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Sample records for homes-a randomized control

  1. Effect of specialized bathing systems on resident cleanliness and water quality in nursing homes: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Philip D; Cohen, Lauren W; Williams, Christianna S; Munn, Jean; Preisser, John S; Sobsey, Mark D; Wait, Douglas A; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2007-06-01

    A randomized controlled trial evaluated the impact of different methods of water agitation on clinical and microbiological outcomes in 31 nursing home residents. Four conditions were tested: a) whirlpool tub, jets on, using standard soap products; b) ultrasound tub, ultrasound on, using the standard soap products; c) ultrasound tub, ultrasound on, using specialized soap and skin conditioner; and d) either tub (randomized), water circulation off, using standard soap products (the control condition). Outcomes of interest included skin microbial flora, water microbial flora, skin condition, time spent bathing, and staff satisfaction. Resident skin condition and skin microbial flora did not differ between the four treatments. The tubs also did not differ in terms of bacterial colonization; however, there was a non-statistically significant trend for the highest counts to occur in whirlpool tubs after being idle overnight. The ultrasound and whirlpool tubs were preferred by staff over the control treatment (still water) in terms of sound and overall suitability. In addition, staff reported that the ultrasound tub using enhanced skin cleansers made bathing residents easier and faster than the same tub using standard cleansers. PMID:17674576

  2. Linking clinic and home: a randomized, controlled clinical effectiveness trial of real-time, wireless blood pressure monitoring for older patients with kidney disease and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rifkin, Dena E.; Abdelmalek, Joseph A.; Miracle, Cynthia M.; Low, Chai; Barsotti, Ryan; Rios, Phil; Stepnowsky, Carl; Agha, Zia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Older adults with chronic kidney disease have a high rate of uncontrolled hypertension. Home monitoring of blood pressure (BP) is an integral part of management, but requires that patients bring records to clinic visits. Telemonitoring interventions, however, have not targeted older, less technologically-skilled populations. Methods Veterans with stage 3 or greater chronic kidney disease and uncontrolled hypertension were randomized to a novel telemonitoring device pairing a Bluetooth-enabled BP cuff with an Internet-enabled hub, which wirelessly transmitted readings (n= 28), or usual care (n= 15). Home recordings were reviewed weekly and telemonitoring participants were contacted if BP was above goal. The prespecified primary endpoints were improved data exchange and device acceptability. Secondary endpoint was BP change. Results Forty-three participants (average age 68 years, 75% white) completed the 6-month study. Average start-of-study BP was 147/78mmHg. Those in the intervention arm had a median of 29 (IQR 22, 53) transmitted BP readings per month, with 78% continuing to use the device regularly, whereas only 20% of those in the usual care group brought readings to in-person visits. The median number of telephone contacts triggered by the wireless monitoring was 2 (IQR 1, 4) per patient. Both groups had a significant improvement in systolic BP (P< 0.05, for both changes); systolic BP fell a median of 13 mmHg in monitored participants compared with 8.5mmHg in usual care participants (P for comparison 0.31). Conclusion This low-cost wireless monitoring strategy led to greater sharing of data between patients and clinic and produced a trend toward improvements in BP control over usual care at 6 months. PMID:23275313

  3. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, John; Chapman, Katie; Nixon, Jane; Patel, Anita; Holloway, Ivana; Mellish, Kirste; Anwar, Shamaila; Breen, Rachel; Knapp, Martin; Murray, Jenni; Farrin, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— We developed a new postdischarge system of care comprising a structured assessment covering longer-term problems experienced by patients with stroke and their carers, linked to evidence-based treatment algorithms and reference guides (the longer-term stroke care system of care) to address the poor longer-term recovery experienced by many patients with stroke. Methods— A pragmatic, multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial of this system of care. Eligible patients referred to community-based Stroke Care Coordinators were randomized to receive the new system of care or usual practice. The primary outcome was improved patient psychological well-being (General Health Questionnaire-12) at 6 months; secondary outcomes included functional outcomes for patients, carer outcomes, and cost-effectiveness. Follow-up was through self-completed postal questionnaires at 6 and 12 months. Results— Thirty-two stroke services were randomized (29 participated); 800 patients (399 control; 401 intervention) and 208 carers (100 control; 108 intervention) were recruited. In intention to treat analysis, the adjusted difference in patient General Health Questionnaire-12 mean scores at 6 months was −0.6 points (95% confidence interval, −1.8 to 0.7; P=0.394) indicating no evidence of statistically significant difference between the groups. Costs of Stroke Care Coordinator inputs, total health and social care costs, and quality-adjusted life year gains at 6 months, 12 months, and over the year were similar between the groups. Conclusions— This robust trial demonstrated no benefit in clinical or cost-effectiveness outcomes associated with the new system of care compared with usual Stroke Care Coordinator practice. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN 67932305. PMID:26152298

  4. Nonpharmacologic Pain Management Interventions in German Nursing Homes: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Sonja; Budnick, Andrea; Kuhnert, Ronny; Könner, Franziska; Kissel-Kröll, Angela; Kreutz, Reinhold; Dräger, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    The reported prevalence of pain among nursing home residents (NHRs) is high. Insufficient use of analgesics, the conventional pain management strategy, is often reported. Whether and to what extent nonpharmacologic therapies (NPTs) are used to manage the pain of NHRs in Germany is largely unknown. The aim of this cluster-randomized trial was to assess the NPTs provided and to enhance the application and prescription of NPTs in NHRs on an individual level. There were six nursing homes in the intervention group and six in the control group. There were 239 NHRs, aged ≥65 years, with an average Mini-Mental State Examination score of at least 18 at baseline. Pain management interventions (cluster level) included an online course for physicians and 1-day seminar for nurses. Data on NPT applied by nurses and therapeutic NPT prescribed by physicians were obtained from residents' nursing documentation. Face-to-face interviews with NHRs assessed the NPT received. At baseline, 82.6% of NHR (mean age 83 years) were affected by pain, but less than 1 in 10 received NPT. The intervention did not result in a significant increase in the NPT applied by nurses, but did significantly increase the therapeutic NPT prescribed by physicians. Residents were active in using NPT to self-manage their pain. Given the prevalence of pain in NHRs, there is a clear need to improve pain management in this population. Extended use of NPT offers a promising approach. We recommend that nurses provide residents with education on pain-management techniques to support them in taking a proactive role in managing their pain. PMID:26256216

  5. Control theory for random systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current knowledge available for designing and predicting the effectiveness of controllers for dynamic systems which can be modeled by ordinary differential equations. A short discussion of feedback control is followed by a description of deterministic controller design and the concept of system state. The need for more realistic disturbance models led to the use of stochastic process concepts, in particular the Gauss-Markov process. A compensator controlled system, with random forcing functions, random errors in the measurements, and random initial conditions, is treated as constituting a Gauss-Markov random process; hence the mean-square behavior of the controlled system is readily predicted. As an example, a compensator is designed for a helicopter to maintain it in hover in a gusty wind over a point on the ground.

  6. Networked Dynamic Systems: Identification, Controllability, and Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi-Abdolyousefi, Marzieh

    The presented dissertation aims to develop a graph-centric framework for the analysis and synthesis of networked dynamic systems (NDS) consisting of multiple dynamic units that interact via an interconnection topology. We examined three categories of network problems, namely, identification, controllability, and randomness. In network identification, as a subclass of inverse problems, we made an explicit relation between the input-output behavior of an NDS and the underlying interacting network. In network controllability, we provided structural and algebraic insights into features of the network that enable external signal(s) to control the state of the nodes in the network for certain classes of interconnections, namely, path, circulant, and Cartesian networks. We also examined the relation between network controllability and the symmetry structure of the graph. Motivated by the analysis results for the controllability and observability of deterministic networks, a natural question is whether randomness in the network layer or in the layer of inputs and outputs generically leads to favorable system theoretic properties. In this direction, we examined system theoretic properties of random networks including controllability, observability, and performance of optimal feedback controllers and estimators. We explored some of the ramifications of such an analysis framework in opinion dynamics over social networks and sensor networks in estimating the real-time position of a Seaglider from experimental data.

  7. Recruiting Participants for Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, H. Alix; Roschelle, Jeremy; Feng, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to look across strategies used in a wide range of studies to build a framework for researchers to use in conceptualizing the recruitment process. This paper harvests lessons learned across 19 randomized controlled trials in K-12 school settings conducted by a leading research organization to identify strategies that…

  8. Reporting Randomized Controlled Trials in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean; Montgomery, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly used to evaluate programs and interventions in order to inform education policy and practice. High quality reports of these RCTs are needed for interested readers to understand the rigor of the study, the interventions tested, and the context in which the evaluation took place (Mayo-Wilson et…

  9. Nonperturbative dynamical decoupling with random control.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jun; Bishop, C Allen; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2014-01-01

    Parametric fluctuations or stochastic signals are introduced into the rectangular pulse sequence to investigate the feasibility of random dynamical decoupling. In a large parameter region, we find that the out-of-order control pulses work as well as the regular pulses for dynamical decoupling and dissipation suppression. Calculations and analysis are enabled by and based on a nonperturbative dynamical decoupling approach allowed by an exact quantum-state-diffusion equation. When the average frequency and duration of the pulse sequence take proper values, the random control sequence is robust, fault-tolerant, and insensitive to pulse strength deviations and interpulse temporal separation in the quasi-periodic sequence. This relaxes the operational requirements placed on quantum control devices to a great deal. PMID:25169735

  10. Sample controllability of impulsive differential systems with random coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuorui; Sun, Jitao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the controllability of impulsive differential systems with random coefficients. Impulsive differential systems with random coefficients are a different stochastic model from stochastic differential equations. Sufficient conditions of sample controllability for impulsive differential systems with random coefficients are obtained by using random Sadovskii's fixed-point theorem. Finally, an example is given to illustrate our results.

  11. ADULTS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Krupa N.; Majeed, Zahraa; Yoruk, Yilmaz B.; Yang, Hongmei; Hilton, Tiffany N.; McMahon, James M.; Hall, William J.; Walck, Donna; Luque, Amneris E.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected older adults (HOA) are at risk of functional decline. Interventions promoting physical activity that can attenuate functional decline and are easily translated into the HOA community are of high priority. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether a physical activity counseling intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) improves physical function, autonomous motivation, depression and the quality of life (QOL) in HOA. Methods A total of 67 community-dwelling HOA with mild-to-moderate functional limitations were randomized to one of two groups: a physical activity counseling group or the usual care control group. We used SDT to guide the development of the experimental intervention. Outcome measures that were collected at baseline and final study visits included a battery of physical function tests, levels of physical activity, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL. Results The study participants were similar in their demographic and clinical characteristics in both the treatment and control groups. Overall physical performance, gait speed, measures of endurance and strength, and levels of physical activity improved in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Measures of autonomous regulation such as identified regulation, and measures of depression and QOL improved significantly in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Across the groups, improvement in intrinsic regulation and QOL correlated with an improvement in physical function (p<0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that a physical activity counseling program grounded in SDT can improve physical function, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL in HOA with functional limitations. PMID:26867045

  12. The penumbra of randomized control trials

    PubMed Central

    Nanivadekar, Arun S.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-occupation with randomized control trials as the basis of evidence-based medicine has increasingly shadowed other study designs over the last half a century. These include surveys, case-control studies, and case-cohort studies. They have the potential to overcome several ethical and cost constraints, but depend on the embedding of research in routine practice, emphasis on relevant but limited, accurate, and complete data, harnessing of information technology for this purpose, and epidemiological and statistical literacy among clinicians. Only then will it be possible to nurture and network research-oriented practices by therapeutic areas. Given these, the alternative study designs can pave the way to regulatory reforms that will ultimately benefit the discoverers, approvers and users of health-care tools. PMID:24010055

  13. Effects of Dementia-Care Mapping on Residents and Staff of Care Homes: A Pragmatic Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Geertje; Draskovic, Irena; Adang, Eddy M. M.; Donders, Rogier; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of dementia-care mapping (DCM) for institutionalised people with dementia has been demonstrated in an explanatory cluster-randomised controlled trial (cRCT) with two DCM researchers carrying out the DCM intervention. In order to be able to inform daily practice, we studied DCM effectiveness in a pragmatic cRCT involving a wide range of care homes with trained nursing staff carrying out the intervention. Methods Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care homes received DCM training and conducted the 4-months DCM-intervention twice during the study. The primary outcome was agitation, measured with the Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory (CMAI). The secondary outcomes included residents’ neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs) and quality of life, and staff stress and job satisfaction. The nursing staff made all measurements at baseline and two follow-ups at 4-month intervals. We used linear mixed-effect models to test treatment and time effects. Results 34 units from 11 care homes, including 434 residents and 382 nursing staff members, were randomly assigned. Ten nurses from the intervention units completed the basic and advanced DCM training. Intention-to-treat analysis showed no statistically significant effect on the CMAI (mean difference between groups 2·4, 95% CI −2·7 to 7·6; p = 0·34). More NPSs were reported in the intervention group than in usual care (p = 0·02). Intervention staff reported fewer negative and more positive emotional reactions during work (p = 0·02). There were no other significant effects. Conclusions Our pragmatic findings did not confirm the effect on the primary outcome of agitation in the explanatory study. Perhaps the variability of the extent of implementation of DCM may explain the lack of effect. Trial Registration Dutch Trials Registry NTR2314. PMID:23844003

  14. Periodic or random nanostructures for light scattering control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berginc, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Our paper mainly focuses on the control of light scattering by periodic or randomly rough structures. First designed with bi-periodical structures, antireflective surfaces can be achieved with random patterns. We present some new structures with periodic or random patterns, which have been designed by rigorous numerical methods (FDTD) or analytical methods. We show that random interfaces offer new degrees of freedom and possibilities by control of their statistical properties.

  15. Randomized controlled trials - a matter of design.

    PubMed

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial. PMID:27354804

  16. Estimating the minimum control count of random network models

    PubMed Central

    Ruths, Derek; Ruths, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The study of controllability of complex networks has introduced the minimum number of controls required for full controllability as a new network measure of interest. This network measure, like many others, is non-trivial to compute. As a result, establishing the significance of minimum control counts (MCCs) in real networks using random network null models is expensive. Here we derive analytic estimates for the expected MCCs of networks drawn from three commonly-used random network models. Our estimates show good agreement with exact control counts. Furthermore, the analytic expressions we derive offer insights into the structures within each random network model that induce the need for controls. PMID:26817434

  17. How chaosity and randomness control human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulmetyev, Renat M.; Yulmetyeva, Dinara; Gafarov, Fail M.

    2005-08-01

    We discuss the fundamental role that chaosity and randomness play in the determination of quality and efficiency of medical treatment. The statistical parameter of non-Markovity from non-equilibrium statistical physics of condensed matters is offered as a quantitative information measure of chaosity and randomness. The role of chaosity and randomness is determined by the phenomenological property, which includes quantitative informational measures of chaosity and randomness and pathology (disease) in a covariant form. Manifestations of the statistical informational behavior of chaosity and randomness are examined while analyzing the chaotic dynamics of RR intervals from human ECG's, the electric signals of a human muscle's tremor of legs in a normal state and at Parkinson disease, the electric potentials of the human brain core from EEG's during epileptic seizure and a human hand finger tremor in Parkinson's disease. The existence of the above stated informational measure allows to introduce the quantitative factor of the quality of treatment. The above-stated examples confirm the existence of new phenomenological property, which is important not only for the decision of medical problems, but also for the analysis of the wide range of problems of physics of complex systems of life and lifeless nature.

  18. Digital servo control of random sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    It is necessary to place number of sensors at different positions in sound field to determine actual sound intensities to which test object is subjected. It is possible to determine whether specification is being met adequately or exceeded. Since excitation is of random nature, signals are essentially coherent and it is impossible to obtain true average.

  19. Randomized controlled trials: what are they and who needs them?

    PubMed

    Pihlstrom, Bruce L; Curran, Alice E; Voelker, Helen T; Kingman, Albert

    2012-06-01

    Dentistry is rapidly entering a new era of evidence-based practice, and society is demanding prevention and treatment that has been proven to be effective in terms of meaningful health outcomes. Practitioners, individual patients and the public need randomized controlled trials because they provide the highest level of scientific evidence to change clinical practice and inform public health policy. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are conceptually simple but deceptively complex to design, implement and translate into clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials are fundamentally different from observational clinical research because they randomly assign volunteers to receive test or control interventions, they are prospective and the success of the test intervention is based on a meaningful clinical outcome that is specified before the trial begins. To be successful, randomized controlled trials must be carefully designed and powered to answer a specific question that will be generalizable to the population under study. Randomized controlled trials can be designed to evaluate efficacy, effectiveness, superiority, equivalence or noninferiority. Prominent issues and challenges in designing and conducting randomized controlled trials include carefully defining enrollment criteria, establishing an organizational infrastructure, use of a data-coordinating center, developing a manual of procedures, obtaining informed consent, recruiting and ensuring the safety of volunteer subjects, ensuring data quality, analysis and publication of trial outcomes, and translating results into clinical practice. PMID:22507057

  20. Randomized, Controlled Trial of a Comprehensive Program for Young Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Young, Helen E; Falco, Ruth A; Hanita, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    This randomized, controlled trial, comparing the Comprehensive Autism Program (CAP) and business as usual programs, studied outcomes for 3-5 year old students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included 84 teachers and 302 students with ASD and their parents. CAP utilized specialized curricula and training components to implement specific evidence-based practices both at school and home. A comprehensive set of outcome areas was studied. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to estimate the treatment impact. CAP had small positive impacts on the students' receptive language (effect size of .13) and on their social skills as rated by teachers (effect size of .19). Treatment effects were moderated by severity of ASD. PMID:26438637

  1. History of the Athens Canadian Random Bred and the Athens Random Bred control populations.

    PubMed

    Collins, K E; Marks, H L; Aggrey, S E; Lacy, M P; Wilson, J L

    2016-05-01

    The University of Georgia maintains two meat-type chicken control strains: the Athens Random Bred (ARB) and the Athens Canadian Random Bred (ACRB). The Athens Random Bred was developed from colored plumage commercial meat chicken strains in 1956. The ACRB is a replicate population of the Ottawa Meat Control strain which was developed in 1955 from white plumage commercial meat-type chickens. These genetic lines have been extremely valuable research resources and have been used extensively to provide comparative context to modern meat-type strains. The ACRB may be the oldest pedigreed control commercial meat-type chicken still in existence today. This paper reviews the history of the breed backgrounds for both control populations and reviews research utilizing the ACRB. PMID:26976904

  2. Random and Targeted Interventions for Epidemic Control in Metapopulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Gouhei; Urabe, Chiyori; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-07-01

    In general, different countries and communities respond to epidemics in accordance with their own control plans and protocols. However, owing to global human migration and mobility, strategic planning for epidemic control measures through the collaboration of relevant public health administrations is gaining importance for mitigating and containing large-scale epidemics. Here, we present a framework to evaluate the effectiveness of random (non-strategic) and targeted (strategic) epidemic interventions for spatially separated patches in metapopulation models. For a random intervention, we analytically derive the critical fraction of patches that receive epidemic interventions, above which epidemics are successfully contained. The analysis shows that the heterogeneity of patch connectivity makes it difficult to contain epidemics under the random intervention. We demonstrate that, particularly in such heterogeneously connected networks, targeted interventions are considerably effective compared to the random intervention. Our framework is useful for identifying the target areas where epidemic control measures should be focused.

  3. Multiple input/output random vibration control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-input/output random vibration control algorithm was developed based on system identification concepts derived from random vibration spectral analysis theory. The unique features of the algorithm are: (1) the number of input excitors and the number of output control responses need not be identical; (2) the system inverse response matrix is obtained directly from the input/output spectral matrix; and (3) the system inverse response matrix is updated every control loop cycle to accommodate system amplitude nonlinearities. A laboratory demonstration case of two imputs with three outputs is presented to demonstrate the system capabilities.

  4. Affectionate Writing Reduces Total Cholesterol: Two Randomized, Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Kory; Mikkelson, Alan C.; Hesse, Colin; Pauley, Perry M.

    2007-01-01

    In two 5-week trials, healthy college students were randomly assigned either to experimental or control groups. Participants in the experimental groups wrote about their affection for significant friends, relatives, and/or romantic partners for 20 minutes on three separate occasions; on the same schedule, those in the control groups wrote about…

  5. The Use of Control in Non-Randomized Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Si; Jorgensen, Randall

    The concept of control is fundamental to comparative research. In research designs where randomization of observational units is not possible, control has been exercised statistically from a single covariate by a process of residualization. The alternative, known as subclassification on the propensity score, was developed primarily for…

  6. Randomized Controlled Trials for the Treatment of Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Dominique C; Mekkes, Jan R; Tzellos, Thrasivoulos

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, inflammatory, recurrent, debilitating skin disease. Several treatment modalities are available, but most of them lack high-quality evidence. A systematic search was performed to identify all randomized controlled trials for the treatment of HS in order to review and evaluate the evidence. Recommendations for future randomized controlled trials include using validated scores, inclusion of patient rated outcomes, and thorough report of side effects. Evidence for long-term treatment and benefit/risk ratio of available treatment modalities is needed in order to enhance evidence-based treatment in daily clinical practice. Combining surgery with antiinflammatory treatment warrants further investigation. PMID:26617360

  7. In School Settings, Are All RCTs (Randomized Control Trials) Exploratory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Denis; Jaciw, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    The motivation for this paper is the authors' recent work on several randomized control trials in which they found the primary result, which averaged across subgroups or sites, to be moderated by demographic or site characteristics. They are led to examine a distinction that the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) makes between "confirmatory"…

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Two Online Mathematics Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Haiwen; Woodworth, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    This study applies a randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of supplemental instruction using two online mathematics curricula--DreamBox and Reasoning Mind. It is an independent evaluation intended to generate unbiased results that will help inform the ongoing development of a charter school network's hybrid instructional model, which…

  9. Pedometer Use in University Freshmen: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCheminant, James D.; Smith, John D.; Covington, N. Kay; Hardin-Renschen, Tracie; Heden, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To describe activity patterns associated with a pedometer intervention in university freshmen and compare the intervention participants to controls for several health outcomes. Methods: Forty-six university freshmen were randomized to a group that wore a pedometer across the academic year with a goal of 10,000 steps/day or to a control…

  10. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  11. A double-blind randomized control trial of diazepam

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    A double-blind randomized controlled trial of diazepam against placebo in the management of minor conditions seen in general practice demonstrated that administration of either diazepam or placebo was associated with a substantial reduction in symptomatology three weeks later. There was no demonstrable difference between diazepam and placebo. PMID:6358487

  12. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  13. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  14. Teacher Awareness Program on Child Abuse: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Patrick; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Because teachers lack knowledge of the law, of school board policies, and of issues regarding child abuse and neglect, a professional development workshop was developed and presented to all teachers in the Ottawa Public Schools. Evaluation by a randomized controlled trial showed the workshop effective in increasing and maintaining knowledge.…

  15. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  16. The quality of randomized controlled trials in major anesthesiology journals.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Mary Lou V H; Rosenberg, Andrew L; O'Reilly, Michael; Shanks, Amy M; Sliwinski, Michelle J; Nauss, Michael D

    2005-06-01

    Increased attention has been directed at the quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and how they are being reported. We examined leading anesthesiology journals to identify if there were specific areas for improvement in the design and analysis of published clinical studies. All RCTs that appeared between January 2000 and December 2000 in leading anesthesiology journals (Anesthesiology,Anesthesia & Analgesia,Anaesthesia, and Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia) were retrieved by a MEDLINE search. We used a previously validated assessment tool, including 14 items associated with study quality, to determine a quality score for each article. The overall mean weighted quality score was 44% +/- 16%. Overall average scores were relatively high for appropriate controls (77% +/- 7%) and discussions of side effects (67% +/- 6%). Scores were very low for randomization blinding (5% +/- 2%), blinding observers to results (1% +/- 1%), and post-beta estimates (16% +/- 13%). Important pretreatment clinical predictors were absent in 32% of all studies. Significant improvement in the reporting and conduct of RCTs is required and should focus on randomization methodology, the blinding of investigators, and sample size estimates. Repeat assessments of the literature may improve the adoption of guidelines for the improvement of the quality of randomized controlled trials. PMID:15920210

  17. Randomized controlled trials in diving and hyperbaric medicine.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are widely accepted as the most appropriate methodology available for the investigation of health interventions. This is because of the low potential for systematic bias and the ability to assume causality. Well-designed RCTs, often modified by the addition of blinding participants to the treatment allocated, greatly assist physicians and funding agencies in deciding on the most effective and cost-efficient methods available to prevent and treat ill health. One of the problems for hyperbaric physicians is the widely scattered nature of the evidence, making retrieval and appraisal problematic. This review assembles the randomized evidence in order to assist practitioners, discusses the nature of randomized trials and explores approaches to designing and performing powerful and convincing trials in this area. It is extracted from the UHMS Report Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Indications. PMID:24224286

  18. Control with a random access protocol and packet dropouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liyuan; Guo, Ge

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates networked control systems whose actuators communicate with the controller via a limited number of unreliable channels. The access to the channels is decided by a so-called group random access protocol, which is modelled as a binary Markov sequence. Data packet dropouts in the channels are modelled as independent Bernoulli processes. For such systems, a systematic characterisation for controller synthesis is established and stated in terms of the transition probabilities of the Markov protocol and the packet dropout probabilities. The results are illustrated via a numerical example.

  19. Perceptions of Massage Therapists Participating in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Adam; Dreusicke, Mark; Keever, Teresa; Ali, Ather

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical practice and randomized trials often have disparate aims, despite involving similar interventions. Attitudes and expectancies of practitioners influence patient outcomes, and there is growing emphasis on optimizing provider–patient relationships. In this study, we evaluated the experiences of licensed massage therapists involved in a randomized controlled clinical trial using qualitative methodology. Methods Seven massage therapists who were interventionists in a randomized controlled trial participated in structured interviews approximately 30 minutes in length. Interviews focused on their experiences and perceptions regarding aspects of the clinical trial, as well as recommendations for future trials. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for emergent topics and themes using standard qualitative methods. Results Six themes emerged. Therapists discussed 1) promoting the profession of massage therapy through research, 2) mixed views on using standardized protocols, 3) challenges of sham interventions, 4) participant response to the sham intervention, 5) views on scheduling and compensation, and 6) unanticipated benefits of participating in research. Conclusions Therapists largely appreciated the opportunity to promote massage through research. They demonstrated insight and understanding of the rationale for a clinical trial adhering to a standardized protocol. Evaluating the experiences and ideas of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners provides valuable insight that is relevant for the implementation and design of randomized trials. PMID:26388961

  20. Observer-based controller design for networked control systems with sensor quantisation and random communication delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; You, Jia

    2012-10-01

    This article addresses the study of observer-based controller design for network-based control systems in the presence of output quantisation and random communication delay simultaneously. In the communication channel, the output measurement are quantised before transmission, and two kinds of network-induced delays are taken into account simultaneously: (i) random delay from sensor to controller and (ii) random delay from controller to actuator. These two types of random delays are modelled as two independent Bernoulli distributed white sequences. The observer-based controller is synthesised to stabilise the networked closed-loop system in the sense of stochastic stability. Sufficient conditions for the existence of the controller are provided by stochastic Lyapunov method. An illustrative numerical example is employed to demonstrate the applicability and flexibility of the proposed design strategy.

  1. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. Methods: To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. Results: There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors’ efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Conclusions: Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups—plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen

  2. Teacher awareness program on child abuse: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McGrath, P; Cappelli, M; Wiseman, D; Khalil, N; Allan, B

    1987-01-01

    Teachers have a significant role in preventing, detecting and reporting child abuse and neglect. They are hindered in fulfilling this role by a serious lack of knowledge of the law, of school board policies, and of maltreatment. A comprehensive professional development workshop was developed and presented to elementary school teachers. The package was evaluated by means of a randomized controlled trial. The workshop proved to be effective in increasing and maintaining knowledge. PMID:3828866

  3. Active control of tensegrity structures under random excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Raja, M.; Narayanan, S.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we consider vibration control of tensegrity structures under stationary and nonstationary random excitations. These excitations may be representative of many physical loading conditions, such as earthquake, wind, aerodynamic and acoustic excitations. The optimal control theory based on H2 and \\mathrm {H}_{\\infty } controller with full state and limited state feedback is used for the control. The response of the tensegrity structure is represented by the zero lag covariance matrix and the same is obtained by solving the matrix Lyapunov equation. The force generated by the electro-mechanical coupling of the piezoelectric actuator is used in the formulation. A tensegrity structure of class-1 comprising of two modules, with 24 pretension cables and six struts with piezoelectric actuators, is considered.

  4. Randomly Sampled-Data Control Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kuoruey

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to solve the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) problem with random time sampling. Such a sampling scheme may arise from imperfect instrumentation as in the case of sampling jitter. It can also model the stochastic information exchange among decentralized controllers to name just a few. A practical suboptimal controller is proposed with the nice property of mean square stability. The proposed controller is suboptimal in the sense that the control structure is limited to be linear. Because of i. i. d. assumption, this does not seem unreasonable. Once the control structure is fixed, the stochastic discrete optimal control problem is transformed into an equivalent deterministic optimal control problem with dynamics described by the matrix difference equation. The N-horizon control problem is solved using the Lagrange's multiplier method. The infinite horizon control problem is formulated as a classical minimization problem. Assuming existence of solution to the minimization problem, the total system is shown to be mean square stable under certain observability conditions. Computer simulations are performed to illustrate these conditions.

  5. Aromatherapy and behaviour disturbances in dementia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, J; Brown, R; Coulter, F; Irvine, E; Copland, C

    2001-10-01

    A random controlled trial of the relaxing effects of an aromatherapy massage on disordered behaviour in dementia was conducted. Twenty-one patients were randomly allocated into one of three conditions, aromatherapy and massage (AM), conversation and aromatherapy (CA) and massage only (M). AM showed the greatest reduction in the frequency of excessive motor behaviour of all three conditions. This reached statistical significance between the hours of three and four pm (p < 0.05). Post hoc analysis suggested that at this time of day the AM consistently reduced motor behaviour when compared with CA (p = 0.05). This provides preliminary evidence of a measurable sedative effect of aromatherapy massage on dementia within a robust scientific paradigm. Further research is recommended with an expanded sample size. PMID:11607948

  6. The Effectiveness of Propolis on Gingivitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Niraldo; Nör, Jacques E.; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a propolis rinse on induced gingivitis by using the co-twin study design. Methods: Twenty-one twin pairs (n=42) were enrolled in a gingivitis study with oral hygiene promotion (14 days) and gingivitis induction (21 days). During the gingivitis induction phase, one member of the twin pair was randomly assigned to a 2% typified propolis rinse, and the other was assigned a color-matched 0.05% sodium fluoride plus 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride rinse (positive control). Patients rinsed twice daily with 20 mL for 30 seconds for 21 days. Gingivitis was measured on days −14 (baseline), 0 (after hygiene phase), and 21 (after no-hygiene phase) by using the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) and by standard digital imaging of the gum tissues (G-parameter). Results: The 38 persons who completed the study (age 13–22 years) were well balanced according to PBS at baseline and G-parameter after the initial hygiene phase. After 21 days without oral hygiene, the propolis rinse and positive control rinse groups did not differ significantly for average PBS measurements or G-parameter. Conclusions: Use of a 2% typified propolis rinse was equivalent to a positive control rinse during a 21-day no-hygiene period. PMID:25380344

  7. Building Kindergartners’ Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to one of three groups (n = 44 in each group): a number sense intervention group, a language intervention group, or a business as usual control group. Accounting for initial skill level in mathematical knowledge, children who received the number sense intervention performed better than controls at immediate post test, with meaningful effects on measures of number competencies and general math achievement. Many of the effects held eight weeks after the intervention was completed, suggesting that children internalized what they had learned. There were no differences between the language and control groups on any math-related measures. PMID:25866417

  8. Balneotherapy in fibromyalgia: a single blind randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ozkurt, Seçil; Dönmez, Arif; Zeki Karagülle, M; Uzunoğlu, Emel; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of balneotherapy in fibromyalgia management. Fifty women with fibromyalgia under pharmacological treatment were randomly assigned to either the balneotherapy (25) or the control (25) group. Four patients from the balneotherapy group and one patient from the control group left the study after randomization. The patients in the balneotherapy group (21) had 2 thermomineral water baths daily for 2 weeks in Tuzla Spa Center. The patients in the control group (24) continued to have their medical treatment and routine daily life. An investigator who was blinded to the study arms assessed the patients. All patients were assessed four times; at the beginning of the study, at the end of the 2nd week, the 1st month, and the 3rd month after balneotherapy. Outcome measures of the study were pain intensity, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), patient's global assessment, investigator's global assessment, SF-36 scores, and tender point count. Balneotherapy was found to be superior at the end of the cure period in terms of pain intensity, FIQ, Beck Depression Inventory, patient's global assessment, investigator's global assessment scores, and tender point count as compared to the control group. The superiority of balneotherapy lasted up to the end of the 3rd month, except for the Beck Depression Inventory score and the investigator's global assessment score. Significant improvements were observed in PF, GH, and MH subscales of SF-36 during the study period in the balneotherapy group; however, no such improvement was observed in the control group. Balneotherapy was superior only in VT subscale at the end of therapy and at the end of the third month after the therapy as compared to the controls. It was concluded that balneotherapy provides beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:21461716

  9. Cervical Lidocaine for IUD Insertional Pain: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, Colleen P.; Madden, Tessa; Zhao, Qiuhong; Secura, Gina; Allsworth, Jenifer E.; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anticipated pain with intrauterine device (IUD) insertion may be a barrier to widespread use. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of intracervical 2% lidocaine gel for pain relief with IUD insertion. Study Design We performed a double-blind, randomized controlled trial of women undergoing IUD insertion. Participants were randomly assigned to 2% lidocaine or placebo gel. Study gel (3ccs) wase placed 3 minutes prior to IUD insertion. Pain scores were measured at various time points using a 10-point visual analog scale. Results Of the 200 participants randomized, 199 completed the study. Pain scores among lidocaine and placebo arms were similar at tenaculum placement (lidocaine and placebo; median 4, range 0–10 p=0.15) as well as with insertion (lidocaine: median 5 range 1–10, placebo: median 6 range 0–10 p=0.16). These results did not differ by parity. Conclusions Topical or intracervical 2% lidocaine gel prior to IUD insertion does not decrease pain scores. PMID:23107081

  10. Medication reconciliation at patient admission: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Antonio E.; Lombardi, Natália F.; Andrzejevski, Vânia S.; Frandoloso, Gibran; Correr, Cassyano J.; Carvalho, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To measure length of hospital stay (LHS) in patients receiving medication reconciliation. Secondary characteristics included analysis of number of preadmission medications, medications prescribed at admission, number of discrepancies, and pharmacists interventions done and accepted by the attending physician. Methods: A 6 month, randomized, controlled trial conducted at a public teaching hospital in southern Brazil. Patients admitted to general wards were randomized to receive usual care or medication reconciliation, performed within the first 72 hours of hospital admission. Results: The randomization process assigned 68 patients to UC and 65 to MR. LHS was 10±15 days in usual care and 9±16 days in medication reconciliation (p=0.620). The total number of discrepancies was 327 in the medication reconciliation group, comprising 52.6% of unintentional discrepancies. Physicians accepted approximately 75.0% of the interventions. Conclusion: These results highlight weakness at patient transition care levels in a public teaching hospital. LHS, the primary outcome, should be further investigated in larger studies. Medication reconciliation was well accepted by physicians and it is a useful tool to find and correct discrepancies, minimizing the risk of adverse drug events and improving patient safety. PMID:27011775

  11. Shallow Semantic Parsing of Randomized Controlled Trial Reports

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Hyung; Kogan, Yacov; Thomas, Prem; Codish, Seymour; Krauthammer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we are measuring the performance of Propbank-based Machine Learning (ML) for automatically annotating abstracts of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) with semantically meaningful tags. Propbank is a resource of annotated sentences from the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) corpus, and we were interested in assessing performance issues when porting this resource to the medical domain. We compare intra-domain (WSJ/WSJ) with cross-domain (WSJ/medical abstracts) performance. Although the intra-domain performance is superior, we found a reasonable cross-domain performance. PMID:17238412

  12. Neighborhood Effects in a Behavioral Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Sandi L.; Leonard, Tammy; Murdoch, James; Hughes, Amy; McQueen, Amy; Gupta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions intended to modify health behaviors may be influenced by neighborhood effects which can impede unbiased estimation of intervention effects. Examining a RCT designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (N=5,628), we found statistically significant neighborhood effects: average CRC test use among neighboring study participants was significantly and positively associated with individual patient’s CRC test use. This potentially important spatially-varying covariate has not previously been considered in a RCT. Our results suggest that future RCTs of health behavior interventions should assess potential social interactions between participants, which may cause intervention arm contamination and may bias effect size estimation. PMID:25456014

  13. Efficacy of Yoga for Vasomotor Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Katherine M.; Reed, Susan D.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Sherman, Karen J.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Caan, Bette; Sternfeld, Barbara; Carpenter, Janet S.; Learman, Lee A.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Cohen, Lee S.; Joffe, Hadine; Anderson, Garnet L.; Larson, Joseph C.; Hunt, Julie R.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of yoga in alleviating VMS frequency and bother. Methods Three by two factorial design, randomized, controlled. Eligible women were randomized to yoga (n=107), exercise (n=106), or usual activity (n=142), and were simultaneously randomized to double-blind comparison of omega-3 fatty acid (n=177) or placebo (n=178) capsules. Yoga intervention was twelve, weekly, 90-minute yoga classes with daily home practice. Primary outcomes were VMS frequency and bother assessed by daily diaries at baseline, 6, and 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included insomnia symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index) at baseline and 12 weeks. Results Among 249 randomized women, 237 (95%) completed 12-week assessments. Mean baseline VMS frequency was 7.4/day (95% CI 6.6, 8.1) in the yoga group and 8.0/day (95% CI 7.3, 8.7) in the usual activity group. Intent-to-treat analyses included all participants with response data (n=237). There was no difference between intervention groups in change in VMS frequency from baseline to 6 and 12 weeks (mean difference (yoga – usual activity) from baseline −0.3 (95% CI −1.1, 0.5) at 6 weeks and −0.3 (95% CI −1.2, 0.6) at 12 weeks (p=0.119 across both time points). Results were similar for VMS bother. At week 12, yoga was associated with an improvement in insomnia symptoms (mean difference [yoga-usual activity] in change –Insomnia Severity Index, 1.3 [95% CI −2.5, −0.1][p=0.007]). Conclusion Among healthy women, 12 weeks of yoga class plus home practice compared with usual activity did not improve VMS frequency or bother, but reduced insomnia symptoms. PMID:24045673

  14. A randomized controlled trial of qigong for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia is difficult to treat and requires the use of multiple approaches. This study is a randomized controlled trial of qigong compared with a wait-list control group in fibromyalgia. Methods One hundred participants were randomly assigned to immediate or delayed practice groups, with the delayed group receiving training at the end of the control period. Qigong training (level 1 Chaoyi Fanhuan Qigong, CFQ), given over three half-days, was followed by weekly review/practice sessions for eight weeks; participants were also asked to practice at home for 45 to 60 minutes per day for this interval. Outcomes were pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function, and these were recorded at baseline, eight weeks, four months and six months. Immediate and delayed practice groups were analyzed individually compared to the control group, and as a combination group. Results In both the immediate and delayed treatment groups, CFQ demonstrated significant improvements in pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function when compared to the wait-list/usual care control group at eight weeks, with benefits extending beyond this time. Analysis of combined data indicated significant changes for all measures at all times for six months, with only one exception. Post-hoc analysis based on self-reported practice times indicated greater benefit with the per protocol group compared to minimal practice. Conclusions This study demonstrates that CFQ, a particular form of qigong, provides long-term benefits in several core domains in fibromyalgia. CFQ may be a useful adjuvant self-care treatment for fibromyalgia. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938834. PMID:22863206

  15. Enhancing antiepileptic drug adherence: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian; Sheeran, Paschal; Reuber, Markus

    2009-12-01

    Suboptimal adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is commonplace, and increases the risk of status epilepticus and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. This randomized controlled trial was designed to demonstrate whether an implementation intention intervention involving the completion of a simple self-administered questionnaire linking the intention of taking medication with a particular time, place, and other activity can improve AED treatment schedule adherence. Of the 81 patients with epilepsy who were randomized, 69 completed a 1-month monitoring period with an objective measure of tablet taking (electronic registration of pill bottle openings, Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS]). Intervention participants showed improved adherence relative to controls on all three outcomes: doses taken in total (93.4% vs. 79.1%), days on which correct dose was taken (88.7% vs. 65.3%), and doses taken on schedule (78.8% vs. 55.3%) (P<0.01). The implementation intention intervention may be an easy-to-administer and effective means of promoting AED adherence. PMID:19864187

  16. Cognitive Stimulation in Patients with Dementia: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mapelli, Daniela; Di Rosa, Elisa; Nocita, Rosaria; Sava, Donatella

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims This study explores the effective outcomes of a structured cognitive stimulation treatment to improve cognition and behavioral symptoms in people with dementia (PWDs), using a randomized controlled clinical trial. Methods Thirty PWDs were divided into three groups: experimental (treated with cognitive stimulation), placebo (treated with occupational therapy), and control (continuing with the usual activities of the nursing home). Assessment, at baseline and after a period of 8 weeks, was performed using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, activities of daily living, Mini-Mental State Examination, Esame Neuropsicologico Breve 2, Geriatric Depression Scale and Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Scale. Results Only the experimental group improved its performance in cognitive tests (p < 0.05) and showed a significant decrease in behavioral symptoms (p < 0.01) after the treatment. Conclusions The results suggest that a cognitive stimulation treatment for PWDs would improve not only their cognition, but also behavioral symptoms. PMID:24052800

  17. Standards of Reporting of Randomized Controlled Trials in General Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Wiener, Martin; Alshameeri, Zeiad; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Elbourne, Diana; Reed, Malcolm W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the quality of reporting of surgical randomized controlled trials published in surgical and general medical journals using Jadad score, allocation concealment, and adherence to CONSORT guidelines and to identify factors associated with good quality. Summary Background Data: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide the best evidence about the relative effectiveness of different interventions. Improper methodology and reporting of RCTs can lead to erroneous conclusions about treatment effects, which may mislead decision-making in health care at all levels. Methods: Information was obtained on RCTs published in 6 general surgical and 4 general medical journals in the year 2003. The quality of reporting of RCTs was assessed under masked conditions using allocation concealment, Jadad score, and a CONSORT checklist devised for the purpose. Results: Of the 69 RCTs analyzed, only 37.7% had a Jadad score of ≥3, and only 13% of the trials clearly explained allocation concealment. The modified CONSORT score of surgical trials reported in medical journals was significantly higher than those reported in surgical journals (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.001). Overall, the modified CONSORT score was higher in studies with higher author numbers (P = 0.03), multicenter studies (P = 0.002), and studies with a declared funding source (P = 0.022). Conclusion: The overall quality of reporting of surgical RCTs was suboptimal. There is a need for improving awareness of the CONSORT statement among authors, reviewers, and editors of surgical journals and better quality control measures for trial reporting and methodology. PMID:17060756

  18. Preconception maternal nutrition: a multi-site randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research directed to optimizing maternal nutrition commencing prior to conception remains very limited, despite suggestive evidence of its importance in addition to ensuring an optimal nutrition environment in the periconceptional period and throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. Methods/Study design This is an individually randomized controlled trial of the impact on birth length (primary outcome) of the time at which a maternal nutrition intervention is commenced: Arm 1: ≥ 3 mo preconception vs. Arm 2: 12-14 wk gestation vs. Arm 3: none. 192 (derived from 480) randomized mothers and living offspring in each arm in each of four research sites (Guatemala, India, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo). The intervention is a daily 20 g lipid-based (118 kcal) multi-micronutient (MMN) supplement. Women randomized to receive this intervention with body mass index (BMI) <20 or whose gestational weight gain is low will receive an additional 300 kcal/d as a balanced energy-protein supplement. Researchers will visit homes biweekly to deliver intervention and monitor compliance, pregnancy status and morbidity; ensure prenatal and delivery care; and promote breast feeding. The primary outcome is birth length. Secondary outcomes include: fetal length at 12 and 34 wk; incidence of low birth weight (LBW); neonatal/infant anthropometry 0-6 mo of age; infectious disease morbidity; maternal, fetal, newborn, and infant epigenetics; maternal and infant nutritional status; maternal and infant microbiome; gut inflammatory biomarkers and bioactive and nutritive compounds in breast milk. The primary analysis will compare birth Length-for-Age Z-score (LAZ) among trial arms (independently for each site, estimated effect size: 0.35). Additional statistical analyses will examine the secondary outcomes and a pooled analysis of data from all sites. Discussion Positive results of this trial will support a paradigm shift in attention to nutrition of all females of

  19. Postoperative pain relief following hysterectomy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Raghvendra, K. P.; Thapa, Deepak; Mitra, Sukanya; Ahuja, Vanita; Gombar, Satinder; Huria, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women experience moderate to severe postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a new modality for providing postoperative pain relief in these patients. Materials and Methods: The present study was a single center, prospective randomized trial. After the Institutional Ethics Committee approval and informed consent, patients were randomized to either epidural group: Epidural block placement + general anesthesia (GA) or TAP group: Single shot TAP block + GA. Patients in both the groups received standard general anesthetic technique and intravenous tramadol patient-controlled analgesia in the postoperative period. Patients were monitored for tramadol consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) both at rest and on coughing, hemodynamics, and side effects at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. Results: The total consumption of tramadol in 24 h was greater in TAP group as compared to epidural group (68.8 [25.5] vs. 5.3 [11.6] mg, P < 0.001). The VAS scores at rest and on coughing were higher in TAP group as compared to the epidural group at 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively (P < 0.05). None of the patients in either group had any adverse effects. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia provided greater tramadol-sparing effect with superior analgesia postoperatively as compared to TAP block in patients up to 24 h following TAH. PMID:27499592

  20. Treatment of bulimia nervosa with sertraline: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Milano, W; Petrella, C; Sabatino, C; Capasso, A

    2004-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is one of the most frequently encountered eating disorders in industrialized societies. It has been suggested that reduced serotonin activity may trigger some of the cognitive and mood disturbances associated with BN. Thus, pharmacologic treatment of BN is mainly based on the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which have proved effective. At present, the biological basis of this disorder is not completely clear. The aim of this randomized, controlled trial was to verify the efficacy of sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, in a group of patients with a diagnosis of BN. Twenty female outpatients, with an age range of 24 to 36 years and a diagnosis of purging type BN as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM IV), were assigned randomly to two treatment groups. The first group received sertraline 100 mg/day for 12 weeks; the second group received placebo. The study was conducted for 12 weeks, with weekly clinical assessments. At the end of the observation period, the group treated with sertraline had a statistically significant reduction in the number of binge eating crises and purging compared with the group who received placebo. In no case was treatment interrupted because of side effects. This study confirms that sertraline is well tolerated and effective in reducing binge-eating crises and purging in patients with BN. PMID:15605617

  1. Treatment of bulimia nervosa with fluvoxamine: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Milano, W; Siano, C; Putrella, C; Capasso, A

    2005-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is one of the most common eating disorders in industrialized societies. It has been suggested that reduced serotonin activity triggers some of the cognitive and mood disturbances associated with BN. For this reason, the pharmacologic treatment of BN consists mainly of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which have been proven effective. At present, the physiologic bases of this disorder are not yet completely understood. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to verify the efficacy of the SSRI fluvoxamine in patients with a diagnosis of BN. Twelve female outpatients aged 21 to 34 years with a diagnosis of BN-binge purging (as defined by the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [DSM IV]) were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups: the fluvoxamine 200 mg/day group and the placebo group. The patients underwent weekly clinical assessments for 12 weeks. At the end of the observation period, there was a statistically significant reduction in the number of binge-eating crises and purging episodes in the fluvoxamine group compared with placebo. In no case was treatment interrupted because of emergent side effects. These findings support the hypothesis that fluvoxamine is well tolerated and effective in reducing binge-eating crises and purging episodes in patients with BN. PMID:16236688

  2. Reiki for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Assefi, Nassim; Bogart, Andy; Goldberg, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Fibromyalgia is a common, chronic pain condition for which patients frequently use complementary and alternative medicine, including Reiki. Our objective was to determine whether Reiki is beneficial as an adjunctive fibromyalgia treatment. Design This was a factorial designed, randomized, sham-controlled trial in which participants, data collection staff, and data analysts were blinded to treatment group. Setting/location The study setting was private medical offices in the Seattle, Washington metropolitan area. Subjects The subjects were comprised 100 adults with fibromyalgia. Intervention Four (4) groups received twice-weekly treatment for 8 weeks by either a Reiki master or actor randomized to use direct touch or no touch (distant therapy). Outcome measures The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by visual analog scale at weeks 4, 8, and 20 (3 months following end of treatment). Secondary outcomes were physical and mental functioning, medication use, and health provider visits. Participant blinding and adverse effects were ascertained by selfreport. Improvement between groups was examined in an intention-to-treat analysis. Results Neither Reiki nor touch had any effect on pain or any of the secondary outcomes. All outcome measures were nearly identical among the 4 treatment groups during the course of the trial. Conclusion Neither Reiki nor touch improved the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Energy medicine modalities such as Reiki should be rigorously studied before being recommended to patients with chronic pain symptoms. PMID:18991519

  3. The electrically and magnetically controllable random laser from dye-doped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lihua; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Chong; Wang, Yan; Cui, Yiping; Lu, Yanqing

    2014-08-01

    The electrically and magnetically controllable random laser from dye-doped liquid crystals (LCs) was studied. The rubbing-alignment of the polyimide in the LC cell influenced the threshold voltage and the response time of the electrically controllable random laser. When the applied electric field was increased, the response time of the random laser decreased. The magnetically controllable random laser was studied in the hollow fiber structure, of which the response time was less than 1 s.

  4. A randomized controlled trial of analgesia during vaccination in adults.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Anna; Lord, Allison; Hogan, Mary-Ellen; Kikuta, Andrew; Yiu, Ashley; Darra, Erwin; Bruinse, Barbara; Keogh, Tom; Stephens, Derek

    2010-07-19

    Although immunization injections are the most common painful medical procedures, pain-relieving interventions are not routinely used. In this randomized controlled trial, we compared the effectiveness of topical anesthesia using liposomal lidocaine to: (1) vapocoolant spray using a proprietary blend of 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane; (2) nurse-administered tactile stimulation; or (3) self-directed distraction by means of reading a magazine. Liposomal lidocaine was more effective (p

  5. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect. PMID:18387273

  6. Randomized Controlled Trials in Environmental Health Research: Ethical Issues

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are becoming increasingly common in environmental health research. Like all studies involving human subjects, environmental health RCTs raise many different ethical issues, ranging from obtaining informed consent, to minimizing risks, to protecting privacy and confidentiality. One of the most important issues raised by these studies is whether it is ethical to withhold effective environmental health interventions from research subjects in order to satisfy scientific objectives. Although environmental health investigators usually do not have professional obligations to provide medical care to research subjects, they have ethical obligations to avoid exploiting them. Withholding interventions from research subjects can be ethical, provided that it does not lead to exploitation of individuals or groups. To avoid exploiting individuals or groups, investigators should ensure that research subjects and study populations receive a fair share of the benefits of research. PMID:18236934

  7. Outcomes in Registered, Ongoing Randomized Controlled Trials of Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Cécile; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life). Methods On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1) patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2) surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. Principal Findings We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333) of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623) of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150) used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150) as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150), primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61) of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59) in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22) in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months). Conclusions There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs. PMID:22916183

  8. Effects of nattokinase on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Gum, Si Nae; Paik, Jean Kyung; Lim, Hyo Hee; Kim, Kyong-Chol; Ogasawara, Kazuya; Inoue, Kenichi; Park, Sungha; Jang, Yangsoo; Lee, Jong Ho

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of nattokinase supplementation on blood pressure in subjects with pre-hypertension or stage 1 hypertension. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 86 participants ranging from 20 to 80 years of age with an initial untreated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 130 to 159 mmHg received nattokinase (2,000 FU/capsule) or a placebo capsule for 8 weeks. Seventy-three subjects completed the protocol. Compared with the control group, the net changes in SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were -5.55 mmHg (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -0.57 mmHg; p<0.05) and -2.84 mmHg (CI, -5.33 to -0.33 mmHg; p<0.05), respectively, after the 8-week intervention. The corresponding net change in renin activity was -1.17 ng/mL/h for the nattokinase group compared with the control group (p<0.05). In conclusion, nattokinase supplementation resulted in a reduction in SBP and DBP. These findings suggest that increased intake of nattokinase may play an important role in preventing and treating hypertension. PMID:18971533

  9. Qigong and fibromyalgia: randomized controlled trials and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, Jana; Lynch, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Qigong is currently considered as meditative movement, mindful exercise, or complementary exercise and is being explored for relief of symptoms in fibromyalgia. Aim. This narrative review summarizes randomized controlled trials, as well as additional studies, of qigong published to the end of 2013 and discusses relevant methodological issues. Results. Controlled trials indicate regular qigong practice (daily, 6-8 weeks) produces improvements in core domains for fibromyalgia (pain, sleep, impact, and physical and mental function) that are maintained at 4-6 months compared to wait-list subjects or baselines. Comparisons with active controls show little difference, but compared to baseline there are significant and comparable effects in both groups. Open-label studies provide information that supports benefit but remain exploratory. An extension trial and case studies involving extended practice (daily, 6-12 months) indicate marked benefits but are limited by the number of participants. Benefit appears to be related to amount of practice. Conclusions. There is considerable potential for qigong to be a useful complementary practice for the management of fibromyalgia. However, there are unique methodological challenges, and exploration of its clinical potential will need to focus on pragmatic issues and consider a spectrum of trial designs. Mechanistic considerations need to consider both system-wide and more specific effects. PMID:25477991

  10. Ameliorating children's reading-comprehension difficulties: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Paula J; Snowling, Margaret J; Truelove, Emma; Hulme, Charles

    2010-08-01

    Children with specific reading-comprehension difficulties can read accurately, but they have poor comprehension. In a randomized controlled trial, we examined the efficacy of three interventions designed to improve such children's reading comprehension: text-comprehension (TC) training, oral-language (OL) training, and TC and OL training combined (COM). Children were assessed preintervention, midintervention, postintervention, and at an 11-month follow-up. All intervention groups made significant improvements in reading comprehension relative to an untreated control group. Although these gains were maintained at follow-up in the TC and COM groups, the OL group made greater gains than the other groups did between the end of the intervention and follow-up. The OL and COM groups also demonstrated significant improvements in expressive vocabulary compared with the control group, and this was a mediator of the improved reading comprehension of the OL and COM groups. We conclude that specific reading-comprehension difficulties reflect (at least partly) underlying oral-language weaknesses that can be effectively ameliorated by suitable teaching. PMID:20585051

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness Meditation for Chronic Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jason C.; Manber, Rachel; Segal, Zindel; Xia, Yinglin; Shapiro, Shauna; Wyatt, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic insomnia. Design: Three-arm, single-site, randomized controlled trial. Setting: Academic medical center. Participants: Fifty-four adults with chronic insomnia. Interventions: Participants were randomized to either mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI), or an eight-week self-monitoring (SM) condition. Measurements and Results: Patient-reported outcome measures were total wake time (TWT) from sleep diaries, the pre-sleep arousal scale (PSAS), measuring a prominent waking correlate of insomnia, and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) to determine remission and response as clinical endpoints. Objective sleep measures were derived from laboratory polysomnography and wrist actigraphy. Linear mixed models showed that those receiving a meditation-based intervention (MBSR or MBTI) had significantly greater reductions on TWT minutes (43.75 vs 1.09), PSAS (7.13 vs 0.16), and ISI (4.56 vs 0.06) from baseline-to-post compared to SM. Post hoc analyses revealed that each intervention was superior to SM on each of the patient-reported measures, but no significant differences were found when comparing MBSR to MBTI from baseline-to-post. From baseline to 6-month follow-up, MBTI had greater reductions in ISI scores than MBSR (P < 0.05), with the largest difference occurring at the 3-month follow-up. Remission and response rates in MBTI and MBSR were sustained from post-treatment through follow-up, with MBTI showing the highest rates of treatment remission (50%) and response (78.6%) at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions: Mindfulness meditation appears to be a viable treatment option for adults with chronic insomnia and could provide an alternative to traditional treatments for insomnia. Trial Registration: Mindfulness-Based Approaches to Insomnia: clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT00768781 Citation: Ong JC, Manber R, Segal Z, Xia Y

  12. Emphasized warning reduces salt intake: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pinjuh Markota, Nina; Rumboldt, Mirjana; Rumboldt, Zvonko

    2015-03-01

    Excessive salt intake is a major cardiovascular risk factor. At variance to the developed countries, the main source of sodium in transitional and developing countries is salt added while cooking and/or at the table. The objective of this trial was to examine the impact of warning labels placed on home salt containers on daily salt intake.A sample of treated hypertensives (n = 150) was randomized in two subgroups, one receiving just a leaflet about the harmful effects of excessive salt intake (control; n = 74), and the other one receiving in addition warning stickers for household salt containers (intervention; n = 76). Arterial blood pressure (BP) and 24-hour urinary sodium excretion (Na24) were measured in all the subjects at the start of the trial, and 1 month and 2 months later. The average starting Na24 was 207 ± 71 mmol in the control group and 211 ± 85 mmol in the intervention group (P = .745). One month and 2 months later, a significant decrease was observed in the intervention group (to 183 ± 63 mmol and 176 ± 55 mmol; P < .0001), as opposed to the control group (203 ± 60 mmol and 200 ± 58 mmol; P = .1466). Initial BP was 143.7/84.1 mm Hg in the control, and 142.9/84.7 mm Hg in the intervention group (P = .667). One month and 2 months later, a significant drop in BP, by 5.3/2.9 mm Hg, was observed in the intervention group as opposed to the control group (0.4/0.9 mm Hg). Decrease in Na24 positively correlated to BP lowering (r(2) = 0.5989; P < .0001). A significant reduction in 24Na and BP is achieved with warning labels on harmful effects of excessive salt intake. Decreasing daily salt input by 35 mmol may result in an extra BP lowering by some 5-6/2-3 mm Hg. PMID:25659228

  13. Acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Hollifield, Michael; Sinclair-Lian, Nityamo; Warner, Teddy D; Hammerschlag, Richard

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential efficacy and acceptability of accupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). People diagnosed with PTSD were randomized to either an empirically developed accupuncture treatment (ACU), a group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or a wait-list control (WLC). The primary outcome measure was self-reported PTSD symptoms at baseline, end treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Repeated measures MANOVA was used to detect predicted Group X Time effects in both intent-to-treat (ITT) and treatment completion models. Compared with the WLC condition in the ITT model, accupuncture provided large treatment effects for PTSD (F [1, 46] = 12.60; p < 0.01; Cohen's d = 1.29), similar in magnitude to group CBT (F [1, 47] = 12.45; p < 0.01; d = 1.42) (ACU vs. CBT, d = 0.29). Symptom reductions at end treatment were maintained at 3-month follow-up for both interventions. Accupuncture may be an efficacious and acceptable nonexposure treatment option for PTSD. Larger trials with additional controls and methods are warranted to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:17568299

  14. Rural providers' access to online resources: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Laura J.; McElfresh, Karen R.; Warner, Teddy D.; Stromberg, Tiffany L.; Trost, Jaren; Jelinek, Devin A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research determined the usage and satisfaction levels with one of two point-of-care (PoC) resources among health care providers in a rural state. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, twenty-eight health care providers in rural areas were stratified by occupation and region, then randomized into either the DynaMed or the AccessMedicine study arm. Study participants were physicians, physician assistants, and nurses. A pre- and post-study survey measured participants' attitudes toward different information resources and their information-seeking activities. Medical student investigators provided training and technical support for participants. Data analyses consisted of analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired t tests, and Cohen's d statistic to compare pre- and post-study effects sizes. Results Participants in both the DynaMed and the AccessMedicine arms of the study reported increased satisfaction with their respective PoC resource, as expected. Participants in both arms also reported that they saved time in finding needed information. At baseline, both arms reported too little information available, which increased to “about right amounts of information” at the completion of the study. DynaMed users reported a Cohen's d increase of +1.50 compared to AccessMedicine users' reported use of 0.82. DynaMed users reported d2 satisfaction increases of 9.48 versus AccessMedicine satisfaction increases of 0.59 using a Cohen's d. Conclusion Participants in the DynaMed arm of the study used this clinically oriented PoC more heavily than the users of the textbook-based AccessMedicine. In terms of user satisfaction, DynaMed users reported higher levels of satisfaction than the users of AccessMedicine. PMID:26807050

  15. Naturopathic Care for Anxiety: A Randomized Controlled Trial ISRCTN78958974

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Kieran; Szczurko, Orest; Perri, Dan; Mills, Edward J.; Bernhardt, Bob; Zhou, Qi; Seely, Dugald

    2009-01-01

    Background Anxiety is a serious personal health condition and represents a substantial burden to overall quality of life. Additionally anxiety disorders represent a significant cost to the health care system as well as employers through benefits coverage and days missed due to incapacity. This study sought to explore the effectiveness of naturopathic care on anxiety symptoms using a randomized trial. Methods Employees with moderate to severe anxiety of longer than 6 weeks duration were randomized based on age and gender to receive naturopathic care (NC) (n = 41) or standardized psychotherapy intervention (PT) (n = 40) over a period of 12 weeks. Blinding of investigators and participants during randomization and allocation was maintained. Participants in the NC group received dietary counseling, deep breathing relaxation techniques, a standard multi-vitamin, and the herbal medicine, ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) (300 mg b.i.d. standardized to 1.5% withanolides, prepared from root). The PT intervention received psychotherapy, and matched deep breathing relaxation techniques, and placebo. The primary outcome measure was the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and secondary outcome measures included the Short Form 36 (SF-36), Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), and Measure Yourself Medical Outcomes Profile (MY-MOP) to measure anxiety, mental health, and quality of life respectively. Participants were blinded to the placebo-controlled intervention. Results Seventy-five participants (93%) were followed for 8 or more weeks on the trial. Final BAI scores decreased by 56.5% (p<0.0001) in the NC group and 30.5% (p<0.0001) in the PT group. BAI group scores were significantly decreased in the NC group compared to PT group (p = 0.003). Significant differences between groups were also observed in mental health, concentration, fatigue, social functioning, vitality, and overall quality of life with the NC group exhibiting greater clinical benefit. No serious adverse reactions

  16. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. Methods: All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. Results: The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P < 0.01), and a lower EPDS score 42 days postpartum (P < 0.05). The rate of cesarean section in the EM group was lower than the UC group (P < 0.01), and the cesarean section rate without a medical indication was lower (P < 0.01). The duration of the second stage of labor in the EM group was shorter than the UC group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China. PMID:26309641

  17. Randomized controlled trials – a matter of design

    PubMed Central

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial. PMID:27354804

  18. Carnosine Treatment for Gulf War Illness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Baraniuk, James N.; El-Amin, Suliman; Corey, Rebecca; Rayhan, Rakib U.; Timbol, Christian R.

