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Sample records for homocysteine induces hypophosphorylation

  1. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  2. NMDA Receptors and Oxidative Stress Induced by the Major Metabolites Accumulating in HMG Lyase Deficiency Mediate Hypophosphorylation of Cytoskeletal Proteins in Brain From Adolescent Rats: Potential Mechanisms Contributing to the Neuropathology of This Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; Pierozan, Paula; Soares, Gilberto Machado; Ferreira, Fernanda; Zanatta, Ângela; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Borges, Clarissa Günther; Wajner, Moacir; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-10-01

    Neurological symptoms and cerebral abnormalities are commonly observed in patients with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMG lyase) deficiency, which is biochemically characterized by predominant tissue accumulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric (HMG), 3-methylglutaric (MGA), and 3-methylglutaconic (MGT) acids. Since the pathogenesis of this disease is poorly known, the present study evaluated the effects of these compounds on the cytoskeleton phosphorylating system in rat brain. HMG, MGA, and MGT caused hypophosphorylation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and of the neurofilament subunits NFL, NFM, and NFH. HMG-induced hypophosphorylation was mediated by inhibiting the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on Ser55 residue of NFL and c-Jun kinase (JNK) by acting on KSP repeats of NFM and NFH subunits. We also evidenced that the subunit NR2B of NMDA receptor and Ca(2+) was involved in HMG-elicited hypophosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins. Furthermore, the antioxidants L-NAME and TROLOX fully prevented both the hypophosphorylation and the inhibition of PKA and JNK caused by HMG, suggesting that oxidative damage may underlie these effects. These findings indicate that the main metabolites accumulating in HMG lyase deficiency provoke hypophosphorylation of cytoskeleton neural proteins with the involvement of NMDA receptors, Ca(2+), and reactive species. It is presumed that these alterations may contribute to the neuropathology of this disease. PMID:26174040

  3. Acute Hyperammonemia Induces NMDA-Mediated Hypophosphorylation of Intermediate Filaments Through PP1 and PP2B in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Rônan Vivian; da Silva Ferreira, Fernanda; Heimfarth, Luana; Pierozan, Paula; Fernandes, Carolina; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we studied the effects of toxic ammonia levels on the cytoskeleton of neural cells, with emphasis in the homeostasis of the phosphorylating system associated with the intermediate filaments (IFs). We used in vivo and in vitro models of acute hyperammonemia in 10- and 21-day-old rats. In the in vivo model, animals were intraperitoneally injected with ammonium acetate (7 mmol/Kg), and the phosphorylation level of the cytoskeletal proteins was analyzed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus 30 and 60 min after injection. The injected ammonia altered the IF phosphorylation of astrocytes (GFAP and vimentin) and neurons (neurofilament subunits of low, middle, and high molecular weight, respectively: NFL, NFM, and NFH) from cerebral cortex of 21-day-old rats. This was a transitory effect observed 30 min after injection, recovering 30 min afterward. Phosphorylation was not altered in the cerebral cortex of 10-day-old pups. The homeostasis of hippocampal IFs was preserved at the studied ages and times. In the in vitro model, cortical slices of 10- and 21-day-old rats were incubated with 0.5, 1, or 5 mM NH4Cl, and the phosphorylation level of the IF proteins was analyzed after 30 min. The IF phosphorylation was not altered in cortical slices of 10-day-old rats; however, in cortical slices of 21-day-old pups, 5 mM NH4Cl induced hypophosphorylation of GFAP and vimentin, preserving neurofilament phosphorylation levels. Hypophosphorylation was mediated by the protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2B (PP2B), and this event was associated with Ca(2+) influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. The aim of this study is to show that acute ammonia toxicity targets the phosphorylating system of IFs in the cerebral cortex of rats in a developmentally regulated manner, and NMDA-mediated Ca(2+) signaling plays a central role in this mechanism. We propose that the disruption of cytoskeletal homeostasis could be an endpoint of the acute hyperammonemia

  4. Inhibition of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and endothelial cell damage by l-serine and glycine.

    PubMed

    Sim, Woo-Cheol; Han, Inhoi; Lee, Wonseok; Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Kim, Dong Gwang; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Oh, Seon-Hee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The use of vitamins to modulate homocysteine metabolism substantially lowers the risk by reducing plasma homocysteine levels. In this study, we evaluated the effects of l-serine and related amino acids on homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial cell damage using EA.hy926 human endothelial cells. Homocysteine treatment decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis, which were reversed by cotreatment with l-serine. l-Serine inhibited homocysteine-induced ER stress as verified by decreased glucose-regulated protein 78kDa (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) expression as well as X-box binding protein 1 (xbp1) mRNA splicing. The effects of l-serine on homocysteine-induced ER stress are not attributed to intracellular homocysteine metabolism, but instead to decreased homocysteine uptake. Glycine exerted effects on homocysteine-induced ER stress, apoptosis, and cell viability that were comparable to those of l-serine. Although glycine did not affect homocysteine uptake or export, coincubation of homocysteine with glycine for 24h reduced the intracellular concentration of homocysteine. Taken together, l-serine and glycine cause homocysteine-induced endothelial cell damage by reducing the level of intracellular homocysteine. l-Serine acts by competitively inhibiting homocysteine uptake in the cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which glycine lowers homocysteine levels are unclear. PMID:27064126

  5. Effect of Transgenic Extrahepatic Expression of Betaine-Homocysteine Methyltransferase on Alcohol or Homocysteine-Induced Fatty Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Cheng; Shinohara, Masao; Vance, Dennis; Than, Tin Aung; Ookhtens, Murad; Chan, Christine; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol feeding induces hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy). Previously, we reported a protective role of betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) in homocysteine-induced injury in cultured hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated the direct role of BHMT in alcohol or homocysteine-induced liver injury. Methods Betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase transgenic (Tg) mice were generated. Comparisons were made between the Tg and wild type (WT) mice in their response to intragastric alcohol infusion or to oral feeding of a high methionine low folate diet (HMLF). Results Expression of the Tg BHMT was increased in organs peripheral to the liver. The alcohol infusion for 4 weeks increased: plasma ALT by 5-fold in WT mice and 2.7-fold in Tg mice; plasma homocysteine by 7-fold in WT mice and 2-fold in Tg mice; liver triglycerides by 4-fold in WT mice and 2.5-fold in Tg mice. The alcohol-induced fatty liver was more severe in WT than in Tg mice based on H&E staining. The HMLF feeding for 4 weeks increased plasma ALT by 2-fold in WT mice and 1-fold in Tg mice; plasma homocysteine by 21-fold in WT mice and 3.3-fold in Tg mice; liver triglycerides by 2.5-fold in WT mice and 1.5-fold in Tg mice. HMLF induced accumulation of macro fat droplets in WT but not Tg mice. Betaine supplementation decreased partially the alcohol or HMLF-induced increase of ALT, homocysteine and liver lipids in WT mice. However, Tg mice were normal when fed both HMLF and betaine. In WT mice, both alcohol and HMLF induced moderate increase of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) protein which was partially reduced by betaine supplementation. In Tg mice, alcohol but not HMLF increased SREBP1. Carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein was increased by alcohol in either WT or Tg mice which was not affected by betaine supplementation. Ratio of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) was reduced by 50% in WT and by 20% in Tg mice fed alcohol. Ratio of

  6. [HOMOCYSTEINE-INDUCED MEMBRANE CURRENTS, CALCIUM RESPONSES AND CHANGES OF MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL IN RAT CORTICAL NEURONS].

    PubMed

    Abushik, P A; Karelina, T V; Sibarov, D A; Stepanenko, J D; Giniatullin, R; Antonov, S M

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, exhibits neurotoxic effects and is involved in the pathogenesis of several major neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to well studied excitoxicity of glutamate, the mechanism of homocysteine neurotoxicity is not clearly understood. By using whole-cell patch-clamp, calcium imaging (fluo-3) and measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (rhodamine 123) we studied transmembrane currents, calcium signals and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential induced by homocysteine versus responses induced by NMDA and glutamate in cultured rat cortical neurons. L-homocysteine (50 µM) induced inward currents that could be completely blocked by the selective antagonist of NMDA receptors - AP-5. In contrast to NMDA-induced currents, homocysteine-induced currents had a smaller steady-state amplitude. Comparison of calcium responses to homocysteine, NMDA or glutamate demonstrated that in all cortical neurons homocysteine elicited short, oscillatory-type calcium responses, whereas NMDA or glutamate induced sustained increase of intracellular calcium. Analysis of mitochondrial changes demonstrated that in contrast to NMDA homocysteine did not cause a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential at the early stages of action. However, after its long-term action, as in the case of NMDA and glutamate, the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were comparable with the full drop of respiratory chain induced by protonophore FCCP. Our data suggest that in cultured rat cortical neuron homocysteine at the first stages of action induces neurotoxic effects through activation of NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors with strong calcium influx through the channels of these receptors. The long-term action of homocysteine may lead to mitochondrial disfuction and appears as a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:26547950

  7. Turkish propolis supresses MCF-7 cell death induced by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Tartik, Musa; Darendelioglu, Ekrem; Aykutoglu, Gurkan; Baydas, Giyasettin

    2016-08-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level is a most important risk factor for various vascular diseases including coronary, cerebral and peripheral arterial and venous thrombosis. Propolis is produced by honeybee from various oils, pollens and wax materials. Therefore, it has various biological properties including antioxidant, antitumor and antimicrobial activities. This study investigated the effects of propolis and Hcy on apoptosis in cancer cells. According to our findings, Hcy induced apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells by regulating numerous genes and proteins involved in the apoptotic signal transduction pathway. In contrast, treatment with propolis inhibited caspase- 3 and -9 induced by Hcy in MCF-7 cells. It can be concluded that Hcy may augment the activity of anticancer agents that induce excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in their target cells. In contrast to the previous studies herein we found that propolis in low doses protected cancer cells inhibiting cellular apoptosis mediated by intracellular ROS-dependent mitochondrial pathway. PMID:27470414

  8. NADPH oxidase 4 regulates homocysteine metabolism and protects against acetaminophen-induced liver damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Thomas V.A.; Dong, Xuebin; Sawyer, Greta J.; Caldwell, Anna; Halket, John; Sherwood, Roy; Quaglia, Alberto; Dew, Tracy; Anilkumar, Narayana; Burr, Simon; Mistry, Rajesh K.; Martin, Daniel; Schröder, Katrin; Brandes, Ralf P.; Hughes, Robin D.; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione is the major intracellular redox buffer in the liver and is critical for hepatic detoxification of xenobiotics and other environmental toxins. Hepatic glutathione is also a major systemic store for other organs and thus impacts on pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, Sickle Cell Anaemia and chronic diseases associated with aging. Glutathione levels are determined in part by the availability of cysteine, generated from homocysteine through the transsulfuration pathway. The partitioning of homocysteine between remethylation and transsulfuration pathways is known to be subject to redox-dependent regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. An association between plasma Hcy and a single nucleotide polymorphism within the NADPH oxidase 4 locus led us to investigate the involvement of this reactive oxygen species- generating enzyme in homocysteine metabolism. Here we demonstrate that NADPH oxidase 4 ablation in mice results in increased flux of homocysteine through the betaine-dependent remethylation pathway to methionine, catalysed by betaine-homocysteine-methyltransferase within the liver. As a consequence NADPH oxidase 4-null mice display significantly lowered plasma homocysteine and the flux of homocysteine through the transsulfuration pathway is reduced, resulting in lower hepatic cysteine and glutathione levels. Mice deficient in NADPH oxidase 4 had markedly increased susceptibility to acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury which could be corrected by administration of N-acetyl cysteine. We thus conclude that under physiological conditions, NADPH oxidase 4-derived reactive oxygen species is a regulator of the partitioning of the metabolic flux of homocysteine, which impacts upon hepatic cysteine and glutathione levels and thereby upon defence against environmental toxins. PMID:26472193

