  4. Dietary Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... grains and beans. Proteins from meat and other animal products are complete proteins. This means they supply all of the amino acids the body can't make on its own. Most plant proteins are incomplete. You should eat different types of plant proteins every day to get ...

  5. Protein Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sam K. C.

    Proteins are an abundant component in all cells, and almost all except storage proteins are important for biological functions and cell structure. Food proteins are very complex. Many have been purified and characterized. Proteins vary in molecular mass, ranging from approximately 5000 to more than a million Daltons. They are composed of elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Twenty α-amino acids are the building blocks of proteins; the amino acid residues in a protein are linked by peptide bonds. Nitrogen is the most distinguishing element present in proteins. However, nitrogen content in various food proteins ranges from 13.4 to 19.1% (1) due to the variation in the specific amino acid composition of proteins. Generally, proteins rich in basic amino acids contain more nitrogen.

  6. Quantifying Protein Disorder through Measures of Excess Conformational Entropy.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Nandakumar; Gopi, Soundhararajan; Narayan, Abhishek; Naganathan, Athi N

    2016-05-19

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and proteins with a large degree of disorder are abundant in the proteomes of eukaryotes and viruses, and play a vital role in cellular homeostasis and disease. One fundamental question that has been raised on IDPs is the process by which they offset the entropic penalty involved in transitioning from a heterogeneous ensemble of conformations to a much smaller collection of binding-competent states. However, this has been a difficult problem to address, as the effective entropic cost of fixing residues in a folded-like conformation from disordered amino acid neighborhoods is itself not known. Moreover, there are several examples where the sequence complexity of disordered regions is as high as well-folded regions. Disorder in such cases therefore arises from excess conformational entropy determined entirely by correlated sequence effects, an entropic code that is yet to be identified. Here, we explore these issues by exploiting the order-disorder transitions of a helix in Pbx-Homeodomain together with a dual entropy statistical mechanical model to estimate the magnitude and sign of the excess conformational entropy of residues in disordered regions. We find that a mere 2.1-fold increase in the number of allowed conformations per residue (∼0.7kBT favoring the unfolded state) relative to a well-folded sequence, or ∼2(N) additional conformations for a N-residue sequence, is sufficient to promote disorder under physiological conditions. We show that this estimate is quite robust and helps in rationalizing the thermodynamic signatures of disordered regions in important regulatory proteins, modeling the conformational folding-binding landscapes of IDPs, quantifying the stability effects characteristic of disordered protein loops and their subtle roles in determining the partitioning of folding flux in ordered domains. In effect, the dual entropy model we propose provides a statistical thermodynamic basis for the relative

  7. The ePHD protein SPBP interacts with TopBP1 and together they co-operate to stimulate Ets1-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sjøttem, Eva; Rekdal, Cecilie; Svineng, Gunbjørg; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Klenow, Helle; Uglehus, Rebecca Dale; Johansen, Terje

    2007-01-01

    SPBP (Stromelysin-1 PDGF responsive element binding protein) is a ubiquitously expressed 220 kDa nuclear protein shown to enhance or repress the transcriptional activity of various transcription factors. A yeast two-hybrid screen, with the extended plant homeodomain (ePHD) of SPBP as bait, identified TopBP1 (topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1) as a candidate interaction partner of SPBP. TopBP1 has eight BRCA1 carboxy-terminal (BRCT) domains and is involved in DNA replication, DNA damage responses and in the regulation of gene expression. The interaction between SPBP and TopBP1 was confirmed in vitro and in vivo, and was found to be mediated by the ePHD domain of SPBP and the BRCT6 domain of TopBP1. Both SPBP and TopBP1 enhanced the transcriptional activity of Ets1 on the c-myc P1P2- and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) promoters. Together they displayed a more than additive effect. Both proteins were associated with these promoters. The involvement of TopBP1 was dependent on the serine 1159 phosphorylation site, known to be important for transcriptional activation. Depletion of endogenous SPBP by siRNA treatment reduced MMP3 secretion by 50% in phorbol ester-stimulated human fibroblasts. Taken together, our results show that TopBP1 and SPBP interact physically and functionally to co-operate as co-activators of Ets1. PMID:17913746

  8. The ePHD protein SPBP interacts with TopBP1 and together they co-operate to stimulate Ets1-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sjøttem, Eva; Rekdal, Cecilie; Svineng, Gunbjørg; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Klenow, Helle; Uglehus, Rebecca Dale; Johansen, Terje

    2007-01-01

    SPBP (Stromelysin-1 PDGF responsive element binding protein) is a ubiquitously expressed 220 kDa nuclear protein shown to enhance or repress the transcriptional activity of various transcription factors. A yeast two-hybrid screen, with the extended plant homeodomain (ePHD) of SPBP as bait, identified TopBP1 (topoisomerase II β-binding protein 1) as a candidate interaction partner of SPBP. TopBP1 has eight BRCA1 carboxy-terminal (BRCT) domains and is involved in DNA replication, DNA damage responses and in the regulation of gene expression. The interaction between SPBP and TopBP1 was confirmed in vitro and in vivo, and was found to be mediated by the ePHD domain of SPBP and the BRCT6 domain of TopBP1. Both SPBP and TopBP1 enhanced the transcriptional activity of Ets1 on the c-myc P1P2- and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) promoters. Together they displayed a more than additive effect. Both proteins were associated with these promoters. The involvement of TopBP1 was dependent on the serine 1159 phosphorylation site, known to be important for transcriptional activation. Depletion of endogenous SPBP by siRNA treatment reduced MMP3 secretion by 50% in phorbol ester-stimulated human fibroblasts. Taken together, our results show that TopBP1 and SPBP interact physically and functionally to co-operate as co-activators of Ets1. PMID:17913746

  9. Residue-specific force field based on the protein coil library. RSFF1: modification of OPLS-AA/L.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fan; Zhou, Chen-Yang; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2014-06-26

    Traditional protein force fields use one set of parameters for most of the 20 amino acids (AAs), allowing transferability of the parameters. However, a significant shortcoming is the difficulty to fit the Ramachandran plots of all AA residues simultaneously, affecting the accuracy of the force field. In this Feature Article, we report a new strategy for protein force field parametrization. Backbone and side-chain conformational distributions of all 20 AA residues obtained from protein coil library were used as the target data. The dihedral angle (torsion) potentials and some local nonbonded (1-4/1-5/1-6) interactions in OPLS-AA/L force field were modified such that the target data can be excellently reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations of dipeptides (blocked AAs) in explicit water, resulting in a new force field with AA-specific parameters, RSFF1. An efficient free energy decomposition approach was developed to separate the corrections on ϕ and ψ from the two-dimensional Ramachandran plots. RSFF1 is shown to reproduce the experimental NMR (3)J-coupling constants of AA dipeptides better than other force fields. It has a good balance between α-helical and β-sheet secondary structures. It can successfully fold a set of α-helix proteins (Trp-cage and Homeodomain) and β-hairpins (Trpzip-2, GB1 hairpin), which cannot be consistently stabilized by other state-of-the-art force fields. Interestingly, the RSFF1 force field systematically overestimates the melting temperature (and the stability of native state) of these peptides/proteins. It has a potential application in the simulation of protein folding and protein structure refinement. PMID:24815738

  10. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  11. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... shows that taking whey protein in combination with strength training increases lean body mass, strength, and muscle size. ... grams/kg of whey protein in combination with strength training for 6-10 weeks. For HIV/AIDS-related ...

  12. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  13. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  14. Protein folds and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, R. Dustin; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The classification of protein folds is necessarily based on the structural elements that distinguish domains. Classification of protein domains consists of two problems: the partition of structures into domains and the classification of domains into sets of similar structures (or folds). Although similar topologies may arise by convergent evolution, the similarity of their respective folding pathways is unknown. The discovery and the characterization of the majority of protein folds will be followed by a similar enumeration of available protein folding pathways. Consequently, understanding the intricacies of structural domains is necessary to understanding their collective folding pathways. We review the current state of the art in the field of protein domain classification and discuss methods for the systematic and comprehensive study of protein folding across protein fold space via atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we discuss our large-scale Dynameomics project, which includes simulations of representatives of all autonomous protein folds. PMID:21051320

  15. Dual transcriptional activities of SIX proteins define their roles in normal and ectopic eye development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Abigail M; Weasner, Bonnie M; Weasner, Brandon P; Kumar, Justin P

    2012-03-01

    The SIX family of homeodomain-containing DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in both Drosophila and vertebrate retinal specification. In flies, three such family members exist, but only two, Sine oculis (So) and Optix, are expressed and function within the eye. In vertebrates, the homologs of Optix (Six3 and Six6) and probably So (Six1 and Six2) are also required for proper eye formation. Depending upon the individual SIX protein and the specific developmental context, transcription of target genes can either be activated or repressed. These activities are thought to occur through physical interactions with the Eyes absent (Eya) co-activator and the Groucho (Gro) co-repressor, but the relative contribution that each complex makes to overall eye development is not well understood. Here, we attempt to address this issue by investigating the role that each complex plays in the induction of ectopic eyes in Drosophila. We fused the VP16 activation and Engrailed repressor domains to both So and Optix, and attempted to generate ectopic eyes with these chimeric proteins. Surprisingly, we find that So and Optix must initially function as transcriptional repressors to trigger the formation of ectopic eyes. Both factors appear to be required to repress the expression of non-retinal selector genes. We propose that during early phases of eye development, SIX proteins function, in part, to repress the transcription of non-retinal selector genes, thereby allowing induction of the retina to proceed. This model of repression-mediated induction of developmental programs could have implications beyond the eye and might be applicable to other systems. PMID:22318629

  16. Deconvoluting Protein (Un)folding Structural Ensembles Using X-Ray Scattering, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Nasedkin, Alexandr; Marcellini, Moreno; Religa, Tomasz L.; Freund, Stefan M.; Menzel, Andreas; Fersht, Alan R.; Jemth, Per; van der Spoel, David; Davidsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The folding and unfolding of protein domains is an apparently cooperative process, but transient intermediates have been detected in some cases. Such (un)folding intermediates are challenging to investigate structurally as they are typically not long-lived and their role in the (un)folding reaction has often been questioned. One of the most well studied (un)folding pathways is that of Drosophila melanogaster Engrailed homeodomain (EnHD): this 61-residue protein forms a three helix bundle in the native state and folds via a helical intermediate. Here we used molecular dynamics simulations to derive sample conformations of EnHD in the native, intermediate, and unfolded states and selected the relevant structural clusters by comparing to small/wide angle X-ray scattering data at four different temperatures. The results are corroborated using residual dipolar couplings determined by NMR spectroscopy. Our results agree well with the previously proposed (un)folding pathway. However, they also suggest that the fully unfolded state is present at a low fraction throughout the investigated temperature interval, and that the (un)folding intermediate is highly populated at the thermal midpoint in line with the view that this intermediate can be regarded to be the denatured state under physiological conditions. Further, the combination of ensemble structural techniques with MD allows for determination of structures and populations of multiple interconverting structures in solution. PMID:25946337

  17. Chromatin condensation and recruitment of PHD finger proteins to histone H3K4me3 are mutually exclusive.

    PubMed

    Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Gallardo, Carmen Mora; Shinsky, Stephen A; Ospina, Ruben Rosas; Liendo, Andrea Mansilla; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Klein, Brianna J; Andrews, Forest H; Strahl, Brian D; M van Wely, Karel H; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2016-07-27

    Histone post-translational modifications, and specific combinations they create, mediate a wide range of nuclear events. However, the mechanistic bases for recognition of these combinations have not been elucidated. Here, we characterize crosstalk between H3T3 and H3T6 phosphorylation, occurring in mitosis, and H3K4me3, a mark associated with active transcription. We detail the molecular mechanisms by which H3T3ph/K4me3/T6ph switches mediate activities of H3K4me3-binding proteins, including those containing plant homeodomain (PHD) and double Tudor reader domains. Our results derived from nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift perturbation analysis, orthogonal binding assays and cell fluorescence microscopy studies reveal a strong anti-correlation between histone H3T3/T6 phosphorylation and retention of PHD finger proteins in chromatin during mitosis. Together, our findings uncover the mechanistic rules of chromatin engagement for H3K4me3-specific readers during cell division. PMID:27016734

  18. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q.; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  19. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Eidahl, Jocelyn O; Lancelot, Céline; Tassin, Alexandra; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  20. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the Drosophila Polycomb (Pc) chromodomain show developmental alterations: possible role of Pc chromodomain proteins in chromatin-mediated gene regulation in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, R; Charrier, B; Scollan, C; Meyer, P

    1999-01-01

    The chromodomain of the Drosophila Polycomb (Pc) protein has been introduced into tobacco nuclei to determine its location in the nucleus and its effect on plant development. Pc is a repressor of homeotic Drosophila genes that shares a well-conserved, although not identical, chromodomain with a structural heterochromatin component, Heterochromatin Protein 1. The chromodomains might therefore play a common role in chromatin repression. An analysis of transgenic plants expressing the Pc chromodomain, which was linked to the green fluorescent protein, suggested that the Pc chromodomain has distinct target regions in the plant genome. Transgenic plants expressing the Pc chromodomain had phenotypic abnormalities in their leaves and flowers, indicating a disruption in development. In axillary shoot buds of plants displaying altered leaf phenotypes, enhanced expression of a homeodomain gene, which is downregulated in wild-type leaves, was found. In Drosophila, Pc has been shown to possess distinct chromosome binding activity and to be involved in the regulation of development-specific genes. Our results support the assumptions that the heterologous chromodomain affects related functions in Drosophila and in plants, and that chromatin modification mechanisms are involved in the regulation of certain plant genes, in a manner similar to chromatin-mediated gene regulation in Drosophila. PMID:10368176

  1. Structural consequences of disease-causing mutations in the ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain of the chromatin-associated protein ATRX

    PubMed Central

    Argentaro, Anthony; Yang, Ji-Chun; Chapman, Lynda; Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Gibbons, Richard J.; Higgs, Douglas R.; Neuhaus, David; Rhodes, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    The chromatin-associated protein ATRX was originally identified because mutations in the ATRX gene cause a severe form of syndromal X-linked mental retardation associated with α-thalassemia. Half of all of the disease-associated missense mutations cluster in a cysteine-rich region in the N terminus of ATRX. This region was named the ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain, based on sequence homology with a family of DNA methyltransferases. Here, we report the solution structure of the ADD domain of ATRX, which consists of an N-terminal GATA-like zinc finger, a plant homeodomain finger, and a long C-terminal α-helix that pack together to form a single globular domain. Interestingly, the α-helix of the GATA-like finger is exposed and highly basic, suggesting a DNA-binding function for ATRX. The disease-causing mutations fall into two groups: the majority affect buried residues and hence affect the structural integrity of the ADD domain; another group affects a cluster of surface residues, and these are likely to perturb a potential protein interaction site. The effects of individual point mutations on the folding state and stability of the ADD domain correlate well with the levels of mutant ATRX protein in patients, providing insights into the molecular pathophysiology of ATR-X syndrome. PMID:17609377

  2. Protein Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenfelder, Hans

    2011-03-01

    Proteins combine properties of solids, liquids, and glasses. Schrödinger anticipated the main features of biomolecules long ago by stating that they had to be solid-like, but able to assume many different conformations. Indeed proteins can assume a gigantic number of conformational substates with the same primary sequence but different conformations. The different substates are described as craters in a very-high-dimensional energy landscape. The energy landscape is organized in a hierarchy of tiers, craters within craters within craters. Protein motions are pictured as transition between substates - jumps from crater to crater. Initially we assumed that these jumps were controlled by internal barriers between substates, but experiments have shown that nature selected a different approach. Proteins are surrounded by one to two layers of water and are embedded in a bulk solvent. Structural motions of the protein are controlled by the alpha fluctuations in the solvent surrounding the protein. Some internal motions most likely involving side chains are controlled electrostatically by beta fluctuations in the hydration shell. The dynamics of proteins is consequently dominated by the environment (H. Frauenfelder et al. PNAS 106, 5129 (2009). One can speculate that this organization permits exchange of information among biomolecules. The energy landscape is not just organized into two tiers, alpha and beta, but cryogenic experiments have revealed more tiers and protein more properties similar to that of glasses. While proteins function at ambient temperatures, cryogenic studies are necessary to understand the physics relevant for biology.

  3. The PAX3-FKHR fusion protein created by the t(2;13) translocation in alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas is a more potent transcriptional activator than PAX3.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, W J; Galili, N; Mukhopadhyay, S; Rovera, G; Bennicelli, J; Barr, F G; Rauscher, F J

    1995-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas are pediatric solid tumors with a hallmark cytogenetic abnormality: translocation of chromosomes 2 and 13 [t(2;13) (q35;q14)]. The genes on each chromosome involved in this translocation have been identified as the transcription factor-encoding genes PAX3 and FKHR. The NH2-terminal paired box and homeodomain DNA-binding domains of PAX3 are fused in frame to COOH-terminal regions of the chromosome 13-derived FKHR gene, a novel member of the forkhead DNA-binding domain family. To determine the role of the fusion protein in transcriptional regulation and oncogenesis, we identified the PAX3-FKHR fusion protein and characterized its function(s) as a transcription factor relative to wild-type PAX3. Antisera specific to PAX3 and FKHR were developed and used to examine PAX3 and PAX3-FKHR expression in tumor cell lines. Sequential immunoprecipitations with anti-PAX3 and anti-FKHR sera demonstrated expression of a 97-kDa PAX3-FKHR fusion protein in the t(2;13)-positive rhabdomyosarcoma Rh30 cell line and verified that a single polypeptide contains epitopes derived from each protein. The PAX3-FKHR protein was localized to the nucleus in Rh30 cells, as was wild-type PAX3, in t(2;13)-negative A673 cells. In gel shift assays using a canonical PAX binding site (e5 sequence), we found that DNA binding of PAX3-FKHR was significantly impaired relative to that of PAX3 despite the two proteins having identical PAX DNA-binding domains. However, the PAX3-FKHR fusion protein was a much more potent transcriptional activator than PAX3 as determined by transient cotransfection assays using e5-CAT reporter plasmids. The PAX3-FKHR protein may function as an oncogenic transcription factor by enhanced activation of normal PAX3 target genes. PMID:7862145

  4. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for longer times. The appearance of three distinct RET states suggested a spatially heterogeneous surface – with areas of high protein density (i.e. strongly-interacting clusters) coexisting with mobile monomers. Distinct association states exhibited characteristic behavior, i.e. partial-RET (monomer-monomer) associations were shorter-lived than complete-RET (protein-cluster) associations. While the fractional surface area covered by regions with high protein density (i.e. clusters) increased with increasing concentration, the distribution of contact times between monomers and clusters was independent of solution concentration, suggesting that associations were a local phenomenon, and independent of the global surface coverage. PMID:24274729

  5. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance, for replacing or supplementing milk-based infant formulas, and for reversing weight loss and increasing glutathione ( ... allergic reactions compared to infants who receive standard formula. However, taking why protein might not be helpful ...