    2013-01-01

    About 25% of 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War veterans experience disabling fatigue, widespread pain, and cognitive dysfunction termed Gulf War illness (GWI) or Chronic Multisymptom Illness (CMI). A leading theory proposes that wartime exposures initiated prolonged production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and central nervous system injury. The endogenous antioxidant L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a potential treatment since it is a free radical scavenger in nervous tissue. To determine if nutritional supplementation with L-carnosine would significantly improve pain, cognition and fatigue in GWI, a randomized double blind placebo controlled 12 week dose escalation study involving 25 GWI subjects was employed. L-carnosine was given as 500, 1000, and 1500 mg increasing at 4 week intervals. Outcomes included subjective fatigue, pain and psychosocial questionnaires, and instantaneous fatigue and activity levels recorded by ActiWatch Score devices. Cognitive function was evaluated by WAIS-R digit symbol substitution test. Carnosine had 2 potentially beneficial effects: WAIS-R scores increased significantly, and there was a decrease in diarrhea associated with irritable bowel syndrome. No other significant incremental changes were found. Therefore, 12 weeks of carnosine (1500 mg) may have beneficial cognitive effects in GWI. Fatigue, pain, hyperalgesia, activity and other outcomes were resistant to treatment. PMID:23618477

  19. Carnosine treatment for gulf war illness: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, James Nicholas; El-Amin, Suliman; Corey, Rebecca; Rayhan, Rakib; Timbol, Christian

    2013-05-01

    About 25% of 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War veterans experience disabling fatigue, widespread pain, and cognitive dysfunction termed Gulf War illness (GWI) or Chronic Multisymptom Illness (CMI). A leading theory proposes that wartime exposures initiated prolonged production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and central nervous system injury. The endogenous antioxidant L-carnosine (B-alanyl-L-histidine) is a potential treatment since it is a free radical scavenger in nervous tissue. To determine if nutritional supplementation with L-carnosine would significantly improve pain, cognition and fatigue in GWI, a randomized double blind placebo controlled 12 week dose escalation study involving 25 GWI subjects was employed. L-carnosine was given as 500, 1000, and 1500 mg increasing at 4 week intervals. Outcomes included subjective fatigue, pain and psychosocial questionnaires, and instantaneous fatigue and activity levels recorded by ActiWatch Score devices. Cognitive function was evaluated by WAIS-R digit symbol substitution test. Carnosine had 2 potentially beneficial effects: WAIS-R scores increased significantly, and there was a decrease in diarrhea associated with irritable bowel syndrome. No other significant incremental changes were found. Therefore, 12 weeks of carnosine (1500 mg) may have beneficial cognitive effects in GWI. Fatigue, pain, hyperalgesia, activity and other outcomes were resistant to treatment. PMID:23618477

  20. Modifying Media Content for Preschool Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Michelle M.; Herrenkohl, Todd; Haggerty, Kevin; Rivara, Frederick P.; Zhou, Chuan; Liekweg, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although previous studies have revealed that preschool-aged children imitate both aggression and prosocial behaviors on screen, there have been few population-based studies designed to reduce aggression in preschool-aged children by modifying what they watch. METHODS: We devised a media diet intervention wherein parents were assisted in substituting high quality prosocial and educational programming for aggression-laden programming without trying to reduce total screen time. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 565 parents of preschool-aged children ages 3 to 5 years recruited from community pediatric practices. Outcomes were derived from the Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation at 6 and 12 months. RESULTS: At 6 months, the overall mean Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation score was 2.11 points better (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78–3.44) in the intervention group as compared with the controls, and similar effects were observed for the externalizing subscale (0.68 [95% CI: 0.06–1.30]) and the social competence subscale (1.04 [95% CI: 0.34–1.74]). The effect for the internalizing subscale was in a positive direction but was not statistically significant (0.42 [95% CI: −0.14 to 0.99]). Although the effect sizes did not noticeably decay at 12 months, the effect on the externalizing subscale was no longer statistically significant (P = .05). In a stratified analysis of the effect on the overall scores, low-income boys appeared to derive the greatest benefit (6.48 [95% CI: 1.60–11.37]). CONCLUSIONS: An intervention to reduce exposure to screen violence and increase exposure to prosocial programming can positively impact child behavior. PMID:23420911

  1. Amoxicillin for acute rhinosinusitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Garbutt, Jane M.; Banister, Christina; Spitznagel, Edward; Piccirillo, Jay F.

    2013-01-01

    Context Evidence to support antibiotic treatment for acute rhinosinusitis is scant, yet antibiotics are commonly used. Objective To determine the incremental effect of amoxicillin treatment over symptomatic treatments for adults with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis. Design Randomized placebo-controlled trial Participants and Setting Adults with uncomplicated, acute rhinosinusitis were recruited from 10 community practices in Missouri between November 1st 2006 and May 1st 2009 Interventions Ten-day course of either amoxicillin (1500mg/day) or placebo administered in three doses/day. All patients received a 5-7-day supply of symptomatic treatments for pain, fever, cough and nasal congestion to use as needed. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was improvement in the disease-specific quality of life after 3–4 days of treatment assessed with the SNOT-16 (minimally important difference 0.5 on 0 to 3 scale). Secondary outcomes included the patients' retrospective assessment of change in sinus symptoms and functional status, recurrence or relapse, satisfaction with and adverse effects of treatment. Outcomes were assessed by telephone interview at Days 3, 7, 10 and 28. Results 166 adults (36% male, 78% Caucasian) were randomized to amoxicillin (85) or placebo (81); 92% concurrently used ≥1 symptomatic treatment (amoxicillin, 94%, placebo 90%, p=0.34). The mean change in SNOT-16 scores was not significantly different between groups on Day 3 (mean difference between groups 0.03, 95% CI −0.12 to 0.19) and Day 10, but differed at Day 7 favoring amoxicillin (mean difference between groups 0.19, 95% CI 0.024 to 0.35). At Day 7 more participants treated with amoxicillin reported symptom improvement (74% vs. 56%, p=0.0205; NNT = 6, 95% CI 3 to 34), with no difference at Day-3 or Day-10. No between group differences were found for any other secondary outcomes. No serious adverse events occurred. Conclusion Among patients with acute rhinosinusitis, a 10-day

  2. Randomized controlled trial of atorvastatin in clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Waubant, E.; Pelletier, D.; Mass, M.; Cohen, J.A.; Kita, M.; Cross, A.; Bar-Or, A.; Vollmer, T.; Racke, M.; Stüve, O.; Schwid, S.; Goodman, A.; Kachuck, N.; Preiningerova, J.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Calabresi, P.A.; Miller, A.; Mokhtarani, M.; Iklé, D.; Murphy, S.; Kopetskie, H.; Ding, L.; Rosenberg, E.; Spencer, C.; Zamvil, S.S.; Waubant, E.; Pelletier, D.; Mass, M.; Bourdette, D.; Egan, R.; Cohen, J.; Stone, L.; Kita, M.; Elliott, M.; Cross, A.; Parks, B.J.; Bar-Or, A.; Vollmer, T.; Campagnolo, D.; Racke, M.; Stüve, O.; Frohman, E.; Schwid, S.; Goodman, A.; Segal, B.; Kachuck, N.; Weiner, L.; Preiningerova, J.; Carrithers, M.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Calabresi, P.; Kerr, D.; Miller, A.; Lublin, F.; Sayre, Peter; Hayes, Deborah; Rosenberg, Ellen; Gao, Wendy; Ding, Linna; Adah, Steven; Mokhtarani, Masoud; Neuenburg, Jutta; Bromstead, Carolyn; Olinger, Lynn; Mullen, Blair; Jamison, Ross; Speth, Kelly; Saljooqi, Kerensa; Phan, Peter; Phippard, Deborah; Seyfert-Margolis, Vicki; Bourcier, Katarzyna; Debnam, Tracia; Romaine, Jennifer; Wolin, Stephanie; O'Dale, Brittany; Iklé, David; Murphy, Stacey; Kopetskie, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To test efficacy and safety of atorvastatin in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). Methods: Subjects with CIS were enrolled in a phase II, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 14-center randomized trial testing 80 mg atorvastatin on clinical and brain MRI activity. Brain MRIs were performed quarterly. The primary endpoint (PEP) was development of ≥3 new T2 lesions, or one clinical relapse within 12 months. Subjects meeting the PEP were offered additional weekly interferon β-1a (IFNβ-1a). Results: Due to slow recruitment, enrollment was discontinued after 81 of 152 planned subjects with CIS were randomized and initiated study drug. Median (interquartile range) numbers of T2 and gadolinium-enhancing (Gd) lesions were 15.0 (22.0) and 0.0 (0.0) at baseline. A total of 53.1% of atorvastatin recipients (n = 26/49) met PEP compared to 56.3% of placebo recipients (n = 18/32) (p = 0.82). Eleven atorvastatin subjects (22.4%) and 7 placebo subjects (21.9%) met the PEP by clinical criteria. Proportion of subjects who did not develop new T2 lesions up to month 12 or to starting IFNβ-1a was 55.3% in the atorvastatin and 27.6% in the placebo group (p = 0.03). Likelihood of remaining free of new T2 lesions was significantly greater in the atorvastatin group compared with placebo (odds ratio [OR] = 4.34, p = 0.01). Likelihood of remaining free of Gd lesions tended to be higher in the atorvastatin group (OR = 2.72, p = 0.11). Overall, atorvastatin was well tolerated. No clear antagonistic effect of atorvastatin plus IFNβ-1a was observed on MRI measures. Conclusion: Atorvastatin treatment significantly decreased development of new brain MRI T2 lesion activity, although it did not achieve the composite clinical and imaging PEP. Classification of Evidence: This study provided Class II evidence that atorvastatin did not reduce the proportion of patients with CIS meeting imaging and clinical criteria for starting immunomodulating therapy after 12 months

  3. Controlling transmission eigenchannels in random media by edge reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liyi; Tian, Chushun; Bliokh, Yury P.; Freilikher, Valentin

    2015-09-01

    Transmission eigenchannels and associated eigenvalues, that give a full account of wave propagation in random media, have recently emerged as a major theme in theoretical and applied optics. Here, we demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that in quasi-one-dimensional (1 D ) diffusive samples, their behavior is governed mostly by the asymmetry in the reflections of the sample edges rather than by the absolute values of the reflection coefficients themselves. We show that there exists a threshold value of the asymmetry parameter, below which high transmission eigenchannels exist, giving rise to a singularity in the distribution of the transmission eigenvalues ρ (T →1 ) ˜(1-T ) -1/2 . At the threshold, ρ (T ) exhibits critical statistics with a distinct singularity ˜(1-T ) -1/3 ; above it, the high transmission eigenchannels disappear and ρ (T ) vanishes for T exceeding a maximal transmission eigenvalue. We show that such statistical behavior of the transmission eigenvalues can be explained in terms of effective cavities (resonators), analogous to those in which the states are trapped in 1 D strong Anderson localization. In particular, the ρ (T ) transition can be mapped onto the shuffling of the resonator with perfect transmittance from the sample center to the edge with stronger reflection. We also find a similar transition in the distribution of resonant transmittances in 1 D layered samples. These results reveal a physical connection between high transmission eigenchannels in diffusive systems and 1 D strong Anderson localization. They open up a fresh opportunity for practically useful application: controlling the transparency of opaque media and the spatial profile of high transmission eigenchannels by tuning their coupling to the environment.

  4. Internet-based randomized controlled trials: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Erin; McGeechan, Kevin; Barratt, Alexandra; Herbert, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background The internet is increasingly being used to conduct randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Knowledge of the types of interventions evaluated and the methodological quality of these trials could inform decisions about whether to conduct future trials using conventional methods, fully online or a mixture of the two. Objective To identify and describe the scope of internet-based RCTs for human health condition interventions and evaluate their methodological quality. Methods A systematic review of RCTs of any health intervention conducted fully or primarily on the internet was carried out. Results 23 fully and 27 primarily internet-based RCTs were identified. The first was conducted in 2000. The majority of trials evaluated interventions that involved providing health information to participants, but a few evaluated self-administered interventions (eg, valerian, stretching). Methodological quality was variable and the methods were generally poorly reported. The risk of bias was low in only a small number of trials; most had substantial methodological shortcomings. Only one trial was identified as meeting all criteria for adequate methodological quality. A particular problem was high rates of loss to follow-up (fully online: mean 47%; primarily online: mean 36%). Conclusions It is theoretically possible but perhaps difficult to test the effectiveness of health interventions rigorously with RCTs conducted fully or primarily over the internet. The use of the internet to conduct trials is more suited to pragmatic rather than explanatory trials. The main limitation of these trials is that they typically experience high rates of loss to follow-up. Methodological standards now accepted for traditional RCTs needs to be evident for online RCTs as well, especially in reporting of their methods. PMID:23065196

  5. The HONEYPOT Randomized Controlled Trial Statistical Analysis Plan

    PubMed Central

    Pascoe, Elaine Mary; Lo, Serigne; Scaria, Anish; Badve, Sunil V.; Beller, Elaine Mary; Cass, Alan; Hawley, Carmel Mary; Johnson, David W.

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: The HONEYPOT study is a multicenter, open-label, blinded-outcome, randomized controlled trial designed to determine whether, compared with standard topical application of mupirocin for nasal staphylococcal carriage, exit-site application of antibacterial honey reduces the rate of catheter-associated infections in peritoneal dialysis patients. ♦ Objective: To make public the pre-specified statistical analysis principles to be adhered to and the procedures to be performed by statisticians who will analyze the data for the HONEYPOT trial. ♦ Methods: Statisticians and clinical investigators who were blinded to treatment allocation and treatment-related study results and who will remain blinded until the central database is locked for final data extraction and analysis determined the statistical methods and procedures to be used for analysis and wrote the statistical analysis plan. The plan describes basic analysis principles, methods for dealing with a range of commonly encountered data analysis issues, and the specific statistical procedures for analyzing the primary, secondary, and safety outcomes. ♦ Results: A statistical analysis plan containing the pre-specified principles, methods, and procedures to be adhered to in the analysis of the data from the HONEYPOT trial was developed in accordance with international guidelines. The structure and content of the plan provide sufficient detail to meet the guidelines on statistical principles for clinical trials produced by the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. ♦ Conclusions: Making public the pre-specified statistical analysis plan for the HONEYPOT trial minimizes the potential for bias in the analysis of trial data and the interpretation and reporting of trial results. PMID:23843589

  6. Tryptophan Supplementation and Postoperative Delirium – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Thomas N.; Dunn, Christina L.; Adams, Jill C.; Hawkins, Carrie L.; Tran, Zung V.; Raeburn, Christopher D.; Moss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Tryptophan deficiency has been associated with increased incidence of postoperative delirium. Therefore, we hypothesized that the post-operative administration of tryptophan would be beneficial for elderly surgical patients who are at higher risk of developing post-operative delirium. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Setting: Participants A total of 325 individuals aged 60 years and older undergoing major elective operations requiring a postoperative intensive care unit admission. Intervention L-tryptophan, 1 gram orally, three times daily or placebo was started following the operation and continued for up to three days postoperatively. Measurements Delirium and its motor subtypes were measured using the Confusion Assessment Method-ICU and the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale. The primary outcome for between groups comparison was the incidence of excitatory (mixed and hyperactive) postoperative delirium. The secondary outcomes for comparison were the incidence and duration of overall postoperative delirium. Results The overall incidence of postoperative delirium was 39% (116) (95% confidence interval 34% to 44%). The percentages of patients with excitatory delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups were 17% and 9% (p=0.176), and the duration of excitatory delirium was 3.3±1.7 and 3.1±1.9 days (p=0.741). The percentage of patients with overall delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups was 40% and 37% (p=0.597), and the duration of overall delirium was 2.9±1.8 and 2.4±1.6 days (p=0.167). Conclusion Postoperative tryptophan supplementation in older adults undergoing major elective operations requiring postoperative intensive care unit admission demonstrated no efficacy in reducing the incidence of postoperative excitatory delirium or overall delirium, and the duration of excitatory or overall delirium. PMID:25112175

  7. Community based intervention to optimize osteoporosis management: randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis-related fractures are a significant public health concern. Interventions that increase detection and treatment of osteoporosis are underutilized. This pragmatic randomised study was done to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted community-based care program aimed at optimizing evidence-based management in patients at risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Methods This was a 12-month randomized trial performed in Ontario, Canada. Eligible patients were community-dwelling, aged ≥55 years, and identified to be at risk for osteoporosis-related fractures. Two hundred and one patients were allocated to the intervention group or to usual care. Components of the intervention were directed towards primary care physicians and patients and included facilitated bone mineral density testing, patient education and patient-specific recommendations for osteoporosis treatment. The primary outcome was the implementation of appropriate osteoporosis management. Results 101 patients were allocated to intervention and 100 to control. Mean age of participants was 71.9 ± 7.2 years and 94% were women. Pharmacological treatment (alendronate, risedronate, or raloxifene) for osteoporosis was increased by 29% compared to usual care (56% [29/52] vs. 27% [16/60]; relative risk [RR] 2.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29 to 3.40). More individuals in the intervention group were taking calcium (54% [54/101] vs. 20% [20/100]; RR 2.67, 95% CI 1.74 to 4.12) and vitamin D (33% [33/101] vs. 20% [20/100]; RR 1.63, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.65). Conclusions A multi-faceted community-based intervention improved management of osteoporosis in high risk patients compared with usual care. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT00465387) PMID:20799973

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Storytelling as a Communication Tool

    PubMed Central

    Hartling, Lisa; Scott, Shannon D.; Johnson, David W.; Bishop, Ted; Klassen, Terry P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Stories may be an effective tool to communicate with patients because of their ability to engage the reader. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of story booklets compared to standard information sheets for parents of children attending the emergency department (ED) with a child with croup. Methods Parents were randomized to receive story booklets (n=208) or standard information sheets (n=205) during their ED visit. The primary outcome was change in anxiety between triage to ED discharge as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted at 1 and 3 days after discharge, then every other day until 9 days (or until resolution of symptoms), and at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included: expected future anxiety, event impact, parental knowledge, satisfaction, decision regret, healthcare utilization, time to symptom resolution. Results There was no significant difference in the primary outcome of change in parental anxiety between recruitment and ED discharge (change of 5 points for the story group vs. 6 points for the comparison group, p=0.78). The story group showed significantly greater decision regret regarding their decision to go to the ED (p<0.001): 6.7% of the story group vs. 1.5% of the comparison group strongly disagreed with the statement “I would go for the same choice if I had to do it over again”. The story group reported shorter time to resolution of symptoms (mean 3.7 days story group vs. 4.0 days comparison group, median 3 days both groups; log rank test, p=0.04). No other outcomes were different between study groups. Conclusions Stories about parent experiences managing a child with croup did not reduce parental anxiety. The story group showed significantly greater decision regret and quicker time to resolution of symptoms. Further research is needed to better understand whether stories can be effective in improving patient-important outcomes. Trial Registration Current Controlled

  9. Massage Therapy and Labor Outcomes: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Patricia; Shroff, Farah; Jaspar, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Massage is a time-honored method by which women have received comfort throughout the millennia, yet it has not been rigorously evaluated in the modern day delivery suite. No study to date that we are aware of has evaluated the effect of massage therapy by a regulated massage therapist on labor pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of massage therapy provided by registered massage therapists in managing pain among women in active labor. Methods BC Women’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Research Design: a randomized controlled trial. Participants: 77 healthy nulliparous women presenting in spontaneous labor. Intervention: Swedish massage administered for up to five hours by a registered massage therapist during labor vs. standard care. Main outcome measures include: cervical dilation at the time of administration of epidural, compared using estimated marginal means in an analysis of covariance. We also compared perception of pain at three time periods during labor according to cervical dilation at 3–4 cm, 5–7 cm, and 8–10 cm using the McGill Present Pain Intensity Scale. Results The mean cervical dilation at the time of epidural insertion after adjustment for station of the presenting part, cervical dilation, and status of membranes on admission to hospital was 5.9 cm (95% CI 5.2–6.7) compared to 4.9 in the control group (95% CI 4.2–5.8). Scores on the McGill Pain Scale were consistently lower in the massage therapy group (13.3 vs. 16.9 at 3–4 cm, 13.3 vs. 15.8 at 5–6 cm, and 19.4 vs. 28.3 at 7–8 cm), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Our findings from this pilot study suggest that massage therapy by a registered massage therapist has the potential to be an effective means of pain management that may be associated with delayed use of epidural analgesia. It may therefore have the potential to reduce exposure to epidural analgesia during labor and decrease rates of associated

  10. All optical mode controllable Er-doped random fiber laser with distributed Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W L; Ma, R; Tang, C H; Rao, Y J; Zeng, X P; Yang, Z J; Wang, Z N; Gong, Y; Wang, Y S

    2015-07-01

    An all-optical method to control the lasing modes of Er-doped random fiber lasers (RFLs) is proposed and demonstrated. In the RFL, an Er-doped fiber (EDF) recoded with randomly separated fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) is used as the gain medium and randomly distributed reflectors, as well as the controllable element. By combining random feedback of the FBG array and Fresnel feedback of a cleaved fiber end, multi-mode coherent random lasing is obtained with a threshold of 14 mW and power efficiency of 14.4%. Moreover, a laterally-injected control light is used to induce local gain perturbation, providing additional gain for certain random resonance modes. As a result, active mode selection of the RFL is realized by changing locations of the laser cavity that is exposed to the control light. PMID:26125397

  11. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. Conclusion The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  12. Gabapentin Treatment for Alcohol Dependence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Barbara J.; Quello, Susan; Goodell, Vivian; Shadan, Farhad; Kyle, Mark; Begovic, Adnan

    2013-01-01

    Importance Approved medications for alcohol dependence are prescribed for fewer than 9% of US alcoholics. Objective To determine if gabapentin, a widely-prescribed generic calcium channel/GABA modulating medication, increases rates of sustained abstinence and no heavy drinking, and decreases alcohol-related insomnia, dysphoria and craving, in a dose-dependent manner. Design, Participants and Setting A 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized dose-ranging trial of 150 men and women over 18 years of age with current alcohol dependence, conducted 2004–2010 at a single-site outpatient clinical research facility adjoining a general medical hospital. Interventions Oral gabapentin (0, 900, 1800 mg/d) and concomitant manual-guided counseling. Main Outcome Measures Rates of complete abstinence and no heavy drinking (co-primary) and changes in mood, sleep and craving (secondary) over the 12-week study. Results Gabapentin significantly improved the rates of abstinence and no heavy drinking. The abstinence rate was 4.1% (95% CI, 1.1 to 13.7) in the placebo group, 11.1% (95% CI, 5.2 to 22.2) in the 900 mg group, and 17.0% (95% CI, 8.9 to 30.1) in the 1800 mg group (p = 0.04 for linear dose effect, NNT = 8 for 1800 mg). The no heavy drinking rate was 22.5% (95% CI, 13.6 to 37.2) in the placebo group, 29.6% (95% CI, 19.1 to 42.8) in the 900 mg group, and 44.7% (95% CI, 31.4 to 58.8) in the 1800 mg group (p = 0.02 for linear dose effect, NNT = 5 for 1800 mg). Similar linear dose effects were obtained with measures of mood (F=7.37, df=2, p=0.001), sleep (F=136, df=2, p<0.001), and craving (F=3.56, df=2, p=0.029). There were no serious drug-related adverse events, and terminations from adverse-events (9 of 150 participants), time on study (9.1 [3.8] weeks) and rate of study completion (85 of 150 participants) did not differ between groups. Conclusions and Relevance Gabapentin (particularly the 1800 mg dosage) was effective in treating alcohol dependence and relapse

  13. Weight Control Intervention for Truck Drivers: The SHIFT Randomized Controlled Trial, United States

    PubMed Central

    Wipfli, Brad; Thompson, Sharon V.; Elliot, Diane L.; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Hammer, Leslie B.; Perrin, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of the Safety and Health Involvement For Truckers (SHIFT) intervention with a randomized controlled design. Methods. The multicomponent intervention was a weight-loss competition supported with body weight and behavioral self-monitoring, computer-based training, and motivational interviewing. We evaluated intervention effectiveness with a cluster-randomized design involving 22 terminals from 5 companies in the United States in 2012 to 2014. Companies were required to provide interstate transportation services and operate at least 2 larger terminals. We randomly assigned terminals to intervention or usual practice control conditions. We assessed participating drivers (n = 452) at baseline and 6 months. Results. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the postintervention difference between groups in mean body mass index change was 1.00 kilograms per meters squared (P < .001; intervention = −0.73; control = +0.27). Behavioral changes included statistically significant improvements in fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity. Conclusions. Results establish the effectiveness of a multicomponent and remotely administered intervention for producing significant weight loss among commercial truck drivers. PMID:27463067

  14. Physiologic Responsiveness Should Guide Entry into Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Goligher, Ewan C; Kavanagh, Brian P; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Ferguson, Niall D

    2015-12-15

    Most randomized trials in critical care report no mortality benefit; this may reflect competing pathogenic mechanisms, patient heterogeneity, or true ineffectiveness of interventions. We hypothesize that in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), randomizing only those patients who show a favorable physiological response to an intervention would help ensure that only those likely to benefit would be entered into the study. If true, this would decrease study "noise" and reduce required sample size, thereby increasing the chances of finding true-positive outcomes. It would also lessen the chances of exposing patients to treatments that are unlikely to help or that could cause harm. We present a reanalysis of randomized clinical trials of positive end-expiratory pressure in ARDS that support this hypothesis. PMID:25580530

  15. Key Items to Get Right When Conducting a Randomized Controlled Trial in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This is a checklist of key items to get right when conducting a randomized controlled trial to evaluate an educational program or practice ("intervention"). It is intended as a practical resource for researchers and sponsors of research, describing items that are often critical to the success of a randomized controlled trial. A significant…

  16. Outcomes from a School-Randomized Controlled Trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Eric C.; Low, Sabina; Smith, Brian H.; Haggerty, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program conducted in 33 California elementary schools. Schools were matched on school demographic characteristics and assigned randomly to intervention or waitlisted control conditions. Outcome measures were obtained from (a) all school…

  17. Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Treatment Trials for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Hunna J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a meta-analysis on randomized, controlled treatment trials of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Studies were included if they employed randomized, controlled methodology and treated young people (19 years or under) with OCD. A comprehensive literature search identified 13 RCTs containing 10…

  18. The Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese Families: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Sin, Tammy C. S.; Choi, Siu-yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Hong Kong Chinese families, using randomized controlled trial design. Methods: The participants included 111 Hong Kong Chinese parents with children aged 2--7 years old, who were randomized into the intervention group (n = 54) and control group (n…

  19. Intention-to-Treat Analysis in Partially Nested Randomized Controlled Trials with Real-World Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan David; Pane, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Demands for scientific knowledge of what works in educational policy and practice has driven interest in quantitative investigations of educational outcomes, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have proliferated under these conditions. In educational settings, even when individuals are randomized, both experimental and control students are…

  20. Efficacy of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach: Results from a 3-Year, Longitudinal Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Larsen, Ross A. A.; Baroody, Alison E.; Curby, Timothy W.; Ko, Michelle; Thomas, Julia B.; Merritt, Eileen G.; Abry, Tashia; DeCoster, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled field trial examined the efficacy of the Responsive Classroom (RC) approach on student achievement. Schools (n = 24) were randomized into intervention and control conditions; 2,904 children were studied from end of second to fifth grade. Students at schools assigned to the RC condition did not outperform students at…

  1. The Deckled Incision: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Sarah J; Ngo, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Background Scar visibility is multifactorial and skin closure technique is thought to play an important role. It is an established principle in plastic surgery that Z plasties generally reduce scar contracture by breaking up the lines of tension in a wound. As an extension of this principle, it is postulated that irregular “deckled” skin incisions made during tumor excision would produce aesthetically superior scars. Objective The primary objective of this study is to assess both the clinician and patient opinion of scar quality using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS). Secondary objectives include the proportion of scars judged as good by the both the patient and clinician (less than or equal to 5 on the overall PSOAS scale), the number of adverse events, and the proportion of the scar visible at 1 meter. Methods The deckling study will be a patient-blinded, simple randomized controlled trial (RCT) at a single center institution. The two groups will be equally allocated on a 1:1 ratio into the control and treatment arms. All patients greater than 18 years of age undergoing a plastic surgery procedure involving excision of skin lesions will be enrolled. Any patients requiring re-excision through the wound or undergoing injectable corticosteroid therapy will be excluded. A total of 500 patients will be enrolled. The patients will be followed-up at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months post-operatively. Results The study is expected to begin enrolment in August 2016. We anticipate that the deckling study group will have superior scar outcomes when compared to the straight line incision. From clinical experience this is especially true for lesions involving the face and in those areas of the skin that have undergone radiation therapy. The study will be funded by the Plastics and Reconstructive Surgery Department at St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Ethics approval has been obtained for the study. Conclusion: We believe this will be an

  2. Building Kindergartners' Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2012-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small-group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (n = 44 in each…

  3. The role of parental control and modelling in predicting a child's diet and relationship with food after they leave home. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Emma; Ogden, Jane

    2014-05-01

    Research indicates that parental control and parental modelling are key factors in shaping a child's eating behaviour. To date, however, little is known about how these factors influence a child's diet once they have left home. This prospective study evaluated the extent to which a parent's own behaviour and their use of control over food whilst their child was still living at home predicted their child's relationship with food once they had begun to live independently. Parent/child dyads (n=93) took part in the study. Parents completed baseline measures of parental control practices (overt control, covert control and pressure to eat), their own diet (unhealthy snacks, unhealthy meals, healthy foods) and eating behaviours (emotional, uncontrolled and restrained eating). At one year follow up, once their child had left home, the child completed measures of their own diet and eating behaviours. The results showed a clear role for modelling with concordance between a child's intake of unhealthy snacks and emotional eating and their parents' own reports of these behaviours. Furthermore, the child's intake of healthy foods was also predicted by their parent's behaviour although there was both concordance and discordance between parents and their children. No role for parental control was found for any measure of diet or eating behaviour. It is concluded that a parent's own behaviour rather than parental control has a stronger longer lasting influence once a child has left home and that although this mostly involves a child copying their parent's behaviour (action) at times it also involves the opposite (reaction). PMID:24480669

  4. Controlling Random Lasing with Three-Dimensional Plasmonic Nanorod Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoxian; Meng, Xiangeng; Choi, Seung Ho; Knitter, Sebastian; Kim, Young L; Cao, Hui; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2016-04-13

    Plasmonics has brought revolutionary advances to laser science by enabling deeply subwavelength nanolasers through surface plasmon amplification. However, the impact of plasmonics on other promising laser systems has so far remained elusive. Here, we present a class of random lasers enabled by three-dimensional plasmonic nanorod metamaterials. While dense metallic nanostructures are usually detrimental to laser performance due to absorption losses, here the lasing threshold keeps decreasing as the volume fraction of metal is increased up to ∼0.07. This is ∼460 times higher than the optimal volume fraction reported thus far. The laser supports spatially confined lasing modes and allows for efficient modulation of spectral profiles by simply tuning the polarization of the pump light. Full-field speckle-free imaging at micron-scales has been achieved by using plasmonic random lasers as the illumination sources. Our findings show that plasmonic metamaterials hold potential to enable intriguing coherent optical sources. PMID:27023052

  5. Evaluation of an evidence-based guidance on the reduction of physical restraints in nursing homes: a cluster-randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN34974819

    PubMed Central

    Haut, Antonie; Köpke, Sascha; Gerlach, Anja; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Haastert, Burkhard; Meyer, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Background Physical restraints are regularly applied in German nursing homes. Their frequency varies substantially between centres. Beneficial effects of physical restraints have not been proven, however, observational studies and case reports suggest various adverse effects. We developed an evidence-based guidance on this topic. The present study evaluates the clinical efficacy and safety of an intervention programme based on this guidance aimed to reduce physical restraints and minimise centre variations. Methods/Design Cluster-randomised controlled trial with nursing homes randomised either to the intervention group or to the control group with standard information. The intervention comprises a structured information programme for nursing staff, information materials for legal guardians and residents' relatives and a one-day training workshop for nominated nurses. A total of 36 nursing home clusters including approximately 3000 residents will be recruited. Each cluster has to fulfil the inclusion criteria of at least 20% prevalence of physical restraints at baseline. The primary endpoint is the number of residents with at least one physical restraint at six months. Secondary outcome measures are the number of falls and fall-related fractures. Discussion If successful, the intervention should be implemented throughout Germany. In case the intervention does not succeed, a three-month pre-post-study with an optimised intervention programme within the control group will follow the randomised trial. Trial registration ISRCTN34974819 PMID:19735564

  6. Interference control training for PTSD: A randomized controlled trial of a novel computer-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B; Lang, Ariel J

    2015-08-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic and debilitating condition characterized by persistent intrusive memories. Although effective treatments exist for PTSD, there is a need for development of alternative treatments. Diminished ability to control proactive interference may contribute to re-experiencing symptoms and may be a novel intervention target. The present study tested an intervention designed to modify proactive interference control clinicaltrials.gov identifier: (NCT02139137). Forty-two women with PTSD were randomly assigned to a computerized cognitive training or a control condition. The impact of these programs on cognitive performance and symptoms was assessed. PTSD re-experiencing symptoms and interference control performance improved significantly more for individuals in the training group relative to those in the control group. Other PTSD and general distress symptoms improved equally over time in both groups. Cognitive training of this type may hold promise as a novel intervention for reducing PTSD symptoms, although the mechanism of action and implications for models of PTSD requires future study. PMID:26114901

  7. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chloe E.; Robbins, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Art therapists have long held that art production causes reductions in stress and elevations in mood (Rubin, 1999). The authors examined this claim in a randomized, controlled trial. Fifty adults between the ages of 18 and 30 were randomly assigned to either create an art work or to view and sort a series of art prints. Three measures of overall…

  8. The Late Pretest Problem in Randomized Control Trials of Education Interventions. NCEE 2009-4033

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2008-01-01

    Pretest-posttest experimental designs are often used in randomized control trials (RCTs) in the education field to improve the precision of the estimated treatment effects. For logistic reasons, however, pretest data are often collected after random assignment, so that including them in the analysis could bias the posttest impact estimates. Thus,…

  9. The Late Pretest Problem in Randomized Control Trials of Education Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2010-01-01

    Pretest-posttest experimental designs often are used in randomized control trials (RCTs) in the education field to improve the precision of the estimated treatment effects. For logistic reasons, however, pretest data often are collected after random assignment, so that including them in the analysis could bias the posttest impact estimates. Thus,…

  10. What to Do when Data Are Missing in Group Randomized Controlled Trials. NCEE 2009-0049

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.; Olsen, Robert B.; Bell, Stephen H.; Price, Cristofer

    2009-01-01

    This NCEE Technical Methods report examines how to address the problem of missing data in the analysis of data in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) of educational interventions, with a particular focus on the common educational situation in which groups of students such as entire classrooms or schools are randomized. Missing outcome data are a…

  11. Brief Motivational Interventions for Heavy College Drinkers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Henson, James H.

    2006-01-01

    In this randomized controlled trial, the authors evaluated brief motivational interventions (BMIs) for at-risk college drinkers. Heavy drinking students (N = 509; 65% women, 35% men) were randomized into 1 of 6 intervention conditions formed by crossing the baseline Timeline Followback (TLFB) interview (present versus absent) and intervention type…

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Standardized Behavior Management Intervention for Students with Externalizing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Martin; Sundell, Knut; Morris, Richard J.; Karlberg, Martin; Melin, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the results from a Swedish randomized controlled trial of a standardized behavior management intervention. The intervention targeted students with externalizing behavior in a regular education setting. First- and second-grade students (N = 100) from 38 schools were randomly assigned to either the intervention or an active…

  13. Testing Links between Childhood Positive Peer Relations and Externalizing Outcomes through a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witvliet, Miranda; van Lier, Pol A. C.; Cuijpers, Pim; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors used a randomized controlled trial to explore the link between having positive peer relations and externalizing outcomes in 758 children followed from kindergarten to the end of 2nd grade. Children were randomly assigned to the Good Behavior Game (GBG), a universal classroom-based preventive intervention, or a control…

  14. Maternal Dietary Counseling Reduces Consumption of Energy-Dense Foods among Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitolo, Marcia Regina; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bo; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a dietary counseling in reducing the intake of energy-dense foods by infants. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting and Participants: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. Mothers and infants of a low-income-group population were randomized into intervention (n = 163) and received dietary counseling during 10 home…

  15. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Preventive Intervention for Perinatal Depression in High-Risk Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral (CBT) intervention to prevent perinatal depression in high-risk Latinas. Method: A sample of 217 participants, predominantly low-income Central American immigrants who met demographic and depression risk criteria, were randomized into usual…

  16. A Parent-Adolescent Intervention to Increase Sexual Risk Communication: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarruel, Antonia M.; Cherry, Carol Loveland; Cabriales, Esther Gallegos; Ronis, David L.; Zhou, Yan

    2008-01-01

    This article reports results of a randomized controlled trial designed to test an intervention to increase parent-adolescent sexual risk communication among Mexican parents. Data were analyzed from parents (n = 791) randomly assigned to an HIV risk reduction or health promotion intervention. Measures were administered at pretest, posttest, and 6-…

  17. After-School Multifamily Groups: A Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Low-Income, Urban, Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Lynn; Moberg, D. Paul; Brown, Roger; Rodriguez-Espiricueta, Ismael; Flores, Nydia I.; Burke, Melissa P.; Coover, Gail

    2006-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated a culturally representative parent engagement strategy with Latino parents of elementary school children. Ten urban schools serving low-income children from mixed cultural backgrounds participated in a large study. Classrooms were randomly assigned either either to an after-school, multifamily support…

  18. Testing a Violence-Prevention Intervention for Incarcerated Women Using a Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott; Kim, Woo Jong; Fedock, Gina; Bybee, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Beyond Violence (BV), a new prevention program for women with assaultive offenses, demonstrated feasibility in previous studies. This study's purpose is to assess the efficacy of BV using a randomized control trial. Method: Eligible women were randomly assigned to treatment as usual (TAU) and the experimental condition (BV). Measures of…

  19. Evaluating the Collaborative Strategic Reading Intervention: An Overview of Randomized Controlled Trial Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, John H.; Kurki, Anja; Wilkins, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph; Gersten, Russell

    2009-01-01

    When attempting to determine if an intervention has a causal impact, the "gold standard" of program evaluation is the randomized controlled trial (RCT). In education studies random assignment is rarely feasible at the student level, making RCTs harder to conduct. School-level assignment is more common but this often requires considerable resources…

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Brief Interventions for Body Dissatisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Tracey; George, Wing Man; Atkinson, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relative effectiveness of 3 different approaches to the experience of body dissatisfaction compared to a control and ruminative attention control condition, with respect to increasing weight and appearance satisfaction. One hundred female undergraduates (mean age = 24.38, SD = 9.39) underwent a body dissatisfaction…

  1. Effects of the FITKids Randomized Controlled Trial on Executive Control and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Castelli, Darla M.; Khan, Naiman A.; Raine, Lauren B.; Scudder, Mark R.; Drollette, Eric S.; Moore, Robert D.; Wu, Chien-Ting; Kamijo, Keita

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a physical activity (PA) intervention on brain and behavioral indices of executive control in preadolescent children. METHODS: Two hundred twenty-one children (7–9 years) were randomly assigned to a 9-month afterschool PA program or a wait-list control. In addition to changes in fitness (maximal oxygen consumption), electrical activity in the brain (P3-ERP) and behavioral measures (accuracy, reaction time) of executive control were collected by using tasks that modulated attentional inhibition and cognitive flexibility. RESULTS: Fitness improved more among intervention participants from pretest to posttest compared with the wait-list control (1.3 mL/kg per minute, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3 to 2.4; d = 0.34 for group difference in pre-to-post change score). Intervention participants exhibited greater improvements from pretest to posttest in inhibition (3.2%, 95% CI: 0.0 to 6.5; d = 0.27) and cognitive flexibility (4.8%, 95% CI: 1.1 to 8.4; d = 0.35 for group difference in pre-to-post change score) compared with control. Only the intervention group increased attentional resources from pretest to posttest during tasks requiring increased inhibition (1.4 µV, 95% CI: 0.3 to 2.6; d = 0.34) and cognitive flexibility (1.5 µV, 95% CI: 0.6 to 2.5; d = 0.43). Finally, improvements in brain function on the inhibition task (r = 0.22) and performance on the flexibility task correlated with intervention attendance (r = 0.24). CONCLUSIONS: The intervention enhanced cognitive performance and brain function during tasks requiring greater executive control. These findings demonstrate a causal effect of a PA program on executive control, and provide support for PA for improving childhood cognition and brain health. PMID:25266425

  2. Ethical Considerations for Conducting a Randomized Controlled Trial in Transport

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Andrew P.; Daly, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Although recent studies support the rapid transfer of patients experiencing time-sensitive emergencies, limited data exist to support the use of air transport for non-urgent patient transfers. The nature of medical transport and the heterogeneity of patients who are transferred present unique challenges in designing and conducting clinical research trials that could contribute to the evidence-based decision-making for patient care and transport. The current regulatory framework presents several barriers to conducting such research in the medical transport setting. We present a hypothetical study that randomizes patients to either ground or air transport as an exemplar. We discuss informed consent, risk, and the impracticality of conducting community consultations in a medical transport setting. Finally, recommendations for potential changes to current regulations are presented. These are directed at facilitating the conduct of emergency research through a system of oversight that integrates characteristics of quality improvement and health services research. PMID:25441519

  3. Randomized controlled trials for Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Teresi, Giulio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The continuous increase in elderly and oldest-old population, and subsequent rise in prevalence of chronic neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), are a major challenge for healthcare systems. These two conditions are the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in older persons and physicians should engage treatment for these patients. In this field, Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) specifically focused on elderly populations are still lacking. The aim of this study was to identify RCTs conducted among AD and PD and to examine the difference between mean age of enrollment and incidence of these two neurodegenerative diseases. We found that the scenario is different between PD and AD. In particular, the enrollment for PD trials seems to include younger persons than AD, although the incidence of both diseases is similar and highest after 80 years old. The consequence of these results could influence conclusive guidelines of treatment in older parkinsonian patients. PMID:27100346

  4. Complementary feeding: a Global Network cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inadequate and inappropriate complementary feeding are major factors contributing to excess morbidity and mortality in young children in low resource settings. Animal source foods in particular are cited as essential to achieve micronutrient requirements. The efficacy of the recommendation for regular meat consumption, however, has not been systematically evaluated. Methods/Design A cluster randomized efficacy trial was designed to test the hypothesis that 12 months of daily intake of beef added as a complementary food would result in greater linear growth velocity than a micronutrient fortified equi-caloric rice-soy cereal supplement. The study is being conducted in 4 sites of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research located in Guatemala, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Zambia in communities with toddler stunting rates of at least 20%. Five clusters per country were randomized to each of the food arms, with 30 infants in each cluster. The daily meat or cereal supplement was delivered to the home by community coordinators, starting when the infants were 6 months of age and continuing through 18 months. All participating mothers received nutrition education messages to enhance complementary feeding practices delivered by study coordinators and through posters at the local health center. Outcome measures, obtained at 6, 9, 12, and 18 months by a separate assessment team, included anthropometry; dietary variety and diversity scores; biomarkers of iron, zinc and Vitamin B12 status (18 months); neurocognitive development (12 and 18 months); and incidence of infectious morbidity throughout the trial. The trial was supervised by a trial steering committee, and an independent data monitoring committee provided oversight for the safety and conduct of the trial. Discussion Findings from this trial will test the efficacy of daily intake of meat commencing at age 6 months and, if beneficial, will provide a strong rationale

  5. Individual and contextual determinants of resident-on-resident abuse in nursing homes: a random sample telephone survey of adults with an older family member in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Schiamberg, Lawrence B; von Heydrich, Levente; Chee, Grace; Post, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Few empirical investigations of elder abuse in nursing homes address the frequency and determinants of resident-on-resident abuse (RRA). A random sample of 452 adults with an older adult relative, ≥65 years of age, in a nursing home completed a telephone survey regarding elder abuse experienced by that elder family member. Using a Linear Structural Relations (LISREL) modeling design, the study examined the association of nursing home resident demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender), health and behavioral characteristics (e.g., diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease, Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), types of staff abuse (e.g., physical, emotional), and factors beyond the immediate nursing home setting (e.g., emotional closeness of resident with family members) with RRA. Mplus statistical software was used for structural equation modeling. Main findings indicated that resident-on-resident mistreatment of elderly nursing home residents is associated with the age of the nursing home resident, all forms of staff abuse, all ADLs and IADLs, and emotional closeness of the older adult to the family. PMID:26026215

  6. Brief cognitive therapy for panic disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Clark, D M; Salkovskis, P M; Hackmann, A; Wells, A; Ludgate, J; Gelder, M

    1999-08-01

    Cognitive therapy (CT) is a specific and highly effective treatment for panic disorder (PD). Treatment normally involves 12-15 1-hr sessions. In an attempt to produce a more cost-effective version, a briefer treatment that made extensive use of between-sessions patient self-study modules was created. Forty-three PD patients were randomly allocated to full CT (FCT), brief CT (BCT), or a 3-month wait list. FCT and BCT were superior to wait list on all measures, and the gains obtained in treatment were maintained at 12-month follow-up. There were no significant differences between FCT and BCT. Both treatments had large (approximately 3.0) and essentially identical effect sizes. BCT required 6.5 hr of therapist time, including booster sessions. Patients' initial expectation of therapy success was negatively correlated with posttreatment panic-anxiety. Cognitive measures at the end of treatment predicted panic-anxiety at 12-month follow-up. PMID:10450630

  7. Deterministic quasi-random nanostructures for photon control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Emiliano R.; Li, Juntao; Liu, Yikun; Depauw, Valérie; Chen, Zhanxu; Zhou, Jianying; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2013-10-01

    Controlling the flux of photons is crucial in many areas of science and technology. Artificial materials with nano-scale modulation of the refractive index, such as photonic crystals, are able to exercise such control and have opened exciting new possibilities for light manipulation. An interesting alternative to such periodic structures is the class of materials known as quasi-crystals, which offer unique advantages such as richer Fourier spectra. Here we introduce a novel approach for designing such richer Fourier spectra, by using a periodic structure that allows us to control its Fourier components almost at will. Our approach is based on binary gratings, which makes the structures easy to replicate and to tailor towards specific applications. As an example, we show how these structures can be employed to achieve highly efficient broad-band light trapping in thin films that approach the theoretical (Lambertian) limit, a problem of crucial importance for photovoltaics.

  8. CoCo trial: Color-coded blood pressure Control, a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, Corinne; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Del Prete, Valerio; Steurer-Stey, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background Inadequate blood pressure (BP) control is a frequent challenge in general practice. The objective of this study was to determine whether a color-coded BP booklet using a traffic light scheme (red, >180 mmHg systolic BP and/or >110 mmHg diastolic BP; yellow, >140–180 mmHg systolic BP or >90–110 mmHg diastolic BP; green, ≤140 mmHg systolic BP and ≤90 mmHg diastolic BP) improves BP control and adherence with home BP measurement. Methods In this two-group, randomized controlled trial, general practitioners recruited adult patients with a BP >140 mmHg systolic and/or >90 mmHg diastolic. Patients in the control group received a standard BP booklet and the intervention group used a color-coded booklet for daily home BP measurement. The main outcomes were changes in BP, BP control (treatment goal <140/90 mmHg), and adherence with home BP measurement after 6 months. Results One hundred and twenty-one of 137 included patients qualified for analysis. After 6 months, a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic BP was achieved in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups (16.1/7.9 mmHg in the intervention group versus 13.1/8.6 mmHg in the control group, P=0.3/0.7). BP control (treatment target <140/90 mmHg) was achieved significantly more often in the intervention group (43% versus 25%; P=0.037; number needed to treat of 5). Adherence with home BP measurement overall was high, with a trend in favor of the intervention group (98.6% versus 96.2%; P=0.1) Conclusion Color-coded BP self-monitoring significantly improved BP control (number needed to treat of 5, meaning that every fifth patient utilizing color-coded self-monitoring achieved better BP control after 6 months), but no significant between-group difference was observed in BP change. A markedly higher percentage of patients achieved BP values in the normal range. This simple, inexpensive approach of color-coded BP self-monitoring is user-friendly and applicable in primary care

  9. Stochastic Control for a Class of Random Evolution Models

    SciTech Connect

    Hongler, Max-Olivier Soner, Halil Mete Streit, Ludwig

    2004-03-15

    We construct the explicit connection existing between a solvable model of the discrete velocities non-linear Boltzmann equation and the Hamilton-Bellman-Jacobi equation associated with a simple optimal control of a piecewise deterministic process. This study extends the known relation that exists between the Burgers equation and a simple controlled diffusion problem. In both cases the resulting partial differential equations can be linearized via a logarithmic transformation and hence offer the possibility to solve physically relevant non-linear field models in full generality.

  10. Behavior Therapy for Pediatric Trichotillomania: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Martin E.; Edson, Aubrey L.; Ledley, Deborah A.; Cahill, Shawn P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy and durability of a behavioral therapy (BT) protocol for pediatric TTM compared with a minimal attention control (MAC) condition. It was hypothesized that the BT condition would be superior to MAC at the end of acute treatment, and would also demonstrate durability of gains through the maintenance treatment…

  11. Does Playworks Work? Findings from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James-Burdumy, Susanne; Bleeker, Martha; Beyler, Nicholas; London, Rebecca A.; Westrich, Lisa; Stokes-Guinan, Katie; Castrechini, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Most school principals believe recess has a positive impact on the development of students' social skills and academic achievement. Research also suggests that physical activity and play during recess may be linked to improvements in both academic and prosocial behaviors (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2010). Recess, however, has been…

  12. Surface segregation of fluorinated moieties on random copolymer films controlled by random-coil conformation of polymer chains in solution.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dongwu; Wang, Xinping; Ni, Huagang; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Gi

    2009-02-17

    The relationship between solution properties, film-forming methods, and the solid surface structures of random copolymers composed of butyl methacrylate and dodecafluorheptyl methylacrylate (DFHMA) was investigated by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy, and surface tension measurements. The results, based on thermodynamic considerations, demonstrated that the random copolymer chain conformation at the solution/air interface greatly affected the surface structure of the resulting film, thereby determining the surface segregation of fluorinated moieties on films obtained by various film-forming techniques. When the fluorinated monomer content of the copolymer solution was low, entropic forces dominated the interfacial structure, with the perfluoroalkyl groups unable to migrate to the solution/air interface and thus becoming buried in a random-coil chain conformation. When employing this copolymer solution for film preparation by spin-coating, the copolymer chains in solution were likely extended due to centrifugal forces, thereby weakening the entropy effect of the polymer chains. Consequently, this resulted in the segregation of the fluorinated moieties on the film surface. For the films prepared by casting, the perfluoroalkyl groups were, similar to those in solution, incapable of segregating at the film surface and were thus buried in the random-coil chains. When the copolymers contained a high content of DFHMA, the migration of perfluoroalkyl groups at the solution/air interface was controlled by enthalpic forces, and the perfluoroalkyl groups segregated at the surface of the film regardless of the film-forming technique. The aim of the present work was to obtain an enhanced understanding of the formation mechanism of the chemical structure on the surface of the polymer film, while demonstrating that film-forming methods may be used in practice to promote the segregation of fluorinated

  13. Pelvic Static Magnetic Stimulation to Control Urinary Incontinence in Older Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Marianne C.; Davies, Elizabeth A.; Thalib, Lukman; Griffiths, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the efficacy of non-invasive static magnetic stimulation (SMS) of the pelvic floor compared to placebo in the treatment of women aged 60 years and over with urinary incontinence for 6 months or more. Subjects and Methods A single-blinded randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. Subjects were excluded if they had an implanted electronic device, had experienced a symptomatic urinary tract infection, or had commenced pharmacotherapy for the same in the previous 4 weeks, or if they were booked for pelvic floor or gynecological surgery within the next 3 months. Once written consent was obtained, subjects were randomly assigned to the active SMS group (n=50) or the placebo group (n=51). Treatment was an undergarment incorporating 15 static magnets of 800–1200 Gauss anterior, posterior, and inferior to the pelvis for at least 12 hours a day for 3 months. Placebo was the same protocol with inert metal disks replacing the magnets. Primary outcome measure was cessation of incontinence as measured by a 24-hour pad test. Secondary outcomes were frequency and severity of symptoms as measured by the Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms questionnaire (BFLUTS-SF), the Incontinence Severity Index, a Bothersomeness Visual Analog scale, and a 24-hour bladder diary. Data were collected at baseline and 12 weeks later. Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups in any of the outcome measures from baseline to 12 weeks. Initial evidence of subjective improvement in the treatment group compared to the placebo group was not sustained with sensitivity analysis. Conclusion This study found no evidence that static magnets cure or decrease the symptoms of urinary incontinence. Additional work into the basic physics of the product and garment design is recommended prior to further clinical trials research. PMID:21817123

  14. The quality of control groups in non-randomized studies published in Journal of Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shepard P.; Malay, Sunitha; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate control group selection in non-randomized studies published in the Journal of Hand Surgery American (JHS). Methods We reviewed all papers published in JHS in 2013 to identify studies that used non-randomized control groups. Data collected included type of study design and control group characteristics. We then appraised studies to determine if authors discussed confounding and selection bias and how they controlled for confounding. Results Thirty-seven non-randomized studies were published in JHS in 2013. The source of control was either the same institution as the study group, a different institution, a database, or not provided in the manuscript. Twenty-nine (78%) studies statistically compared key characteristics between control and study group. Confounding was controlled with matching, exclusion criteria, or regression analysis. Twenty-two (59%) papers explicitly discussed the threat of confounding and 18(49%) identified sources of selection bias. Conclusions In our review of non-randomized studies published in JHS, papers had well-defined controls that were similar to the study group, allowing for reasonable comparisons. However, we identified substantial confounding and bias that were not addressed as explicit limitations, which might lead the reader to overestimate the scientific validity of the data. Clinical relevance Incorporating a brief discussion of control group selection in scientific manuscripts should help readers interpret the study more appropriately. Authors, reviewers, and editors should strive to address this component of clinical importance. PMID:25447000

  15. Biases in Estimating Treatment Effects Due to Attrition in Randomized Controlled Trials and Cluster Randomized Controlled Trials: A Simulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Nianbo; Lipsey, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Attrition occurs when study participants who were assigned to the treatment and control conditions do not provide outcome data and thus do not contribute to the estimation of the treatment effects. It is very common in experimental studies in education as illustrated, for instance, in a meta-analysis studying "the effects of attrition on baseline…

  16. Distributed reservation control protocols for random access broadcasting channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, E. P.; Ephremides, A.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to a communication network consisting of an arbitrary number of nodes which can communicate with each other via a time-division multiple access (TDMA) broadcast channel. The reported investigation is concerned with the development of efficient distributed multiple access protocols for traffic consisting primarily of single packet messages in a datagram mode of operation. The motivation for the design of the protocols came from the consideration of efficient multiple access utilization of moderate to high bandwidth (4-40 Mbit/s capacity) communication satellite channels used for the transmission of short (1000-10,000 bits) fixed length packets. Under these circumstances, the ratio of roundtrip propagation time to packet transmission time is between 100 to 10,000. It is shown how a TDMA channel can be adaptively shared by datagram traffic and constant bandwidth users such as in digital voice applications. The distributed reservation control protocols described are a hybrid between contention and reservation protocols.

  17. Caudal epidural steroid injection: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Murakibhavi, V. G.; Khemka, Aditya G.

    2011-01-01

    Study design: Prospective study. Study rationale: A recurrent phenomenon, the lifetime prevalence of low back pain has been reported as 54%–80%, while annual prevalence ranges from 15%–45%.1 It is also associated with enormous economic, societal, and health impact.2 India, being a developing country, has its problem compounded by the occupational compulsions in parts of the rural areas.3 For some interventional therapies, like epidural steroid injections, utilization rates have increased dramatically.4,5,6,7,8,9 They have become one of the most commonly performed interventions in the United States for low back pain with radiculopathy.10 Clinical question: Multiple systematic reviews,11 a meta-analysis,12 several guidelines,13 health technology assessments by insurers, and local medical review policies and coverage decisions have been published. However, controversy continues regarding the effectiveness of epidural steroid injections. In addition three types of epidurals, namely interlaminar, transforaminal, and caudal, with variable results complicate the picture for practice of interventional pain management. The underlying mechanism of action of epidurally administered steroid and local anesthetic injections is still not well understood and compounds the problem.14 Objective: To evaluate and update the effects of caudal epidural injection in the management of chronic low back pain and sciatica. Final Class of evidence-treatment Yes Study design:  RCT •  Cohort  Case control  Case series Methods  Concealed allocation (RCT) •  Intention to treat (RCT) •  Blinded/independent evaluation of primary outcome •  F/U ≥ 85% •  Adequate sample size • Control for confounding Overall class of evidence II The definiton of the different classes of evidence is available here. PMID:23230402

  18. Do children with cerebral palsy benefit from computerized working memory training? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in childhood (2 to 3 per 1000 live births), and is frequently accompanied by cognitive impairments and behavioural problems. Children with CP are at increased risk of attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity (Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)) including working memory deficits. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate if cognitive training may improve working memory in children with CP. Methods/Designs The study is an investigator-blinded, randomized controlled trial with a stepped-wedge design that will include 115 schoolchildren with CP. Eligible for participation are children with CP, aged 7 to 15 years, who are able to follow instructions and handle a computer mouse. Exclusion criteria are the presence of photosensitive epilepsy, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level V (most severe CP) (Phys Ther 80: 974-985, 2000) and severe visual or hearing impairments. Following assessment of eligibility and baseline cognitive assessment the participants will be randomized to either cognitive working memory training or treatment-as-usual (‘control group’). The intervention is a computer-based working memory training program consisting of 25 daily sessions to be performed over a 5 to 6-week period at home. A neuropsychological assessment will be performed before and 4 to 6 weeks after completed training. When the latter assessment has been completed in the intervention group, the ‘control group’ will start on the same training program. Both groups will meet for a final neuropsychological assessment six months after completed training by an examiner unaware of group adherence. Discussion There is limited evidence for the effect of most interventions in children with CP, and evidence is completely lacking for interventions aiming to improve deficits in cognition, learning and behaviour. The proposed multicenter study

  19. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE TRAINING TO IMPROVE GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN OLDER ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE-To determine the efficacy of high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) on glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-We performed a 16-week randomized controlled trial in 62 Latino older adults (40 women and 22 men; mean +/- SE age 66 +/...