  9. Existence of molten globule state in homocysteine-induced protein covalent modifications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tarun; Sharma, Gurumayum Suraj; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine thiolactone is a toxic metabolite produced from homocysteine by amino-acyl t-RNA synthetase in error editing reaction. The basic cause of toxicity of homocysteine thiolactone is believed to be due to the adduct formation with lysine residues (known as protein N-homocysteinylation) leading to protein aggregation and loss of enzyme function. There was no data available until now that showed the effect of homocysteine thiolactone on the native state structural changes that led to aggregate formation. In the present study we have investigated the time dependent structural changes due to homocysteine thiolactone induced modifications on three different proteins having different physico-chemical properties (cytochrome-c, lysozyme and alpha lactalbumin). We discovered that N-homocysteinylation leads to the formation of molten globule state--an important protein folding intermediate in the protein folding pathway. We also found that the formation of the molten globule state might be responsible for the appearance of aggregate formation. The study indicates the importance of protein folding intermediate state in eliciting the homocysteine thiolactone toxicity. PMID:25405350

  10. Salidroside improves homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sin Bond; Zhang, Huina; Lau, Chi Wai; Huang, Yu; Lin, Zhixiu

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases through increased oxidative stress. Salidroside is an active ingredient of the root of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative, antihypoxia and neuroprotective properties. However, the vascular benefits of salidroside against endothelial dysfunction have yet to be explored. The present study, therefore, aimed to investigate the protective effect of salidroside on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction. Functional studies on the rat aortas were performed to delineate the vascular effect of salidroside. DHE imaging was used to evaluate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in aortic wall and endothelial cells. Western blotting was performed to assess the protein expression associated with oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Exposure to homocysteine attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxations in rat aortas while salidroside pretreatment rescued it. Salidroside inhibited homocystein-induced elevation in the NOX2 expression and ROS overproduction in both aortas and cultured endothelial cells and increased phosphorylation of eNOS which was diminished by homocysteine. The present study shows that salidroside is effective in preserving the NO bioavailability and thus protects against homocysteine-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, largely through inhibiting the NOX2 expression and ROS production. Our results indicate a therapeutic potential of salidroside in the management of oxidative-stress-associated cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:23589720

  11. Homocysteine-induced attenuation of vascular endothelium-dependent hyperalgesia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Joseph, E K; Green, P G; Ferrari, L F; Levine, J D

    2015-01-22

    We have recently demonstrated a role of the vascular endothelium in peripheral pain mechanism by disrupting endothelial cell function using intravascular administration of octoxynol-9, a non-selective membrane active agent. As an independent test of the role of endothelial cells in pain mechanisms, we evaluated the effect of homocysteine, an agent that damages endothelial cell function. Mechanical stimulus-induced enhancement of endothelin-1 hyperalgesia in the gastrocnemius muscle of the rat was first prevented then enhanced by intravenous administration of homocysteine, but was only inhibited by its precursor, methionine. Both homocysteine and methionine significantly attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia in two models of ergonomic muscle pain, induced by exposure to vibration, and by eccentric exercise, and cutaneous mechanical hyperalgesia in an ischemia-reperfusion injury model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I, all previously shown responsive to octoxynol-9. This study provides independent support for a role of the endothelial cell in pain syndromes thought to have a vascular basis, and suggests that substances that are endothelial cell toxins can enhance vascular pain. PMID:25451284

  12. Elevated homocysteine levels in suction-induced blister fluid of active vitiligo lesions.

    PubMed

    Anbar, Tag; Zuel-Fakkar, Nehal Mohamed; Matta, Mary Fikry; Arbab, Mai Mohammed Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Vitiligo is the most prevalent acquired pigmentary disorder as a result of destruction of melanocytes. Several studies have reported increased serum levels of homocysteine (Hcy) in vitiligo patients which may be the result of decreased Vitamin B12 and folic acid levels. In addition, homocystinuria is associated with pigmentary dilution. On the other hand, other studies reported normal serum homocysteine levels. Our aim was to study the Hcy level in active vitiligo patients both in serum and in suction blister fluid obtained from the lesional skin. A total of 30 patients with active vitiligo of both sexes and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Sera from the blood and from lesional induced bullae were obtained from the patients and controls and were assayed for Hcy by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The collected data were analyzed by SPSS version 17. There were no significant differences in the serum levels of Hcy between patients and healthy controls, however, the increase in Hcy level was highly statistically significant in the patients' lesional induced bulla compared to the healthy controls. There was no significant difference in Hcy levels between males and females and between patients with negative or positive family histories of vitiligo. The presence of a high homocysteine level in active vitiligo lesions points to a local event occurring in this lesion, which is not reflected as an increase in the patient's serum level. PMID:26678812

  13. Dysregulated Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Drives Homocysteine Elevation in Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pacana, Tommy; Cazanave, Sophie; Verdianelli, Aurora; Patel, Vaishali; Min, Hae-Ki; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Quinlivan, Eoin; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2015-01-01

    Methionine metabolism plays a central role in methylation reactions, production of glutathione and methylarginines, and modulating homocysteine levels. The mechanisms by which these are affected in NAFLD are not fully understood. The aim is to perform a metabolomic, molecular and epigenetic analyses of hepatic methionine metabolism in diet-induced NAFLD. Female 129S1/SvlmJ;C57Bl/6J mice were fed a chow (n = 6) or high-fat high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet (n = 8) for 52 weeks. Metabolomic study, enzymatic expression and DNA methylation analyses were performed. HFHC diet led to weight gain, marked steatosis and extensive fibrosis. In the methionine cycle, hepatic methionine was depleted (30%, p< 0.01) while s-adenosylmethionine (SAM)/methionine ratio (p< 0.05), s-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) (35%, p< 0.01) and homocysteine (25%, p< 0.01) were increased significantly. SAH hydrolase protein levels decreased significantly (p <0.01). Serine, a substrate for both homocysteine remethylation and transsulfuration, was depleted (45%, p< 0.01). In the transsulfuration pathway, cystathionine and cysteine trended upward while glutathione decreased significantly (p< 0.05). In the transmethylation pathway, levels of glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), the most abundant methyltransferase in the liver, decreased. The phosphatidylcholine (PC)/ phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio increased significantly (p< 0.01), indicative of increased phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase (PEMT) activity. The protein levels of protein arginine methytransferase 1 (PRMT1) increased significantly, but its products, monomethylarginine (MMA) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), decreased significantly. Circulating ADMA increased and approached significance (p< 0.06). Protein expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 1A, cystathionine β-synthase, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, and methionine synthase remained unchanged. Although gene expression of the DNA

  14. Potent homocysteine-induced ERK phosphorylation in cultured neurons depends on self-sensitization via system Xc{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Li; Hu Xiaoling; Xue Zhanxia; Yang Jun; Wan Lishu; Ren Yan; Hertz, Leif; Peng Liang

    2010-01-15

    Homocysteine is increased during pathological conditions, endangering vascular and cognitive functions, and elevated homocysteine during pregnancy may be correlated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia in the offspring. This study showed that millimolar homocysteine concentrations in saline medium cause phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK{sub 1/2}) in cerebellar granule neurons, inhibitable by metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists. These findings are analogous to observations by , that similar concentrations cause neuronal death. However, these concentrations are much higher than those occurring clinically during hyperhomocysteinemia. It is therefore important that a approx 10-fold increase in potency occurred in the presence of the glutamate precursor glutamine, when ERK{sub 1/2} phosphorylation became inhibitable by NMDA or non-NMDA antagonists and dependent upon epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor transactivation. However, glutamate release to the medium was reduced, suggesting that reversal of the cystine/glutamate antiporter, system X{sub c}{sup -} could be involved in potentiation of the response by causing a localized release of initially accumulated homocysteine. In agreement with this hypothesis further enhancement of ERK{sub 1/2} phosphorylation occurred in the additional presence of cystine. Pharmacological inhibition of system X{sub c}{sup -} prevented the effect of micromolar homocysteine concentrations, and U0126-mediated inhibition of ERK{sub 1/2} phosphorylation enhanced homocysteine-induced death. In conclusion, homocysteine interacts with system X{sub c}{sup -} like quisqualate (Venkatraman et al. 1994), by 'self-sensitization' with initial accumulation and subsequent release in exchange with cystine and/or glutamate, establishing high local homocysteine concentrations, which activate adjacent ionotropic glutamate receptors and cause neurotoxicity.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide mitigates homocysteine mediated pathological remodeling by inducing miR-133a in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kesherwani, Varun; Nandi, Shyam S.; Sharawat, Surender K.; Shahshahan, Hamid R.; Mishra, Paras K.

    2015-01-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine called hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is associated with pathological cardiac remodeling. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a cardioprotective gas, however the mechanism by which H2S mitigates homocysteine mediated pathological remodeling in cardiomyocytes is unclear. We hypothesized that H2S ameliorates HHcy mediated hypertrophy by inducing cardioprotective miR-133a in cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis, HL1 cardiomyocytes were treated with: 1) plain medium (control, CT), 2) 100μM of homocysteine (Hcy), 3) Hcy with 30μM of H2S (Hcy+H2S), and 4) H2S for 24 hour. The levels of hypertrophy markers: c-fos, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), miR-133a and its transcriptional inducer myosin enhancer factor- 2c (MEF2C) were determined by Western blotting, RT-qPCR, and immunofluorescence. The activity of MEF2C was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation of MEF2C with histone deacetylase -1(HDAC1). Our results show that H2S ameliorates homocysteine mediated up regulation of c-fos, ANP and β-MHC, and down regulation of MEF2C and miR-133a. HHcy induces the binding of MEF2C with HDAC1, whereas H2S releases MEF2C from MEF2C-HDAC1 complex causing activation of MEF2C. These findings elicit that HHcy induces cardiac hypertrophy by promoting MEF2C-HDAC1 complex formation that inactivates MEF2C causing suppression of anti-hypertrophy miR-133a in cardiomyocytes. H2S mitigates hypertrophy by inducing miR-133a through activation of MEF2C in HHcy cardiomyocytes. To our knowledge this is a novel mechanism of H2S mediated activation of MEF2C and induction of miR-133a and inhibition of hypertrophy in HHcy cardiomyocytes. PMID:25763715

  16. Overexpression of Hypo-Phosphorylated IκBβ at Ser313 Protects the Heart against Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying-Ying; Wang, Li; Luo, Peng-Fei; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    IκBβis an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B(NF-κB) and participates in the cardiac response to sepsis. However, the role of the hypo-phosphorylated form of IκBβ at Ser313, which can be detected during sepsis, is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of IκBβ with a mutation at Ser313→Ala313 on cardiac damage induced by sepsis. Transgenic (Tg) mice were generated to overexpress IκBβ, in which Ser-313 is replaced with alanine ubiquitously, in order to mimic the hypo-phosphorylated form of IκBβ. Survival analysis showed that Tg mice exhibited decreased inflammatory cytokine levels and decreased rates of mortality in comparison to wild type (WT) mice, after sepsis in a cecal-ligation and puncture model (CLP). Compared to WT septic mice, sepsis in Tg mice resulted in improved cardiac functions, lower levels of troponin I and decreased rates of cardiomyocyte apoptosis, compared to WT mice. The increased formation of autophagicvacuoles detected with electron microscopy demonstrated the enhancement of cardiac autophagy. This phenomenon was further confirmed by the differential expression of genes related to autophagy, such as LC3, Atg5, Beclin-1, and p62. The increased expression of Cathepsin L(Ctsl), a specific marker for mitochondrial stress response, may be associated with the beneficial effects of the hypo-phosphorylated form of IκBβ. Our observations suggest that the hypo-phosphorylated form of IκBβ at Ser313 is beneficial to the heart in sepsis through inhibition of apoptosisand enhancement of autophagy in mutated IκBβ transgenic mice. PMID:27508931