  6. Recognition of unmodified histone H3 by the first PHD finger of bromodomain-PHD finger protein 2 provides insights into the regulation of histone acetyltransferases monocytic leukemic zinc-finger protein (MOZ) and MOZ-related factor (MORF).

    PubMed

    Qin, Su; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Jiahai; Liu, Lei; Ji, Peng; Wu, Mian; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2011-10-21

    MOZ (monocytic leukemic zinc-finger protein) and MORF (MOZ-related factor) are histone acetyltransferases important for HOX gene expression as well as embryo and postnatal development. They form complexes with other regulatory subunits through the scaffold proteins BRPF1/2/3 (bromodomain-PHD (plant homeodomain) finger proteins 1, 2, or 3). BRPF proteins have multiple domains, including two PHD fingers, for potential interactions with histones. Here we show that the first PHD finger of BRPF2 specifically recognizes the N-terminal tail of unmodified histone H3 (unH3) and report the solution structures of this PHD finger both free and in complex with the unH3 peptide. Structural analysis revealed that the unH3 peptide forms a third antiparallel β-strand that pairs with the PHD1 two-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The binding specificity was determined primarily through the recognition of arginine 2 and lysine 4 of the unH3 by conserved aspartic acids of PHD1 and of threonine 6 of the unH3 by a conserved asparagine. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR assays showed that post-translational modifications such as H3R2me2as, H3T3ph, H3K4me, H3K4ac, and H3T6ph antagonized the interaction between histone H3 and PHD1. Furthermore, histone binding by PHD1 was important for BRPF2 to localize to the HOXA9 locus in vivo. PHD1 is highly conserved in yeast NuA3 and other histone acetyltransferase complexes, so the results reported here also shed light on the function and regulation of these complexes. PMID:21880731

  7. Traversing the folding pathway of proteins using temperature-aided cascade molecular dynamics with conformation-dependent charges.

    PubMed

    Jani, Vinod; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Joshi, Rajendra

    2016-07-01

    Protein folding is a multi-micro second time scale event and involves many conformational transitions. Crucial conformational transitions responsible for biological functions of biomolecules are difficult to capture using current state-of-the-art molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Protein folding, being a stochastic process, witnesses these transitions as rare events. Many new methodologies have been proposed for observing these rare events. In this work, a temperature-aided cascade MD is proposed as a technique for studying the conformational transitions. Folding studies for Engrailed homeodomain and Immunoglobulin domain B of protein A have been carried out. Using this methodology, the unfolded structures with RMSD of 20 Å were folded to a structure with RMSD of 2 Å. Three sets of cascade MD runs were carried out using implicit solvation, explicit solvation, and charge updation scheme. In the charge updation scheme, charges based on the conformation obtained are calculated and are updated in the topology file. In all the simulations, the structure of 2 Å was reached within a few nanoseconds using these methods. Umbrella sampling has been performed using snapshots from the temperature-aided cascade MD simulation trajectory to build an entire conformational transition pathway. The advantage of the method is that the possible pathways for a particular reaction can be explored within a short duration of simulation time and the disadvantage is that the knowledge of the start and end state is required. The charge updation scheme adds the polarization effects in the force fields. This improves the electrostatic interaction among the atoms, which may help the protein to fold faster. PMID:26872480

  8. In vivo analysis of developmentally and evolutionarily dynamic protein-DNA interactions regulating transcription of the Pgk2 gene during mammalian spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Hirotaka; Geyer, Christopher B; Hornecker, Jacey L; Patel, Krishan T; McCarrey, John R

    2007-11-01

    Transcription of the testis-specific Pgk2 gene is selectively activated in primary spermatocytes to provide a source of phosphoglycerate kinase that is critical to normal motility and fertility of mammalian spermatozoa. We examined dynamic changes in protein-DNA interactions at the Pgk2 gene promoter during murine spermatogenesis in vivo by performing genomic footprinting and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with enriched populations of murine spermatogenic cells at stages prior to, during, and following transcription of this gene. We found that genes encoding the testis-specific homeodomain factor PBX4 and its coactivator, PREP1, are expressed in patterns that mirror expression of the Pgk2 gene and that these factors become bound to the Pgk2 enhancer in cells in which this gene is actively expressed. We therefore suggest that these factors, along with CREM and SP3, direct stage- and cell type-specific transcription of the Pgk2 gene during spermatogenesis. We propose that binding of PBX4, plus its coactivator PREP1, is a rate-limiting step leading to the initiation of tissue-specific transcription of the Pgk2 gene. This study provides insight into the developmentally dynamic establishment of tissue-specific protein-DNA interactions in vivo. It also allows us to speculate about the events that led to tissue-specific regulation of the Pgk2 gene during mammalian evolution. PMID:17875925

  9. Hipk is an essential protein that promotes Notch signal transduction in the Drosophila eye by inhibition of the global co-repressor Groucho.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wendy; Andrews, Bryan C; Faust, Michael; Walldorf, Uwe; Verheyen, Esther M

    2009-01-01

    Homeodomain interacting protein kinase (Hipk) is a member of a novel family of serine/threonine kinases. Extensive biochemical studies of vertebrate homologs, particularly Hipk2, have identified a growing list of interactors, including proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling and essential signaling pathways such as Wnt and TGFbeta. To gain insight into the in vivo functions of the single Drosophila Hipk we characterized loss of function alleles, which revealed an essential requirement for hipk. We find that in the developing eye, hipk promotes the Notch pathway. Notch signaling acts at multiple points in eye development to promote growth, proliferation and patterning. Hipk stimulates the early function of Notch in promotion of global growth of the eye disc. It has been shown in the Drosophila eye that Hipk interferes with the repressive activity of the global co-repressor, Groucho (Gro). Here, we propose that Hipk antagonizes Gro to promote the transmission of the Notch signal, indicating that Hipk plays numerous roles in regulating gene expression through interference with the formation of Gro-containing co-repressor complexes. PMID:19013449

  10. Designed protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Dirk; Treiber, Nora; Ziegler, Mathias O P; Koetter, Jochen W A; Schulze, Monika-Sarah; Schulz, Georg E

    2008-01-11

    The analysis of natural contact interfaces between protein subunits and between proteins has disclosed some general rules governing their association. We have applied these rules to produce a number of novel assemblies, demonstrating that a given protein can be engineered to form contacts at various points of its surface. Symmetry plays an important role because it defines the multiplicity of a designed contact and therefore the number of required mutations. Some of the proteins needed only a single side-chain alteration in order to associate to a higher-order complex. The mobility of the buried side chains has to be taken into account. Four assemblies have been structurally elucidated. Comparisons between the designed contacts and the results will provide useful guidelines for the development of future architectures. PMID:18187656

  11. Quorum sensing controls hyphal initiation in Candida albicans through Ubr1-mediated protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Su, Chang; Unoje, Ohimai; Liu, Haoping

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of invasive fungal infections in humans. Its ability to undergo the morphological transition from yeast to hyphal growth forms is critical for its pathogenesis. Hyphal initiation requires the activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway, which down-regulates the expression of NRG1, the major repressor of hyphal development. Hyphal initiation also requires inoculation of a small amount of C. albicans cells from overnight culture to fresh medium. This inoculation releases the inhibition from farnesol, a quorum-sensing molecule of C. albicans, that accumulated in the spent medium. Here, we show that farnesol inhibits hyphal initiation mainly through blocking the protein degradation of Nrg1. Through screening a kinase mutant library, we identified Sok1 as the kinase required for Nrg1 degradation during inoculation. SOK1 expression is transiently activated on inoculation during hyphal initiation, and overexpression of SOK1 overcomes the farnesol-mediated inhibition of hyphal initiation. Screening a collection of transcription factor mutants, the homeodomain-containing transcription repressor Cup9 is found to be responsible for the repression of SOK1 expression in response to farnesol inhibition. Interestingly, farnesol inhibits Cup9 degradation mediated by the N-end rule E3 ubiquitin ligase, Ubr1. Therefore, hyphal initiation requires both the cAMP-PKA pathway-dependent transcriptional down-regulation of NRG1 and Sok1-mediated degradation of Nrg1 protein. The latter is triggered by the release from farnesol inhibition of Cup9 degradation and consequently, derepression of SOK1 transcription. Neither pathway alone is sufficient for hyphal initiation. PMID:24449897

  12. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  13. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  14. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 1-dependent Phosphorylation of cAMP Response Element-binding Protein Decreases Chromatin Occupancy*

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Anthony T.; Kim, Sang Hwa; Chang, Hae-yoon; Mastrocola, Adam S.; Tibbetts, Randal S.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) initiates transcriptional responses to a wide variety of stimuli. CREB activation involves its phosphorylation on Ser-133, which promotes interaction between the CREB kinase-inducible domain (KID) and the KID-interacting domain of the transcriptional coactivator, CREB-binding protein (CBP). The KID also contains a highly conserved phosphorylation cluster, termed the ATM/CK cluster, which is processively phosphorylated in response to DNA damage by the coordinated actions of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and casein kinases (CKs) 1 and 2. The ATM/CK cluster phosphorylation attenuates CBP binding and CREB transcriptional activity. Paradoxically, it was recently reported that DNA damage activates CREB through homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation of Ser-271 near the CREB bZIP DNA binding domain. In this study we sought to further clarify DNA damage-dependent CREB phosphorylation as well as to explore the possibility that the ATM/CK cluster and Ser-271 synergistically or antagonistically modulate CREB activity. We show that, rather than being induced by DNA damage, Ser-270 and Ser-271 of CREB cophosphorylated in a CDK1-dependent manner during G2/M phase. Functionally, we show that phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-270/Ser-271 during mitosis correlated with reduced CREB chromatin occupancy. Furthermore, CDK1-dependent phosphorylation of CREB in vitro inhibited its DNA binding activity. The combined results suggest that CDK1-dependent phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-270/Ser-271 facilitates its dissociation from chromatin during mitosis by reducing its intrinsic DNA binding potential. PMID:23814058

  15. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  16. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    PubMed

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/. PMID:26935399

  17. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 and protein kinase HIPK2 cooperate to promote cortical neurogenesis by suppressing Groucho/TLE:Hes1-mediated inhibition of neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ciarapica, R; Methot, L; Tang, Y; Lo, R; Dali, R; Buscarlet, M; Locatelli, F; del Sal, G; Rota, R; Stifani, S

    2014-02-01

    The Groucho/transducin-like Enhancer of split 1 (Gro/TLE1):Hes1 transcriptional repression complex acts in cerebral cortical neural progenitor cells to inhibit neuronal differentiation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the anti-neurogenic function of the Gro/TLE1:Hes1 complex during cortical neurogenesis remain to be defined. Here we show that prolyl isomerase Pin1 (peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1) and homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) are expressed in cortical neural progenitor cells and form a complex that interacts with the Gro/TLE1:Hes1 complex. This association depends on the enzymatic activities of both HIPK2 and Pin1, as well as on the association of Gro/TLE1 with Hes1, but is independent of the previously described Hes1-activated phosphorylation of Gro/TLE1. Interaction with the Pin1:HIPK2 complex results in Gro/TLE1 hyperphosphorylation and weakens both the transcriptional repression activity and the anti-neurogenic function of the Gro/TLE1:Hes1 complex. These results provide evidence that HIPK2 and Pin1 work together to promote cortical neurogenesis, at least in part, by suppressing Gro/TLE1:Hes1-mediated inhibition of neuronal differentiation. PMID:24270405

  18. The Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox Protein PDX-1 Regulates the Ductal Specific Keratin 19 through the Degradation of MEIS1 and DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    von Burstin, Johannes; Reichert, Maximilian; Wescott, Melanie P.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreas organogenesis is the result of well-orchestrated and balanced activities of transcription factors. The homeobox transcription factor PDX-1 plays a crucial role in the development and function of the pancreas, both in the maintenance of progenitor cells and in determination and maintenance of differentiated endocrine cells. However, the activity of homeobox transcription factors requires coordination with co-factors, such as PBX and MEIS proteins. PBX and MEIS proteins belong to the family of three amino acid loop extension (TALE) homeodomain proteins. In a previous study we found that PDX-1 negatively regulates the transcriptional activity of the ductal specific keratin 19 (Krt19). In this study, we investigate the role of different domains of PDX-1 and elucidate the functional interplay of PDX-1 and MEIS1 necessary for Krt19 regulation. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we demonstrate that PDX-1 exerts a dual manner of regulation of Krt19 transcriptional activity. Deletion studies highlight that the NH2-terminus of PDX-1 is functionally relevant for the down-regulation of Krt19, as it is required for DNA binding of PDX-1 to the Krt19 promoter. Moreover, this effect occurs independently of PBX. Second, we provide insight on how PDX-1 regulates the Hox co-factor MEIS1 post-transcriptionally. We find specific binding of MEIS1 and MEIS2 to the Krt19 promoter using IP-EMSA, and siRNA mediated silencing of Meis1, but not Meis2, reduces transcriptional activation of Krt19 in primary pancreatic ductal cells. Over-expression of PDX-1 leads to a decreased level of MEIS1 protein, and this decrease is prevented by inhibition of the proteasome. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our data provide evidence for a dual mechanism of how PDX-1 negatively regulates Krt19 ductal specific gene expression. These findings imply that transcription factors may efficiently regulate target gene expression through diverse, non-redundant mechanisms. PMID:20808819

  19. Training intensity modulates changes in PGC-1α and p53 protein content and mitochondrial respiration, but not markers of mitochondrial content in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Granata, Cesare; Oliveira, Rodrigo S F; Little, Jonathan P; Renner, Kathrin; Bishop, David J

    2016-02-01

    Exercise training has been associated with increased mitochondrial content and respiration. However, no study to date has compared in parallel how training at different intensities affects mitochondrial respiration and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Twenty-nine healthy men performed 4 wk (12 cycling sessions) of either sprint interval training [SIT; 4-10 × 30-s all-out bouts at ∼200% of peak power output (WPeak)], high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 4-7 × 4-min intervals at ∼90% WPeak), or sublactate threshold continuous training (STCT; 20-36 min at ∼65% WPeak). The STCT and HIIT groups were matched for total work. Resting biopsy samples (vastus lateralis) were obtained before and after training. The maximal mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized muscle fibers increased significantly only after SIT (25%). Similarly, the protein content of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, p53, and plant homeodomain finger-containing protein 20 (PHF20) increased only after SIT (60-90%). Conversely, citrate synthase activity, and the protein content of TFAM and subunits of the electron transport system complexes remained unchanged throughout. Our findings suggest that training intensity is an important factor that regulates training-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration and that there is an apparent dissociation between training-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial content. Moreover, changes in the protein content of PGC-1α, p53, and PHF20 are more strongly associated with training-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration than mitochondrial content. PMID:26572168

  20. The histone demethylase PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yuzhou; Pan, Xufeng; Zhao, Heng

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PHF8 overexpresses in human NSCLC and predicts poor survival. • PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell growth and transformation. • PHF8 regulates apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. • PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer. • MiR-21 is critically essential for PHF8 function in human lung cancer cells. - Abstract: PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing protein and erases repressive histone marks including H4K20me1 and H3K9me1/2. It binds to H3K4me3, an active histone mark usually located at transcription start sites (TSSs), through its plant homeo-domain, and is thus recruited and enriched in gene promoters. PHF8 is involved in the development of several types of cancer, including leukemia, prostate cancer, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Herein we report that PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PHF8 is up-regulated in human NSCLC tissues, and high PHF8 expression predicts poor survival. Our in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrate that PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell proliferation and cellular transformation. We found that PHF8 knockdown induces DNA damage and apoptosis in lung cancer cells. PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer, and miR-21 knockdown blocks the effects of PHF8 on proliferation and apoptosis of lung cancer cells. In summary, PHF8 promotes lung cancer cell growth and survival by regulating miR-21.

  1. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  2. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  3. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  4. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  5. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  6. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  7. Arabidopsis Ovate Family Proteins, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor Family, Control Multiple Aspects of Plant Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Guo, Jianjun; Zeng, Qingning; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs), a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7), and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1)-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the first overview of a

  8. Protein folding, protein homeostasis, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Drie, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold into their functional 3-dimensional structures from a linear amino acid sequence. In vitro this process is spontaneous; while in vivo it is orchestrated by a specialized set of proteins, called chaperones. Protein folding is an ongoing cellular process, as cellular proteins constantly undergo synthesis and degradation. Here emerging links between this process and cancer are reviewed. This perspective both yields insights into the current struggle to develop novel cancer chemotherapeutics and has implications for future chemotherapy discovery. PMID:21272445

  9. Split-Protein Systems: Beyond Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Sujan S.; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-01-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome [1], a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, E. coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  10. Split-protein systems: beyond binary protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Sujan S; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2011-12-01

    It has been estimated that 650,000 protein-protein interactions exist in the human interactome (Stumpf et al., 2008), a subset of all possible macromolecular partnerships that dictate life. Thus there is a continued need for the development of sensitive and user-friendly methods for cataloguing biomacromolecules in complex environments and for detecting their interactions, modifications, and cellular location. Such methods also allow for establishing differences in the interactome between a normal and diseased cellular state and for quantifying the outcome of therapeutic intervention. A promising approach for deconvoluting the role of macromolecular partnerships is split-protein reassembly, also called protein fragment complementation. This approach relies on the appropriate fragmentation of protein reporters, such as the green fluorescent protein or firefly luciferase, which when attached to possible interacting partners can reassemble and regain function, thereby confirming the partnership. Split-protein methods have been effectively utilized for detecting protein-protein interactions in cell-free systems, Escherichia coli, yeast, mammalian cells, plants, and live animals. Herein, we present recent advances in engineering split-protein systems that allow for the rapid detection of ternary protein complexes, small molecule inhibitors, as well as a variety of macromolecules including nucleic acids, poly(ADP) ribose, and iron sulfur clusters. We also present advances that combine split-protein systems with chemical inducers of dimerization strategies that allow for regulating the activity of orthogonal split-proteases as well as aid in identifying enzyme inhibitors. Finally, we discuss autoinhibition strategies leading to turn-on sensors as well as future directions in split-protein methodology including possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:22070901

  11. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a number ...

  12. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  13. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive tract to absorb proteins ( protein-losing enteropathy ) Malnutrition Kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome Scarring of the ... may indicate: Abnormally low level of LDL cholesterol Malnutrition Increased gamma globulin proteins may indicate: Bone marrow ...