  20. Effects of a Worksite Weight-Control Programme in Obese Male Workers: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iriyama, Yae; Murayama, Nobuko

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a randomized controlled crossover trial to evaluate the effects of a new worksite weight-control programme designed for men with or at risk of obesity using a combination of nutrition education and nutrition environmental interventions. Subjects and methods: Male workers with or at risk of obesity were recruited for this…

  1. Effects of zinc supplementation on subscales of anorexia in children: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Khademian, Majid; Farhangpajouh, Neda; Shahsanaee, Armindokht; Bahreynian, Maryam; Mirshamsi, Mehran; Kelishadi, Roya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to assess the effects of zinc supplementation on improving the appetite and its subscales in children. Methods: This study was conducted in 2013 in Isfahan, Iran. It had two phases. At the first step, after validation of the Child Eating Behaviour Questionaire (CEBQ), it was completed for 300 preschool children, who were randomly selected. The second phase was conducted as a randomized controlled trial. Eighty of these children were randomly selected, and were randomly assigned to two groups of equal number receiving zinc (10 mg/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. Results: Overall 77 children completed the trial (39 in the case and 3 in the control group).The results showed that zinc supplement can improve calorie intake in children by affecting some CEBQ subscales like Emotional over Eating and Food Responsible. Conclusion: Zinc supplementation had positive impact in promoting the calorie intake and some subscales of anorexia. PMID:25674110

  2. Randomized Control Trial of a CBT Trauma Recovery Program in Palestinian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ian G.; Abdallah, Ghassan; Smith, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The current study aimed to assess the Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT) trauma recovery program within the context of ongoing violence. Utilizing a randomized controlled trial, 11-14-year-old students in Nablus, Palestine, were allocated by class to intervention or wait-list control conditions. Standardized measures assessed trauma exposure,…

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Hanen's "More than Words" in Toddlers with Early Autism Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Alice S.; Messinger, Daniel S.; Stone, Wendy L.; Celimli, Seniz; Nahmias, Allison S.; Yoder, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: This randomized controlled trial compared Hanen's "More than Words" (HMTW), a parent-implemented intervention, to a "business as usual" control group. Methods: Sixty-two children (51 boys and 11 girls; M age = 20 months; SD = 2.6) who met criteria for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their parents participated in the study. The HMTW…

  4. A Compound Herbal Preparation (CHP) in the Treatment of Children with ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, M.; Adar Levine, A.; Kol-Degani, H.; Kav-Venaki, L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the efficacy of a patented, compound herbal preparation (CHP) in improving attention, cognition, and impulse control in children with ADHD. Method: Design: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Setting: University-affiliated tertiary medical center. Participants: 120 children newly diagnosed with ADHD,…

  5. Parent Training for Young Children with Developmental Disabilities: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Laura Lee

    2008-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate a parent training intervention for caregivers with preschool-age children with developmental disabilities. The 21 families in the experimental group received usual care plus the 12-week Incredible Years Parent Training Program with developmental delay modifications. Families in the control group…

  6. Randomized Trial of Anger Control Training for Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome and Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhdolsky, Denis G.; Vitulano, Lawrence A.; Carroll, Deirdre H.; McGuire, Joseph; Leckman, James F.; Scahill, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A randomized trial to examine the efficacy of anger control training for treating adolescents with Tourette's syndrome and disruptive behavior reveals that those administered with the anger control training showed a decrease in their Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale score by 52 percent as compared with a decrease of 11 percent in the treatment as…

  7. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  8. Neural network based adaptive control of nonlinear plants using random search optimization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a method for utilizing artificial neural networks for direct adaptive control of dynamic systems with poorly known dynamics. The neural network weights (controller gains) are adapted in real time using state measurements and a random search optimization algorithm. The results are demonstrated via simulation using two highly nonlinear systems.

  9. Strength and Agility Training in Adolescents with Down Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hsiu-Ching; Wuang, Yee-Pay

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a proposed strength and agility training program of adolescents with Down syndrome. Ninety-two adolescents were recruited and evenly randomized to two intervention groups (exercise group vs. control group). The mean age for the exercise and the control group was 10.6 plus or minus 3.2 and…

  10. Promoting Early Intervention Referral through a Randomized Controlled Home-Visiting Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Donald F.; O'Sullivan, Ann L.; Guinn, Judith; Mautone, Jennifer A.; Carlson, Elyse C.; Zhao, Huaqing; Zhang, Xuemei; Esposito, Tara L.; Askew, Megan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn

    2012-01-01

    The MOM Program is a randomized, controlled trial of an intervention to promote mothers' care for the health and development of their children, including accessing early intervention (EI) services. Study aims were to determine whether, relative to controls, this intervention increased receipt of and referral to EI services. Mothers (N = 302)…

  11. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sandhaus, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a condition caused by the inheritance of two mutated SERPINA1 gene alleles. Individuals with AATD are at increased risk of injury to the liver and lungs. The pulmonary manifestations include precocious onset of pulmonary emphysema and bronchiectasis. For nearly three decades, treatment has been available to individuals with emphysema caused by AATD, but this therapy-augmentation of plasma and tissue alpha-1 antitrypsin levels by intravenous administration of human plasma-derived protein-was approved by regulatory authorities based on its biochemical efficacy. This therapy appears to slow the progression of emphysema in patients with AATD. The medical, patient, and regulatory communities have sought assurance that this expensive therapy provides measurable clinical benefit. Documenting such benefit has been difficult because of the slow progression of the underlying lung disease in AATD, the rarity of this genetic condition, and the lack of direct quantitative measurements of emphysema progression. Over the past decade, quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry of the lungs has been found to correlate with severity and progression of emphysema. The recent publication of a well-powered, masked, placebo-controlled study using CT densitometry to evaluate the effectiveness of augmentation therapy at slowing the progression of emphysema has provided some assurance of the clinical efficacy of this therapy. PMID:27564674

  12. 78 FR 63479 - Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials (RCTs) for the Evaluation of Risk To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials (RCTs... scientific approaches for the conduct and assessment of meta-analyses of randomized controlled clinical... others from the general public, about the use of meta-analyses of randomized trials as a tool for...

  13. Effect of Probiotics on Glycemic Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Chen, Fangyao; Chen, Rongping; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous clinical trials indicate that probiotic consumption may improve blood glucose control, however, results from randomized trials on glycemic control have been inconsistent. Objective To investigate the effects of probiotics on glycemic control in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Data Sources PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrial.gov through October 2014. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2). Results Seventeen randomized controlled trials were included, in which 17 fasting blood glucose (n = 1105), 11 fasting plasma insulin (n = 788), 8 homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (n = 635) comparisons were reported. Probiotic consumption, compared with placebo, significantly reduced fasting glucose (MD = -0.31 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.56, 0.06; p = 0.02), fasting plasma insulin (MD = -1.29 μU/mL; 95% CI -2.17, -0.41; p = 0.004), and HOMA-IR (MD = 0.48; 95% CI -0.83, -0.13; p = 0.007). Conclusions Probiotic consumption may improve glycemic control modestly. Modification of gut microbiota by probiotic supplementation may be a method for preventing and control hyperglycemia in clinical practice. PMID:26161741

  14. Analysis of random drop for gateway congestion control. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashem, Emam Salaheddin

    1989-01-01

    Lately, the growing demand on the Internet has prompted the need for more effective congestion control policies. Currently No Gateway Policy is used to relieve and signal congestion, which leads to unfair service to the individual users and a degradation of overall network performance. Network simulation was used to illustrate the character of Internet congestion and its causes. A newly proposed gateway congestion control policy, called Random Drop, was considered as a promising solution to the pressing problem. Random Drop relieves resource congestion upon buffer overflow by choosing a random packet from the service queue to be dropped. The random choice should result in a drop distribution proportional to the bandwidth distribution among all contending TCP connections, thus applying the necessary fairness. Nonetheless, the simulation experiments demonstrate several shortcomings with this policy. Because Random Drop is a congestion control policy, which is not applied until congestion has already occurred, it usually results in a high drop rate that hurts too many connections including well-behaved ones. Even though the number of packets dropped is different from one connection to another depending on the buffer utilization upon overflow, the TCP recovery overhead is high enough to neutralize these differences, causing unfair congestion penalties. Besides, the drop distribution itself is an inaccurate representation of the average bandwidth distribution, missing much important information about the bandwidth utilization between buffer overflow events. A modification of Random Drop to do congestion avoidance by applying the policy early was also proposed. Early Random Drop has the advantage of avoiding the high drop rate of buffer overflow. The early application of the policy removes the pressure of congestion relief and allows more accurate signaling of congestion. To be used effectively, algorithms for the dynamic adjustment of the parameters of Early Random Drop

  15. Microcomputer-controlled high-power low-frequency random-signal generator

    SciTech Connect

    Baishusin, B.M.; Galin, I.A.; Galishnikov, Y.P.; Voznyi, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    This paper describes a generator of high-power low-frequency random signals that is controlled by a microcomputer and realizes polygaussian expansions. The generator provides random as well as determined periodic or single signals of any shape with a power of up to 25 kW at frequencies of 0-200 Hz. A schematic diagram of the interface is shown. It consists of an Elektronika D3-28 microcomputer, an interface, a control-pulse generator, a thyristor switch unit, and a parallel voltage divider.

  16. Joint Random Access and Power Control Game in Ad Hoc Networks with Noncooperative Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chengnian; Guan, Xinping

    We consider a distributed joint random access and power control scheme for interference management in wireless ad hoc networks. To derive decentralized solutions that do not require any cooperation among the users, we formulate this problem as non-cooperative joint random access and power control game, in which each user minimizes its average transmission cost with a given rate constraint. Using supermodular game theory, the existence and uniqueness of Nash equilibrium are established. Furthermore, we present an asynchronous distributed algorithm to compute the solution of the game based on myopic best response updates, which converges to Nash equilibrium globally.

  17. Digital servo control of random sound test excitation. [in reverberant acoustic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A digital servocontrol system for random noise excitation of a test object in a reverberant acoustic chamber employs a plurality of sensors spaced in the sound field to produce signals in separate channels which are decorrelated and averaged. The average signal is divided into a plurality of adjacent frequency bands cyclically sampled by a time division multiplex system, converted into digital form, and compared to a predetermined spectrum value stored in digital form. The results of the comparisons are used to control a time-shared up-down counter to develop gain control signals for the respective frequency bands in the spectrum of random sound energy picked up by the microphones.

  18. A cluster-randomized trial of insecticide-treated curtains for dengue vector control in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Audrey; Trongtokit, Yuwadee; Alexander, Neal; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Satimai, Wichai; Vanlerberghe, Veerle; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; McCall, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of insecticide-treated window curtains (ITCs) for dengue vector control was evaluated in Thailand in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. A total of 2,037 houses in 26 clusters was randomized to receive the intervention or act as control (no treatment). Entomological surveys measured Aedes infestations (Breteau index, house index, container index, and pupae per person index) and oviposition indices (mean numbers of eggs laid in oviposition traps) immediately before and after intervention, and at 3-month intervals over 12 months. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in entomological indices between intervention and control clusters, although oviposition indices were lower (P < 0.01) in ITC clusters during the wet season. It is possible that the open housing structures in the study reduced the likelihood of mosquitoes making contact with ITCs. ITCs deployed in a region where this house design is common may be unsuitable for dengue vector control. PMID:23166195

  19. A Cluster-Randomized Trial of Insecticide-Treated Curtains for Dengue Vector Control in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Audrey; Trongtokit, Yuwadee; Alexander, Neal; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Satimai, Wichai; Vanlerberghe, Veerle; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; McCall, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of insecticide-treated window curtains (ITCs) for dengue vector control was evaluated in Thailand in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. A total of 2,037 houses in 26 clusters was randomized to receive the intervention or act as control (no treatment). Entomological surveys measured Aedes infestations (Breteau index, house index, container index, and pupae per person index) and oviposition indices (mean numbers of eggs laid in oviposition traps) immediately before and after intervention, and at 3-month intervals over 12 months. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in entomological indices between intervention and control clusters, although oviposition indices were lower (P < 0.01) in ITC clusters during the wet season. It is possible that the open housing structures in the study reduced the likelihood of mosquitoes making contact with ITCs. ITCs deployed in a region where this house design is common may be unsuitable for dengue vector control. PMID:23166195

  20. Universal polarization terahertz phase controllers using randomly aligned liquid crystal cells with graphene electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    We present a universal polarization terahertz (THz) phase controller using a randomly aligned liquid crystal (LC) cell with graphene electrodes. The LC cell was fabricated using a nematic LC and two quartz substrates that were coated with a monolayer of graphene as the transparent electrode. The LC in the cell was prepared without any alignment treatments and was randomly aligned. The size of the random domains and the width of the disclination lines in the LC layer were several tens of microns. These textures disappeared when an alternating voltage was applied to the LC through the graphene layers. Using a THz time domain spectroscopic technique, we investigated the complex transmittance of the LC cell. The LC cell was highly transparent in the THz frequency range, and there was little change in the transmittance with the applied voltage. This indicated that the scattering loss originating in the randomly aligned LC molecules was small for the THz waves. We also demonstrated that the THz phase shift could be controlled by the applied voltage. The amplitude of the phase shift was explained by the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices of the LC. These LC cells with graphene electrodes can be used to realize universal polarization THz phase controllers because of the random alignment. PMID:25831380

  1. Use of Kampo Diagnosis in Randomized Controlled Trials of Kampo Products in Japan: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Motoo, Yoshiharu; Arai, Ichiro; Tsutani, Kiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Background The Committee for Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) of the Japan Society for Oriental Medicine started compiling Evidence Reports of Kampo Treatment (EKAT) in 2007. EKAT is a compilation of structured abstracts of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), along with comments by a third party reviewer. As of 31 December, 2012, there were 378 RCTs of Kampo medicines in Japan. The primary research question of this study is “How frequently is Kampo diagnosis used in RCTs of Kampo medicines?” The secondary research question is “When is Kampo diagnosis used in RCTs?” Materials and Methods The structured abstract (SA) of each RCT article was reviewed to examine how Kampo diagnosis was used in RCTs, especially how Kampo diagnosis was used in the randomization process. Results Kampo diagnosis was used before randomization in 27 RCTs (7.1%), after randomization in 31 RCTs (8.2%), and not used in 320 RCTs (84.7%). Before randomization, Kampo diagnosis was used as a criterion for inclusion in 10 RCTs, criterion for exclusion in 9 RCTs, and criteria for both inclusion and exclusion in 2 RCTs. Kampo formulas were determined according to Kampo diagnosis in 7 RCTs. After randomization, subgroup analyses according to Kampo diagnosis were done in 27 RCTs, and grade of disease severity at Kampo diagnosis was used for analysis as an endpoint in 4 RCTs. Conclusions Kampo diagnosis was used before randomization only in approximately 15% of RCTs, and the number of RCT articles using Kampo diagnosis after randomization was almost the same as that before randomization. Further studies to determine the good RCTs conforming to CONSORT requirements and good systematic reviews conforming to PRISMA requirements are needed to clarify the significance of Kampo diagnosis. PMID:25119187

  2. PDE-based random-valued impulse noise removal based on new class of controlling functions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Tang, Chen

    2011-09-01

    This paper is concerned with partial differential equation (PDE)-based image denoising for random-valued impulse noise. We introduce the notion of ENI (the abbreviation for "edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels") that denotes the number of homogeneous pixels in a local neighborhood and is significantly different for edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels. We redefine the controlling speed function and the controlling fidelity function to depend on ENI. According to our two controlling functions, the diffusion and fidelity process at edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels can be selectively carried out. Furthermore, a class of second-order improved and edge-preserving PDE denoising models is proposed based on the two new controlling functions in order to deal with random-valued impulse noise reliably. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed PDEs via application to five standard test images, corrupted by random-valued impulse noise with various noise levels and comparison with the related second-order PDE models and the other special filtering methods for random-valued impulse noise. Our two controlling functions are extended to automatically other PDE models. PMID:21435980

  3. Sham Acupressure Controls Used in Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review and Critique

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jing-Yu; Suen, Lorna K. P.; Wang, Tao; Molassiotis, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the commonly utilized sham acupressure procedures in existing acupressure trials, and to assess whether different types of sham interventions yield different therapeutic outcomes, and, as far as possible, to identify directions for the future development of an adequate sham acupressure method. Methods Randomized controlled trials comparing true acupressure with sham interventions were included. Thirteen electronic databases were adopted to locate relevant studies from inception to July 3, 2014. Meanwhile, eight Chinese journals on complementary and alternative medicine were manually searched to locate eligible articles. In addition, eligible studies listed in the reference lists of the included papers and other related systematic reviews on acupressure were also screened to further search any potentially eligible trials. Methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated using the risk of bias assessment tool developed by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Descriptive analysis was adopted to summarize the therapeutic outcomes. Results Sixty-six studies with 7265 participants were included. Methodological quality of the included trials was generally satisfactory. Six types of sham acupressure approaches were identified and “non-acupoint” stimulation was the most frequently utilized sham point while an acupressure device was the most commonly used approach for administering sham treatments. Acupressure therapy was a beneficial approach in managing a variety of health problems and the therapeutic effect was found to be more effective in the true acupressure groups than that in the sham comparative groups. No clear association could be identified between different sham acupressure modalities and the reported treatment outcomes. Conclusions A great diversity of sham acupressure controls have been used in clinical practice and research. A solid conclusion whether different sham alternatives are related to different treatment outcomes

  4. Research Methods in Healthcare Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Stewardship: Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Deverick J; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCT) produce the strongest level of clinical evidence when comparing interventions. RCTs are technically difficult, costly, and require specific considerations including the use of patient- and cluster-level randomization and outcome selection. In this methods paper, we focus on key considerations for RCT methods in healthcare epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship (HE&AS) research, including the need for cluster randomization, conduct at multiple sites, behavior modification interventions, and difficulty with identifying appropriate outcomes. We review key RCTs in HE&AS with a focus on advantages and disadvantages of methods used. A checklist is provided to aid in the development of RCTs in HE&AS. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:629-634. PMID:27108848

  5. Acupuncture as a treatment for functional dyspepsia: design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Tian, Xiao-ping; Li, Ying; Liang, Fan-rong; Yu, Shu-guang; Liu, Xu-guang; Tang, Yong; Yang, Xu-guang; Yan, Jie; Sun, Guo-jie; Chang, Xiao-rong; Zhang, Hong-xing; Ma, Ting-ting; Yu, Shu-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is widely used in China to treat functional dyspepsia (FD). However, its effectiveness in the treatment of FD, and whether FD-specific acupoints exist, are controversial. So this study aims to determine if acupuncture is an effective treatment for FD and if acupoint specificity exists according to traditional acupuncture meridians and acupoint theories. Design This multicenter randomized controlled trial will include four acupoint treatment groups, one non-acupoint control group and one drug (positive control) group. The four acupoint treatment groups will focus on: (1) specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; (2) non-specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; (3) specific acupoints of alarm and transport points; and (4) acupoints of the gallbladder meridian. These four groups of acupoints are thought to differ in terms of clinical efficacy, according to traditional acupuncture meridians and acupoint theories. A total of 120 FD patients will be included in each group. Each patient will receive 20 sessions of acupuncture treatment over 4 weeks. The trial will be conducted in eight hospitals located in three centers of China. The primary outcomes in this trial will include differences in Nepean Dyspepsia Index scores and differences in the Symptom Index of Dyspepsia before randomization, 2 weeks and 4 weeks after randomization, and 1 month and 3 months after completing treatment. Discussion The important features of this trial include the randomization procedures (controlled by a central randomization system), a standardized protocol of acupuncture manipulation, and the fact that this is the first multicenter randomized trial of FD and acupuncture to be performed in China. The results of this trial will determine whether acupuncture is an effective treatment for FD and whether using different acupoints or different meridians leads to differences in clinical efficacy. Trial registration number Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT00599677

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Koru: A Mindfulness Program for College Students and Other Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeson, Jeffrey M.; Juberg, Michael K.; Maytan, Margaret; James, Kiera; Rogers, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Koru, a mindfulness training program for college students and other emerging adults. Participants: Ninety students (66% female, 62% white, 71% graduate students) participated between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Methods: Randomized controlled trial. It was hypothesized that Koru, compared with a wait-list…

  7. Thinking outside the Randomized Controlled Trials Experimental Box: Strategies for Enhancing Credibility and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2013-01-01

    Some evaluators employ randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the gold standard of evidence-based practice (EBP). Critics of RCT designs argue that RCTs do not include the complexity of program participants' experiences or clinical expertise, and couple this with criticisms that it is difficult to transfer RCT findings from the laboratory to…

  8. Searching for Control: Priming Randomness Increases the Evaluation of Ritual Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legare, Cristine H.; Souza, André L.

    2014-01-01

    Reestablishing feelings of control after experiencing uncertainty has long been considered a fundamental motive for human behavior. We propose that rituals (i.e., socially stipulated, causally opaque practices) provide a means for coping with the aversive feelings associated with randomness due to the perception of a connection between ritual…

  9. Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial Examining Intelligent Tutoring of Structure Strategy for Fifth-Grade Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijekumar, Kausalai; Meyer, Bonnie J. F.; Lei, Pui-Wa; Lin, Yu-Chu; Johnson, Lori A.; Spielvogel, James A.; Shurmatz, Kathryn M.; Ray, Melissa; Cook, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a large scale randomized controlled trial to study the efficacy of a web-based intelligent tutoring system for the structure strategy designed to improve content area reading comprehension. The research was conducted with 128 fifth-grade classrooms within 12 school districts in rural and suburban settings. Classrooms within…

  10. An Empirical Comparison of Randomized Control Trials and Regression Discontinuity Estimations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera-Osorio, Felipe; Filmer, Deon; McIntyre, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and regression discontinuity (RD) studies both provide estimates of causal effects. A major difference between the two is that RD only estimates local average treatment effects (LATE) near the cutoff point of the forcing variable. This has been cited as a drawback to RD designs (Cook & Wong, 2008).…

  11. Training Anxious Children to Disengage Attention from Threat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Haim, Yair; Morag, Inbar; Glickman, Shlomit

    2011-01-01

    Background: Threat-related attention biases have been implicated in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. As a result, attention bias modification (ABM) protocols have been employed as treatments for anxious adults. However, they have yet to emerge for children. A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted to…

  12. Interpretation Training in Individuals with Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nader; Taylor, Charles T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of a multisession computerized interpretation modification program (IMP) in the treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD). Method: The sample comprised 49 individuals meeting diagnostic criteria for GSAD who were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial comparing IMP (n = 23)…

  13. 77 FR 26789 - Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... violation of section 337 in the infringement of certain patents. 73 FR 75131. The principal respondent was... order. 75 FR 44989-90 (July 30, 2010). The Commission also issued cease and desist orders against those... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers...

  14. Digestive Enzyme Supplementation for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munasinghe, Sujeeva A.; Oliff, Carolyn; Finn, Judith; Wray, John A.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effects of a digestive enzyme supplement in improving expressive language, behaviour and other symptoms in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial using crossover design over 6 months for 43 children, aged 3-8 years. Outcome measurement tools included monthly Global Behaviour Rating…

  15. Determinants of glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with T2DM to date. We examined estimates of insulin sensitivit...

  16. Mixed Results from Six Large Randomized Controlled Trials of Learning Communities in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Alexander K.; Weiss, Michael J.; Visher, Mary G.; Sommo, Colleen; Rudd, Timothy; Cullinan, Dan; Weissman, Evan; Wathington, Heather D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents research that explores similarities and differences across six randomized controlled trials of learning communities in community colleges that were conducted by MDRC and the National Center for Postsecondary Research. Five of these studies track students' progress in the program semester and two follow-up semesters, and one…

  17. Randomized, Controlled Trial of a Comprehensive Program for Young Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Helen E.; Falco, Ruth A.; Hanita, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, controlled trial, comparing the Comprehensive Autism Program (CAP) and business as usual programs, studied outcomes for 3-5 year old students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included 84 teachers and 302 students with ASD and their parents. CAP utilized specialized curricula and training components to implement…

  18. Vestibular Stimulation for ADHD: Randomized Controlled Trial of Comprehensive Motion Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David L.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Crowl, Lindsay; Bozzolo, Hernan; Peruggia, Mario; Ramadan, Yaser; Bornstein, Robert; Hollway, Jill A.; Thompson, Susan; Malone, Krista; Hall, Kristy L.; Shelton, Sara B.; Bozzolo, Dawn R.; Cook, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This research evaluates effects of vestibular stimulation by Comprehensive Motion Apparatus (CMA) in ADHD. Method: Children ages 6 to 12 (48 boys, 5 girls) with ADHD were randomized to thrice-weekly 30-min treatments for 12 weeks with CMA, stimulating otoliths and semicircular canals, or a single-blind control of equal duration and…

  19. Learning Mathematics in a Visuospatial Format: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Mental Abacus Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barner, David; Alvarez, George; Sullivan, Jessica; Brooks, Neon; Srinivasan, Mahesh; Frank, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Mental abacus (MA) is a technique of performing fast, accurate arithmetic using a mental image of an abacus; experts exhibit astonishing calculation abilities. Over 3 years, 204 elementary school students (age range at outset: 5-7 years old) participated in a randomized, controlled trial to test whether MA expertise (a) can be acquired in standard…

  20. Cancer Screening Knowledge Changes: Results from a Randomized Control Trial of Women with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Susan L.; Rose, Roderick A.; Luken, Karen; Swaine, Jamie G.; O'Hare, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    Background: Women with developmental disabilities are much less likely than nondisabled women to receive cervical and breast cancer screening according to clinical guidelines. One barrier to receipt of screenings is a lack of knowledge about preventive screenings. Method: To address this barrier, we used a randomized control trial (n = 175 women)…

  1. Factors Influencing Hand Washing Behaviour in Primary Schools: Process Evaluation within a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chittleborough, Catherine R.; Nicholson, Alexandra L.; Basker, Elaine; Bell, Sarah; Campbell, Rona

    2012-01-01

    This article explores factors that may influence hand washing behaviour among pupils and staff in primary schools. A qualitative process evaluation within a cluster randomized controlled trial included pupil focus groups (n = 16, aged 6-11 years), semi-structured interviews (n = 16 teachers) and observations of hand washing facilities (n = 57).…

  2. Fit 5 Kids TV reduction program for Latino preschoolers: A cluster randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing Latino preschoolers' TV viewing is needed to reduce their risk of obesity and other chronic diseases. This study's objective was to evaluate the Fit 5 Kids (F5K) TV reduction program's impact on Latino preschooler's TV viewing. The study design was a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT...

  3. Working Memory Training in Young Children with ADHD: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dongen-Boomsma, Martine; Vollebregt, Madelon A.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Until now, working memory training has not reached sufficient evidence as effective treatment for ADHD core symptoms in children with ADHD; for young children with ADHD, no studies are available. To this end, a triple-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was designed to assess the efficacy of Cogmed Working Memory Training…

  4. Randomized Controlled Trial: Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skill Intervention for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Ollendick, Thomas; Albano, Anne Marie; Oswald, Donald; Johnson, Cynthia; Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; Kim, Inyoung; Scahill, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is common among adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and may amplify the core social disability, thus necessitating combined treatment approaches. This pilot, randomized controlled trial evaluated the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of the Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skills Intervention (MASSI) program in a sample of 30…

  5. Escitalopram in the Treatment of Adolescent Depression: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Multisite Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emslie, Graham J.; Ventura, Daniel; Korotzer, Andrew; Tourkodimitris, Stavros

    2009-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that involves 312 male and female patients aged 12-17 reveal the effectiveness of escitalopram in the treatment of depressed adolescents. Eighty-three percent of the participants or 259 participants completed the 8 weeks therapy period.

  6. Service Learning in Medical and Nursing Training: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, A. Y. M.; Chan, S. S. C.; Kwan, C. W.; Cheung, M. K. T.; Leung, S. S. K.; Fong, D. Y. T.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the long term effect of a service learning project on medical and nursing students' knowledge in aging and their attitudes toward older adults. A total of 124 students were recruited and then randomized to intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). A pre-and-post-intervention design measured students'…

  7. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  8. A Randomized Control Study of Responsive Teaching with Young Turkish Children and Their Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaaslan, Ozcan; Diken, Ibrahim H.; Mahoney, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    A randomized control study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of responsive teaching (RT) with a sample of 19 Turkish preschool-age children with disabilities and their mothers over a 6-months period. RT is an early intervention curriculum that attempts to promote children's development by encouraging parents to engage in highly…

  9. Lower extremity power training in elderly subjects with moderate mobility limitations: A randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty-seven community-dwelling older adults were randomized to either high-velocity high-power training (POW), slow-velocity progressive resistance training (STR) or a control group of lower extremity stretching (CON). Training was performed three times per week for 12 weeks and subjects completed t...

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of Video Self-Modeling Following Speech Restructuring Treatment for Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cream, Angela; O'Brian, Sue; Jones, Mark; Block, Susan; Harrison, Elisabeth; Lincoln, Michelle; Hewat, Sally; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross; Onslow, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated the efficacy of video self-modeling (VSM) following speech restructuring treatment to improve the maintenance of treatment effects. Method: The design was an open-plan, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants were 89 adults and adolescents who undertook intensive speech…

  11. Cycling Versus Continuous Mode In Neuromodulator Programming: A Crossover, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Beer, Gwendolyn M; Gurule, Margaret M; Komesu, Yuko M; Qualls, Clifford R; Rogers, Rebecca G

    2016-01-01

    This is a randomized, controlled, blind, crossover trial comparing cycling versus continuous programming of a sacral neuromodulator in women diagnosed with overactive bladder (OAB). At 6 months, treatment order significantly affected Overactive Bladder Questionnaire - Short Form (OABq-SF) symptom scores. The cycling followed by continuous stimulation group had superior OABq-SF scores (p > 0.02). PMID:27501593

  12. Mainstreaming Remedial Mathematics Students in Introductory Statistics: Results Using a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Alexandra W.; Watanabe-Rose, Mari

    2014-01-01

    This study used a randomized controlled trial to determine whether students, assessed by their community colleges as needing an elementary algebra (remedial) mathematics course, could instead succeed at least as well in a college-level, credit-bearing introductory statistics course with extra support (a weekly workshop). Researchers randomly…

  13. Attachment-Based Family Therapy for Adolescents with Suicidal Ideation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Guy S.; Wintersteen, Matthew B.; Brown, Gregory K.; Diamond, Gary M.; Gallop, Robert; Shelef, Karni; Levy, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is more effective than Enhanced Usual Care (EUC) for reducing suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms in adolescents. Method: This was a randomized controlled trial of suicidal adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17, identified in primary care and emergency departments. Of…

  14. Randomized Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial of a Telehealth Treatment for Chronic Stuttering: The Camperdown Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Block, Susan; Jones, Mark; Packman, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although there are treatments that can alleviate stuttering in adults for clinically significant periods, in Australia there are barriers to the accessibility and availability of best-practice treatment. Aims: This parallel group, non-inferiority randomized controlled trial with multiple blinded outcome assessments investigated whether…

  15. Theory of Mind Training in Children with Autism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeer, Sander; Gevers, Carolien; Clifford, Pamela; Verhoeve, Manja; Kat, Kirstin; Hoddenbach, Elske; Boer, Frits

    2011-01-01

    Many children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) participate in social skills or Theory of Mind (ToM) treatments. However, few studies have shown evidence for their effectiveness. The current study used a randomized controlled design to test the effectiveness of a 16-week ToM treatment in 8-13 year old children with ASD and normal IQs (n = 40).…

  16. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Stephen; Bertoglio, Kiah; Ashwood, Paul; Bostrom, Alan; Hendren, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial to determine the feasibility and initial safety and efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids (1.3 g/day) for the treatment of hyperactivity in 27 children ages 3-8 with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). After 12 weeks, hyperactivity, as measured by the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, improved 2.7 (plus or minus…

  17. The Effectiveness of Healthy Start Home Visit Program: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study reported the effectiveness of a home visit program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, using cluster randomized controlled trial design. Method: Participants included 191 parents and their children from 24 preschools, with 84 dyads (12 preschools) in the intervention group and 107 dyads (12 preschools) in…

  18. Learning What Works in ITS from Non-Traditional Randomized Controlled Trial Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardos, Zachary A.; Dailey, Matthew D.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2011-01-01

    The well established, gold standard approach to finding out what works in education research is to run a randomized controlled trial (RCT) using a standard pre-test and post-test design. RCTs have been used in the intelligent tutoring community for decades to determine which questions and tutorial feedback work best. Practically speaking, however,…

  19. Randomized Controlled Caregiver Mediated Joint Engagement Intervention for Toddlers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasari, Connie; Gulsrud, Amanda C.; Wong, Connie; Kwon, Susan; Locke, Jill

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if a joint attention intervention would result in greater joint engagement between caregivers and toddlers with autism. The intervention consisted of 24 caregiver-mediated sessions with follow-up 1 year later. Compared to caregivers and toddlers randomized to the waitlist control group the immediate treatment (IT)…

  20. Benefits and Harms of Sick Leave: Lack of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelsson, Inge; Marnetoft, Sven-Uno

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to try to identify those randomized controlled trials that compare sick leave with no sick leave or a different duration or degree of sick leave. A comprehensive, systematic, electronic search of Clinical Evidence, the Cochrane Library and PubMed, and a manual search of the Campbell Library and a journal supplement was…

  1. Installing the Communities that Care Prevention System: Implementation Progress and Fidelity in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinby, Rose K.; Hanson, Koren; Brooke-Weiss, Blair; Arthur, Michael W.; Hawkins, J. David; Fagan, Abigail A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the degree to which high fidelity implementation of the Communities That Care (CTC) prevention operating system was reached during the first 18 months of intervention in 12 communities in the Community Youth Development Study, a 5-year group randomized controlled trial designed to test the efficacy of the CTC system. CTC…

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of the Focus Parent Training for Toddlers with Autism: 1-Year Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterling, Iris; Visser, Janne; Swinkels, Sophie; Rommelse, Nanda; Donders, Rogier; Woudenberg, Tim; Roos, Sascha; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Buitelaar, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial compared results obtained after 12 months of nonintensive parent training plus care-as-usual and care-as-usual alone. The training focused on stimulating joint attention and language skills and was based on the intervention described by Drew et al. (Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatr 11:266-272, 2002). Seventy-five…

  3. Ice Hockey Players Using a Weighted Implement when Training on the Ice: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Timothy W.; Tvoric, Bojan; Walker, Bruce; Noonan, Dom; Sibla, Janeene

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for improving hockey players' performance using a weighted implement on the ice. Forty-eight players were tested using a grip strength dynamometer. They also were assessed on their abilities to stick-handle. The participants were randomly placed into a control or research group. The…

  4. Computerized Training of Working Memory in Children with ADHD-A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingberg, Torkel; Fernell, Elisabeth; Olesen, Pernille J.; Johnson, Mats; Gustafsson, Per; Dahlstrom, Kerstin; Gillberg, Christopher G.; Forssberg, Hans; Westerberg, Helena

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Deficits in executive functioning, including working memory (WM) deficits, have been suggested to be important in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). During 2002 to 2003, the authors conducted a multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial to investigate the effect of improving WM by computerized, systematic…

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial of Transdermal Secretin on Behavior of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff-Schaub, Karen; Carey, Tracy; Reeves, Gretchen; Rogers, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Previous trials of secretin for the treatment of autism have utilized a single or double dose administered intravenously. This is a report of a double-blind, randomized, controlled crossover trial of transdermally applied secretin in 15 children diagnosed with autism or pervasive developmental delay. Secretin or placebo was applied daily, in…

  6. Aquatic Physical Therapy for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Susan; McIntyre, Auburn; Plummer, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic therapy is an intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) that has not been investigated formally. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial to investigate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an aquatic therapy program to improve motor skills of children with DCD. Thirteen children (mean age 7…

  7. Melatonin Treatment in Individuals with Intellectual Disability and Chronic Insomnia: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braam, W.; Didden, R.; Smits, M.; Curfs, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: While several small-number or open-label studies suggest that melatonin improves sleep in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) with chronic sleep disturbance, a larger randomized control trial is necessary to validate these promising results. Methods: The effectiveness of melatonin for the treatment of chronic sleep…

  8. Teaching Third Graders about Real-Life Mathematical Problem Solving: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Finelli, Robin; Courey, Susan J.; Hamlett, Carol L.; Sones, Estelle M.; Hope, Susan K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of schema-broadening instruction (SBI), with and without explicit instruction in strategies for tackling the complexities involved in real-life (RL) math problems, on the math problem solving of third-grade students. Teachers (n = 30) were assigned randomly to 3 16-week conditions: control, SBI,…

  9. The Efficiency and Efficacy of Equivalence-Based Learning: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinn, Tracy E.; Newland, M. Christopher; Ritchie, Katie E.

    2015-01-01

    Because it employs an emergent-learning framework, equivalence-based instruction (EBI) is said to be highly efficient, but its presumed benefits must be compared quantitatively with alternative techniques. In a randomized controlled trial, 61 college students attempted to learn 32 pairs of proprietary and generic drug names using computer-based…

  10. Randomized, Controlled Trial to Examine the Impact of Providing Yogurt to Women Enrolled in WIC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Ellen B.; Ritchie, Lorrene D.; Walker, Brent H.; Gildengorin, Ginny; Crawford, Patricia B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Examine the impact of providing yogurt to women enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Design: Randomized, controlled intervention trial. Setting: Two California WIC local agency sites. Participants: 511 pregnant, breast-feeding, or postpartum women. Intervention: Substitution of…

  11. Effectiveness of a Parent Training Program in (Pre)Adolescence: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leijten, Patty; Overbeek, Geertjan; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of the parent training program Parents and Children Talking Together (PCTT) for parents with children in the preadolescent period who experience parenting difficulties. The program is focused on reducing child problem behavior by improving parents' communication and problem solving…

  12. Treatment Preferences Affect the Therapeutic Alliance: Implications for Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iacoviello, Brian M.; McCarthy, Kevin Scott; Barrett, Marna S.; Rynn, Moira; Gallop, Robert; Barber, Jacques P.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of treatment preferences on the development of the therapeutic alliance was investigated. Seventy-five patients were followed while participating in a randomized controlled trial comparing supportive-expressive psychotherapy with sertraline or pill placebo in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Therapeutic alliance was…

  13. Methylprednisolone in the management of spinal cord injuries: Lessons from randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Vincent; Hoshide, Reid; Bansal, Vishal; Kasper, Ekkehard; Chen, Clark C.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of glucocorticoid for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries remains a controversial topic. Differing medical societies have issued conflicting recommendations in this regard. Here we review the available randomized, controlled trial (RCT) data on this subject and offer a synthesis of these data sets. PMID:26392918

  14. EEG Neurofeedback for ADHD: Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Randomized Pilot Feasibility Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Lofthouse, Nicholas; Hersch, Sarah; Pan, Xueliang; Hurt, Elizabeth; Bates, Bethany; Kassouf, Kathleen; Moone, Stacey; Grantier, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Preparing for a definitive randomized clinical trial (RCT) of neurofeedback (NF) for ADHD, this pilot trial explored feasibility of a double-blind, sham-controlled design and adherence/palatability/relative effect of two versus three treatments/week. Method: Unmedicated 6- to 12-year-olds with "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  15. Group Lidcombe Program Treatment for Early Stuttering: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnott, Simone; Onslow, Mark; O'Brian, Sue; Packman, Ann; Jones, Mark; Block, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study adds to the Lidcombe Program evidence base by comparing individual and group treatment of preschoolers who stutter. Method: A randomized controlled trial of 54 preschoolers was designed to establish whether group delivery outcomes were not inferior to the individual model. The group arm used a rolling group model, in which a…

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Behavioral Economic Supplement to Brief Motivational Interventions for College Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James G.; Dennhardt, Ashley A.; Skidmore, Jessica R.; Borsari, Brian; Barnett, Nancy P.; Colby, Suzanne M.; Martens, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Behavioral economic theory suggests that a reduction in substance use is most likely when there is an increase in rewarding substance-free activities. The goal of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the incremental efficacy of a novel behavioral economic supplement (Substance-Free Activity Session [SFAS]) to a…

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial Study of the ABRACADABRA Reading Intervention Program in Grade 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Robert S.; Abrami, Philip; Hipps, Geoffrey; Deault, Louise

    2009-01-01

    This study reports a randomized controlled trial evaluation of a computer-based balanced literacy intervention, ABRACADABRA (http://grover.concordia.ca/abra/version1/abracadabra.html). Children (N = 144) in Grade 1 were exposed either to computer activities for word analysis, text comprehension, and fluency, alongside shared stories (experimental…

  18. Reconsidering Findings of "No Effects" in Randomized Control Trials: Modeling Differences in Treatment Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Bradford

    2016-01-01

    The primary technique that many researchers use to analyze data from randomized control trials (RCTs)--detecting the average treatment effect (ATE)--imposes assumptions upon the data that often are not correct. Both theory and past research suggest that treatments may have significant impacts on subgroups even when showing no overall effect.…

  19. Covariate Adjustment Strategy Increases Power in the Randomized Controlled Trial With Discrete-Time Survival Endpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safarkhani, Maryam; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, a decision needs to be made about the total number of subjects for adequate statistical power. One way to increase the power of a trial is by including a predictive covariate in the model. In this article, the effects of various covariate adjustment strategies on increasing the power is studied for discrete-time…

  20. Using Small-Scale Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate the Efficacy of New Curricular Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drits-Esser, Dina; Bass, Kristin M.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2014-01-01

    How can researchers in K-12 contexts stay true to the principles of rigorous evaluation designs within the constraints of classroom settings and limited funding? This paper explores this question by presenting a small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the efficacy of curricular supplemental materials on epigenetics. The…

  1. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of a School-Based Depression Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merry, Sally; McDowell, Heather; Wild, Chris J.; Bir, Julliet; Cunliffe, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a placebo-controlled study of the effectiveness of a universal school-based depression prevention program. Method: Three hundred ninety-two students age 13 to 15 from two schools were randomized to intervention (RAP-Kiwi) and placebo programs run by teachers. RAP-Kiwi was an 11-session manual-based program derived from…

  2. Computer-Assisted Learning in Elementary Reading: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Lisa Cassidy; Styers, Mary Koenig; Wilkerson, Stephanie Baird; Peery, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of Accelerated Reader, a computer-based learning program, at improving student reading. Accelerated Reader is a progress-monitoring, assessment, and practice tool that supports classroom instruction and guides independent reading. Researchers used a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the program with 344…

  3. Nasal Oxytocin for Social Deficits in Childhood Autism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadds, Mark R.; MacDonald, Elayne; Cauchi, Avril; Williams, Katrina; Levy, Florence; Brennan, John

    2014-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a surge in research investigating the application of oxytocin as a method of enhancing social behaviour in humans. Preliminary evidence suggests oxytocin may have potential as an intervention for autism. We evaluated a 5-day "live-in" intervention using a double-blind randomized control trial. 38 male…

  4. Attention Training in Individuals with Generalized Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nader; Beard, Courtney; Taylor, Charles T.; Klumpp, Heide; Elias, Jason; Burns, Michelle; Chen, Xi

    2009-01-01

    The authors conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to examine the efficacy of an attention training procedure in reducing symptoms of social anxiety in 44 individuals diagnosed with generalized social phobia (GSP). Attention training comprised a probe detection task in which pictures of faces with either a threatening or…

  5. Fluoxetine, Smoking, and History of Major Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Bonnie; Doran, Neal; Pagoto, Sherry; McChargue, Dennis; Cook, Jessica Werth; Bailey, Katherine; Crayton, John; Hedeker, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The study was a randomized placebo-controlled trial testing whether fluoxetine selectively enhances cessation for smokers with a history of depression. Euthymic smokers with (H+, n = 109) or without (H-, n = 138) a history of major depression received 60 mg fluoxetine or placebo plus group behavioral quit-smoking treatment for 12 weeks. Fluoxetine…

  6. Laser acupuncture for adolescent smokers--a randomized double-blind controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yiming, C; Changxin, Z; Ung, W S; Lei, Z; Kean, L S

    2000-01-01

    A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of laser acupuncture treatment in adolescent smokers. Three hundred and thirty adolescent smokers at the Smoking Cessation Clinic of Child Guidance Clinic, Institute of Health, Singapore, were randomly assigned in equal numbers to laser acupuncture treatment and sham acupuncture (control) groups. The proportions of patients with complete smoking cessation after completing treatment for four weeks were 21.9% in the treatment group and 21.4% in the control group. At three months post-treatment, the rates for complete cessation were 24.8% and 26.2%, respectively. Thus, there was no significant difference in the rates of smoking cessation in the treatment and control groups. PMID:11154059

  7. Best (but oft-forgotten) practices: designing, analyzing, and reporting cluster randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew W; Li, Peng; Bohan Brown, Michelle M; Kaiser, Kathryn A; Keith, Scott W; Oakes, J Michael; Allison, David B

    2015-08-01

    Cluster randomized controlled trials (cRCTs; also known as group randomized trials and community-randomized trials) are multilevel experiments in which units that are randomly assigned to experimental conditions are sets of grouped individuals, whereas outcomes are recorded at the individual level. In human cRCTs, clusters that are randomly assigned are typically families, classrooms, schools, worksites, or counties. With growing interest in community-based, public health, and policy interventions to reduce obesity or improve nutrition, the use of cRCTs has increased. Errors in the design, analysis, and interpretation of cRCTs are unfortunately all too common. This situation seems to stem in part from investigator confusion about how the unit of randomization affects causal inferences and the statistical procedures required for the valid estimation and testing of effects. In this article, we provide a brief introduction and overview of the importance of cRCTs and highlight and explain important considerations for the design, analysis, and reporting of cRCTs by using published examples. PMID:26016864

  8. Randomized controlled trials in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Police, Rachel L; Trask, Peter C; Wang, Jianmin; Olivares, Robert; Khan, Shahnaz; Abbe, Adeline; Colosia, Ann; Njue, Annete; Sherril, Beth; Ruiz-Soto, Rodrigo; Kaye, James A; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    This systematic literature review evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of interventions used in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Primary efficacy outcomes were objective response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival. Safety endpoints were grade 3/4 toxicities, serious adverse events and withdrawals or deaths due to toxicity. Studies were selected if they were randomized controlled trials reporting on the efficacy or safety of treatments for relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma, and if outcomes were reported separately from trials that included other lymphoid neoplasms. We used the Bucher method for conducting adjusted indirect comparisons within a meta-analysis. We identified 10 randomized controlled trials of treatments for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. The most prominent drug investigated (alone or in combination) was rituximab. Most trials did not report median overall survival. Two trials reported median event-free survival (range, 1.2-23.2 months). Six of ten trials reported objective response rate (range, 9-93%). Meta-analysis showed only one statistically significant result: rituximab + bortezomib yielded a significantly higher objective response rate than rituximab monotherapy (relative risk, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.47). Otherwise, there were no discernable differences in overall survival or progression-free survival, partly due to insufficient reporting of results in the clinical trials. The relatively small number of randomized controlled trials, few overlapping treatment arms, and variability in the randomized controlled trial features and in the endpoints studied complicate the formal comparison of therapies for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Additional well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to fully understand the relative outcomes of older and more recently developed therapies. PMID:26320127

  9. Brief Report: Staged-informed Consent in the Cohort Multiple Randomized Controlled Trial Design.

    PubMed

    Young-Afat, Danny A; Verkooijen, Helena A M; van Gils, Carla H; van der Velden, Joanne M; Burbach, Johannes P; Elias, Sjoerd G; van Delden, Jonannes J; Relton, Clare; van Vulpen, Marco; van der Graaf, Rieke

    2016-05-01

    The "cohort multiple randomized controlled trial," a new design for pragmatic trials, embeds multiple trials within a cohort. The cohort multiple RCT is an attractive alternative to conventional RCTs in fields where recruitment is slow, multiple new (competing) interventions for the same condition have to be tested, new interventions are highly preferred by patients and doctors, and the risk of disappointment bias, cross-over, and contamination is considerable. To prevent these unwanted effects, the cohort multiple RCT provides information on randomization to the intervention group/arm only, and only after randomization (i.e., prerandomization). To some, especially in a clinical setting, this is not ethically acceptable. In this article, we argue that prerandomization in the cohort multiple randomized controlled trial (cmRCT) can be avoided by adopting a staged-informed consent procedure. In the first stage, at entry into the cohort, all potential participants are asked for their informed consent to participate in a cohort study and broad consent to be either randomly selected to be approached for experimental interventions or to serve as control without further notice during participation in the cohort. In a second stage, at the initiation of an RCT within the cohort, informed consent to receive the intervention is then only sought in those randomly selected for the intervention arm. At the third stage, after completion of each RCT, all cohort participants receive aggregate disclosure of trial results. This staged-informed consent procedure avoids prerandomization in cmRCT and aims to keep participants actively engaged in the research process. PMID:27035689

  10. A randomized controlled trial of knifelight and open carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, R; Birdsall, P D; Finn, P; Stothard, J

    2004-04-01

    A randomized controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel decompression using the standard open approach and the Knifelight technique. Twenty-six patients with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome requiring operation were selected for the study and the operative technique was randomized for the first hand. Six weeks later, the second hand was operated upon using the alternate technique. There was little difference between the two techniques with regard to time taken to return to work, return of grip strength, symptom relief, complications, incidence of pillar pain and patient preference. However, the incidence of scar tenderness was significantly lower with the Knifelight technique. PMID:15010154

  11. Unicursal random maze tool path for computer-controlled optical surfacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunjin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Qiao

    2015-12-01

    A novel unicursal random maze tool path is proposed in this paper, which can not only implement uniform coverage of the polishing surfaces, but also possesses randomness and multidirectionality. The simulation experiments along with the practical polishing experiments are conducted to make the comparison of three kinds of paths, including maze path, raster path, and Hilbert path. The experimental results validate that the maze path can warrant uniform polishing and avoid the appearance of the periodical structures in the polished surface. It is also more effective than the Hilbert path in restraining the mid-spatial frequency error in computer-controlled optical surfacing process. PMID:26836670

  12. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic dizziness: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness is one of the most challenging symptoms in medicine. No medication for dizziness in current use has well-established curative or prophylactic value or is suitable for long-term palliative use. Unconventional remedies, such as acupuncture, should be considered and scientifically evaluated. However, there has been relatively little evidence in randomized controlled clinical trials on acupuncture to treat chronic dizziness. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with dizziness. Methods/Design This trial is a randomized, single-blind, controlled study. A total of 80 participants will be randomly assigned to two treatment groups receiving acupuncture and sham acupuncture treatment, respectively, for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measures are the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS). Treatment will be conducted over a period of 4 weeks, at a frequency of two sessions per week. The assessment is at baseline (before treatment initiation), 4 weeks after the first acupuncture session, and 8 weeks after the first acupuncture session. Discussion The results from this study will provide clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with chronic dizziness. Trial registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN52695239 PMID:24330810

  13. Aerobic exercise in obese diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease: a randomized and controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with obesity, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are generally physically inactive, have a high mortality rate, and may benefit from an exercise program. Methods We performed a 24-week randomized controlled feasibility study comparing aerobic exercise plus optimal medical management to medical management alone in patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity (body mass index [BMI] > 30 kg/m2), and stage 2-4 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 15-90 mL/min/1.73 m2 with persistent proteinuria). Subjects randomized to exercise underwent thrice weekly aerobic training for 6 followed by 18 weeks of supervised home exercise. The primary outcome variable was change in proteinuria. Results Seven subjects randomized to exercise and 4 control subjects completed the study. Exercise training resulted in an increase in exercise duration during treadmill testing, which was accompanied by slight but insignificant decreases in resting systolic blood pressure and 24-hour proteinuria. Exercise did not alter GFR, hemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, serum lipids, or C-reactive protein (CRP). Caloric intake and body weight and composition also did not change with exercise training. Conclusion Exercise training in obese diabetic patients with CKD is feasible and may have clinical benefits. A large-scale randomized controlled trial to determine the effects of exercise on renal functions, cardiovascular fitness, inflammation, and oxidative stress in diabetic patients with CKD is planned. PMID:20003224

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial for Behavioral Smoking and Weight Control Treatment: Effect of Concurrent Versus Sequential Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Bonnie; Pagoto, Sherry; Pingitore, Regina; Doran, Neal; Schneider, Kristin; Hedeker, Don

    2004-01-01

    The authors compared simultaneous versus sequential approaches to multiple health behavior change in diet, exercise, and cigarette smoking. Female regular smokers (N = 315) randomized to 3 conditions received 16 weeks of behavioral smoking treatment, quit smoking at Week 5, and were followed for 9 months after quit date. Weight management was…

  15. Mindfulness meditation in older adults with postherpetic neuralgia: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Meize-Grochowski, Robin; Shuster, George; Boursaw, Blake; DuVal, Michelle; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Schrader, Ron; Smith, Bruce W.; Herman, Carla J.; Prasad, Arti

    2015-01-01

    This parallel-group, randomized controlled pilot study examined daily meditation in a diverse sample of older adults with postherpetic neuralgia. Block randomization was used to allocate participants to a treatment group (n = 13) or control group (n = 14). In addition to usual care, the treatment group practiced daily meditation for six weeks. All participants completed questionnaires at enrollment in the study, two weeks later, and six weeks after that, at the study’s end. Participants recorded daily pain and fatigue levels in a diary, and treatment participants also noted meditation practice. Results at the .10 level indicated improvement in neuropathic, affective, and total pain scores for the treatment group, whereas affective pain worsened for the control group. Participants were able to adhere to the daily diary and meditation requirements in this feasibility pilot study. PMID:25784079

  16. Mindfulness meditation in older adults with postherpetic neuralgia: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Meize-Grochowski, Robin; Shuster, George; Boursaw, Blake; DuVal, Michelle; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Schrader, Ron; Smith, Bruce W; Herman, Carla J; Prasad, Arti

    2015-01-01

    This parallel-group, randomized controlled pilot study examined daily meditation in a diverse sample of older adults with postherpetic neuralgia. Block randomization was used to allocate participants to a treatment group (n = 13) or control group (n = 14). In addition to usual care, the treatment group practiced daily meditation for six weeks. All participants completed questionnaires at enrollment in the study, two weeks later, and six weeks after that, at the study's end. Participants recorded daily pain and fatigue levels in a diary, and treatment participants also noted meditation practice. Results at the 0.10 level indicated improvement in neuropathic, affective, and total pain scores for the treatment group, whereas affective pain worsened for the control group. Participants were able to adhere to the daily diary and meditation requirements in this feasibility pilot study. PMID:25784079

  17. A parent-adolescent intervention to increase sexual risk communication: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Villarruel, Antonia M; Cherry, Carol Loveland; Cabriales, Esther Gallegos; Ronis, David L; Zhou, Yan

    2008-10-01

    This article reports results of a randomized controlled trial designed to test an intervention to increase parent-adolescent sexual risk communication among Mexican parents. Data were analyzed from parents (n = 791) randomly assigned to an HIV risk reduction or health promotion intervention. Measures were administered at pretest, posttest, and 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Generalized estimation equation (GEE) analysis indicates parents in the HIV risk reduction intervention reported significantly more general communication (p < .005), more sexual risk communication (p < .001) and more comfort with communication (p < .001) than parents in the control intervention. Behavioral, normative, and control beliefs significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on all communication outcomes. This study demonstrates the efficacy of an intervention to increase the quality and quantity of parent-adolescent communication related to general and sex-specific communication. PMID:18956979

  18. In their own voices: Latinas' experiences with a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F; Genovez, Marta; Cardeli, Emma

    2013-06-01

    We conducted exit interviews with a random sample of 39 predominantly Central American immigrant mothers who had completed a longitudinal randomized controlled trial to prevent perinatal depression. We found that rates and levels of perinatal depression in the intervention and control groups were lower than expected and did not differ between groups at 1 year postpartum. Therefore, we conducted extensive semistructured interviews to (a) understand why these high-risk women had such low rates of major depressive episodes and depressive symptoms, and (b) determine if the mechanisms responsible for reductions in depression differed between the intervention and usual care groups. We discovered that the intervention group learned specific mood-management skills from their participation in the intervention, and that the control group experienced their participation in the study as a "low-dose" intervention. Our experience highlights the importance of conducting qualitative studies to understand quantitative outcomes of intervention studies. PMID:23539092

  19. Effects of online cognitive treatment for problematic anger: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Howie, Amanda J; Malouff, John M

    2014-01-01

    Problematic anger, which is common, has been associated with a wide range of negative interpersonal and intrapersonal consequences, including violent behaviour, relationship damage, health problems and low self-esteem. This article reports the results of the first randomized controlled trial of brief online cognitive treatment for anger. The sample included 75 adults who were randomly assigned to cognitive treatment or a waiting list control. The analyses with the 59 participants who completed the post-intervention assessment at four weeks after the beginning of the intervention showed that individuals who received the intervention reported significantly lower anger levels than the control group at post-assessment. The treatment group showed a substantial decrease in anger from pre to post. The results suggest that brief online cognitive treatment can be effective for reducing problematic anger in adults. These findings provide an initial support for the development of internet-based cognitive treatment for problematic anger. PMID:25065452

  20. Home-based alcohol prevention program for parents and children: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mares, S H W; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A; Verdurmen, J; Schulten, I; Engels, R C M E

    2016-07-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based alcohol prevention program to delay initiation of alcohol use in children. Methods In 2011, a total of 1349 sixth-grade children (M=12.15, SD=0.47) and their mothers who could read and write Dutch were recruited from primary schools in the northern part of the Netherlands. They participated in a cluster randomized controlled trial with two conditions; (1) intervention group (5 modules which families received by mail every 4weeks over 5months), (2) control group (a factsheet information brochure). An independent statistician allocated the schools to the conditions (allocation ratio (1:1)). Participants and data-analyst were blind to randomization. The primary outcome was alcohol initiation. Results Of the participants, 680 were randomized to the intervention and 669 to the control condition. In the intervention condition (N=540) 5.4% of the children drank alcohol compared to 7.1% in the control condition (N=601). The difference was not significant (OR=.99, 95% CI=.96-1.02, p=52). Conclusion The present study showed no effects of 'In control: No alcohol!' on alcohol initiation. A critical evaluation of program design and content, and future studies in different target groups, are suggested. The trial is registered at trialregister.nl, number NTR2474. PMID:27143498

  1. Predictors of Missed Research Appointments in a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Stéphanie J.E.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: The primary aim of this study was to determine predictors of missed research appointments in a prospective randomized placebo injection-controlled trial with evaluations 1 to 3 and 5 to 8 months after enrollment. Methods: This study represents a secondary use of data from 104 patients that were enrolled in a prospective randomized controlled trial of dexamethasone versus lidocaine (placebo) injection for various diagnoses. Patients were enrolled between June 2003 and February 2008. Sixty-three patients (61%) had lateral epicondylosis, 17 patients (16%) had trapeziometacarpal arthrosis, and 24 patients (23%) had de Quervain syndrome. Each patient completed a set of questionnaires at time of enrollment. Bivariable and multivariable analyses were used to determine factors associated with missed research appointments. Results: Fourteen patients (13%) did not return for the first follow-up and 33 patients (32%) did not return for the second follow-up. The best multivariable logistic regression model for missing the first research visit explained 35% of the variability and included younger age, belief that health can be controlled, and no college education. The best model for missing the second research visit explained 17% of the variability and included greater pain intensity, less personal responsibility for health, and diagnosis (trapeziometacarpal arthrosis and de Quervain syndrome). Conclusions: Younger patients with no college education, who believe their health can be controlled, are more likely to miss a research appointment when enrolled in a randomized placebo injection-controlled trial. PMID:25386581

  2. Key analytic considerations in design and analysis of randomized controlled trials in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Losina, Elena; Ranstam, Jonas; Collins, Jamie; Schnitzer, Thomas J; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To highlight methodologic challenges pertinent to design, analysis, and reporting of results of randomized clinical trials in OA and offer practical suggestions to overcome these challenges. Design The topics covered in this paper include subject selection, randomization, approaches to handling missing data, subgroup analysis, sample size, and issues related to changing design mid-way through the study. Special attention is given to standardizing the reporting of results and economic analyses. Results Key findings include the importance of blinding and concealment, the distinction between superiority and non-inferiority trials, the need to minimize missing data, and appropriate analysis and interpretation of subgroup effects. Conclusion Investigators may use the findings and recommendations advanced in this paper to guide design and conduct of randomized controlled trials of interventions for osteoarthritis. PMID:25952341

  3. Can attention control conditions have detrimental effects in behavioral medicine randomized trials?

    PubMed Central

    Pagoto, Sherry; McDermott, Mary M.; Reed, George; Greenland, Philip; Mazor, Kathy M.; Ockene, Judith K.; Whited, Matt; Schneider, Kristin; Appelhans, Brad; Leung, Kathy; Merriam, Philip; Ockene, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Objective Attention control conditions are used to balance nonspecific attention in randomized trials of behavioral interventions. Very little guidance is available in the literature about which behavioral interventions and outcomes merit an attention control. The primary aim of the present paper is to demonstrate a scenario in which use of attention control in a behavioral randomized trial was unnecessary and possibly detrimental. Methods Exploratory analyses were performed in a randomized controlled trial that tested whether a patient-centered telephone counseling (PC) intervention reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in 355 participants with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), compared to attention control (AC) and usual care (UC) conditions. The PC intervention was designed to activate participants to ask their physician for lipid-lowering medication and/or increase dose intensity, increase medication adherence, and reduce fat intake. The AC condition involved attention-matched phone-delivered health education, and the UC condition consisted of an educational pamphlet. Results At 12-month follow-up, mean LDL-C changes were −11.1, and −6.8 mg/dl in the UC and AC conditions, respectively (p=.17). The proportion of participants who increased use or dose intensity of medication was significantly lower in AC than UC, 17.5% versus 30.5% (p=0.03). No significant difference between AC and UC were observed on other outcomes. Conclusions The AC had significantly worse medication outcomes and there was no indication of a therapeutic effect on other endpoints. Implications for use of attention control in behavioral randomized trials are discussed. PMID:23197844