  17. Overexpression of Hypo-Phosphorylated IκBβ at Ser313 Protects the Heart against Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Qing; Tang, Tao; Wang, Zhong-Shan; Liu, Ying-Ying; Wang, Li; Luo, Peng-Fei; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    IκBβis an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B(NF-κB) and participates in the cardiac response to sepsis. However, the role of the hypo-phosphorylated form of IκBβ at Ser313, which can be detected during sepsis, is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of IκBβ with a mutation at Ser313→Ala313 on cardiac damage induced by sepsis. Transgenic (Tg) mice were generated to overexpress IκBβ, in which Ser-313 is replaced with alanine ubiquitously, in order to mimic the hypo-phosphorylated form of IκBβ. Survival analysis showed that Tg mice exhibited decreased inflammatory cytokine levels and decreased rates of mortality in comparison to wild type (WT) mice, after sepsis in a cecal-ligation and puncture model (CLP). Compared to WT septic mice, sepsis in Tg mice resulted in improved cardiac functions, lower levels of troponin I and decreased rates of cardiomyocyte apoptosis, compared to WT mice. The increased formation of autophagicvacuoles detected with electron microscopy demonstrated the enhancement of cardiac autophagy. This phenomenon was further confirmed by the differential expression of genes related to autophagy, such as LC3, Atg5, Beclin-1, and p62. The increased expression of Cathepsin L(Ctsl), a specific marker for mitochondrial stress response, may be associated with the beneficial effects of the hypo-phosphorylated form of IκBβ. Our observations suggest that the hypo-phosphorylated form of IκBβ at Ser313 is beneficial to the heart in sepsis through inhibition of apoptosisand enhancement of autophagy in mutated IκBβ transgenic mice. PMID:27508931

  18. Homocysteine induces cardiac hypertrophy by up-regulating ATP7a expression

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhanwei; Zhang, Yanzhou; Sun, Tongwen; Zhang, Shuguang; Yu, Weiya; Zhu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study is to investigate the molecular mechanism by which homocysteine (Hcy) induces cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Primary cardiomyocytes were obtained from baby Sprague-Dawley rats within 3 days after birth. Flow cytometry was used to measure cell sizes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the expression of β-myosin heavy chain and atrial natriuretic peptide genes. Western blotting assay was employed to determine ATP7a protein expression. Cytochrome C oxidase (COX) activity test was used to evaluate the activity of COX. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was performed to determine copper content. siRNAs were used to target-silence the expression of ATP7a. Results: Hcy induced cardiac hypertrophy and increased the expression of cardiac hypertrophy-related genes. ATP7a was a key factor in cardiac hypertrophy induced by Hcy. Reduced ATP7a expression inhibited cardiac hypertrophy induced by Hcy. Elevated ATP7a expression induced by Hcy inhibited COX activity. Enhanced ATP7a expression inhibited COX activity by lowering intracellular copper content. Conclusions: Hcy elevates ATP7a protein expression, reduces copper content, and lowers COX activity, finally leading to cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26722473

  19. Reactive oxygen species mediates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human endothelial cells: Modulation by antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-de-Arce, Karen; Foncea, Rocio . E-mail: rfoncea@med.puc.cl; Leighton, Federico

    2005-12-16

    It has been proposed that homocysteine (Hcy)-induces endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A previous report has shown that Hcy promotes mitochondrial damage. Considering that oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that Hcy-induced ROS in endothelial cells may lead to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. We found that Hcy-induced ROS (1.85-fold), leading to a NF-{kappa}B activation and increase the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, was significantly elevated in Hcy-treated cells. These changes were accompanied by increase in mitochondrial mass and higher mRNA and protein expression of the subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase. These effects were significantly prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidants, catechin and trolox. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by Hcy, and that modulation of oxidative stress by antioxidants may protect against the adverse vascular effects of Hcy.

  20. Cheese 'refinement' with whey B-vitamin removal during precipitation potentially induces temporal 'functional' dietary shortage: homocysteine as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Shapira, N

    2014-07-25

    Cottage cheese 'refinement' with massive B-vitamin losses (≈70-84%) through whey removal during precipitation may potentially induce an acute imbalance between protein/methionine load and temporal inadequacy/shortage of nutrients critical for their metabolism, i.e. B6 and B12. The temporal effect of cottage cheese consumption was evaluated using increased plasma homocysteine as a B-vitamin shortage marker. In a double-blind study, healthy, normal-weight (BMI = 22-27), premenopausal women aged 25-45 years were first given a methionine load (100 mg kg(-1), n = 15), then cottage cheese alone (500 g, ≈50 g protein, ≈1200 mg methionine, n = 49) at breakfast, and then with added B6 (2 mg, n = 8) and/or B6 + folate (1 mg + 200 mcg, n = 7). Plasma homocysteine was measured preprandially (t0) and then postprandially 5 h (t5) and ≥6-24 h. Cheese-induced homocysteine increased 28.7% (p ≤ 0.001), ≈60% of the free methionine response, remaining higher through ≥6-8 h. Co-supplementation with B6 reduced the Hcy increase by 45.0% (to 14.9%, p = 0.025), and that with B6 + folate reduced the Hcy increase by 72.3% (to 7.5%, p = 0.556, NS). Homocysteine increased more in participants with lower baselines (<5 μM vs. ≥5 μM, p ≤ 0.001) following cheese, ≈3-fold (54.8% vs. 18.5%) or methionine, 47.3% (266.7% vs. 181.1%). Cheese B-vitamin depletion - i.e. to B6 ≈ 2.0-4.0 μg g(-1) protein, far below women's metabolic requirement (15-20 μg g(-1)) - appeared to induce acute relative shortage compared to methionine/protein loads, exemplified by greater homocysteine increases than with other animal proteins (previous data), more so with lower baseline homocysteine. Smaller increases following re-supplementation demonstrated potential for 'functional fortification'/co-supplementation. Unnoted cheese 'refinement', like white bread, potentially induces episodic vitamin shortage effects, warranting consideration for acute/cumulative implications, alternative processing

  1. Turkish propolis protects human endothelial cells in vitro from homocysteine-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Darendelioglu, Ekrem; Aykutoglu, Gurkan; Tartik, Musa; Baydas, Giyasettin

    2016-05-01

    Chronic cardiovascular and neurodegenerative complications induced by hyperhomocysteinemia have been most relatively associated with endothelial cell injury. Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) accompanying with oxidative stress which is hallmarks of the molecular mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular disease. Propolis is a natural product, obtained by honeybee from various oils, pollens, special resins and wax materials, conventionally used with the purpose of treatment by folks Propolis has various biological activities and powerful antioxidant capacity. The flavonoids and phenolic acids, most bioactive components of propolis, have superior antioxidant ability to defend cell from free radicals. This study was designed to examine the protective effects of Turkish propolis (from east of country) on Hcy induced ROS production and apoptosis in human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). According to results, co-treatment of HUVECs with propolis decreased Hcy-induced ROS overproduction and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels. Furthermore, overproductions of Bax, caspase-9 and caspase-3 protein, elevation of cytochrome c release in Hcy-treated HUVECs were significantly reduced by propolis. It was concluded that propolis has cytoprotective ability against cytotoxic effects of high Hcy in HUVECs. PMID:27085254

  2. Homocysteine thiolactone induces apoptotic DNA damage mediated by increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide and caspase 3 activation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, R F; Huang, S M; Lin, B S; Wei, J S; Liu, T Z

    2001-05-11

    The cytotoxicity of homocysteine derivatives on chromosomal damage in somatic cells is not well established. The present study used reactive homocysteine derivative of homocysteine thiolactone (Hcy) to investigate its causal effect on apoptotic DNA injury in human promyeloid HL-60 cells. Our results demonstrated that Hcy induced cell death and features of apoptosis including increased phosphotidylserine exposure on the membrane surface, increased apoptotic cells with hypoploid DNA contents, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, all of which occurred in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hcy treatment also significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species H2O2, which coincided with the elimination of caspase 3 proenzyme levels and increased caspase 3 activity at the time of the appearance of apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Preincubation of Hcy-treated HL-60 cells with catalase completely scavenged intracellular H2O2, thus inhibiting caspase 3 activity and protecting cells from apoptotic DNA damage. In contrast, superoxide dismutase failed to inhibit Hcy-induced DNA damage. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Hcy exerted its genotoxic effects on HL-60 cells through an apoptotic pathway, which is mediated by the activation of caspase 3 activity induced by an increase in intracellular hydrogen peroxide. PMID:11432446

  3. Redox signaling via lipid raft clustering in homocysteine-induced injury of podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun; Hu, Jun-Jun; Xia, Min; Boini, Krishna M.; Brimson, Christopher; Li, Pin-Lan

    2010-01-01

    Our recent studies have indicated that hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys) may induce podocyte damage, resulting in glomerulosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating hHcys-induced podocyte injury are still poorly understood. In the present study, we first demonstrated that an intact NADPH oxidase system is present in podocytes as shown by detection of its membrane subunit (gp91phox) and cytosolic subunit (p47phox). Then, confocal microscopy showed that gp91phox and p47phox could be aggregated in lipid raft (LR) clusters in podocytes treated with homocysteine (Hcys), which were illustrated by their co-localization with cholera toxin B, a common LR marker. Different mechanistic LR disruptors, either methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) or filipin abolished such Hcys-induced formation of LR-gp91phox or LR-p47phox transmembrane signaling complexes. By flotation of detergent-resistant membrane fractions we found that gp91phox and p47phox were enriched in LR fractions upon Hcys stimulation, and such enrichment of NADPH oxidase subunits and increase in its enzyme activity were blocked by MCD or filipin. Functionally, disruption of LR clustering significantly attenuated Hcys-induced podocyte injury, as shown by their inhibitory effects on Hcys-decreased expression of slit diaphragm molecules such as nephrin and podocin. Similarly, Hcys-increased expression of desmin was also reduced by disruption of LR clustering. In addition, inhibition of such LR-associated redox signaling prevented cytoskeleton disarrangement and apoptosis induced by Hcys. It is concluded that NADPH oxidase subunits aggregation and consequent activation of this enzyme through LR clustering is an important molecular mechanism triggering oxidative injury of podocytes induced by Hcys. PMID:20036696

  4. Effects of heparin on the production of homocysteine-induced extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hangyuan; Lee, Jong-Dae; Uzui, Hiroyasu; Yue, Hong; Wang, Ping; Toyoda, Kiyohiro; Geshi, Tooru; Ueda, Takanori

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of heparin on the production of homocysteine-induced extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. METHODS: The effects of different homocysteine levels (0 μmol/L to 1000 μmol/L) on MMP-2 production and the effects of different heparin concentrations (0 μg/mL to 100 μg/mL) on homocysteine-induced MMP-2 in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells were examined using gelatin zymography and Western blotting. The changes in MMP-2 were further compared with various treatments for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. RESULTS: Homocysteine (50 μmol/L to 1000 μmol/L) increased the production of MMP-2 significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Increased production of MMP-2 induced by homocysteine was reduced by the extracellular addition of heparin in a dose-dependent manner. Production of MMP-2 with various treatment regimens for 72 h was greater than for 24 h and 48 h. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular addition of heparin decreased homocysteine-induced MMP-2 secretion. Data suggest a mechanism by which hyperhomocysteinemia is involved in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and demonstrate a beneficial effect of heparin on these conditions. PMID:17380220