  14. Domains mediate protein-protein interactions and nucleate protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Costa, S; Cesareni, G

    2008-01-01

    Cell physiology is governed by an intricate mesh of physical and functional links among proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites. The recent information flood coming from large-scale genomic and proteomic approaches allows us to foresee the possibility of compiling an exhaustive list of the molecules present within a cell, enriched with quantitative information on concentration and cellular localization. Moreover, several high-throughput experimental and computational techniques have been devised to map all the protein interactions occurring in a living cell. So far, such maps have been drawn as graphs where nodes represent proteins and edges represent interactions. However, this representation does not take into account the intrinsically modular nature of proteins and thus fails in providing an effective description of the determinants of binding. Since proteins are composed of domains that often confer on proteins their binding capabilities, a more informative description of the interaction network would detail, for each pair of interacting proteins in the network, which domains mediate the binding. Understanding how protein domains combine to mediate protein interactions would allow one to add important features to the protein interaction network, making it possible to discriminate between simultaneously occurring and mutually exclusive interactions. This objective can be achieved by experimentally characterizing domain recognition specificity or by analyzing the frequency of co-occurring domains in proteins that do interact. Such approaches allow gaining insights on the topology of complexes with unknown three-dimensional structure, thus opening the prospect of adopting a more rational strategy in developing drugs designed to selectively target specific protein interactions. PMID:18491061

  15. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  16. Protein sensing with engineered protein nanopores*

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohammad M.; Movileanu, Liviu

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanopores is a powerful new frontier in single-molecule sciences. Nanopores have been used effectively in exploring various biophysical features of small polypeptides and proteins, such as their folding state and structure, ligand interactions, and enzymatic activity. In particular, the α-hemolysin protein pore (αHL) has been used extensively for the detection, characterization and analysis of polypeptides, because this protein nanopore is highly robust, versatile and tractable under various experimental conditions. Inspired by the mechanisms of protein translocation across the outer membrane translocases of mitochondria, we have shown the ability to use nanopore-probe techniques in controlling a single protein using engineered αHL pores. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the preparation of αHL protein nanopores. Moreover, we demonstrate that placing attractive electrostatic traps is instrumental in tackling single-molecule stochastic sensing of folded proteins. PMID:22528256

  17. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  18. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  19. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  20. Sorghum and millet proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum and millet proteins are an important source of dietary protein for significant numbers of people living throughout Africa and parts of Asia. Compared to other food proteins, such as those found in milk, eggs and wheat, little is known about the functionality of sorghum and millet proteins. ...

  1. Whey protein fractionation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated whey protein products from cheese whey, such as whey protein concentrate (WPC) and whey protein isolate (WPI), contain more than seven different types of proteins: alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulins (Igs), lactoferrin ...

  2. Protein in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... protein. The basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids. You need protein in your diet to help your body repair cells and make new ones. Protein is also important for growth and development in children, teens, and pregnant women.

  3. Techniques in protein methylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Cheng, Donghang; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-01-01

    Proteins can be methylated on the side-chain nitrogens of arginine and lysine residues or on carboxy-termini. Protein methylation is a way of subtly changing the primary sequence of a peptide so that it can encode more information. This common posttranslational modification is implicated in the regulation of a variety of processes including protein trafficking, transcription and protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, we will use the arginine methyltransferases to illustrate different approaches that have been developed to assess protein methylation. Both in vivo and in vitro methylation techniques are described, and the use of small molecule inhibitors of protein methylation will be demonstrated. PMID:15173617

  4. Biochemical Approaches for Discovering Protein-Protein Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein-protein interactions or protein complexes are indigenous to nearly all cellular processes, ranging from metabolism to structure. Elucidating both individual protein associations and complex protein interaction networks, while challenging, is an essential goal of functional genomics. For ex...

  5. Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: 24-Hour Urine Protein; Urine Total Protein; Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio; ...

  6. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  7. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  8. Designing Fluorinated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Marsh, E N G

    2016-01-01

    As methods to incorporate noncanonical amino acid residues into proteins have become more powerful, interest in their use to modify the physical and biological properties of proteins and enzymes has increased. This chapter discusses the use of highly fluorinated analogs of hydrophobic amino acids, for example, hexafluoroleucine, in protein design. In particular, fluorinated residues have proven to be generally effective in increasing the thermodynamic stability of proteins. The chapter provides an overview of the different fluorinated amino acids that have been used in protein design and the various methods available for producing fluorinated proteins. It discusses model proteins systems into which highly fluorinated amino acids have been introduced and the reasons why fluorinated residues are generally stabilizing, with particular reference to thermodynamic and structural studies from our laboratory. Lastly, details of the methodology we have developed to measure the thermodynamic stability of oligomeric fluorinated proteins are presented, as this may be generally applicable to many proteins. PMID:27586337

  9. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  10. PINT: Protein-protein Interactions Thermodynamic Database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M D Shaji; Gromiha, M Michael

    2006-01-01

    The first release of Protein-protein Interactions Thermodynamic Database (PINT) contains >1500 data of several thermodynamic parameters along with sequence and structural information, experimental conditions and literature information. Each entry contains numerical data for the free energy change, dissociation constant, association constant, enthalpy change, heat capacity change and so on of the interacting proteins upon binding, which are important for understanding the mechanism of protein-protein interactions. PINT also includes the name and source of the proteins involved in binding, their Protein Information Resource, SWISS-PROT and Protein Data Bank (PDB) codes, secondary structure and solvent accessibility of residues at mutant positions, measuring methods, experimental conditions, such as buffers, ions and additives, and literature information. A WWW interface facilitates users to search data based on various conditions, feasibility to select the terms for output and different sorting options. Further, PINT is cross-linked with other related databases, PIR, SWISS-PROT, PDB and NCBI PUBMED literature database. The database is freely available at http://www.bioinfodatabase.com/pint/index.html. PMID:16381844

  11. DNA mimicry by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dryden, D T F; Tock, M R

    2006-04-01

    It has been discovered recently, via structural and biophysical analyses, that proteins can mimic DNA structures in order to inhibit proteins that would normally bind to DNA. Mimicry of the phosphate backbone of DNA, the hydrogen-bonding properties of the nucleotide bases and the bending and twisting of the DNA double helix are all present in the mimics discovered to date. These mimics target a range of proteins and enzymes such as DNA restriction enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, DNA gyrase and nucleosomal and nucleoid-associated proteins. The unusual properties of these protein DNA mimics may provide a foundation for the design of targeted inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:16545103

  12. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  13. Protein C blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in the body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... history of blood clots. Protein C helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  14. Protein S blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in your body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... family history of blood clots. Protein S helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  15. Protein electrophoresis - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... nephropathy Kidney failure Multiple myeloma Nephrotic syndrome Acute urinary tract infection Risks There are no risks associated with this ... Primary amyloidosis Protein in diet Protein urine test Urinary tract infection - adults Update Date 5/29/2014 Updated by: ...

  16. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Amiot, A

    2015-07-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare syndrome of gastrointestinal protein loss. The primary causes can be classified into lymphatic leakage due to increased interstitial pressure and increased leakage of protein-rich fluids due to erosive or non-erosive gastrointestinal disorders. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy should be considered in patients with chronic diarrhea and peripheral oedema. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy is most commonly based on the determination of fecal alpha-1 antitrypsin clearance. Most protein-losing enteropathy cases are the result of either lymphatic obstruction or a variety of gastrointestinal disorders and cardiac diseases, while primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is less common. Treatment of protein-losing enteropathy targets the underlying disease but also includes dietary modification, such as high-protein and low-fat diet along with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. PMID:25618488

  17. Learning about Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, and protecting you from disease. All About Amino Acids When you eat foods that contain protein, the ... called amino (say: uh-MEE-no) acids. The amino acids then can be reused to make the proteins ...

  18. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  19. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins. PMID:21406855

  20. Understanding protein folding: small proteins in silico.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Olav; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-01-01

    Recent improvements in methodology and increased computer power now allow atomistic computer simulations of protein folding. We briefly review several advanced Monte Carlo algorithms that have contributed to this development. Details of folding simulations of three designed mini proteins are shown. Adding global translations and rotations has allowed us to handle multiple chains and to simulate the aggregation of six beta-amyloid fragments. In a different line of research we have developed several algorithms to predict local features from sequence. In an outlook we sketch how such biasing could extend the application spectrum of Monte Carlo simulations to structure prediction of larger proteins. PMID:18036571

  1. Imaging Protein-protein Interactions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seegar, Tom; Barton, William

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are a hallmark of all essential cellular processes. However, many of these interactions are transient, or energetically weak, preventing their identification and analysis through traditional biochemical methods such as co-immunoprecipitation. In this regard, the genetically encodable fluorescent proteins (GFP, RFP, etc.) and their associated overlapping fluorescence spectrum have revolutionized our ability to monitor weak interactions in vivo using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)1-3. Here, we detail our use of a FRET-based proximity assay for monitoring receptor-receptor interactions on the endothelial cell surface. PMID:20972411

  2. CSF myelin basic protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF myelin basic protein is a test to measure the level of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The CSF ... less than 4 ng/mL of myelin basic protein in the CSF. Normal value ranges may vary ...

  3. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  4. Palmitoylation of Hedgehog proteins.

    PubMed

    Buglino, John A; Resh, Marilyn D

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are secreted signaling proteins that contain amide-linked palmitate at the N-terminus and cholesterol at the C-terminus. Palmitoylation of Hh proteins is critical for effective long- and short-range signaling. The palmitoylation reaction occurs during transit of Hh through the secretory pathway, most likely in the lumen of the ER. Attachment of palmitate to Hh proteins is independent of cholesterol modification and autoprocessing and is catalyzed by Hhat (Hedgehog acyltransferase). Hhat is a member of the membrane bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family, a subgroup of multipass membrane proteins that catalyze transfer of fatty acyl groups to lipids and proteins. Several classes of secreted proteins have recently been shown to be substrates for MBOAT acyltransferases, including Hh proteins and Spitz (palmitoylated by Hhat), Wg/Wnt proteins (modified with palmitate and/or palmitoleate by Porcupine) and ghrelin (octanoylated by ghrelin O-acyltransferase). These findings highlight protein fatty acylation as a mechanism that not only influences membrane binding of intracellular proteins but also regulates the signaling range and efficacy of secreted proteins. PMID:22391306

  5. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    Normal value ranges are: Total protein: 6.4 to 8.3 g/dL (grams per deciliter) Albumin: 3.5 to 5.0 g/dL Alpha-1 ... Decreased total protein may indicate: Abnormal loss of protein from the digestive tract or the inability of the digestive tract ...

  6. CSF total protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 mg/dL. Note: mg/dL = ...

  7. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  8. Texturized dairy proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy proteins are amenable to structural modifications induced by high temperature, shear and moisture; in particular, whey proteins can change conformation to new unfolded states. The change in protein state is a basis for creating new foods. The dairy products, nonfat dried milk (NDM), whey prote...

  9. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  10. Protein - Which is Best?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  11. Hypomorphic mutation of the TALE gene Prep1 (pKnox1) causes a major reduction of Pbx and Meis proteins and a pleiotropic embryonic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Elisabetta; Villaescusa, J Carlos; Di Rosa, Patrizia; Fernandez-Diaz, Luis C; Longobardi, Elena; Mazzieri, Roberta; Miccio, Annarita; Micali, Nicola; Selleri, Licia; Ferrari, Giuliana; Blasi, Francesco

    2006-08-01

    The interaction of Prep1 and Pbx homeodomain transcription factors regulates their activity, nuclear localization, and likely, function in development. To understand the in vivo role of Prep1, we have analyzed an embryonic lethal hypomorphic mutant mouse (Prep1(i/i)). Prep1(i/i) embryos die at embryonic day 17.5 (E17.5) to birth with an overall organ hypoplasia, severe anemia, impaired angiogenesis, and eye anomalies, particularly in the lens and retina. The anemia correlates with delayed differentiation of erythroid progenitors and may be, at least in part, responsible for intrauterine death. At E14.5, Prep1 is present in fetal liver (FL) cMyb-positive cells, whose deficiency causes a marked hematopoietic phenotype. Prep1 is also localized to FL endothelial progenitors, consistent with the observed angiogenic phenotype. Likewise, at the same gestational day, Prep1 is present in the eye cells that bear Pax6, implicated in eye development. The levels of cMyb and Pax6 in FL and in the retina, respectively, are significantly decreased in Prep1(i/i) embryos, consistent with the hematopoietic and eye phenotypes. Concomitantly, Prep1 deficiency results in the overall decrease of protein levels of its related family member Meis1 and its partners Pbx1 and Pbx2. As both Prep1 and Meis interact with Pbx, the overall Prep1/Meis-Pbx DNA-binding activity is strongly reduced in whole Prep1(i/i) embryos and their organs. Our data indicate that Prep1 is an essential gene that acts upstream of and within a Pbx-Meis network that regulates multiple aspects of embryonic development. PMID:16847320

  12. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  13. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  14. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  15. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  16. Selective Precipitation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-01-01

    Selective precipitation of proteins can be used as a bulk method to recover the majority of proteins from a crude lysate, as a selective method to fractionate a subset of proteins from a protein solution, or as a very specific method to recover a single protein of interest from a purification step. This unit describes a number of methods suitable for selective precipitation. In each of the protocols that are outlined, the physical or chemical basis of the precipitation process, the parameters that can be varied for optimization, and the basic steps for developing an optimized precipitation are described. PMID:26836410

  17. Pancreatic beta cells express a diverse set of homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, A; Ling, T Y; Odagiri, H; Rutter, W J; German, M S

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes, which are found in all eukaryotic organisms, encode transcriptional regulators involved in cell-type differentiation and development. Several homeobox genes encoding homeodomain proteins that bind and activate the insulin gene promoter have been described. In an attempt to identify additional beta-cell homeodomain proteins, we designed primers based on the sequences of beta-cell homeobox genes cdx3 and lmx1 and the Drosophila homeodomain protein Antennapedia and used these primers to amplify inserts by PCR from an insulinoma cDNA library. The resulting amplification products include sequences encoding 10 distinct homeodomain proteins; 3 of these proteins have not been described previously. In addition, an insert was obtained encoding a splice variant of engrailed-2, a homeodomain protein previously identified in the central nervous system. Northern analysis revealed a distinct pattern of expression for each homeobox gene. Interestingly, the PCR-derived clones do not represent a complete sampling of the beta-cell library because no inserts encoding cdx3 or lmx1 protein were obtained. Beta cells probably express additional homeobox genes. The abundance and diversity of homeodomain proteins found in beta cells illustrate the remarkable complexity and redundancy of the machinery controlling beta-cell development and differentiation. Images PMID:7991607

  18. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  19. Mechanism of protein decarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Ming; Marcocci, Lucia; Das, Dividutta; Wang, Xinhong; Luo, Haibei; Zungu-Edmondson, Makhosazane; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2013-12-01

    Ligand/receptor stimulation of cells promotes protein carbonylation that is followed by the decarbonylation process, which might involve thiol-dependent reduction (C.M. Wong et al., Circ. Res. 102:301-318; 2008). This study further investigated the properties of this protein decarbonylation mechanism. We found that the thiol-mediated reduction of protein carbonyls is dependent on heat-labile biologic components. Cysteine and glutathione were efficient substrates for decarbonylation. Thiols decreased the protein carbonyl content, as detected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, but not the levels of malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. Mass spectrometry identified proteins that undergo thiol-dependent decarbonylation, which include peroxiredoxins. Peroxiredoxin-2 and -6 were carbonylated and subsequently decarbonylated in response to the ligand/receptor stimulation of cells. siRNA knockdown of glutaredoxin inhibited the decarbonylation of peroxiredoxin. These results strengthen the concept that thiol-dependent decarbonylation defines the kinetics of protein carbonylation signaling. PMID:24044890

  20. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  1. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  3. Phage display of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kościelska, K; Kiczak, L; Kasztura, M; Wesołowska, O; Otlewski, J

    1998-01-01

    In recent years the phage display approach has become an increasingly popular method in protein research. This method enables the presentation of large peptide and protein libraries on the surface of phage particles from which molecules of desired functional property(ies) can be rapidly selected. The great advantage of this method is a direct linkage between an observed phenotype and encapsulated genotype, which allows fast determination of selected sequences. The phage display approach is a powerful tool in generating highly potent biomolecules, including: search for specific antibodies, determining enzyme specificity, exploring protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, minimizing proteins, introducing new functions into different protein scaffolds, and searching sequence space of protein folding. In this article many examples are given to illustrate that this technique can be used in different fields of protein science. The phage display has a potential of the natural evolution and its possibilities are far beyond rational prediction. Assuming that we can design the selection agents and conditions we should be able to engineer any desired protein function or feature. PMID:9918498

  4. Energy design for protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ravikant, D. V. S.; Elber, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Proteins bind to other proteins efficiently and specifically to carry on many cell functions such as signaling, activation, transport, enzymatic reactions, and more. To determine the geometry and strength of binding of a protein pair, an energy function is required. An algorithm to design an optimal energy function, based on empirical data of protein complexes, is proposed and applied. Emphasis is made on negative design in which incorrect geometries are presented to the algorithm that learns to avoid them. For the docking problem the search for plausible geometries can be performed exhaustively. The possible geometries of the complex are generated on a grid with the help of a fast Fourier transform algorithm. A novel formulation of negative design makes it possible to investigate iteratively hundreds of millions of negative examples while monotonically improving the quality of the potential. Experimental structures for 640 protein complexes are used to generate positive and negative examples for learning parameters. The algorithm designed in this work finds the correct binding structure as the lowest energy minimum in 318 cases of the 640 examples. Further benchmarks on independent sets confirm the significant capacity of the scoring function to recognize correct modes of interactions. PMID:21842951

  5. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  6. Protein-protein docking with backbone flexibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chu; Bradley, Philip; Baker, David

    2007-10-19

    Computational protein-protein docking methods currently can create models with atomic accuracy for protein complexes provided that the conformational changes upon association are restricted to the side chains. However, it remains very challenging to account for backbone conformational changes during docking, and most current methods inherently keep monomer backbones rigid for algorithmic simplicity and computational efficiency. Here we present a reformulation of the Rosetta docking method that incorporates explicit backbone flexibility in protein-protein docking. The new method is based on a "fold-tree" representation of the molecular system, which seamlessly integrates internal torsional degrees of freedom and rigid-body degrees of freedom. Problems with internal flexible regions ranging from one or more loops or hinge regions to all of one or both partners can be readily treated using appropriately constructed fold trees. The explicit treatment of backbone flexibility improves both sampling in the vicinity of the native docked conformation and the energetic discrimination between near-native and incorrect models. PMID:17825317

  7. Energy design for protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikant, D. V. S.; Elber, Ron

    2011-08-01

    Proteins bind to other proteins efficiently and specifically to carry on many cell functions such as signaling, activation, transport, enzymatic reactions, and more. To determine the geometry and strength of binding of a protein pair, an energy function is required. An algorithm to design an optimal energy function, based on empirical data of protein complexes, is proposed and applied. Emphasis is made on negative design in which incorrect geometries are presented to the algorithm that learns to avoid them. For the docking problem the search for plausible geometries can be performed exhaustively. The possible geometries of the complex are generated on a grid with the help of a fast Fourier transform algorithm. A novel formulation of negative design makes it possible to investigate iteratively hundreds of millions of negative examples while monotonically improving the quality of the potential. Experimental structures for 640 protein complexes are used to generate positive and negative examples for learning parameters. The algorithm designed in this work finds the correct binding structure as the lowest energy minimum in 318 cases of the 640 examples. Further benchmarks on independent sets confirm the significant capacity of the scoring function to recognize correct modes of interactions.