  4. Intervention randomized controlled trials involving wrist and shoulder arthroscopy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although arthroscopy of upper extremity joints was initially a diagnostic tool, it is increasingly used for therapeutic interventions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard for assessing treatment efficacy. We aimed to review the literature for intervention RCTs involving wrist and shoulder arthroscopy. Methods We performed a systematic review for RCTs in which at least one arm was an intervention performed through wrist arthroscopy or shoulder arthroscopy. PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were searched up to December 2012. Two researchers reviewed each article and recorded the condition treated, randomization method, number of randomized participants, time of randomization, outcomes measures, blinding, and description of dropouts and withdrawals. We used the modified Jadad scale that considers the randomization method, blinding, and dropouts/withdrawals; score 0 (lowest quality) to 5 (highest quality). The scores for the wrist and shoulder RCTs were compared with the Mann–Whitney test. Results The first references to both wrist and shoulder arthroscopy appeared in the late 1970s. The search found 4 wrist arthroscopy intervention RCTs (Kienböck’s disease, dorsal wrist ganglia, volar wrist ganglia, and distal radius fracture; first 3 compared arthroscopic with open surgery). The median number of participants was 45. The search found 50 shoulder arthroscopy intervention RCTs (rotator cuff tears 22, instability 14, impingement 9, and other conditions 5). Of these, 31 compared different arthroscopic treatments, 12 compared arthroscopic with open treatment, and 7 compared arthroscopic with nonoperative treatment. The median number of participants was 60. The median modified Jadad score for the wrist RCTs was 0.5 (range 0–1) and for the shoulder RCTs 3.0 (range 0–5) (p = 0.012). Conclusion Despite the increasing use of wrist arthroscopy in the treatment of various wrist disorders the efficacy of arthroscopically

  5. One-step receding horizon H(∞) control for networked control systems with random delay and packet disordering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andong; Yu, Li; Zhang, Wen-An

    2011-01-01

    The receding horizon H(∞) control (RHHC) problem is investigated in this paper for a class of networked control systems (NCSs) with random delay and packet disordering. A new model is proposed to describe the NCS with random delay which may be larger than one sampling period. The random delay is modeled as a Markov chain while the closed-loop system is described as a Markovian jump system. Sufficient conditions for the closed-loop NCS to be stochastically stable and the performance index to be upper bounded are derived by using the receding optimization principle. Furthermore, by solving a semi-definite programming (SDP) with linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) constraint, a piecewise-constant receding horizon H(∞) controller is obtained, and the designed piecewise-constant controller ensures that the closed-loop NCS achieves a prescribed H(∞) disturbance attenuation level. Finally, an illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:21036353

  6. Comparison of two purification products of shankha bhasma: A prospective randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Manjiri; Chary, Dingari Laxmana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Shankha bhasma is widely used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. Aim: To compare the efficacy of two purification methods of shankha bhasma in relieving GERD symptoms. In method A, purification was done with lemon juice and method B with sour gruel. Materials and Methods: Patients with heartburn since at least four days/week but who did undergo endoscopy to assess esophageal mucosa could participate. In this single-phase, single-center, prospective, randomized control trial, the patients were randomized to receive either shankha bhasma purified by method A or by method B. The primary efficacy variable was the proportion of patients with resolution of heartburn at week 4 and week 8. Design: Single-phase, single-center, prospective, randomized control trial in a hospital setting. Results: Of the total 70 patients who received samples A and B in a randomized double-blind manner, 65% of the patients showed resolution of symptoms in sample A and 28% in sample B at the end of four weeks, whereas, 71% of the patients showed resolution of symptoms in sample A and 31% in sample B at the end of eight weeks; P value was statistically significant for resolution of symptoms (P <0.005). Conclusion: Purification of shankha bhasma by lemon juice method is better than sour gruel method in terms of clinical outcome in GERD patients and is hence recommended. PMID:23633854

  7. Searching for control: priming randomness increases the evaluation of ritual efficacy.

    PubMed

    Legare, Cristine H; Souza, André L

    2014-01-01

    Reestablishing feelings of control after experiencing uncertainty has long been considered a fundamental motive for human behavior. We propose that rituals (i.e., socially stipulated, causally opaque practices) provide a means for coping with the aversive feelings associated with randomness due to the perception of a connection between ritual action and a desired outcome. Two experiments were conducted (one in Brazil [n = 40] and another in the United States [n = 94]) to evaluate how the perceived efficacy of rituals is affected by feelings of randomness. In a between-subjects design, the Scramble Sentence Task was used as a priming procedure in three conditions (i.e., randomness, negativity, and neutral) and participants were then asked to rate the efficacy of rituals used for problem-solving purposes. The results demonstrate that priming randomness increased participants' perception of ritual efficacy relative to negativity and neutral conditions. Implications for increasing our understanding of the relationship between perceived control and ritualistic behavior are discussed. PMID:23941272

  8. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118. PMID:27088040

  9. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118. PMID:27088040

  10. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials on sterilization methods of extracted human teeth

    PubMed Central

    Western, J. Sylvia; Dicksit, Daniel Devaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this Study: The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of different sterilization methods on extracted human teeth (EHT) by a systematic review of in vitro randomized controlled trials. Methodology: An extensive electronic database literature search concerning the sterilization of EHT was conducted. The search terms used were “human teeth, sterilization, disinfection, randomized controlled trials, and infection control.” Randomized controlled trials which aim at comparing the efficiency of different methods of sterilization of EHT were all included in this systematic review. Results: Out of 1618 articles obtained, eight articles were selected for this systematic review. The sterilization methods reviewed were autoclaving, 10% formalin, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% glutaraldehyde, 0.1% thymol, and boiling to 100°C. Data were extracted from the selected individual studies and their findings were summarized. Conclusion: Autoclaving and 10% formalin can be considered as 100% efficient and reliable methods. While the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% glutaraldehyde, 0.1% thymol, and boiling to 100°C was inefficient and unreliable methods of sterilization of EHT. PMID:27563183

  11. Application of dietary fiber in clinical enteral nutrition: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gang; Wu, Xiao-Ting; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Ying-Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of dietary fiber (DF) as a part of enteral nutrition (EN) formula on diarrhea, infection, and length of hospital stay. METHODS: Following electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials about DF: Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. RevMan 4.1 was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials with 400 pat-ients were included. The supplement of DF in EN was compared with standard enteral formula in five trials. Combined analysis did not show a significant reduction in occurrence of diarrhea, but there were valuable results for non-critically ill patients. Combined analysis of two trials observing the infection also did not show any valid evidence that DF could decrease the infection rate, though the length of hospital stay was reduced significantly. CONCLUSION: Based on the current eligible randomized controlled trials, there is no evidence that the value of DF in the diarrhea can be proved. Though length of hospital stay was shortened by the use of DF, there is no available evidence in preventing infection by DF. Further studies are needed for evaluating the value of DF in EN. PMID:15991297

  12. Creation and implementation of a historical controls database from randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jigar R; Bowen, Edward A; Danielson, Mark M; Allam, Rajasekhar R; Cantor, Michael N

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethical concerns about randomly assigning patients to suboptimal or placebo arms and the paucity of willing participants for randomization into control and experimental groups have renewed focus on the use of historical controls in clinical trials. Although databases of historical controls have been advocated, no published reports have described the technical and informatics issues involved in their creation. Objective To create a historical controls database by leveraging internal clinical trial data at Pfizer, focusing on patients who received only placebo in randomized controlled trials. Methods We transformed disparate clinical data sources by indexing, developing, and integrating clinical data within internal databases and archives. We focused primarily on trials mapped into a consistent standard and trials in the pain therapeutic area as a pilot. Results Of the more than 20 000 internal Pfizer clinical trials, 2404 completed placebo controlled studies with a parallel design were identified. Due to challenges with informed consent and data standards used in older clinical trials, studies completed before 2000 were excluded, yielding 1134 studies from which placebo subjects and associated clinical data were extracted. Conclusions It is technically feasible to pool portions of placebo populations through a stratification and segmentation approach for a historical placebo group database. A sufficiently large placebo controls database would enable previous distribution calculations on representative populations to supplement, not eliminate, the placebo arm of future clinical trials. Creation of an industry-wide placebo controls database, utilizing a universal standard, beyond the borders of Pfizer would add significant efficiencies to the clinical trial and drug development process. PMID:23449762

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-based Indoor Tanning Intervention: Acceptability and Preliminary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Jerod L.; Manne, Sharon L.; Darabos, Katie; Greene, Kathryn; Ray, Anne E.; Turner, Amber L.; Coups, Elliot J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This manuscript describes the acceptability and preliminary behavioral outcomes from a pilot randomized control trial of a web-based indoor tanning intervention for young adult women. The intervention targets indoor tanning user’s perceptions of then benefits and value of tanning and addresses the role of body image-related constructs in indoor tanning. Methods Participants were 186 young adult women who reported indoor tanning at least once in the past 12 months. The study design was a 2-arm randomized controlled trial with pre and post assessments and random assignment to an intervention or control condition. Intervention acceptability was assessed by obtaining participants’ evaluation of the intervention. Regression analyses were used to test for intervention condition differences in preliminary behavioral outcomes measured at 6-weeks post-intervention. Results Participants provided favorable evaluations of the intervention on several dimensions and a highly positive overall rating. Intervention participants were more likely to report abstaining from indoor tanning and indicated a lower likelihood of using indoor tanning in the future compared to control participants on the post-intervention assessment. No differences were found for sunburns. Conclusions The results of this pilot randomized controlled trial provide evidence that the indoor tanning intervention is acceptable to participants and may encourage cessation of indoor tanning behavior. The findings provide preliminary support for an indoor tanning intervention that engages tanners to challenge their beliefs about the benefits of indoor tanning. The use of a web-based indoor tanning intervention is unique and provides strong potential for dissemination. PMID:26651469

  14. Reinforcement Behavior Therapy by Kindergarten Teachers on Preschool Children’s Aggression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yektatalab, Shahrzad; Alipour, Abdolrasool; Edraki, Mitra; Tavakoli, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aggression is a kind of behavior that causes damage or harm to others. The prevalence of aggression is 8–20% in 3–6 years old children. The present study aimed to assess the effect of training kindergarten teachers regarding reinforcement behavior therapy on preschoolers’ aggression. Methods: In this cluster randomized control trial, 14 out of 35 kindergarten and preschool centers of Mohr city, Iran, were chosen using random cluster sampling and then randomly assigned to an intervention and a control group. All 370 kindergarten and preschool children in 14 kindergarten were assessed by preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire and 60 children who obtained a minimum aggression score of 117.48 for girls and 125.77 for boys were randomly selected. The teachers in the intervention group participated in 4 educational sessions on behavior therapy and then practiced this technique under the supervision of the researcher for two months. Preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire was computed in both intervention and control groups before and after a two-month period. Results: The results demonstrated a significant statistical difference in the total aggression score (P=0.01), verbal (P=0.02) and physical (P=0.01) aggression subscales scores in the intervention group in comparison to the control group after the intervention. But the scores of relational aggression (P=0.09) and impulsive anger (P=0.08) subscales were not statistically different in the intervention group compared to the controls. Conclusion: This study highlighted the importance of teaching reinforcement behavior therapy by kindergarten teachers in decreasing verbal and physical aggression in preschoolers. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014042617436N1 PMID:26793733

  15. The Effects of School Gardens on Children's Science Knowledge: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Low-Income Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Nancy M.; Myers, Beth M.; Todd, Lauren E.; Barale, Karen; Gaolach, Brad; Ferenz, Gretchen; Aitken, Martha; Henderson, Charles R.; Tse, Caroline; Pattison, Karen Ostlie; Taylor, Cayla; Connerly, Laura; Carson, Janet B.; Gensemer, Alexandra Z.; Franz, Nancy K.; Falk, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial or "true experiment" examines the effects of a school garden intervention on the science knowledge of elementary school children. Schools were randomly assigned to a group that received the garden intervention (n?=?25) or to a waitlist control group that received the garden intervention at the end of the…

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluation of an After-School Prosocial Behavior Program in an Area of Socioeconomic Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, Liam; Biggart, Andy; Kerr, Karen; Connolly, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate the effects of a prosocial behavior after-school program called Mate-Tricks for 9- and 10-year-old children and their parents living in an area of significant socioeconomic disadvantage. The children were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 220) or a control group (n = 198). Children were…

  17. Speed synchronization control for integrated automotive motor-transmission powertrain system with random delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Hui; Fang, Zongde

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a robust speed synchronization controller design for an integrated motor-transmission powertrain system in which the driving motor and multi-gearbox are directly coupled. As the controller area network (CAN) is commonly used in the vehicle powertrain system, the possible network-induced random delays in both feedback and forward channel are considered and modeled by using two Markov chains in the controller design process. For the application perspective, the control law adopted here is a generalized proportional-integral (PI) control. By employing the system-augmentation technique, a delay-free stochastic closed-loop system is obtained and the generalized PI controller design problem is converted to a static output feedback (SOF) controller design problem. Since there are external disturbances involved in the closed-loop system, the energy-to-peak performance is considered to guarantee the robustness of the controller. And the controlled output is chosen as the speed synchronization error. To further improve the transient response of the closed-loop system, the pole placement is also employed in the energy-to-peak performance based speed synchronization control. The mode-dependent control gains are obtained by using an iterative linear matrix inequality (LMI) algorithm. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  18. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  19. Are Randomized Controlled Trials the (G)old Standard? From Clinical Intelligence to Prescriptive Analytics.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Thomeer, Michiel; Heath, John; Vukicevic, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Despite the accelerating pace of scientific discovery, the current clinical research enterprise does not sufficiently address pressing clinical questions. Given the constraints on clinical trials, for a majority of clinical questions, the only relevant data available to aid in decision making are based on observation and experience. Our purpose here is 3-fold. First, we describe the classic context of medical research guided by Poppers' scientific epistemology of "falsificationism." Second, we discuss challenges and shortcomings of randomized controlled trials and present the potential of observational studies based on big data. Third, we cover several obstacles related to the use of observational (retrospective) data in clinical studies. We conclude that randomized controlled trials are not at risk for extinction, but innovations in statistics, machine learning, and big data analytics may generate a completely new ecosystem for exploration and validation. PMID:27383622

  20. Randomized controlled trial of nettle sting for treatment of base-of-thumb pain.

    PubMed Central

    Randall, C; Randall, H; Dobbs, F; Hutton, C; Sanders, H

    2000-01-01

    There are numerous published references to use of nettle sting for arthritis pain but no randomized controlled trials have been reported. We conducted a randomized controlled double-blind crossover study in 27 patients with osteoarthritic pain at the base of the thumb or index finger. Patients applied stinging nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) daily for one week to the painful area. The effect of this treatment was compared with that of placebo, white deadnettle leaf (Lamium album), for one week after a five-week washout period. Observations of pain and disability were recorded for the twelve weeks of the study. After one week's treatment with nettle sting, score reductions on both visual analogue scale (pain) and health assessment questionnaire (disability) were significantly greater than with placebo (P = 0.026 and P = 0.0027). PMID:10911825

  1. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir–Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems. PMID:26096622

  2. Estimating optimal treatment regimes via subgroup identification in randomized control trials and observational studies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haoda; Zhou, Jin; Faries, Douglas E

    2016-08-30

    With new treatments and novel technology available, personalized medicine has become an important piece in the new era of medical product development. Traditional statistics methods for personalized medicine and subgroup identification primarily focus on single treatment or two arm randomized control trials. Motivated by the recent development of outcome weighted learning framework, we propose an alternative algorithm to search treatment assignments which has a connection with subgroup identification problems. Our method focuses on applications from clinical trials to generate easy to interpret results. This framework is able to handle two or more than two treatments from both randomized control trials and observational studies. We implement our algorithm in C++ and connect it with R. Its performance is evaluated by simulations, and we apply our method to a dataset from a diabetes study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26892174

  3. Filtering random matrices: the effect of incomplete channel control in multiple scattering.

    PubMed

    Goetschy, A; Stone, A D

    2013-08-01

    We present an analytic random matrix theory for the effect of incomplete channel control on the measured statistical properties of the scattering matrix of a disordered multiple-scattering medium. When the fraction of the controlled input channels, m1, and output channels, m2, is decreased from unity, the density of the transmission eigenvalues is shown to evolve from the bimodal distribution describing coherent diffusion, to the distribution characteristic of uncorrelated Gaussian random matrices, with a rapid loss of access to the open eigenchannels. The loss of correlation is also reflected in an increase in the information capacity per channel of the medium. Our results have strong implications for optical and microwave experiments on diffusive scattering media. PMID:23971574

  4. Building social resilience in soldiers: A double dissociative randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Cacioppo, John T; Adler, Amy B; Lester, Paul B; McGurk, Dennis; Thomas, Jeffrey L; Chen, Hsi-Yuan; Cacioppo, Stephanie

    2015-07-01

    Can social resilience be trained? We report results of a double-dissociative randomized controlled study in which 48 Army platoons were randomly assigned to social resilience training (intervention condition) or cultural awareness training (active control group). The same surveys were administered to all platoons at baseline and after the completion of training to determine the short-term training effects, generalization effects beyond training, and possible adverse effects. Multilevel modeling analyses indicated that social resilience, compared with cultural awareness, training produced small but significant improvements in social cognition (e.g., increased empathy, perspective taking, & military hardiness) and decreased loneliness, but no evidence was found for social resilience training to generalize beyond these training foci nor to have adverse effects. Moreover, as predicted, cultural awareness, compared with social resilience, training produced increases in knowledge about and decreases in prejudice toward Afghans. Additional research is warranted to determine the long-term durability, safety, and generalizability of social resilience training. PMID:26098588

  5. Acupoint Stimulation on Weight Reduction for Obesity: A Randomized Sham-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Mei-Ling; Chu, Nain-Feng; Hsu, Man-Ying F; Hsu, Chin-Che; Chung, Yu-Chu

    2015-12-01

    Auricular acupoint stimulation has become a popular weight loss method. However, its efficacy for obesity treatment has not been fully studied. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a 10-week intervention of auricular electrical stimulation combined with auricular acupressure on weight reduction in obese outpatients. In this single-blind randomized sham-controlled study, 134 participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group receiving stimulation at true acupoints, or a sham group receiving stimulation delivered in the same manner but at sham acupoints. Each participant received nutrition counseling by a nutritionist weekly. The results showed significant differences in body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin or adiponectin over time within the group, but not between the groups. This study could not exclude the effect of placebo and dietary consultation. Further study that adds a control group receiving no treatment is therefore needed to confirm the effects of auricular acupressure. PMID:25183702

  6. Prayer and healing: A medical and scientific perspective on randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv

    2009-01-01

    Religious traditions across the world display beliefs in healing through prayer. The healing powers of prayer have been examined in triple-blind, randomized controlled trials. We illustrate randomized controlled trials on prayer and healing, with one study in each of different categories of outcome. We provide a critical analysis of the scientific and philosophical dimensions of such research. Prayer has been reported to improve outcomes in human as well as nonhuman species, to have no effect on outcomes, to worsen outcomes and to have retrospective healing effects. For a multitude of reasons, research on the healing effects of prayer is riddled with assumptions, challenges and contradictions that make the subject a scientific and religious minefield. We believe that the research has led nowhere, and that future research, if any, will forever be constrained by the scientific limitations that we outline. PMID:20048448

  7. Are Randomized Controlled Trials the (G)old Standard? From Clinical Intelligence to Prescriptive Analytics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the accelerating pace of scientific discovery, the current clinical research enterprise does not sufficiently address pressing clinical questions. Given the constraints on clinical trials, for a majority of clinical questions, the only relevant data available to aid in decision making are based on observation and experience. Our purpose here is 3-fold. First, we describe the classic context of medical research guided by Poppers’ scientific epistemology of “falsificationism.” Second, we discuss challenges and shortcomings of randomized controlled trials and present the potential of observational studies based on big data. Third, we cover several obstacles related to the use of observational (retrospective) data in clinical studies. We conclude that randomized controlled trials are not at risk for extinction, but innovations in statistics, machine learning, and big data analytics may generate a completely new ecosystem for exploration and validation. PMID:27383622

  8. Defining a Clinically Meaningful Effect for the Design and Interpretation of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Helena C.; Epstein, Robert S.; Frank, Ellen; Haynes, Ginger; Laughren, Thomas P.; Mcnulty, James; Reed, Shelby D.; Sanchez, Juan; Leon, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article captures the proceedings of a meeting aimed at defining clinically meaningful effects for use in randomized controlled trials for psychopharmacological agents. Design: Experts from a variety of disciplines defined clinically meaningful effects from their perspectives along with viewpoints about how to design and interpret randomized controlled trials. Setting: The article offers relevant, practical, and sometimes anecdotal information about clinically meaningful effects and how to interpret them. Participants: The concept for this session was the work of co-chairs Richard Keefe and the late Andy Leon. Faculty included Richard Keefe, PhD; James McNulty, AbScB; Robert S. Epstein, MD, MS; Shelby D. Reed, PhD; Juan Sanchez, MD; Ginger Haynes, PhD; Andrew C. Leon, PhD; Helena Chmura Kraemer, PhD; Ellen Frank, PhD, and Kenneth L. Davis, MD. Results: The term clinically meaningful effect is an important aspect of designing and interpreting randomized controlled trials but can be particularly difficult in the setting of psychopharmacology where effect size may be modest, particularly over the short term, because of a strong response to placebo. Payers, regulators, patients, and clinicians have different concerns about clinically meaningful effects and may describe these terms differently. The use of moderators in success rate differences may help better delineate clinically meaningful effects. Conclusion: There is no clear consensus on a single definition for clinically meaningful differences in randomized controlled trials, and investigators must be sensitive to specific concerns of stakeholders in psychopharmacology in order to design and execute appropriate clinical trials. PMID:23882433

  9. A systematic mapping review of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) in care homes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A thorough understanding of the literature generated from research in care homes is required to support evidence-based commissioning and delivery of healthcare. So far this research has not been compiled or described. We set out to describe the extent of the evidence base derived from randomized controlled trials conducted in care homes. Methods A systematic mapping review was conducted of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in care homes. Medline was searched for “Nursing Home”, “Residential Facilities” and “Homes for the Aged”; CINAHL for “nursing homes”, “residential facilities” and “skilled nursing facilities”; AMED for “Nursing homes”, “Long term care”, “Residential facilities” and “Randomized controlled trial”; and BNI for “Nursing Homes”, “Residential Care” and “Long-term care”. Articles were classified against a keywording strategy describing: year and country of publication; randomization, stratification and blinding methodology; target of intervention; intervention and control treatments; number of subjects and/or clusters; outcome measures; and results. Results 3226 abstracts were identified and 291 articles reviewed in full. Most were recent (median age 6 years) and from the United States. A wide range of targets and interventions were identified. Studies were mostly functional (44 behaviour, 20 prescribing and 20 malnutrition studies) rather than disease-based. Over a quarter focussed on mental health. Conclusions This study is the first to collate data from all RCTs conducted in care homes and represents an important resource for those providing and commissioning healthcare for this sector. The evidence-base is rapidly developing. Several areas - influenza, falls, mobility, fractures, osteoporosis – are appropriate for systematic review. For other topics, researchers need to focus on outcome measures that can be compared and collated. PMID:22731652

  10. Dramatic reduction of read disturb through pulse width control in spin torque random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihui; Wang, Xiaobin; Gan, Huadong; Jung, Dongha; Satoh, Kimihiro; Lin, Tsann; Zhou, Yuchen; Zhang, Jing; Huai, Yiming; Chang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Te-ho

    2013-09-01

    Magnetizations dynamic effect in low current read disturb region is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Dramatic read error rate reduction through read pulse width control is theoretically predicted and experimentally observed. The strong dependence of read error rate upon pulse width contrasts conventional energy barrier approach and can only be obtained considering detailed magnetization dynamics at long time thermal magnetization reversal region. Our study provides a design possibility for ultra-fast low current spin torque random access memory.

  11. Reliable H∞ control of discrete-time systems against random intermittent faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuan; Shen, Dong; Fang, Mengqi; Wang, Youqing

    2016-07-01

    A passive fault-tolerant control strategy is proposed for systems subject to a novel kind of intermittent fault, which is described by a Bernoulli distributed random variable. Three cases of fault location are considered, namely, sensor fault, actuator fault, and both sensor and actuator faults. The dynamic feedback controllers are designed not only to stabilise the fault-free system, but also to guarantee an acceptable performance of the faulty system. The robust H∞ performance index is used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. In terms of linear matrix inequality, the sufficient conditions of the existence of controllers are given. An illustrative example indicates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control method.

  12. An Eight Month Randomized Controlled Exercise Intervention Alters Resting State Synchrony in Overweight Children

    PubMed Central

    Krafft, Cynthia E.; Pierce, Jordan E.; Schwarz, Nicolette F.; Chi, Lingxi; Weinberger, Abby L.; Schaeffer, David J.; Rodrigue, Amanda L.; Camchong, Jazmin; Allison, Jerry D.; Yanasak, Nathan E.; Liu, Tianming; Davis, Catherine L.; McDowell, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Children with low aerobic fitness have altered brain function compared to higher-fit children. This study examined the effect of an 8-month exercise intervention on resting state synchrony. Twenty-two sedentary, overweight (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) children 8–11 years old were randomly assigned to one of two after-school programs: aerobic exercise (n=13) or sedentary attention control (n=9). Before and after the 8-month programs, all subjects participated in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Independent components analysis identified several networks, with four chosen for between-group analysis: salience, default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks. The default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks showed more spatial refinement over time in the exercise group compared to controls. The motor network showed increased synchrony in the exercise group with the right medial frontal gyrus compared to controls. Exercise behavior may enhance brain development in children. PMID:24096138

  13. An eight month randomized controlled exercise intervention alters resting state synchrony in overweight children.

    PubMed

    Krafft, C E; Pierce, J E; Schwarz, N F; Chi, L; Weinberger, A L; Schaeffer, D J; Rodrigue, A L; Camchong, J; Allison, J D; Yanasak, N E; Liu, T; Davis, C L; McDowell, J E

    2014-01-01

    Children with low aerobic fitness have altered brain function compared to higher-fit children. This study examined the effect of an 8-month exercise intervention on resting state synchrony. Twenty-two sedentary, overweight (body mass index ≥85th percentile) children 8-11 years old were randomly assigned to one of two after-school programs: aerobic exercise (n=13) or sedentary attention control (n=9). Before and after the 8-month programs, all subjects participated in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Independent components analysis identified several networks, with four chosen for between-group analysis: salience, default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks. The default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks showed more spatial refinement over time in the exercise group compared to controls. The motor network showed increased synchrony in the exercise group with the right medial frontal gyrus compared to controls. Exercise behavior may enhance brain development in children. PMID:24096138

  14. A genotype-specific, randomized controlled behavioral intervention to improve the neuroemotional outcome of cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgery is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide with >700,000 surgeries in 2006 in the US alone. Cardiac surgery results in a considerable exposure to physical and emotional stress; stress-related disorders such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder are the most common adverse outcomes of cardiac surgery, seen in up to 20% of patients. Using information from a genome-wide association study to characterize genetic effects on emotional memory, we recently identified a single nucleotide polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (the Bcll single nucleotide polymorphism) as a significant genetic risk factor for traumatic memories from cardiac surgery and symptoms of post-traumaticstress disorder. The Bcll high-risk genotype (Bcll GG) has a prevalence of 16.6% in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and is associated with increased glucocorticoid receptor signaling under stress. Concomitant animal experiments have confirmed an essential role of glucocorticoid receptor activation for traumatic memory formation during stressful experiences. Early cognitive behavioral intervention has been shown to prevent stress-related disorders after heart surgery. Methods/Design The proposed study protocol is based on the above mentioned earlier findings from animal experiments and preclinical studies in volunteers. Patients (n = 872) will be genotyped for the Bcll single nucleotide polymorphism before surgery, which should result in 120 homozygous high-risk carriers of the Bcll GG allele and 240 randomly selected low-risk heterozygous or non-carriers of the single nucleotide polymorphism. All patients will then undergo randomization to either cognitive behavioral intervention or a control intervention consisting of non-specific general information about the role of stress in heart disease. The primary efficacy endpoint will be post-traumatic stress levels at one year after surgery as determined by a standardized

  15. Effect of pravastatin on survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, S; Yamasaki, E; Nagase, T; Inui, Y; Ito, N; Matsuda, Y; Inada, M; Tamura, S; Noda, S; Imai, Y; Matsuzawa, Y

    2001-01-01

    Chemotherapy is not effective for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HMG-CoA redutase inhibitors have cytostatic activity for cancer cells, but their clinical usefulness is unknown. To investigate whether pravastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, prolongs survival in patients with advanced HCC, this randomized controlled trial was conducted between February 1990 and February 1998 at Osaka University Hospital. 91 consecutive patients <71 years old (mean age 62) with unresectable HCC were enroled in this study. 8 patients were withdrawn because of progressive liver dysfunction; 83 patients were randomized to standard treatment with or without pravastatin. All patients underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) followed by oral 5-FU 200 mg−1d for 2 months. Patients were then randomly assigned to control (n = 42) and pravastatin (n = 41) groups. Pravastatin was administered at a daily dose of 40 mg. The effect of pravastatin on tumour growth was assessed by ultrasonography. Primary endpoint was death due to progression of HCC. The duration of pravastatin administration was 16.5 ± 9.8 months (mean ± SD). No patients in either group were lost to follow-up. Median survival was 18 months in the pravastatin group versus 9 months in controls (P = 0.006). The Cox proportional hazards model showed that pravastatin was a significant factor contributing to survival. Pravastatin prolonged the survival of patients with advanced HCC, suggesting its value for adjuvant treatment. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11286466

  16. Reducing HIV-Related Stigma in Health Care Settings: A Randomized Controlled Trial in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zunyou; Liang, Li-Jung; Guan, Jihui; Jia, Manhong; Rou, Keming; Yan, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of the intervention was to reduce service providers’ stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors toward people living with HIV. Methods. The randomized controlled trial was conducted in 40 county-level hospitals in 2 provinces of China between October 2008 and February 2010. Forty-four service providers were randomly selected from each hospital, yielding a total of 1760 study participants. We randomized the hospitals to either an intervention condition or a control condition. In the intervention hospitals, about 15% of the popular opinion leaders were identified and trained to disseminate stigma reduction messages. Results. We observed significant improvements for the intervention group in reducing prejudicial attitudes (P < .001), reducing avoidance intent towards people living with HIV (P < .001), and increasing institutional support in the hospitals (P = .003) at 6 months after controlling for service providers’ background factors and clinic-level characteristics. The intervention effects were sustained and strengthened at 12 months. Conclusions. The intervention reduced stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors among service providers. It has the potential to be integrated into the health care systems in China and other countries. PMID:23237175

  17. Virtual reality robotic surgery simulation curriculum to teach robotic suturing: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Daniel J; Gotlieb, Walter H; Lau, Susie; Zeng, Xing; Samouelian, Vanessa; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Zakrzewski, Helena; Brin, Sonya; Fraser, Shannon A; Korsieporn, Pira; Drudi, Laura; Press, Joshua Z

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this randomized, controlled trial was to assess whether voluntary participation in a proctored, proficiency-based, virtual reality robotic suturing curriculum using the da Vinci(®) Skills Simulator™ improves robotic suturing performance. Residents and attending surgeons were randomized to participation or non-participation during a 5 week training curriculum. Robotic suturing skills were evaluated before and after training using an inanimate vaginal cuff model, which participants sutured for 10 min using the da Vinci(®) Surgical System. Performances were videotaped, anonymized, and subsequently graded independently by three robotic surgeons. 27 participants were randomized. 23 of the 27 completed both the pre- and post-test, 13 in the training group and 10 in the control group. Mean training time in the intervention group was 238 ± 136 min (SD) over the 5 weeks. The primary outcome (improvement in GOALS+ score) and the secondary outcomes (improvement in GEARS, total knots, satisfactory knots, and the virtual reality suture sponge 1 task) were significantly greater in the training group than the control group in unadjusted analysis. After adjusting for lower baseline scores in the training group, improvement in the suture sponge 1 task remained significantly greater in the training group and a trend was demonstrated to greater improvement in the training group for the GOALS+ score, GEARS score, total knots, and satisfactory knots. PMID:26531197

  18. An effective group psychoeducational intervention for improving compliance with vaginal dilation: A randomized controlled trial

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, Sherryl A.; Robinson, John W. . E-mail: johnrobi@cancerboard.ab.ca; Craighead, Peter S.; Keats, Melanie R.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal dilation is often recommended to minimize or prevent vaginal scarring after pelvic radiotherapy, compliance with this recommendation has historically been very low. Therefore, effective intervention strategies are needed to enhance compliance with vaginal dilation after radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of a psychoeducational intervention specifically designed to increase compliance with vaginal dilation. The information-motivation-behavioral skills model of enhancing compliance with behavioral change was the basis for the intervention design. Forty-two sexually active women, 21 to 65 years of age, diagnosed with Stages Ic-III cervical or endometrial cancer, who received pelvic radiotherapy, were randomized to either the experimental psychoeducational group or the information-only control group. Assessment via questionnaire occurred before treatment and at 6-week, 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Assessment via interview also occurred at 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Results: The psychoeducational intervention was successful in increasing compliance with vaginal dilation. Conclusions: This study is the first randomized controlled study to demonstrate the effectiveness of an intervention in increasing compliance with the use of vaginal dilators.

  19. Testing a workplace physical activity intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased physical activity levels benefit both an individuals' health and productivity at work. The purpose of the current study was to explore the impact and cost-effectiveness of a workplace physical activity intervention designed to increase physical activity levels. Methods A total of 1260 participants from 44 UK worksites (based within 5 organizations) were recruited to a cluster randomized controlled trial with worksites randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition. Measurement of physical activity and other variables occurred at baseline, and at 0 months, 3 months and 9 months post-intervention. Health outcomes were measured during a 30 minute health check conducted in worksites at baseline and 9 months post intervention. The intervention consisted of a 3 month tool-kit of activities targeting components of the Theory of Planned Behavior, delivered in-house by nominated facilitators. Self-reported physical activity (measured using the IPAQ short-form) and health outcomes were assessed. Results and discussion Multilevel modelling found no significant effect of the intervention on MET minutes of activity (from the IPAQ) at any of the follow-up time points controlling for baseline activity. However, the intervention did significantly reduce systolic blood pressure (B = -1.79 mm/Hg) and resting heart rate (B = -2.08 beats) and significantly increased body mass index (B = .18 units) compared to control. The intervention was found not to be cost-effective, however the substantial variability round this estimate suggested that further research is warranted. Conclusions The current study found mixed support for this worksite physical activity intervention. The paper discusses some of the tensions involved in conducting rigorous evaluations of large-scale randomized controlled trials in real-world settings. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08807396 PMID:21481265

  20. Distributed control of cluster synchronisation in networks with randomly occurring non-linearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Aihua; Cao, Jinde; Hu, Manfeng; Guo, Liuxiao

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the issue of mean square cluster synchronisation in complex networks, which consist of non-identical nodes with randomly occurring non-linearities. In order to guarantee synchronisation, distributed controllers depending on the information from the neighbours in the same cluster are applied to each node, meanwhile, the control gains are supposed to be updated according to the given laws. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, the sufficient synchronisation conditions are derived and proved theoretically. Finally, a numerical example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the results.

  1. The anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy on patients awaiting ambulatory surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ni, Cheng-Hua; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Chang, Ming-Li; Yu, Lee-Fen; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if aromatherapy could reduce preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. A total of 109 preoperative patients were randomly assigned to experimental (bergamot essential oil) and control (water vapor) conditions and their responses to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and vital signs were monitored. Patients were stratified by previous surgical experience, but that did not influence the results. All those exposed to bergamot essential oil aromatherapy showed a greater reduction in preoperative anxiety than those in the control groups. Aromatherapy may be a useful part of a holistic approach to reducing preoperative anxiety before ambulatory surgery. PMID:24454517

  2. A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of an Interpersonal Violence Prevention Program With a Mexican American Community

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Patricia J.; Lesser, Janna; Cheng, An-Lin; Osóos-Sánchez, Manuel; Martinez, Elisabeth; Pineda, Daniel; Mancha, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Using methods of community-based participatory research, a prospective randomized controlled trial of a violence prevention program based on Latino cultural values was implemented with elementary school children in a Mexican American community. Community members participated in intervention program selection, implementation, and data collection. High-risk students who participated in the program had greater nonviolent self-efficacy and demonstrated greater endorsement of program values than did high-risk students in the control group. This collaborative partnership was able to combine community-based participatory research with a rigorous study design and provide sustained benefit to community partners. PMID:20531101

  3. A Chinese Mind-Body Exercise Improves Self-Control of Children with Autism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes S.; Sze, Sophia L.; Siu, Nicolson Y.; Lau, Eliza M.; Cheung, Mei-chun

    2013-01-01

    Self-control problems commonly manifest as temper outbursts and repetitive/rigid/impulsive behaviors, in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which often contributes to learning difficulties and caregiver burden. The present study aims to compare the effect of a traditional Chinese Chan-based mind-body exercise, Nei Yang Gong, with that of the conventional Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) technique in enhancing the self-control of children with ASD. Forty-six age- and IQ-matched ASD children were randomly assigned to receive group training in Nei Yang Gong (experimental group) or PMR (control group) twice per week for four weeks. The participants’ self-control was measured by three neuropsychological tests and parental rating on standardized questionnaires, and the underlying neural mechanism was assessed by the participants’ brain EEG activity during an inhibitory-control task before and after intervention. The results show that the experimental group demonstrated significantly greater improvement in self-control than the control group, which concurs with the parental reports of reduced autistic symptoms and increased control of temper and behaviors. In addition, the experimental group showed enhanced EEG activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region that mediates self-control, whereas the PMR group did not. The present findings support the potential application of Chinese Chan-based mind-body exercises as a form of neuropsychological rehabilitation for patients with self-control problems. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry; Registration No.: ChiCTR-TRC-12002561; URL: www.chictr.org. PMID:23874533

  4. Effect of pharmacist-led patient education on glycemic control of type 2 diabetics: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Farsaei, Shadi; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Zargarzadeh, Amir Hooshang; Amini, Massoud

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a clinical pharmacist-led patient education program for type 2 diabetic patients at Isfahan Endocrine & Metabolism Research Center (IEMRC) from April 2008 to January 2009. METHODS: In a randomized controlled clinical trial, a total of 172 patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes were selected and randomly allocated into control and intervention groups. After taking informed written consent, the intervention group received an educational program about oral anti-hyperglycemic medications, adherence, diabetes dairy log and pill box usage. Patient's glycemic control in the intervention group was followed for three months through either telephone or face to face interviews with the pharmacist. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c were measured at the start and end of the pharmacistled drug education program for both intervention and control groups. RESULTS: After a three months follow-up, mean fasting blood glucose and HbA1c of the patients in the intervention group decreased significantly compared to control group (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates an improvement in diabetes management of type 2 diabetics by involving a pharmacist in the multidisciplinary teams in the outpatient clinics. The results suggest the benefits of adding adherence education to the diabetic education programs. PMID:21448382

  5. Evaluating the optimal timing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections are the most common hospital-acquired infections among surgical patients. The administration of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis reduces the risk of surgical site infections . The optimal timing of this procedure is still a matter of debate. While most studies suggest that it should be given as close to the incision time as possible, others conclude that this may be too late for optimal prevention of surgical site infections. A large observational study suggests that surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered 74 to 30 minutes before surgery. The aim of this article is to report the design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial investigating the optimal timing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. Methods/Design In this bi-center randomized controlled trial conducted at two tertiary referral centers in Switzerland, we plan to include 5,000 patients undergoing general, oncologic, vascular and orthopedic trauma procedures. Patients are randomized in a 1:1 ratio into two groups: one receiving surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the anesthesia room (75 to 30 minutes before incision) and the other receiving surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the operating room (less than 30 minutes before incision). We expect a significantly lower rate of surgical site infections with surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis administered more than 30 minutes before the scheduled incision. The primary outcome is the occurrence of surgical site infections during a 30-day follow-up period (one year with an implant in place). When assuming a 5% surgical site infection risk with administration of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the operating room, the planned sample size has an 80% power to detect a relative risk reduction for surgical site infections of 33% when administering surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the anesthesia room (with a two-sided type I error of 5%). We expect the study to be completed within three

  6. Robotic-assisted versus laparoscopic colorectal surgery: a meta-analysis of four randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Robotic-assisted laparoscopy is popularly performed for colorectal disease. The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare the safety and efficacy of robotic-assisted colorectal surgery (RCS) and laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) for colorectal disease based on randomized controlled trial studies. Methods Literature searches of electronic databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library) were performed to identify randomized controlled trial studies that compared the clinical or oncologic outcomes of RCS and LCS. This meta-analysis was performed using the Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.2) that is provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. The data used were mean differences and odds ratios for continuous and dichotomous variables, respectively. Fixed-effects or random-effects models were adopted according to heterogeneity. Results Four randomized controlled trial studies were identified for this meta-analysis. In total, 110 patients underwent RCS, and 116 patients underwent LCS. The results revealed that estimated blood losses (EBLs), conversion rates and times to the recovery of bowel function were significantly reduced following RCS compared with LCS. There were no significant differences in complication rates, lengths of hospital stays, proximal margins, distal margins or harvested lymph nodes between the two techniques. Conclusions RCS is a promising technique and is a safe and effective alternative to LCS for colorectal surgery. The advantages of RCS include reduced EBLs, lower conversion rates and shorter times to the recovery of bowel function. Further studies are required to define the financial effects of RCS and the effects of RCS on long-term oncologic outcomes. PMID:24767102

  7. Psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavior therapy of chronic depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite limited effectiveness of short-term psychotherapy for chronic depression, there is a lack of trials of long-term psychotherapy. Our study is the first to determine the effectiveness of controlled long-term psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral (CBT) treatments and to assess the effects of preferential vs. randomized assessment. Methods/design Patients are assigned to treatment according to their preference or randomized (if they have no clear preference). Up to 80 sessions of psychodynamic or psychoanalytically oriented treatments (PAT) or up to 60 sessions of CBT are offered during the first year in the study. After the first year, PAT can be continued according to the ‘naturalistic’ usual method of treating such patients within the system of German health care (normally from 240 up to 300 sessions over two to three years). CBT therapists may extend their treatment up to 80 sessions, but focus mainly maintenance and relapse prevention. We plan to recruit a total of 240 patients (60 per arm). A total of 11 assessments are conducted throughout treatment and up to three years after initiation of treatment. The primary outcome measures are the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms (QIDS, independent clinician rating) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) after the first year. Discussion We combine a naturalistic approach with randomized controlled trials(RCTs)to investigate how effectively chronic depression can be treated on an outpatient basis by the two forms of treatment reimbursed in the German healthcare system and we will determine the effects of treatment preference vs. randomization. Trial registration http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN91956346 PMID:22834725

  8. [Caries prevention strategies for 6-year-olds. A randomized controlled study].

    PubMed

    Vermaire, J H; van Loveren, C

    2015-04-01

    A randomized controlled study of caries prevention strategies was conducted on patients with a mixed socioeconomic status in a large general dental practice in the Netherlands. A group of children following a non-operative caries treatment programme (NOCTP) was compared to a control group and a group that also received 2 topical fluoride applications (IPFA) as a supplement to the control programme (receiving a dental check-up twice a year with topical fluoride applications and routinely sealing of the first permanent molars). A total of 230 6-year-old children were randomly assigned to one of these groups. After 3 years, 179 children were studied again (54 NOCTP, 62 IPFA and 63 controls). Caries-increment was lowest in the NOCTP group (0.15 DMFS). In the IPFA group and the control group DMFS-increments were 0.34 and 0.47 respectively. Although the results of this study are very promising, a follow-up study on a larger scale is required to make clear whether the application of NOCTP is more effective than standard prevention in general practice. PMID:26210120

  9. Supported Employment for the Reintegration of Disability Pensioners with Mental Illnesses: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Viering, Sandra; Jäger, Matthias; Bärtsch, Bettina; Nordt, Carlos; Rössler, Wulf; Warnke, Ingeborg; Kawohl, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Work is beneficial for the recovery from mental illness. Although the approach of individual placement and support (IPS) has been shown to be effective in Europe, it has not yet been widely implemented in European health care systems. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the effectiveness of IPS for disability pensioners with mental illnesses new on disability benefits in Switzerland. In the study at hand, 250 participants were randomly assigned to either the control or the intervention group. The participants in the intervention group received job coaching according to IPS during 2 years. The control group received no structured support. Both groups were interviewed at baseline and followed up every 6 months (baseline, 6, 12, 16, 18, 24 months) for 2 years. Primary outcome was to obtain a job in the competitive employment. IPS was more effective for the reintegration into the competitive employment market for disability pensioners than the control condition. Thirty-two percent of the participants of the intervention group and 12% of the control group obtained new jobs in the competitive employment. IPS is also effective for the reintegration into competitive employment of people with mental illness receiving disability pensions. PMID:26539425

  10. Trends in the methodological quality of published randomized controlled trials on antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Falagas, Matthew E; Pitsouni, Eleni I; Bliziotis, Ioannis A

    2008-01-01

    AIM To investigate the trends of the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antimicrobial agents published during the last 30 years. METHODS We randomly selected from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database 70 RCTs of antibacterial agents that were published during a 30-year study period (1975–2005); specifically, we randomly selected 10 RCTs published during each of the following years: 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000 and 2005. In each of the selected RCTs, we searched for information on various methodological aspects and graded the methodological quality of the RCTs to evaluate trends for possible improvement. RESULTS No improvement was noted in most of the analysed methodological aspects of the RCTs during the 30-year study period. Description of randomization, double blinding, description of the blinding, and allocation concealment were rather scarce among the evaluated RCTs, without observing a trend for improvement during the study period. We noted improvement in reporting power of the study calculations, baseline data as well as in reporting the presence or not of statistical significance and the statistical cut-off of significance. In only 1/70 RCTs were all 13 of the examined methodological quality aspects met and in one more RCT 12 of them were met. CONCLUSIONS We did not observe considerable improvement in the quality of the reporting and methodology of RCTs on antibacterial agents during the last 30 years. The methodological quality aspects that need most improvement are those that help safeguard against various types of biases. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are believed to be one of the best methods of clinical research because they can minimize systematic errors of various types. Temporal trends in the various aspects of RCTs have been studied in several medical fields (e.g. nephrology, hepatology, oncology). However, there is lack of data regarding the

  11. Massage Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Cancer: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Maria; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Davis, Roger B.; Walton, Tracy; Kahn, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objectives were to determine the feasibility and effects of providing therapeutic massage at home for patients with metastatic cancer. Design This was a randomized controlled trial. Settings/location Patients were enrolled at Oncology Clinics at a large urban academic medical center; massage therapy was provided in patients' homes. Subjects Subjects were patients with metastatic cancer. Interventions There were three interventions: massage therapy, no-touch intervention, and usual care. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were pain, anxiety, and alertness; secondary outcomes were quality of life and sleep. Results In this study, it was possible to provide interventions for all patients at home by professional massage therapists. The mean number of massage therapy sessions per patient was 2.8. A significant improvement was found in the quality of life of the patients who received massage therapy after 1-week follow-up, which was not observed in either the No Touch control or the Usual Care control groups, but the difference was not sustained at 1 month. There were trends toward improvement in pain and sleep of the patients after therapeutic massage but not in patients in the control groups. There were no serious adverse events related to the interventions. Conclusions The study results showed that it is feasible to provide therapeutic massage at home for patients with advanced cancer, and to randomize patients to a no-touch intervention. Providing therapeutic massage improves the quality of life at the end of life for patients and may be associated with further beneficial effects, such as improvement in pain and sleep quality. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to substantiate these findings. PMID:23368724

  12. Differential Effect of Taekwondo Training on Knee Muscle Strength and Reactive and Static Balance Control in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Chung, Joanne W. Y.; Chow, Lina P. Y.; Ma, Ada W. W.; Tsang, William W. N.

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the effect of short-term intensive TKD training on the isokinetic knee muscle strength and reactive and static balance control of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Among the 44 children with DCD (mean age: 7.6 plus or minus 1.3 years) recruited, 21 were randomly assigned…

  13. Treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria with levamisole: a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Shan, C; Hua, Z; Zhao, P; Zhang, H

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of treating chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) with levamisole in combination with levocetirizine. This was a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial that included 132 patients with active CIU who were treated for 6 weeks with either levocetirizine alone (control group; n = 65) or levamisole plus levocetirizine (treatment group; n = 67). Response to therapy was evaluated by measuring the efficacy rate. After 2 weeks of treatment, there was no significant difference in the efficacy rate between the treatment and control groups (54.84% and 42.37%, respectively). After 6 weeks of treatment, a statistically significant difference in the efficacy rate was observed between the groups (76.27% and 54.39% for the treatment and control groups, respectively). This study demonstrated that a combination of levamisole plus levocetirizine is more effective than levocetirizine alone and potentially provides a new, promising approach to the treatment of CIU. PMID:19761700

  14. Randomized-Control Screening Trials to Lower Gall Bladder Cancer Mortality in High Risk Populations.

    PubMed

    Krishnatreya, Manigreeva; Kataki, Amal Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Gall bladder cancer is generally fatal. The high morbidity and mortality due to gall bladder cancer exerts a significant impact on efforts towards cancer control in high risk populations of the World and a rationale program for control of gall bladder cancer mortality has remained as an unmet need in these populations. Currently there are no effective strategies for controlling gall bladder cancer mortality. This mini review is to highlight the need and feasibility for secondary prevention of gall bladder cancer by screening in high risk populations. A way forward is to assess the role of secondary prevention of gall bladder cancers by conducting randomized- controlled screening trials in high risk populations. PMID:27221939

  15. Bedside charting of pain levels in hospitalized patients with cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, R L; Delafield, J P; Hays, R D; Drazin, R; Conolly, M

    1996-02-01

    Despite advances in the technology of cancer pain assessment and control, cancer pain often remains undertreated even in hospital settings. To determine whether a graphical display of cancer patients' pain levels might improve their treatment, the investigators conducted a randomized controlled trial. Patients assigned to the intervention group (N = 40) had periodic pain assessments by study staff, who graphically recorded their reported pain-intensity levels on bedside wall charts. Control group patients (N = 38) had periodic pain assessments by study staff but did not have this information displayed. The results failed to show a significant beneficial effect of the intervention on pain control, sleep, cancer-related symptoms, or analgesic dosing, but confidence intervals were broad. More research is needed to improve the quality of care for inpatients with cancer-related pain. PMID:8907138

  16. Mindfulness-based therapy in adults with an autism spectrum disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Spek, Annelies A; van Ham, Nadia C; Nyklíček, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that depression and anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric concern in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) has been found effective in reducing anxiety and depression symptoms, however research in autism is limited. Therefore, we examined the effects of a modified MBT protocol (MBT-AS) in high-functioning adults with ASD. 42 participants were randomized into a 9-week MBT-AS training or a wait-list control group. Results showed a significant reduction in depression, anxiety and rumination in the intervention group, as opposed to the control group. Furthermore, positive affect increased in the intervention group, but not in the control group. Concluding, the present study is the first controlled trial to demonstrate that adults with ASD can benefit from MBT-AS. PMID:22964266

  17. The effect of Neuragen PN® on Neuropathic pain: A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the naturally derived topical oil, "Neuragen PN®" for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Methods Sixty participants with plantar cutaneous (foot sole) pain due to all cause peripheral neuropathy were recruited from the community. Each subject was randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments (Neuragen PN® or placebo) per week in a crossover design. The primary outcome measure was acute spontaneous pain level as reported on a visual analog scale. Results There was an overall pain reduction for both treatments from pre to post application. As compared to the placebo, Neuragen PN® led to significantly (p < .05) greater pain reduction. Fifty six of sixty subjects (93.3%) receiving Neuragen PN® reported pain reduction within 30 minutes. This reduction within 30 minutes occurred in only twenty one of sixty (35.0%) subjects receiving the placebo. In a break out analysis of the diabetic only subgroup, 94% of subjects in the Neuragen PN® group achieved pain reduction within 30 minutes vs 11.0% of the placebo group. No adverse events were observed. Conclusions This randomized, placebo controlled, clinical trial with crossover design revealed that the naturally derived oil, Neuragen PN®, provided significant relief from neuropathic pain in an all cause neuropathy group. Participants with diabetes within this group experienced similar pain relief. Trial registration ISRCTN registered: ISRCTN13226601 PMID:20487567

  18. Herbal Medicines for Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hun; Cho, Ki-Ho; Jung, Woo-Sang; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective We conducted systematic review to evaluate current evidence of herbal medicines (HMs) for Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods Along with hand searches, relevant literatures were located from the electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsycInfo, CNKI, 7 Korean Medical Databases and J-East until August, 2010 without language and publication status. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomized controlled trials and randomized crossover trials, which evaluate HMs for idiopathic PD were selected for this review. Two independent authors extracted data from the relevant literatures and any disagreement was solved by discussion. Results From the 3432 of relevant literatures, 64 were included. We failed to suggest overall estimates of treatment effects on PD because of the wide heterogeneity of used herbal recipes and study designs in the included studies. When compared with placebo, specific effects were not observed in favor of HMs definitely. Direct comparison with conventional drugs suggested that there was no evidence of better effect for HMs. Many studies compared combination therapy with single active drugs and combination therapy showed significant improvement in PD related outcomes and decrease in the dose of anti-Parkinson's drugs with low adverse events rate. Conclusion Currently, there is no conclusive evidence about the effectiveness and efficacy of HMs on PD. For establishing clinical evidence of HMs on PD, rigorous RCTs with sufficient statistical power should be promoted in future. PMID:22615738

  19. Perioperative Continuous Ropivacaine Wound Infusion in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized Controlled Double-blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Fassoulaki, Argyro; Vassi, Emilia; Korkolis, Dimitrios; Zotou, Marianna

    2016-02-01

    Wound infusion with local anesthetics has been used for postoperative pain relief with variable results. This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial examines the effect of ropivacaine infusion on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A total of 110 patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups. After induction of anesthesia a 75-mm catheter was inserted subcutaneously and connected to an elastomeric pump containing either 0.75% ropivacaine (ropivacaine group) or normal saline (control group) for 24 hours postoperatively. Before skin closure, each hole was infiltrated with 2 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine or normal saline according to randomization. Pain at rest, pain during cough, and analgesic consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit and at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Analgesic requirements and pain scores were recorded 1 and 3 months after surgery. The ropivacaine group reported less pain during cough (P=0.044) in the postanesthesia care unit (P=0.017) and 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.038). Ropivacaine wound infusion had no effect on late and chronic pain. PMID:26679680

  20. The Safety of Yoga: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Holger; Ward, Lesley; Saper, Robert; Fishbein, Daniel; Dobos, Gustav; Lauche, Romy

    2015-08-15

    As yoga has gained popularity as a therapeutic intervention, its safety has been questioned in the lay press. Thus, this review aimed to systematically assess and meta-analyze the frequency of adverse events in randomized controlled trials of yoga. MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and IndMED were screened through February 2014. Of 301 identified randomized controlled trials of yoga, 94 (1975-2014; total of 8,430 participants) reported on adverse events. Life-threatening, disabling adverse events or those requiring intensive treatment were defined as serious and all other events as nonserious. No differences in the frequency of intervention-related, nonserious, or serious adverse events and of dropouts due to adverse events were found when comparing yoga with usual care or exercise. Compared with psychological or educational interventions (e.g., health education), more intervention-related adverse events (odds ratio = 4.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 17.67; P = 0.05) and more nonserious adverse events (odds ratio = 7.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.91, 27.92; P < 0.01) occurred in the yoga group; serious adverse events and dropouts due to adverse events were comparable between groups. Findings from this review indicate that yoga appears as safe as usual care and exercise. The adequate reporting of safety data in future randomized trials of yoga is crucial to conclusively judge its safety. PMID:26116216

  1. The differential influences of positive affect, random reward, and performance-contingent reward on cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Fröber, Kerstin; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2014-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that positive affect and reward have differential effects on cognitive control. So far, however, these effects have never been studied together. Here, the authors present one behavioral study investigating the influences of positive affect and reward (contingent and noncontingent) on proactive control. A modified version of the AX-continuous performance task, which has repeatedly been shown to be sensitive to reward and affect manipulations, was used. In a first phase, two experimental groups received either neutral or positive affective pictures before every trial. In a second phase, the two halves of a given affect group additionally received, respectively, performance-contingent or random rewards. The results replicated the typical affect effect, in terms of reduced proactive control under positive as compared to neutral affect. Also, the typical reward effects associated with increased proactive control were replicated. Most interestingly, performance-contingent reward counteracted the positive affect effect, whereas random reward mirrored that effect. In sum, this study provides first evidence that performance-contingent reward, on the one hand, and positive affect and performance-noncontingent reward, on the other hand, have oppositional effects on cognitive control: Only performance-contingent reward showed a motivational effect in terms of a strategy shift toward increased proactive control, whereas positive affect alone and performance-noncontingent reward reduced proactive control. Moreover, the integrative design of this study revealed the vulnerability of positive affect effects to motivational manipulations. The results are discussed with respect to current neuroscientific theories of the effects of dopamine on affect, reward, and cognitive control. PMID:24659000

  2. The effects of motivation feedback in patients with severe mental illness: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Eline C; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van Dam, Arno; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of providing clinicians with regular feedback on the patient’s motivation for treatment in increasing treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness. Methods Design: cluster randomized controlled trial (Dutch Trials Registry NTR2968). Participants: adult outpatients with a primary diagnosis of a psychotic disorder or a personality disorder and their clinicians, treated in 12 community mental health teams (the clusters) of two mental health institutions in the Netherlands. Interventions: monthly motivation feedback (MF) generated by clinicians additional to treatment as usual (TAU) and TAU by the community mental health teams. Primary outcome: treatment engagement at patient level, assessed at 12 months by clinicians. Randomization: teams were allocated to MF or TAU by a computerized randomization program that randomized each team to a single treatment by blocks of varying size. All participants within these teams received similar treatment. Clinicians and patients were not blind to treatment allocation at the 12-month assessment. Results The 294 randomized patients (148 MF, 146 TAU) and 57 clinicians (29 MF, 28 TAU) of 12 teams (6 MF, 6 TAU) were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups on treatment engagement were found (adjusted mean difference =0.1, 95% confidence interval =−2.2 to 2.3, P=0.96, d=0). Preplanned ancillary analyses showed statistically significant interaction effects between treatment group and primary diagnosis on treatment motivation and quality of life (secondary outcomes), which were beneficial for patients with a primary diagnosis of a personality disorder but not for those with a psychotic disorder. There were no reports of adverse events. Conclusion The current findings imply that monitoring and discussing the patient’s motivation is insufficient to improve motivation and treatment engagement, and

  3. Design and conduct of a large obstetric or neonatal randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tarnow-Mordi, William; Cruz, Melinda; Morris, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    As event rates fall, if mortality and disability are to improve further there is increasing need for large, well-designed trials. These should enroll more patients, more rapidly and at lower cost, with better representation of infants at highest risk and greater integration with routine care. This may require simpler datasets, linkage with routinely collected data, and international collaboration. It may be helpful to draw attention to recent evidence that participation in Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is at least as safe as receiving established care. Nationally coordinated clinical research networks employing local research staff may be the single most effective strategy to integrate clinical trials into routine practice. Other goals are: international standardization of outcomes; consensus on composite endpoints, biomarkers, surrogates and measures of disability; greater efficiency through randomized factorial designs and cluster or cross-over cluster RCTs; and equipping parents as partners in all aspects of the conduct of RCTs and in implementing their results. PMID:26522427

  4. Effect of visual biofeedback to acquire supraglottic swallow in healthy individuals: a randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Imada, Miho; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Ishiguro, Yuriko; Kato, Miho; Inamoto, Yoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Shibata, Seiko; Saitoh, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback therapy in acquiring supraglottic swallow (SGS) in a randomized-controlled trial with healthy individuals. Eighteen individuals (mean age, 26 years) who could not close or keep closed the vocal folds before and during the swallow in SGS were allocated randomly to either a visual biofeedback group (eight individuals) or a nonbiofeedback group (10 individuals). A videoendoscope was inserted intranasally and an SGS exercise, using 4 ml of green-colored water, was performed 30 times per day up to 5 days. When the participant failed to perform SGS, the result was provided only to the participants in the visual biofeedback group. The median length of time until acquiring SGS was 1.5 days in the visual biofeedback group and 3.5 days in the nonbiofeedback group (P=0.040). We concluded that visual biofeedback effectively enabled participants to acquire SGS earlier. PMID:26795716

  5. Blinding Techniques in Randomized Controlled Trials of Laser Therapy: An Overview and Possible Solution

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Roberta; Pirotta, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy has evidence accumulating about its effectiveness in a variety of medical conditions. We reviewed 51 double blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of laser treatment. Analysis revealed 58% of trials showed benefit of laser over placebo. However, less than 5% of the trials had addressed beam disguise or allocation concealment in the laser machines used. Many of the trials used blinding methods that rely on staff cooperation and are therefore open to interference or bias. This indicates significant deficiencies in laser trial methodology. We report the development and preliminary testing of a novel laser machine that can blind both patient and operator to treatment allocation without staff participation. The new laser machine combines sealed preset and non-bypassable randomization codes, decoy lights and sound, and a conical perspex tip to overcome laser diode glow detection. PMID:18955233

  6. The case for randomized controlled trials to assess the impact of clinical information systems

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    There is a persistent view of a significant minority in the medical informatics community that the randomized controlled trial (RCT) has a limited role to play in evaluating clinical information systems. A common reason voiced by skeptics is that these systems are fundamentally different from drug interventions, so the RCT is irrelevant. There is an urgent need to promote the use of RCTs, given the shift to evidence-based policy and the need to demonstrate cost-effectiveness of these systems. The authors suggest returning to first principles and argue that what is required is clarity about how to match methods to evaluation questions. The authors address common concerns about RCTs, and the extent to which they are fallacious, and also discuss the challenges of conducting RCTs in informatics and alternative study designs when randomized trials are infeasible. While neither a perfect nor universal evaluation method, RCTs form an important part of an evaluator's toolkit. PMID:21270132

  7. Aggressive parenteral nutrition in sick very low birth weight babies: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tagare, Amit; Walawalkar, Meenal; Vaidya, Umesh

    2013-10-01

    Survival of preterm neonates in developing world has improved. Developing countries lag behind in nutritional management in NICU especially parenteral nutrition (PN). This randomized controlled trial was done to evaluate the effect of aggressive parenteral nutrition on nitrogen retention of sick VLBW and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies. From September 2009 to February 2010, total 34 babies were randomized to receive aggressive parenteral nutrition (APN)(n=17) or standard parenteral nutrition (SPN) (n=17). The average daily total and PN calory intake of babies in APN group was significantly higher during first week. APN was well-tolerated; however, nitrogen retention was not significantly higher in APN group. Aggressive parenteral nutrition in sick VLBW babies is feasible in developing world, though it did not improve nitrogen retention in first week of life. PMID:23798635

  8. Quality and Reporting of Cluster Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Occupational Therapy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tokolahi, Ema; Hocking, Clare; Kersten, Paula; Vandal, Alain C.