  5. Folate rescues lithium-, homocysteine- and Wnt3A-induced vertebrate cardiac anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mingda; Serrano, Maria C.; Lastra-Vicente, Rosana; Brinez, Pilar; Acharya, Ganesh; Huhta, James C.; Chen, Ren; Linask, Kersti K.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Elevated plasma homocysteine (HCy), which results from folate (folic acid, FA) deficiency, and the mood-stabilizing drug lithium (Li) are both linked to the induction of human congenital heart and neural tube defects. We demonstrated previously that acute administration of Li to pregnant mice on embryonic day (E)6.75 induced cardiac valve defects by potentiating Wnt–β-catenin signaling. We hypothesized that HCy may similarly induce cardiac defects during gastrulation by targeting the Wnt–β-catenin pathway. Because dietary FA supplementation protects from neural tube defects, we sought to determine whether FA also protects the embryonic heart from Li- or HCy-induced birth defects and whether the protection occurs by impacting Wnt signaling. Maternal elevation of HCy or Li on E6.75 induced defective heart and placental function on E15.5, as identified non-invasively using echocardiography. This functional analysis of HCy-exposed mouse hearts revealed defects in tricuspid and semilunar valves, together with altered myocardial thickness. A smaller embryo and placental size was observed in the treated groups. FA supplementation ameliorates the observed developmental errors in the Li- or HCy-exposed mouse embryos and normalized heart function. Molecular analysis of gene expression within the avian cardiogenic crescent determined that Li, HCy or Wnt3A suppress Wnt-modulated Hex (also known as Hhex) and Islet-1 (also known as Isl1) expression, and that FA protects from the gene misexpression that is induced by all three factors. Furthermore, myoinositol with FA synergistically enhances the protective effect. Although the specific molecular epigenetic control mechanisms remain to be defined, it appears that Li or HCy induction and FA protection of cardiac defects involve intimate control of the canonical Wnt pathway at a crucial time preceding, and during, early heart organogenesis. PMID:19638421

  6. Folate rescues lithium-, homocysteine- and Wnt3A-induced vertebrate cardiac anomalies.

    PubMed

    Han, Mingda; Serrano, Maria C; Lastra-Vicente, Rosana; Brinez, Pilar; Acharya, Ganesh; Huhta, James C; Chen, Ren; Linask, Kersti K

    2009-01-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (HCy), which results from folate (folic acid, FA) deficiency, and the mood-stabilizing drug lithium (Li) are both linked to the induction of human congenital heart and neural tube defects. We demonstrated previously that acute administration of Li to pregnant mice on embryonic day (E)6.75 induced cardiac valve defects by potentiating Wnt-beta-catenin signaling. We hypothesized that HCy may similarly induce cardiac defects during gastrulation by targeting the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway. Because dietary FA supplementation protects from neural tube defects, we sought to determine whether FA also protects the embryonic heart from Li- or HCy-induced birth defects and whether the protection occurs by impacting Wnt signaling. Maternal elevation of HCy or Li on E6.75 induced defective heart and placental function on E15.5, as identified non-invasively using echocardiography. This functional analysis of HCy-exposed mouse hearts revealed defects in tricuspid and semilunar valves, together with altered myocardial thickness. A smaller embryo and placental size was observed in the treated groups. FA supplementation ameliorates the observed developmental errors in the Li- or HCy-exposed mouse embryos and normalized heart function. Molecular analysis of gene expression within the avian cardiogenic crescent determined that Li, HCy or Wnt3A suppress Wnt-modulated Hex (also known as Hhex) and Islet-1 (also known as Isl1) expression, and that FA protects from the gene misexpression that is induced by all three factors. Furthermore, myoinositol with FA synergistically enhances the protective effect. Although the specific molecular epigenetic control mechanisms remain to be defined, it appears that Li or HCy induction and FA protection of cardiac defects involve intimate control of the canonical Wnt pathway at a crucial time preceding, and during, early heart organogenesis. PMID:19638421

  7. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg3 against homocysteine-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Soo Yeun; Lee, Jun-Ho; Jeong, Sang Min; Yoon, In-Soo; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Lee, Joon-Hee; Pyo, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sang-Mok; Chung, Jun-Mo; Kim, Sunoh; Rhim, Hyewhon; Oh, Jae-Wook; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2007-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg(3) (Rg(3)), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, attenuates NMDA receptor-mediated currents and NMDA-induced neurotoxicity (Kim, S., Kim, T., Ahn, K., Park, W.K., Nah, S.Y., Rhim, H., 2004. Ginsenoside Rg(3) antagonizes NMDA receptors through a glycine modulatory site in rat cultured hippocampal neurons. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 323, 416-424). Accumulating evidence suggests that homocysteine (HC), a metabolite of methionine, exerts its excitotoxicity through NMDA receptor activation. In the present study, we examined the neuroprotective effects of Rg(3) on HC-induced hippocampal excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro studies using rat cultured hippocampal neurons revealed that Rg(3) treatment significantly and dose-dependently inhibited HC-induced hippocampal cell death, with an EC(50) value of 28.7+/-7.5 muM. Rg(3) treatment not only significantly reduced HC-induced DNA damage, but also dose-dependently attenuated HC-induced caspase-3 activity in vitro. Our in vivo studies revealed that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) pre-administration of Rg(3) significantly and dose-dependently reduced i.c.v. HC-induced hippocampal damage in rats. To examine the mechanisms underlying the in vitro and in vivo neuroprotective effects of Rg(3) against HC-induced hippocampal excitotoxicity, we examined the effect of Rg(3) on HC-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevations in cultured hippocampal cells and found that Rg(3) treatment dose-dependently inhibited HC-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, with an IC(50) value of 41.5+/-17.5 muM. In addition, Rg(3) treatment dose-dependently inhibited HC-induced currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing the NMDA receptor, with an IC(50) of 47.3+/-14.2 muM. These results collectively indicate that Rg(3)-induced neuroprotection against HC in rat hippocampus might be achieved via inhibition of HC-mediated NMDA receptor activation. PMID:17239831

  8. Discriminatory detection of cysteine and homocysteine based on dialdehyde-functionalized aggregation-induced emission fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ju; Wang, Yijia; Tong, Jiaqi; Wang, Jian; Qin, Anjun; Sun, Jing Zhi; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a concept-proof work of using fluorescence (FL) "turn-on" probes for the discriminatory detection of cysteine (Cys) over homocysteine (Hcy). The fluorogens are provided with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristic and functionalized with two aldehyde-groups (DMTPS-ALD and TPE-ALD). All the detections were carried out in a biocompatible medium (10 mM HEPES buffer and DMSO, pH 7.4). In principle, the formation of thiazinane/thiazolidine through the chemical reaction of aldehydes on the probe molecules and the residue of Cys/Hcy determines the selective recognition of Cys and Hcy over other amino acids and glucose. The FL responses originate from the AIE property of thiazinane/thiazolidine resultants, which have low solubility and precipitate (aggregate) in the detection medium. The discrimination between Cys and Hcy comes from the difference in reaction kinetics of TPE-ALD/DMTPS-ALD with Cys and Hcy, thereby the FL responses show different time courses and intensity enhancement. It is worth noting that TPE-ALD outshined the other two probes in performance with fast response, a high FL enhancement up to 16-fold, high sensitivity, and good specificity and selectivity. Moreover, its FL response threshold at 250 μM is very close to the lower limit of the normal level of Cys in human plasma, which implies that TPE-ALD could be applied as a potential indicator of Cys deficiency. PMID:23193021

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates Neurodegeneration and Neurovascular Dysfunction Induced by Intracerebral Administered Homocysteine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Pradip K.; Kalani, Anuradha; Givvimani, Srikanth; Sathnur, PB; Tyagi, Suresh C.; Tyagi, Neetu

    2014-01-01

    High levels of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) are associated with neurovascular diseases. H2S, a metabolite of Hcy, has a potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity; however, the effect of H2S has not been explored in Hcy (IC) induced neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction in mice. Therefore, the present study was designed to explore the neuroprotective role of H2S on Hcy induced neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction. To test this hypothesis we employed wild type (WT) males ages 8–10 weeks, WT+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), WT+ Hcy (0.5μmol/μl) intracerebral injection (I.C., one time only prior to NaHS treatment), WT+Hcy +NaHS (sodium hydrogen sulfide, precursor of H2S, 30 μmol/kg, body weight). NaHS was injected intra-peritoneally (I.P.) once daily for the period of 7 days after the Hcy (IC) injection. Hcy treatment significantly increased MDA, nitrite level, acetylcholinestrase activity, TNFα, IL1β, GFAP, iNOS, eNOS and decreased glutathione level indicating oxidative-nitrosative stress and neuroinflammation as compared to control and aCSF treated groups. Further, increased expression of NSE, S100B and decreased expression of (PSD95, SAP97) synaptic protein indicated neurodegeneration. Brain sections of Hcy treated mice showed damage in the cortical area and periventricular cells. TUNEL positive cells and Fluro Jade-C staining indicated apoptosis and neurodegeneration. The increased expression of MMP9, MMP2 and decreased expression of TIMP-1, TIMP-2, tight junction proteins (ZO1, Occuldin) in Hcy treated group indicate neurovascular remodeling. Interestingly, NaHS treatment significantly attenuated Hcy induced oxidative stress, memory deficit, neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation and cerebrovascular remodeling. The results indicate that H2S is effective in providing protection against neurodegeneration and neurovascular dysfunction. PMID:23912038

  10. Dietary intake of S-(α-carboxybutyl)-DL-homocysteine induces hyperhomocysteinemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Strakova, Jana; Williams, Kelly T.; Gupta, Sapna; Schalinske, Kevin L.; Kruger, Warren D.; Rozen, Rima; Jiracek, Jiri; Li, Lucas; Garrow, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from betaine to homocysteine forming dimethylglycine and methionine. We previously showed that inhibiting BHMT in mice by intraperitoneal injection of S-(α-carboxybutyl)-DL-homocysteine (CBHcy) results in hyperhomocysteinemia. In the present study, CBHcy was fed to rats to determine whether it could be absorbed and cause hyperhomocysteinemia as observed for the intraperitoneal administration of the compound in mice. We hypothesized that dietary administered CBHcy will be absorbed and will result in the inhibition of BHMT and cause hyperhomocysteinemia. Rats were meal-fed every 8 hours an L-amino acid-defined diet either containing or devoid of CBHcy (5 mg/meal) for 3 days. The treatment decreased liver BHMT activity by 90% and had no effect on methionine synthase, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase and CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase activities. In contrast, cystathionine β-synthase activity and immunodetectable protein decreased (56 and 26%, respectively) and glycine N-methyltransferase activity increased (52%) in CBHcy-treated rats. Liver S-adenosylmethionine levels decreased by 25% in CBHcy-treated rats and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels did not change. Further, plasma choline decreased (22%) and plasma betaine increased (15-fold) in CBHcy-treated rats. The treatment had no effect on global DNA and CpG island methylation, liver histology and plasma markers of liver damage. We conclude that CBHcy mediated BHMT inhibition causes an elevation in total plasma homocysteine that is not normalized by the folate-dependent conversion of homocysteine to methionine. Further, metabolic changes caused by BHMT inhibition affect cystathionine β-synthase and glycine N-methyltransferase activities, which further deteriorate plasma homocysteine levels. PMID:20797482

  11. Folate Deficiency Induces Neural Stem Cell Apoptosis by Increasing Homocysteine In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Mei; Huang, Guo-Wei; Tian, Zhi-Hong; Ren, Da-Lin; X. Wilson, John

    2009-01-01

    Cellular events for neural progenitor cells, such as proliferation and differentiation, are regulated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic cell signals. Folate plays a central role in central nervous system development, so folate, as an extrinsic signal, may affect neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of folate deficiency on the cell proliferation, cell apoptosis and homocysteine concentrations in NSCs. NSCs were isolated from fetal rats and identified as NSCs by their expression of immunoreactive nestin. Cell proliferation was quantitated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Apoptotic cells were detected and confirmed by flow cytometric analysis. We measured homocysteine concentrations in NSCs by high performance liquid chromatography and detected the expression of caspase-3 by western blot method. Folate deficiency not only decreased cell proliferation, but also increased the apoptotic rate of NSCs as demonstrated by the increased expression of early apoptotic markers such as caspase-3, compared to control group (p<0.05). Furthermore, There was a statistically significant increase in homocysteine concentration during folate deficiency in NSCs (p<0.05). These data suggest that folate affects the cell proliferation, apoptosis and homocysteine generation in NSC cells. PMID:19590702

  12. Dietary homocysteine promotes atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inducing scavenger receptors expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels have been recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, the causative mechanisms have not been delineated. Scavenger receptors such as scavenger receptor-AI/II (SR-A), CD36, and lectin-like oxidized LDL ...