  8. Mechanisms Regulating Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Doetsch, Paul W; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Cellular functions are dictated by protein content and activity. There are numerous strategies to regulate proteins varying from modulating gene expression to post-translational modifications. One commonly used mode of regulation in eukaryotes is targeted localization. By specifically redirecting the localization of a pool of existing protein, cells can achieve rapid changes in local protein function. Eukaryotic cells have evolved elegant targeting pathways to direct proteins to the appropriate cellular location or locations. Here, we provide a general overview of these localization pathways, with a focus on nuclear and mitochondrial transport, and present a survey of the evolutionarily conserved regulatory strategies identified thus far. We end with a description of several specific examples of proteins that exploit localization as an important mode of regulation. PMID:26172624

  9. Electrophoretic separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chakavarti, Bulbul; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Electrophoresis is used to separate complex mixtures of proteins (e.g., from cells, subcellular fractions, column fractions, or immunoprecipitates), to investigate subunit compositions, and to verify homogeneity of protein samples. It can also serve to purify proteins for use in further applications. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proteins migrate in response to an electrical field through pores in a polyacrylamide gel matrix; pore size decreases with increasing acrylamide concentration. The combination of pore size and protein charge, size, and shape determines the migration rate of the protein. In this unit, the standard Laemmli method is described for discontinuous gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, i.e., in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). PMID:19066548

  10. Outer membrane protein purification.

    PubMed

    Arigita, C; Jiskoot, W; Graaf, M R; Kersten, G F

    2001-01-01

    The major outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from Neisseria meningitidis, which are expressed at high levels, are subdivided in five classes based on molecular weight (1,2) (see Table 1). Table 1 Major Meningococcal Outer-Membrane Proteins Outer-membrane proteins Name Molecular maass Function/characteristics Class 1 PorA 44-47 kDa Porin Class 2/3 PorB 37-42 kDa Porin Class 4 Rmp Reductionmodifiableprotein, unknown Class 5 Opa 26-30 kDa Adhesion,opacity protein Opc 25 kDa Invasion, opacity protein Iron-regulated proteins Mirp 37 kDa Iron acquisition (?);majoriron-regulatedprotein FrpB 70 kDa Ferric enterobactin receptor (also FetA) Adapted from ref. (1). PMID:21336748

  11. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  12. Principles of Flexible Protein-Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Andrusier, Nelly; Mashiach, Efrat; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J.

    2008-01-01

    Treating flexibility in molecular docking is a major challenge in cell biology research. Here we describe the background and the principles of existing flexible protein-protein docking methods, focusing on the algorithms and their rational. We describe how protein flexibility is treated in different stages of the docking process: in the preprocessing stage, rigid and flexible parts are identified and their possible conformations are modeled. This preprocessing provides information for the subsequent docking and refinement stages. In the docking stage, an ensemble of pre-generated conformations or the identified rigid domains may be docked separately. In the refinement stage, small-scale movements of the backbone and side-chains are modeled and the binding orientation is improved by rigid-body adjustments. For clarity of presentation, we divide the different methods into categories. This should allow the reader to focus on the most suitable method for a particular docking problem. PMID:18655061

  13. Antimicrobial proteins: From old proteins, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Valerie J; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A

    2015-12-01

    This review describes the main types of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) synthesised by crustaceans, primarily those identified in shrimp, crayfish, crab and lobster. It includes an overview of their range of microbicidal activities and the current landscape of our understanding of their gene expression patterns in different body tissues. It further summarises how their expression might change following various types of immune challenges. The review further considers proteins or protein fragments from crustaceans that have antimicrobial properties but are more usually associated with other biological functions, or are derived from such proteins. It discusses how these unconventional AMPs might be generated at, or delivered to, sites of infection and how they might contribute to crustacean host defence in vivo. It also highlights recent work that is starting to reveal the extent of multi-functionality displayed by some decapod AMPs, particularly their participation in other aspects of host protection. Examples of such activities include proteinase inhibition, phagocytosis, antiviral activity and haematopoiesis. PMID:26320628

  14. Elastic proteins and elastomeric protein alloys.

    PubMed

    Aghaei-Ghareh-Bolagh, Behnaz; Mithieux, Suzanne M; Weiss, Anthony S

    2016-06-01

    The elastomeric proteins elastin and resilin have been used extensively in the fabrication of biomaterials for tissue engineering applications due to their unique mechanical and biological properties. Tropoelastin is the soluble monomer component of elastin. Tropoelastin and resilin are both highly elastic with high resilience, substantial extensibility, high durability and low energy loss, which makes them excellent candidates for the fabrication of elastic tissues that demand regular and repetitive movement like the skin, lung, blood vessels, muscles and vocal folds. Combinations of these proteins with silk fibroin further enhance their biomechanical and biological properties leading to a new class of protein alloy materials with versatile properties. In this review, the properties of tropoelastin-based and resilin-based biomaterials with and without silk are described in concert with examples of their applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26780495

  15. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell, Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC) uses a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for macromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of macromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystallized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  16. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  17. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  18. Computer Models of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Marc Pusey (seated) and Dr. Craig Kundrot use computers to analyze x-ray maps and generate three-dimensional models of protein structures. With this information, scientists at Marshall Space Flight Center can learn how proteins are made and how they work. The computer screen depicts a proten structure as a ball-and-stick model. Other models depict the actual volume occupied by the atoms, or the ribbon-like structures that are crucial to a protein's function.

  19. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  20. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3. PMID:26510391

  1. Biomolecular membrane protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Bolla, Jani; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2012-07-01

    Integral membrane proteins comprise approximately 30% of the sequenced genomes, and there is an immediate need for their high-resolution structural information. Currently, the most reliable approach to obtain these structures is X-ray crystallography. However, obtaining crystals of membrane proteins that diffract to high resolution appears to be quite challenging, and remains a major obstacle in structural determination. This brief review summarizes a variety of methodologies for use in crystallizing these membrane proteins. Hopefully, by introducing the available methods, techniques, and providing a general understanding of membrane proteins, a rational decision can be made about now to crystallize these complex materials.

  2. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  3. Consensus protein design.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Benjamin T; Buckle, Ashley M

    2016-07-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  4. Prediction of protein-protein interactions based on protein-protein correlation using least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Huang, De-Shuang; Zhang, Lei; Han, Kyungsook; Deng, Suping; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    In order to transform protein sequences into the feature vectors, several works have been done, such as computing auto covariance (AC), conjoint triad (CT), local descriptor (LD), moran autocorrelation (MA), normalized moreaubroto autocorrelation (NMB) and so on. In this paper, we shall adopt these transformation methods to encode the proteins, respectively, where AC, CT, LD, MA and NMB are all represented by '+' in a unified manner. A new method, i.e. the combination of least squares regression with '+' (abbreviated as LSR(+)), will be introduced for encoding a protein-protein correlation-based feature representation and an interacting protein pair. Thus there are totally five different combinations for LSR(+), i.e. LSRAC, LSRCT, LSRLD, LSRMA and LSRNMB. As a result, we combined a support vector machine (SVM) approach with LSR(+) to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI) and PPI networks. The proposed method has been applied on four datasets, i.e. Saaccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Homo sapiens and Caenorhabditis elegans. The experimental results demonstrate that all LSR(+) methods outperform many existing representative algorithms. Therefore, LSR(+) is a powerful tool to characterize the protein-protein correlations and to infer PPI, whilst keeping high performance on prediction of PPI networks. PMID:25059329

  5. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  6. PIC: Protein Interactions Calculator.

    PubMed

    Tina, K G; Bhadra, R; Srinivasan, N

    2007-07-01

    Interactions within a protein structure and interactions between proteins in an assembly are essential considerations in understanding molecular basis of stability and functions of proteins and their complexes. There are several weak and strong interactions that render stability to a protein structure or an assembly. Protein Interactions Calculator (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of 3D structure of a protein or an assembly, computes various interactions such as disulphide bonds, interactions between hydrophobic residues, ionic interactions, hydrogen bonds, aromatic-aromatic interactions, aromatic-sulphur interactions and cation-pi interactions within a protein or between proteins in a complex. Interactions are calculated on the basis of standard, published criteria. The identified interactions between residues can be visualized using a RasMol and Jmol interface. The advantage with PIC server is the easy availability of inter-residue interaction calculations in a single site. It also determines the accessible surface area and residue-depth, which is the distance of a residue from the surface of the protein. User can also recognize specific kind of interactions, such as apolar-apolar residue interactions or ionic interactions, that are formed between buried or exposed residues or near the surface or deep inside. PMID:17584791

  7. Glycolipid transfer proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rhoderick E.; Mattjus, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Glycolipid transfer proteins (GLTPs) are small (24 kD), soluble, ubiquitous proteins characterized by their ability to accelerate the intermembrane transfer of glycolipids in vitro. GLTP specificity encompasses both sphingoid- and glycerol-based glycolipids, but with a strict requirement that the initial sugar residue be beta-linked to the hydrophobic lipid backbone. The 3D protein structures of GLTP reveal liganded structures with unique lipid binding modes. The biochemical properties of GLTP action at the membrane surface have been studied rather comprehensively, but the biological role of GLTP remains enigmatic. What is clear is that GLTP differs distinctly from other known glycolipid-binding proteins, such as nonspecific lipid transfer proteins, lysosomal sphingolipid activator proteins, lectins, lung surfactant proteins as well as other lipid binding/transfer proteins. Based on the unique conformational architecture that targets GLTP to membranes and enables glycolipid binding, GLTP is now considered the prototypical and founding member of a new protein superfamily in eukaryotes. PMID:17320476

  8. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases.

    PubMed

    Shorter, James

    2016-05-15

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. PMID:27255695

  9. Cellulose synthase interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities. PMID:21150290

  10. Consensus protein design

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  11. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    PubMed

    Kicinska, Anna; Leluk, Jacek; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil), a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds) or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups. PMID:25338074

  12. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. PMID:27255695

  13. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  14. Protein metabolism and requirements.

    PubMed

    Biolo, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adaptation to critical illness includes insulin resistance, accelerated proteolysis, and increased release of glutamine and the other amino acids. Such amino acid efflux from skeletal muscle provides precursors for protein synthesis and energy fuel to the liver and to the rapidly dividing cells of the intestinal mucosa and the immune system. From these adaptation mechanisms, severe muscle wasting, glutamine depletion, and hyperglycemia, with increased patient morbidity and mortality, may ensue. Protein/amino acid nutrition, through either enteral or parenteral routes, plays a pivotal role in treatment of metabolic abnormalities in critical illness. In contrast to energy requirement, which can be accurately assessed by indirect calorimetry, methods to determine individual protein/amino acid needs are not currently available. In critical illness, a decreased ability of protein/amino acid intake to promote body protein synthesis is defined as anabolic resistance. This abnormality leads to increased protein/amino acid requirement and relative inefficiency of nutritional interventions. In addition to stress mediators, immobility and physical inactivity are key determinants of anabolic resistance. The development of mobility protocols in the intensive care unit should be encouraged to enhance the efficacy of nutrition. In critical illness, protein/amino acid requirement has been defined as the intake level associated with the lowest rate of catabolism. The optimal protein-sparing effects in patients receiving adequate energy are achieved when protein/amino acids are administered at rates between 1.3 and 1.5 g/kg/day. Extra glutamine supplementation is required in conditions of severe systemic inflammatory response. Protein requirement increases during hypocaloric feeding and in patients with acute renal failure on continuous renal replacement therapy. Evidence suggests that receiving adequate protein/amino acid intake may be more important than achieving

  15. Binding Efficiency of Protein-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Day, Eric S.; Cote, Shaun M.; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    We examine the relationship between binding affinity and interface size for reversible protein-protein interactions (PPI), using cytokines from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily and their receptors as a test case. Using surface plasmon resonance, we measured single-site binding affinities for the large receptor TNFR1 binding to its ligands TNFα (KD = 1.4 ± 0.4 nM) and lymphotoxin-α (KD = 50 ± 10 nM), and also for the small receptor Fn14 binding to TWEAK (KD = 70 ± 10 nM). We additionally assembled data for all other TNF/TNFR family complexes for which reliable single site binding affinities have been reported. We used these values to calculate the binding efficiency – defined as binding energy per Å2 of surface area buried at the contact interface – for the nine of these complexes for which co-crystal structures are available, and compared the results to those for a set of 144 protein-protein complexes with published affinity values. The results show that the most efficient PPI complexes generate ~20 cal.mol−1/Å2 of binding energy. A minimum contact area of ~500 Å2 is required for a stable complex, required to generate sufficient interaction energy to pay the entropic cost of co-localizing two proteins from 1 M solution. The most compact and efficient TNF/TNFR complex was BAFF/BR3, which achieved ~80% of the maximum achievable binding efficiency. Other small receptors also gave high binding efficiencies, while the larger receptors generated only 44-49% of this limit despite interacting primarily through just a single small domain. The results provide new insight into how much binding energy can be generated by a PPI interface of a given size, and establish a quantitative method to predict how large a natural or engineered contact interface must be to achieve a given level of binding affinity. PMID:23088250

  16. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery. PMID:25815400

  17. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Michael H.; Squire, Christopher J.; Mercer, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK) are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range. PMID:25690795

  18. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  19. Proteins and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, H.

    1997-12-31

    The structure, the energy landscape, and the dynamics of proteins and glasses are similar. Both types of systems display characteristic nonexponential time dependencies of relaxation phenomena. Experiments suggest that both, proteins and glasses, are heterogeneous and that this fact causes the observed time dependence. This result is discussed in terms of the rough energy landscape characteristic of complex systems.

  20. Synthesis of Lipidated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-08-17

    Protein lipidation is one of the major post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. The attachment of the lipid moiety frequently determines the localization and the function of the lipoproteins. Lipidated proteins participate in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the immune response. Malfunction of these cellular processes usually leads to various diseases such as cancer. Understanding the mechanism of cellular signaling and identifying the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in which the lipoproteins are involved is a crucial task. To achieve these goals, fully functional lipidated proteins are required. However, access to lipoproteins by means of standard expression is often rather limited. Therefore, semisynthetic methods, involving the synthesis of lipidated peptides and their subsequent chemoselective ligation to yield full-length lipoproteins, were developed. In this Review we summarize the commonly used methods for lipoprotein synthesis and the development of the corresponding chemoselective ligation techniques. Several key studies involving full-length semisynthetic lipidated Ras, Rheb, and LC3 proteins are presented. PMID:27444727

  1. The AVIT protein family

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Alexandra; Winklmayr, Martina; Lepperdinger, Günther; Kreil, Günther

    2003-01-01

    Homologues of a protein originally isolated from snake venom and frog skin secretions are present in many vertebrate species. They contain 80–90 amino acids, 10 of which are cysteines with identical spacing. Various names have been given to these proteins, such as mamba intestinal protein 1 (MIT1), Bv8 (Bombina variegata molecular mass ∼8 kDa), prokineticins and endocrine-gland vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF). Their amino-terminal sequences are identical, and so we propose that the sequence of their first four residues, AVIT, is used as a name for this family. From a comparison of the sequences, two types of AVIT proteins can be discerned. These proteins seem to be distributed widely in mammalian tissues and are known to bind to G-protein-coupled receptors. Members of this family have been shown to stimulate contraction of the guinea pig ileum, to cause hyperalgesia after injection into rats and to be active as specific growth factors. Moreover, the messenger RNA level of one of these AVIT proteins changes rhythmically in the region of the brain known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This shows that members of this new family of small proteins are involved in diverse biological processes. PMID:12728244

  2. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  3. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  4. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.

    2003-12-05

    ProteinShop Gives Researchers a Hands-On Tool for Manipulating, Visualizing Protein Structures. The Human Genome Project and other biological research efforts are creating an avalanche of new data about the chemical makeup and genetic codes of living organisms. But in order to make sense of this raw data, researchers need software tools which let them explore and model data in a more intuitive fashion. With this in mind, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Davis, have developed ProteinShop, a visualization and modeling program which allows researchers to manipulate protein structures with pinpoint control, guided in large part by their own biological and experimental instincts. Biologists have spent the last half century trying to unravel the ''protein folding problem,'' which refers to the way chains of amino acids physically fold themselves into three-dimensional proteins. This final shape, which resembles a crumpled ribbon or piece of origami, is what determines how the protein functions and translates genetic information. Understanding and modeling this geometrically complex formation is no easy matter. ProteinShop takes a given sequence of amino acids and uses visualization guides to help generate predictions about the secondary structures, identifying alpha helices and flat beta strands, and the coil regions that bind them. Once secondary structures are in place, researchers can twist and turn these pre-configurations until they come up with a number of possible tertiary structure conformations. In turn, these are fed into a computationally intensive optimization procedure that tries to find the final, three-dimensional protein structure. Most importantly, ProteinShop allows users to add human knowledge and intuition to the protein structure prediction process, thus bypassing bad configurations that would otherwise be fruitless for optimization. This saves compute cycles and accelerates the entire process, so

  5. Proteins, fluctuations and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Chen, Guo; Fenimore, Paul W

    2008-01-01

    Glasses, supercooled liquids, and proteins share common properties, in particular the existence of two different types of fluctuations, {alpha} and {beta}. While the effect of the {alpha} fluctuations on proteins has been known for a few years, the effect of {beta} fluctuations has not been understood. By comparing neutron scattering data on the protein myoglobin with the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell measured by dielectric spectroscopy we show that the internal protein motions are slaved to these fluctuations. We also show that there is no 'dynamic transition' in proteins near 200 K. The rapid increase in the mean square displacement with temperature in many neutron scattering experiments is quantitatively predicted by the {beta} fluctuations in the hydration shell.