    2015-01-01

    Growing use of cluster randomized control trials (RCTs) in health care research requires careful attention to study designs, with implications for the development of an evidence base for practice. The objective of this study is to investigate the characteristics, quality, and reporting of cluster RCTs evaluating occupational therapy interventions to inform future research design. An extensive search of cluster RCTs evaluating occupational therapy was conducted in several databases. Fourteen studies met our inclusion criteria; four were protocols. Eleven (79%) justified the use of a cluster RCT and accounted for clustering in the sample size and analysis. All full studies reported the number of clusters randomized, and five reported intercluster correlation coefficients (50%): Protocols had higher compliance. Risk of bias was most evident in unblinding of participants. Statistician involvement was associated with improved trial quality and reporting. Quality of cluster RCTs of occupational therapy interventions is comparable with those from other areas of health research and needs improvement. PMID:27504689

  9. Two Self-management Interventions to Improve Hypertension Control: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Hayden B.; Olsen, Maren K.; Grubber, Janet M.; Neary, Alice M.; Orr, Melinda M.; Powers, Benjamin J.; Adams, Martha B.; Svetkey, Laura P.; Reed, Shelby D.; Li, Yanhong; Dolor, Rowena J.; Oddone, Eugene Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background Less than 40% of Americans with hypertension have adequate blood pressure (BP) control. Objectives To compare two self-management interventions for improving BP control among hypertensive patients. Design A 2 by 2 randomized trial stratified by enrollment site and patient literacy status with two-year follow-up (5/2004-1/2008). Setting Two university-affiliated primary care clinics. Patients 636 patients were randomized (31% recruitment rate) among the 2060 eligible hypertensive patients. Interventions Research assistants randomized eligible patients via a centralized blinded and stratified randomization algorithm to receive either: 1) usual care; 2) bi-monthly tailored nurse-administered telephone intervention targeting hypertension-related behaviors; 3) BP monitoring consisting of measuring BP three times per week, or; 4) a combination of the two interventions. Measurements The primary outcome was BP control evaluated at six-month intervals over 24 months. 475 (75%) completed the 24-month BP follow-up. Results Improvements in proportion of BP control for the intervention groups relative to the usual care group at 24 months were: behavioral group, 4.3% (95% CI: −4.5%, 12.9); home BP monitoring group, 7.6% (95% CI: −1.9%, 17.0%); and, combined interventions, 11.0% (95% CI: 1.9%, 19.8%). For systolic BP, relative to usual care, the 24 month difference was, +0.6 mmHg (95% CI: −2.2, 3.4) for the behavioral intervention group, −0.6 mmHg (95% CI: −3.6, 2.3) for the home monitoring group, and −3.9 mmHg (95% CI: −6.9, −0.9) for the combined interventions. Similar patterns were observed for diastolic BP at 24 months. Limitations Changes in medication use and diet were only monitored in intervention participants; 25% lacked 24 month outcome data; 73% had adequate BP control at baseline; the study setting was an academic health center, all factors that potentially limit generalizability. Conclusion Combined home BP monitoring and tailored

  10. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Recruitment Methods: The Staying Well after Depression Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Adele; Rudolf von Rohr, Isabelle; Muse, Kate; Duggan, Danielle; Crane, Catherine; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are widely accepted as being the most efficient way of investigating the efficacy of psychological therapies. However, researchers conducting RCTs commonly report difficulties recruiting an adequate sample within planned timescales. In an effort to overcome recruitment difficulties, researchers often are forced to expand their recruitment criteria or extend the recruitment phase, thus increasing costs and delaying publication of results. Research investigating the effectiveness of recruitment strategies is limited and trials often fail to report sufficient details about the recruitment sources and resources utilised. Purpose We examined the efficacy of strategies implemented during the Staying Well after Depression RCT in Oxford to recruit participants with a history of recurrent depression. Methods We describe eight recruitment methods utilised and two further sources not initiated by the research team and examine their efficacy in terms of (i) the return, including the number of potential participants who contacted the trial and the number who were randomized into the trial, (ii) cost-effectiveness, comprising direct financial cost and manpower for initial contacts and randomized participants, and (iii) comparison of sociodemographic characteristics of individuals recruited from different sources. Results Poster advertising, web-based advertising and mental health worker referrals were the cheapest methods per randomized participant; however, the ratio of randomized participants to initial contacts differed markedly per source. Advertising online, via posters and on a local radio station were the most cost-effective recruitment methods for soliciting participants who subsequently were randomized into the trial. Advertising across many sources (saturation) was found to be important. Limitations It may not be feasible to employ all the recruitment methods used in this trial to obtain participation from other

  11. Back massage intervention for relieving lower back pain in puerperal women: A randomized control trial study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiu-Jung; Ko, Yi-Li

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of a back massage (BM) intervention in relieving lower back pain (LBP) in post-partum women.This is a randomized controlled trial study. Sixty normal spontaneous delivery women (response rate: 96.7%), who gave birth at our hospital, participated in this study from February to May of 2012. We randomly assigned 30 women to the experimental group and 30 women to the control group. During the 1 month post-partum period, the women in the experimental group received a BM for 5 consecutive days, whereas the women in the control group received routine care only. The LBP score was assessed according to a pain visual analog scale. After 5 days of intervention, the experimental group (n = 30) experienced significantly less LBP than did the control group (n = 30) (2.97 ± 1.71 vs. 4.43 ± 1.77, t = 3.26, P = 0.002). BM therapy can effectively reduce LBP during the first post-partum month. Additional studies are required to confirm the effects of BM therapy during extended post-partum periods. PMID:26125572

  12. Insulation workers in Belfast. 1. Comparison of a random sample with a control population1

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, William F. M.; Langlands, Jean H. M.

    1971-01-01

    Wallace, W. F. M., and Langlands, J. H. M. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 211-216. Insulation workers in Belfast. 1. Comparison of a random sample with a control population. A sample of 50 men was chosen at random from the population of asbestos insulators in Belfast and matched with a control series of men of similar occupational group with respect to age, height, and smoking habit. Significantly more of the insulators complained of cough and sputum and had basal rales on examination. Clubbing was assessed by means of measurements of the hyponychial angle of both index fingers. These angles were significantly greater in the group of insulators. Twenty-one insulators had ϰ-rays which showed pleural calcification with or without pulmonary fibrosis; one control ϰ-ray showed pulmonary fibrosis. The insulators had no evidence of airways obstruction but static lung volume was reduced and their arterial oxygen tension was lower than that of the controls and their alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient was greater. PMID:5557841

  13. Preventing College Women's Sexual Victimization Through Parent Based Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joseph H.; Livingston, Jennifer A.; Turrisi, Rob

    2010-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial, using parent-based intervention (PBI) was designed to reduce the incidence of alcohol-involved sexual victimization among first-year college students. The PBI, adapted from Turrisi et al. (2001), was designed to increase alcohol-specific and general communication between mother and daughter. Female graduating high school seniors and their mothers were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to one of four conditions: Alcohol PBI (n=305), Enhanced Alcohol + Sex PBI (n= 218), Control (n=288) or Unmeasured Control (n=167). Mothers in the intervention conditions were provided an informational handbook and encouraged to discuss its contents with their daughters prior to college matriculation. Consistent with hypotheses, PBI, either standard or enhanced, was associated with lower incidence of incapacitated rape in the first year of college relative to controls. Path analysis revealed support for a hypothesized indirect effects model, by which intervention increased mother-daughter communication, which predicted lower frequency of first semester heavy episodic drinking, resulting in lower rates of alcohol-involved sexual victimization in the first year of college. PMID:20169410

  14. Effects of kettlebell training on postural coordination and jump performance: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jay, Kenneth; Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Skotte, Jørgen H; Jørgensen, Marie B; Andersen, Christoffer H; Pedersen, Mogens T; Andersen, Lars L

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a worksite intervention using kettlebell training to improve postural reactions to perturbation and jump performance. This single-blind randomized controlled trial involved 40 adults (n = 40) from occupations with a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and discomfort (mean age 44 years, body mass index 23 kg·m, 85% women). A blinded examiner took measures at baseline and follow-up. Participants were randomly assigned to a training group-doing kettlebell swings 3 times a week for 8 weeks-or to a control group. The outcome measures were postural reactions to sudden perturbation and maximal countermovement jump height. Compared with the control group, the training group had a significant decreased stopping time after perturbation (-109 ms, 95% confidence interval [-196 to -21]). Jump height increased significantly in the training group (1.5 cm, 95% confidence interval [0.5 to 2.5]), but this was nonsignificantly different from control. Kettlebell training improves postural reactions to sudden perturbation. Future studies should investigate whether kettlebell training can reduce the risk of low back injury in occupations with manual material handling or patient handling where sudden perturbations often occur. PMID:22843044

  15. The Efficacy of Computerized Cognitive Training in Adults With ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Stern, Adi; Malik, Elad; Pollak, Yehuda; Bonne, Omer; Maeir, Adina

    2014-04-22

    Objective: This is a randomized control trial examining the efficiency of computerized cognitive training (CCT) for adults with ADHD, comparing two training conditions with graded levels of executive cognitive demands. Method: Adults with ADHD (n = 60) were randomized into study (n = 34) and control (n = 26) groups. Training was conducted with the computerized AttenFocus program. Control group received a simple, non-hierarchical version with less executive demands. Results: Significant positive changes in symptoms ratings, ecological measures of executive functions, and occupational performance were found in both groups. No significant changes were found in variables of neurocognitive performance battery and quality of life. No significant time by group interaction effects were found. Conclusion: No benefits of the intervention were found relative to the control. Lack of interaction effects may be due to insufficient power, non-specific cognitive training or placebo effects. Results demonstrate some positive findings for general CCT, yet do not support the inclusion of specific higher level executive training. PMID:24756172

  16. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation and steroids in the management of multiple sclerosis relapses: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dackovic, Jelena; Tepavcevic, Darija Kisic; Basuroski, Irena Dujmovic; Mesaros, Sarlota; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Drulovic, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Periodic relapses are one of the main characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS), from which recovery is often incomplete despite high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential benefits of short-term HDMP combined with multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MDR) in persons with MS in relapse in order to assess whether combination of steroid therapy with MDR is more beneficial than steroid therapy alone. Material and methods This investigation was conducted as a randomized controlled trial. The MS patients were eligible if they had an established diagnosis and relapse requiring application of HDMP. Forty-nine patients were included in the study and randomized to control and treatment groups, and 37 completed the study. High-dose methylprednisolone was administered to all patients. The treatment group additionally underwent an MDR program over a 3-week period. All outcome measures were completed at baseline and 1 and 3 months later. Results The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) motor scores improved statistically significantly 1 month after HDMP, in both treatment and control groups. During the study period, in the treatment group, a sustained large effect size (ES) was found for both physical and mental composite scores of Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 (MSQoL-54), while in the controls, a sustained moderate ES was demonstrated only for physical composite score. Conclusions Our findings suggest that MDR improves MS relapse outcome. PMID:27186184

  17. Topical diclofenac therapy for osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhen-Han; Zeng, Chao; Yang, Ye; Li, Yu-Sheng; Wei, Jie; Yang, Tuo; Li, Hui; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical diclofenac therapy for osteoarthritis (OA). A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted. A comprehensive literature search, covering the databases of Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE, was conducted in September 2014 to identify the randomized controlled trials which adopted the topical diclofenac therapy for OA. A total of nine papers were included in this meta-analysis. Topical diclofenac appears to be effective in both pain relief (standard mean differences (SMD) = 0.40; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 0.62; P = 0.0003) and function improvement (SMD = 0.23; 95 % CI 0.03 to 0.43; P = 0.03) when compared with the control group. The sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis showed that the result of pain intensity was stable and reliable, while the result of physical function improvement was vague. With respect to safety, topical diclofenac demonstrated a higher incidence of adverse events such as dry skin, rash, dermatitis, neck pain, and withdrawal. Topical diclofenac is effective in pain relief as a treatment of OA. It may also have a potential effect in function improvement, which needs further studies to be explored. Although, some adverse effects were observed in the application of topical diclofenac, none of them was serious. PMID:26242469

  18. Impact of pedometer-based walking on menopausal women's sleep quality: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tadayon, M; Abedi, P; Farshadbakht, F

    2016-08-01

    Objective Sleep disturbances are one of the most common psycho-physiological issues among postmenopausal women. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of walking with a pedometer on the sleep quality of postmenopausal Iranian women. Methods This randomized, controlled trial was conducted on 112 women who were randomly assigned to two groups. The women in the intervention group (n = 56) were asked to walk with a pedometer each day for 12 weeks and to increase their walking distance by 500 steps per week. A sociodemographic instrument and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were used to collect data. Sleep quality was measured at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after intervention. The control group (n = 56) did not receive any intervention. Results After 12 weeks, subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleeping medication, and daytime dysfunction improved to a significantly greater extent in the intervention group than in the control group (p < 0.05). The total sleep quality score was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (0.64 vs. 0.98, p = 0.001). Conclusion This study showed that walking with a pedometer is an easy and cost-effective way to improve the quality of sleep among postmenopausal women. Use of this method in public health centers is recommended. PMID:26757356

  19. Effects of Resistance Exercise Applied Early After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, Nayana Nazaré Pessoa Sousa; Borges, Daniel Lago; Lima, Reijane Oliveira; Silva, Mayara Gabrielle Barbosa e; da Silva, Luan Nascimento; Costa, Marina de Albuquerque Gonçalves; Baldez, Thiago Eduardo Pereira; Nina, Vinícius José da Silva

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise applied early after coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS It is a randomized controlled trial with 34 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting between August 2013 and May 2014. Patients were randomized into two groups by simple draw: a control group (n=17), who received conventional physical therapy and an intervention group (n=17), who received, additionally, resistance exercise. Pulmonary function and functional capacity were evaluated in preoperative period and hospital discharge by spirometry and the six-minute walk test. For statistical analysis, we used the following tests: Shapiro-Wilk, Mann-Whitney, Student's t and Fisher's exact. Variables with P<0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS Groups were homogeneous in terms of demographic, clinical and surgical variables. Resistance exercise exerted no effect on pulmonary function of intervention group compared to control group. However, intervention group maintained functional capacity at hospital discharge measured by percentage of predict distance in 6MWT (54.122.7% vs. 52.515.5%, P=0.42), while control group had a significant decrease (59.211.1% vs. 50.69.9%, P<0.016). CONCLUSION Our results indicate that resistance exercise, applied early, may promote maintenance of functional capacity on coronary artery bypass grafting patients, having no impact on pulmonary function when compared to conventional physical therapy. PMID:26934401

  20. A randomized controlled trial of an automated telephone intervention to improve blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Teresa N; Ho, Timothy S; Handler, Joel; Kanter, Michael H; Goldberg, Ruthie A; Reynolds, Kristi

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a telephonic outreach program to improve blood pressure (BP) control among patients with hypertension. The authors identified adults 18 years and older with uncontrolled BP within the previous 12 months. Patients received either an automated telephone call advising them to have a walk-in BP check (n=31,619) or usual care (n=33,154). The primary outcome was BP control at 4 weeks. Significantly more patients who received the intervention achieved BP control compared with the usual care group (32.5% vs 23.7%; P<.0001). Patients in the intervention arm with cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, or diabetes mellitus achieved better BP control. Older age, female sex, and having a household income above the median were associated with BP control. When designing quality-improvement interventions to increase BP control rates, health care organizations should consider utilizing an automated telephone outreach campaign. PMID:24034658

  1. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of Oral N-Acetylcysteine in Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Hardan, Antonio Y.; Fung, Lawrence K.; Libove, Robin A.; Obukhanych, Tetyana V.; Nair, Surekha; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Frazier, Thomas W.; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra

    2016-01-01

    Background An imbalance in the excitatory/inhibitory systems with abnormalities in the glutamatergic pathways has been implicated in the pathophysiology of autism. Furthermore, chronic redox imbalance was also recently linked to this disorder. The goal of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of using oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a glutamatergic modulator and an antioxidant in the treatment of behavioral disturbance in children with autism. Methods This is a 12-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of NAC in children with autistic disorder. Subjects randomized to NAC were initiated at 900 mg daily for 4 weeks, then 900 mg twice-daily for 4 weeks and 900 mg three-times-daily for 4 weeks. The primary behavioral measure (Aberrant Behavior Checklist – Irritability subscale) and safety measures were performed at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Secondary measures included the ABC-Stereotypy subscale, Repetitive Behavior Scale – Revised (RBS-R), and Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Results Thirty-three subjects (31 males, 2 females; aged 3.2–10.7 years) were randomized in the study. Follow-up data was available on fourteen subjects in the NAC group and fifteen in the placebo group. Oral NAC was well-tolerated with limited side effects. Compared to placebo, NAC resulted in significant improvements on ABC-Irritability subscale (F=6.80; p<.001; d=.96). Conclusions Data from this pilot investigation support the potential usefulness of NAC for treating irritability in children with autistic disorder. Large randomized controlled investigations are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00627705 PMID:22342106

  2. How large are the nonspecific effects of acupuncture? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While several recent large randomized trials found clinically relevant effects of acupuncture over no treatment or routine care, blinded trials comparing acupuncture to sham interventions often reported only minor or no differences. This raises the question whether (sham) acupuncture is associated with particularly potent nonspecific effects. We aimed to investigate the size of nonspecific effects associated with acupuncture interventions. Methods MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials and reference lists were searched up to April 2010 to identify randomized trials of acupuncture for any condition, including both sham and no acupuncture control groups. Data were extracted by one reviewer and verified by a second. Pooled standardized mean differences were calculated using a random effects model with the inverse variance method. Results Thirty-seven trials with a total of 5754 patients met the inclusion criteria. The included studies varied strongly regarding patients, interventions, outcome measures, methodological quality and effect sizes reported. Among the 32 trials reporting a continuous outcome measure, the random effects standardized mean difference between sham acupuncture and no acupuncture groups was -0.45 (95% confidence interval, -0.57, -0.34; I2 = 54%; Egger's test for funnel plot asymmetry, P = 0.25). Trials with larger effects of sham over no acupuncture reported smaller effects of acupuncture over sham intervention than trials with smaller nonspecific effects (β = -0.39, P = 0.029). Conclusions Sham acupuncture interventions are often associated with moderately large nonspecific effects which could make it difficult to detect small additional specific effects. Compared to inert placebo interventions, effects associated with sham acupuncture might be larger, which would have considerable implications for the design and interpretation of clinical trials. PMID:21092261

  3. Staff training and ambulatory tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a cluster randomized controlled trial in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Simon; Dick, Judy; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Lombard, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether adding a training intervention for clinic staff to the usual DOTS strategy (the internationally recommended control strategy for tuberculosis (TB)) would affect the outcomes of TB treatment in primary care clinics with treatment success rates below 70%. METHODS: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted from July 1996 to July 2000 in nurse-managed ambulatory primary care clinics in Cape Town, South Africa. Clinics with successful TB treatment completion rates of less than 70% and annual adult pulmonary TB loads of more than 40 patients per year were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 12) or control (n = 12) groups. All clinics completed follow-up. Treatment outcomes were measured in cohorts of adult, pulmonary TB patients before the intervention (n = 1200) and 9 months following the training (n = 1177). The intervention comprised an 18-hour experiential, participatory in-service training programme for clinic staff delivered by nurse facilitators and focusing on patient centredness, critical reflection on practice, and quality improvement. The main outcome measure was successful treatment, defined as patients who were cured and those who had completed tuberculosis treatment. FINDINGS: The estimated effect of the intervention was an increase in successful treatment rates of 4.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): -5.5% to 15.2%) and in bacteriological cure rates of 10.4% (CI: -1.2% to 22%). A treatment effect of 10% was envisaged, based on the views of policy-makers on the minimum effect size for large-scale implementation. CONCLUSION: This is the first evidence from a randomized controlled trial on the effects of experiential, participatory training on TB outcomes in primary care facilities in a developing country. Such training did not appear to improve TB outcomes. However, the results were inconclusive and further studies are required. PMID:15868015

  4. Sleep Education Improves the Sleep Duration of Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kira, Geoff; Maddison, Ralph; Hull, Michelle; Blunden, Sarah; Olds, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and pilot a sleep education program in New Zealand high school students. Methods: A parallel, two-arm randomized controlled pilot trial was conducted. High school students (13 to 16 years) were randomly allocated to either a classroom-based sleep education program intervention (n = 15) or to a usual curriculum control group (n = 14). The sleep education program involved four 50-minute classroom-based education sessions with interactive groups. Students completed a 7-day sleep diary, a sleep questionnaire (including sleep hygiene, knowledge and problems) at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks) and 10 weeks follow-up. Results: An overall treatment effect was observed for weekend sleep duration (F1,24 = 5.21, p = 0.03). Participants in the intervention group slept longer during weekend nights at 5 weeks (1:37 h:min, p = 0.01) and 10 weeks: (1:32 h:min, p = 0.03) compared to those in the control group. No differences were found between groups for sleep duration on weekday nights. No significant differences were observed between groups for any of the secondary outcomes (sleep hygiene, sleep problems, or sleep knowledge). Conclusions: A sleep education program appears to increase weekend sleep duration in the short term. Although this program was feasible, most schools are under time and resource pressure, thus alternative methods of delivery should be assessed for feasibility and efficacy. Larger trials of longer duration are needed to confirm these findings and determine the sustained effect of sleep education on sleep behavior and its impact on health and psychosocial outcomes. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 793. Citation: Kira G, Maddison R, Hull M, Blunden S, Olds T. Sleep education improves the sleep duration of adolescents: a randomized controlled pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):787-792. PMID:25024657

  5. Psychosocial and Cardiac Outcomes of Yoga for ICD Patients: A Randomized Clinical Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toise, Stefanie C.F.; Sears, Samuel F.; Schoenfeld, Mark H.; Blitzer, Mark L.; Marieb, Mark A.; Drury, John H.; Slade, Martin D.; Donohue, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Because as many as 46% of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients experience clinical symptoms of shock anxiety, this randomized controlled study evaluated the efficacy of adapted yoga (vs. usual care) in reducing clinical psychosocial risks shown to impact morbidity and mortality in ICD recipients. Methods Forty-six participants were randomized to a control group or an 8-week adapted yoga group that followed a standardized protocol with weekly classes and home practice. Medical and psychosocial data were collected at baseline and follow-up, then compared and analyzed. Results Total shock anxiety decreased for the yoga group and increased for the control group, t(4.43, 36), p < 0.0001, with significant differences between these changes. Similarly, consequential anxiety decreased for the yoga group but increased for the control group t(2.86,36) p = 0.007. Compared to the control, the yoga group had greater overall self-compassion, t(–2.84,37), p = 0.007, and greater mindfulness, t(–2.10,37) p = 0.04, at the end of the study. Exploratory analyses utilizing a linear model (R2 = .98) ofobserved device-treated ventricular (DTV) events revealed that the expected number of DTV events in the yoga group was significantly lower than in the control group (p<.0001). Compared to the control, the yoga group had a 32% lower risk of experiencing device-related firings at end of follow-up. Conclusions Our study demonstrated psychosocial benefits from a program of adapted yoga (vs. usual care) for ICD recipients. This data supports continued research to better understand the role of complementary medicine to address ICD-specific stress in cardiac outcomes. PMID:23981048

  6. Sealing caries in primary molars: randomized control trial, 5-year results.

    PubMed

    Innes, N P T; Evans, D J P; Stirrups, D R

    2011-12-01

    The Hall Technique (HT) is a method for managing carious primary molars. Decay is sealed under pre-formed metal crowns without any caries removal, tooth preparation, or local anesthesia. The aim of this study was to compare HT clinical/radiographic failure rates with General Dental Practitioners' (GDPs) standard (control) restorations. We conducted a split-mouth, randomized control trial (132 children, aged 3-10 yrs, GDPs n = 17) in Scotland. There were 264 study teeth with initial lesions, 42% of which were radiographically > half-way into dentin, and 67% of which had Class II restorations. Teeth were randomized to HT (intervention) or GDPs' usual treatment (control). Annual clinical/radiographic follow-up data were recorded. Ninety-one patients (69%) had 48 months' minimum follow-up. At 60 months, 'Major' failures (irreversible pulpitis, loss of vitality, abscess, or unrestorable tooth) were recorded: HT, 3 (3%); control restorations, 15 (16.5%) (p = 0.000488; NNT 8); and 'Minor' failures (reversible pulpitis, restoration loss/wear/fracture; or secondary caries): HT, 4 (5%); control restorations, 38 (42%) (p < 0.000001; NNT 3). Overall, there were follow-up data for 130 patients (2-60 mos): 'Major' failures: HT, 3 (2%); control restorations, 22 (17%) (p = 0.000004; NNT 7); and 'Minor' failures, HT, 7 (5%); control restorations, 60 (46%) (p < 0.000001; NNT 3). Sealing in caries by the Hall Technique statistically, and clinically, significantly outperformed GDPs' standard restorations in the long term (Trial registration no. ISRCTN 47267892). PMID:21921249

  7. Diarrhea and dengue control in rural primary schools in Colombia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diarrheal diseases and dengue fever are major global health problems. Where provision of clean water is inadequate, water storage is crucial. Fecal contamination of stored water is a common source of diarrheal illness, but stored water also provides breeding sites for dengue vector mosquitoes. Poor household water management and sanitation are therefore potential determinants of both diseases. Little is known of the role of stored water for the combined risk of diarrhea and dengue, yet a joint role would be important for developing integrated control and management efforts. Even less is known of the effect of integrating control of these diseases in school settings. The objective of this trial was to investigate whether interventions against diarrhea and dengue will significantly reduce diarrheal disease and dengue entomological risk factors in rural primary schools. Methods/design This is a 2×2 factorial cluster randomized controlled trial. Eligible schools were rural primary schools in La Mesa and Anapoima municipalities, Cundinamarca, Colombia. Eligible pupils were school children in grades 0 to 5. Schools were randomized to one of four study arms: diarrhea interventions (DIA); dengue interventions (DEN); combined diarrhea and dengue interventions (DIADEN); and control (C). Schools were allocated publicly in each municipality (strata) at the start of the trial, obviating the need for allocation concealment. The primary outcome for diarrhea is incidence rate of diarrhea in school children and for dengue it is density of adult female Aedes aegypti per school. Approximately 800 pupils from 34 schools were enrolled in the trial with eight schools in the DIA arm, nine in the DEN, eight in the DIADEN, and nine in the control arms. The trial status as of June 2012 was: completed baseline data collections; enrollment, randomization, and allocation of schools. The trial was funded by the Research Council of Norway and the Lazos de Calandaima Foundation

  8. A Fully Automated Diabetes Prevention Program, Alive-PD: Program Design and Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Kristen MJ; Block, Torin J; Romanelli, Robert J; Carpenter, Heather; Hopkins, Donald; Palaniappan, Latha; Block, Clifford H

    2015-01-01

    Background In the United States, 86 million adults have pre-diabetes. Evidence-based interventions that are both cost effective and widely scalable are needed to prevent diabetes. Objective Our goal was to develop a fully automated diabetes prevention program and determine its effectiveness in a randomized controlled trial. Methods Subjects with verified pre-diabetes were recruited to participate in a trial of the effectiveness of Alive-PD, a newly developed, 1-year, fully automated behavior change program delivered by email and Web. The program involves weekly tailored goal-setting, team-based and individual challenges, gamification, and other opportunities for interaction. An accompanying mobile phone app supports goal-setting and activity planning. For the trial, participants were randomized by computer algorithm to start the program immediately or after a 6-month delay. The primary outcome measures are change in HbA1c and fasting glucose from baseline to 6 months. The secondary outcome measures are change in HbA1c, glucose, lipids, body mass index (BMI), weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Randomization and delivery of the intervention are independent of clinic staff, who are blinded to treatment assignment. Outcomes will be evaluated for the intention-to-treat and per-protocol populations. Results A total of 340 subjects with pre-diabetes were randomized to the intervention (n=164) or delayed-entry control group (n=176). Baseline characteristics were as follows: mean age 55 (SD 8.9); mean BMI 31.1 (SD 4.3); male 68.5%; mean fasting glucose 109.9 (SD 8.4) mg/dL; and mean HbA1c 5.6 (SD 0.3)%. Data collection and analysis are in progress. We hypothesize that participants in the intervention group will achieve statistically significant reductions in fasting glucose and HbA1c as compared to the control group at 6 months post baseline. Conclusions The randomized trial will provide rigorous evidence regarding the efficacy of

  9. A yoga intervention for type 2 diabetes risk reduction: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a major health problem in many countries including India. Yoga may be an effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategy in India, particularly given its cultural familiarity. Methods This was a parallel, randomized controlled pilot study to collect feasibility and preliminary efficacy data on yoga for diabetes risk factors among people at high risk of diabetes. Primary outcomes included: changes in BMI, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and cholesterol. We also looked at measures of psychological well-being including changes in depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect and perceived stress. Forty-one participants with elevated fasting blood glucose in Bangalore, India were randomized to either yoga (n = 21) or a walking control (n = 20). Participants were asked to either attend yoga classes or complete monitored walking 3–6 days per week for eight weeks. Randomization and allocation was performed using computer-generated random numbers and group assignments delivered in sealed, opaque envelopes generated by off-site study staff. Data were analyzed based on intention to treat. Results This study was feasible in terms of recruitment, retention and adherence. In addition, yoga participants had significantly greater reductions in weight, waist circumference and BMI versus control (weight −0.8 ± 2.1 vs. 1.4 ± 3.6, p = 0.02; waist circumference −4.2 ± 4.8 vs. 0.7 ± 4.2, p < 0.01; BMI −0.2 ± 0.8 vs. 0.6 ± 1.6, p = 0.05). There were no between group differences in fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, insulin resistance or any other factors related to diabetes risk or psychological well-being. There were significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, anxiety, depression, negative affect and perceived stress in both the yoga intervention and walking

  10. The HOPE Social Media Intervention for Global HIV Prevention: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Young, Sean D.; Cumberland, William G.; Nianogo, Roch; Menacho, Luis A.; Galea, Jerome T.; Coates, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media technologies are newly emerging tools that can be used for HIV prevention and testing in low- and middle-income countries, such as Peru. This study examined the efficacy of using the Harnessing Online Peer Education (HOPE) social media intervention to increase HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Peru. Methods In a cluster randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation, Peruvian MSM from Greater Lima/Callao (N = 556) were randomly assigned to join private intervention or control groups on Facebook for 12 weeks. In the intervention condition, forty-nine Peruvian MSM were trained and randomly assigned to be HIV prevention mentors to participants via Facebook groups over 12 weeks. Control participants received an enhanced standard of care, including standard offline HIV prevention available in Peru as well as participation in Facebook groups (without peer leaders) that provided study updates and HIV testing information. After accepting a request to join the groups, continued participation was voluntary. Participants could request a free HIV test at a local community clinic, and completed questionnaires on HIV risk behaviors and social media use at baseline and 12-week follow-up. Findings Between March 19, 2012, and June 11, 2012, and Sept 26, 2012, and Dec 19, 2012, 556 participants were randomly assigned to intervention groups (N=278) or control groups (N=278); we analyse data for 252 and 246. 43 participants (17%) in the intervention group and 16 (7%) in the control groups got tested for HIV (adjusted odds ratio 2.61, 95% CI 1.55–4.38). No adverse events were reported. Retention at 12-week follow-up was 90%. Across conditions, 7 (87.5%) of the 8 participants who tested positive were linked to care at a local clinic. Interpretation Development of peer-mentored social media communities seemed to be an effective method to increase HIV testing among high-risk populations in Peru.: Results suggest that the HOPE social

  11. A stochastic control approach to Slotted-ALOHA random access protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrabissa, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    ALOHA random access protocols are distributed protocols based on transmission probabilities, that is, each node decides upon packet transmissions according to a transmission probability value. In the literature, ALOHA protocols are analysed by giving necessary and sufficient conditions for the stability of the queues of the node buffers under a control vector (whose elements are the transmission probabilities assigned to the nodes), given an arrival rate vector (whose elements represent the rates of the packets arriving in the node buffers). The innovation of this work is that, given an arrival rate vector, it computes the optimal control vector by defining and solving a stochastic control problem aimed at maximising the overall transmission efficiency, while keeping a grade of fairness among the nodes. Furthermore, a more general case in which the arrival rate vector changes in time is considered. The increased efficiency of the proposed solution with respect to the standard ALOHA approach is evaluated by means of numerical simulations.

  12. The prevention of depressive symptoms in rural school children: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Clare; Kane, Robert; Thomson, Helen; Bishop, Brian; Hart, Bret

    2003-06-01

    A controlled trial was conducted to evaluate a prevention program aimed at reducing depressive and anxious symptoms in rural school children. Seventh-grade children with elevated depression were selected. Nine primary schools (n = 90) were randomly assigned to receive the program, and 9 control schools (n = 99) received their usual health education classes. Children completed questionnaires on depression, anxiety, explanatory style, and social skills. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (T. M. Achenbach, 1991). No intervention effects were found for depression. Intervention group children reported less anxiety than the control group after the program and at 6-month follow-up and more optimistic explanations at postintervention. Intervention group parents reported fewer child internalizing and externalizing symptoms at postintervention only. PMID:12795585

  13. Improving Classroom Learning Environments by Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE): Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Patricia A.; Frank, Jennifer L.; Snowberg, Karin E.; Coccia, Michael A.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE for Teachers) is a mindfulness-based professional development program designed to reduce stress and improve teachers' performance and classroom learning environments. A randomized controlled trial examined program efficacy and acceptability among a sample of 50 teachers randomly assigned to…

  14. A Facility Specialist Model for Improving Retention of Nursing Home Staff: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillemer, Karl; Meador, Rhoda; Henderson, Charles, Jr.; Robison, Julie; Hegeman, Carol; Graham, Edwin; Schultz, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on a randomized, controlled intervention study designed to reduce employee turnover by creating a retention specialist position in nursing homes. Design and Methods: We collected data three times over a 1-year period in 30 nursing homes, sampled in stratified random manner from facilities in New York State and…

  15. Treatment Effectiveness of Parent Management Training in Norway: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Children with Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogden, Terje; Hagen, Kristine Amlund

    2008-01-01

    This study was a randomized control trial (RCT) of Parent Management Training--The Oregon Model (PMTO) in Norway. A sample representing all health regions of Norway and consisting of 112 children with conduct problems and their families participated in the study. Families were randomly assigned to either PMTO or a regular services comparison…

  16. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Randomized, Controlled Trial and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberge, Pasquale; Marchand, Andre; Reinharz, Daniel; Savard, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    A randomized, controlled trial was conducted to examine the cost-effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder with agoraphobia. A total of 100 participants were randomly assigned to standard (n = 33), group (n = 35), and brief (n = 32) treatment conditions. Results show significant clinical and statistical improvement…

  17. Mechanism of Developmental Change in the PLAY Project Home Consultation Program: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Gerald; Solomon, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This investigation is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized control trial of the PLAY Home Consultation Intervention Program which was conducted with 112 preschool children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and their parents (Solomon et al. in "J Dev Behav Pediatr" 35:475-485, 2014). Subjects were randomly assigned to either a…

  18. Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence among Older Adults: Meta-Analysis of Adherence Outcomes among Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Vicki S.; Hafdahl, Adam R.; Cooper, Pamela S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Mehr, David R.; Russell, Cynthia L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the effectiveness of interventions to improve medication adherence (MA) in older adults. Design and Methods: Meta-analysis was used to synthesize results of 33 published and unpublished randomized controlled trials. Random-effects models were used to estimate overall mean effect sizes (ESs) for MA, knowledge,…

  19. Divalproex Sodium for the Treatment of PTSD and Conduct Disordered Youth: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Hans; Saxena, Kirti S.; Carrion, Victor; Khanzode, Leena A.; Silverman, Melissa; Chang, Kiki

    2007-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of divalproex sodium (DVP) for the treatment of PTSD in conduct disorder, utilizing a previous study in which 71 youth were enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial. Twelve had PTSD. Subjects (all males, mean age 16, SD 1.0) were randomized into high and low dose conditions. Clinical Global Impression (CGI)…

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Two Syntactic Treatment Procedures with Cantonese-Speaking, School-Age Children with Language Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    To, Carol K. S.; Lui, Hoi Ming; Li, Xin Xin; Lam, Gary Y. H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of sentence-combining (SC) and narrative-based (NAR) intervention approaches to syntax intervention using a randomized-controlled-trial design. Method: Fifty-two Cantonese-speaking, school-age children with language impairment were assigned randomly to either the SC or the NAR treatment…

  1. The Ethics of Randomized Controlled Trials in Social Settings: Can Social Trials Be Scientifically Promising and Must There Be Equipoise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fives, Allyn; Russell, Daniel W.; Canavan, John; Lyons, Rena; Eaton, Patricia; Devaney, Carmel; Kearns, Norean; O'Brien, Aoife

    2015-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial (RCT), treatments are assigned randomly and treatments are withheld from participants. Is it ethically permissible to conduct an RCT in a social setting? This paper addresses two conditions for justifying RCTs: that there should be a state of equipoise and that the trial should be scientifically promising.…

  2. Effects of warm acupuncture on breast cancer–related chronic lymphedema: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yao, C.; Xu, Y.; Chen, L.; Jiang, H.; Ki, C.S.; Byun, J.S.; Bian, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective treatment for breast cancer–related chronic lymphedema (bcrl) remains a clinical challenge. Acupuncture and moxibustion treatments have been shown to be beneficial and safe for treating bcrl. In the present randomized controlled trial, we compared the effectiveness of combined acupuncture and moxibustion (“warm acupuncture”) with that of diosmin in bcrl. Methods Breast cancer patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria (n = 30) were randomized to experimental and control groups (15 per group). On alternate days, patients in the experimental group received 30 minutes of acupuncture at 6 acupoints, with 3 of the needles each being topped by a 3-cm moxa stick. The control treatment was diosmin 900 mg 3 times daily. The control and experimental treatments were administered for 30 days. Outcome measures included arm circumferences (index of effectiveness), range of motion [rom (shoulder joint function)], quality of life, clinical safety, and adverse events. Results Measured by the index of effectiveness, bcrl improved by 51.46% in the experimental group and by 26.27% in the control group (p < 0.00001). Effects were greatest at 10 cm above the elbow and at the wrist, where the warm needling was provided. Impairments in shoulder joint rom were minimal at baseline in both treatment groups. However, the roms of rear protraction, abduction, intorsion, and extorsion in the experimental group improved significantly; they did not change in the control group. Self-reported quality of life was significantly better with warm acupuncture than with diosmin. No adverse effects were reported during the treatment period, and laboratory examinations for clinical safety fell within the normal ranges. Conclusions Compared with diosmin, warm acupuncture treatment can effectively reduce the degree of bcrl at the specific acupoints treated and can promote quality of life. Warm acupuncture showed good clinical safety, without any adverse effects on blood

  3. Hypnosis as a treatment of chronic widespread pain in general practice: A randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Grøndahl, Jan Robert; Rosvold, Elin Olaug

    2008-01-01

    Background Hypnosis treatment in general practice is a rather new concept. This pilot study was performed to evaluate the effect of a standardized hypnosis treatment used in general practice for patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP). Methods The study was designed as a randomized control group-controlled study. Sixteen patients were randomized into a treatment group or a control group, each constituting eight patients. Seven patients in the treatment group completed the schedule. After the control period, five of the patients in the control group also received treatment, making a total of 12 patients having completed the treatment sessions. The intervention group went through a standardized hypnosis treatment with ten consecutive therapeutic sessions once a week, each lasting for about 30 minutes, focusing on ego-strengthening, relaxation, releasing muscular tension and increasing self-efficacy. A questionnaire was developed in order to calibrate the symptoms before and after the 10 weeks period, and the results were interpolated into a scale from 0 to 100, increasing numbers representing increasing suffering. Data were analyzed by means of T-tests. Results The treatment group improved from their symptoms, (change from 62.5 to 55.4), while the control group deteriorated, (change from 37.2 to 45.1), (p = 0,045). The 12 patients who completed the treatment showed a mean improvement from 51.5 to 41.6. (p = 0,046). One year later the corresponding result was 41.3, indicating a persisting improvement. Conclusion The study indicates that hypnosis treatment may have a positive effect on pain and quality of life for patients with chronic muscular pain. Considering the limited number of patients, more studies should be conducted to confirm the results. Trial Registration The study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov and released 27.08.07 Reg nr NCT00521807 Approval Number: 05032001. PMID:18801190

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the therapeutic efficiency of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded study. Forty-four patients with CTS were randomized into intervention or control groups. Patients in the intervention group were treated with PRF and night splint, and the control group was prescribed night splint alone. Primary outcome was the onset time of significant pain relief assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), and secondary outcomes included evaluation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) results, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. All outcome measurements were performed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Results Thirty-six patients completed the study. The onset time of pain relief in the intervention group was significantly shorter (median onset time of 2 days vs. 14 days; hazard ratio = 7.37; 95% CI, 3.04–17.87) compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Significant improvement in VAS and BCTQ scores (p < 0.05) was detected in the intervention group at all follow-up periods compared to the controls (except for the severity subscale of BCTQ at week 1). Ultrasound-guided PRF treatment resulted in a lower VAS score and stronger finger pinch compared to the control group over the entire study. Conclusions Our study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF serves as a better approach for pain relief in patients with CTS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02217293 PMID:26067628

  5. Prospective, Randomized, Multicenter, Controlled Trial of a Bioartificial Liver in Treating Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Demetriou, Achilles A.; Brown, Robert S.; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Fair, Jeffrey; McGuire, Brendan M.; Rosenthal, Philip; Am Esch, Jan Schulte; Lerut, Jan; Nyberg, Scott L.; Salizzoni, Mauro; Fagan, Elizabeth A.; de Hemptinne, Bernard; Broelsch, Christoph E.; Muraca, Maurizio; Salmeron, Joan Manuel; Rabkin, John M.; Metselaar, Herold J.; Pratt, Daniel; De La Mata, Manuel; McChesney, Lawrence P.; Everson, Gregory T.; Lavin, Philip T.; Stevens, Anthony C.; Pitkin, Zorina; Solomon, Barry A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The HepatAssist liver support system is an extracorporeal porcine hepatocyte-based bioartificial liver (BAL). The safety and efficacy of the BAL were evaluated in a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter trial in patients with severe acute liver failure. Summary Background Data: In experimental animals with acute liver failure, we demonstrated beneficial effects of the BAL. Similarly, Phase I trials of the BAL in acute liver failure patients yielded promising results. Methods: A total of 171 patients (86 control and 85 BAL) were enrolled. Patients with fulminant/subfulminant hepatic failure and primary nonfunction following liver transplantation were included. Data were analyzed with and without accounting for the following confounding factors: liver transplantation, time to transplant, disease etiology, disease severity, and treatment site. Results: For the entire patient population, survival at 30 days was 71% for BAL versus 62% for control (P = 0.26). After exclusion of primary nonfunction patients, survival was 73% for BAL versus 59% for control (n = 147; P = 0.12). When survival was analyzed accounting for confounding factors, in the entire patient population, there was no difference between the 2 groups (risk ratio = 0.67; P = 0.13). However, survival in fulminant/subfulminant hepatic failure patients was significantly higher in the BAL compared with the control group (risk ratio = 0.56; P = 0.048). Conclusions: This is the first prospective, randomized, controlled trial of an extracorporeal liver support system, demonstrating safety and improved survival in patients with fulminant/subfulminant hepatic failure. PMID:15082970

  6. Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Venekamp, Roderick P.; Bonten, Marc J.M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Verheij, Theo J.M.; Sachs, Alfred P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute rhinosinusitis are frequently encountered in primary care. Although corticosteroids are being increasingly used for symptom control, evidence supporting their use is inconclusive. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed, uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis. Methods: We conducted a block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial at 54 primary care practices (68 family physicians) in the Netherlands between Dec. 30, 2008, and Apr. 28, 2011. Adult patients with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis were randomly assigned to receive either prednisolone 30 mg/d or placebo for 7 days and asked to complete a symptom diary for 14 days. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients with resolution of facial pain or pressure on day 7. Results: Of the 185 patients included in the trial (93 in the treatment group, 92 in the placebo group), 2 withdrew from the study and 9 were excluded from the primary analysis because of incomplete symptom reporting. The remaining 174 patients (88 in the treatment group, 86 in the placebo group) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The proportions of patients with resolution of facial pain or pressure on day 7 were 62.5% (55/88) in the prednisolone group and 55.8% (48/86) in the placebo group (absolute risk difference 6.7%, 95% confidence interval −7.9% to 21.2%). The groups were similar with regard to the decrease over time in the proportion of patients with total symptoms (combined symptoms of runny nose, postnasal discharge, nasal congestion, cough and facial pain) and health-related quality of life. Adverse events were mild and did not differ significantly between the groups. Interpretation: Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy had no clinically relevant beneficial effects among patients with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis. Netherlands Trial Register

  7. Preoperative hair removal and surgical site infections: network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, A; Saliou, P; Lucet, J C; Mimoz, O; Keita-Perse, O; Grandbastien, B; Bruyère, F; Boisrenoult, P; Lepelletier, D; Aho-Glélé, L S

    2015-10-01

    Preoperative hair removal has been used to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs) or to prevent hair from interfering with the incision site. We aimed to update the meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials about hair removal for the prevention of SSIs, and conduct network meta-analyses to combine direct and indirect evidence and to compare chemical depilation with clipping. The PubMed, ScienceDirect and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized controlled trials analysing different hair removal techniques and no hair removal in similar groups. Paired and network meta-analyses were conducted. Two readers independently assessed the study limitations for each selected article according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) method. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria. No study compared clipping with chemical depilation. Network meta-analyses with shaving as the reference showed significantly fewer SSIs with clipping, chemical depilation, or no depilation [relative risk 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.79; 0.60, 0.36-0.97; and 0.56, 0.34-0.96, respectively]. No significant difference was observed between the absence of depilation and chemical depilation or clipping (1.05, 0.55-2.00; 0.97, 0.51-1.82, respectively] or between chemical depilation and clipping (1.09, 0.59-2.01). This meta-analysis of 19 randomized controlled trials confirmed the absence of any benefit of depilation to prevent surgical site infection, and the higher risk of surgical site infection when shaving is used for depilation. Chemical depilation and clipping were compared for the first time. The risk of SSI seems to be similar with both methods. PMID:26320612

  8. Effect of Vitamin E on Oxaliplatin-induced Peripheral Neuropathy Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Zeinab; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most important limitations of oxaliplatin base regimen, which is the standard for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Evidence has shown that Vitamin E may be protective in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Vitamin E administration on prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods: This was a prospective randomized, controlled clinical trial. Patients with colorectal cancer and scheduled to receive oxaliplatin-based regimens were enrolled in this study. Enrolled patients were randomized into two groups. The first group received Vitamin E at a dose of 400 mg daily and the second group observed, until after the sixth course of the oxaliplatin regimen. For oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy assessment, we used the symptom experience diary questionnaire that completed at baseline and after the sixth course of chemotherapy. Only patients with a score of zero at baseline were eligible for this study. Results: Thirty-two patients were randomized to the Vitamin E group and 33 to the control group. There was no difference in the mean peripheral neuropathy score changes (after − before) between two groups, after sixth course of the oxaliplatin base regimen (mean difference [after − before] of Vitamin E group = 6.37 ± 2.85, control group = 6.57 ± 2.94; P = 0.78). Peripheral neuropathy scores were significantly increased after intervention compared with a base line in each group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results from this current trial demonstrate a lack of benefit for Vitamin E in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26682028

  9. Random-start GnRH antagonist for emergency fertility preservation: a self-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Miguel A; Brassesco, Mario; Sastre, Margalida; Gómez, Manuel; Herrero, Julio; Marque, Laura; Brassesco, Arturo; Espinós, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for emergency fertility preservation, regardless of the phase of the menstrual cycle. A self-controlled pilot clinical trial (NCT01385332) was performed in an acute-care teaching hospital and in two private reproductive centers in Barcelona, Spain. Eleven egg donors participated in the study. Two random-start gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocols were assessed in which ganirelix was initiated on either day 10 (protocol B) or on day 20 (protocol C) of the menstrual cycle and was continued until estradiol levels were below 60 pg/dL. These protocols were compared with a standard protocol (protocol A). The main outcome of interest was the number of metaphase 2 oocytes retrieved. Results from this study show that the number of mature oocytes retrieved was comparable across the different protocols (14.3±4.6 in the standard protocol versus 13.0±9.1 and 13.2±5.2 in protocols B and C, respectively; values expressed as mean ± standard deviation). The mean number of days needed for a GnRH antagonist to lower estradiol levels, as well as the ongoing pregnancy rates, were also similar when protocols B (stimulation in follicular phase) and C (stimulation on luteal phase) were compared with protocol A (standard stimulation). GnRH antagonists can be effectively used for random-start controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with an ovarian response similar to that of standard protocols, and the antagonists appear suitable for emergency fertility preservation in cancer patients. PMID:25709506

  10. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of idebenone in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Klopstock, Thomas; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Rouleau, Jacinthe; Heck, Suzette; Bailie, Maura; Atawan, Alaa; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Schubert, Marion; Garip, Aylin; Kernt, Marcus; Petraki, Diana; Rummey, Christian; Leinonen, Mika; Metz, Günther; Griffiths, Philip G.; Meier, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of inherited metabolic disease caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations have yet to translate into treatments of proven efficacy. Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy is the most common mitochondrial DNA disorder causing irreversible blindness in young adult life. Anecdotal reports support the use of idebenone in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, but this has not been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. We conducted a 24-week multi-centre double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 85 patients with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy due to m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C or mitochondrial DNA mutations. The active drug was idebenone 900 mg/day. The primary end-point was the best recovery in visual acuity. The main secondary end-point was the change in best visual acuity. Other secondary end-points were changes in visual acuity of the best eye at baseline and changes in visual acuity for both eyes in each patient. Colour-contrast sensitivity and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness were measured in subgroups. Idebenone was safe and well tolerated. The primary end-point did not reach statistical significance in the intention to treat population. However, post hoc interaction analysis showed a different response to idebenone in patients with discordant visual acuities at baseline; in these patients, all secondary end-points were significantly different between the idebenone and placebo groups. This first randomized controlled trial in the mitochondrial disorder, Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, provides evidence that patients with discordant visual acuities are the most likely to benefit from idebenone treatment, which is safe and well tolerated. PMID:21788663

  11. Do Motion Controllers Make Action Video Games Less Sedentary? A Randomized Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Tate, Deborah F.; Ward, Dianne S.; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Bowling, J. Michael; Kalyanaraman, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Sports- and fitness-themed video games using motion controllers have been found to produce physical activity. It is possible that motion controllers may also enhance energy expenditure when applied to more sedentary games such as action games. Young adults (N = 100) were randomized to play three games using either motion-based or traditional controllers. No main effect was found for controller or game pair (P > .12). An interaction was found such that in one pair, motion control (mean [SD] 0.96 [0.20] kcal · kg−1 · hr−1) produced 0.10 kcal · kg−1 · hr−1 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.17) greater energy expenditure than traditional control (0.86 [0.17] kcal · kg−1 · hr−1, P = .048). All games were sedentary. As currently implemented, motion control is unlikely to produce moderate intensity physical activity in action games. However, some games produce small but significant increases in energy expenditure, which may benefit health by decreasing sedentary behavior. PMID:22028959

  12. Do motion controllers make action video games less sedentary? A randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Tate, Deborah F; Ward, Dianne S; Ribisl, Kurt M; Bowling, J Michael; Kalyanaraman, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Sports- and fitness-themed video games using motion controllers have been found to produce physical activity. It is possible that motion controllers may also enhance energy expenditure when applied to more sedentary games such as action games. Young adults (N = 100) were randomized to play three games using either motion-based or traditional controllers. No main effect was found for controller or game pair (P > .12). An interaction was found such that in one pair, motion control (mean [SD] 0.96 [0.20] kcal · kg(-1) · hr(-1)) produced 0.10 kcal · kg(-1) · hr(-1) (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.17) greater energy expenditure than traditional control (0.86 [0.17] kcal · kg(-1) · hr(-1), P = .048). All games were sedentary. As currently implemented, motion control is unlikely to produce moderate intensity physical activity in action games. However, some games produce small but significant increases in energy expenditure, which may benefit health by decreasing sedentary behavior. PMID:22028959

  13. Hardware random number generator base on monostable multivibrators dedicated for distributed measurement and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Pawel

    2013-10-01

    The hardware random number generator based on the 74121 monostable multivibrators for applications in cryptographically secure distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources was presented. This device was implemented on the basis of the physical electronic vibration generator in which the circuit is composed of two "loop" 74121 monostable multivibrators, D flip-flop and external clock signal source. The clock signal, witch control D flip-flop was generated by a computer on one of the parallel port pins. There was presented programmed the author's acquisition process of random data from the measuring system to a computer. The presented system was designed, builded and thoroughly tested in the term of cryptographic security in our laboratory, what there is the most important part of this publication. Real cryptographic security was tested based on the author's software and the software environment called RDieHarder. The obtained results was here presented and analyzed in detail with particular reference to the specificity of distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources.

  14. Remote ischemic preconditioning to reduce contrast-induced nephropathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing use of pre- and posthydration protocols and low-osmolar instead of high-osmolar iodine-containing contrast media, the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is still significant. There is evidence that contrast media cause ischemia-reperfusion injury of the medulla. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a non-invasive, safe, and low-cost method to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury. Methods The RIPCIN study is a multicenter, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial in which 76 patients at risk of CIN will receive standard hydration combined with RIPC or hydration with sham preconditioning. RIPC will be applied by four cycles of 5 min ischemia and 5 min reperfusion of the forearm by inflating a blood pressure cuff at 50 mmHg above the actual systolic pressure. The primary outcome measure will be the change in serum creatinine from baseline to 48 to 72 h after contrast administration. Discussion A recent pilot study reported that RIPC reduced the incidence of CIN after coronary angioplasty. The unusual high incidence of CIN in this study is of concern and limits its generalizability. Therefore, we propose a randomized controlled trial to study whether RIPC reduces contrast-induced kidney injury in patients at risk for CIN according to the Dutch guidelines. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN76496973 PMID:24721127

  15. Music Training Increases Phonological Awareness and Reading Skills in Developmental Dyslexia: A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Flaugnacco, Elena; Lopez, Luisa; Terribili, Chiara; Montico, Marcella; Zoia, Stefania; Schön, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    There is some evidence for a role of music training in boosting phonological awareness, word segmentation, working memory, as well as reading abilities in children with typical development. Poor performance in tasks requiring temporal processing, rhythm perception and sensorimotor synchronization seems to be a crucial factor underlying dyslexia in children. Interestingly, children with dyslexia show deficits in temporal processing, both in language and in music. Within this framework, we test the hypothesis that music training, by improving temporal processing and rhythm abilities, improves phonological awareness and reading skills in children with dyslexia. The study is a prospective, multicenter, open randomized controlled trial, consisting of test, rehabilitation and re-test (ID NCT02316873). After rehabilitation, the music group (N = 24) performed better than the control group (N = 22) in tasks assessing rhythmic abilities, phonological awareness and reading skills. This is the first randomized control trial testing the effect of music training in enhancing phonological and reading abilities in children with dyslexia. The findings show that music training can modify reading and phonological abilities even when these skills are severely impaired. Through the enhancement of temporal processing and rhythmic skills, music might become an important tool in both remediation and early intervention programs.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02316873 PMID:26407242

  16. Music Training Increases Phonological Awareness and Reading Skills in Developmental Dyslexia: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Flaugnacco, Elena; Lopez, Luisa; Terribili, Chiara; Montico, Marcella; Zoia, Stefania; Schön, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    There is some evidence for a role of music training in boosting phonological awareness, word segmentation, working memory, as well as reading abilities in children with typical development. Poor performance in tasks requiring temporal processing, rhythm perception and sensorimotor synchronization seems to be a crucial factor underlying dyslexia in children. Interestingly, children with dyslexia show deficits in temporal processing, both in language and in music. Within this framework, we test the hypothesis that music training, by improving temporal processing and rhythm abilities, improves phonological awareness and reading skills in children with dyslexia. The study is a prospective, multicenter, open randomized controlled trial, consisting of test, rehabilitation and re-test (ID NCT02316873). After rehabilitation, the music group (N = 24) performed better than the control group (N = 22) in tasks assessing rhythmic abilities, phonological awareness and reading skills. This is the first randomized control trial testing the effect of music training in enhancing phonological and reading abilities in children with dyslexia. The findings show that music training can modify reading and phonological abilities even when these skills are severely impaired. Through the enhancement of temporal processing and rhythmic skills, music might become an important tool in both remediation and early intervention programs. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02316873 PMID:26407242

  17. Hydrotherapy for the Treatment of Pain in People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Lara-Palomo, Inmaculada; Saavedra-Hernández, Manuel; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating neurological disease. Several studies have reported that complementary and alternative therapies can have positive effects against pain in these patients. Objective. The objective was to investigate the effectiveness of an Ai-Chi aquatic exercise program against pain and other symptoms in MS patients. Methods. In this randomized controlled trial, 73 MS patients were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group for a 20-week treatment program. The experimental group underwent 40 sessions of Ai-Chi exercise in swimming pool and the control group 40 sessions of abdominal breathing and contraction-relaxation exercises in therapy room. Outcome variables were pain, disability, spasm, depression, fatigue, and autonomy, which were assessed before the intervention and immediately and at 4 and 10 weeks after the last treatment session. Results. The experimental group showed a significant (P < 0.028) and clinically relevant decrease in pain intensity versus baseline, with an immediate posttreatment reduction in median visual analogue scale scores of 50% that was maintained for up to 10 weeks. Significant improvements were also observed in spasm, fatigue, disability, and autonomy. Conclusion. According to these findings, an Ai-Chi aquatic exercise program improves pain, spasms, disability, fatigue, depression, and autonomy in MS patients. PMID:21785645

  18. The "Healthy Habits, Healthy Girls" randomized controlled trial for girls: study design, protocol, and baseline results.