  13. HOMOCYSTEINE INDUCED ATHEROSCLEROSIS DOES NOT DEPEND ON PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES AND CHEMOKINES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels are recognized as risk factors for cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases. ApoE mice fed with Hcy have increased cholesterol and aortic lesions, but underlying mechanisms need to be delineated. Hcy forms protein adducts and triggers immune activation. In ApoE...

  14. Homocysteine induces glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase acetylation and apoptosis in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a.

    PubMed

    Fang, M; Jin, A; Zhao, Y; Liu, X

    2016-02-01

    High plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) promote the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which Hcy mediates neurotoxicity has not been elucidated. We observed that upon incubation with Hcy, the viability of a neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a declined in a dose-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced within 48 h. The median effective concentration (EC50) of Hcy was approximately 5 mM. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) nuclear translocation and acylation has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. We found that nuclear translocation and acetylation of GAPDH increased in the presence of 5 mM Hcy and that higher levels of acetyltransferase p300/CBP were detected in Neuro2a cells. These findings implicate the involvement of GAPDH in the mechanism whereby Hcy induces apoptosis in neurons. This study highlights a potentially important pathway in neurodegenerative disorders, and a novel target pathway for neuroprotective therapy. PMID:26785692

  15. Homocysteine induces glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase acetylation and apoptosis in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a

    PubMed Central

    Fang, M.; Jin, A.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, X.

    2016-01-01

    High plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) promote the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which Hcy mediates neurotoxicity has not been elucidated. We observed that upon incubation with Hcy, the viability of a neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a declined in a dose-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced within 48 h. The median effective concentration (EC50) of Hcy was approximately 5 mM. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) nuclear translocation and acylation has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. We found that nuclear translocation and acetylation of GAPDH increased in the presence of 5 mM Hcy and that higher levels of acetyltransferase p300/CBP were detected in Neuro2a cells. These findings implicate the involvement of GAPDH in the mechanism whereby Hcy induces apoptosis in neurons. This study highlights a potentially important pathway in neurodegenerative disorders, and a novel target pathway for neuroprotective therapy. PMID:26785692

  16. Homocysteine Induced Cerebrovascular Dysfunction: A Link to Alzheimer’s Disease Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, P.K; Vacek, J.C; Kalani, A; Tyagi, N

    2015-01-01

    A high serum level of homocysteine, known as hyperhomocystenemia (HHcy) is associated with vascular dysfunction such as altered angiogenesis and increased membrane permeability. Epidemiological studies have found associations between HHcy and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression that eventually leads to vascular dementia (VaD). VaD is the second most common cause of dementia in people older than 65, the first being AD. VaD affects the quality of life for those suffering by drastically decreasing their cognitive function. VaD, a cerebrovascular disease, generally occurs due to cerebral ischemic events from either decreased perfusion or hemorrhagic lesions. HHcy is associated with the hallmarks of dementia such as tau phosphorylation, Aβ aggregation, neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Previous reports also suggest HHcy may promote AD like pathology by more than one mechanism, including cerebral microangiopathy, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, neurotoxicity and apoptosis. Despite the corelations presented above, the question still exists – does homocysteine have a causal connection to AD? In this review, we highlight the role of HHcy in relation to AD by discussing its neurovascular effects and amelioration with dietary supplements. Moreover, we consider the studies using animal models to unravel the connection of Hcy to AD. PMID:26157520

  17. MiR-30b Is Involved in the Homocysteine-Induced Apoptosis in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells by Regulating the Expression of Caspase 3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Chen, Qi; Song, Xiaowei; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Jianliang

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an independent risk factor for a variety of cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary heart disease, hypertension, stroke, etc. There is a close relationship between the vascular endothelial cell apoptosis and these diseases. Recent studies have shown homocysteine can induce apoptosis in endothelial cells, which may be an important mechanism for the development of theses cardiovascular diseases. Although there are several reports about how the Hcy induces apoptosis in endothelial cells, the exact mechanism is not fully understood. MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNA. Previous studies have shown that there is a close relationship between several microRNAs and cell apoptosis. However, there are no studies about the role of microRNAs in Hcy-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells so far. In this study, we constructed the model of homocysteine-induced apoptosis in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) and found miR-30b was significantly down-regulated by 1 mmol/L Hcy. In addition, overexpression of miR-30b can improve the Hcy-induced apoptosis in HCAECs by downregulating caspase-3 expression. Therefore, miR-30b may play an important role in Hcy-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells. PMID:26263983

  18. HSP27 Inhibits Homocysteine-Induced Endothelial Apoptosis by Modulation of ROS Production and Mitochondrial Caspase-Dependent Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin; Zhao, Lei; Song, Xianjing; Yan, Youyou; Liu, Ning; Li, Tianyi; Yan, Bingdi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) could lead to endothelial dysfunction and is viewed as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a small heat shock protein, is reported to exert protective effect against atherosclerosis. This study aims to investigate the protective effect of HSP27 against Hcy-induced endothelial cell apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and to determine the underlying mechanisms. Methods. Apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of normal or HSP27-overexpressing HUVECs in the presence of Hcy were analyzed by flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression levels were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot. Results. We found that Hcy could induce cell apoptosis with corresponding decrease of nitric oxide (NO) level, increase of endothelin-1 (ET-1), intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels, elevation of ROS, and dissipation of MMP. In addition, HSP27 could protect the cell against Hcy-induced apoptosis and inhibit the effect of Hcy on HUVECs. Furthermore, HSP27 could increase the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax and inhibit caspase-3 activity. Conclusions. Therefore, we concluded that HSP27 played a protective role against Hcy-induced endothelial apoptosis through modulation of ROS production and the mitochondrial caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. PMID:27190988

  19. Molecular mechanisms of homocysteine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Boldyrev, A A

    2009-06-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for a number of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative processes as well as a complicating factor in normal pregnancy. Toxic effects of homocysteine and the product of its spontaneous oxidation, homocysteic acid, are based on their ability to activate NMDA receptors, increasing intracellular levels of ionized calcium and reactive oxygen species. Even a short-term exposure of cells to homocysteic acid at concentrations characteristic of hyperhomocysteinemia induces their apoptotic transformation. The discovery of NMDA receptors both in neuronal tissue and in several other tissues and organs (including immunocompetent cells) makes them a target for toxic action of homocysteine. The neuropeptide carnosine was found to protect the organism from homocysteine toxicity. Treatment of pregnant rats with carnosine under conditions of alimentary hyperhomocysteinemia increases viability and functional activity of their progeny. PMID:19645662

  20. Polyphenols and Polypeptides in Chinese Rice Wine Inhibit Homocysteine-induced Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Liping; Liu, Longbin; Zhou, Changzuan; Pan, Sunlei; Zhai, Xiaoya; Jiang, Chengjian; Guo, Yan; Ji, Zheng; Chi, Jufang; Peng, Fang; Guo, Hangyuan

    2016-06-01

    The beneficial effect of Chinese rice wine on atherosclerosis has been proved, but the exact components that have the cardiovascular protective effect are still unknown. This study aimed to explore the exact ingredients in Chinese rice wine that could inhibit homocysteine (Hcy)-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration. VSMCs were divided into 7 groups: control, Hcy (1 mmol/L), Hcy + oligosaccharide, Hcy + polypeptides, Hcy + polyphenols, Hcy + alcohol, and Hcy + Chinese rice wine. methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, Transwell chambers, and wound-healing assay were used to test the proliferation and migratory ability of the VSMCs. Western blot and gelatin zymography were used to investigate the expressions and activities of metal matrix proteinase 2/9 (MMP-2/9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) in VSMCs. Polypeptides and polyphenols in the Chinese rice wine reduced the proliferation and migration ability of the VSMCs. Furthermore, they also decreased the expression and activity of MMP-2/9 but had no obvious impact on the expression of TIMP-2 in each group. This study further confirms that polypeptides and polyphenols in the Chinese rice wine could inhibit Hcy-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs and maintain the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and TIMPs. PMID:26836482

  1. NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibits the proteasomal degradation of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum protein.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tomoji; Tanabe-Fujimura, Chiaki; Fujita, Yu; Abe, Chihiro; Nanakida, Yoshino; Zou, Kun; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Komano, Hiroto

    2016-05-13

    Homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein (Herp) is an ER stress-inducible key regulatory component of ER-associated degradation (ERAD) that has been implicated in insulin hypersecretion in diabetic mouse models. Herp expression is tightly regulated. Additionally, Herp is a highly labile protein and interacts with various proteins, which are characteristic features of ubiquitinated protein. Previously, we reported that ubiquitination is not required for Herp degradation. In addition, we found that the lysine residues of Herp (which are ubiquitinated by E3 ubiquitin ligase) are not sufficient for regulation of Herp degradation. In this study, we found that NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-mediated targeting of Herp to the proteasome was involved in Herp degradation. In addition, we found that Herp protein levels were markedly elevated in synoviolin-null cells. The E3 ubiquitin ligase synoviolin is a central component of ERAD and is involved in the degradation of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), which regulates cellular reactive oxygen species. Additionally, NQO1 is a target of Nrf2. Thus, our findings indicated that NQO1 could stabilize Herp protein expression via indirect regulation of synoviolin. PMID:27084451

  2. Homocysteine-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells coincides with nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 activity.

    PubMed

    Sipkens, Jessica A; Hahn, Nynke; van den Brand, Carlien S; Meischl, Christof; Cillessen, Saskia A G M; Smith, Desirée E C; Juffermans, Lynda J M; Musters, René J P; Roos, Dirk; Jakobs, Cornelis; Blom, Henk J; Smulders, Yvo M; Krijnen, Paul A J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Rauwerda, Jan A; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Niessen, Hans W M

    2013-11-01

    Apoptosis of endothelial cells related to homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported in several studies. In this study, we evaluated whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing signaling pathways contribute to Hcy-induced apoptosis induction, with specific emphasis on NADPH oxidases. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 0.01-2.5 mM Hcy. We determined the effect of Hcy on caspase-3 activity, annexin V positivity, intracellular NOX1, NOX2, NOX4, and p47(phox) expression and localization, nuclear nitrotyrosine accumulation, and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m). Hcy induced caspase-3 activity and apoptosis; this effect was concentration dependent and maximal after 6-h exposure to 2.5 mM Hcy. It was accompanied by a significant increase in ΔΨ m. Cysteine was inactive on these parameters excluding a reactive thiol group effect. Hcy induced an increase in cellular NOX2, p47(phox), and NOX4, but not that of NOX1. 3D digital imaging microscopy followed by image deconvolution analysis showed nuclear accumulation of NOX2 and p47(phox) in endothelial cells exposed to Hcy, but not in control cells, which coincided with accumulation of nuclear nitrotyrosine residues. Furthermore, Hcy enhanced peri-nuclear localization of NOX4 coinciding with accumulation of peri-nuclear nitrotyrosine residues, a reflection of local ROS production. p47(phox) was also increased in the peri-nuclear region. The Hcy-induced increase in caspase-3 activity was prevented by DPI and apocynin, suggesting involvement of NOX activity. The data presented in this article reveal accumulation of nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 accumulation as potential source of ROS production in Hcy-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells. PMID:22038300

  3. Homocysteine induced cardiovascular events: a consequence of long term anabolic‐androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse

    PubMed Central

    Graham, M R; Grace, F M; Boobier, W; Hullin, D; Kicman, A; Cowan, D; Davies, B; Baker, J S