  6. Structures of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Henderson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In reviewing the structures of membrane proteins determined up to the end of 2009, we present in words and pictures the most informative examples from each family. We group the structures together according to their function and architecture to provide an overview of the major principles and variations on the most common themes. The first structures, determined 20 years ago, were those of naturally abundant proteins with limited conformational variability, and each membrane protein structure determined was a major landmark. With the advent of complete genome sequences and efficient expression systems, there has been an explosion in the rate of membrane protein structure determination, with many classes represented. New structures are published every month and more than 150 unique membrane protein structures have been determined. This review analyses the reasons for this success, discusses the challenges that still lie ahead, and presents a concise summary of the key achievements with illustrated examples selected from each class. PMID:20667175

  7. Protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium. PMID:15036160

  8. Proteins in unexpected locations.

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, N R

    1996-01-01

    Members of all classes of proteins--cytoskeletal components, secreted growth factors, glycolytic enzymes, kinases, transcription factors, chaperones, transmembrane proteins, and extracellular matrix proteins--have been identified in cellular compartments other than their conventional sites of action. Some of these proteins are expressed as distinct compartment-specific isoforms, have novel mechanisms for intercompartmental translocation, have distinct endogenous biological actions within each compartment, and are regulated in a compartment-specific manner as a function of physiologic state. The possibility that many, if not most, proteins have distinct roles in more than one cellular compartment has implications for the evolution of cell organization and may be important for understanding pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer. PMID:8862516

  9. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  10. The centrality of cancer proteins in human protein-protein interaction network: a revisit.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Xie, Luyu; Zhou, Shuigeng; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Topological analysis of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has been widely applied to the investigation on cancer mechanisms. However, there is still a debate on whether cancer proteins exhibit more topological centrality compared to the other proteins in the human PPI network. To resolve this debate, we first identified four sets of human proteins, and then mapped these proteins into the yeast PPI network by homologous genes. Finally, we compared these proteins' properties in human and yeast PPI networks. Experiments over two real datasets demonstrated that cancer proteins tend to have higher degree and smaller clustering coefficient than non-cancer proteins. Experimental results also validated that cancer proteins have larger betweenness centrality compared to the other proteins on the STRING dataset. However, on the BioGRID dataset, the average betweenness centrality of cancer proteins is larger than that of disease and control proteins, but smaller than that of essential proteins. PMID:24878726

  11. Protein Regulation in Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Yaffe, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYCells must respond to a diverse, complex, and ever-changing mix of signals, using a fairly limited set of parts. Changes in protein level, protein localization, protein activity, and protein-protein interactions are critical aspects of signal transduction, allowing cells to respond highly specifically to a nearly limitless set of cues and also to vary the sensitivity, duration, and dynamics of the response. Signal-dependent changes in levels of gene expression and protein synthesis play an important role in regulation of protein levels, whereas posttranslational modifications of proteins regulate their degradation, localization, and functional interactions. Protein ubiquitylation, for example, can direct proteins to the proteasome for degradation or provide a signal that regulates their interactions and/or location within the cell. Similarly, protein phosphorylation by specific kinases is a key mechanism for augmenting protein activity and relaying signals to other proteins that possess domains that recognize the phosphorylated residues. PMID:27252361

  12. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  13. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  14. PSC: protein surface classification

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25 857 functional surfaces identified from 24 170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided. PMID:22669905

  15. Structure Prediction of Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Weng, Zhiping

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for biological function. They directly and indirectly influence the biological systems of which they are a part. Antibodies bind with antigens to detect and stop viruses and other infectious agents. Cell signaling is performed in many cases through the interactions between proteins. Many diseases involve protein-protein interactions on some level, including cancer and prion diseases.

  16. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin. The major storage protein of leguminous plants and a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. It is studied in efforts to enhance nutritional value of proteins through protein engineerings. It is isolated from Jack Bean because of it's potential as a nutritional substance. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Alex McPherson.

  17. Protein Crystal Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Eddie Snell (standing), Post-Doctoral Fellow the National Research Council (NRC),and Marc Pusey of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) use a reciprocal space mapping diffractometer for marcromolecular crystal quality studies. The diffractometer is used in mapping the structure of marcromolecules such as proteins to determine their structure and thus understand how they function with other proteins in the body. This is one of several analytical tools used on proteins crystalized on Earth and in space experiments. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  18. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  19. Piezoelectric allostery of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins.

  20. Emerging fluorescent protein technologies.

    PubMed

    Enterina, Jhon Ralph; Wu, Lanshi; Campbell, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs), such as the Aequorea jellyfish green FP (GFP), are firmly established as fundamental tools that enable a wide variety of biological studies. Specifically, FPs can serve as versatile genetically encoded markers for tracking proteins, organelles, or whole cells, and as the basis for construction of biosensors that can be used to visualize a growing array of biochemical events in cells and tissues. In this review we will focus on emerging applications of FPs that represent unprecedented new directions for the field. These emerging applications include new strategies for using FPs in biosensing applications, and innovative ways of using FPs to manipulate protein function or gene expression. PMID:26043278

  1. Piezoelectric allostery of protein.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Jun; Sato, Takato; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    Allostery is indispensable for a protein to work, where a locally applied stimulus is transmitted to a distant part of the molecule. While the allostery due to chemical stimuli such as ligand binding has long been studied, the growing interest in mechanobiology prompts the study of the mechanically stimulated allostery, the physical mechanism of which has not been established. By molecular dynamics simulation of a motor protein myosin, we found that a locally applied mechanical stimulus induces electrostatic potential change at distant regions, just like the piezoelectricity. This novel allosteric mechanism, "piezoelectric allostery", should be of particularly high value for mechanosensor/transducer proteins. PMID:27575163

  2. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2007-10-02

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  3. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2005-07-12

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  4. Evolution of proteins.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of proteins from living organisms are dealt with. The structure of proteins is first discussed; the variation in this structure from one biological group to another is illustrated by the first halves of the sequences of cytochrome c, and a phylogenetic tree is derived from the cytochrome c data. The relative geological times associated with the events of this tree are discussed. Errors which occur in the duplication of cells during the evolutionary process are examined. Particular attention is given to evolution of mutant proteins, globins, ferredoxin, and transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNA's). Finally, a general outline of biological evolution is presented.

  5. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  6. A Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Jason M.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Sharp, Julia L.; White, Amanda M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.

    2008-07-01

    The Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities (BEPro3) is a software tool for estimating probabilities of protein-protein association between bait and prey protein pairs using data from multiple-bait, multiple-replicate, protein pull-down LC-MS assay experiments. BEPro3 is open source software that runs on both Windows XP and Mac OS 10.4 or newer versions, and is freely available from http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/BEPro3.

  7. Interactive protein manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  8. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  9. Engineered Proteins for Bioelectrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, Muhammad Safwan; Rehman, Jawad Ur; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-06-01

    It is only in the past two decades that excellent protein engineering tools have begun to meet parallel advances in materials chemistry, nanofabrication, and electronics. This is revealing scenarios from which synthetic enzymes can emerge, which were previously impossible, as well as interfaces with novel electrode materials. That means the control of the protein structure, electron transport pathway, and electrode surface can usher us into a new era of bioelectrochemistry. This article reviews the principle of electron transfer (ET) and considers how its application at the electrode, within the protein, and at a redox group is directing key advances in the understanding of protein structure to create systems that exhibit better efficiency and unique bioelectrochemistry.

  10. Protein Model Database

    SciTech Connect

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  11. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  12. Untying knots in proteins.

    PubMed

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2010-10-13

    A shoelace can be readily untied by pulling its ends rather than its loops. Attempting to untie a native knot in a protein can also succeed or fail depending on where one pulls. However, thermal fluctuations induced by the surrounding water affect conformations stochastically and may add to the uncertainty of the outcome. When the protein is pulled by the termini, the knot can only get tightened, and any attempt at untying results in failure. We show that, by pulling specific amino acids, one may easily retract a terminal segment of the backbone from the knotting loop and untangle the knot. At still other amino acids, the outcome of pulling can go either way. We study the dependence of the untying probability on the way the protein is grasped, the pulling speed, and the temperature. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying this dependence is critical for a successful experimental realization of protein knot untying. PMID:20857930

  13. Membrane Protein Prediction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Punta, Marco; Forrest, Lucy R.; Bigelow, Henry; Kernytsky, Andrew; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    We survey computational approaches that tackle membrane protein structure and function prediction. While describing the main ideas that have led to the development of the most relevant and novel methods, we also discuss pitfalls, provide practical hints and highlight the challenges that remain. The methods covered include: sequence alignment, motif search, functional residue identification, transmembrane segment and protein topology predictions, homology and ab initio modeling. Overall, predictions of functional and structural features of membrane proteins are improving, although progress is hampered by the limited amount of high-resolution experimental information available. While predictions of transmembrane segments and protein topology rank among the most accurate methods in computational biology, more attention and effort will be required in the future to ameliorate database search, homology and ab initio modeling. PMID:17367718

  14. Bence-Jones protein - quantitative

    MedlinePlus

    Immunoglobulin light chains - urine; Urine Bence-Jones protein ... Bence-Jones proteins are a part of regular antibodies called light chains. These proteins are not normally in urine. Sometimes, when ...

  15. Protein Nitrogen Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The protein content of foods can be determined by numerous methods. The Kjeldahl method and the nitrogen combustion (Dumas) method for protein analysis are based on nitrogen determination. Both methods are official for the purposes of nutrition labeling of foods. While the Kjeldahl method has been used widely for over a hundred years, the recent availability of automated instrumentation for the Dumas method in many cases is replacing use of the Kjeldahl method.

  16. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  17. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  18. Protein conducting nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsman, Anke; Krüger, Vivien; Bartsch, Philipp; Honigmann, Alf; Schmidt, Oliver; Rao, Sanjana; Meisinger, Christof; Wagner, Richard

    2010-11-01

    About 50% of the cellular proteins have to be transported into or across cellular membranes. This transport is an essential step in the protein biosynthesis. In eukaryotic cells secretory proteins are transported into the endoplasmic reticulum before they are transported in vesicles to the plasma membrane. Almost all proteins of the endosymbiotic organelles chloroplasts and mitochondria are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and posttranslationally imported. Genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches led to rather detailed knowledge on the composition of the translocon-complexes which catalyze the membrane transport of the preproteins. Comprehensive concepts on the targeting and membrane transport of polypeptides emerged, however little detail on the molecular nature and mechanisms of the protein translocation channels comprising nanopores has been achieved. In this paper we will highlight recent developments of the diverse protein translocation systems and focus particularly on the common biophysical properties and functions of the protein conducting nanopores. We also provide a first analysis of the interaction between the genuine protein conducting nanopore Tom40SC as well as a mutant Tom40SC (\\mathrm {S}_{54} \\to E ) containing an additional negative charge at the channel vestibule and one of its native substrates, CoxIV, a mitochondrial targeting peptide. The polypeptide induced a voltage-dependent increase in the frequency of channel closure of Tom40SC corresponding to a voltage-dependent association rate, which was even more pronounced for the Tom40SC S54E mutant. The corresponding dwelltime reflecting association/transport of the peptide could be determined with \\bar {t}_{\\mathrm {off}} \\cong 1.1 ms for the wildtype, whereas the mutant Tom40SC S54E displayed a biphasic dwelltime distribution (\\bar {t}_{\\mathrm {off}}^1 \\cong 0.4 ms \\bar {t}_{\\mathrm {off}}^2 \\cong 4.6 ms).

  19. Cotton and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Edwards, J. V.; Rayburn, Alfred R.; Gaither, Kari A.; Castro, Nathan J.

    2006-06-30

    The adsorbent properties of important wound fluid proteins and cotton cellulose are reviewed. This review focuses on the adsorption of albumin to cotton-based wound dressings and some chemically modified derivatives targeted for chronic wounds. Adsorption of elastase in the presence of albumin was examined as a model to understand the interactive properties of these wound fluid components with cotton fibers. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase appears to be over-expressed, and it digests tissue and growth factors, interfering with the normal healing process. Albumin is the most prevalent protein in wound fluid, and in highly to moderately exudative wounds, it may bind significantly to the fibers of wound dressings. Thus, the relative binding properties of both elastase and albumin to wound dressing fibers are of interest in the design of more effective wound dressings. The present work examines the binding of albumin to two different derivatives of cotton, and quantifies the elastase binding to the same derivatives following exposure of albumin to the fiber surface. An HPLC adsorption technique was employed coupled with a colorimetric enzyme assay to quantify the relative binding properties of albumin and elastase to cotton. The results of wound protein binding are discussed in relation to the porosity and surface chemistry interactions of cotton and wound proteins. Studies are directed to understanding the implications of protein adsorption phenomena in terms of fiber-protein models that have implications for rationally designing dressings for chronic wounds.

  20. Stretching to Understand Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2007-03-01

    Mechanical stretching of single proteins has been studied experimentally for about 50 proteins yielding a variety of force patterns and values of the peak forces. We have performed a theoretical survey of 7749 proteins of known native structure and map out the landscape of possible dynamical behaviors unders stretching at constant speed. The model used is constructed based on the native geometry. It is solved by methods of molecular dynamics and validated by comparing the theoretical predictions to experimental results. We characterize the distribution of peak forces and on correlations with the system size and with the structure classification as characterized by the CATH scheme. We identify proteins with the biggest forces and show that they belong to few topology classes. We determine which protein segments act as mechanical clamps and show that, in most cases, they correspond to long stretches of parallel beta-strands, but other mechanisms are also possible. We then consider stretching by fluid flows. We show that unfolding induced by a uniform flow shows a richer behavior than that in the force clamp. The dynamics of unfolding is found to depend strongly on the selection of the amino acid, usually one of the termini, which is anchored. These features offer potentially wider diagnostic tools to investigate structure of proteins compared to experiments based on the atomic force microscopy.

  1. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  2. Use of protein-protein interactions in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Sholukh, M; Korpela, T

    2001-10-30

    Biospecific recognition between proteins is a phenomenon that can be exploited for designing affinity-chromatographic purification systems for proteins. In principle, the approach is straightforward, and there are usually many alternative ways, since a protein can be always found which binds specifically enough to the desired protein. Routine immunoaffinity chromatography utilizes the recognition of antigenic epitopes by antibodies. However, forces involved in protein-protein interactions as well the forces keeping the three-dimensional structures of proteins intact are complicated, and proteins are easily unfolded by various factors with unpredictable results. Because of this and because of the generally high association strength between proteins, the correct adjustment of binding forces between an immobilized protein and the protein to be purified as well as the release of bound proteins in biologically active form from affinity complexes are the main problem. Affinity systems involving interactions like enzyme-enzyme, subunit-oligomer, protein-antibody, protein-chaperone and the specific features involved in each case are presented as examples. This article also aims to sketch prospects for further development of the use of protein-protein interactions for the purification of proteins. PMID:11694271

  3. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  4. Multifunctional protein: cardiac ankyrin repeat protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xie, Xiao-jie; Wang, Jian-an

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) not only serves as an important component of muscle sarcomere in the cytoplasm, but also acts as a transcription co-factor in the nucleus. Previous studies have demonstrated that CARP is up-regulated in some cardiovascular disorders and muscle diseases; however, its role in these diseases remains controversial now. In this review, we will discuss the continued progress in the research related to CARP, including its discovery, structure, and the role it plays in cardiac development and heart diseases. PMID:27143260

  5. Bioinformatics and Moonlighting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Franco, Luís; Calvo, Alejandra; Ferragut, Gabriela; Hermoso, Antoni; Amela, Isaac; Gómez, Antonio; Querol, Enrique; Cedano, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyze and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics, and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are (a) remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, (b) detection of functional motifs and domains, (c) analysis of data from protein-protein interaction databases (PPIs), (d) match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE), and (e) mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs) has the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations - it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences - but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/), previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses. PMID:26157797

  6. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  7. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  8. Benchtop Detection of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    A process, and a benchtop-scale apparatus for implementing the process, have been developed to detect proteins associated with specific microbes in water. The process and apparatus may also be useful for detection of proteins in other, more complex liquids. There may be numerous potential applications, including monitoring lakes and streams for contamination, testing of blood and other bodily fluids in medical laboratories, and testing for microbial contamination of liquids in restaurants and industrial food-processing facilities. A sample can be prepared and analyzed by use of this process and apparatus within minutes, whereas an equivalent analysis performed by use of other processes and equipment can often take hours to days. The process begins with the conjugation of near-infrared-fluorescent dyes to antibodies that are specific to a particular protein. Initially, the research has focused on using near-infrared dyes to detect antigens or associated proteins in solution, which has proven successful vs. microbial cells, and streamlining the technique in use for surface protein detection on microbes would theoretically render similar results. However, it is noted that additional work is needed to transition protein-based techniques to microbial cell detection. Consequently, multiple such dye/antibody pairs could be prepared to enable detection of multiple selected microbial species, using a different dye for each species. When excited by near-infrared light of a suitable wavelength, each dye fluoresces at a unique longer wavelength that differs from those of the other dyes, enabling discrimination among the various species. In initial tests, the dye/antibody pairs are mixed into a solution suspected of containing the selected proteins, causing the binding of the dye/antibody pairs to such suspect proteins that may be present. The solution is then run through a microcentrifuge that includes a membrane that acts as a filter in that it retains the dye/antibody/protein

  9. Solid State NMR and Protein-Protein Interactions in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  10. Solid state NMR and protein-protein interactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-12-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high-resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water-soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  11. The detection of DNA-binding proteins by protein blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, B; Steinberg, J; Laemmli, U K; Weintraub, H

    1980-01-01

    A method, called "protein blotting," for the detection of DNA-binding proteins is described. Proteins are separated on an SDA-polyacrylamide gel. The gel is sandwiched between 2 nitrocellulose filters and the proteins allowed to diffuse out of the gel and onto the filters. The proteins are tightly bound to each filter, producing a replica of the original gel pattern. The replica is used to detect DNA-binding proteins, RNA-binding proteins or histone-binding proteins by incubation of the filter with [32P]DNA, [125I]RNA, or [125I] histone. Evidence is also presented that specific protein-DNA interactions may be detected by this technique; under appropriate conditions, the lac repressor binds only to DNA containing the lac operator. Strategies for the detection of specific protein-DNA interactions are discussed. Images PMID:6243775

  12. Histophilus somni Surface Proteins.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, Lynette B

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen surface is usually the first site of interaction with the host. Histophilus somni was earlier thought to only have an outer membrane on its surface. Now it is known that the surface is composed of many virulence factors, including outer membrane proteins, lipooligosaccharide or endotoxin, a fibrillar network, and an exopolysaccharide. Outer membrane blebs, endotoxin, the fibrillar network, and the exopolysaccharide are also shed from the surface. This review will focus on the surface proteins of this pathogen that may colonize the mucosal surface of ruminants as a commensal or may cause pneumonia, septicemia, myocarditis, thrombotic meningoencephalitis, arthritis, and/or abortion. The major outer membrane protein has been well studied. Since its size and epitopes vary from strain to strain, it may be useful for typing strains. Iron-regulated OMPs have also received much attention because of their role in iron uptake for in vivo growth of H. somni. Other OMPs may be protective, based on passive immunization with monospecific antibodies and active immunization experiments. The surface and shed fibrillar network has been shown to be an immunoglobulin-binding protein in that it binds bovine IgG2 by the Fc portion. Two repeat domains (DR1 and DR2) have cytotoxic Fic motifs. Vaccine studies with recombinant DR2 are promising. Studies of the bacterial genome as well as comparison of surface proteins of different strains from the various H. somni syndromes and carrier states will be discussed and have provided much insight into pathogenesis and protection. PMID:26728061