    PubMed

    Leme, Ana Carolina Barco; Philippi, Sonia Tucunduva

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the study design, protocol, and baseline results of the "Healthy Habits, Healthy Girls" program. The intervention is being evaluated through a randomized controlled trial in 10 public schools in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Data on the following variables were collected and assessed at baseline and will be reevaluated at 7 and 12 months: body mass index, waist circumference, dietary intake, nutrition, physical activity, social cognitive mediators, physical activity level, sedentary behaviors, self-rated physical status, and overall self-esteem. According to the baseline results, 32.4% and 23.4% of girls were overweight in the intervention and control groups, respectively, and in both groups a higher percentage failed to meet daily recommendations for moderate and vigorous physical activity and maximum screen time (TV, computer, mobile devices). There were no significant differences between the groups for most of the variables, except age (p = 0.000) and waist circumference (p = 0.014). The study showed a gap in the Brazilian literature on protocols for randomized controlled trials to prevent obesity among youth. The current study may thus be an important initial contribution to the field. PMID:26248094

  19. Effect of pre-treatment with chlorhexidine on the retention of restorations: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Anelise Fernandes; Perroni, Ana Paula; Corrêa, Marcos Britto; Masotti, Alexandre Severo; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) application on etched dentin on the 6-month retention of restorations placed on non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). A randomized controlled split-mouth and triple blind trial was carried out. Patients (n=42) with at least two non-carious cervical lesions were included. NCCLs were randomly assigned to two groups: control (placebo solution) or test group (2% CHX solution for 60 s after acid etching and before the adhesive application). Class V restorations (n=169) were performed with an etch-and-rinse adhesive system and composite resin by 10 trained operators. A calibrated examiner evaluated the restorations at 1 week (baseline) and at 6 months using the FDI criteria. The primary outcome was retention of the restorations. The analysis of factors associated to failure of restorations was carried out by Fisher's exact test (α=0.05). After 6 months of follow-up, 3.4% (CI 95% 1.3-7.3) of the restorations failed. There was no statistically significant difference between control and CHX (p=0.920). Regarding the cavity variables, deeper (p=0.04), wider (p=0.004) and wedge-shaped (p=0.033) cavities failed more. Both treatments provided acceptable clinical performance of the restorations. The use of CHX as a adjuvant in dentin adhesion did not influence the retention of Class V restorations after 6 months of follow-up. PMID:26200146

  20. Ligustrazine for the Treatment of Unstable Angina: A Meta-Analysis of 16 Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Suman; Zhao, Wenli; Bu, Huaien; Zhao, Ye; Yu, Chunquan

    2016-01-01

    Ligustrazine is a principal ingredient of chuanxiong. Concerns regarding the evaluation of the effectiveness of ligustrazine in the treatment of UA have resulted in a meta-analysis combined with recent clinical evidence. Seven computer databases that included the China hospital knowledge database (CHKD), Wanfang Med Online, the Chinese medical journal database (CMJD), PubMed, Cochrane, Embase (Ovid), and Medline (Ovid) were systematically searched. We included randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Our systematic review identified 16 RCTs that met our eligibility criteria. Ligustrazine combined with conventional medicine was associated with an increased rate of marked improvement in symptoms and an increased rate of marked improvement of ECG compared with conventional Western medicine alone. Additionally, the use of ligustrazine was associated with significant trends in the reduction of the consumption of nitroglycerin and the level of fibrinogen when compared with conventional Western medicine alone. No firm results were found between the intervention and the control method groups in the reduction of the time of onset or the frequency of acute attack angina due to the high level of heterogeneity. In conclusion, our meta-analysis found that ligustrazine was associated with some benefits for people with unstable angina. PMID:27213001

  1. Training pharmacy workers in recognition, management, and prevention of STDs: district-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Patricia; Hughes, James; Carcamo, Cesar; Holmes, King K.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of an intervention for pharmacy workers in improving their recognition and management of sexually transmitted disease (STD) syndromes. METHODS: We randomly selected 14 districts (total population nearly 4 million) from the 24 districts of low socioeconomic status in Lima, Peru. We randomly assigned paired districts to receive training and support for management and prevention of STDs or a control intervention about management of diarrhoea. The STD intervention included interactive luncheon seminars on recognition and management of four STD syndromes (urethral discharge, vaginal discharge, genital ulcers, and pelvic inflammatory disease) and STD/HIV prevention counselling; monthly pharmacy visits by "prevention salespersons" who distributed materials that included "STD/HIV prevention packets" containing information, condoms, and cards given to patients for referral of their sex partners; and workshops for physicians on managing patients with STD syndromes referred from pharmacies. Standardized simulated patients visited pharmacies in intervention and control districts at one, three, and six months after training to assess outcomes. FINDINGS: Standardized simulated patients reported significantly better recognition and management (appropriate antimicrobial regimens provided for discharge syndromes and referral to specially trained physicians for genital ulcers or pelvic inflammatory disease) by pharmacy workers of all four STD syndromes. They also reported significantly more frequent recommendations for use of condoms and treatment of partners at pharmacies in intervention districts than in control districts (by "intention-to-train" analyses, P<0.05 for 47/48 primary outcome comparisons). CONCLUSION: Training was feasible and effectively improved pharmacy workers' practices. PMID:14758407

  2. Effects of yoga on chronic neck pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Dol

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of yoga in the management of chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain. The trials were published in the English language between January 1966 and December 2015. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess the quality of the trials. [Results] Three trials were identified and included in this review. A critical appraisal was performed on the trials, and the result indicated a high risk of bias. A narrative description was processed because of the small number of RCTs. Neck pain intensity and functional disability were significantly lower in the yoga groups than in the control groups. [Conclusion] Evidence from the 3 randomly controlled trials shows that yoga may be beneficial for chronic neck pain. The low-quality result of the critical appraisal and the small number of trials suggest that high-quality RCTs are required to examine further the effects of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain relief. PMID:27512290

  3. Effects of mailed advice on stress reduction among employees in Japan: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, N; Haratani, T; Iwata, N; Imanaka, Y; Murata, K; Araki, S

    1999-04-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to examine the effects of mailed advice on reducing psychological distress, blood pressure, serum lipids, and sick leave of workers employed in a manufacturing plant in Japan. Those who indicated higher psychological distress (defined as having GHQ scores of three or greater) in the baseline questionnaire survey (n = 226) were randomly assigned to an intervention group or a control group. Individualized letters were sent to the subjects of the intervention group, informing them of their stress levels and recommending an improvement in daily habits and other behaviors to reduce stress. Eighty-one and 77 subjects in the intervention and control groups, respectively, responded to the one-year follow-up survey. No significant intervention effect was observed for the GHQ scores, blood pressure, serum lipids, or sick leave (p > 0.05). The intervention effect was marginally significant for changes in regular breakfasts and daily alcohol consumption (p = 0.09). The intervention effect was marginally significant for the GHQ scores among those who initially did not eat breakfast regularly (p = 0.06). The study suggests that only sending mailed advice is not an effective measure for worksite stress reduction. Mailed advice which focuses on a particular subgroup (e.g., those who do not eat breakfast regularly) may be more effective. PMID:10319572

  4. Design and Implementation of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Genomic Counseling for Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Kevin; Gordon, Erynn S.; Sturm, Amy C.; Schmidlen, Tara J.; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Keller, Margaret A.; Stack, Catharine B.; García-España, J. Felipe; Bellafante, Mark; Tayal, Neeraj; Embi, Peter; Binkley, Philip; Hershberger, Ray E.; Sadee, Wolfgang; Christman, Michael; Marsh, Clay

    2014-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a randomized controlled trial to investigate the impact of genomic counseling on a cohort of patients with heart failure (HF) or hypertension (HTN), managed at a large academic medical center, the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center (OSUWMC). Our study is built upon the existing Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC®). OSUWMC patient participants with chronic disease (CD) receive eight actionable complex disease and one pharmacogenomic test report through the CPMC® web portal. Participants are randomized to either the in-person post-test genomic counseling—active arm, versus web-based only return of results—control arm. Study-specific surveys measure: (1) change in risk perception; (2) knowledge retention; (3) perceived personal control; (4) health behavior change; and, for the active arm (5), overall satisfaction with genomic counseling. This ongoing partnership has spurred creation of both infrastructure and procedures necessary for the implementation of genomics and genomic counseling in clinical care and clinical research. This included creation of a comprehensive informed consent document and processes for prospective return of actionable results for multiple complex diseases and pharmacogenomics (PGx) through a web portal, and integration of genomic data files and clinical decision support into an EPIC-based electronic medical record. We present this partnership, the infrastructure, genomic counseling approach, and the challenges that arose in the design and conduct of this ongoing trial to inform subsequent collaborative efforts and best genomic counseling practices. PMID:24926413

  5. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation during stressful military training: a randomized, controlled, double-blind field study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus K; Padilla, Genieleah A; Stanfill, Katherine E; Markham, Amanda E; Khosravi, Jasmine Y; Ward, Michael D Dial; Koehler, Matthew M

    2012-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) are anabolic prehormones involved in the synthesis of testosterone. Both have been shown to exert neuroprotective effects during stress. In this randomized, controlled, double-blind field study, we examined the effects of a 12-day DHEA regimen on stress indices in military men undergoing survival training. Forty-eight men were randomized to either a DHEA treatment group or placebo control group. The treatment group received 50 mg of oral DHEA supplementation daily for 5 days during classroom training followed by 7 days of 75 mg during stressful field operations. Control subjects received identical placebo pills. Salivary assays (DHEA[S], testosterone, and cortisol) were conducted at four time points: distal pre-stress (T1), proximal pre-stress (T2), mock-captivity stress (T3), and 24 h recovery (T4). Subjective distress was also assessed at T1, T3, and T4. As expected, DHEA treatment resulted in higher salivary concentrations of DHEA and DHEAS during daily living, mock-captivity stress, and recovery. Similar patterns were observed for salivary markers of anabolic balance: DHEA/cortisol, DHEAS/cortisol, and testosterone/cortisol concentration ratios. Despite notable time effects, no group differences emerged for subjective distress. A brief, low dose DHEA regimen yielded large increases in salivary DHEA(S) concentrations and enhanced anabolic balance throughout sustained military stress. These physiological changes did not extrapolate to subjective distress. PMID:21790446

  6. Effects of yoga on chronic neck pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Dol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of yoga in the management of chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain. The trials were published in the English language between January 1966 and December 2015. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess the quality of the trials. [Results] Three trials were identified and included in this review. A critical appraisal was performed on the trials, and the result indicated a high risk of bias. A narrative description was processed because of the small number of RCTs. Neck pain intensity and functional disability were significantly lower in the yoga groups than in the control groups. [Conclusion] Evidence from the 3 randomly controlled trials shows that yoga may be beneficial for chronic neck pain. The low-quality result of the critical appraisal and the small number of trials suggest that high-quality RCTs are required to examine further the effects of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain relief. PMID:27512290

  7. Global Postural Reeducation for patients with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Giovanni E.; Barreto, Rodrigo G. P.; Robinson, Caroline C.; Plentz, Rodrigo D. M.; Silva, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To systematically review randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) on patient-reported outcomes in conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Method An electronic search of MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and SciELO was performed from their inception to June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that analyzed pain and patient-reported outcomes were included in this review. The Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias Tool was used to evaluate risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was rated following the GRADE approach. There were no language restrictions. Results Eleven trials were included totaling 383 patients. Overall, the trials had high risk of bias. GPR was superior to no treatment but not to other forms of treatment for pain and disability. No placebo-controlled trials were found. Conclusion GPR is not superior to other treatments; however, it is superior to no treatment. Due to the lack of studies, it is unknown if GPR is better than placebo. The quality of the available evidence ranges from low to very low, therefore future studies may change the effect estimates of GPR in musculoskeletal conditions. PMID:27437710

  8. Noninvasive Ventilation for Preterm Twin Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Wang, Li; Li, Jie; Wang, Nan; Shi, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation has been proven to be effective strategies for reducing the need for endotracheal ventilation in preterm infant with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), however the best option needs to be further determined. A single center, paired design, randomized, controlled trial was conducted between Jan 2011 and July 2014. Preterm twins with RDS were included. One of a pair was randomized to NIPPV, while another to NCPAP. Surfactant was administrated as rescue treatment. The primary outcome was the need for endotracheal ventilation. The secondary outcomes were the complications. 143 pairs were randomized and 129 pairs finished the trial. The rates of endotracheal ventilation did not differ significantly between NIPPV and NCPAP groups (11.9% vs 19.6%, P = 0.080). This difference was not observed in the subgroup of infants who received surfactant therapy (11.1% vs 19.7%, P = 0.087). No secondary outcomes also differed significantly between the two groups. NIPPV did not result in a significantly lower incidence of intubation as compared with NCPAP in preterm twins with RDS. PMID:26399752

  9. Noninvasive Ventilation for Preterm Twin Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Wang, Li; Li, Jie; Wang, Nan; Shi, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation has been proven to be effective strategies for reducing the need for endotracheal ventilation in preterm infant with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), however the best option needs to be further determined. A single center, paired design, randomized, controlled trial was conducted between Jan 2011 and July 2014. Preterm twins with RDS were included. One of a pair was randomized to NIPPV, while another to NCPAP. Surfactant was administrated as rescue treatment. The primary outcome was the need for endotracheal ventilation. The secondary outcomes were the complications. 143 pairs were randomized and 129 pairs finished the trial. The rates of endotracheal ventilation did not differ significantly between NIPPV and NCPAP groups (11.9% vs 19.6%, P = 0.080). This difference was not observed in the subgroup of infants who received surfactant therapy (11.1% vs 19.7%, P = 0.087). No secondary outcomes also differed significantly between the two groups. NIPPV did not result in a significantly lower incidence of intubation as compared with NCPAP in preterm twins with RDS. PMID:26399752

  10. Is fresh frozen plasma clinically effective? A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Stanworth, S J; Brunskill, S J; Hyde, C J; McClelland, D B L; Murphy, M F

    2004-07-01

    Summary Randomized controlled trials of good quality are a recognized means to robustly assess the efficacy of interventions in clinical practice. A systematic identification and appraisal of all randomized trials involving fresh frozen plasma (FFP) has been undertaken in parallel to the drafting of the updated British Committee for Standards in Haematology guidelines on the use of FFP. A total of 57 trials met the criteria for inclusion in the review. Most clinical uses of FFP, currently recommended by practice guidelines, are not supported by evidence from randomized trials. In particular, there is little evidence for the effectiveness of the prophylactic use of FFP. Many published trials on the use of FFP have enrolled small numbers of patients, and provided inadequate information on the ability of the trial to detect meaningful differences in outcomes between the two patient groups. Other concerns about the design of the trials include the dose of FFP used, and the potential for bias. No studies have taken adequate account of the extent to which adverse effects might negate the clinical benefits of treatment with FFP. There is a need to consider how best to develop new trials to determine the efficacy of FFP in different clinical scenarios to provide the evidence base to support national guidelines for transfusion practice. Trials of modified FFP (e.g. pathogen inactivated) are of questionable value when there is little evidence that the standard product is an effective treatment. PMID:15198745

  11. Accelerated Hepatitis B Vaccine Schedule among Drug Users – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Lu-Yu; Grimes, Carolyn Z.; Tran, Thanh Quoc; Clark, April; Xia, Rui; Lai, Dejian; Troisi, Catherine; Williams, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B vaccine provides a model for improving uptake and completion of multi-dose vaccinations in the drug-using community. Methods DASH project conducted randomized controlled trial among not-in-treatment current drug users in two urban neighborhoods. Neighborhoods were cluster-randomized to receive a standard (HIV information) or enhanced (HBV vaccine acceptance/adherence) behavioral intervention; participants within clusters were randomized to a standard (0, 1, 6 mo) or accelerated (0, 1, 2 mo) vaccination schedule. Outcomes were completion of three-dose vaccine and HBV seroprotection. Results Of those screening negative for HIV/HBV, 77% accepted HB vaccination and 75% of those received all 3 doses. Injecting drug users (IDUs) on the accelerated schedule were significantly more likely to receive 3 doses (76%) than those on the standard schedule (66%, p=.04), although for drug users as a whole the adherence was 77% and 73%. No difference in adherence was observed between behavioral intervention groups. Predictors of adherence were older age, African American race, stable housing, and alcohol use. Cumulative HBV seroprotection (≥10 mIU/mL) was gained by 12 months by 65% of those completing. Seroprotection at 6 months was greater for the accelerated schedule group. Conclusions The accelerated vaccine schedule improves hepatitis B vaccination adherence among IDU. PMID:20936979

  12. How to Measure Motivational Interviewing Fidelity in Randomized Controlled Trials: Practical Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Jelsma, Judith G M; Mertens, Vera-Christina; Forsberg, Lisa; Forsberg, Lars

    2015-07-01

    Many randomized controlled trials in which motivational interviewing (MI) is a key intervention make no provision for the assessment of treatment fidelity. This methodological shortcoming makes it impossible to distinguish between high- and low-quality MI interventions, and, consequently, to know whether MI provision has contributed to any intervention effects. This article makes some practical recommendations for the collection, selection, coding and reporting of MI fidelity data, as measured using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Code. We hope that researchers will consider these recommendations and include MI fidelity measures in future studies. PMID:25962891

  13. Improvement of erectile function with Prelox: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Stanislavov, R; Nikolova, V; Rohdewald, P

    2008-01-01

    In a randomly allocated, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 50 patients with mild to moderate erectile dysfunction (ED) were treated for 1 month with placebo or a combination of L-arginine aspartate and Pycnogenol (Prelox). Patients reported sexual function from diaries. Testosterone levels and endothelial NO synthase (e-NOS) were monitored along with routine clinical chemistry. Intake of Pycnogenol for 1 month restored erectile function to normal. Intercourse frequency doubled. e-NOS in spermatozoa and testosterone levels in blood increased significantly. Cholesterol levels and blood pressure were lowered. No unwanted effects were reported. Prelox is a promising alternative to treat mild to moderate ED. PMID:17703218

  14. Screening Obstetric Ultrasound Training for a Five-Country Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Robert; Swanson, Jonathan; Marks, William; Goldsmith, Nicole; Vance, Cheryl; Sserwanga, Brian; Swanson, David; McClure, Elizabeth M.; Franklin, Holly; Mirza, Waseem; Mwenechanya, Musaku; Muyodi, David; Figuero, Lester; Bolamba, Victor Lokomba; Goldenberg, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    With decreased equipment cost, provision of ultrasound is now feasible in some low resource settings. Screening obstetric ultrasound may identify potential pregnancy complications and with this knowledge, allow women to plan to deliver at the appropriate level of care. In this paper we describe a ten-day course with quality assurance activities to train ultrasound-naïve non-physician healthcare professionals at mid-level health facilities to perform screening obstetric ultrasound. Those trained will participate in a cluster-randomized controlled trial to assess the impact of screening obstetric ultrasound on maternal and newborn outcomes. PMID:25415862

  15. A pilot randomized controlled trial comparing prenatal yoga to perinatal health education for antenatal depression.

    PubMed

    Uebelacker, Lisa A; Battle, Cynthia L; Sutton, Kaeli A; Magee, Susanna R; Miller, Ivan W

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing a prenatal yoga intervention to perinatal-focused health education in pregnant women with depression. Findings document acceptability and feasibility of the yoga intervention: no yoga-related injuries were observed, instructors showed fidelity to the yoga manual, and women rated interventions as acceptable. Although improvements in depression were not statistically different between groups, they favored yoga. This study provides support for a larger scale RCT examining prenatal yoga to improve mood during pregnancy. PMID:26385456

  16. Inappropriate statistical method in a parallel-group randomized controlled trial results in unsubstantiated conclusions.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Rositsa B; Allison, David B

    2016-01-01

    The conclusions of Cassani et al. in the January 2015 issue of Nutrition Journal (doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-14-5 ) cannot be substantiated by the analysis reported nor by the data themselves. The authors ascribed the observed decrease in inflammatory markers to the components of flaxseed and based their conclusions on within-group comparisons made between the final and the baseline measurements separately in each arm of the randomized controlled trial. However, this is an improper approach and the conclusions of the paper are invalid. A correct analysis of the data shows no such effects. PMID:27265269

  17. Implementing Quality Control on a Random Number Stream to Improve a Stochastic Weather Generator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For decades stochastic modelers have used computerized random number generators to produce random numeric sequences fitting a specified statistical distribution. Unfortunately, none of the random number generators we tested satisfactorily produced the target distribution. The result is generated d...

  18. Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE): a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Residual disability after stroke is substantial; 65% of patients at 6 months are unable to incorporate the impaired upper extremity into daily activities. Task-oriented training programs are rapidly being adopted into clinical practice. In the absence of any consensus on the essential elements or dose of task-specific training, an urgent need exists for a well-designed trial to determine the effectiveness of a specific multidimensional task-based program governed by a comprehensive set of evidence-based principles. The Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE) Stroke Initiative is a parallel group, three-arm, single blind, superiority randomized controlled trial of a theoretically-defensible, upper extremity rehabilitation program provided in the outpatient setting. The primary objective of ICARE is to determine if there is a greater improvement in arm and hand recovery one year after randomization in participants receiving a structured training program termed Accelerated Skill Acquisition Program (ASAP), compared to participants receiving usual and customary therapy of an equivalent dose (DEUCC). Two secondary objectives are to compare ASAP to a true (active monitoring only) usual and customary (UCC) therapy group and to compare DEUCC and UCC. Methods/design Following baseline assessment, participants are randomized by site, stratified for stroke duration and motor severity. 360 adults will be randomized, 14 to 106 days following ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke onset, with mild to moderate upper extremity impairment, recruited at sites in Atlanta, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. The Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) time score is the primary outcome at 1 year post-randomization. The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) hand domain is a secondary outcome measure. The design includes concealed allocation during recruitment, screening and baseline, blinded outcome assessment and intention to treat analyses. Our primary hypothesis is that the

  19. Patients’ ability to treat anaphylaxis using adrenaline autoinjectors: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Umasunthar, T; Procktor, A; Hodes, M; Smith, J G; Gore, C; Cox, H E; Marrs, T; Hanna, H; Phillips, K; Pinto, C; Turner, P J; Warner, J O; Boyle, R J

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous work has shown patients commonly misuse adrenaline autoinjectors (AAI). It is unclear whether this is due to inadequate training, or poor device design. We undertook a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate ability to administer adrenaline using different AAI devices. Methods We allocated mothers of food-allergic children prescribed an AAI for the first time to Anapen or EpiPen using a computer-generated randomization list, with optimal training according to manufacturer's instructions. After one year, participants were randomly allocated a new device (EpiPen, Anapen, new EpiPen, JEXT or Auvi-Q), without device-specific training. We assessed ability to deliver adrenaline using their AAI in a simulated anaphylaxis scenario six weeks and one year after initial training, and following device switch. Primary outcome was successful adrenaline administration at six weeks, assessed by an independent expert. Secondary outcomes were success at one year, success after switching device, and adverse events. Results We randomized 158 participants. At six weeks, 30 of 71 (42%) participants allocated to Anapen and 31 of 73 (43%) participants allocated to EpiPen were successful – RR 1.00 (95% CI 0.68–1.46). Success rates at one year were also similar, but digital injection was more common at one year with EpiPen (8/59, 14%) than Anapen (0/51, 0%, P = 0.007). When switched to a new device without specific training, success rates were higher with Auvi-Q (26/28, 93%) than other devices (39/80, 49%; P < 0.001). Conclusions AAI device design is a major determinant of successful adrenaline administration. Success rates were low with several devices, but were high using the audio-prompt device Auvi-Q. PMID:25850463

  20. Memantine and brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease: a 1-year randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Fox, Nick C; Barkhof, Frederik; Phul, Ravinder; Lemming, Ole; Scheltens, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of total brain atrophy (TBA) with serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using the Brain Boundary Shift Integral (BBSI), in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) over the course of 52 weeks of treatment with memantine or placebo. This was a multi-national, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose 1-year study. Patients were randomized (1 : 1) to treatment with placebo or memantine. Patients randomized to memantine were up-titrated to the target dose of 20 mg/day over 4 weeks. MRI scans were collected at screening and at Weeks 4, 42, and 52. Secondary efficacy assessments included several cognitive and behavioral scales. 518 patients were screened, 278 patients were randomized, and 217 patients completed the study. In the primary efficacy analysis, the differences in TBA rates between memantine (15.2 mL/year) and placebo (15.3 mL/year) were not statistically significant (-0.04 mL/year [(95% CI: -2.60, 2.52), p = 0.98]). There was a statistically significant correlation between change in TBA and change in most cognitive and behavioral scale scores. Patients who were not treated with acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) showed a significantly lower TBA rate than patients treated with AChEIs. Memantine had a placebo-level incidence of adverse events. There were no statistically significant differences between memantine and placebo in total brain or hippocampal atrophy rates in patients with probable AD treated for 1 year. The biological relevance of cerebral atrophy was supported by a significant correlation between rate of atrophy and decline in cognitive and behavioral outcomes. PMID:22269160

  1. Safety of polyethylene glycol 3350 solution in chronic constipation: randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and tolerability of aqueous solution concentrate (ASC) of polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 in patients with functional constipation. Patients and methods The patients who met Rome III diagnostic criteria for functional constipation were randomized in this multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blind study to receive once daily dose of PEG 3350 (17 g) ASC or placebo solution for 14 days. The study comprised a screening period (visit 1), endoscopy procedure (visits 2 and 3), and followup telephone calls 30 days post-treatment. Safety end points included adverse events (AEs), clinical laboratory evaluations, vital signs, and others. The primary end points were the proportion of patients with abnormalities of the oral and esophageal mucosa, detected by visual and endoscopic examination of the oral cavity and esophagus, respectively, compared with placebo. A secondary objective was to compare the safety and tolerability of ASC by evaluating AEs or adverse drug reactions. Results A total of 65 patients were enrolled in this study, 31 were randomized to PEG 3350 ASC and 34 were randomized to placebo, of which 62 patients completed the study. No patients in either group showed abnormalities in inflammation of the oral mucosa during visit 2 (before treatment) or visit 3 (after treatment). Fewer abnormalities of the esophageal mucosa were observed in the PEG 3350 ASC group than in the placebo group on visit 3, with no significant difference in the proportion of abnormalities between the treatment groups. Overall, 40 treatment-emergent AEs were observed in 48.4% of patients treated with PEG 3350 ASC, and 41 treatment-emergent AEs were observed in 55.9% of patients treated with placebo – nonsignificant difference of −7.5% (95% CI: −21.3, 6.3) between treatment groups. No serious AEs or deaths were reported, and no patient discontinued because of an AE. Conclusion PEG 3350 ASC is safe and well tolerated in patients with functional

  2. Computer decision support software safely improves glycemic control in the burn intensive care unit: a randomized controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Elizabeth A.; Jones, John A.; Wolf, Steven E.; Wade, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The optimal method for glycemic control in the critically burned patient is unknown. The purpose of this randomized controlled study was to determine the safety and efficacy of computer decision support software (CDSS) to control serum glucose concentration in a burn intensive care unit. Methods Eighteen adult burn/trauma patients receiving continuous insulin infusion were initially randomized to receive glucose management via a traditional paper-based protocol (PP) or a computer protocol (CP) for 72 hours, then crossed over to the alternate method for an additional 72 hours. Results Time in target glucose range (80-110 mg/dl) was higher in the CP group (47 ± 17% versus 41 ± 16.6%; p ≤ 0.05); time over target range was not significantly reduced in the CP group (49 ± 17.8% versus 54 ± 17.1; p = 0.08); and no difference was noted in time under target range of 80 mg/dl (CP 4.5 ± 2.8, PP 4.8 ± 3.3%; p = 0.8), under 60 mg/dl (p = 0.7), and under 40 mg/dl (p = 1.0). Severe hypoglycemic events (< 40 mg/dl) did not differ from the CP group compared to historical controls for patients receiving no insulin (p = 0.6). More glucose measurements were performed in the CP group (p = 0.0003), and nursing staff compliance with CP recommendations was greater (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Glycemic control using CDSS is safe and effective for the critically burned patient. Time in target range improved without increase in hypoglycemic events. CDSS enhanced consistency in practice, providing standardization among nursing staff. PMID:21240001

  3. Hyperbaric treatment for children with autism: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Daniel A; Rossignol, Lanier W; Smith, Scott; Schneider, Cindy; Logerquist, Sally; Usman, Anju; Neubrander, Jim; Madren, Eric M; Hintz, Gregg; Grushkin, Barry; Mumper, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    Background Several uncontrolled studies of hyperbaric treatment in children with autism have reported clinical improvements; however, this treatment has not been evaluated to date with a controlled study. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial to assess the efficacy of hyperbaric treatment in children with autism. Methods 62 children with autism recruited from 6 centers, ages 2–7 years (mean 4.92 ± 1.21), were randomly assigned to 40 hourly treatments of either hyperbaric treatment at 1.3 atmosphere (atm) and 24% oxygen ("treatment group", n = 33) or slightly pressurized room air at 1.03 atm and 21% oxygen ("control group", n = 29). Outcome measures included Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale, Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), and Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC). Results After 40 sessions, mean physician CGI scores significantly improved in the treatment group compared to controls in overall functioning (p = 0.0008), receptive language (p < 0.0001), social interaction (p = 0.0473), and eye contact (p = 0.0102); 9/30 children (30%) in the treatment group were rated as "very much improved" or "much improved" compared to 2/26 (8%) of controls (p = 0.0471); 24/30 (80%) in the treatment group improved compared to 10/26 (38%) of controls (p = 0.0024). Mean parental CGI scores significantly improved in the treatment group compared to controls in overall functioning (p = 0.0336), receptive language (p = 0.0168), and eye contact (p = 0.0322). On the ABC, significant improvements were observed in the treatment group in total score, irritability, stereotypy, hyperactivity, and speech (p < 0.03 for each), but not in the control group. In the treatment group compared to the control group, mean changes on the ABC total score and subscales were similar except a greater number of children improved in irritability (p = 0.0311). On the ATEC, sensory/cognitive awareness significantly improved (p = 0.0367) in the treatment group

  4. A Multidisciplinary Intervention Utilizing Virtual Communication Tools to Reduce Health Disparities: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, John F.; Welch, Madelyn; Rossman, Whitney E.; Carek, Stephen; Ludden, Thomas; Templin, Megan; Moore, Charity G.; Tapp, Hazel; Dulin, Michael; McWilliams, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Advances in technology are likely to provide new approaches to address healthcare disparities for high-risk populations. This study explores the feasibility of a new approach to health disparities research using a multidisciplinary intervention and advanced communication technology to improve patient access to care and chronic disease management. A high-risk cohort of uninsured, poorly-controlled diabetic patients was identified then randomized pre-consent with stratification by geographic region to receive either the intervention or usual care. Prior to enrollment, participants were screened for readiness to make a behavioral change. The primary outcome was the feasibility of protocol implementation, and secondary outcomes included the use of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) services and markers of chronic disease control. The intervention included a standardized needs assessment, individualized care plan, intensive management by a multidisciplinary team, including health coach-facilitated virtual visits, and the use of a cloud-based glucose monitoring system. One-hundred twenty-seven high-risk, potentially eligible participants were randomized. Sixty-one met eligibility criteria after an in-depth review. Due to limited resources and time for the pilot, we only attempted to contact 36 participants. Of these, we successfully reached 20 (32%) by phone and conducted a readiness to change screen. Ten participants screened in as ready to change and were enrolled, while the remaining 10 were not ready to change. Eight enrolled participants completed the final three-month follow-up. Intervention feasibility was demonstrated through successful implementation of 13 out of 14 health coach-facilitated virtual visits, and 100% of participants indicated that they would recommend the intervention to a friend. Protocol feasibility was demonstrated as eight of 10 participants completed the entire study protocol. At the end of the three-month intervention, participants had a

  5. A Multidisciplinary Intervention Utilizing Virtual Communication Tools to Reduce Health Disparities: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Emerson, John F; Welch, Madelyn; Rossman, Whitney E; Carek, Stephen; Ludden, Thomas; Templin, Megan; Moore, Charity G; Tapp, Hazel; Dulin, Michael; McWilliams, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Advances in technology are likely to provide new approaches to address healthcare disparities for high-risk populations. This study explores the feasibility of a new approach to health disparities research using a multidisciplinary intervention and advanced communication technology to improve patient access to care and chronic disease management. A high-risk cohort of uninsured, poorly-controlled diabetic patients was identified then randomized pre-consent with stratification by geographic region to receive either the intervention or usual care. Prior to enrollment, participants were screened for readiness to make a behavioral change. The primary outcome was the feasibility of protocol implementation, and secondary outcomes included the use of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) services and markers of chronic disease control. The intervention included a standardized needs assessment, individualized care plan, intensive management by a multidisciplinary team, including health coach-facilitated virtual visits, and the use of a cloud-based glucose monitoring system. One-hundred twenty-seven high-risk, potentially eligible participants were randomized. Sixty-one met eligibility criteria after an in-depth review. Due to limited resources and time for the pilot, we only attempted to contact 36 participants. Of these, we successfully reached 20 (32%) by phone and conducted a readiness to change screen. Ten participants screened in as ready to change and were enrolled, while the remaining 10 were not ready to change. Eight enrolled participants completed the final three-month follow-up. Intervention feasibility was demonstrated through successful implementation of 13 out of 14 health coach-facilitated virtual visits, and 100% of participants indicated that they would recommend the intervention to a friend. Protocol feasibility was demonstrated as eight of 10 participants completed the entire study protocol. At the end of the three-month intervention, participants had a

  6. Peers Promoting Physical Activity among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Bernardine M.; Stein, Kevin; Dunsiger, Shira

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although studies have shown that physical activity (PA) can reduce some treatment-related side-effects of breast cancer, there is a need to offer PA programs outside of research settings to reach more cancer survivors. We partnered with the American Cancer Society's Reach to Recovery program (RTR) to train their volunteers (breast cancer survivors) to deliver a 12-week PA intervention to other breast cancer survivors. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare the PA intervention delivered by RTR volunteers (PA plus RTR) with contact control (RTR Control). Eighteen RTR volunteers/coaches (mean age=54.9 years, mean years since diagnosis=7.0) delivered the contact control condition or the PA intervention. Seventy-six breast cancer survivors in New England (mean age=55.6 years, mean years since diagnosis=1.1) were randomized to one of the two groups. At baseline, 12 weeks (post-intervention) and at 24 weeks, participants wore an accelerometer for seven days, were interviewed about their PA and reported their motivational readiness for PA. Results Adjusted mixed effects longitudinal regression models showed significant group differences favoring the PA plus RTR group in minutes of moderate to vigorous PA at 12 weeks (mean difference=103 minutes/ week, p<.001) and 24 weeks (mean difference=34.7 minutes/week, p=.03). Results were corroborated with significant group differences in accelerometer data favoring the PA plus RTR group at both time-points. Conclusions Peer volunteers were able to significantly increase PA among cancer survivors relative to contact control. Partnerships with existing volunteer programs can help to widen the reach of behavioral interventions among cancer survivors. PMID:25110844

  7. Improving Motor Control in Walking: A Randomized Clinical Trial in Older Adults with Subclinical Walking Difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Brach, Jennifer S.; Lowry, Kristin; Perera, Subashan; Hornyak, Victoria; Wert, David; Studenski, Stephanie A.; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective was to test the proposed mechanism of action of a task-specific motor learning intervention by examining its effect on measures of the motor control of gait. Design Single blinded randomized clinical trial. Setting University research laboratory. Participants Forty older adults 65 years of age and older, with gait speed >1.0 m/s and impaired motor skill (Figure of 8 walk time > 8 secs). Interventions The two interventions included a task-oriented motor learning and a standard exercise program. Both interventions lasted 12 weeks, with twice weekly one hour physical therapist supervised sessions. Main Outcome Measures Two measure of the motor control of gait, gait variability and smoothness of walking, were assessed pre and post intervention by assessors masked to treatment arm. Results Of 40 randomized subjects; 38 completed the trial (mean age 77.1±6.0 years). Motor control group improved more than standard group in double support time variability (0.13 vs. 0.05 m/s; adjusted difference, AD=0.006, p=0.03). Smoothness of walking in the anterior/posterior direction improved more in motor control than standard for all conditions (usual: AD=0.53, p=0.05; narrow: AD=0.56, p=0.01; dual task: AD=0.57, p=0.04). Conclusions Among older adults with subclinical walking difficulty, there is initial evidence that task-oriented motor learning exercise results in gains in the motor control of walking, while standard exercise does not. Task-oriented motor learning exercise is a promising intervention for improving timing and coordination deficits related to mobility difficulties in older adults, and needs to be evaluated in a definitive larger trial. PMID:25448244

  8. Supportive Nursing Care and Satisfaction of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Navidian, Ali; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is the most important criterion in evaluating the quality of care. Besides, its assessment in patients with severe mental disorder treated by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly appropriate. The ECT is accompanied by lower satisfaction and may exacerbate the patients’ condition. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the effect of supportive nursing care on the satisfaction of patients receiving ECT. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted in the education center of Baharan psychiatric hospital, Zahedan, Iran. Seventy hospitalized patients receiving ECT were randomly divided into two groups of control (n = 35) and intervention (n = 35).The socio-personal and Webster Satisfaction Questionnaire were used as data collection tools. The intervention group received supportive nursing care by nurses trained in informational, emotional, and physical aspects. The control group received only regular nursing care. The levels of satisfaction were measured and compared between groups, before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software, and Chi-square, independent and paired t tests, as well as covariance analysis were performed. Results: The results showed similarities in socio-personal characteristics of both groups. However, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the means of satisfaction in the groups, predominantly for the intervention group. In other words, a significant difference (P < 0.001) was observed between the means of satisfaction of the intervention (54.71 ± 5.27) and control (36.28 ± 7.00) groups after intervention by controlling the effect of socio-personal variables. Conclusions: Results of the current study confirmed the effect of supportive nursing care on increasing the level of satisfaction in ECT receiving patients, recommending the use of this therapeutic method. PMID:26473077

  9. Randomized Controlled Trial of BASICS for Heavy Drinking Mandated and Volunteer Undergraduates: 12-Month Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Terlecki, Meredith A.; Buckner, Julia D.; Larimer, Mary E.; Copeland, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    This is the first randomized trial testing whether heavy drinking undergraduates mandated to the Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) program following a campus alcohol violation would benefit as much as heavy drinking volunteers up to one year post-intervention using control groups with high-risk drinkers to model disciplinary-related and naturalistic changes in drinking. Participants (61% male; 51% mandated; 84% Caucasian; Mage = 20.14 years) were screened for heavy drinking and randomized to BASICS (n = 115) or assessment-only control (n = 110). Outcome measures (drinking, alcohol problems) were collected at baseline, 4 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months post-intervention. At 4 weeks post-intervention, intent-to-treat multilevel longitudinal models showed that regardless of referral group (mandated or volunteer) BASICS significantly decreased weekly drinking, typical drinks, and peak drinks relative to controls (ds = .41-.92). BASICS had a large effect on decreases in alcohol problems (d = .87). At 12 months post-intervention, BASICS participants (regardless of referral group) reported significantly fewer alcohol problems (d = .56) compared to controls. Significant long-term intervention gains for peak and typical drinks were sustained in both referral groups relative to controls (ds = .42; .11). Referral group had no significant main effect and did not interact with intervention condition to predict outcomes. Given that BASICS was associated with less drinking and fewer alcohol problems (even among heavier drinking mandated students up to one year post-intervention), provision of BASICS-style programs within disciplinary settings may help reduce heavy and problematic drinking among at-risk students. PMID:25844834

  10. Training Mentors of Clinical and Translational Research Scholars: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pfund, Christine; House, Stephanie C.; Asquith, Pamela; Fleming, Michael F.; Buhr, Kevin A.; Burnham, Ellen L.; Gilmore, Julie M. Eichenberger; Huskins, W. Charles; McGee, Richard; Schurr, Kathryn; Shapiro, Eugene D.; Spencer, Kimberly C.; Sorkness, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a structured mentoring curriculum improves research mentoring skills. Method The authors conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) at 16 academic health centers (June 2010 to July 2011). Faculty mentors of trainees who were conducting clinical/translational research ≥50% of the time were eligible. The intervention was an eight-hour, case-based curriculum focused on six mentoring competencies. The primary outcome was the change in mentors’ self-reported pretest to posttest composite scores on the Mentoring Competency Assessment (MCA). Secondary outcomes included changes in the following: mentors’ awareness as measured by their self-reported retrospective change in MCA scores, mentees’ ratings of their mentors’ competency as measured by MCA scores, and mentoring behaviors as reported by mentors and their mentees. Results A total of 283 mentor–mentee pairs were enrolled: 144 mentors were randomized to the intervention; 139 to the control condition. Self-reported pre-/posttest change in MCA composite scores was higher for mentors in the intervention group compared with controls (P < .001). Retrospective changes in MCA composite scores between the two groups were even greater, and extended to all six subscale scores (P < .001). More intervention-group mentors reported changes in their mentoring practices than control mentors (P < .001). Mentees working with intervention-group mentors reported larger changes in retrospective MCA pre-/posttest scores (P = .003) and more changes in their mentors’ behavior (P = .002) than those paired with control mentors. Conclusions This RCT demonstrates that a competency-based research mentor training program can improve mentors’ skills. PMID:24667509

  11. Effects of Voice Rehabilitation After Radiation Therapy for Laryngeal Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tuomi, Lisa; Andréll, Paulin

    2014-08-01

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy for laryngeal cancer often experience voice problems. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of voice rehabilitation for laryngeal cancer patients after having undergone radiation therapy and to investigate whether differences between different tumor localizations with regard to rehabilitation outcomes exist. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine male patients irradiated for laryngeal cancer participated. Voice recordings and self-assessments of communicative dysfunction were performed 1 and 6 months after radiation therapy. Thirty-three patients were randomized to structured voice rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist and 36 to a control group. Furthermore, comparisons with 23 healthy control individuals were made. Acoustic analyses were performed for all patients, including the healthy control individuals. The Swedish version of the Self Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngeal Cancer and self-ratings of voice function were used to assess vocal and communicative function. Results: The patients who received vocal rehabilitation experienced improved self-rated vocal function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors who received voice rehabilitation had statistically significant improvements in voice quality and self-rated vocal function, whereas the control group did not. Conclusion: Voice rehabilitation for male patients with laryngeal cancer is efficacious regarding patient-reported outcome measurements. The patients experienced better voice function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors also showed an improvement in terms of acoustic voice outcomes. Rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist is recommended for laryngeal cancer patients after radiation therapy, particularly for patients with supraglottic tumors.

  12. EEG neurofeedback treatments in children with ADHD: an updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Fond, Guillaume; Lopez, Régis; Bioulac, Stéphanie; Philip, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We undertook a meta-analysis of published Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT) with semi-active control and sham-NF groups to determine whether Electroencephalogram-neurofeedback (EEG-NF) significantly improves the overall symptoms, inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity dimensions for probably unblinded assessment (parent assessment) and probably blinded assessment (teacher assessment) in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Data sources: A systematic review identified independent studies that were eligible for inclusion in a random effects meta-analysis. Data extraction: Effect sizes for ADHD symptoms were expressed as standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: Five identified studies met eligibility criteria, 263 patients with ADHD were included, 146 patients were trained with EEG-NF. On parent assessment (probably unblinded assessment), the overall ADHD score (SMD = −0.49 [−0.74, −0.24]), the inattention score (SMD = −0.46 [−0.76, −0.15]) and the hyperactivity/impulsivity score (SMD = −0.34 [−0.59, −0.09]) were significantly improved in patients receiving EEG-NF compared to controls. On teacher assessment (probably blinded assessment), only the inattention score was significantly improved in patients receiving EEG-NF compared to controls (SMD = −0.30 [−0.58, −0.03]). Conclusions: This meta-analysis of EEG-NF in children with ADHD highlights improvement in the inattention dimension of ADHD symptoms. Future investigations should pay greater attention to adequately blinded studies and EEG-NF protocols that carefully control the implementation and embedding of training. PMID:25431555

  13. Control logic to track the outputs of a command generator or randomly forced target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trankle, T. L.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for synthesizing time-invariant control logic to cause the outputs of a linear plant to track the outputs of an unforced (or randomly forced) linear dynamic system. The control logic uses feed-forward of the reference system state variables and feedback of the plant state variables. The feed-forward gains are obtained from the solution of a linear algebraic matrix equation of the Liapunov type. The feedback gains are the usual regulator gains, determined to stabilize (or augment the stability of) the plant, possibly including integral control. The method is applied here to the design of control logic for a second-order servomechanism to follow a linearly increasing (ramp) signal, an unstable third-order system with two controls to track two separate ramp signals, and a sixth-order system with two controls to track a constant signal and an exponentially decreasing signal (aircraft landing-flare or glide-slope-capture with constant velocity).

  14. Entomological impact and social participation in dengue control: a cluster randomized trial in Fortaleza, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Caprara, Andrea; De Oliveira Lima, José Wellington; Rocha Peixoto, Ana Carolina; Vasconcelos Motta, Cyntia Monteiro; Soares Nobre, Joana Mary; Sommerfeld, Johannes; Kroeger, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Background This study intended to implement a novel intervention strategy, in Brazil, using an ecohealth approach and analyse its effectiveness and costs in reducing Aedes aegypti vector density as well as its acceptance, feasibility and sustainability. The intervention was conducted from 2012 to 2013 in the municipality of Fortaleza, northeast Brazil. Methodology A cluster randomized controlled trial was designed by comparing ten intervention clusters with ten control clusters where routine vector control activities were conducted. The intervention included: community workshops; community involvement in clean-up campaigns; covering the elevated containers and in-house rubbish disposal without larviciding; mobilization of schoolchildren and senior inhabitants; and distribution of information, education and communication (IEC) materials in the community. Results Differences in terms of social participation, commitment and leadership were present in the clusters. The results showed the effectiveness of the intervention package in comparison with the routine control programme. Differences regarding the costs of the intervention were reasonable and could be adopted by public health services. Conclusions Embedding social participation and environmental management for improved dengue vector control was feasible and significantly reduced vector densities. Such a participatory ecohealth approach offers a promising alternative to routine vector control measures. PMID:25604760

  15. Effect of Chromium Supplementation on Glucose Metabolism and Lipids: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. A systematic review of the effect of chromium supplementation on glucose metabolism and lipid levels. Research Design and Methods. Literature search conducted in MEDLINE and Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau. Eligible studies were English language randomized controlled trials of chromium ...

  16. Implementing Randomized Controlled Trials in Preschool Settings That Include Young Children with Disabilities: Considering the Context of Strain and Bovey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In this commentary, developments related to conducting randomized controlled trials in authentic preschool settings that include young children with disabilities are discussed in relation to the Strain and Bovey study.

  17. Effectiveness of a Novel Integrative Online Treatment for Depression (Deprexis): Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Thomas; Caspar, Franz; Beevers, Christopher G; Andersson, Gerhard; Weiss, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with immense suffering and costs, and many patients receive inadequate care, often because of the limited availability of treatment. Web-based treatments may play an increasingly important role in closing this gap between demand and supply. We developed the integrative, Web-based program Deprexis, which covers therapeutic approaches such as behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, mindfulness/acceptance exercises, and social skills training. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the Web-based intervention in a randomized controlled trial. Methods There were 396 adults recruited via Internet depression forums in Germany, and they were randomly assigned in an 80:20 weighted randomization sequence to either 9 weeks of immediate-program-access as an add-on to treatment-as-usual (N = 320), or to a 9-week delayed-access plus treatment-as-usual condition (N = 76). At pre- and post-treatment and 6-month follow-up, we measured depression (Beck Depression Inventory) as the primary outcome measure and social functioning (Work and Social Adjustment Scale) as the secondary outcome measure. Completer analyses and intention-to-treat analyses were performed. Results Of 396 participants, 216 (55%) completed the post-measurement 9 weeks later. Available case analyses revealed a significant reduction in depression severity (BDI), Cohen’s d = .64 (CI 95% = 0.33 - 0.94), and significant improvement in social functioning (WSA), Cohen’s d = .64, 95% (CI 95% = 0.33 - 0.95). These improvements were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Intention-to-treat analyses confirmed significant effects on depression and social functioning improvements (BDI: Cohen’s d = .30, CI 95% = 0.05 - 0.55; WSA: Cohen’s d = .36, CI 95% = 0.10 - 0.61). Moreover, a much higher percentage of patients in the intervention group experienced a significant reduction of depression symptoms (BDI: odds ratio [OR] = 6.8, CI 95% = 2.90 - 18.19) and recovered more often (OR

  18. Supported Telemonitoring and Glycemic Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes: The Telescot Diabetes Pragmatic Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Sarah H.; Hanley, Janet; Lewis, Stephanie C.; McKnight, John A.; Padfield, Paul L.; Parker, Richard A.; Pinnock, Hilary; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring of blood glucose among people with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin does not appear to be effective in improving glycemic control. We investigated whether health professional review of telemetrically transmitted self-monitored glucose results in improved glycemic control in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods and Findings We performed a randomized, parallel, investigator-blind controlled trial with centralized randomization in family practices in four regions of the United Kingdom among 321 people with type 2 diabetes and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) >58 mmol/mol. The supported telemonitoring intervention involved self-measurement and transmission to a secure website of twice-weekly morning and evening glucose for review by family practice clinicians who were not blinded to allocation group. The control group received usual care, with at least annual review and more frequent reviews for people with poor glycemic or blood pressure control. HbA1c assessed at 9 mo was the primary outcome. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. 160 people were randomized to the intervention group and 161 to the usual care group between June 6, 2011, and July 19, 2013. HbA1c data at follow-up were available for 146 people in the intervention group and 139 people in the control group. The mean (SD) HbA1c at follow-up was 63.0 (15.5) mmol/mol in the intervention group and 67.8 (14.7) mmol/mol in the usual care group. For primary analysis, adjusted mean HbA1c was 5.60 mmol/mol / 0.51% lower (95% CI 2.38 to 8.81 mmol/mol/ 95% CI 0.22% to 0.81%, p = 0·0007). For secondary analyses, adjusted mean ambulatory systolic blood pressure was 3.06 mmHg lower (95% CI 0.56–5.56 mmHg, p = 0.017) and mean ambulatory diastolic blood pressure was 2.17 mmHg lower (95% CI 0.62–3.72, p = 0.006) among people in the intervention group when compared with usual care after adjustment for baseline differences and minimization strata. No significant

  19. Auricular acupuncture for chemically dependent pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial of the NADA protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of maternal drug use during pregnancy in North America has been estimated to be as high as 6-10%. The consequences for the newborn include increased risk for perinatal mortality and ongoing physical, neurobehavioral, and psychosocial problems. Methadone is frequently used to wean women off street drugs but is implicated as a cause of adverse fetal/neonatal outcomes itself. The purpose of our study was to test the ability of maternal acupuncture treatment among mothers who use illicit drugs to reduce the frequency and severity of withdrawal symptoms among their newborns. Methods We randomly assigned chemically dependent pregnant women at BC Women’s Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia to daily acupuncture treatments versus usual care. By necessity, neither our participants nor acupuncturists were blinded as to treatment allocation. Our primary outcome was days of neonatal morphine treatment for symptoms of neonatal withdrawal. Secondary neonatal outcomes included admission to a neonatal ICU and transfer to foster care. Results We randomized 50 women to acupuncture and 39 to standard care. When analyzed by randomized groups, we did not find benefit of acupuncture; the average length of treatment with morphine for newborns in the acupuncture group was 2.7 (6.3) compared to 2.8 (7.0) in the control group. Among newborns of women who were compliant with the acupuncture regime, we observed a reduction of 2.1 and 1.5 days in length of treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome compared to the non-compliant and control groups, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible treatment to assist mothers to reduce their dosage of methadone. Our results should encourage ongoing studies to test the ability of acupuncture to mitigate the severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome among their newborns. Clinical Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov registry: W05

  20. Safety data from randomized controlled trials: applying models for recurrent events.

    PubMed

    Hengelbrock, Johannes; Gillhaus, Johanna; Kloss, Sebastian; Leverkus, Friedhelm

    2016-07-01

    Simple descriptive listings and inference statistics based on 2×2 tables are still the most common way of summarizing and reporting adverse events data from randomized controlled trials, although these methods do not account for differences in observation times between treatment groups. Using standard methods from survival analysis such as the Cox model or Kaplan-Meier estimates would overcome this problem but limit the analysis to the first safety-related event of each subject. As an alternative, we discuss two models for recurrent events data-the Andersen-Gill and Prentice-Williams-Peterson model-regarding their applicability to safety data from randomized controlled trials. We argue that these models can be used to estimate two different quantities: a direct treatment effect on the risk of an event (Prentice-Williams-Peterson) and a total treatment effect as sum of the direct effect and the treatment's indirect effect via the event history (Anderson-Gill). Using simulated data, we illustrate the difference between these treatment effects and analyze the performance of both models in different scenarios. Because both models are limited to the analysis of cause-specific hazards if competing risks are present, we suggest to incorporate estimates of the mean frequency of events in the analysis to additionally allow the comparison of treatment effects on absolute event probabilities. We demonstrate the application of both models and the mean frequency function to safety endpoints with an illustrative analysis of data from a randomized phase-III study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27291933

  1. Randomized, Controlled Trial of an Intervention for Toddlers With Autism: The Early Start Denver Model

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Geraldine; Rogers, Sally; Munson, Jeffrey; Smith, Milani; Winter, Jamie; Greenson, Jessica; Donaldson, Amy; Varley, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To conduct a randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a comprehensive developmental behavioral intervention, for improving outcomes of toddlers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). METHODS Forty-eight children diagnosed with ASD between 18 and 30 months of age were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (1) ESDM intervention, which is based on developmental and applied behavioral analytic principles and delivered by trained therapists and parents for 2 years; or (2) referral to community providers for intervention commonly available in the community. RESULTS Compared with children who received community-intervention, children who received ESDM showed significant improvements in IQ, adaptive behavior, and autism diagnosis. Two years after entering intervention, the ESDM group on average improved 17.6 standard score points (1 SD:15 points) compared with 7.0 points in the comparison group relative to baseline scores. The ESDM group maintained its rate of grow thin adaptive behavior compared with a normative sample of typically developing children. In contrast, over the 2-year span, the comparison group showed greater delays in adaptive behavior. Children who received ESDM also were more likely to experience a change in diagnosis from autism to pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified, than the comparison group. CONCLUSIONS This is the first randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate the efficacy of a comprehensive developmental behavioral intervention for toddlers with ASD for improving cognitive and adaptive behavior and reducing severity of ASD diagnosis. Results of this study underscore the importance of early detection of and intervention in autism. PMID:19948568

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury in Latin America: Lifespan Analysis Randomized Control Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Chesnut, Randall M.; Temkin, Nancy; Carney, Nancy; Dikmen, Sureyya; Pridgeon, Jim; Barber, Jason; Celix, Juanita M.; Chaddock, Kelley; Cherner, Marianna; Hendrix, Terence; Lujan, Silvia; Machamer, Joan; Petroni, Gustavo; Rondina, Carlos; Videtta, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Background Although in the developed world the intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor is considered “standard of care” for patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), its usefulness to direct treatment decisions has never been tested rigorously. Objective The primary focus is to conduct a high quality randomized, controlled trial to determine if ICP monitoring used to direct TBI treatment improves patient outcomes. By providing education, equipment, and structure, the project will enhance the research capacity of the collaborating investigators and will foster the collaborations established during earlier studies (add refs to papers from earlier studies). Methods Study centers were selected that routinely treated ICP based on clinical examination and CT imaging using internal protocols. We randomize patients to either an ICP Monitor Group or an Imaging and Clinical Examination Group. Treatment decisions for the ICP Monitor Group are guided by ICP monitoring, based on established guidelines. Treatment decisions for the Imaging and Clinical Examination Group are made using a single protocol derived from those previously being used at those centers. Expected Outcomes There are two study hypotheses: 1) Patients with severe TBI whose acute care treatment is managed using ICP monitors will have improved outcomes and 2) incorporating ICP monitoring into the care of patients with severe TBI will minimize complications and decrease length of ICU stay. Discussion This clinical trial tests the effectiveness of a management protocol based on technology considered pivotal to brain trauma treatment in the developed world - the ICP monitor. A randomized controlled trial of ICP monitoring has never been performed - a critical gap in the evidence base that supports the role of ICP monitoring in TBI care. As such, the results of this RCT will have global implications regardless of the level of development of the trauma system. PMID:22986600

  3. A Behavioral Intervention for War-Affected Youth in Sierra Leone: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; McBain, Ryan; Newnham, Elizabeth A.; Akinsulure-Smith, Adeyinka M.; Brennan, Robert T.; Weisz, John R.; Hansen, Nathan B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Youth in war-affected regions are at risk for poor psychological, social, and educational outcomes. Effective interventions are needed to improve mental health, social behavior, and school functioning. This randomized controlled trial tested the effectiveness of a 10-session cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)–based group mental health intervention for multisymptomatic war-affected youth (aged 15–24 years) in Sierra Leone. Method War-affected youth identified by elevated distress and impairment via community screening were randomized (stratified by sex and age) to the Youth Readiness Intervention (YRI) (n = 222) or to a control condition (n = 214). After treatment, youth were again randomized and offered an education subsidy immediately (n = 220) or waitlisted (n = 216). Emotion regulation, psychological distress, prosocial attitudes/behaviors, social support, functional impairment, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were assessed at pre- and postintervention and at 6-month follow-up. For youth in school, enrollment, attendance, and classroom performance were assessed after 8 months. Linear mixed-effects regressions evaluated outcomes. Results The YRI showed significant postintervention effects on emotion regulation, prosocial attitudes/behaviors, social support, and reduced functional impairment, and significant follow-up effects on school enrollment, school attendance, and classroom behavior. In contrast, education subsidy was associated with better attendance but had no effect on mental health or functioning, school retention, or classroom behavior. Interactions between education subsidy and YRI were not significant. Conclusion YRI produced acute improvements in mental health and functioning as well as longer-term effects on school engagement and behavior, suggesting potential to prepare war-affected youth for educational and other opportunities. Clinical trial registration information-Trial of the Youth Readiness Intervention (YRI

  4. Mavoglurant in fragile X syndrome: Results of two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Des Portes, Vincent; Hagerman, Randi; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Charles, Perrine; Visootsak, Jeannie; Brinkman, Marc; Rerat, Karin; Koumaras, Barbara; Zhu, Liansheng; Barth, Gottfried Maria; Jaecklin, Thomas; Apostol, George; von Raison, Florian

    2016-01-13

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and autistic spectrum disorder, is typically caused by transcriptional silencing of the X-linked FMR1 gene. Work in animal models has described altered synaptic plasticity, a result of the up-regulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated signaling, as a putative downstream effect. Post hoc analysis of a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover phase 2 trial suggested that the selective mGluR5 antagonist mavoglurant improved behavioral symptoms in FXS patients with completely methylated FMR1 genes. We present the results of two phase 2b, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group studies of mavoglurant in FXS, designed to confirm this result in adults (n = 175, aged 18 to 45 years) and adolescents (n = 139, aged 12 to 17 years). In both trials, participants were stratified by methylation status and randomized to receive mavoglurant (25, 50, or 100 mg twice daily) or placebo over 12 weeks. Neither of the studies achieved the primary efficacy end point of improvement on behavioral symptoms measured by the Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community Edition using the FXS-specific algorithm (ABC-C(FX)) after 12 weeks of treatment with mavoglurant. The safety and tolerability profile of mavoglurant was as previously described, with few adverse events. Therefore, under the conditions of our study, we could not confirm the mGluR theory of FXS nor the ability of the methylation state of the FMR1 promoter to predict mavoglurant efficacy. Preclinical results suggest that future clinical trials might profitably explore initiating treatment in a younger population with longer treatment duration and longer placebo run-ins and identifying new markers to better assess behavioral and cognitive benefits. PMID:26764156

  5. Effects of oral vitamin E on treatment of atopic dermatitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jaffary, Fariba; Faghihi, Gita; Mokhtarian, Arghavan; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) remains to be determined; recently a possible change in the immune system with production of immunoglobulins is proposed. As vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, with the ability to decrease the serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in atopic patients, we aimed to evaluate the effect of oral vitamin E on treatment of AD. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprised seventy participants with mild-to-moderate AD, based on the Hanifin and Rajka diagnostic criteria. The patients were randomly selected from teaching skin clinics in Isfahan, Iran. They were randomly assigned to two groups of equal number, receiving vitamin E (400 IU/day) and placebo for four 4 months. Each month, the extent, severity, and subjective symptoms including itch and sleeplessness were measured by SCORAD index. Three months after the end of intervention, the recurrence rate was assessed. Results: The improvement in all symptoms, except sleeplessness, was significantly higher in the group receiving vitamin E than in controls (–1.5 vs. 0.218 in itching, –10.85 vs. –3.54 in extent of lesion, and –11.12 vs. –3.89 in SCORAD index, respectively, P < 0.05). Three months after the end of intervention, the recurrence rate of AD was evaluated. Recurrence rate between all 42 individuals, who remained in the study, was 18.6%. Recurrence ratio of the group receiving vitamin E compared to the placebo group was 1.17, without significant differences between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: This study suggests that vitamin E can improve the symptoms and the quality of life in patients with AD. As vitamin E has no side effects with a dosage of 400 IU/day, it can be recommended for the treatment of AD. PMID:26941808

  6. Randomized controlled trial of the Medifast 5 & 1 Plan for weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Shikany, James M.; Thomas, Amy S.; Beasley, T. Mark; Lewis, Cora E.; Allison, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Medifast 5 & 1 Plan (MD) is a portion-controlled, nutritionally-balanced, low-fat weight-loss plan. We studied the effects of MD compared with a reduced-energy, food-based diet (FB) on body weight, waist circumference, fat mass, and other measures in adults. Design We conducted a 2 parallel-arm, randomized, controlled trial comparing MD to FB over 52 weeks. A total of 120 men and women aged 19-65 years with BMI ≥35 and ≤50 kg/m2 were randomized to MD (n = 60) or FB (n = 60). Follow-up included a 26-week weight-loss phase and 26-week weight-maintenance phase. Anthropometric, body composition, biochemical, and appetite/satiety measures were performed at baseline, 26 and 52 weeks. An intention-to-treat, linear mixed models analysis was the primary analysis. Results Fifty MD subjects (83.3%) and 45 FB subjects (75.0%) completed the study on assigned treatment. At 26 weeks, race-adjusted mean weight loss was 7.5 kg in MD subjects vs. 3.8 kg in FB subjects (P = 0.0002 for difference); reduction in waist circumference was 5.7 cm in MD vs. 3.7 cm in FB (P = 0.0064); and fat mass loss was 6.4 kg in MD vs. 3.7 kg in FB (P = 0.0011). At 52 weeks, the corresponding reductions were 4.7 vs. 1.9 kg (P = 0.0004); 5.0 vs. 3.6 cm (P = 0.0082); and 4.1 vs. 1.9 kg (P = 0.0019) in MD and FB subjects, respectively. Conclusion In obese adults, MD resulted in significantly greater reductions in body weight and fat compared with an FB diet for one year after randomization. PMID:23567927