    2006-01-01

    Objectives The long term effects (>20 years) of anabolic‐androgenic steroid (AAS) use on plasma concentrations of homocysteine (HCY), folate, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index, urea, creatinine, haematocrit (HCT), vitamin B12, and urinary testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratio, were examined in a cohort of self‐prescribing bodybuilders. Methods Subjects (n = 40) were divided into four distinct groups: (1) AAS users still using AAS (SU; n = 10); (2) AAS users abstinent from AAS administration for 3 months (SA; n = 10); (3) non‐drug using bodybuilding controls (BC; n = 10); and (4) sedentary male controls (SC; n = 10). Results HCY levels were significantly higher in SU compared with BC and SC (p<0.01), and with SA (p<0.05). Fat free mass was significantly higher in both groups of AAS users (p<0.01). Daily energy intake (kJ) and daily protein intake (g/day) were significantly higher in SU and SA (p<0.05) compared with BC and SC, but were unlikely to be responsible for the observed HCY increases. HCT concentrations were significantly higher in the SU group (p<0.01). A significant linear inverse relationship was observed in the SU group between SHBG and HCY (r = −0.828, p<0.01), indicating a possible influence of the sex hormones in determining HCY levels. Conclusions With mounting evidence linking AAS to adverse effects on some clotting factors, the significantly higher levels of HCY and HCT observed in the SU group suggest long term AAS users have increased risk of future thromboembolic events. PMID:16488899

  4. The involvement of homocysteine in stress-induced Aβ precursor protein misprocessing and related cognitive decline in rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Zhao, Yun; Ma, Jing; Gong, Jing-Bo; Wang, Shi-Da; Zhang, Liang; Gao, Xiu-Jie; Qian, Ling-Jia

    2016-09-01

    Chronic stress is a risk factor in the development of cognitive decline and even Alzheimer's disease (AD), although its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Our previous data demonstrated that the level of homocysteine (Hcy) was significantly elevated in the plasma of stressed animals, which suggests the possibility that Hcy is a link between stress and cognitive decline. To test this hypothesis, we compared the cognitive function, plasma concentrations of Hcy, and the brain beta-amyloid (Aβ) level between rats with or without chronic unexpected mild stress (CUMS). A lower performance by rats in behavioral tests indicated that a significant cognitive decline was induced by CUMS. Stress also disturbed the normal processing of Aβ precursor protein (APP) and resulted in the accumulation of Aβ in the brains of rats, which showed a positive correlation with the hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) that appeared in stressed rats. Hcy-targeting intervention experiments were used to verify further the involvement of Hcy in stress-induced APP misprocessing and related cognitive decline. The results showed that diet-induced HHcy could mimic the cognitive impairment and APP misprocessing in the same manner as CUMS, while Hcy reduction by means of vitamin B complex supplements and betaine could alleviate the cognitive deficits and dysregulation of Aβ metabolism in CUMS rats. Taken together, the novel evidence from our present study suggests that Hcy is likely to be involved in chronic stress-evoked APP misprocessing and related cognitive deficits. Our results also suggested the possibility of Hcy as a target for therapy and the potential value of vitamin B and betaine intake in the prevention of stress-induced cognitive decline. PMID:27435080

  5. High homocysteine levels prevent via H2 S the CoCl2 -induced alteration of lymphocyte viability.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Laurie; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Fromonot, Julien; Durand-Gorde, Josée-Martine; Condo, Jocelyne; Kipson, Nathalie; Mottola, Giovanna; Deharo, Pierre; Guieu, Régis; Ruf, Jean

    2016-08-01

    High homocysteine (HCy) levels are associated with lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory responses that are sometimes in turn related to hypoxia. Because adenosine is a potent lymphocyte suppressor produced in hypoxic conditions and shares metabolic pathways with HCy, we addressed the influence of high HCy levels on the hypoxia-induced, adenosine-mediated, alteration of lymphocyte viability. We treated mitogen-stimulated human lymphocytes isolated from healthy individuals and the human lymphoma T-cell line CEM with cobalt chloride (CoCl2 )to reproduce hypoxia. We found that CoCl2 -altered cell viability was dose-dependently reversed using HCy. In turn, the HCy effect was inhibited using DL-propargylglycine, a specific inhibitor of the hydrogen sulphide (H2 S)-synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase involved in HCy catabolism. We then addressed the intracellular metabolic pathway of adenosine and HCy, and the role of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2 A R). We observed that: (i) hypoxic conditions lowered the intracellular concentration of HCy by increasing adenosine production, which resulted in high A2 A R expression and 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate production; (ii) increasing intracellular HCy concentration reversed the hypoxia-induced adenosinergic signalling despite high adenosine concentration by promoting both S-adenosylhomocysteine and H2 S production; (iii) DL-propargylglycine that inhibits H2 S production abolished the HCy effect. Together, these data suggest that high HCy levels prevent, via H2 S production and the resulting down-regulation of A2 A R expression, the hypoxia-induced adenosinergic alteration of lymphocyte viability. We point out the relevance of these mechanisms in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27061011

  6. Homocysteine in ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil Ananthanarayanan; Ranimenon

    2015-10-23

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a derived sulfur-containing and non-proteinogenic amino acid. The metabolism of Hcy occurs either through the remethylation to methionine or transsulfuration to cysteine. Studies have identified hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) as one of the possible risk factors for a multitude of diseases including vascular, neurodegenerative and ocular diseases. Association of HHcy with eye diseases such as retinopathy, pseudoexfoliative glaucoma maculopathy, cataract, optic atrophy and retinal vessel atherosclerosis is established. The molecular mechanism underlying these ocular diseases has been reported as impaired vascular endothelial function, apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, extracellular matrix alterations, decreased lysyl oxidase activity and oxidative stress. The formed homocysteine-thiolactone in HHcy has stronger cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory properties which can induce lens opacification and optic nerve damage. The metabolism of Hcy requires enzymes with vitamins such as folic acid, vitamins B12 and B6. Despite the mixed conclusion of various studies regarding the level of these vitamins in elder people, studies recommended the treatment with folate and B12 to reduce Hcy levels in subjects with or without any defect in the enzymes involved in its metabolism. The levels of Hcy, folate, B6 as well as B12 should be measured early in patients with visual impairment that would aid to screen patients for life-threatening disorders related with HHcy. Elder patients may supplement with these vitamins in order to attenuate the ocular damages. This article discusses the association of Hcy in ocular diseases and the possible mechanism in the pathogenesis. PMID:26343924

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology, Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, and Synaptic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kyles, Philip; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) level is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). During transsulfuration pathways, Hcy is metabolized into hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a synaptic modulator, as well as a neuro-protective agent. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation, in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and synaptic dysfunction, leading to AD pathology is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibition of neuronal NMDA-R by H2S and MK801 mitigate the Hcy-induced BBB disruption and synapse dysfunction, in part by decreasing neuronal matrix degradation. Hcy intracerebral (IC) treatment significantly impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral circulation and memory function. Hcy treatment also decreases the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in the brain along with increased expression of NMDA-R (NR1) and synaptosomal Ca(2+) indicating excitotoxicity. Additionally, we found that Hcy treatment increased protein and mRNA expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 and also increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the brain. The increased expression of ICAM-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the decreased expression of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and claudin-5 indicates BBB disruption and vascular inflammation. Moreover, we also found decreased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP-97), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showing synapse dysfunction in the hippocampus. Furthermore, NaHS and MK801 treatment ameliorates BBB disruption, CBF, and synapse functions in the mice brain. These results demonstrate a neuro-protective effect of H2S over Hcy-induced

  8. FABP4-mediated homocysteine-induced cholesterol accumulation in THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages and the potential epigenetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yideng; Ma, Shengchao; Zhang, Huiping; Yang, Xiaoling; Lu, Guan Jun; Zhang, Hui; He, Yangyang; Kong, Fanqi; Yang, Anning; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Minghao; Jiao, Yun; Li, Guizhong; Cao, Jun; Jia, Yuexia; Jin, Shaoju; Wei, Jun; Shi, Yingkang

    2016-07-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis (AS), according to overwhelming number of clinical and epidemiological studies. However, the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms by which HHcy promotes AS remain to be fully elucidated. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) has been shown to be important in macrophage cholesterol trafficking. The objective of the present study was to determine whether homocysteine (Hcy) accelerates AS through regulating FABP4, and then mediates cholesterol accumulation in macrophages. Hcy concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 200 and 500 µM, and 100 µM Hcy+30 µM vitamin B12 (VB12)+30 µM folic acid (FA) were respectively added to cultured THP‑1 monocyte‑derived macrophages for 24 h. The levels of FABP4, which acts as a key factor connecting cellular lipid accumulation to inflammation, were determined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) and western blot analyses in the macrophages. The present study used a nested touchdown methylation‑specific PCR assay to detect the DNA methylation status of the FABP4 promoter region. In addition, the FABP4 gene fragment was inserted into the cloning vector, pcDNA3.1‑EGFP, to construct the recombinant plasmid, pcDNA3.1‑EGFP/FABP4, which was identified using restriction endonuclease digestion analysis and DNA sequencing. The pcDNA3.1‑EGFP/FABP4 expression plasmid was transfected into THP‑1 monocyte‑derived macrophages, mediated by liposome reagent, following which the expression levels of FABP4 were detected using RT‑qPCR and western blot analyses. The present study also determined the intracellular accumulation of total cholesterol in the macrophages. The results indicated that Hcy decreased the levels of FABP4 promoter methylation, but increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of FABP4 in the macrophages, compared with the control group (0 µM Hcy). However, no dose

  9. Attenuation of drug-stimulated topoisomerase II-DNA cleavable complex formation in wild-type HL-60 cells treated with an intracellular calcium buffer is correlated with decreased cytotoxicity and site-specific hypophosphorylation of topoisomerase IIalpha.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, M; Grabowski, D R; Dubyak, G R; Constantinou, A I; Rybicki, L A; Bukowski, R M; Ganapathi, M K; Hickson, I D; Ganapathi, R

    1998-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (topo II), an essential enzyme for cell viability, is also the target for clinically important anti-neoplastic agents that stimulate topo II-mediated DNA scission. The role of alterations in topo IIalpha phosphorylation and its effect on drug-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity were investigated. Following loading of HL-60 cells with the calcium buffer 1, 2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetra(acetoxymethyl) ester (BAPTA-AM), which abrogates intracellular Ca2+ transients, a significant decrease in etoposide (VP-16)- or amsacrine (m-AMSA)-stabilized topo II-DNA cleavable complex formation and a corresponding decrease in cytotoxicity was observed. In a cell-free system, nuclear extracts from BAPTA-AM-treated cells exhibited markedly less activity when assayed for VP-16-stabilized topo II-DNA complex formation, but not decatenation of kinetoplast DNA. In contrast, the loading of HL-60 cells with N,N,N', N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), which binds heavy metals without disturbing calcium or magnesium concentrations, did not significantly affect VP-16-stimulated topo II-DNA cleavable complex formation or cytotoxicity. In HL-60 cells the accumulation of BAPTA, but not TPEN, also led to the hypophosphorylation of topo IIalpha. Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of topo IIalpha protein from HL-60 cells revealed: (a) eight major phosphorylation sites in untreated cells; (b) hypophosphorylation of two out of eight sites in BAPTA-AM-treated cells; and (c) hypophosphorylation of between two and four out of eight sites in topo II-poison-resistant HL-60 cells. The two hypophosphorylated sites present following BAPTA-AM treatment of wild-type cells were identical with the hypophosphorylated sites in the resistant cells, but were not the same as the sites that are substrates for casein kinase II [Wells, Addison, Fry, Ganapathi and Hickson (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 29746-29751]. In summary, changes in intracellular Ca2+ transients