  13. Plant protein kinase substrates identification using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate signaling pathways by phosphorylating their targets. They play critical roles in plant signaling networks. Although many important protein kinases have been identified in plants, their substrates are largely unknown. We have developed and produced plant protein microarrays with more than 15,000 purified plant proteins. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to use these microarrays to identify plant protein kinase substrates via in vitro phosphorylation assays on these arrays. PMID:25930701

  14. How Many Protein-Protein Interactions Types Exist in Nature?

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Pralay; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Protein quaternary structure universe” refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the protein complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) into 3,629 families and 1,761 folds. A statistical model was introduced to obtain the quantitative relation between the numbers of quaternary families and quaternary folds in nature. The total number of possible protein-protein interactions was estimated around 4,000, which indicates that the current protein repository contains only 42% of quaternary folds in nature and a full coverage needs approximately a quarter century of experimental effort. The results have important implications to the protein complex structural modeling and the structure genomics of protein-protein interactions. PMID:22719985

  15. How many protein-protein interactions types exist in nature?

    PubMed

    Garma, Leonardo; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Mitra, Pralay; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    "Protein quaternary structure universe" refers to the ensemble of all protein-protein complexes across all organisms in nature. The number of quaternary folds thus corresponds to the number of ways proteins physically interact with other proteins. This study focuses on answering two basic questions: Whether the number of protein-protein interactions is limited and, if yes, how many different quaternary folds exist in nature. By all-to-all sequence and structure comparisons, we grouped the protein complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) into 3,629 families and 1,761 folds. A statistical model was introduced to obtain the quantitative relation between the numbers of quaternary families and quaternary folds in nature. The total number of possible protein-protein interactions was estimated around 4,000, which indicates that the current protein repository contains only 42% of quaternary folds in nature and a full coverage needs approximately a quarter century of experimental effort. The results have important implications to the protein complex structural modeling and the structure genomics of protein-protein interactions. PMID:22719985

  16. Computational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Bienstock, Rachelle J

    2012-01-01

    Novel discoveries in molecular disease pathways within the cell, combined with increasing information regarding protein binding partners has lead to a new approach in drug discovery. There is interest in designing drugs to modulate protein-protein interactions as opposed to solely targeting the catalytic active site within a single enzyme or protein. There are many challenges in this new approach to drug discovery, particularly since the protein-protein interface has a larger surface area, can comprise a discontinuous epitope, and is more amorphous and less well defined than the typical drug design target, a small contained enzyme-binding pocket. Computational methods to predict modes of protein-protein interaction, as well as protein interface hot spots, have garnered significant interest, in order to facilitate the development of drugs to successfully disrupt and inhibit protein-protein interactions. This review summarizes some current methods available for computational protein-protein docking, as well as tabulating some examples of the successful design of antagonists and small molecule inhibitors for protein-protein interactions. Several of these drugs are now beginning to appear in the clinic. PMID:22316151

  17. Advanced protein formulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that protein product development is far more challenging than that for small-molecule drugs. The major challenges include inherent sensitivity to different types of stresses during the drug product manufacturing process, high rate of physical and chemical degradation during long-term storage, and enhanced aggregation and/or viscosity at high protein concentrations. In the past decade, many novel formulation concepts and technologies have been or are being developed to address these product development challenges for proteins. These concepts and technologies include use of uncommon/combination of formulation stabilizers, conjugation or fusion with potential stabilizers, site-specific mutagenesis, and preparation of nontraditional types of dosage forms—semiaqueous solutions, nonfreeze-dried solid formulations, suspensions, and other emerging concepts. No one technology appears to be mature, ideal, and/or adequate to address all the challenges. These gaps will likely remain in the foreseeable future and need significant efforts for ultimate resolution. PMID:25858529

  18. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  19. Collapse transition in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Guy; Thirumalai, D; Haran, Gilad

    2009-01-01

    The coil-globule transition, a tenet of the physics of polymers, has been identified in recent years as an important unresolved aspect of the initial stages of the folding of proteins. We describe the basics of the collapse transition, starting with homopolymers and continuing with proteins. Studies of denatured-state collapse under equilibrium are then presented. An emphasis is placed on single-molecule fluorescence experiments, which are particularly useful for measuring properties of the denatured state even under conditions of coexistence with the folded state. Attempts to understand the dynamics of collapse, both theoretically and experimentally, are then described. Only an upper limit for the rate of collapse has been obtained so far. Improvements in experimental and theoretical methodology are likely to continue to push our understanding of the importance of the denatured-state thermodynamics and dynamics for protein folding in the coming years. PMID:19081910

  20. Polarizable protein packing.

    PubMed

    Ng, Albert H; Snow, Christopher D

    2011-05-01

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol(-1)] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. PMID:21264879

  1. Matricellular proteins and biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Aaron H.; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials are essential to modern medicine as components of reconstructive implants, implantable sensors, and vehicles for localized drug delivery. Advances in biomaterials have led to progression from simply making implants that are nontoxic to making implants that are specifically designed to elicit particular functions within the host. The interaction of implants and the extracellular matrix during the foreign body response is a growing area of concern for the field of biomaterials, because it can lead to implant failure. Expression of matricellular proteins is modulated during the foreign body response and these proteins interact with biomaterials. The design of biomaterials to specifically alter the levels of matricellular proteins surrounding implants provides a new avenue for the design and fabrication of biomimetic biomaterials. PMID:24657843

  2. Electron transfer in proteins.

    PubMed

    Gray, H B; Winkler, J R

    1996-01-01

    Electron-transfer (ET) reactions are key steps in a diverse array of biological transformations ranging from photosynthesis to aerobic respiration. A powerful theoretical formalism has been developed that describes ET rates in terms of two parameters: the nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) and the electronic-coupling strength (HAB). Studies of ET reactions in ruthenium-modified proteins have probed lambda and HAB in several metalloproteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, azurin). This work has shown that protein reorganization energies are sensitive to the medium surrounding the redox sites and that an aqueous environment, in particular, leads to large reorganization energies. Analyses of electronic-coupling strengths suggest that the efficiency of long-range ET depends on the protein secondary structure: beta sheets appear to mediate coupling more efficiently than alpha-helical structures, and hydrogen bonds play a critical role in both. PMID:8811189

  3. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  4. Protein crystallization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyne, James Evans

    1996-01-01

    The Structural Biology laboratory at NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center uses x-ray crystallographic techniques to conduct research into the three-dimensional structure of a wide variety of proteins. A major effort in the laboratory involves an ongoing study of human serum albumin (the principal protein in human plasma) and its interaction with various endogenous substances and pharmaceutical agents. Another focus is on antigenic and functional proteins from several pathogenic organisms including the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the widespread parasitic genus, Schistosoma. My efforts this summer have been twofold: first, to identify clinically significant drug interactions involving albumin binding displacement and to initiate studies of the three-dimensional structure of albumin complexed with these agents, and secondly, to establish collaborative efforts to extend the lab's work on human pathogens.

  5. New MAPS for misfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Volkmar, Norbert; Fenech, Emma; Christianson, John C

    2016-06-28

    Clearing misfolded proteins from the cytoplasm is essential to maintain cellular homeostasis. Now, a parallel clearance system is described that uses the deubiquitylase USP19 to enable secretion of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins when conventional proteasomal degradation is compromised. Misfolding-associated protein secretion (MAPS) has important implications for protein quality control and prion-like transmission. PMID:27350445

  6. SOY PROTEIN NANOPARTICLES AND NANOCOMPOSITES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein isolate (SPI) is obtained from soybean by removing soybean oil and soy carbohydrates. SPI contains more than 90% protein. Structurally, SPI is a globular protein and its aggregates in water consist of sphere-like protein particles. The number average aggregate size of SPI at pH=5.2 is...

  7. FLOW BEHAVIOR OF PROTEIN BLENDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blending proteins can increase textural strength or enhance taste or mouth feel, such as blending soy with whey to improve taste. In this study, we measured the viscosity of various combinations of six proteins (whey protein isolates, calcium caseinate, soy protein isolates, wheat gluten, egg album...

  8. Bioinformatics and Moonlighting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Sergio; Franco, Luís; Calvo, Alejandra; Ferragut, Gabriela; Hermoso, Antoni; Amela, Isaac; Gómez, Antonio; Querol, Enrique; Cedano, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyze and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics, and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are (a) remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, (b) detection of functional motifs and domains, (c) analysis of data from protein–protein interaction databases (PPIs), (d) match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE), and (e) mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs) has the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations – it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences – but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/), previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses. PMID:26157797

  9. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling. PMID:27497164

  10. Epistasis in protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Starr, Tyler N; Thornton, Joseph W

    2016-07-01

    The structure, function, and evolution of proteins depend on physical and genetic interactions among amino acids. Recent studies have used new strategies to explore the prevalence, biochemical mechanisms, and evolutionary implications of these interactions-called epistasis-within proteins. Here we describe an emerging picture of pervasive epistasis in which the physical and biological effects of mutations change over the course of evolution in a lineage-specific fashion. Epistasis can restrict the trajectories available to an evolving protein or open new paths to sequences and functions that would otherwise have been inaccessible. We describe two broad classes of epistatic interactions, which arise from different physical mechanisms and have different effects on evolutionary processes. Specific epistasis-in which one mutation influences the phenotypic effect of few other mutations-is caused by direct and indirect physical interactions between mutations, which nonadditively change the protein's physical properties, such as conformation, stability, or affinity for ligands. In contrast, nonspecific epistasis describes mutations that modify the effect of many others; these typically behave additively with respect to the physical properties of a protein but exhibit epistasis because of a nonlinear relationship between the physical properties and their biological effects, such as function or fitness. Both types of interaction are rampant, but specific epistasis has stronger effects on the rate and outcomes of evolution, because it imposes stricter constraints and modulates evolutionary potential more dramatically; it therefore makes evolution more contingent on low-probability historical events and leaves stronger marks on the sequences, structures, and functions of protein families. PMID:26833806

  11. Single-cell proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.

    1983-02-11

    Both photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic microorganisms, grown on various carbon and energy sources, are used in fermentation processes for the production of single-cell proteins. Commercial-scale production has been limited to two algal processes, one bacterial process, and several yeast and fungal processes. High capital and operating costs and the need for extensive nutritional and toxicological assessments have limited the development and commercialization of new processes. Any increase in commercial-scale production appears to be limited to those regions of the world where low-cost carbon and energy sources are available and conventional animal feedstuff proteins, such as soybean meal or fish meal, are in short supply. (Refs. 59).

  12. Protein-based ferrogels.

    PubMed

    Mody, Puja; Hart, Cassidy; Romano, Siena; El-Magbri, Mariam; Esson, Moira M; Ibeh, Trisha; Knowlton, Elizabeth D; Zhang, Ming; Wagner, Michael J; Hartings, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel synthesis in which hemoglobin and Fe(2+) react, in the presence of KNO3 and KOH, to produce protein microgels that contain magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The synthesis results in microgels with polymer properties (denaturing and glass transition temperatures) that are consistent with the dried protein. The iron oxide nanoparticles that exhibit an average diameter of 22nm, are ferrimagnetic, and display properties consistent with Fe3O4. The multiple functional capabilities displayed by these materials: biocompatibility, magnetism, dye uptake and controlled release, and other properties archetypal of hydrogels, will make the magnetic hydrogels attractive for a number of biomedical applications. PMID:26901627

  13. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  14. Congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation is an essential process by which sugars are attached to proteins and lipids. Complete lack of glycosylation is not compatible with life. Because of the widespread function of glycosylation, inherited disorders of glycosylation are multisystemic. Since the identification of the first defect on N-linked glycosylation in the 1980s, there are over 40 different congenital protein hypoglycosylation diseases. This review will include defects of N-linked glycosylation, O-linked glycosylation and disorders of combined N- and O-linked glycosylation. PMID:23776380

  15. Lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiujuan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are basic proteins found in abundance in higher plants. LTPs play lots of roles in plants such as participation in cutin formation, embryogenesis, defense reactions against phytopathogens, symbiosis, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions. In addition, LTPs from field mustard and Chinese daffodil exhibit antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. LTPs from chili pepper and coffee manifest inhibitory activity against fungi pathogenic to humans such as Candida species. The intent of this article is to review LTPs in the plant kingdom. PMID:23193591

  16. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  17. Conformation Distributions in Adsorbed Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuse, Curtis W.; Hubbard, Joseph B.; Vrettos, John S.; Smith, Jackson R.; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2007-03-01

    While the structural basis of protein function is well understood in the biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, few methods for the characterization and comparison of protein conformation distributions are available. New methods capable of measuring the stability of protein conformations and the integrity of protein-protein, protein-ligand and protein-surface interactions both in solution and on surfaces are needed to help the development of protein-based products. We are developing infrared spectroscopy methods for the characterization and comparison of molecular conformation distributions in monolayers and in solutions. We have extracted an order parameter describing the orientational and conformational variations of protein functional groups around the average molecular values from a single polarized spectrum. We will discuss the development of these methods and compare them to amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange methods for albumin in solution and on different polymer surfaces to show that our order parameter is related to protein stability.

  18. Extreme multifunctional proteins identified from a human protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Charles E.; Robisson, Benoit; Spinelli, Lionel; Guien, Céline; Becker, Emmanuelle; Brun, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins are a subclass of multifunctional proteins whose functions are unrelated. Although they may play important roles in cells, there has been no large-scale method to identify them, nor any effort to characterize them as a group. Here, we propose the first method for the identification of ‘extreme multifunctional' proteins from an interactome as a first step to characterize moonlighting proteins. By combining network topological information with protein annotations, we identify 430 extreme multifunctional proteins (3% of the human interactome). We show that the candidates form a distinct sub-group of proteins, characterized by specific features, which form a signature of extreme multifunctionality. Overall, extreme multifunctional proteins are enriched in linear motifs and less intrinsically disordered than network hubs. We also provide MoonDB, a database containing information on all the candidates identified in the analysis and a set of manually curated human moonlighting proteins. PMID:26054620

  19. Protein-protein interactions: methods for detection and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Phizicky, E M; Fields, S

    1995-01-01

    The function and activity of a protein are often modulated by other proteins with which it interacts. This review is intended as a practical guide to the analysis of such protein-protein interactions. We discuss biochemical methods such as protein affinity chromatography, affinity blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, and cross-linking; molecular biological methods such as protein probing, the two-hybrid system, and phage display: and genetic methods such as the isolation of extragenic suppressors, synthetic mutants, and unlinked noncomplementing mutants. We next describe how binding affinities can be evaluated by techniques including protein affinity chromatography, sedimentation, gel filtration, fluorescence methods, solid-phase sampling of equilibrium solutions, and surface plasmon resonance. Finally, three examples of well-characterized domains involved in multiple protein-protein interactions are examined. The emphasis of the discussion is on variations in the approaches, concerns in evaluating the results, and advantages and disadvantages of the techniques. PMID:7708014

  20. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  1. Transient protein-protein interactions visualized by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Gong, Zhou; Dong, Xu; Tang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Proteins interact with each other to establish their identities in cell. The affinities for the interactions span more than ten orders of magnitude, and KD values in μM-mM regimen are considered transient and are important in cell signaling. Solution NMR including diamagnetic and paramagnetic techniques has enabled atomic-resolution depictions of transient protein-protein interactions. Diamagnetic NMR allows characterization of protein complexes with KD values up to several mM, whereas ultraweak and fleeting complexes can be modeled with the use of paramagnetic NMR especially paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). When tackling ever-larger protein complexes, PRE can be particularly useful in providing long-range intermolecular distance restraints. As NMR measurements are averaged over the ensemble of complex structures, structural information for dynamic protein-protein interactions besides the stereospecific one can often be extracted. Herein the protein interaction dynamics are exemplified by encounter complexes, alternative binding modes, and coupled binding/folding of intrinsically disordered proteins. Further integration of NMR with other biophysical techniques should allow better visualization of transient protein-protein interactions. In particular, single-molecule data may facilitate the interpretation of ensemble-averaged NMR data. Though same structures of proteins and protein complexes were found in cell as in diluted solution, we anticipate that the dynamics of transient protein protein-protein interactions be different, which awaits awaits exploration by NMR. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:25896389

  2. Preparing Protein Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Cindy Barnes of University Space Research Association (USRA) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center pipettes a protein solution in preparation to grow crystals as part of NASA's structural biology program. Research on Earth helps scientists define conditions and specimens they will use in space experiments.

  3. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  4. Cosolvent assisted protein refolding.

    PubMed

    Cleland, J L; Wang, D I

    1990-12-01

    The use of cosolvents in aqueous systems has been shown to enhance protein refolding and decrease aggregation. In this study, we have used polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the molecular weight range of 1000 to 8000 Daltons to effectively increase the rate of refolding and prevent aggregation of the model protein, bovine carbonic anhydrase B (CAB). At concentrations of 3 and 30 g/l, PEG increased the rate of recovery of active protein in the absence of aggregation. Using 3 g/l PEG (3350 MW), the refolding rate was three fold greater than the observed normal refolding rate. The observed rate enhancement was caused by PEG acting on the first intermediate in the CAB refolding pathway to increase the rate of formation of the second intermediate. The interaction of PEG with the first intermediate also prevented its self-association during refolding and at equilibrium. The stabilization of this first intermediate resulted in complete recovery of active protein under normal aggregating conditions. PMID:1367488

  5. The Protein Ensemble Database.

    PubMed

    Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The scientific community's major conceptual notion of structural biology has recently shifted in emphasis from the classical structure-function paradigm due to the emergence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). As opposed to their folded cousins, these proteins are defined by the lack of a stable 3D fold and a high degree of inherent structural heterogeneity that is closely tied to their function. Due to their flexible nature, solution techniques such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are particularly well-suited for characterizing their biophysical properties. Computationally derived structural ensembles based on such experimental measurements provide models of the conformational sampling displayed by these proteins, and they may offer valuable insights into the functional consequences of inherent flexibility. The Protein Ensemble Database (http://pedb.vib.be) is the first openly accessible, manually curated online resource storing the ensemble models, protocols used during the calculation procedure, and underlying primary experimental data derived from SAXS and/or NMR measurements. By making this previously inaccessible data freely available to researchers, this novel resource is expected to promote the development of more advanced modelling methodologies, facilitate the design of standardized calculation protocols, and consequently lead to a better understanding of how function arises from the disordered state. PMID:26387108

  6. Protein Requirements during Aging.

    PubMed

    Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B; Elango, Rajavel

    2016-01-01

    Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR) and recommended dietary allowance (RDA), respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals. PMID:27529275

  7. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  8. Protein-protein and protein-salt interactions in aqueous protein solutions containing concentrated electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.A.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1998-01-05

    Protein-protein and protein-salt interactions have been obtained for ovalbumin in solutions of ammonium sulfate and for lysozyme in solutions of ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, potassium isothiocyanate, and potassium chloride. The two-body interactions between ovalbumin molecules in concentrated ammonium-sulfate solutions can be described by the DLVO potentials plus a potential that accounts for the decrease in free volume available to the protein due to the presence of the salt ions. The interaction between ovalbumin and ammonium sulfate is unfavorable, reflecting the kosmotropic nature of sulfate anions. Lysozyme-lysozyme interactions cannot be described by the above potentials because anion binding to lysozyme alters these interactions. Lysozyme-isothiocyanate complexes are strongly attractive due to electrostatic interactions resulting from bridging by the isothiocyanate ion. Lysozyme-lysozyme interactions in sulfate solutions are more repulsive than expected, possibly resulting from a larger excluded volume of a lysozyme-sulfate bound complex or perhaps, hydration forces between the lysozyme-sulfate complexes.