  7. The HAART cell phone adherence trial (WelTel Kenya1): a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Richard T; Mills, Edward J; Kariri, Antony; Ritvo, Paul; Chung, Michael; Jack, William; Habyarimana, James; Karanja, Sarah; Barasa, Samson; Nguti, Rosemary; Estambale, Benson; Ngugi, Elizabeth; Ball, T Blake; Thabane, Lehana; Kimani, Joshua; Gelmon, Lawrence; Ackers, Marta; Plummer, Francis A

    2009-01-01

    Background The objectives are to compare the effectiveness of cell phone-supported SMS messaging to standard care on adherence, quality of life, retention, and mortality in a population receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nairobi, Kenya. Methods and Design A multi-site randomized controlled open-label trial. A central randomization centre provided opaque envelopes to allocate treatments. Patients initiating ART at three comprehensive care clinics in Kenya will be randomized to receive either a structured weekly SMS ('short message system' or text message) slogan (the intervention) or current standard of care support mechanisms alone (the control). Our hypothesis is that using a structured mobile phone protocol to keep in touch with patients will improve adherence to ART and other patient outcomes. Participants are evaluated at baseline, and then at six and twelve months after initiating ART. The care providers keep a weekly study log of all phone based communications with study participants. Primary outcomes are self-reported adherence to ART and suppression of HIV viral load at twelve months scheduled follow-up. Secondary outcomes are improvements in health, quality of life, social and economic factors, and retention on ART. Primary analysis is by 'intention-to-treat'. Sensitivity analysis will be used to assess per-protocol effects. Analysis of covariates will be undertaken to determine factors that contribute or deter from expected and determined outcomes. Discussion This study protocol tests whether a novel structured mobile phone intervention can positively contribute to ART management in a resource-limited setting. Trial Registration Trial Registration Number: NCT00830622 PMID:19772596

  8. Adaptive control of the propagation of ultrafast light through random and nonlinear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Mark David

    2001-12-01

    Ultrafast light sources generate coherent pulses with durations of less than one picosecond, and represent the next generation of illuminators for medical imaging and optical communications applications. Such sources are already widely used experimentally. Correction of temporal widths or pulse envelopes after traversal of optically non-ideal materials is critical for the delivery of optimal ultrashort pulses. It is important to investigate the physical mechanisms that distort pulses and to develop and implement methods for minimizing these effects. In this work, we investigate methods for characterizing and manipulating pulse propagation dynamics in random (scattering) and nonlinear optical media. In particular, we use pulse shaping to manipulate the light field of ultrashort infrared pulses. Application of spectral phase by a liquid crystal spatial light modulator is used to control the temporal pulse shape. The applied phase is controlled by a genetic algorithm that adaptively responds to the feedback from previous phase profiles. Experiments are detailed that address related aspects of the character of ultrafast pulses-the short timescales and necessarily wide frequency bandwidths. Material dispersion is by definition frequency dependent. Passage through an inhomogeneous system of randomly situated boundaries (scatterers) causes additional distortion of ballistic pulses due to multiple reflections. The reflected rays accumulate phase shifts that depend on the separation of the reflecting boundaries and the photon frequency. Ultrafast bandwidths present a wide range of frequencies for dispersion and interaction with macroscopic dielectric structure. The shaper and adaptive learning algorithm are used to reduce these effects, lessening the impact of the scattering medium on propagating pulses. The timescale of ultrashort pulses results in peak intensities that interact with the electronic structure of optical materials to induce polarization that is no longer

  9. Intravenous immunoglobulin and idiopathic secondary recurrent miscarriage: a multicentered randomized placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Mary D.; Kutteh, William H.; Purkiss, Susan; Librach, Cliff; Schultz, Patricia; Houlihan, Edwina; Liao, Chuanhong

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic secondary recurrent miscarriage may be associated with an abnormal maternal immune response to subsequent pregnancies. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been studied in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with conflicting results. Therefore, a definitive trial was proposed. METHODS We conducted an investigator-initiated, multicentered, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial comparing IVIG with saline in women with idiopathic secondary recurrent miscarriage, defined as a history of at least one prior ongoing pregnancy followed by three or more consecutive unexplained miscarriages. Subjects received either IVIG 500 mg/kg or the equivalent volume of normal saline. Preconception infusions were administered 14–21 days from the projected next menstrual period. With documentation of pregnancy, the subject received the same infusion every 4 weeks until 18–20 weeks of gestation. The primary outcome was an ongoing pregnancy of at least 20 weeks of gestation. RESULTS A total of 82 patients enrolled, of whom 47 had an index pregnancy. All ongoing pregnancies resulted in live births. Therefore, the live birth rates were 70% (16/23) in the IVIG group and 63% (15/24) in the control group (P = 0.760); odds ratio (OR) 1.37 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41–4.61]. Including only clinical pregnancies (embryo with cardiac activity at 6 weeks of gestation), the live birth rates were equivalent, 94% (16/17) and (15/16), respectively (P > 0.999); OR 1.07 (95% CI 0.06–18.62). Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating IVIG for idiopathic secondary recurrent miscarriage revealed live birth rates of 70% (31/44) in the IVIG group and 62% (28/45) in the control group (P = 0.503); common OR 1.44 (95% CI 0.59–3.48). CONCLUSIONS This is the largest RCT to date in which IVIG was evaluated in women with idiopathic secondary recurrent miscarriage; no treatment benefit was found. The meta-analysis, which combined our study

  10. Topical Tacrolimus versus Hydrocortisone on Atopic Dermatitis in Paediatric Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M F; Nandi, A K; Kabir, S; Kamal, M; Basher, M S; Banu, L A

    2015-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease in early childhood. Atopic dermatitis is familial disease, often coexists with other atopic diseases with multiple risk factors associated with atopic eczema. The disease is more frequent in urban areas compared with rural areas. Changes in nutrition and a decrease in infant breast-feeding and respiratory allergies are contributory factors for the condition. A Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was carried to compare the efficacy and safety of Tacrolimus ointment with a topical corticosteroid reference therapy. A total 60 patients aged between 2 to 10 years, having atopic dermatitis for at least one year and comply Hanifin-Rajka criteria were selected using random number table and allocated into study and control groups through randomization. Study group was treated with topical Tacrolimus 0.03% twice daily for three weeks, while the control group was treated with 1% Hydrocortisone acetate for the same period. Both groups had a washed out phase for 2 weeks with a follow up period of 6 weeks. Eczema Area and Severity lndex (EASI) was assessed at baseline and three weeks after treatment. Efficacy was evaluated at each visit by six clinical signs of atopic dermatitis through measurement of the affected surface area and the EASI score in each of four body regions. Before intervention, in study group mean EASI score was 11.29 with a SD of 2.14, while in control group it was 11.05 with a SD of 2.46. Difference was statistically insignificant (p>0.05). At the end of the treatment, in study group mean EASI score was 4.86 with a SD of 1.01, while in control group it was 7.97 with a SD of 1.80. Statistically high significant difference was observed between EASI scores of two groups before and after the treatment (p<0.001). After getting treatment with Tacrolimus, median reduction of EASI score was 56.07 in study group, while getting treatment with Hydrocortisone, median reduction of EASI score was 27

  11. Pulsatile dry cupping in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee – a randomized controlled exploratory trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cupping is used in various traditional medicine forms to relieve pain in musculoskeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cupping in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods In a two-group, randomized controlled exploratory pilot study patients with a clinically and radiological confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale: 2-4) and a pain intensity > 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) were included. 40 Patients were randomized to either 8 sessions of pulsatile dry cupping within 4 weeks or no intervention (control). Paracetamol was allowed on demand for both groups. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) score, the pain intensity on a VAS (0 mm = no pain to 100 mm = maximum intensity) and Quality of Life (SF-36) 4 and 12 weeks after randomization. Use of Paracetamol was documented within the 4-week treatment period. Analyses were performed by analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline value for each outcome. Results 21 patients were allocated to the cupping group (5 male; mean age 68 ± SD 7.2) and 19 to the control group (8 male; 69 ± 6.8). After 4 weeks the WOMAC global score improved significantly more in the cupping group with a mean of 27.7 (95% confidence interval 22.1; 33.3) compared to 42.2 (36.3; 48.1) in the control group (p = 0.001). After 12 weeks the WOMAC global score were still significantly different in favor for cupping (31.0 (24.9; 37.2) vs. 40.8 (34.4; 47.3) p = 0.032), however the WOMAC subscores for pain and stiffness were not significant anymore. Significantly better outcomes in the cupping group were also observed for pain intensity on VAS and for the SF-36 Physical Component Scale compared to the control group after 4 and 12 weeks. No significant difference was observed for the SF-36 Mental Component Scale and the total number of consumed Paracetamol tablets

  12. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C; Sørensen, S S; Haedersdal, M

    2015-11-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK and delays SCC development in mice. We investigated the effect of repeated PDT over 5 years for primary prophylaxis of skin dysplasia. These data represent an interim analysis of an on-going randomized controlled trial. During 2008-2011, 25 renal transplant recipients with clinically normal skin were randomized to split-side PDT of the face, forearm and hand, the contralateral side serving as untreated control. Patients received PDT on inclusion and at 6-monthly intervals for 5 years. Blinded evaluation was performed at each visit. We found that prophylactic PDT significantly delayed onset of AK compared with untreated skin, p = 0.020. At 3-year follow-up, we observed AK in 63% of patients in untreated skin areas compared with 28% of patients in PDT-treated skin, with a total number of cumulated AKs in untreated skin (n = 43) compared with PDT-treated skin (n = 8), p = 0.005. These preliminary data indicate a novel approach to early prevention of skin dysplasia that may reduce morbidity from multiple AKs and SCCs in OTR. PMID:26018207

  13. Effect of olive oil massage on weight gain in preterm infants: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jabraeile, Mahnaz; Rasooly, Alehe Seyyed; Farshi, Mahni Rahkar; Malakouti, Jamileh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the fact that effect of massage with or without oil on the baby's weight gain is not clear, but recent studies have shown that massage with essential oils make lipid absorption through the skin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of olive oil massage on weight gain in preterm infants. Materials and Methods: This study was a single-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. In this study, infants who met inclusion criteria for the study were divided into two groups by using random numbers table. Newborns in intervention group were under massage for 10 days and 3 times for 15 min daily; the mother of these newborns had been trained already using olive oil. Moreover, the infants of the control group were under massaging without oil same as the above-mentioned method. Researchers weighed babies daily during 10 days and recorded it at the checklist. Data from the study were reviewed and analyzed by descriptive statistics and repeated measure test using the statistical software SPSS/13. Results: This study showed that the neonatal weight gain in the infants with the oil massage was 21 g daily in average, whereas the increase in infant massage without oil was 7 g. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Considering the positive effect of infant massage on weight gain in premature infants with olive oil, it is recommended that nurses use oil in infant massage in the neonatal units. PMID:27397955

  14. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Sympathectomy for Palmar Hyperhidrosis: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenxiong; Yu, Dongliang; Jiang, Han; Xu, Jianjun; Wei, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathectomy (VTS) is effective in treating palmar hyperhidrosis (PH). However, it is no consensus over which segment should undergo VTS to maximize efficacy and minimize the complications of compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH). This study was designed to compare the efficiency and side effects of VTS of different segments in the treatment of PH. Methods A comprehensive search of PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, the Cochrane Library, Scopus and Google Scholar was performed to identify studies comparing VTS of different segments for treatment of PH. The data was analyzed by Revman 5.3 software and SPSS 18.0. Results A total of eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 1200 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that single segment/low segments VTS could reduce the risk of moderate/severe CH compared with multiple segments/high segments. The risk of total CH had a similar trend. In the subgroup analysis of single segment VTS, no significant differences were found between T2/T3 VTS and other segments in postoperative CH and degree of CH. T4 VTS showed better efficacy in limiting CH compared with other segments. Conclusions T4 appears to be the best segment for the surgical treatment of PH. Our findings require further validation in more high-quality, large-scale randomized controlled trials. PMID:27187774

  15. Can Targeted Intervention Mitigate Early Emotional and Behavioral Problems?: Generating Robust Evidence within Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Orla; McGlanaghy, Edel; O’Farrelly, Christine; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a targeted Irish early intervention program on children’s emotional and behavioral development using multiple methods to test the robustness of the results. Data on 164 Preparing for Life participants who were randomly assigned into an intervention group, involving home visits from pregnancy onwards, or a control group, was used to test the impact of the intervention on Child Behavior Checklist scores at 24-months. Using inverse probability weighting to account for differential attrition, permutation testing to address small sample size, and quantile regression to characterize the distributional impact of the intervention, we found that the few treatment effects were largely concentrated among boys most at risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. The average treatment effect identified a 13% reduction in the likelihood of falling into the borderline clinical threshold for Total Problems. The interaction and subgroup analysis found that this main effect was driven by boys. The distributional analysis identified a 10-point reduction in the Externalizing Problems score for boys at the 90th percentile. No effects were observed for girls or for the continuous measures of Total, Internalizing, and Externalizing problems. These findings suggest that the impact of this prenatally commencing home visiting program may be limited to boys experiencing the most difficulties. Further adoption of the statistical methods applied here may help to improve the internal validity of randomized controlled trials and contribute to the field of evaluation science more generally. Trial Registration: ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN04631728 PMID:27253184

  16. The Effect of Intradialytic Aerobic Exercise on Dialysis Efficacy in Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Raheleh; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Ilali, Ehteramosadat; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Makhlough, Atieh

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to determine the impact of an 8-week intradialytic exercise program (consisting of 15 minutes low-intensity exercise during the first 2 hours of dialysis) on dialysis efficacy. Methods In an open randomized controlled trial, a total of 50 clinically stable hemodialysis patients were enrolled into the study and randomly allocated into two groups: the aerobic exercise group (n=25) and the control group (n=25). Aerobic exercises were done in the intervention group for 15 min/day, three times a week for 2 months. The dialysis efficacy was assessed prior to and at the end of each month of the program. Results The efficacy of dialysis increased at the end of the first month and remained elevated for the duration of the program in the exercise group (p<0.05). Conclusion A simplified aerobic exercise program has increased the efficacy of dialysis and may be considered as a safe, complementary and effective modality for hemodialysis patients. PMID:24044062

  17. Assessing the Quality of Randomized Controlled Urological Trials Conducted by Korean Medical Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the quality of randomized controlled urological trials conducted by Korean medical institutions. Materials and Methods Quality assessment was conducted by using the Jadad scale; in addition, the van Tulder scale and the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool were used as individual indices. All assessments were performed by two reviewers. If the outcomes differed, the two reviewers and a third reviewer adjusted the discrepancy in the results through discussion. Starting from 1986, a quality analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted in 1-year and 5-year units. The quality assessment was conducted by subject, type of intervention, presence of double blinding, presence of funding, and review by an Institutional Review Board (IRB). Results Whereas the number of RCTs published has gradually increased, there was no significant difference in the quality of the RCTs according to publication year. Drug studies, double-blind studies, studies with funding, and studies reviewed by IRBs had higher quality scores and a higher percentage of high-quality RCTs than did other studies. Thirty-six RCTs were published in journals included in the Science Citation Index and 20 RCTs were published in journals included in the Science Citation Index Expanded. The largest number of RCTs (32.32%) were published by the Korean Journal of Urology. Conclusions A quantitative increase was observed in RCTs over time, but no qualitative improvement in the RCTs was observed. It seems necessary to put effort into the quality improvement of RCTs at the design stage. PMID:23700493

  18. Herbal Medicines for Treating Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Youme; Sasaki, Yui; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Song, Yun-Kyung; Shin, Yong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in the management of metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods. On December 9, 2015, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, AMED, CNKI, KoreaMed, KMBASE, OASIS, and J-STAGE with no restriction on language or published year. We selected randomized controlled trials that involved patients with metabolic syndrome being treated with herbal medicines as intervention. The main keywords were “Chinese herbal medicines”, “metabolic syndrome”, and “randomized controlled trials”. Herbal substances which were not based on East Asian medical theory, combination therapy with western medicines, and concurrent diseases other than metabolic syndrome were excluded. The risk of bias was assessed by Cochrane's “Risk of Bias” tool. The protocol or review was registered in PROSPERO (an international prospective register of systematic reviews) (CRD42014006842). Results. From 1,098 articles, 12 RCTs were included in this review: five trials studied herbal medicines versus a placebo or no treatment, and seven trials studied herbal medicines versus western medicines. Herbal medicines were effective on decreasing waist circumference, blood glucose, blood lipids, and blood pressure. Conclusion. This study suggests the possibility that herbal medicines can be complementary and alternative medicines for metabolic syndrome. PMID:27413388

  19. Dressing wear time after breast reconstruction: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the major risk variables for surgical site infection is wound management. Understanding infection risk factors for breast operations is essential in order to develop infection-prevention strategies and improve surgical outcomes. The aim of this trial is to assess the influence of dressing wear time on surgical site infection rates and skin colonization. Patients’ perception at self-assessment will also be analyzed. Methods/Design This is a two-arm randomized controlled trial. Two hundred breast cancer patients undergoing immediate or delayed breast reconstruction will be prospectively enrolled. Patients will be randomly allocated to group I (dressing removed on postoperative day one) or group II (dressing removed on postoperative day six). Surgical site infections will be defined by standard criteria from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Skin colonization will be assessed by culture of samples collected at predefined time points. Patients will score dressing wear time with regard to safety, comfort and convenience. Discussion The evidence to support dressing standards for breast surgery wounds is empiric and scarce. CDC recommends protecting, with a sterile dressing for 24 to 48 hours postoperatively, a primarily closed incision, but there is no recommendation to cover this kind of incision beyond 48 hours, or on the appropriate time to shower or bathe with an uncovered incision. The results of the ongoing trial may support standard recommendations regarding dressing wear time after breast reconstruction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: http://NCT01148823. PMID:23432779

  20. Immunomodulatory Effects of Kimchi in Chinese Healthy College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hansongyi; Kim, Do Yeon; Lee, Mi Ae; Jang, Ja-Young

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the potential immunomodulatory effects of Kimchi, a traditional fermented Korean vegetable, in healthy Chinese college students. The four-week clinical-trial (randomized, open-label, prospective, controlled) was followed by a one week wash-out period. Healthy Chinese college students (over 20 years of age with a body mass index of 18.5-23.0 kg/m2) volunteered for this study. Forty-three students were randomly classified into two groups, Kimchi (n = 21, supplemented with 100 g of Kimchi per day) or non-Kimchi (n = 22, supplemented with 100 g of radish per day, control) groups. During the four-week intervention period, students were asked to maintain their usual diet and activity, and instructed not to take any medications, functional food products, or dietary supplements. Anthropometrics, nutritional intake, and blood immune parameters (lymphocyte subsets, cytokines, and immunoglobulins) were measured before and after the four weeks of intervention. Thirty-nine students (19 in the Kimchi group, 20 in the non-Kimchi group) finished the study. After the intervention, no significant changes were observed in lymphocyte subsets (T-cell, B-cell, NK cell), pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10), and immunoglobulins (Ig A, G, and M) between groups in either the Kimchi or non-Kimchi. These results suggest that the short-term consumption of Kimchi has no immunomodulatory effects in healthy Chinese college students. PMID:25136537

  1. Immunomodulatory effects of kimchi in chinese healthy college students: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hansongyi; Kim, Do Yeon; Lee, Mi Ae; Jang, Ja-Young; Choue, Ryowon

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the potential immunomodulatory effects of Kimchi, a traditional fermented Korean vegetable, in healthy Chinese college students. The four-week clinical-trial (randomized, open-label, prospective, controlled) was followed by a one week wash-out period. Healthy Chinese college students (over 20 years of age with a body mass index of 18.5-23.0 kg/m(2)) volunteered for this study. Forty-three students were randomly classified into two groups, Kimchi (n = 21, supplemented with 100 g of Kimchi per day) or non-Kimchi (n = 22, supplemented with 100 g of radish per day, control) groups. During the four-week intervention period, students were asked to maintain their usual diet and activity, and instructed not to take any medications, functional food products, or dietary supplements. Anthropometrics, nutritional intake, and blood immune parameters (lymphocyte subsets, cytokines, and immunoglobulins) were measured before and after the four weeks of intervention. Thirty-nine students (19 in the Kimchi group, 20 in the non-Kimchi group) finished the study. After the intervention, no significant changes were observed in lymphocyte subsets (T-cell, B-cell, NK cell), pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10), and immunoglobulins (Ig A, G, and M) between groups in either the Kimchi or non-Kimchi. These results suggest that the short-term consumption of Kimchi has no immunomodulatory effects in healthy Chinese college students. PMID:25136537

  2. Acupoints Stimulation for Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients: A Quantitative Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Deng, Renli; Tan, Jing-Yu; Guan, Feng-Guang

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at concluding the current evidence on the therapeutic effects of acupoints stimulation for cancer patients with anxiety and depression. Randomized controlled trials using acupoints stimulation for relieving anxiety and/or depression in cancer patients were searched, and 11 studies were finally included, of which eight trials compared acupoints stimulation with standard methods of treatment/care, and acupoints stimulation showed significantly better effects in improving depression than using standard methods of treatment/care. Four studies compared true acupoints stimulation with sham methods, and no significant differences can be found between groups for either depression or anxiety, although the pooled effects still favored true intervention. For the five studies that evaluated sleep quality, the results were conflicting, with three supporting the superiority of acupoints stimulation in improving sleep quality and two demonstrating no differences across groups. Acupoints stimulation seems to be an effective approach in relieving depression and anxiety in cancer patients, and placebo effects may partially contribute to the benefits. However, the evidence is not conclusive due to the limited number of included studies and the clinical heterogeneity identified among trials. More rigorous designed randomized, sham-controlled studies are necessary in future research. PMID:27118981

  3. Pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls in two randomized controlled trials of multidimensional treatment foster care.

    PubMed

    Kerr, David C R; Leve, Leslie D; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2009-06-01

    Preventing adolescent pregnancy is a national research priority that has had limited success. In the present study, the authors examined whether Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) relative to intervention services as usual (group care [GC]) decreased pregnancy rates among juvenile justice girls mandated to out-of-home care. Girls (13-17 years of age) with histories of criminal referrals (Mdn = 10) were randomly assigned to MTFC (n = 81) or GC (n = 85) as part of 2 randomized controlled trials. Pregnancy histories were assessed from baseline through 24 months. Fewer postbaseline pregnancies were reported for MTFC girls (26.9%) than for GC girls (46.9%)--an effect that remained significant after controlling for baseline criminal referrals, pregnancy history, and sexual activity. MTFC has previously been shown to decrease arrest and lock-up rates. The present findings support the long-term preventive effects of MTFC on adolescent girls' pregnancy rates. Findings are consistent with the notion that programs that target delinquency by impacting general risk behavior pathways and contexts may more successfully prevent teen pregnancy than those that directly target sexual behaviors. PMID:19485598

  4. Testing an empowerment intervention to help parents make homes smoke-free: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Rosemary J; Gagnon, Anita J; O'Loughlin, Jennifer L; Rennick, Janet E

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to test if parents' participation in an intervention based on an empowerment ideology and participatory experiences decreased the number of cigarettes smoked in homes. Sixty families were randomized to the intervention (n = 30) or control (n = 30) group. The intervention included three weekly group sessions followed by three weekly follow-up telephone calls over six consecutive weeks. During group sessions, parents shared experiences about environmental tobacco smoke, identified personal strengths and resources, and developed action plans. Data were collected in interviewer-administered questionnaires at baseline and 6 months follow-up. Ninety-three percent of the sample consisted of mothers, 77% of whom smoked during pregnancy. Forty-two percent of the total sample reported a household income of <$15,000. The median number of cigarettes smoked in the home daily decreased from 18 to 4 in the total sample however no statistically significant difference was detected between groups at 6 months follow-up. Participation in the study, independent of group, may have resulted in parents decreasing the number of cigarettes smoked in the home. Valuable lessons were learned about recruiting and working with this group of parents, all of whom faced the challenges of tobacco and almost half of whom lived in poverty. PMID:21234793

  5. Comparison of Ondansetron and Meperidine for Treatment of Postoperative Shivering: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahoori, Alireza; Noroozinia, Heydar; Hasani, Ebrahim; Soltanahmadi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: The involved neurotransmitter pathways in the postoperative shivering (POS) are poorly understood. Recently, 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists have been reported to prevent POS. We investigated the effect of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist that is used to treat postoperative nausea and vomiting, on shivering. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ondansetron and meperidine in the treatment of shivering after general anesthesia. Patients and Methods: In this double-blinded randomized clinical trial, 83 patients (age range, 18-60 years) who had shivering after general anesthesia were randomly allocated to any of these three groups: Group A, (number = 27) received 4 mg of intravenous ondansetron, Group B, (number = 27) received 8 mg of intravenous ondansetron, and Group C, (number = 29) received 0.4 mg/kg of intravenous meperidine at recovery room. The surface temperatures and the incidence as well as intensity of shivering were recorded. Results: Shivering was controlled in 16 patients (59%) in Group A, 22 (81%) in Group B, and 25 (86%) in Group C (P = 0.01). Within each group, there were no significant differences among the surface temperature in recovery room. Patients in groups A and B had significantly lower incidence of nausea and vomiting than group C (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Ondansetron and meperidine have similar effects on shivering. We concluded that 8 mg of intravenous ondansetron can control shivering and this is the dose of choice, especially in patients with POS with nausea and vomiting. PMID:25389473

  6. Homeopathic arnica for prevention of pain and bruising: randomized placebo-controlled trial in hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Devaraj, V S; Fountain-Barber, A; Hawkins, S; Ernst, E

    2003-02-01

    Homeopathic arnica is widely believed to control bruising, reduce swelling and promote recovery after local trauma; many patients therefore take it perioperatively. To determine whether this treatment has any effect, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial with three parallel arms. 64 adults undergoing elective surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome were randomized to take three tablets daily of homeopathic arnica 30C or 6C or placebo for seven days before surgery and fourteen days after surgery. Primary outcome measures were pain (short form McGill Pain Questionnaire) and bruising (colour separation analysis) at four days after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were swelling (wrist circumference) and use of analgesic medication (patient diary). 62 patients could be included in the intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences on the primary outcome measures of pain (P=0.79) and bruising (P=0.45) at day four. Swelling and use of analgesic medication also did not differ between arnica and placebo groups. Adverse events were reported by 2 patients in the arnica 6C group, 3 in the placebo group and 4 in the arnica 30C group. The results of this trial do not suggest that homeopathic arnica has an advantage over placebo in reducing postoperative pain, bruising and swelling in patients undergoing elective hand surgery. PMID:12562974

  7. Homeopathic arnica for prevention of pain and bruising: randomized placebo-controlled trial in hand surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stevinson, C; Devaraj, V S; Fountain-Barber, A; Hawkins, S; Ernst, E

    2003-01-01

    Homeopathic arnica is widely believed to control bruising, reduce swelling and promote recovery after local trauma; many patients therefore take it perioperatively. To determine whether this treatment has any effect, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial with three parallel arms. 64 adults undergoing elective surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome were randomized to take three tablets daily of homeopathic arnica 30C or 6C or placebo for seven days before surgery and fourteen days after surgery. Primary outcome measures were pain (short form McGill Pain Questionnaire) and bruising (colour separation analysis) at four days after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were swelling (wrist circumference) and use of analgesic medication (patient diary). 62 patients could be included in the intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences on the primary outcome measures of pain (P=0.79) and bruising (P=0.45) at day four. Swelling and use of analgesic medication also did not differ between arnica and placebo groups. Adverse events were reported by 2 patients in the arnica 6C group, 3 in the placebo group and 4 in the arnica 30C group. The results of this trial do not suggest that homeopathic arnica has an advantage over placebo in reducing postoperative pain, bruising and swelling in patients undergoing elective hand surgery. PMID:12562974

  8. Long-Term Propranolol Use in Severely Burned Pediatric Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, David N.; Rodriguez, Noe A.; Diaz, Eva C.; Hegde, Sachin; Jennings, Kristofer; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Suri, Jaipreet S.; Lee, Jong O.; Williams, Felicia N.; Meyer, Walter; Suman, Oscar E.; Barrow, Robert E.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety and efficacy of propranolol given for 1 year on cardiac function, resting energy expenditure, and body composition in a prospective randomized single-center controlled study in pediatric patients with large burns. Summary Background Data Severe burns trigger a hypermetabolic response that persists for up to 2 years after burn. Propranolol given for 1 month post burn blunts this response. Whether propranolol administration for 1 year after injury provides a continued benefit is currently unclear. Methods One-hundred seventy nine pediatric patients with >30% total body surface area burns were randomized to receive control (n = 89) or 4 mg/kg/d propranolol (n = 90) for 12 months after burn. Changes in resting energy expenditure, cardiac function, and body composition were measured acutely at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postburn. Statistical analyses included techniques that adjust for non-normality, repeated measures, and regression analyses. P <0.05 was considered significant. Results Long-term propranolol treatment significantly reduced the percent of the predicted heart rate and percent of the predicted resting energy expenditure, decreased accumulation of central mass and central fat, prevented bone loss, and improved lean body mass accretion. There were very few adverse effects from the dose of propranolol used. Conclusions Propranolol treatment for 12 months, following thermal injury, ameliorates the hyperdynamic, hypermetabolic, hypercatabolic, and osteopenic responses in pediatric patients. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00675714. PMID:22895351

  9. Does Encouragement Matter in Improving Gender Imbalances in Technical Fields? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Unkovic, Cait; Sen, Maya; Quinn, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Does encouragement help address gender imbalances in technical fields? We present the results of one of the first and largest randomized controlled trials on the topic. Using an applied statistics conference in the social sciences as our context, we randomly assigned half of a pool of 3,945 graduate students to receive two personalized emails encouraging them to apply (n = 1,976) and the other half to receive nothing (n = 1,969). We find a robust, positive effect associated with this simple intervention and suggestive evidence that women responded more strongly than men. However, we find that women's conference acceptance rates are higher within the control group than in the treated group. This is not the case for men. The reason appears to be that female applicants in the treated group solicited supporting letters at lower rates. Our findings therefore suggest that "low dose" interventions may promote diversity in STEM fields but may also have the potential to expose underlying disparities when used alone or in a non-targeted way. PMID:27097315

  10. How can good randomized controlled trials in leading journals be so misinterpreted?

    PubMed

    Veith, Frank J

    2013-02-01

    The results of good randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in leading peer-reviewed journals have been deemed the best possible basis for good medical practice. However, several limitations may decrease their value. These include flaws and weaknesses in the design and the timeliness of RCTs. Progress in a treatment method or control arm may invalidate a trial. So too can defects in patient selection, physician competence, randomization, applicability, end points, and the population being studied. Idiosyncratic flaws can also invalidate an RCT. Examples of these flaws and weaknesses are presented. Another problem with articles describing RCTs is the potential for the conclusions of the trial report to be misleading because of error or bias. This plus subsequent misinterpretation of the trial results or conclusions by others can make the effect of the trial misleading with an unintended detrimental result on medical practice. Guidelines based on such errors or bias-based conclusions and misinterpretations can further compound the problem. This article provides examples of misleading conclusions and/or misinterpretations (spinning) of trial results in articles describing RCTs in leading journals. All physicians should recognize these value-limiting processes so that RCTs can be evaluated adequately and fairly. In that way, they can be used along with good physician judgment to optimize the care delivered to individual patients and to society at large. PMID:23336854

  11. Qualitative Contributions to a Randomized Controlled Trial Addressing HIV/AIDS-Stigma in Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Marzán-Rodríguez, Melissa; Varas-Díaz, Nelson; Neilands, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Specialized training for healthcare professionals (HCP) in order to reduce HIV/AIDS related stigma must be part of a public health model for HIV/AIDS. Tested interventions to reduce HIV/AIDS related stigma among HCP have been mostly absent from these efforts. A qualitative approach was used to assess stigma reduction within a traditional randomized controlled design in order to better understand how our current stigma intervention worked and was understood by 2nd year medical students. After conducting a quantitative follow up survey one-year post intervention we conducted 20 in-depth qualitative interviews with a subsample of our intervention group participants as part of the overall evaluation process. Once the interviews were finished, we transcribed them and used NVivo (v.8) to organized the qualitative data. In the process of analyzing the qualitative data we identified core intervention areas participants described as useful for their training and development: (1) acquiring more HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, (2) increased skills for management of high stigma situations, and (3) the ability to identify socio-structural factors that foster HIV infection among clients. The gathered information is important in order to have a deep understanding of how attitudinal change happens as part of our intervention strategies. Keywords: HIV/AIDS, Stigma, Randomized Controlled Trial, Qualitative Evaluation, Medical Students, Puerto Rico PMID:26855975

  12. Corticosteroid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhong-Min; Wang, Shi-Ji; Zhao, Shu-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yu-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent reports about the benefits of corticosteroid therapy in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have shown conflicting results. We aimed to explore the effects of corticosteroid therapy in SAP patients on patient outcomes by performing a meta-analysis. Methods: Databases (Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedicine Database, and China Academic Journal Full-Text Database) were queried for all relevant, randomized, controlled trials investigating corticosteroid therapy in patients with SAP. Results: Six randomized, controlled trials including 430 SAP patients were identified. Corticosteroid therapy for SAP was associated with reductions in the length of hospital stay, the need for surgical intervention, and the mortality rate (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -9.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.91 to -2.04, P = 0.01; odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.18-0.67, P = 0.002; OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.94, P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the complication rates or Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores in patients with or without corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion: Corticosteroid therapy may improve outcomes in patients with SAP. PMID:26339332

  13. Pain Management for Elective Foot and Ankle Surgery: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Liu, George T; Mayo, Helen G; Joshi, Girish P

    2015-01-01

    Pain after foot and ankle surgery can significantly affect the postoperative outcomes. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials assessing postoperative pain after foot and ankle surgery, because the surgery will lead to moderate-to-severe postoperative pain, but the optimal pain therapy has been controversial. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials in English reporting on pain after foot and ankle surgery in adults published from January 1946 to February 2013 was performed. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative pain scores. The secondary outcome measures included supplemental analgesic requirements and other recovery outcomes. With 953 studies identified, 45 met the inclusion criteria. The approaches improving pain relief (reduced pain scores or opioid requirements) included peripheral nerve blocks, wound infiltration, intravenous dexamethasone, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors, and opioids. Wound instillation, intra-articular injection, and intravenous regional analgesia had variable analgesia. The lack of homogeneous study design precluded quantitative analyses. Optimal pain management strategies included locoregional analgesic techniques plus acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors, with opioids used for "rescue," and 1 intraoperative dose of parenteral dexamethasone. Popliteal sciatic nerve blocks would be appropriate when expecting severe postoperative pain (extensive surgical procedure), and ankle blocks and surgical incision infiltration would be appropriate when expecting moderate postoperative pain (less extensive and minimally invasive surgical procedures). Additional studies are needed to assess multimodal analgesia techniques. PMID:24954920

  14. Randomized controlled trials in industrial low back pain. Part 3. Subacute/chronic pain interventions.

    PubMed

    Scheer, S J; Watanabe, T K; Radack, K L

    1997-04-01

    The most significant costs attributed to settlement of workplace back injury claims are related to chronic low back pain (LBP). Unfortunately, our knowledge of this fact has not led to a reduction of the considerable costs paid out annually by employers and insurers to deal with the chronic pain syndrome. This article is the third in a series of reviews on randomized controlled trials found in the English language medical literature between 1975 and 1993. Of more than 4,000 LBP citations, 35 studies met-the selection criteria of randomization, reasonable concurrent controls and work return comparisons. This review focuses on the 12 studies utilizing nonsurgical interventions for subacute and chronic LBP, including multidisciplinary pain clinics, exercise, cognitive-behavioral strategies, and others. A 26-point quality system was again used to compare the methodologic rigor of each study. The majority of prospective studies investigating return to work after chronic LBP have methodological limitations; additional research is clearly needed to more confidently answer the question of what interventions improve work capacity in patients with chronic LBP. PMID:9111463

  15. A randomized controlled trial to increase information, motivation, and behavioral skills in Ugandan adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ybarra, Michele L.; Korchmaros, Josephine D.; Prescott, Tonya L.; Birungi, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Background One in twenty-five Ugandan adolescents is HIV positive. Purpose Examine the impact of an Internet-based HIV prevention program on Information-Motivation-Behavior Skills Model-related constructs. Methods Three hundred and sixty-six sexually experienced and inexperienced students 12-18+ years-old in Mbarara, Uganda were randomly assigned to: the five-lesson CyberSenga program or treatment-as-usual. Half of the intervention participants were further randomized to a booster session. Assessments were collected at three and six months post-baseline. Results Participants’ HIV-related information improved over time at a greater rate for the intervention groups compared to the control group. Motivation for condom use changed to a greater degree over time for the intervention group – especially those in the intervention+booster group - compared to the control group. Behavioral skills for condom use, and motivation and behavioral skills for abstinence were statistically similar over time for both groups. Conclusions CyberSenga improves HIV preventive information and motivation to use condoms. PMID:25633626

  16. Effects of resistance training on sarcopenic obesity index in older women: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, André Bonadias; Paiva, Flávio Macedo Lahud; Gauche, Rafael; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Lima, Ricardo Moreno

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of resistance training (RT) on sarcopenic obesity (SO) in older women. 243 older women underwent body composition measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the SO index was calculated. This randomized controlled trial adopted from the baseline sample, 113 volunteers (67.0±5.2years) were randomly assigned to a control group (CG, n=64) or an experimental group (EG, n=69). The EG took part in a 24-week RT program, conducted three times per week. Body composition measurements were repeated at the end of the training program. RT induced a significant increase in fat-free mass (P<0.01), but not decrease in fat mass in the EG. Moreover, the SO index was also significantly improved in the EG (P<0.01), while it decreased significantly in the CG (P<0.01). It is concluded that RT is an effective approach to promote body composition alterations in older women, and it might improve SO-related phenotypes. PMID:27057600

  17. Effectiveness and moderators of the preventive intervention kids in divorce situations: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pelleboer-Gunnink, Hannah A; Van der Valk, Inge E; Branje, Susan J T; Van Doorn, Muriel D; Deković, Maja

    2015-10-01

    Children of divorced parents have an increased risk of a variety of problems in comparison to children from intact families. Therefore, several intervention programs have been developed directed at children of divorced parents. Yet, empirical data on the effectiveness of these interventions are limited. This study evaluated the school-based, child-directed prevention program Kids In Divorce Situations (KIDS) using a randomized controlled trial. The sample consisted of 156 children randomly assigned at the school level into an experimental (80 children) and control condition (76 children). In addition, 131 mothers and 76 fathers participated in the study. Four assessments took place: a pretest, a posttest, and two follow-up assessments conducted 6 months and 1 year after finishing KIDS. Latent growth analyses demonstrated that the intervention significantly reduced child-reported emotional problems and enhanced child-reported communication with the father and mother-reported communication with the child. The effect sizes ranged from .30-.63. Few moderation effects of gender, time since divorce, or perceived parental conflict on the intervention effects were found. After parental divorce, a limited school-based intervention for children can be efficacious in promoting children's emotional well-being and parent-child communication. PMID:26121535

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Brief Coparenting and Relationship Interventions During the Transition to Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Brian D.; Cicila, Larisa N.; Hsueh, Annie C.; Morrison, Kristen R.; Carhart, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The transition to parenthood has been repeatedly identified as a stressful period, with couples reporting difficulties in domains of individual, coparenting, and relationship functioning. Moreover, these difficulties have been shown to impact children’s development. To buffer against these difficulties, numerous effective parenting, couple, and combined interventions have been developed; however, these interventions are typically lengthy, which limits their potential for dissemination. Therefore, in the present study, we developed and tested separate six-hour interventions that focused exclusively on improving either coparenting or relationship functioning. In a randomized control trial, 90 heterosexual couples (180 individuals) were randomly assigned to an information control group, a coparenting intervention, or a relationship intervention and assessed on seven occasions during the two years following birth. Results revealed that women and high-risk men in both the couple and coparenting interventions showed fewer declines in relationship satisfaction (Cohen’s d = 0.53–0.99) and other areas of relationship functioning. Women also reported improved coparenting in both intervention groups (Cohen’s d = 0.47–1.06). Additionally, women in both interventions experienced less perceived stress during the first year after birth. Given similar effects of the two interventions on coparenting and relationship functioning, future dissemination may be enhanced by delivery of coparenting interventions, as coparenting (compared to relationship) interventions seem to attract more interest from couples and are likely easier to integrate into existing services. PMID:25090255

  19. Acupuncture for acute stroke: study protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture has been widely used as a treatment for stroke in China for more than 3,000 years. However, previous research has not yet shown that acupuncture is effective as a stroke treatment. We report a protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled, and outcome assessor-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture on acute ischemic stroke. Methods/Design In a prospective trial involving three hospitals in the Zhejiang Province (China) 250 patients with a recent (less than 1 week previous) episode of ischemic stroke will be included. Patients will be randomized into two groups: an acupuncture group given scalp acupuncture and electroacupuncture, and a control group given no acupuncture. Eighteen treatment sessions will be performed over a three-week period. The primary outcome will be measured by changes in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at the one, three, and four-week follow-up. Secondary outcome measures will be: 1) the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for motor function; 2) the mini-mental state examination and Montreal cognitive assessment for cognitive function; 3) the video-fluoroscopic swallowing study for swallowing ability; and 4) the incidence of adverse events. Discussion This trial is expected to clarify whether or not acupuncture is effective for acute stroke. It will also show if acupuncture can improve motor, cognitive, or swallowing function. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-12001971. PMID:24908241

  20. Effect of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Indurkar, Maya Sanjeev; Verma, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several chemotherapeutic agents have been developed to prevent gingivitis and its progression into periodontitis. In this present study, the efficacy of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel was assessed and compared on plaque induced gingivitis. Aim: To evaluate the effect of ozonated oil on plaque induced gingivitis and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine gel. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects, aged from 18 to 65 years, with plaque-induced gingivitis were selected from the outpatient Department of Periodontology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Aurangabad, for this study. They were divided randomly into the test or ozonated oil group (Group I) and the control or chlorhexidine gel group (Group II) with 10 subjects in each group. Subjects were randomly assigned to massage their gingiva thrice a day for 3 weeks with ozonated oil (test), and chlorhexidine gel (control). Plaque index and gingival index scores were recorded for the 20 subjects at baseline and after 3 weeks. Results: Ozonated oil (Group I) and chlorhexidine gel (Group II) groups showed statistically significant differences with respect to plaque index and gingival index, from the baseline to 3 weeks (P < 0.001 in both). But the difference between Group I and Group II, at the end of the study period, was not statistically significant with respect to the plaque index and gingival index. Conclusions: The ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel, both can be used as an effective agent in maintaining and improving gingival health. PMID:27041835

  1. Randomized Controlled Trial of RSS Reader Use and Resident Familiarity With Primary Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Brian P.; Desai, Bimal R.; Callahan, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Awareness of the primary literature is important for clinicians. Lack of time, poor access to information, and lack of personal initiative may be barriers for some trainees. Really Simple Syndication (RSS) readers aggregate web content, such as journal abstracts, in a single location for easy viewing. Objective We assessed whether use of an RSS reader would increase resident reading frequency, familiarity, and understanding of the primary literature. Methods We conducted a single-center, prospective, randomized, nonblinded, controlled trial of the effect of RSS reader use on knowledge of recent literature among pediatrics residents. Residents were randomly assigned to the RSS group (education in RSS use and receipt of the Pediatrics RSS feed) or a control group that followed standard reading practices. Outcome measures were differences on baseline and monthly surveys of reading frequency, familiarity with recent publications, and knowledge of recent articles (familiarity validation). Results Of 144 eligible residents, 79 (55%) were enrolled in the survey, with 81% (64 of 79) of participants completing all surveys. The RSS reader use was correlated with greater familiarity with selected articles, but not with improved understanding (as measured by ability to answer multiple-choice questions about content). Participants reported satisfaction with the RSS reader based on its ease of use, accessibility, and as an aid in supplementing reading. Conclusions The RSS reader use was accepted by residents and associated with increased familiarity with the primary literature but not with increased understanding. PMID:24949145

  2. Effect of management training in organizational justice: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, Saki; SOMEMURA, Hironori; SASAKI, Norio; YAMAMOTO, Megumi; TANAKA, Mika; TANAKA, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Organizational justice (OJ) influences the well-being of employees of organizations. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to examine whether or not brief management training increases OJ for subordinates. Study participants were managers and subordinates working in the private manufacturing sector. Randomization at the departmental level generated an intervention group of 23 departments (93 managers and 248 subordinates) and a control group of 23 departments (91 managers and 314 subordinates). Managers in the intervention group received a 90-min training session to investigate the attitudes and behavior of managers and help increase OJ. Subordinates completed self-administered OJ questionnaire surveys on procedural, interpersonal, and informational justice before and 3 months after intervention. For all subordinates, the interaction between group and time in OJ scores obtained before and 3 months after intervention were not significant. However, in subgroup analyses of the lowest tertile group in relation to the baseline of each of the three OJ subscales and total scores, the lowest tertile group of the interpersonal justice subscale showed significant improvement. The results of this study suggest that brief management training in OJ for managers significantly improves a low rating from subordinates in interpersonal justice. Further studies are required to develop a specific intervention method to increase OJ. PMID:26860786

  3. Effect of management training in organizational justice: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Saki; Somemura, Hironori; Sasaki, Norio; Yamamoto, Megumi; Tanaka, Mika; Tanaka, Katsutoshi

    2016-06-10

    Organizational justice (OJ) influences the well-being of employees of organizations. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to examine whether or not brief management training increases OJ for subordinates. Study participants were managers and subordinates working in the private manufacturing sector. Randomization at the departmental level generated an intervention group of 23 departments (93 managers and 248 subordinates) and a control group of 23 departments (91 managers and 314 subordinates). Managers in the intervention group received a 90-min training session to investigate the attitudes and behavior of managers and help increase OJ. Subordinates completed self-administered OJ questionnaire surveys on procedural, interpersonal, and informational justice before and 3 months after intervention. For all subordinates, the interaction between group and time in OJ scores obtained before and 3 months after intervention were not significant. However, in subgroup analyses of the lowest tertile group in relation to the baseline of each of the three OJ subscales and total scores, the lowest tertile group of the interpersonal justice subscale showed significant improvement. The results of this study suggest that brief management training in OJ for managers significantly improves a low rating from subordinates in interpersonal justice. Further studies are required to develop a specific intervention method to increase OJ. PMID:26860786

  4. Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Farchione, Todd J.; Fairholme, Christopher P.; Ellard, Kristen K.; Boisseau, Christina L.; Thompson-Hollands, Johanna; Carl, Jenna R.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    This study further evaluates the efficacy of the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP). A diagnostically heterogeneous clinical sample of 37 patients with a principal anxiety disorder diagnosis was enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) involving up to 18 sessions of treatment and a 6-month follow-up period. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either immediate treatment with the UP (n=26) or delayed treatment, following a 16-week wait-list control period (WLC; n= 11). The UP resulted in significant improvement on measures of clinical severity, general symptoms of depression and anxiety, levels of negative and positive affect, and a measure of symptom interference in daily functioning across diagnoses. In comparison, participants in the WLC condition exhibited little to no change following the 16-week wait-list period. The effects of UP treatment were maintained over the 6-month follow-up period. Results from this RCT provide additional evidence for the efficacy of the UP in the treatment of anxiety and comorbid depressive disorders, and provide additional support for a transdiagnostic approach to the treatment of emotional disorders. PMID:22697453

  5. EMDR for Syrian refugees with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms: results of a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Acarturk, Ceren; Konuk, Emre; Cetinkaya, Mustafa; Senay, Ibrahim; Sijbrandij, Marit; Cuijpers, Pim; Aker, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    Background The most common mental health problems among refugees are depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is an effective treatment for PTSD. However, no previous randomized controlled trial (RCT) has been published on treating PTSD symptoms in a refugee camp population. Objective Examining the effect of EMDR to reduce the PTSD and depression symptoms compared to a wait-list condition among Syrian refugees. Method Twenty-nine adult participants with PTSD symptoms were randomly allocated to either EMDR sessions (n=15) or wait-list control (n=14). The main outcome measures were Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) at posttreatment and 4-week follow-up. Results Analysis of covariance showed that the EMDR group had significantly lower trauma scores at posttreatment as compared with the wait-list group (d=1.78, 95% CI: 0.92–2.64). The EMDR group also had a lower depression score after treatment as compared with the wait-list group (d=1.14, 95% CI: 0.35–1.92). Conclusion The pilot RCT indicated that EMDR may be effective in reducing PTSD and depression symptoms among Syrian refugees located in a camp. Larger RCTs to verify the (cost-) effectiveness of EMDR in similar populations are needed. PMID:25989952

  6. Action observation for upper limb function after stroke: evidence-based review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, KyeongMi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to suggest evidenced information about action observation to improve upper limb function after stroke. [Methods] A systematic review of randomized controlled trials involving adults aged 18 years or over and including descriptions of action observation for improving upper limb function was undertaken. Electronic databases were searched, including MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PEDro (the Physiotherapy Evidence Database), for articles published between 2000 to 2014. Following completion of the searches, two reviewers independently assessed the trials and extracted data using a data extraction form. The same two reviewers independently documented the methodological quality of the trials by using the PEDro scale. [Results] Five randomized controlled trials were ultimately included in this review, and four of them (80%) reported statistically significant effects for motor recovery of upper limb using action observation intervention in between groups. [Conclusion] This review of the literature presents evidence attesting to the benefits conferred on stroke patints resulting from participation in an action observation intervention. The body of literature in this field is growing steadily. Further work needs to be done to evaluate the evidence for different conditions after stroke and different duration of intervention. PMID:26644700

  7. Adjunctive mirror exposure for eating disorders: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Loeb, Katharine; Troupe, Sara; Delinsky, Sherrie

    2012-12-01

    Mirror exposure therapy has proven efficacious in improving body image among individuals with shape/weight concerns and eating disorders. No randomized controlled trials have examined the effect of mirror exposure in a healthy-weight clinical sample of eating disordered individuals. The purpose of the current study was to test the efficacy of a five-session acceptance based mirror exposure therapy (A-MET) versus a non directive body image therapy (ND) control as an adjunctive treatment to outpatient eating disorder treatment. Thirty-three males and females aged 14-65 with a body mass index of 18.5-29.9 were randomized to five sessions of A-MET or ND with a 1-month follow-up. Results indicated large to moderate effect size differences for efficacy of A-MET across measures of body checking, body image dissatisfaction, and eating disorder symptoms (d = -0.38 to -1.61) at end of treatment and follow-up. Baseline measures of social comparison and history of appearance-related teasing were predictive of treatment response. There were also differential effects of treatment on participants' perceived homework quality, but no differences in therapeutic alliance. Results suggest that A-MET is a promising adjunctive treatment for residual body image disturbance among normal and overweight individuals undergoing treatment for an eating disorder. Future research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:23089085

  8. Depression Treatment for Impoverished Mothers by Point-of-Care Providers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Segre, Lisa S.; Brock, Rebecca L.; O’Hara, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression in low-income, ethnic-minority women of childbearing age is prevalent and compromises infant and child development. Yet numerous barriers prevent treatment delivery. Listening Visits (LV), an empirically supported intervention developed for delivery by British home-visiting nurses, could address this unmet mental health need. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of LV delivered at a woman’s usual point-of-care, including home-visits or an ob-gyn office. Method Listening Visits were delivered to depressed pregnant women or mothers of young children by their point-of-care provider (e.g., home visitor or physician’s assistant), all of whom had low levels of prior counseling experience. Three quarters of the study’s participants were low-income. Of those who reported ethnicity, all identified themselves as minorities. Participants from four study sites (N = 66) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio, to LV or a wait-list control group (WLC). Assessments, conducted at baseline and 8 weeks, evaluated depression, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Results Depressive severity, depressive symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved among LV recipients as compared to women receiving standard social/health services. Women valued LV as evidenced by their high attendance rates and treatment satisfaction ratings. Conclusions In a stepped model of depression care, LV can provide an accessible, acceptable, and effective first-line treatment option for at-risk women who otherwise are unlikely to receive treatment. PMID:25486371

  9. Herbal Medicines for Treating Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soobin; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Ko, Youme; Sasaki, Yui; Park, Jeong-Su; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Song, Yun-Kyung; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in the management of metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods. On December 9, 2015, we searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, AMED, CNKI, KoreaMed, KMBASE, OASIS, and J-STAGE with no restriction on language or published year. We selected randomized controlled trials that involved patients with metabolic syndrome being treated with herbal medicines as intervention. The main keywords were "Chinese herbal medicines", "metabolic syndrome", and "randomized controlled trials". Herbal substances which were not based on East Asian medical theory, combination therapy with western medicines, and concurrent diseases other than metabolic syndrome were excluded. The risk of bias was assessed by Cochrane's "Risk of Bias" tool. The protocol or review was registered in PROSPERO (an international prospective register of systematic reviews) (CRD42014006842). Results. From 1,098 articles, 12 RCTs were included in this review: five trials studied herbal medicines versus a placebo or no treatment, and seven trials studied herbal medicines versus western medicines. Herbal medicines were effective on decreasing waist circumference, blood glucose, blood lipids, and blood pressure. Conclusion. This study suggests the possibility that herbal medicines can be complementary and alternative medicines for metabolic syndrome. PMID:27413388

  10. Does Encouragement Matter in Improving Gender Imbalances in Technical Fields? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Unkovic, Cait; Sen, Maya; Quinn, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Does encouragement help address gender imbalances in technical fields? We present the results of one of the first and largest randomized controlled trials on the topic. Using an applied statistics conference in the social sciences as our context, we randomly assigned half of a pool of 3,945 graduate students to receive two personalized emails encouraging them to apply (n = 1,976) and the other half to receive nothing (n = 1,969). We find a robust, positive effect associated with this simple intervention and suggestive evidence that women responded more strongly than men. However, we find that women’s conference acceptance rates are higher within the control group than in the treated group. This is not the case for men. The reason appears to be that female applicants in the treated group solicited supporting letters at lower rates. Our findings therefore suggest that “low dose” interventions may promote diversity in STEM fields but may also have the potential to expose underlying disparities when used alone or in a non-targeted way. PMID:27097315

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Relationship Education in the U.S. Army: 2-Year Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Scott M.; Rhoades, Galena K.; Loew, Benjamin A.; Allen, Elizabeth S.; Carter, Sarah; Osborne, Laura J.; Prentice, Donnella; Markman, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an evidence-based, community-delivered adaptation of couple relationship education (CRE; specifically, PREP, The Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program) delivered at two Army installations. The study is a randomized controlled trial with two years of follow-up, examining marital quality and stability. Sample composition was 662 married couples with a spouse in the U.S. Army. Analyses yielded no evidence of overall enduring intervention effects on relationship quality but couples assigned to intervention at the higher risk site were significantly less likely than controls to be divorced at the two-year follow-up (8.1% vs. 14.9%, p < .01). This effect was moderated by ethnic minority status. Specifically, the impact of the intervention on divorce was strongest for minority couples. The findings add to the literature on who may benefit most from CRE. PMID:25419027

  12. Learning Mathematics in a Visuospatial Format: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Mental Abacus Instruction.

    PubMed

    Barner, David; Alvarez, George; Sullivan, Jessica; Brooks, Neon; Srinivasan, Mahesh; Frank, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    Mental abacus (MA) is a technique of performing fast, accurate arithmetic using a mental image of an abacus; experts exhibit astonishing calculation abilities. Over 3 years, 204 elementary school students (age range at outset: 5-7 years old) participated in a randomized, controlled trial to test whether MA expertise (a) can be acquired in standard classroom settings, (b) improves students' mathematical abilities (beyond standard math curricula), and (c) is related to changes in basic cognitive capacities like working memory. MA students outperformed controls on arithmetic tasks, suggesting that MA expertise can be achieved by children in standard classrooms. MA training did not alter basic cognitive abilities; instead, differences in spatial working memory at the beginning of the study mediated MA learning. PMID:27062391

  13. Randomized controlled trial on the safety of intracameral cephalosporins in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Philip TH; Young, Alvin L; Cheng, Lulu L; Tam, Patrick MK; Lee, Vincent YW

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the safety profiles of intracameral cephalosporins in cataract surgery. Patients and methods: In this controlled trial, 129 patients were randomized to one of four groups to receive 1 mg of one of three cephalosporins – cefazolin, cefuroxime, or ceftazidime, or normal saline – given intracamerally during cataract surgery. Central endothelial cell density (ECD) and retinal center point thickness (CPT) were determined by specular microscopy and ocular coherence tomography, respectively, before and at 3 months after surgery. Results: There were no statistical significant differences in the changes of ECD and CPT between eyes receiving intracameral cephalosporin and control. Conclusion: The use of intracameral cefazolin, cefuroxime, or ceftazidime (1 mg in 0.1-mL solution) at the time of cataract surgery had no significant effect on ECD and CPT postoperatively. PMID:21191447

  14. Building psychosocial assets and wellbeing among adolescent girls: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Katherine Sachs; Gillham, Jane; DeMaria, Lisa; Andrew, Gracy; Peabody, John; Leventhal, Steve

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a 5-month resilience-based program (Girls First Resilience Curriculum or RC) among 2308 rural adolescent girls at 57 government schools in Bihar, India. Local women with at least a 10th grade education served as group facilitators. Girls receiving RC improved more (vs. controls) on emotional resilience, self-efficacy, social-emotional assets, psychological wellbeing, and social wellbeing. Effects were not detected on depression. There was a small, statistically significant negative effect on anxiety (though not likely clinically significant). Results suggest psychosocial assets and wellbeing can be improved for girls in high-poverty, rural schools through a brief school-day program. To our knowledge, this is one of the largest developing country trials of a resilience-based school-day curriculum for adolescents. PMID:26547145

  15. Persistent effects of a message counter-marketing light cigarettes: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, L T; Palmer, R; Stine, M M; Strasser, A A; Yost, B A

    2001-01-01

    In a randomized, controlled trial, a national sample of smokers of Light cigarettes heard by telephone a "radio message" counter-marketing Light cigarettes. This message caused immediate changes in beliefs. Follow-up telephone interviews were done about 7 months later. The Message Group (N = 181) was more likely than the Control Group (N = 85) to report that (a) one Light equaled one Regular in tar yield to smokers, (b) Lights did not decrease health risks, and (c) they wanted to give up smoking (P<.05); they did not report greater quitting or intention to quit, or greater knowledge of filter ventilation. Systematic counter-marketing of Lights is recommended. A telephone-based exposure and follow-up procedure could be a good way to study message effects. PMID:11436936

  16. Parent Training for Young Children With Developmental Disabilities: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Laura Lee

    2009-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate a parent training intervention for caregivers with preschool-age children with developmental disabilities. The 21 families in the experimental group received usual care plus the 12-week Incredible Years Parent Training Program with developmental delay modifications. Families in the control group (n = 23) received usual care, including early childhood education and related services. Results suggest that this parent training intervention was superior to usual care for young children with developmental delays or disabilities in reducing negative parent–child interactions and child behavior problems. Participants in the experimental group indicated high satisfaction with treatment. Additional research is necessary to document maintenance and generalization of treatment outcomes. PMID:18702556

  17. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Increase Self-Compassion: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yadavaia, James E.; Hayes, Steven C.; Vilardaga, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Self-compassion has been shown to be related to several types of psychopathology, including traumatic stress, and has been shown to improve in response to various kinds of interventions. Current conceptualizations of self-compassion fit well with the psychological flexibility model, which underlies acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). However, there has been no research on ACT interventions specifically aimed at self-compassion. This randomized trial therefore compared a 6-hour ACT-based workshop targeting self-compassion to a wait-list control. From pretreatment to 2-month follow-up, ACT was significantly superior to the control condition in self-compassion, general psychological distress, and anxiety. Process analyses revealed psychological flexibility to be a significant mediator of changes in self-compassion, general psychological distress, depression, anxiety, and stress. Exploratory moderation analyses revealed the intervention to be of more benefit in terms of depression, anxiety, and stress to those with greater trauma history. PMID:25506545

  18. Needle catheter jejunostomy: a controlled, prospective, randomized trial in patients with gynecologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Spirtos, N M; Ballon, S C

    1988-06-01

    Sixty patients with gynecologic cancer entered a prospective, randomized study of immediate postoperative feeding. Thirty-three women in the study group received an elemental diet (Vivonex HN) delivered through a needle catheter jejunostomy. Twenty-seven patients in the control group were given standard 5% dextrose and electrolyte solutions. Patients in both groups were stratified according to nutritional status as determined by anthropometric evaluation and levels of serum albumin, total protein, and transferrin. These parameters also were measured at intervals throughout the study. Only one catheter-related complication occurred. Patients in the study group received significantly more calories (p = 0.01) and were better able to maintain serum levels of transferrin (p = 0.05) than those in the control group. An elemental diet administered through the needle catheter jejunostomy effectively maintains postoperative nutrition and is associated with few complications. PMID:3132853

  19. Gate controllable resistive random access memory devices using reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Preetam; Resmi, A. N.; Jinesh, K. B.