  10. IER5 generates a novel hypo-phosphorylated active form of HSF1 and contributes to tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Yoshinori; Kawase, Tatsuya; Okabe, Atsushi; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Tatebe, Satoko; Kitabayashi, Issay; Tashiro, Fumio; Namiki, Hideo; Kondo, Tadashi; Semba, Kentaro; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Taya, Yoichi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Ohki, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factors HSF1 and p53 both modulate the stress response, thereby protecting and facilitating the recovery of stressed cells, but both have the potential to promote tumor development. Here we show that a p53 target gene, IER5, encodes an activator of HSF1. IER5 forms a ternary complex with HSF1 and the phosphatase PP2A, and promotes the dephosphorylation of HSF1 at numbers of serine and threonine residues, generating a novel, hypo-phosphorylated active form of HSF1. IER5 is also transcriptionally upregulated in various cancers, although this upregulation is not always p53-dependent. The IER5 locus is associated with a so-called super enhancer, frequently associated with hyperactivated oncogenes in cancer cell lines. Enhanced expression of IER5 induces abnormal HSF1 activation in cancer cells and contributes to the proliferation of these cells under stressed conditions. These results reveal the existence of a novel IER5-mediated cancer regulation pathway that is responsible for the activation of HSF1 observed in various cancers. PMID:26754925

  11. IER5 generates a novel hypo-phosphorylated active form of HSF1 and contributes to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshinori; Kawase, Tatsuya; Okabe, Atsushi; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Tatebe, Satoko; Kitabayashi, Issay; Tashiro, Fumio; Namiki, Hideo; Kondo, Tadashi; Semba, Kentaro; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Taya, Yoichi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Ohki, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factors HSF1 and p53 both modulate the stress response, thereby protecting and facilitating the recovery of stressed cells, but both have the potential to promote tumor development. Here we show that a p53 target gene, IER5, encodes an activator of HSF1. IER5 forms a ternary complex with HSF1 and the phosphatase PP2A, and promotes the dephosphorylation of HSF1 at numbers of serine and threonine residues, generating a novel, hypo-phosphorylated active form of HSF1. IER5 is also transcriptionally upregulated in various cancers, although this upregulation is not always p53-dependent. The IER5 locus is associated with a so-called super enhancer, frequently associated with hyperactivated oncogenes in cancer cell lines. Enhanced expression of IER5 induces abnormal HSF1 activation in cancer cells and contributes to the proliferation of these cells under stressed conditions. These results reveal the existence of a novel IER5-mediated cancer regulation pathway that is responsible for the activation of HSF1 observed in various cancers. PMID:26754925

  12. Converging Evidence of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Yeast Model of Homocysteine Metabolism Imbalance*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; John, Lijo; Maity, Shuvadeep; Manchanda, Mini; Sharma, Abhay; Saini, Neeru; Chakraborty, Kausik; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2011-01-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine, a thiol amino acid, is associated with various complex disorders. The cellular effects of homocysteine and its precursors S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) are, however, poorly understood. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to understand the basis of pathogenicity induced by homocysteine and its precursors. Both homocysteine and AdoHcy but not AdoMet inhibited the growth of the str4Δ strain (which lacks the enzyme that converts homocysteine to cystathionine-mimicking vascular cells). Addition of AdoMet abrogated the inhibitory effect of AdoHcy but not that of homocysteine indicating that an increase in the AdoMet/AdoHcy ratio is sufficient to overcome the AdoHcy-mediated growth defect but not that of homocysteine. Also, the transcriptomic profile of AdoHcy and homocysteine showed gross dissimilarity based on gene enrichment analysis. Furthermore, compared with homocysteine, AdoHcy treatment caused a higher level of oxidative stress in the cells. However, unlike a previously reported response in wild type (Kumar, A., John, L., Alam, M. M., Gupta, A., Sharma, G., Pillai, B., and Sengupta, S. (2006) Biochem. J. 396, 61–69), the str4Δ strain did not exhibit an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. This suggests that homocysteine induces varied response depending on the flux of homocysteine metabolism. We also observed altered expression of mitochondrial genes, defective membrane potential, and fragmentation of the mitochondrial network together with the increased expression of fission genes indicating that the imbalance in homocysteine metabolism has a major effect on mitochondrial functions. Furthermore, treatment of cells with homocysteine or AdoHcy resulted in apoptosis as revealed by annexin V staining and TUNEL assay. Cumulatively, our results suggest that elevated levels of homocysteine lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, which could potentially initiate pro-apoptotic pathways, and

  13. Atorvastatin attenuates homocysteine-induced migration of smooth muscle cells through mevalonate pathway involving reactive oxygen species and p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiao-mei; Zheng, Hongchao

    2015-08-01

    Statins have been reported to have an antioxidant effect against homocysteine (Hcy)-induced endothelial dysfunction. It is unknown whether they have the same effect against migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by Hcy. In this study, it was investigated whether and how atorvastatin could inhibit the Hcy-induced migration in cultured VSMCs and revealed the possible redox mechanism. VSMCs were isolated from the thoracic aortas of Sprague-Dawley rats. The migration of VSMCs was examined using a transwell technique and cell viability was determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using the fluoroprobe 2'7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. The activity of NADPH oxidase was assessed by lucigenin enhanced chemiluminescence. Expressions of Nox1 mRNA and p-p38MAPK protein were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis, respectively. The results showed that atorvastatin inhibited the migration of VSMCs induced by Hcy, which was reversed by the mevalonate. In addition, pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI, the free radical scavenger NAC and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 blocked Hcy-induced VSMCs migration. Furthermore, atorvastatin suppressed Hcy-induced activation of NADPH oxidase and ROS, attenuated Hcy-induced overexpression of Nox1mRNA. Similar effects occurred with VSMCs transfected with Nox1 siRNA. Moreover, atorvastatin other than DPI, NAC, SB203580 and Nox1 siRNA transfection blocked Hcy-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which was also reversed by the mevalonate. The data demonstrates that atorvastatin inhibits Hcy-induced VSMCs migration in a mevalonate pathway. Furthermore, a part of the biological effect of atorvastatin involves a decrease in the levels of Nox1-dependent ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. PMID:26041506

  14. Protective Action of Anandamide and Its COX-2 Metabolite against l-Homocysteine-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Injury in Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangbi; Xia, Min; Abais, Justine M; Boini, Krishna; Li, Pin-Lan; Ritter, Joseph K

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that l-homocysteine (Hcys)-induced podocyte injury leading to glomerular damage or sclerosis is attributable to the activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor containing pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Given the demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects of endocannabinoids, the present study was designed to test whether anandamide (AEA) or its metabolites diminish NLRP3 inflammasome activation and prevent podocyte injury and associated glomerular damage during hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys). AEA (100 μM) inhibited Hcys-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in cultured podocytes, as indicated by elevated caspase-1 activity and interleukin-1β levels, and attenuated podocyte dysfunction, as shown by reduced vascular endothelial growth factor production. These effects of AEA were inhibited by the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib (CEL). In mice in vivo, AEA treatment attenuated glomerular NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by hHcys accompanying a folate-free diet, on the basis of inhibition of hHcys-induced colocalization of NLRP3 molecules and increased interleukin-1β levels in glomeruli. Correspondingly, AEA prevented hHcys-induced proteinuria, albuminuria, and glomerular damage observed microscopically. Hcys- and AEA-induced effects were absent in NLRP3-knockout mice. These beneficial effects of AEA against hHcys-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and glomerular injury were not observed in mice cotreated with CEL. We further demonstrated that prostaglandin E2-ethanolamide (PGE2-EA), a COX-2 product of AEA, at 10 μM had a similar inhibitory effect to that of 100 μM AEA on Hcys-induced NLRP3 inflammasome formation and activation in cultured podocytes. From these results, we conclude that AEA has anti-inflammatory properties, protecting podocytes from Hcys-induced injury by inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation through its COX-2 metabolite, PGE2-EA. PMID:27189966

  15. Simvastatin rescues homocysteine-induced apoptosis of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells by decreasing the expressions of NADPH oxidase 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Ayumu; Kanazawa, Ippei; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Notsu, Masakazu; Yokomoto-Umakoshi, Maki; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2016-04-25

    Clinical studies have shown that hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with bone fragility. Homocysteine (Hcy) induces apoptosis of osteoblastic cell lineage by increasing oxidative stress, which may contribute to Hcy-induced bone fragility. Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, ameliorate oxidative stress by regulating oxidant and anti-oxidant enzymes. However, the effects of statins on Hcy-induced apoptosis of osteocytes are unknown. This study was thus aimed to investigate whether or not statins prevent Hcy-induced apoptosis of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells and regulate NADPH oxidase (Nox) expression. TUNEL staining showed that 5 mM Hcy induced apoptosis of MLO-Y4 cells, and that co-incubation of 10(-9) or 10(-8) M simvastatin significantly suppressed the apoptotic effect. Moreover, we confirmed the beneficial effect of simvastatin against Hcy's apoptotic effect by using a DNA fragment ELISA assay. However, TUNEL staining showed no significant effects of pravastatin, a hydrophilic statin, on the Hcy-induced apoptosis. Real-time PCR showed that Hcy increased the mRNA expressions of Nox1 and Nox2, whereas simvastatin inhibited the stimulation of Nox1 and Nox2 expressions by Hcy. In contrast, neither Hcy nor simvastatin had any effect on Nox4 expression. These findings indicate that simvastatin prevents the detrimental effects of Hcy on the apoptosis of osteocytes by regulating the expressions of Nox1 and Nox2, suggesting that statins may be beneficial for preventing Hcy-induced osteocyte apoptosis and the resulting bone fragility. PMID:26842590

  16. Effect of lipid-lowering and anti-hypertensive drugs on plasma homocysteine levels

    PubMed Central

    Dierkes, Jutta; Luley, Claus; Westphal, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, are a risk factor for coronary, cerebral and peripheral artery disease. Next to other factors, drugs used for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular disease may modulate plasma homocysteine levels. Thus, a drug induced homocysteine increase may counteract the desired cardioprotective effect. The aim is to summarize the current knowledge on the effect of two important classes of drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and anti-hypertensive drugs, on homocysteine metabolism. Among the lipid-lowering drugs, especially the fibric acid derivatives, which are used for treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol, are associated with an increase of homocysteine by 20%–50%. This increase can be reduced, but not totally avoided by the addition of folic acid, vitamin B12 and B6 to fibrates. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) do not influence homocysteine concentrations substantially. The effects of nicotinic acid and n3-fatty acids on the homocysteine concentrations are less clear, more studies are necessary to clarify their influence on homocysteine. Antihypertensive drugs have also been studied with respect to homocysteine metabolism. A homocysteine increase has been shown after treatment with hydrochlorothiazide, a lowering was observed after treatment with ß-blockers, but no effect with ACE-inhibitors. The clinical significance of the homocysteine elevation by fibrates and thiazides is not clear. However, individual patients use these drugs for long time, indicating that even moderate increases may be important. PMID:17583180

  17. Why is homocysteine toxic for the nervous and immune systems?

    PubMed

    Boldyrev, Alexander; Bryushkova, Ekaterina; Mashkina, Anna; Vladychenskaya, Elizaveta

    2013-02-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for a number of neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. We have shown that homocysteine induces excitotoxic effects in cells expressing glutamate receptors of the NMDA class. These receptors were found not only in neurons but also in immune-competent cells, neutrophils, red blood cells, cardiomyocytes, and osteoblasts. Activation of these cells by homocysteine results in an increase in cytoplasmic calcium ions, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and activation of MAP kinase. An overload of immune-competent cells activates both necrotic and apoptotic cell death, whereas the neuropeptide carnosine (an antioxidant and immune modulator) protects cells against both processes. In a model of prenatal hyperhomocysteinemia in rats, we have found that carnosine protects animals against homocysteine toxicity with no change of the blood homocysteine levels. The efficiency of carnosine has also been demonstrated in clinical trials of chronic brain ischemia and Parkinson's disease. PMID:23237596

  18. Homocysteine and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Ramón; Passalacqua, Walter; Araya, Julia; Orellana, Myriam; Rivera, Gonzalo