  9. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  10. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  11. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  12. Protein Requirements during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Ball, Ronald O.; Pencharz, Paul B.; Elango, Rajavel

    2016-01-01

    Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR) and recommended dietary allowance (RDA), respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals. PMID:27529275

  13. Protein states and proteinquakes.

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, A; Berendzen, J; Bowne, S F; Frauenfelder, H; Iben, I E; Sauke, T B; Shyamsunder, E; Young, R D

    1985-01-01

    After photodissociation of carbon monoxide bound to myoglobin, the protein relaxes to the deoxy equilibrium structure in a quake-like motion. Investigation of the proteinquake and of related intramolecular equilibrium motions shows that states and motions have a hierarchical glass-like structure. PMID:3860839

  14. Thermal unfolding of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sułkowska, Joanna I.

    2005-11-01

    Thermal unfolding of proteins is compared to folding and mechanical stretching in a simple topology-based dynamical model. We define the unfolding time and demonstrate its low-temperature divergence. Below a characteristic temperature, contacts break at separate time scales and unfolding proceeds approximately in a way reverse to folding. Features in these scenarios agree with experiments and atomic simulations on titin.

  15. Dynamics of protein conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Maria

    2010-10-01

    A novel theoretical methodology is introduced to identify dynamic structural domains and analyze local flexibility in proteins. The methodology employs a multiscale approach combining identification of essential collective coordinates based on the covariance analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories, construction of the Mori projection operator with these essential coordinates, and analysis of the corresponding generalized Langevin equations [M.Stepanova, Phys.Rev.E 76(2007)051918]. Because the approach employs a rigorous theory, the outcomes are physically transparent: the dynamic domains are associated with regions of relative rigidity in the protein, whereas off-domain regions are relatively soft. This also allows scoring the flexibility in the macromolecule with atomic-level resolution [N.Blinov, M.Berjanskii, D.S.Wishart, and M.Stepanova, Biochemistry, 48(2009)1488]. The applications include the domain coarse-graining and characterization of conformational stability in protein G and prion proteins. The results are compared with published NMR experiments. Potential applications for structural biology, bioinformatics, and drug design are discussed.

  16. Protein denaturing on Nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, James; Teichroeb, Jonathan

    2007-03-01

    We have used localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) to monitor the structural changes that accompany thermal denaturing of Bovine Serum Albumin(BSA) adsorbed onto gold nanospheres of size 5nm-60nm. The effect of the protein on the LSPR was monitored by visible extinction spectroscopy. The position of the resonance is affected by the conformation of the adsorbed protein layer, and as such can be used as a very sensitive probe of thermal denaturing that is specific to the adsorbed protein. The results are compared to detailed calculations and show that full calculations can lead to significant increases in knowledge where gold nanospheres are used as biosensors. Thermal denaturing on spheres with diameter > 20 nm show strong similarity to bulk calorimetric studies of BSA in solution. BSA adsorbed on nanospheres with d<= 15 nm shows a qualitative difference in behavior, suggesting a sensitivity of denaturing characteristics on local surface curvature. Studies of isothermal denaturing kinetics were used to obtain an activatiuon barrier for thermal denaturing. This activation barrier also exhibited a strong dependence on nanoparticle size. These results may have important implications for other protein-nanoparticle interactions.

  17. [ALR, the multifunctional protein].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Tibor; Szarka, András

    2015-03-29

    ALR is a mystic protein. It has a so called "long" 22 kDa and a "short" 15 kDa forms. It has been described after partial hepatectomy and it has just been considered as a key protein of liver regeneration. At the beginning of the 21st century it has been revealed that the "long" form is localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and it is an element of the mitochondrial protein import and disulphide relay system. Several proteins of the substrates of the mitochondrial disulphide relay system are necessary for the proper function of the mitochondria, thus any mutation of the ALR gene leads to mitochondrial diseases. The "short" form of ALR functions as a secreted extracellular growth factor and it promotes the protection, regeneration and proliferation of hepatocytes. The results gained on the recently generated conditional ALR mutant mice suggest that ALR can play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatosis. Since the serum level of ALR is modified in several liver diseases it can be a promising marker molecule in laboratory diagnostics. PMID:25796277

  18. The Protein Data Bank

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Helen M.; Westbrook, John; Feng, Zukang; Gilliland, Gary; Bhat, T. N.; Weissig, Helge; Shindyalov, Ilya N.; Bourne, Philip E.

    2000-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB; http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/ ) is the single worldwide archive of structural data of biological macromolecules. This paper describes the goals of the PDB, the systems in place for data deposition and access, how to obtain further information, and near-term plans for the future development of the resource. PMID:10592235

  19. Tuber Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    SHEWRY, PETER R.

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose‐binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers. PMID:12730067

  20. Protein specific polymeric immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such as hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  1. Perspectives on protein crystallisation

    SciTech Connect

    Ochi, T.; Stojanoff, V.; Bolanos-Garcia, V.M.; Moreno, A.

    2009-12-11

    This final part on 'perspectives' is focused on new strategies that can be used to crystallise proteins and improve the crystal quality of macromolecular complexes using any of the methods reviewed in this focused issue. Some advantages and disadvantages, limitations, and plausible applications to high-resolution X-ray crystallography are discussed.

  2. Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-05-28

    The Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities (BEPro3) is a software tool for estimating probabilities of protein-protein association between bait and prey protein pairs using data from multiple-bait, multiple-replicate, protein LC-MS/MS affinity isolation experiments. BEPro3 is public domain software, has been tested on Windows XP and version 10.4 or newer of the Mac OS 10.4, and is freely available. A user guide, example dataset with analysis and additional documentation are included with the BEPro3 download.

  3. Phosphorylation of human link proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Oester, D.A.; Caterson, B.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1986-06-13

    Three link proteins of 48, 44 and 40 kDa were purified from human articular cartilage and identified with monoclonal anti-link protein antibody 8-A-4. Two sets of lower molecular weight proteins of 30-31 kDa and 24-26 kDa also contained link protein epitopes recognized by the monoclonal antibody and were most likely degradative products of the intact link proteins. The link proteins of 48 and 40 kDa were identified as phosphoproteins while the 44 kDa link protein did not contain /sup 32/P. The phosphorylated 48 and 40 kDa link proteins contained approximately 2 moles PO/sub 4//mole link protein.

  4. Identifying the hub proteins from complicated membrane protein network systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi-Zhen; Ding, Yong-Sheng; Gu, Quan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2010-05-01

    The so-called "hub proteins" are those proteins in a protein-protein interaction network system that have remarkably higher interaction relations (or degrees) than the others. Therefore, the information of hub proteins can provide very useful insights for selecting or prioritizing targets during drug development. In this paper, by combining the multi-agent-based method with the graphical spectrum analysis and immune-genetic algorithm, a novel simulator for identifying the hub proteins from membrane protein interaction networks is proposed. As a demonstration of using the simulator, two hub membrane proteins, YPL227C and YIL147C, were identified from a complicated network system consisting of 1500 membrane proteins. Meanwhile, along with the two identified hub proteins, their molecular functions, biological processes, and cellular components were also revealed. It is anticipated that the hub-protein-simulator may become a very useful tool for system biology and drug development, particularly in deciphering unknown protein functions, determining protein complexes, and in identifying the key targets from a complicated disease system. PMID:20507268

  5. Direct Probing of Protein-Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A; Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W

    2005-03-10

    This project aimed to establish feasibility of using experimental techniques based on direct measurements of interaction forces on the single molecule scale to characterize equilibrium interaction potentials between individual biological molecules. Such capability will impact several research areas, ranging from rapid interaction screening capabilities to providing verifiable inputs for computational models. It should be one of the enabling technologies for modern proteomics research. This study used a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations, theoretical considerations, and direct experimental measurements to investigate two model systems that represented typical experimental situations: force-induced melting of DNA rigidly attached to the tip, and force-induced unbinding of a protein-antibody pair connected to flexible tethers. Our results establish that for both systems researchers can use force spectroscopy measurements to extract reliable information about equilibrium interaction potentials. However, the approaches necessary to extract these potentials in each case--Jarzynski reconstruction and Dynamic Force Spectroscopy--are very different. We also show how the thermodynamics and kinetics of unbinding process dictates the choice between in each case.

  6. Recurrent DGCR8, DROSHA, and SIX Homeodomain Mutations in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Amy L.; Ooms, Ariadne; Gadd, Samantha; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Smith, Malcolm A.; Guidry Auvil, Jamie M.; Meerzaman, Daoud; Chen, Qing-Rong; Hsu, Chih Hao; Yan, Chunhua; Nguyen, Cu; Hu, Ying; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Ma, Yussanne; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Schein, Jacqueline; Marra, Marco A.; Huff, Vicki; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Mullighan, Charles G.; Ma, Jing; Wheeler, David A.; Hampton, Oliver A.; Jafari, Nadereh; Ross, Nicole; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the most common single nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumors (FHWT) to occur within SIX1/2 (7% of 534 tumors) and microRNA processing genes (miRNAPG) DGCR8 and DROSHA (15% of 534 tumors). Comprehensive analysis of 77 FHWTs indicates that tumors with SIX1/2 and/or miRNAPG mutations show a pre-induction metanephric mesenchyme gene expression pattern and are significantly associated with both perilobar nephrogenic rests and 11p15 imprinting aberrations. Significantly decreased expression of mature Let-7a and the miR-200 family (responsible for mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition) in miRNAPG-mutant tumors is associated with an undifferentiated blastemal histology. The combination of SIX and miRNAPG mutations in the same tumor is associated with evidence of RAS activation and a higher rate of relapse and death. PMID:25670082

  7. The Arabidopsis homeodomain-leucine zipper II gene family: diversity and redundancy.

    PubMed

    Ciarbelli, Angela Raffaella; Ciolfi, Andrea; Salvucci, Samanta; Ruzza, Valentino; Possenti, Marco; Carabelli, Monica; Fruscalzo, Alberto; Sessa, Giovanna; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-11-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains 10 genes belonging to the HD-Zip II family including ATHB2 and HAT2. Previous work has shown that ATHB2 is rapidly and strongly induced by light quality changes that provoke the shade avoidance response whereas HAT2 expression responds to auxin. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the HD-Zip II family. Phylogeny reconstruction revealed that almost all of the HD-Zip II genes can be subdivided into 4 clades (alpha-delta), each clade comprising 2-3 paralogs. Gene expression studies demonstrated that all the gamma and delta genes are regulated by light quality changes. Kinetics of induction, low R/FR/high R/FR reversibility and auxin response analyses strongly suggested that HAT1, HAT3 and ATHB4, as ATHB2, are under the control of the phytochrome system whereas HAT2 is up-regulated by low R/FR as a consequence of the induction of the auxin signaling pathway provoked by FR-rich light. Root and shoot digital in situ revealed that gamma and delta genes are also tightly regulated during plant development with both distinct and overlapping patterns. Phenotypes of gain of function and dominant negative lines demonstrated that one or more of the HD-Zip II gamma genes negatively regulate cell proliferation during leaf development in a high R/FR light environment. Finally, target gene analysis using a chimeric transcription factor (HD-Zip2-V-G), known to activate ATHB2 target genes in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner, revealed that all the 10 HD-Zip II genes can be recognized by the HD-Zip 2 domain in vivo, implying an intricate negative feedback network. PMID:18758690

  8. Hydrogels Constructed from Engineered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Kong, Na; Laver, Bryce; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-02-24

    Due to their various potential biomedical applications, hydrogels based on engineered proteins have attracted considerable interest. Benefitting from significant progress in recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering/design techniques, the field of protein hydrogels has made amazing progress. The latest progress of hydrogels constructed from engineered recombinant proteins are presented, mainly focused on biorecognition-driven physical hydrogels as well as chemically crosslinked hydrogels. The various bio-recognition based physical crosslinking strategies are discussed, as well as chemical crosslinking chemistries used to engineer protein hydrogels, and protein hydrogels' various biomedical applications. The future perspectives of this fast evolving field of biomaterials are also discussed. PMID:26707834

  9. Redox control of protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, Marta; Jiménez-Moreno, Natalia; Dias, Irundika H.K.; Debelec, Bilge; Vucetic, Milica; Fladmark, Kari E.; Basaga, Huveyda; Ribaric, Samo; Milisav, Irina; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular proteolysis is critical to maintain timely degradation of altered proteins including oxidized proteins. This review attempts to summarize the most relevant findings about oxidant protein modification, as well as the impact of reactive oxygen species on the proteolytic systems that regulate cell response to an oxidant environment: the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), autophagy and the unfolded protein response (UPR). In the presence of an oxidant environment, these systems are critical to ensure proteostasis and cell survival. An example of altered degradation of oxidized proteins in pathology is provided for neurodegenerative diseases. Future work will determine if protein oxidation is a valid target to combat proteinopathies. PMID:26381917

  10. Protein-protein interactions in DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Friedhoff, Peter; Li, Pingping; Gotthardt, Julia

    2016-02-01

    The principal DNA mismatch repair proteins MutS and MutL are versatile enzymes that couple DNA mismatch or damage recognition to other cellular processes. Besides interaction with their DNA substrates this involves transient interactions with other proteins which is triggered by the DNA mismatch or damage and controlled by conformational changes. Both MutS and MutL proteins have ATPase activity, which adds another level to control their activity and interactions with DNA substrates and other proteins. Here we focus on the protein-protein interactions, protein interaction sites and the different levels of structural knowledge about the protein complexes formed with MutS and MutL during the mismatch repair reaction. PMID:26725162

  11. Functionalizing Microporous Membranes for Protein Purification and Protein Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jinlan; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2015-07-01

    This review examines advances in the functionalization of microporous membranes for protein purification and the development of protease-containing membranes for controlled protein digestion prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Recent studies confirm that membranes are superior to bead-based columns for rapid protein capture, presumably because convective mass transport in membrane pores rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. Modification of porous membranes with functional polymeric films or TiO2 nanoparticles yields materials that selectively capture species ranging from phosphopeptides to His-tagged proteins, and protein-binding capacities often exceed those of commercial beads. Thin membranes also provide a convenient framework for creating enzyme-containing reactors that afford control over residence times. With millisecond residence times, reactors with immobilized proteases limit protein digestion to increase sequence coverage in mass spectrometry analysis and facilitate elucidation of protein structures. This review emphasizes the advantages of membrane-based techniques and concludes with some challenges for their practical application.

  12. Affinity purification of proteins binding to GST fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Swaffield, J C; Johnston, S A

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the use of proteins fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST fusion proteins) to affinity purify other proteins, a technique also known as GST pulldown purification. The describes a strategy in which a GST fusion protein is bound to agarose affinity beads and the complex is then used to assay the binding of a specific test protein that has been labeled with [35S]methionine by in vitro translation. However, this method can be adapted for use with other types of fusion proteins; for example, His6, biotin tags, or maltose-binding protein fusions (MBP), and these may offer particular advantages. A describes preparation of an E. coli extract that is added to the reaction mixture with purified test protein to reduce nonspecific binding. PMID:18265191

  13. How do oncoprotein mutations rewire protein-protein interaction networks?

    PubMed

    Bowler, Emily H; Wang, Zhenghe; Ewing, Rob M

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of mutations that activate oncogenes or inactivate tumor suppressors is a primary feature of most cancers. Mutations that directly alter protein sequence and structure drive the development of tumors through aberrant expression and modification of proteins, in many cases directly impacting components of signal transduction pathways and cellular architecture. Cancer-associated mutations may have direct or indirect effects on proteins and their interactions and while the effects of mutations on signaling pathways have been widely studied, how mutations alter underlying protein-protein interaction networks is much less well understood. Systematic mapping of oncoprotein protein interactions using proteomics techniques as well as computational network analyses is revealing how oncoprotein mutations perturb protein-protein interaction networks and drive the cancer phenotype. PMID:26325016

  14. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  15. Protein identification and Peptide expression resolver: harmonizing protein identification with protein expression data.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Paul; Butler, Heather; Eng, Kevin; Hugo, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Proteomic discovery platforms generate both peptide expression information and protein identification information. Peptide expression data are used to determine which peptides are differentially expressed between study cohorts, and then these peptides are targeted for protein identification. In this paper, we demonstrate that peptide expression information is also a powerful tool for enhancing confidence in protein identification results. Specifically, we evaluate the following hypothesis: tryptic peptides originating from the same protein have similar expression profiles across samples in the discovery study. Evidence supporting this hypothesis is provided. This hypothesis is integrated into a protein identification tool, PIPER (Protein Identification and Peptide Expression Resolver), that reduces erroneous protein identifications below 5%. PIPER's utility is illustrated by application to a 72-sample biomarker discovery study where it is demonstrated that false positive protein identifications can be reduced below 5%. Consequently, it is recommended that PIPER methodology be incorporated into proteomic studies where both protein expression and identification data are collected. PMID:18062667

  16. Predicting Disease-Related Proteins Based on Clique Backbone in Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases. PMID:25013377

  17. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out important biological functions which, in fact, depend on the absence of specific 3-D structure. The existence of such proteins does not fit the prevailing structure-function paradigm, which states that unique 3-D structure is a prerequisite to function. Thus, the protein structure-function paradigm has to be expanded to include intrinsically disordered proteins and alternative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and function. This shift in the paradigm represents a major breakthrough for biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, as it opens new levels of understanding with regard to the complex life of proteins. This review will try to answer the following questions: How were intrinsically disordered proteins discovered? Why don't these proteins fold? What is so special about intrinsic disorder? What are the functional advantages of disordered proteins/regions? What is the functional repertoire of these proteins? What are the relationships between intrinsically disordered proteins and human diseases? PMID:20117254

  18. Protein Structure Databases.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A

    2016-01-01

    Web-based protein structure databases come in a wide variety of types and levels of information content. Those having the most general interest are the various atlases that describe each experimentally determined protein structure and provide useful links, analyses, and schematic diagrams relating to its 3D structure and biological function. Also of great interest are the databases that classify 3D structures by their folds as these can reveal evolutionary relationships which may be hard to detect from sequence comparison alone. Related to these are the numerous servers that compare folds-particularly useful for newly solved structures, and especially those of unknown function. Beyond these are a vast number of databases for the more specialized user, dealing with specific families, diseases, structural features, and so on. PMID:27115626

  19. A magnetic protein biocompass.

    PubMed

    Qin, Siying; Yin, Hang; Yang, Celi; Dou, Yunfeng; Liu, Zhongmin; Zhang, Peng; Yu, He; Huang, Yulong; Feng, Jing; Hao, Junfeng; Hao, Jia; Deng, Lizong; Yan, Xiyun; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhao, Zhongxian; Jiang, Taijiao; Wang, Hong-Wei; Luo, Shu-Jin; Xie, Can

    2016-02-01

    The notion that animals can detect the Earth's magnetic field was once ridiculed, but is now well established. Yet the biological nature of such magnetosensing phenomenon remains unknown. Here, we report a putative magnetic receptor (Drosophila CG8198, here named MagR) and a multimeric magnetosensing rod-like protein complex, identified by theoretical postulation and genome-wide screening, and validated with cellular, biochemical, structural and biophysical methods. The magnetosensing complex consists of the identified putative magnetoreceptor and known magnetoreception-related photoreceptor cryptochromes (Cry), has the attributes of both Cry- and iron-based systems, and exhibits spontaneous alignment in magnetic fields, including that of the Earth. Such a protein complex may form the basis of magnetoreception in animals, and may lead to applications across multiple fields. PMID:26569474

  20. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Takenobu; Watabe, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), originally identified as osteoinductive components in extracts derived from bone, are now known to play important roles in a wide array of processes during formation and maintenance of various organs including bone, cartilage, muscle, kidney, and blood vessels. BMPs and the related "growth and differentiation factors" (GDFs) are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family, and transduce their signals through type I and type II serine-threonine kinase receptors and their intracellular downstream effectors, including Smad proteins. Furthermore, BMP signals are finely tuned by various agonists and antagonists. Because deregulation of the BMP activity at multiple steps in signal transduction is linked to a wide variety of human diseases, therapeutic use of activators and inhibitors of BMP signaling will provide potential avenues for the treatment of the human disorders that are caused by hypo- and hyperactivation of BMP signals, respectively. PMID:27252362

  1. Protein mediated membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    Adhesion in the context of mechanical attachment, signaling, and movement in cellular dynamics is mediated by the kinetic interactions between membrane-embedded proteins in an aqueous environment. Here, we present a minimal theoretical framework for the dynamics of membrane adhesion that accounts for the kinetics of protein binding, the elastic deformation of the membrane, and the hydrodynamics of squeeze flow in the membrane gap. We analyze the resulting equations using scaling estimates to characterize the spatiotemporal features of the adhesive patterning and corroborate them using numerical simulations. In addition to characterizing aspects of cellular dynamics, our results might also be applicable to a range of phenomena in physical chemistry and materials science where flow, deformation, and kinetics are coupled to each other in slender geometries.