    2016-04-01

    The biggest challenge in the resistive random access memory (ReRAM) technology is that the basic operational parameters, such as the set and reset voltages, the current on-off ratios (hence the power), and their operational speeds, strongly depend on the active and electrode materials and their processing methods. Therefore, for its actual technological implementations, the unification of the operational parameters of the ReRAM devices appears to be a difficult task. In this letter, we show that by fabricating a resistive memory device in a thin film transistor configuration and thus applying an external gate bias, we can control the switching voltage very accurately. Taking partially reduced graphene oxide, the gate controllable switching is demonstrated, and the possible mechanisms are discussed.

  20. A Yoga Intervention for Posttraumatic Stress: A Preliminary Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jindani, Farah; Turner, Nigel; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.

    2015-01-01

    Yoga may be effective in the reduction of PTSD symptomology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a Kundalini Yoga (KY) treatment on PTSD symptoms and overall wellbeing. To supplement the current field of inquiry, a pilot randomized control trial (RCT) was conducted comparing an 8-session KY intervention with a waitlist control group. 80 individuals with current PTSD symptoms participated. Both groups demonstrated changes in PTSD symptomology but yoga participants showed greater changes in measures of sleep, positive affect, perceived stress, anxiety, stress, and resilience. Between-groups effect sizes were small to moderate (0.09–0.25). KY may be an adjunctive or alternative intervention for PTSD. Findings indicate the need for further yoga research to better understand the mechanism of yoga in relation to mental and physical health, gender and ethnic comparisons, and short- and long-term yoga practice for psychiatric conditions. PMID:26366179

  1. Clinical review: Strict or loose glycemic control in critically ill patients - implementing best available evidence from randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Glycemic control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as 'strict glycemic control' (SGC), decreased mortality and morbidity of adult critically ill patients in two randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Five successive RCTs, however, failed to show benefit of SGC with one trial even reporting an unexpected higher mortality. Consequently, enthusiasm for the implementation of SGC has declined, hampering translation of SGC into daily ICU practice. In this manuscript we attempt to explain the variances in outcomes of the RCTs of SGC, and point out other limitations of the current literature on glycemic control in ICU patients. There are several alternative explanations for why the five negative RCTs showed no beneficial effects of SGC, apart from the possibility that SGC may indeed not benefit ICU patients. These include, but are not restricted to, variability in the performance of SGC, differences among trial designs, changes in standard of care, differences in timing (that is, initiation) of SGC, and the convergence between the intervention groups and control groups with respect to achieved blood glucose levels in the successive RCTs. Additional factors that may hamper translation of SGC into daily ICU practice include the feared risk of severe hypoglycemia, additional labor associated with SGC, and uncertainties about who the primarily responsible caregiver should be for the implementation of SGC. PMID:20550725

  2. Are acupoints specific for diseases? A systematic review of the randomized controlled trials with sham acupuncture controls

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The results of many clinical trials and experimental studies regarding acupoint specificity are contradictory. This review aims to investigate whether a difference in efficacy exists between ordinary acupuncture on specific acupoints and sham acupuncture controls on non-acupoints or on irrelevant acupoints. Methods Databases including Medline, Embase, AMED and Chinese Biomedical Database were searched to identify randomized controlled trials published between 1998 and 2009 that compared traditional body acupuncture on acupoints with sham acupuncture controls on irrelevant acupoints or non-acupoints with the same needling depth. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was employed to address the quality of the included trials. Results Twelve acupuncture clinical trials with sham acupuncture controls were identified and included in the review. The conditions treated varied. Half of the included trials had positive results on the primary outcomes and demonstrated acupoint specificity. However, among those six trials (total sample size: 985) with low risk of bias, five trials (sample size: 940) showed no statistically significant difference between proper and sham acupuncture treatments. Conclusion This review did not demonstrate the existence of acupoint specificity. Further clinical trials with larger sample sizes, optimal acupuncture treatment protocols and appropriate sham acupuncture controls are required to resolve this important issue. PMID:20145733

  3. Bifidobacterium lactis in Treatment of Children with Acute Diarrhea. A Randomized Double Blind Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    El-Soud, Neveen Helmy Abou; Said, Reem Nabil; Mosallam, Dalia Sayed; Barakat, Nahla Abdel Moniem; Sabry, Mohamed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Probiotics are becoming increasingly popular treatment for children diarrhea. Although there are several probiotic strains potentially useful, researches were often limited to certain strains. AIM: To test Bifidobacterium lactis on morbidity of acute diarrhea in children less than 2 years. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted in 50 children (1 - 23 months) admitted with acute diarrhea to the Pediatric Hospital, Cairo University and were randomly assigned to receive in addition to usual treatment of diarrhea according to WHO guidelines; one of two treatments either milk formula non-supplemented (n = 25) or supplemented (n = 25) with Bifidobacterium lactis 14.5 × 106 CFU/100 ml daily for one week. Primary outcomes were frequency and duration of diarrhea and hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were duration of fever and vomiting episodes. Safety and tolerance were also recorded. RESULTS: On admission, patients’ characteristics of both groups (50 cases) were similar. For children who received the probiotics for one week; mean duration of diarrhoea was shorter than in controls (3.12 ± 0.92 vs. 4.10 ± 0.94 days) (P = 0.02), number of motions per day was less than in controls (3.96 ± 0.62 vs. 4.46 ± 0.85) (P = 0.04) and discharge from hospital <2 days was more frequent than in controls (72% vs. 44%) (P = 0.048). There was no effect on fever (P = 0.63) or vomiting (P = 0.54). CONCLUSION: Bifidobacterium lactis probiotics in supplemented milk formula decreased significantly frequency, duration of diarrhea, and hospital stay than usual treatment alone in children with acute diarrhea. Additional researches on other uncommon local probiotic species should be encouraged. PMID:27275258

  4. Localized Piezoelectric Alveolar Decortication for Orthodontic Treatment in Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Charavet, C; Lecloux, G; Bruwier, A; Rompen, E; Maes, N; Limme, M; Lambert, F

    2016-08-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to evaluate the benefits and clinical outcomes of piezocision, which is a minimally invasive approach to corticotomy that is used in orthodontic treatments. Twenty-four adult patients presenting with mild overcrowdings were randomly allocated to either a control group that was treated with conventional orthodontics or a test group that received piezo-assisted orthodontics. The piezocisions were performed 1 wk week after the placement of the orthodontic appliances. Neither grafting material nor sutures were used. All patients were followed every 2 wk, and archwires were changed only when they were no longer active. The periods required for the completion of the overall orthodontic treatments were calculated, and the periodontal parameters were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the orthodontic treatment. Patient-centered outcomes were assessed with a visual analog scale; analgesic use following the procedures was also recorded. The patient characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. The overall treatment time was significantly reduced by 43% in the piezocision group as compared with the control group. In both groups, periodontal parameters (i.e., recession depth, pocket depth, plaque index, and papilla bleeding index) remained unchanged between the baseline and treatment completion time points. No increase in root resorption was observed in either group. Scars were observed in 50% of the patients in the piezocision group. Analgesic consumption was similar following orthodontic appliance placement and piezocision surgery. Patient satisfaction was significantly better in the piezocision group than in the control group. In these conditions, the piezocision technique seemed to be effective in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. No gingival recessions were observed. The risk of residual scars might limit the indications for piezocision in patients with a high smile line (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02590835). PMID

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial of Therapeutic Horseback Riding in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gabriels, Robin L.; Pan, Zhaoxing; Dechant, Briar; Agnew, John A.; Brim, Natalie; Mesibov, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study expands previous equine-assisted intervention research by evaluating the effectiveness of therapeutic horseback riding (THR) on self-regulation, socialization, communication, adaptive, and motor behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method Participants with ASD (ages 6–16 years; N=127) were stratified by nonverbal IQ standard scores (≤ 85 or > 85) and randomized to one of two groups for 10 weeks: THR intervention or a barn activity (BA) control group without horses that employed similar methods. The fidelity of the THR intervention was monitored. Participants were evaluated within one month pre- and post-intervention by raters blind to intervention conditions and unblinded caregiver questionnaires. During the intervention, caregivers rated participants’ behaviors weekly. Results Intent-to-treat analysis conducted on the 116 participants who completed a baseline assessment (THR n = 58; BA control n = 58) revealed significant improvements in the THR group compared to the control on measures of irritability (primary outcome) (p=.002; effect size [ES]=.50) and hyperactivity (p=.001; ES=0.53), beginning by week five of the intervention. Significant improvements in the THR group were also observed on a measure of social cognition (p=.05, ES=.41) and social communication (p=.003; ES =.63), along with the total number of words (p=.01; ES=.54) and new words (p=.01; ES=.54) spoken during a standardized language sample. Sensitivity analyses adjusting for age, IQ, and per-protocol analyses produced consistent results. Conclusion This is the first large-scale randomized, controlled trial demonstrating efficacy of THR for the ASD population, and findings are consistent with previous equine-assisted intervention studies. Clinical trial registration information Trial of Therapeutic Horseback Riding in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder; http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT02301195. PMID:26088658

  6. An Internet Intervention to Improve Asthma Management: Rationale and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Annie YS; Dennis, Sarah; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Coiera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown the effectiveness of self-management for patients with asthma. In particular, possession and use of a written asthma action plan provided by a doctor has shown to significantly improve patients’ asthma control. Yet, uptake of a written asthma action plan and preventative asthma management is low in the community, especially amongst adults. Objective A Web-based personally controlled health management system (PCHMS) called Healthy.me will be evaluated in a 2010 CONSORT-compliant 2-group (static websites verse PCHMS) parallel randomized controlled trial (RCT) (allocation ratio 1:1). Methods The PCHMS integrates an untethered personal health record with consumer care pathways and social forums. After eligibility assessment, a sample of 300 adult patients with moderate persistent asthma will be randomly assigned to one of these arms. After 12 months of using either Healthy.me or information websites (usual care arm), a post-study assessment will be conducted. Results The primary outcome measure is possession of or revision of an asthma action plan during the study. Secondary outcome measures include: (1) adherence to the asthma action plan, (2) rate of planned and unplanned visits to healthcare providers for asthma issues, (3) usage patterns of Healthy.me and attrition rates, (4) asthma control and asthma exacerbation scores, and (5) impact of asthma on life and competing demands, and days lost from work. Conclusions This RCT will provide insights into whether access to an online PCHMS will improve uptake of a written asthma action plan and preventative asthma actions. Trial Registration Trial Registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000716864; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362714 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6IYBJGRnW). PMID:23942523

  7. Nurse Case Management and Housing Interventions Reduce Allergen Exposures: The Milwaukee Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Breysse, Jill; Wendt, Jean; Dixon, Sherry; Murphy, Amy; Wilson, Jonathan; Meurer, John; Cohn, Jennifer; Jacobs, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We examined the impact of a combination of home environmental interventions and nurse case management services on total settled dust loadings and on allergen concentrations in the homes of asthmatic children. Methods Using a randomized longitudinal controlled trial study design, we randomly assigned homes of asthmatic children in Milwaukee to either a control (n=64) or an intervention (n=57) group. Control group homes received a visual assessment, education, bed/pillow dust mite encasings, and treatment of lead-based paint hazards. The intervention group received these same services plus nurse case management that included tailored, individual asthma action plans, provision of minor home repairs, home cleaning using special vacuuming and wet washing, and integrated pest management. Dust vacuum samples were collected from measured surface areas of floors in the TV room, kitchen, and child's bedroom at baseline and at three-, six-, and 12-month follow-up visits. Dust loading (mass per surface area) is a means of measuring total dust and the total amount of allergen present. Results For the intervention group, geometric mean dust loadings declined significantly from baseline (39 milligrams per square foot [mg/ft2]) to post-intervention (11 mg/ft2) (p<0.001). Baseline dust loading, treatment group, visit, and season were significant predictors of follow-up dust loadings. Mean post-intervention dust loadings were 72% higher in the control group. The total amount of allergen in settled house dust declined significantly following the intervention because total dust loading declined; the concentration of allergens in settled dust did not change significantly. Conclusion The combination of nurse case management and home environmental interventions promotes collaboration between health and housing professionals and is effective in reducing exposures to allergens in settled dust. PMID:21563716

  8. Effectiveness of a web-based intervention for injured claimants: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is considerable evidence showing that injured people who are involved in a compensation process show poorer physical and mental recovery than those with similar injuries who are not involved in a compensation process. One explanation for this reduced recovery is that the legal process and the associated retraumatization are very stressful for the claimant. The aim of this study was to empower injured claimants in order to facilitate recovery. Methods Participants were recruited by three Dutch claims settlement offices. The participants had all been injured in a traffic crash and were involved in a compensation process. The study design was a randomized controlled trial. An intervention website was developed with (1) information about the compensation process, and (2) an evidence-based, therapist-assisted problem-solving course. The control website contained a few links to already existing websites. Outcome measures were empowerment, self-efficacy, health status (including depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms), perceived fairness, ability to work, claims knowledge and extent of burden. The outcomes were self-reported through online questionnaires and were measured four times: at baseline, and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results In total, 176 participants completed the baseline questionnaire after which they were randomized into either the intervention group (n = 88) or the control group (n = 88). During the study, 35 participants (20%) dropped out. The intervention website was used by 55 participants (63%). The health outcomes of the intervention group were no different to those of the control group. However, the intervention group considered the received compensation to be fairer (P <0.01). The subgroup analysis of intervention users versus nonusers did not reveal significant results. The intervention website was evaluated positively. Conclusions Although the web-based intervention was not used enough to improve the health of injured

  9. Tilt Table Therapies for Patients with Severe Disorders of Consciousness: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krewer, Carmen; Luther, Marianne; Koenig, Eberhard; Müller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    One major aim of the neurological rehabilitation of patients with severe disorders of consciousness (DOC) is to enhance patients’ arousal and ability to communicate. Mobilization into a standing position by means of a tilt table has been shown to improve their arousal and awareness. However, due to the frequent occurrence of syncopes on a tilt table, it is easier to accomplish verticalization using a tilt table with an integrated stepping device. The objective of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a tilt table therapy with or without an integrated stepping device on the level of consciousness. A total of 50 participants in vegetative or minimally conscious states 4 weeks to 6 month after injury were treated with verticalization during this randomized controlled trial. Interventions involved ten 1-hour sessions of the specific treatment over a 3-week period. Blinded assessors made measurements before and after the intervention period, as well as after a 3-week follow-up period. The coma recovery scale-revised (CRS-R) showed an improvement by a median of 2 points for the group receiving tilt table with integrated stepping (Erigo). The rate of recovery of the group receiving the conventional tilt table therapy significantly increased by 5 points during treatment and by an additional 2 points during the 3-week follow-up period. Changes in spasticity did not significantly differ between the two intervention groups. Compared to the conventional tilt table, the tilt table with integrated stepping device failed to have any additional benefit for DOC patients. Verticalization itself seems to be beneficial though and should be administered to patients in DOC in early rehabilitation. Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials Ltd (www.controlled-trials.com), identifier number ISRCTN72853718 PMID:26623651

  10. A pilot randomized controlled trial to decrease adaptation difficulties in chinese new immigrants to Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaonan; Stewart, Sunita M; Chui, Jolian P L; Ho, Joy L Y; Li, Anthony C H; Lam, Tai Hing

    2014-01-01

    Immigration occurs globally, and immigrants are vulnerable to the development of adaptation difficulties. Little evidence is available for effective programs to enhance immigrant adaptation outside of the West. This pilot randomized controlled trial tested the effectiveness of two interventions used to decrease adaptation difficulties by (a) providing knowledge of resources that are relevant to the Hong Kong context or (b) enhancing personal resilience in immigrants to Hong Kong from Mainland China. A total of 220 participants were randomly assigned to three conditions: information, resilience, or control arms. They completed measures on adaptation difficulties, knowledge, and personal resilience at baseline, immediately after the intervention (postintervention), and at a 3-month follow-up. The information intervention resulted in higher increases postintervention in knowledge than did the other two arms. The resilience intervention reported greater increases in personal resilience than did the control arm at both postintervention and 3 months later; it also reported greater increases than the information arm did at the 3-month follow-up. Although both interventions reported greater decreases in adaptation difficulties than the control arm did at postintervention and 3 months later, no significant differences were found when they were compared with each other at both time points. Both programs had high acceptability and were feasible to implement in the community. Change in knowledge had no significant mediation effect on adaption difficulties, but change in personal resilience from baseline to postintervention mediated the effect of the intervention on the outcome of adaptation difficulties at the 3-month follow-up. These findings indicate evidence for benefits of the information and resilience interventions, and they inform further development of our programs. PMID:24411121

  11. Weight loss improves reproductive outcomes in obese women undergoing fertility treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sim, K A; Dezarnaulds, G M; Denyer, G S; Skilton, M R; Caterson, I D

    2014-04-01

    For women attempting pregnancy, obesity reduces fertility and is an independent risk factor for obstetric and neonatal complications. The aim of this evaluator-blinded, randomized controlled trial was to evaluate a weight loss intervention on pregnancy rates in obese women undertaking fertility treatment. Forty-nine obese women, aged ≤ 37 years, presenting for fertility treatment were randomized to either a 12-week intervention (n = 27) consisting of a very-low-energy diet for the initial 6 weeks followed by a hypocaloric diet, combined with a weekly group multidisciplinary programme; or a control group (n = 22) who received recommendations for weight loss and the same printed material as the intervention. Anthropometric and reproductive parameters were measured at baseline and at 12 weeks. The 22 women who completed the intervention had greater anthropometric changes (-6.6 ± 4.6 kg and -8.7 ± 5.6 cm vs. -1.6 ± 3.6 kg and -0.6 ± 6.3 cm) compared with the control group (n = 17; P < 0.001). The intervention group achieved a pregnancy rate of 48% compared with 14% (P = 0.007), took a mean two fertility treatment cycles to achieve each pregnancy compared with four in the control group (P = 0.002), and had a marked increase in the number of live births (44% vs. 14%; P = 0.02). A group weight loss programme, incorporating dietary, exercise and behavioural components, is associated with a significant improvement in pregnancy rates and live births in a group of obese women undergoing fertility treatment. PMID:25826729

  12. Foot Massage and Physiological Stress in People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Marie Louise; Beattie, Elizabeth; Shum, David H.K.; O'Dwyer, Siobhan T.; Barrett, Sue; Sung, Billy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The anxiety associated with unfamiliar surroundings, the disorientation and mental confusion, and the social isolation that accompanies dementia can often create increased stress for people living in long-term care settings. Such a response is thought to affect the autonomic nervous system and result in emotional and physical symptoms of distress that may be manifested as agitation. There is the potential for such distress to influence the physiological response and in particular Blood Pressure and Heart Rate. A relaxation intervention such as massage may influence the physiological stress response. Methods: This randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the effect of foot massage (FM) versus a control activity (quiet presence, QP) on physiological stress response (i.e., blood pressure [BP] and heart rate [HR]) in people living with moderate-to-severe dementia in long-term-care settings. Results: Fifty-three residents were randomized to intervention (10-minute FM) or control group (QP). While the FM group experienced a greater reduction in HR than the control group, these reductions were not significantly different between groups (p=0.83; see Table 1), or across time (p=0.46). Both groups experienced a reduction in systolic BP and diastolic BP, while the mean reduction in systolic BP was greater for those in the FM group. Conclusions: While the findings do not provide strong support for FM, the finding that both conditions allowed the person with dementia to rest in the presence of another human being is of importance in the care of people with dementia. The close presence of another person may in fact promote relaxation and therefore improve BP and HR measures. PMID:24047244

  13. Improving psychology students' attitudes toward people with schizophrenia: A quasi-randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Magliano, Lorenza; Rinaldi, Angela; Costanzo, Regina; De Leo, Renata; Schioppa, Giustina; Petrillo, Miriam; Read, John

    2016-01-01

    Despite scientific evidence that the majority of people with schizophrenia (PWS) have personal histories of traumatic life events and adversities, their needs for psychological support often remain unmet. Poor availability of nonpharmacological therapies in schizophrenia may be partly because of professionals' attitudes toward people diagnosed with this disorder. As future health professionals, psychology students represent a target population for efforts to increase the probability that PWS will be offered effective psychological therapies. This quasi-randomized controlled study investigated the effect of an educational intervention, addressing common prejudices via scientific evidence and prerecorded audio-testimony from PWS, on the attitudes of psychology students toward PWS. Students in their fifth year of a master's degree in Psychology at the Second University of Naples, Italy were randomly assigned to an experimental group-which attended two 3-hr sessions a week apart-or to a control group. Compared with their baseline assessment, at 1-month reassessment the 76 educated students endorsed more psychosocial causes and more of them recommended psychologists in the treatment of schizophrenia. They were also more optimistic about recovery, less convinced that PWS are recognizable and unpredictable, and more convinced that treatments, pharmacological and psychological, are useful. No significant changes were found, from baseline to 1-month reassessment, in the 112 controls. At 1-month reassessment, educated students were more optimistic about recovery and less convinced that PWS are unpredictable than controls. These findings suggest that psychology students' attitudes toward PWS can be improved by training initiatives including education and indirect contact with users. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26963178

  14. Effect of Using Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Babaii, Atye; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Hajibagheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients in coronary care unit are at risk of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation can be associated with increased blood pressure and heart rate, raising the risk of developing cardiovascular problems among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit. Objectives: This study was carried out to examine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in cardiac patients. Patients and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected using a convenient sampling method and randomly allocated into the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. However, in the experimental group, patients received routine care and eye mask for three subsequent nights. In the both groups, the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Data were analyzed by the chi-square test, independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: After the study, the median scores of the subjective sleep quality, the sleep latency, the sleep duration, the habitual sleep efficiency, and the sleep disturbances domains, as well as the median score of overall Pittsburgh sleep quality index in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the use of sleep medications and the daytime dysfunction domains (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Using eye mask can significantly improve the sleep quality in cardiac patients. Therefore, nurses are recommended to use eye mask in combination with current treatments for improving patients’ sleep quality. PMID:26835463

  15. Calculating the probability of random sampling for continuous variables in submitted or published randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, J B; Dexter, F; Pandit, J J; Shafer, S L; Yentis, S M

    2015-07-01

    In a previous paper, one of the authors (JBC) used a chi-squared method to analyse the means (SD) of baseline variables, such as height or weight, from randomised controlled trials by Fujii et al., concluding that the probabilities that the reported distributions arose by chance were infinitesimally small. Subsequent testing of that chi-squared method, using simulation, suggested that the method was incorrect. This paper corrects the chi-squared method and tests its performance and the performance of Monte Carlo simulations and ANOVA to analyse the probability of random sampling. The corrected chi-squared method and ANOVA method became inaccurate when applied to means that were reported imprecisely. Monte Carlo simulations confirmed that baseline data from 158 randomised controlled trials by Fujii et al. were different to those from 329 trials published by other authors and that the distribution of Fujii et al.'s data were different to the expected distribution, both p < 10(-16) . The number of Fujii randomised controlled trials with unlikely distributions was less with Monte Carlo simulation than with the 2012 chi-squared method: 102 vs 117 trials with p < 0.05; 60 vs 86 for p < 0.01; 30 vs 56 for p < 0.001; and 12 vs 24 for p < 0.00001, respectively. The Monte Carlo analysis nevertheless confirmed the original conclusion that the distribution of the data presented by Fujii et al. was extremely unlikely to have arisen from observed data. The Monte Carlo analysis may be an appropriate screening tool to check for non-random (i.e. unreliable) data in randomised controlled trials submitted to journals. PMID:26032950

  16. Brief Cognitive-Behavioral and Relaxation Training Interventions for Breast Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gudenkauf, Lisa M.; Antoni, Michael H.; Stagl, Jamie M.; Lechner, Suzanne C.; Jutagir, Devika R.; Bouchard, Laura C.; Blomberg, Bonnie B.; Glück, Stefan; Derhagopian, Robert P.; Giron, Gladys L.; Avisar, Eli; Torres-Salichs, Manuel A.; Carver, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Women with breast cancer (BCa) report elevated distress post-surgery. Group-based cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) following surgery improves psychological adaptation, though its key mechanisms remain speculative. This randomized controlled dismantling trial compared two interventions featuring elements thought to drive CBSM effects: a 5-week Cognitive-Behavioral Training (CBT) and 5-week Relaxation Training (RT) vs. a 5-week Health Education (HE) control group. Method Women with stage 0-III BCa (N = 183) were randomized to CBT, RT, or HE condition 2–10 weeks post-surgery. Psychosocial measures were collected at baseline (T1) and post-intervention (T2). Repeated-measures ANOVAs tested whether CBT and RT treatments improved primary measures of psychological adaptation and secondary measures of stress management resource perceptions from pre- to post-intervention relative to HE. Results Both CBT and RT groups reported reduced depressive affect. The CBT group reported improved emotional well-being/quality of life and less cancer-specific thought intrusions. The RT group reported improvements on illness-related social disruption. Regarding stress management resources, the CBT group reported increased reliability of social support networks, while the RT group reported increased confidence in relaxation skills. Psychological adaptation and stress management resource constructs were unchanged in the HE control group. Conclusions Non-metastatic breast cancer patients participating in two forms of brief, 5-week group-based stress management intervention after surgery showed improvements in psychological adaptation and stress management resources compared to an attention-matched control group. Findings provide preliminary support suggesting that using brief group-based stress management interventions may promote adaptation among non-metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:25939017

  17. Using Internet and Mobile Phone Technology to Deliver an Automated Physical Activity Program: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Catt, Michael; De Boni, Marco; Fairley, Bruce William; Hurst, Tina; Murray, Peter; Richardson, Alannah; Sodhi, Jaspreet Singh

    2007-01-01

    Background The Internet has potential as a medium for health behavior change programs, but no controlled studies have yet evaluated the impact of a fully automated physical activity intervention over several months with real-time objective feedback from a monitor. Objective The aim was to evaluate the impact of a physical activity program based on the Internet and mobile phone technology provided to individuals for 9 weeks. Methods A single-center, randomized, stratified controlled trial was conducted from September to December 2005 in Bedfordshire, United Kingdom, with 77 healthy adults whose mean age was 40.4 years (SD = 7.6) and mean body mass index was 26.3 (SD = 3.4). Participants were randomized to a test group that had access to an Internet and mobile phone–based physical activity program (n = 47) or to a control group (n = 30) that received no support. The test group received tailored solutions for perceived barriers, a schedule to plan weekly exercise sessions with mobile phone and email reminders, a message board to share their experiences with others, and feedback on their level of physical activity. Both groups were issued a wrist-worn accelerometer to monitor their level of physical activity; only the test group received real-time feedback via the Internet. The main outcome measures were accelerometer data and self-report of physical activity. Results At the end of the study period, the test group reported a significantly greater increase over baseline than did the control group for perceived control (P < .001) and intention/expectation to exercise (P < .001). Intent-to-treat analyses of both the accelerometer data (P = .02) and leisure time self-report data (P = .03) found a higher level of moderate physical activity in the test group. The average increase (over the control group) in accelerometer-measured moderate physical activity was 2 h 18 min per week. The test group also lost more percent body fat than the control group (test group: −2

  18. Diabetes Self-Management Smartphone Application for Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vandelanotte, Corneel; Fenning, Andrew; Duncan, Mitch J

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistently poor glycemic control in adult type 1 diabetes patients is a common, complex, and serious problem initiating significant damage to the cardiovascular, renal, neural, and visual systems. Currently, there is a plethora of low-cost and free diabetes self-management smartphone applications available in online stores. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a freely available smartphone application combined with text-message feedback from a certified diabetes educator to improve glycemic control and other diabetes-related outcomes in adult patients with type 1 diabetes in a two-group randomized controlled trial. Methods Patients were recruited through an online type 1 diabetes support group and letters mailed to adults with type 1 diabetes throughout Australia. In a 6-month intervention, followed by a three-month follow-up, patients (n=72) were randomized to usual care (control group) or usual care and the use of a smartphone application (Glucose Buddy) with weekly text-message feedback from a Certified Diabetes Educator (intervention group). All outcome measures were collected at baseline and every three months over the study period. Patients’ glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) were measured with a blood test and diabetes-related self-efficacy, self-care activities, and quality of life were measured with online questionnaires. Results The mean age of patients was 35.20 years (SD 10.43) (28 male, 44 female), 39% (28/72) were male, and patients had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for a mean of 18.94 years (SD 9.66). Of the initial 72 patients, 53 completed the study (25 intervention, 28 control group). The intervention group significantly improved glycemic control (HbA1c) from baseline (mean 9.08%, SD 1.18) to 9-month follow-up (mean 7.80%, SD 0.75), compared to the control group (baseline: mean 8.47%, SD 0.86, follow-up: mean 8.58%, SD 1.16). No significant change over time was found in either group in

  19. Internet-based interventions for posttraumatic stress: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kuester, Annika; Niemeyer, Helen; Knaevelsrud, Christine

    2016-02-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent and highly distressing affliction, but access to trauma-focused psychotherapy is limited. Internet-based interventions (IBIs) could improve the delivery of and access to specialized mental health care. Currently, no meta-analytical evidence is available on IBIs for PTSD. We conducted a meta-analysis of 20 randomized controlled studies, including 21 comparisons, in order to summarize the current state of efficacy for the treatment of PTSD and to identify moderator variables. Studies tested internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and expressive writing (EW) against active or passive comparison conditions, including subclinical and clinical samples. Results show that at post-assessment CBT-IBIs are significantly more efficacious than passive controls, resulting in medium to large effects on the PTSD sum and all sub-symptom scores (0.66controls. EW differed from controls only at follow-up in reducing intrusions and hyperarousal, but based on merely two studies. Subgroup analyses reveal that for CBT none of the program components such as provision of therapeutic support, reminders, or number of sessions serves as a moderator. Overall, results for CBT-IBIs are promising, but the number of includable studies for subgroup analyses was low, limiting statistical power. Future research is necessary to systematically investigate the impact of treatment components and test against active controls with optimal power. PMID:26655959

  20. Cardiopulmonary effects of traditional Thai dance on menopausal women: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Phusririt, Chonticha; Angkapattamakul, Sariya; Hurst, Cameron P.; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of Thai dance on cardiopulmonary factors in menopausal women. [Subjects] Sixty-six menopausal women aged 40 years or more. [Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to either the Thai dance or control group. The Thai dance group performed a traditional Thai dancing exercise program for 60 minutes, 3 times per week for 6 weeks. The control group received general health guidance. The 6-minutewalk test, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansion were assessed at baseline and at the end of the study. [Results] Sixty-six menopausal women were eligible. At the end of the study, all variables were significantly better in the Thai dance group than the control group. Moreover, all variables improved significantly compared to baseline in the Thai dance group but not in the control group. For example, the mean 6-minutewalk test result in Thai dance group at the end of the study was 285.4 m, which was significantly higher than that at baseline (254.8 m) and the control group at baseline (247.0 m). [Conclusion] A 6-week Thai dance program improves cardiorespiratory endurance in menopausal women. PMID:26357441

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Conbercept Pretreatment before Vitrectomy in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaochun; Wang, Ruili; Mei, Yan; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ting; Zhao, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy and safety of preoperative intravitreal conbercept (IVC) injection before vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Methods. 107 eyes of 88 patients that underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for active PDR were enrolled. All patients were assigned randomly to either preoperative IVC group or control group. Follow-up examinations were performed for three months after surgery. The primary bioactivity measures were severity of intraoperative bleeding, incidence of early and late recurrent VH, vitreous clear-up time, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) levels. The secondary safety measures included intraocular pressure, endophthalmitis, rubeosis, tractional retinal detachment, and systemic adverse events. Results. The incidence and severity of intraoperative bleeding were significantly lower in IVC group than in the control group. The average vitreous clear-up time of early recurrent VH was significantly shorter in IVC group compared with that in control group. There was no significant difference in vitreous clear-up time of late recurrent VH between the two groups. Patients that received pretreatment of conbercept had much better BCVA at 3 days, 1 week, and 1 month after surgery than control group. Moreover, both patients with improved BCVA were greater in IVC group than in control group at each follow-up. Conclusions. Conbercept pretreatment could be an effective adjunct to vitrectomy in accelerating postoperative vitreous clear-up and acquiring stable visual acuity restoration for PDR. PMID:27034822

  2. A Serious Game to Increase Healthy Food Consumption in Overweight or Obese Adults: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a growing global issue that is linked to cognitive and psychological deficits. Objective This preliminary study investigated the efficacy of training to improve inhibitory control (IC), a process linked to overeating, on consumption and cognitive control factors. Methods This study utilized a multisession mobile phone–based intervention to train IC in an overweight and obese population using a randomized waitlist-control design. A combination of self-assessment questionnaires and psychophysiological measures was used to assess the efficacy of the intervention in terms of improved general IC and modified food consumption after training. Attitudes toward food were also assessed to determine their mediating role in food choices. A total of 58 participants (47 female) completed 2 assessment sessions 3 weeks apart, with 2 weeks of intervention training for the training group during this time. The groups did not differ in baseline demographics including age, body mass index, and inhibitory control. Results Inhibitory control ability improved across the training sessions, with increases in P3 amplitude implying increased cognitive control over responses. Inhibitory control training was associated with increased healthy and reduced unhealthy food consumption in a taste test and in the week following training, as measured by the Healthy Eating Quiz and the food consumption test. Cognitive restraint was enhanced after training for the training but not the waitlist condition in the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, implying that attempts to avoid unhealthy foods in the future will be easier for the training group participants. Conclusions Inhibitory control training delivered via a purpose-designed mobile phone app is easy to complete, is convenient, and can increase cognitive restraint and reduce unhealthy food consumption. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000263493; http

  3. Empowerment of personal injury victims through the internet: design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research has shown that current claims settlement process can have a negative impact on psychological and physical recovery of personal injury (PI) victims. One of the explanations for the negative impact on health is that the claims settlement process is a stressful experience and victims suffer from renewed victimization caused by the claims settlement process. PI victims can experience a lack of information, lack of involvement, lack of 'voice', and poor communication. We present the first study that aims to empower PI victims with respect to the negative impact of the claims settlement process by means of an internet intervention. Methods/design The study is a two armed, randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which 170 PI victims are randomized to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group will get access to a website providing 1) an information module, so participants learn what is happening and what to expect during the claims settlement process, and 2) an e-coach module, so participants learn to cope with problems they experience during the claims settlement process. The control group will get access to a website with hyperlinks to commonly available information only. Participants will be recruited via a PI claims settlement office. Participants are included if they have been involved in a traffic accident which happened less than two years ago, and are at least 18 years old. The main study parameter is the increase of empowerment within the intervention group compared to the control group. Empowerment will be measured by the mastery scale and a self-efficacy scale. The secondary outcomes are perceived justice, burden, well being, work ability, knowledge, amount of damages, and lawyer-client communication. Data are collected at baseline (T0 measurement before randomization), at three months, six months, and twelve months after baseline. Analyses will be conducted according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion This

  4. Effect of Probiotics on Blood Lipid Concentrations: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Ae; Kim, Jeongseon

    2015-10-01

    Previous clinical studies have reported mixed results regarding the effect of probiotics on lipid metabolism. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to quantify the direction and magnitude of the potential effect of probiotics on blood lipid concentrations.Eligible studies were randomized, placebo-controlled trials whose interventions were probiotic products containing live bacteria. The studies reported net changes in lipid profiles (total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides) and their associated standard deviations (or the data to calculate them). The probiotic products did not contain prebiotics or other active ingredients, and the full article was accessible in English.The pooled mean net change in lipid profiles and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Q statistics and I were calculated to examine heterogeneity. Potential sources of heterogeneity were investigated via subgroup and sensitivity analyses, and publication biases were estimated.A total of 30 randomized controlled trials with 1624 participants (828 in intervention groups and 796 in placebo groups) were included in this analysis. Subjects treated with probiotics demonstrated reduced total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol compared to control subjects by 7.8 mg/dL (95% CI: -10.4, -5.2) and 7.3 mg/dL (95% CI: -10.1, -4.4), respectively. There was no significant effect of probiotics on HDL cholesterol or triglycerides. The effect of probiotics on total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol depended on a variety of factors. The significant effects were greater for higher baseline total cholesterol levels, longer treatment durations, and certain probiotic strains. In addition, these associations seem stronger in studies supported by probiotics companies.The studies included in this meta-analysis showed significant heterogeneity as indicated by the Q statistics and I. In addition, industry sponsorship may affect study findings

  5. Safety and Feasibility of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Pediatric Hemiparesis: Randomized Controlled Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Feyma, Tim; Menk, Jeremiah; Usset, Michelle; Vaith, Amy; Wood, Teddi Jean; Worthington, Rebecca; Krach, Linda E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a form of noninvasive brain stimulation that has shown improved adult stroke outcomes. Applying tDCS in children with congenital hemiparesis has not yet been explored. Objective The primary objective of this study was to explore the safety and feasibility of single-session tDCS through an adverse events profile and symptom assessment within a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled preliminary study in children with congenital hemiparesis. A secondary objective was to assess the stability of hand and cognitive function. Design A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled pretest/posttest/follow-up study was conducted. Setting The study was conducted in a university pediatric research laboratory. Participants Thirteen children, ages 7 to 18 years, with congenital hemiparesis participated. Measurements Adverse events/safety assessment and hand function were measured. Intervention Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a control group, with safety and functional assessments at pretest, at posttest on the same day, and at a 1-week follow-up session. An intervention of 10 minutes of 0.7 mA tDCS was applied to bilateral primary motor cortices. The tDCS intervention was considered safe if there was no individual decline of 25% or group decline of 2 standard deviations for motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and behavioral data and no report of adverse events. Results No major adverse events were found, including no seizures. Two participants did not complete the study due to lack of MEP and discomfort. For the 11 participants who completed the study, group differences in MEPs and behavioral data did not exceed 2 standard deviations in those who received the tDCS (n=5) and those in the control group (n=6). The study was completed without the need for stopping per medical monitor and biostatisticial analysis. Limitations A limitation of the study was the small sample size, with data

  6. Effectiveness of a Multidimensional Randomized Control Intervention to Reduce Quartz Exposure Among Construction Workers.

    PubMed

    van Deurssen, Erik; Meijster, Tim; Oude Hengel, Karen M; Boessen, Ruud; Spaan, Suzanne; Tielemans, Erik; Heederik, Dick; Pronk, Anjoeka

    2015-10-01

    There is little evidence with respect to the effectiveness of intervention programs that focus on the reduction of occupational quartz exposure in the construction industry. This article evaluates the effectiveness of a multidimensional intervention which was aimed at reducing occupational quartz exposure among construction workers by increasing the use of technical control measures. Eight companies participating in the cluster randomized controlled trial were randomly allocated to the intervention (four companies) or control condition (four companies). The multidimensional intervention included engineering, organizational, and behavioural elements at both organizational and individual level. Full-shift personal quartz exposure measurements and detailed observations were conducted before and after the intervention among bricklayers, carpenters, concrete drillers, demolishers, and tuck pointers (n = 282). About 59% of these workers measured at baseline were reassessed during follow-up. Bayesian hierarchical models were used to evaluate the intervention effect on exposure levels. Concrete drillers in the intervention group used technical control measures, particularly water suppression, for a significantly greater proportion of the time spent on abrasive tasks during follow-up compared to baseline (93 versus 62%; P < 0.05). A similar effect, although not statistically significant, was observed among demolishers. A substantial overall reduction in quartz exposure (73 versus 40% in the intervention and control group respectively; P < 0.001) was observed for concrete drillers, demolishers, and tuck pointers. The decrease in exposure in the intervention group compared to controls was significantly larger for demolishers and tuck pointers, but not for concrete drillers. The observed effect could at least partly be explained by the introduced interventions; the statistically significant increased use of control measures among concrete drillers explains the observed effect

  7. Multisystemic therapy for adolescents with poorly controlled type I diabetes: Stability of treatment effects in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Deborah A; Templin, Thomas; Naar-King, Sylvie; Frey, Maureen A; Cunningham, Phillippe B; Podolski, Cheryl-Lynn; Cakan, Nedim

    2007-02-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to determine whether multisystemic therapy (MST), an intensive, home-based psychotherapy, improved regimen adherence, metabolic control, and rates of hospitalization for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among adolescents with chronically poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes 6 months after the completion of treatment. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 127 adolescents and their families. Mean participant age was 13.2 years. Sixty-three percent of participants were African American, and 51% were female. Data were collected at baseline, treatment termination, and 6-month follow-up. Changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), frequency of blood glucose testing (BGT), and rate of DKA admissions were assessed. In intent-to-treat analyses, a main effect of MST on DKA admissions was found at both treatment termination and follow-up. Improvements in BGT were moderated by family composition; only 2-parent MST families maintained improvements at follow-up. Improvements in HbA1c for the MST group at treatment termination were lost at follow-up. Results show that intensive, home-based psychotherapy created stable reductions in serious lapses in adherence, as indexed by episodes of DKA, among youth with poorly controlled diabetes. PMID:17295576

  8. Randomized controlled trial: Moxibustion and acupuncture for the treatment of Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Chun-Hui; Zhao, Ji-Meng; Liu, Hui-Rong; Lu, Yuan; Zhu, Yi-Fang; Shi, Yin; Weng, Zhi-Jun; Feng, Hui; Guan, Xin; Li, Jing; Chen, Wei-Feng; Wu, Lu-Yi; Jin, Xiao-Ming; Dou, Chuan-Zi; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture and moxibustion for the treatment of active Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: Ninety-two patients were equally and randomly divided into the treatment group and received herb-partitioned moxibustion combined with acupuncture, and the control group received wheat bran-partitioned moxibustion combined with superficial acupuncture. The patients received three treatment sessions per week for 12 wk and were followed up for 24 wk. The main outcome was evaluated using the CD Activity Index (CDAI) score, and the secondary outcomes were evaluated using laboratory indicators such as hemoglobin (HGB), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, quality-of-life, endoscopic ratings, and intestinal histology scores. RESULTS: The CDAI scores of both the treatment and control groups were significantly reduced after treatment compared with those measured before treatment. However, the degree of improvement in the treatment group was significantly greater than that of the control group. The improvement in symptoms in patients of the treatment group was sustained at follow-up, whereas that of the control group was not. The overall efficacy of the treatment was significantly greater than that of the control. Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in quality-of-life ratings after treatment, but the improvement was significantly greater in the treatment group than in the control group. In addition, the patients in the treatment group showed significantly increased HGB and significantly decreased CRP levels and histopathological scores at the end of treatment, whereas the control group did not exhibit significant changes. CONCLUSION: Moxibustion with acupuncture provided significant therapeutic benefits in patients with active CD beyond the placebo effect and is therefore an effective and safe treatment for active CD. PMID:25152604

  9. Support or competition? How online social networks increase physical activity: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwen; Brackbill, Devon; Yang, Sijia; Becker, Joshua; Herbert, Natalie; Centola, Damon

    2016-12-01

    To identify what features of online social networks can increase physical activity, we conducted a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in 2014 in Philadelphia, PA. Students (n = 790, mean age = 25.2) at an university were randomly assigned to one of four conditions composed of either supportive or competitive relationships and either with individual or team incentives for attending exercise classes. The social comparison condition placed participants into 6-person competitive networks with individual incentives. The social support condition placed participants into 6-person teams with team incentives. The combined condition with both supportive and competitive relationships placed participants into 6-person teams, where participants could compare their team's performance to 5 other teams' performances. The control condition only allowed participants to attend classes with individual incentives. Rewards were based on the total number of classes attended by an individual, or the average number of classes attended by the members of a team. The outcome was the number of classes that participants attended. Data were analyzed using multilevel models in 2014. The mean attendance numbers per week were 35.7, 38.5, 20.3, and 16.8 in the social comparison, the combined, the control, and the social support conditions. Attendance numbers were 90% higher in the social comparison and the combined conditions (mean = 1.9, SE = 0.2) in contrast to the two conditions without comparison (mean = 1.0, SE = 0.2) (p = 0.003). Social comparison was more effective for increasing physical activity than social support and its effects did not depend on individual or team incentives. PMID:27617191

  10. A cluster randomized controlled trial of the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) curriculum.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Neil; Barlow, Alexandra; Wigelsworth, Michael; Lendrum, Ann; Pert, Kirsty; Joyce, Craig; Stephens, Emma; Wo, Lawrence; Squires, Garry; Woods, Kevin; Calam, Rachel; Turner, Alex

    2016-10-01

    This randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluated the efficacy of the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies curriculum (PATHS; Kusche & Greenberg, 1994) as a means to improve children's social-emotional competence (assessed via the Social Skills Improvement System (SSIS); Gresham & Elliot, 2008) and mental health outcomes (assessed via the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ); Goodman, 1997). Forty-five schools in Greater Manchester, England, were randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. Allocation was balanced by proportions of children eligible for free school meals and speaking English as an additional language via minimization. Children (N=4516) aged 7-9years at baseline in the participating schools were the target cohort. During the two-year trial period, teachers of this cohort in schools allocated to the intervention group delivered the PATHS curriculum, while their counterparts in the control group continued their usual provision. Teachers in PATHS schools received initial training and on-going support and assistance from trained coaches. Hierarchical linear modeling of outcome data was undertaken to identify both primary (e.g., for all children) and secondary (e.g., for children classified as "at-risk") intervention effects. A primary effect of the PATHS curriculum was found, demonstrating increases in teacher ratings of changes in children's social-emotional competence. Additionally, secondary effects of PATHS were identified, showing reductions in teacher ratings of emotional symptoms and increases in pro-social behavior and child ratings of engagement among children identified as at-risk at baseline. However, our analyses also identified primary effects favoring the usual provision group, showing reductions in teacher ratings of peer problems and emotional symptoms, and secondary effects demonstrating reductions in teacher ratings of conduct problems and child ratings of co-operation among at-risk children. Effect sizes were small

  11. Acupuncture for ovulation induction in polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Julia; Redman, Leanne; Veldhuis, Paula P.; Sazonova, Antonina; Labrie, Fernand; Holm, Göran; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been demonstrated to improve menstrual frequency and to decrease circulating testosterone in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Our aim was to investigate whether acupuncture affects ovulation frequency and to understand the underlying mechanisms of any such effect by analyzing LH and sex steroid secretion in women with PCOS. This prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted between June 2009 and September 2010. Thirty-two women with PCOS were randomized to receive either acupuncture with manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation or to meetings with a physical therapist twice a week for 10–13 wk. Main outcome measures were changes in LH secretion patterns from baseline to after 10–13 wk of treatment and ovulation frequency during the treatment period. Secondary outcomes were changes in the secretion of sex steroids, anti-Müllerian hormone, inhibin B, and serum cortisol. Ovulation frequency during treatment was higher in the acupuncture group than in the control group. After 10–13 wk of intervention, circulating levels of estrone, estrone sulfate, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenedione, testosterone, free testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, androsterone glucuronide, androstane-3α,17β-diol-3-glucuronide, and androstane-3α,17β-diol-17-glucuronide decreased within the acupuncture group and were significantly lower than in the control group for all of these except androstenedione. We conclude that repeated acupuncture treatments resulted in higher ovulation frequency in lean/overweight women with PCOS and were more effective than just meeting with the therapist. Ovarian and adrenal sex steroid serum levels were reduced with no effect on LH secretion. PMID:23482444

  12. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Tai Chi Chih Randomized Controlled Trial in Senior Female Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Rebecca A.; O’Connor, Kathleen; Light, Kathleen C.; Nakamura, Yoshio; Lipschitz, David; LaStayo, Paul C.; Pappas, Lisa; Boucher, Kenneth; Irwin, Michael R.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Kinney, Anita Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Tai Chi Chih (TCC) is associated with improved physical functioning and psychological benefits in breast cancer survivors and healthy older adults; thus, may also be beneficial for senior cancer survivors with physical functioning declines. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a Tai Chi Chih (TCC) intervention in senior female cancer survivors, with physical functioning limitations, as well as, its effects on QOL. Design This was a two-armed, parallel group, RCT with 12-weeks of Tai Chi Chih or Health Education Control. Methods Sixty-three senior (M age=67 years, SD=7.15) female cancer survivors (83% breast cancer, stages I–III) with physical functioning limitations (SF-12 Health Survey role physical & physical functioning subscales) were randomized to 12-weeks of TCC or Health Education control (HEC). Primary outcomes were feasibility and acceptability. Secondary outcomes included quality of life (SF-36 Health Survey), and participants’ qualitative feedback on intervention. Results Retention (TCC = 91%; HEC = 81%) and class attendance (TCC =79%; HEC = 83%) rates, and satisfaction levels for both study arms were high, but did not significantly differ from one another. At one-week post-intervention, none of the SF-36 scores differed between the TCC and HEC arms. Within-group analyses revealed significant improvements in the mental component summary score in TCC (p = 0.01), but not in HEC. Qualitative analyses indicated that the TCC group felt they received mental and physical benefits, whereas HEC group reported on social support benefits and information received. Conclusion A TCC intervention was found to be a feasible and acceptable modality for senior female cancer survivors. Future, larger definitive trials are needed to clarify TCC dosage effects on QOL in this vulnerable population. PMID:23620504

  13. Efficacy of Bosentan in patients after Fontan procedures: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiao-Ke; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Chang-Dong; Xiao, Shu-Na; Liu, Mei; Wang, Bin; Dong, Nian-Guo

    2016-08-01

    Fontan surgery is a widely used palliative procedure that significantly improves the survival period of patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). However, it does not decrease postoperative complication rate. Previous studies suggested that elevated mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and vascular resistance lead to decreased exercise tolerance and myocardial dysfunction. Therapy with endothelial receptor antagonists (Bosentan) has been demonstrated to improve the patients' prognosis. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was performed to explore the efficacy of Bosentan in treating patients who underwent the Fontan procedure. Eligible participants were randomly divided into Bosentan group and control group. Liver function was tested at a local hospital and the results were reported to the phone inspector every month. If the results suggested abnormal liver function, treatment would be adjusted or terminated. All the participants finished the follow-up study, with no patients lost to follow-up. Unblinding after 2-year follow-up, no mortality was observed in either group. However, secondary end-points were found to be significantly different in the comparable groups. The cardiac function and 6-min walking distance in the Bosentan group were significantly superior to those in the control group (P=0.018 and P=0.027). Bosentan could improve New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional status and improve the results of the 6-min walking test (6MWT) in Fontan patients post-surgery, and no other benefits were observed. Furthermore, a primary meta-analysis study systematically reviewed all the similar clinical trails worldwide and concluded an overall NYHA class improvement in Fontan patients who received Bosentan treatments. PMID:27465329

  14. Games and Telerehabilitation for Balance Impairments and Gaze Dysfunction: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lisa, Lix; Reimer, Karen; Wonneck, Beth; Giacobbo, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Digital media and gaming have received considerable interest from researchers and clinicians as a model for learning a broad range of complex tasks and facilitating the transfer of skills to daily life. These emerging rehabilitation technologies have the potential to improve clinical outcomes and patient participation because they are engaging, motivating, and accessible. Our research goal is to develop preventative and therapeutic point-of-care eHealth applications that will lead to equivalent or better long-term health outcomes and health care costs than existing programs. We have produced a novel computer-aided tele-rehabilitation platform that combines computer game-based exercises with tele-monitoring. Objective Compare the therapeutic effectiveness of an in-home, game-based rehabilitation program (GRP) to standard care delivered in an outpatient physical therapy clinic on measures of balance, gaze control, dizziness, and health-related quality of life. Methods A randomized, controlled, single-blind pilot trial will be conducted. Fifty-six participants with a diagnosis of peripheral vestibular disorder will be randomly assigned to either usual physical therapy (comparator group) or to a game-based intervention (experimental group). Measures to be assessed will include gaze control, dynamic balance, and self-reported measures of dizziness. Results The project was funded and enrollment was started in August 2014. To date, 36 participants have been enrolled. There have been 6 drop-outs. It is expected that the study will be completed January 2016 and the first results are expected to be submitted for publication in Spring of 2016. Conclusions A successful application of this rehabilitation program would help streamline rehabilitation services, leverage therapist time spent with clients, and permit regular practice times at the client’s convenience. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02134444; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02134444

  15. Aloe Vera Gel and Cesarean Wound Healing; A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Molazem, Zahra; Mohseni, Fatemeh; Younesi, Masoumeh; Keshavarzi, Sareh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Failure in complete healing of the wound is one of the probable complications of cesarean. The present study aimed to determine the effectiveness of dressing with aloe vera gel in healing of cesarean wound. Methods: This prospective randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 women who had undergone cesarean operation in Amir-al-Momenin hospital (Gerash, Iran). The participants were randomly divided into two groups each containing 45 patients. In one group, the wound was dressed with aloe vera gel, while simple dressing was used in the control group. Wound healing was assessed 24 hours and 8 days after the cesarean operation using REEDA scale. The data were analyzed through Chi-square and t-test. Results: The participants’ mean age was 27.56±4.20 in the aloe vera group and 26.62±4.88 in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant. However, a significant difference was found between the two groups concerning body mass index, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure (P<0.05). Also, a significant difference was observed between the two groups with respect to the wound healing score 24 hours after the operation (P=0.003). After 8 days, however, the difference in the wound healing score was not significant (P=0.283). Overall, 45 participants in the aloe vera group and 35 ones in the control group had obtained a zero score 24 hours after the operation. These measures were respectively obtained as 42 and 41eight days after the operation. Conclusion: According to the findings of this study, the women are recommended to be informed regarding the positive effects of dressing with aloe vera gel. PMID:25560349

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Massage and Pneumatic Compression for Ultramarathon Recovery.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D; Badowski, Natalie; Chin, Joseph; Stuempfle, Kristin J

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Postexercise recovery techniques are widely used, but little research has examined their effectiveness. Objectives To examine the effectiveness of massage and pneumatic compression on recovery from a 161-km ultramarathon. Methods Participants in the 2015 161-km Western States Endurance Run were randomized to a 20-minute postrace intervention of massage, intermittent sequential pneumatic compression, or supine rest. Each subject completed two 400-m runs at maximum speed before the race and on days 3 and 5 after the race, and also provided muscle pain and soreness ratings and overall muscular fatigue scores before and for 7 days after the race. Results Among the 72 runners who finished the race and completed the study, comparison among intervention groups revealed no significant group or interaction effect on 400-m run time, but there was a significant (P<.0001) time effect. Immediately posttreatment, massage resulted in lower muscle pain and soreness ratings compared with the supine-rest control condition (P<.0001), while both massage (P<.0001) and pneumatic compression (P<.01) resulted in lower overall muscular fatigue scores compared with the control group. There were no significant differences between groups in any outcome 1 to 7 days after the race. Conclusion Single 20-minute sessions of postrace massage and intermittent sequential pneumatic compression provide some immediate subjective benefit. There is no evidence, however, that such treatments provide extended subjective or functional benefits of clinical importance. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02530190). Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(5):320-326. Epub 23 Mar 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6455. PMID:27011305

  17. Sustained effects of online genetics education: a randomized controlled trial on oncogenetics.

    PubMed

    Houwink, Elisa J F; van Teeffelen, Sarah R; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Henneman, Lidewij; Jacobi, Florijn; van Luijk, Scheltus J; Dinant, Geert Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees; Cornel, Martina C

    2014-03-01

    Medical professionals are increasingly expected to deliver genetic services in daily patient care. However, genetics education is considered to be suboptimal and in urgent need of revision and innovation. We designed a Genetics e-learning Continuing Professional Development (CPD) module aimed at improving general practitioners' (GPs') knowledge about oncogenetics, and we conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the outcomes at the first two levels of the Kirkpatrick framework (satisfaction, learning and behavior). Between September 2011 and March 2012, a parallel-group, pre- and post-retention (6-month follow-up) controlled group intervention trial was conducted, with repeated measurements using validated questionnaires. Eighty Dutch GP volunteers were randomly assigned to the intervention or the control group. Satisfaction with the module was high, with the three item's scores in the range 4.1-4.3 (5-point scale) and a global score of 7.9 (10-point scale). Knowledge gains post test and at retention test were 0.055 (P<0.05) and 0.079 (P<0.01), respectively, with moderate effect sizes (0.27 and 0.31, respectively). The participants appreciated applicability in daily practice of knowledge aspects (item scores 3.3-3.8, five-point scale), but scores on self-reported identification of disease, referral to a specialist and knowledge about the possibilities/limitations of genetic testing were near neutral (2.7-2.8, five-point scale). The Genetics e-learning CPD module proved to be a feasible, satisfactory and clinically applicable method to improve oncogenetics knowledge. The educational effects can inform further development of online genetics modules aimed at improving physicians' genetics knowledge and could potentially be relevant internationally and across a wider range of potential audiences. PMID:23942200

  18. Mindfulness training improves attentional task performance in incarcerated youth: a group randomized controlled intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Noelle R.; Jha, Amishi P.; Casarjian, Bethany; Goolsarran, Merissa; Garcia, Cristina; Cleland, Charles M.; Gwadz, Marya V.; Massey, Zohar

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the impact of cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness training (CBT/MT) on attentional task performance in incarcerated adolescents. Attention is a cognitive system necessary for managing cognitive demands and regulating emotions. Yet persistent and intensive demands, such as those experienced during high-stress intervals like incarceration and the events leading to incarceration, may deplete attention resulting in cognitive failures, emotional disturbances, and impulsive behavior. We hypothesized that CBT/MT may mitigate these deleterious effects of high stress and protect against degradation in attention over the high-stress interval of incarceration. Using a quasi-experimental, group randomized controlled trial design, we randomly assigned dormitories of incarcerated youth, ages 16–18, to a CBT/MT intervention (youth n = 147) or an active control intervention (youth n = 117). Both arms received approximately 750 min of intervention in a small-group setting over a 3–5 week period. Youth in the CBT/MT arm also logged the amount of out-of-session time spent practicing MT exercises. The Attention Network Test was used to index attentional task performance at baseline and 4 months post-baseline. Overall, task performance degraded over time in all participants. The magnitude of performance degradation was significantly less in the CBT/MT vs. control arm. Further, within the CBT/MT arm, performance degraded over time in those with no outside-of-class practice time, but remained stable over time in those who practiced mindfulness exercises outside of the session meetings. Thus, these findings suggest that sufficient CBT/MT practice may protect against functional attentional impairments associated with high-stress intervals. PMID:24265621

  19. Efficacy and safety of Suanzaoren decoction for primary insomnia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insomnia is a widespread human health problem, but there currently are the limitations of conventional therapies available. Suanzaoren decoction (SZRD) is a well known classic Chinese herbal prescription for insomnia and has been treating people’s insomnia for more than thousand years. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SZRD for insomnia. Methods A systematic literature search was performed for 6 databases up to July of 2012 to identify randomized control trials (RCTs) involving SZRD for insomniac patients. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed independently using the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Results Twelve RCTs with total of 1376 adult participants were identified. The methodological quality of all included trials are no more than 3/8 score. Majority of the RCTs concluded that SZRD was more significantly effective than benzodiazepines for treating insomnia. Despite these positive outcomes, there were many methodological shortcomings in the studies reviewed, including insufficient information about randomization generation and absence of allocation concealment, lack of blinding and no placebo control, absence of intention-to-treat analysis and lack of follow-ups, selective publishing and reporting, and small number of sample sizes. A number of clinical heterogeneity such as diagnosis, intervention, control, and outcome measures were also reviewed. Only 3 trials reported adverse events, whereas the other 9 trials did not provide the safety information. Conclusions Despite the apparent reported positive findings, there is insufficient evidence to support efficacy of SZRD for insomnia due to the poor methodological quality and the small number of trials of the included studies. SZRD seems generally safe, but is insufficient evidence to make conclusions on the safety because fewer studies reported the adverse events. Further large sample-size and well-designed RCTs are needed

  20. Early Intervention for Toddlers With Language Delays: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Ann P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Early interventions for toddlers with expressive and receptive language delays have not resulted in positive expressive language outcomes. This randomized controlled trial tested the effects on language outcomes of a caregiver-implemented communication intervention targeting toddlers at risk for persistent language delays. METHODS: Participants included 97 toddlers, who were between 24 and 42 months with language scores at least 1.33 SDs below the normative mean and no other developmental delays, and their caregivers. Toddlers were randomly assigned to the caregiver-implemented intervention or a usual-care control group. Caregivers and children participated in 28 sessions in which caregivers were taught to implement the intervention. The primary outcome was the Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition, a broad-based measure of language. Outcome measurement was not blinded. RESULTS: Caregivers in the intervention improved their use of all language facilitation strategies, such as matched turns (adjusted mean difference, intervention-control, 40; 95% confidence interval 34 to 46; P < .01). Children in the intervention group had significantly better receptive language skills (5.3; 95% confidence interval 0.15 to 10.4), but not broad-based expressive language skills (0.37, 95% confidence interval −4.5 to 5.3; P = .88). CONCLUSIONS: This trial provides preliminary evidence of the short-term effects of systematic caregiver instruction on caregiver use of language facilitation strategies and subsequent changes in children’s language skills. Future research should investigate the ideal dosage levels for optimizing child outcomes and determine which language facilitation strategies are associated with specific child outcomes. Research on adaptations for families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds is needed. PMID:25733749