  2. Electron Flow through Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transfers in photosynthesis and respiration commonly occur between metal-containing cofactors that are separated by large molecular distances. Employing laser flash-quench triggering methods, we have shown that 20-Å, coupling-limited FeII to RuIII and CuI to RuIII electron tunneling in Ru-modified cytochromes and blue copper proteins can occur on the microsecond timescale both in solutions and crystals. Redox equivalents can be transferred even longer distances by multistep tunneling, often called hopping, through intervening amino acid side chains. Our work has established that 20-Å hole hopping through an intervening tryptophan is two orders of magnitude faster than single-step electron tunneling in a Re-modified blue copper protein. PMID:20161522

  3. A magnetic protein biocompass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Siying; Yin, Hang; Yang, Celi; Dou, Yunfeng; Liu, Zhongmin; Zhang, Peng; Yu, He; Huang, Yulong; Feng, Jing; Hao, Junfeng; Hao, Jia; Deng, Lizong; Yan, Xiyun; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhao, Zhongxian; Jiang, Taijiao; Wang, Hong-Wei; Luo, Shu-Jin; Xie, Can

    2016-02-01

    The notion that animals can detect the Earth’s magnetic field was once ridiculed, but is now well established. Yet the biological nature of such magnetosensing phenomenon remains unknown. Here, we report a putative magnetic receptor (Drosophila CG8198, here named MagR) and a multimeric magnetosensing rod-like protein complex, identified by theoretical postulation and genome-wide screening, and validated with cellular, biochemical, structural and biophysical methods. The magnetosensing complex consists of the identified putative magnetoreceptor and known magnetoreception-related photoreceptor cryptochromes (Cry), has the attributes of both Cry- and iron-based systems, and exhibits spontaneous alignment in magnetic fields, including that of the Earth. Such a protein complex may form the basis of magnetoreception in animals, and may lead to applications across multiple fields.

  4. The interface of protein structure, protein biophysics, and molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, David A; Teichmann, Sarah A; Bahar, Ivet; Bastolla, Ugo; Bloom, Jesse; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Colwell, Lucy J; de Koning, A P Jason; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Echave, Julian; Elofsson, Arne; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Goldstein, Richard A; Grahnen, Johan A; Holder, Mark T; Lakner, Clemens; Lartillot, Nicholas; Lovell, Simon C; Naylor, Gavin; Perica, Tina; Pollock, David D; Pupko, Tal; Regan, Lynne; Roger, Andrew; Rubinstein, Nimrod; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Sjölander, Kimmen; Sunyaev, Shamil; Teufel, Ashley I; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Thornton, Joseph W; Weinreich, Daniel M; Whelan, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The interface of protein structural biology, protein biophysics, molecular evolution, and molecular population genetics forms the foundations for a mechanistic understanding of many aspects of protein biochemistry. Current efforts in interdisciplinary protein modeling are in their infancy and the state-of-the art of such models is described. Beyond the relationship between amino acid substitution and static protein structure, protein function, and corresponding organismal fitness, other considerations are also discussed. More complex mutational processes such as insertion and deletion and domain rearrangements and even circular permutations should be evaluated. The role of intrinsically disordered proteins is still controversial, but may be increasingly important to consider. Protein geometry and protein dynamics as a deviation from static considerations of protein structure are also important. Protein expression level is known to be a major determinant of evolutionary rate and several considerations including selection at the mRNA level and the role of interaction specificity are discussed. Lastly, the relationship between modeling and needed high-throughput experimental data as well as experimental examination of protein evolution using ancestral sequence resurrection and in vitro biochemistry are presented, towards an aim of ultimately generating better models for biological inference and prediction. PMID:22528593

  5. Improved method for protein complex detection using bottleneck proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Detecting protein complexes is one of essential and fundamental tasks in understanding various biological functions or processes. Therefore accurate identification of protein complexes is indispensable. Methods For more accurate detection of protein complexes, we propose an algorithm which detects dense protein sub-networks of which proteins share closely located bottleneck proteins. The proposed algorithm is capable of finding protein complexes which allow overlapping with each other. Results We applied our algorithm to several PPI (Protein-Protein Interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens, and validated our results using public databases of protein complexes. The prediction accuracy was even more improved over our previous work which used also bottleneck information of the PPI network, but showed limitation when predicting small-sized protein complex detection. Conclusions Our algorithm resulted in overlapping protein complexes with significantly improved F1 score over existing algorithms. This result comes from high recall due to effective network search, as well as high precision due to proper use of bottleneck information during the network search. PMID:23566214

  6. Heat shock proteins: molecular chaperones of protein biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, E A; Gambill, B D; Nelson, R J

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses such as an increase in temperature. Recently, several of the major Hsps have been shown to be intimately involved in protein biogenesis through a direct interaction with a wide variety of proteins. As a reflection of this role, these Hsps have been referred to as molecular chaperones. Hsp70s interact with incompletely folded proteins, such as nascent chains on ribosomes and proteins in the process of translocation from the cytosol into mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum. Hsp60 also binds to unfolded proteins, preventing aggregation and facilitating protein folding. Although less well defined, other Hsps such as Hsp90 also play important roles in modulating the activity of a number of proteins. The function of the proteolytic system is intertwined with that of molecular chaperones. Several components of this system, encoded by heat-inducible genes, are responsible for the degradation of abnormal or misfolded proteins. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven very useful in the analysis of the role of molecular chaperones in protein maturation, translocation, and degradation. In this review, results of experiments are discussed within the context of experiments with other organisms in an attempt to describe the current state of understanding of these ubiquitous and important proteins. PMID:8336673

  7. Path to protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Growth of two-dimensional S-layer crystals on supported lipid bilayers observed in solution using in situ atomic force microscopy. This movie shows proteins sticking onto the supported lipid bilayer, forming a mobile phase that condenses into amorphous clusters, and undergoing a phase transition to crystalline clusters composed of 2 to 15 tetramers. These initial clusters then enter a growth phase in which new tetramers form exclusively at unoccupied lattice sites along the cluster edges.

  8. Protein Crystal Isocitrate Lyase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Isocitrate Lyase earth-grown (left) and space-grown (right). This is a target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast; it regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  9. Bone morphogenetic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yongtao; Xiang Lixin; Shao Jianzhong

    2007-10-26

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multi-functional growth factors belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. It has been demonstrated that BMPs had been involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and apoptosis. However, their hallmark ability is that play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites. In this review, we mainly concentrate on BMP structure, function, molecular signaling and potential medical application.

  10. Protein threading by learning

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Iksoo; Cieplak, Marek; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Maritan, Amos; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    2001-01-01

    By using techniques borrowed from statistical physics and neural networks, we determine the parameters, associated with a scoring function, that are chosen optimally to ensure complete success in threading tests in a training set of proteins. These parameters provide a quantitative measure of the propensities of amino acids to be buried or exposed and to be in a given secondary structure and are a good starting point for solving both the threading and design problems. PMID:11717394

  11. HRTEM in protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, P. W.; Spargo, A. E. C.; Tulloch, P. A.; Johnson, A. W. S.

    Electron microscopy/diffraction (ED/D) using spot-scan and low-dose imaging has been successfully applied to investigate microcrystals of an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein extracted from ootheca of the praying mantis. Fourier transforms of the images show resolution out to 4 A and can be used to phase the corresponding ED data which shows reflections out to 2 A.

  12. Distortions in protein helices.

    PubMed

    Geetha, V

    1996-08-01

    alpha-helices are the most common secondary structures in observed proteins. However, they are not always found in ideal helical conformation and they often exhibit structural distortions. Quantification of these irregularities become essential in understanding the packing of helices and therefore, their role in the functional characteristics of the protein. The backbone torsions phi, psi are of limited utility in this endeavor, because distorted helices often maintain the backbone geometry. The local compensatory effects are responsible for the preservation of the entire hydrogen bond network of the helical stretch. Earlier descriptions of helical linearity and curvature rest mostly on approximation, thus motivating the search for a better method for understanding and quantifying helical irregularities. We developed a method which involves the rotation and superposition of identical repeating units of the protein by the quaternion method. The set of parameters derived from the rotation-superposition algorithm helps in identifying the bends and kinks which are not necessarily induced by unusual amino acids like proline. The quantification of irregularities of observed helices might lead to a better understanding of their packing interactions. PMID:8842770

  13. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Howie, Heather L.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2009-02-20

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition.

  14. Type Zero Copper Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Kyle M.; DeBeer George, Serena; Yokoyama, Keiko; Richards, John H.; Gray, Harry B.

    2009-01-01

    Copper proteins play key roles in biological processes such as electron transfer and dioxygen activation; the active site of each of these proteins is classified as either type 1, 2, or 3, depending on its optical and electron paramagnetic resonance properties. We have built a new type of site that we call “type zero copper” by incorporating leucine, isoleucine, or phenylalanine in place of methionine at position 121 in C112D Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin. X-ray crystallographic analysis shows that these sites adopt distorted tetrahedral geometries, with an unusually short Cu-O(G45 carbonyl) bond (2.35–2.55 Å). Relatively weak absorption near 800 nm and narrow parallel hyperfine splittings in EPR spectra are the spectroscopic signatures of type zero copper. Copper K-edge x-ray absorption spectra suggest elevated Cu(II) 4p character in the d-electron ground state. Cyclic voltammetric experiments demonstrate that the electron transfer reactivities of type zero azurins are enhanced relative to that of the corresponding type 2 (C112D) protein. PMID:20305734

  15. Hydrolyzed Proteins in Allergy.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Silvia; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Hydrolyzed proteins are used worldwide in the therapeutic management of infants with allergic manifestations and have long been proposed as a dietetic measure to prevent allergy in at risk infants. The degree and method of hydrolysis, protein source and non-nitrogen components characterize different hydrolyzed formulas (HFs) and may determine clinical efficacy, tolerance and nutritional effects. Cow's milk (CM)-based HFs are classified as extensively (eHF) or partially HF (pHF) based on the percentage of small peptides. One whey pHF has been shown to reduce atopic dermatitis in high-risk infants who are not exclusively breastfed. More studies are needed to determine the benefit of these formulas in the prevention of CM allergy (CMA) and in the general population. eHFs represent up to now the treatment of choice for most infants with CMA. However, new developments, such as an extensively hydrolyzed rice protein-based formula, could become alternative options if safety and nutritional and therapeutic efficacy are confirmed as this type of formula is less expensive. In some countries, an extensive soy hydrolysate is available. PMID:27336625

  16. Infrared Protein Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    J Sage; Y Zhang; J McGeehan; R Ravelli; M Weik; J van Thor

    2011-12-31

    We consider the application of infrared spectroscopy to protein crystals, with particular emphasis on exploiting molecular orientation through polarization measurements on oriented single crystals. Infrared microscopes enable transmission measurements on individual crystals using either thermal or nonthermal sources, and can accommodate flow cells, used to measure spectral changes induced by exposure to soluble ligands, and cryostreams, used for measurements of flash-cooled crystals. Comparison of unpolarized infrared measurements on crystals and solutions probes the effects of crystallization and can enhance the value of the structural models refined from X-ray diffraction data by establishing solution conditions under which they are most relevant. Results on several proteins are consistent with similar equilibrium conformational distributions in crystal and solutions. However, the rates of conformational change are often perturbed. Infrared measurements also detect products generated by X-ray exposure, including CO{sub 2}. Crystals with favorable symmetry exhibit infrared dichroism that enhances the synergy with X-ray crystallography. Polarized infrared measurements on crystals can distinguish spectral contributions from chemically similar sites, identify hydrogen bonding partners, and, in opportune situations, determine three-dimensional orientations of molecular groups. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Structure and Function in the Crystalline State.

  17. The caveolin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Terence M; Lisanti, Michael P

    2004-01-01

    The caveolin gene family has three members in vertebrates: caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3. So far, most caveolin-related research has been conducted in mammals, but the proteins have also been found in other animals, including Xenopus laevis, Fugu rubripes, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Caveolins can serve as protein markers of caveolae ('little caves'), invaginations in the plasma membrane 50-100 nanometers in diameter. Caveolins are found predominantly at the plasma membrane but also in the Golgi, the endoplasmic reticulum, in vesicles, and at cytosolic locations. They are expressed ubiquitously in mammals, but their expression levels vary considerably between tissues. The highest levels of caveolin-1 (also called caveolin, Cav-1 and VIP2I) are found in terminally-differentiated cell types, such as adipocytes, endothelia, smooth muscle cells, and type I pneumocytes. Caveolin-2 (Cav-2) is colocalized and coexpressed with Cav-1 and requires Cav-1 for proper membrane targeting; the Cav-2 gene also maps to the same chromosomal region as Cav-1 (7q31.1 in humans). Caveolin-3 (Cav-3) has greater protein-sequence similarity to Cav-1 than to Cav-2, but it is expressed mainly in muscle cells, including smooth, skeletal, and cardiac myocytes. Caveolins participate in many important cellular processes, including vesicular transport, cholesterol homeostasis, signal transduction, and tumor suppression. PMID:15003112

  18. A polymetamorphic protein

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Katie L; Dodds, Eric D; Wysocki, Vicki H; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2013-01-01

    Arc repressor is a homodimeric protein with a ribbon-helix–helix fold. A single polar-to-hydrophobic substitution (N11L) at a solvent-exposed position leads to population of an alternate dimeric fold in which 310 helices replace a β-sheet. Here we find that the variant Q9V/N11L/R13V (S-VLV), with two additional polar-to-hydrophobic surface mutations in the same β-sheet, forms a highly stable, reversibly folded octamer with approximately half the✠α-helical content of wild-type Arc. At low protein concentration and low ionic strength, S-VLV also populates both dimeric topologies previously observed for N11L, as judged by NMR chemical shift comparisons. Thus, accumulation of simple hydrophobic mutations in Arc progressively reduces fold specificity, leading first to a sequence with two folds and then to a manifold bridge sequence with at least three different topologies. Residues 9–14 of S-VLV form a highly hydrophobic stretch that is predicted to be amyloidogenic, but we do not observe aggregates of higher order than octamer. Increases in sequence hydrophobicity can promote amyloid aggregation but also exert broader and more complex effects on fold specificity. Altered native folds, changes in fold coupled to oligomerization, toxic pre-amyloid oligomers, and amyloid fibrils may represent a near continuum of accessible alternatives in protein structure space. PMID:23471712

  19. Bioinformatics in protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Persson, B

    2000-01-01

    The chapter gives an overview of bioinformatic techniques of importance in protein analysis. These include database searches, sequence comparisons and structural predictions. Links to useful World Wide Web (WWW) pages are given in relation to each topic. Databases with biological information are reviewed with emphasis on databases for nucleotide sequences (EMBL, GenBank, DDBJ), genomes, amino acid sequences (Swissprot, PIR, TrEMBL, GenePept), and three-dimensional structures (PDB). Integrated user interfaces for databases (SRS and Entrez) are described. An introduction to databases of sequence patterns and protein families is also given (Prosite, Pfam, Blocks). Furthermore, the chapter describes the widespread methods for sequence comparisons, FASTA and BLAST, and the corresponding WWW services. The techniques involving multiple sequence alignments are also reviewed: alignment creation with the Clustal programs, phylogenetic tree calculation with the Clustal or Phylip packages and tree display using Drawtree, njplot or phylo_win. Finally, the chapter also treats the issue of structural prediction. Different methods for secondary structure predictions are described (Chou-Fasman, Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson, Predator, PHD). Techniques for predicting membrane proteins, antigenic sites and postranslational modifications are also reviewed. PMID:10803381

  20. Protein secretion in Bacillus species.

    PubMed Central

    Simonen, M; Palva, I

    1993-01-01

    Bacilli secrete numerous proteins into the environment. Many of the secretory proteins, their export signals, and their processing steps during secretion have been characterized in detail. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms of protein secretion have been relatively poorly characterized. However, several components of the protein secretion machinery have been identified and cloned recently, which is likely to lead to rapid expansion of the knowledge of the protein secretion mechanism in Bacillus species. Comparison of the presently known export components of Bacillus species with those of Escherichia coli suggests that the mechanism of protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane is conserved among gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria differences are found in steps preceding and following the translocation process. Many of the secretory proteins of bacilli are produced industrially, but several problems have been encountered in the production of Bacillus heterologous secretory proteins. In the final section we discuss these problems and point out some possibilities to overcome them. PMID:8464403