    2003-12-01

    The authors examine the available clinical and experimental data supporting the view that homocysteine, an alternative risk factor of cardiovascular disease, may play a role in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. The mechanism of this disease has not been elucidated, but it may be related to impairment of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell function. Therefore, the occurrence of endothelial dysfunction could contribute to alterations of the endothelium-dependent vasomotor regulation. Elevated homocysteinemia diminishes the vasodilation by nitric oxide, increases oxidative stress, stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, and alters the elastic properties of the vascular wall. Thus, homocysteine contributes to elevate the blood pressure. Also it is known that elevated plasma levels of homocysteine could lead to oxidant injury to the endothelium. The correction of elevated homocysteinemia by administration of vitamins B12 and B6 plus folic acid, could be a useful adjuvant therapy of hypertension. However, further controlled randomized trials are necessary to establish the efficacy and tolerability of these potentially therapeutic agents. PMID:14615465

  19. Homocysteine and cytosolic GSH depletion induce apoptosis and oxidative toxicity through cytosolic calcium overload in the hippocampus of aged mice: involvement of TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Övey, I S; Naziroğlu, M

    2015-01-22

    Oxidative stress and apoptosis were induced in neuronal cultures by inhibition of glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis with d,l-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO). Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channels are gated by oxidative stress. The oxidant effects of homocysteine (Hcy) may induce activation of TRPV1 and TRPM2 channels in aged mice as a model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We tested the effects of Hcy, BSO and GSH on oxidative stress, apoptosis and Ca2+ and influx via TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels in the hippocampus of mice. Native mice hippocampal neurons were divided into five groups as follows; control, Hcy, BSO, Hcy+BSO and Hcy+BSO+GSH groups. The neurons in TRPM2 and TRPV1 experiments were stimulated by hydrogen peroxide and capsaicin, respectively. BSO and Hcy incubations increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, mitochondrial depolarization, and levels of caspase 3 and 9. All of these increases were reduced by GSH treatments. Treatment with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid (ACA) as potent inhibitors of TRPM2, capsazepine as a potent inhibitor of TRPV1, verapamil+diltiazem (V+D) as inhibitors of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) and MK-801 as a N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) channel antagonist indicated that GSH depletion and Hcy elevation activated Ca2+ entry into the neurons through TRPM2, TRPV1, VGCC and NMDA channels. Inhibitor roles of 2-APB and capsazepine on the Ca2+ entry higher than in V+D and MK-801 antagonists. In conclusion, these findings support the idea that GSH depletion and Hcy elevation can have damaging effects on hippocampal neurons by perturbing calcium homeostasis, mainly through TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels. GSH treatment can partially reverse these effects. PMID:25305668

  20. Homocysteine aggravates ROS-induced depression of transmitter release from motor nerve terminals: potential mechanism of peripheral impairment in motor neuron diseases associated with hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Bukharaeva, Ellya; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Khuzakhmetova, Venera; Sitdikova, Guzel; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine (HCY) is a pro-inflammatory sulphur-containing redox active endogenous amino acid, which concentration increases in neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A widely held view suggests that HCY could contribute to neurodegeneration via promotion of oxidative stress. However, the action of HCY on motor nerve terminals has not been investigated so far. We previously reported that oxidative stress inhibited synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction, targeting primarily the motor nerve terminals. In the current study, we investigated the effect of HCY on oxidative stress-induced impairment of transmitter release at the mouse diaphragm muscle. The mild oxidant H2O2 decreased the intensity of spontaneous quantum release from nerve terminals (measured as the frequency of miniature endplate potentials, MEPPs) without changes in the amplitude of MEPPs, indicating a presynaptic effect. Pre-treatment with HCY for 2 h only slightly affected both amplitude and frequency of MEPPs but increased the inhibitory potency of H2O2 almost two fold. As HCY can activate certain subtypes of glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors we tested the role of NMDA receptors in the sensitizing action of HCY. Remarkably, the selective blocker of NMDA receptors, AP-5 completely removed the sensitizing effect of HCY on the H2O2-induced presynaptic depressant effect. Thus, at the mammalian neuromuscular junction HCY largely increases the inhibitory effect of oxidative stress on transmitter release, via NMDA receptors activation. This combined effect of HCY and local oxidative stress can specifically contribute to the damage of presynaptic terminals in neurodegenerative motoneuron diseases, including ALS. PMID:26500495

  1. The Effect of Vitamin B12 Infusion on Prevention of Nitrous Oxide-induced Homocysteine Increase: A Double-blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kiasari, Alieh Zamani; Firouzian, Abolfazl; Baradari, Afshin Gholipour; Nia, Hamid Sharif; Kiasari, Seyed Hosein Moosavi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nitrous oxide is a common inhalation anesthetic agent in general anesthesia. While it is widely accepted as a safe anesthetic agent, evidence suggests exposure to this gas, leads to hyperhomocysteinemia. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of single-dose intravenous infusions of vitamin B12, before and after the induction of nitrous oxide anesthesia on homocysteine levels after the surgery. Methods This double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted on 60 patients who were scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia, presumably lasting for more than two hours. The subjects were randomly allocated to three groups of 20. For the first group, vitamin B12 solution (1 mg/100 ml normal saline) and 100 ml of normal saline (placebo), were infused before and after the induction of anesthesia, respectively. The second group received placebo and vitamin B12 infusion before and after the induction of anesthesia, respectively. The third group received placebo infusions at both times. Homocysteine levels were measured before and 24 hours after the surgery. Results The mean homocysteine and vitamin B12 levels were significantly different within the three groups (p<0.001). In patients who had been infused with vitamin B12 before the surgery, homocysteine levels were significantly lower than the other two groups. In the placebo group, homocysteine levels significantly increased after the surgery. Conclusion Nitrous oxide causes hyperhomocysteinemia after general anesthesia. Since vitamin B12 infusion is a safe and inexpensive method to decrease homocysteine levels in these patients, it may be recommended for patients undergoing nitrous oxide anesthesia to be used before induction of anesthesia. PMID:24936269

  2. Hydrogen sulfide epigenetically attenuates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial toxicity mediated through NMDA receptor in mouse brain endothelial (bEnd3) cells†

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Pradip K.; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Suresh C.; Tyagi, Neetu

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have showed that homocysteine (Hcy) caused oxidative stress and altered mitochondrial function. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) has potent anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects. Therefore, in the present study we examined whether H2S ameliorates Hcy-induced mitochondrial toxicity which led to endothelial dysfunction in part, by epigenetic alterations in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3). The bEnd3 cells were exposed to 100μM Hcy treatment in the presence or absence of 30μM NaHS (donor of H2S) for 24hrs. Hcy-activate NMDA receptor and induced mitochondrial toxicity by increased levels of Ca2+, NADPH-oxidase-4 (NOX-4) expression, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and decreased the level of nitrate, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2) expression, mitochondria membrane potentials, ATP production. To confirm the role of epigenetic, 5′-azacitidine (an epigenetic modulator) treatment was given to the cells. Pretreatment with NaHS (30μM) attenuated the Hcy-induced increased expression of DNMT1, DNMT3a, Ca2+ and decreased expression of DNMT3b in bEND3 cells. Furthermore, NaHS treatment also enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress (NOX4, ROS, and NO) and restored ATP that indicates its protective effects against mitochondrial toxicity. Additional, NaHS significantly alleviated Hcy-induced LC3-I/II, CSE, Atg3/7 and low p62 expression which confirm its effect on mitophagy. Likewise, NaHS also restored level of eNOS, CD31, VE-Cadherin and ET-1 and maintains endothelial function in Hcy treated cells. Molecular inhibition of NMDA receptor by using small interfering RNA showed protective effect whereas inhibition of H2S production by propargylglycine (PG) (inhibitor of enzyme CSE) showed mitotoxic effect. Taken together, results demonstrate that, administration of H2S protected the cells from HHcy-induced mitochondrial toxicity and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25056869

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide Epigenetically Attenuates Homocysteine-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity Mediated Through NMDA Receptor in Mouse Brain Endothelial (bEnd3) Cells.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Suresh C; Tyagi, Neetu

    2015-02-01

    Previously we have shown that homocysteine (Hcy) caused oxidative stress and altered mitochondrial function. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has potent anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects. Therefore, in the present study we examined whether H2S ameliorates Hcy-induced mitochondrial toxicity which led to endothelial dysfunction in part, by epigenetic alterations in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3). The bEnd3 cells were exposed to 100 μM Hcy treatment in the presence or absence of 30 μM NaHS (donor of H2S) for 24 h. Hcy-activate NMDA receptor and induced mitochondrial toxicity by increased levels of Ca(2+), NADPH-oxidase-4 (NOX-4) expression, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and decreased the level of nitrate, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2) expression, mitochondria membrane potentials, ATP production. To confirm the role of epigenetic, 5'-azacitidine (an epigenetic modulator) treatment was given to the cells. Pretreatment with NaHS (30 μM) attenuated the Hcy-induced increased expression of DNMT1, DNMT3a, Ca(2+), and decreased expression of DNMT3b in bEND3 cells. Furthermore, NaHS treatment also mitigated mitochondrial oxidative stress (NOX4, ROS, and NO) and restored ATP that indicates its protective effects against mitochondrial toxicity. Additional, NaHS significantly alleviated Hcy-induced LC3-I/II, CSE, Atg3/7, and low p62 expression which confirm its effect on mitophagy. Likewise, NaHS also restored level of eNOS, CD31, VE-cadherin and ET-1 and maintains endothelial function in Hcy treated cells. Molecular inhibition of NMDA receptor by using small interfering RNA showed protective effect whereas inhibition of H2S production by propargylglycine (PG) (inhibitor of enzyme CSE) showed mitotoxic effect. Taken together, results demonstrate that, administration of H2S protected the cells from HHcy-induced mitochondrial toxicity and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25056869

  4. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M.; Lau, Dawn H.W.; Mórotz, Gábor M.; De Vos, Kurt J.; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies. PMID:26459111

  5. Alleviation of hepatic fat accumulation by betaine involves reduction of homocysteine via up-regulation of betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT).

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chul Won; Jun, Doo Sung; Na, Jong Deok; Choi, Yeo Jin; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-08-26

    We investigated the anti-lipogenic effect of betaine in rats fed methionine and choline-deficient diet (MCD). Intake of MCD for 3 wk resulted in a significant accumulation of hepatic lipids, which was prevented by betaine supplementation in drinking water (1%). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), and liver kinase B1 (LKB1) was inhibited by MCD intake, and these changes were all inhibited by betaine feeding. Meanwhile, betaine supplementation reversed the reduction of methionine and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and the elevation of homocysteine levels in the liver, which could be attributable to the induction of betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) and methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). Different cell lines were used to clarify the role of homocysteine on activation of the AMPK pathway. Homocysteine treatment decreased pAMPK, pACC, pSREBP-1c and pLKB1 in HepG2 cells. Metformin-induced activation of AMPK was also inhibited by homocysteine. Treatment with hydroxylamine, a cystathionine β-synthase inhibitor, resulted in a reduction of pAMPK, pACC and pSREBP-1c, accompanied by an elevation of intracellular homocysteine. Betaine treatment prevented the homocysteine-induced reduction of pAMPK, pACC, pSREBP-1c and pLKB1 in H4IIE cells, but not in HepG2 cells. Also the elevation of cellular homocysteine and inhibition of protein expression of BHMT were prevented by betaine only in H4IIE cells which express BHMT. The results suggest that the beneficial effect of betaine against hepatic lipid accumulation may be attributed, at least in part, to the depletion of homocysteine via up-regulation of BHMT in hepatocytes. PMID:27320863

  6. Toxic effects of mildly elevated homocysteine concentrations in neuronal-like cells.

    PubMed

    Currò, M; Gugliandolo, A; Gangemi, C; Risitano, R; Ientile, R; Caccamo, D

    2014-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence indicated that hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with neurodegeneration. However, homocysteine neurotoxic effects have been so far investigated mostly by employing homocysteine concentrations (≥100 µM) much higher than homocysteine mean plasma levels (20 µM) observed in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. While evaluating the effects of a prolonged exposure to ~20 µM homocysteine in neuronal-like differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, we observed a 35% loss of cell viability and a four-fold increase in reactive oxygen species levels in cells incubated with homocysteine for five days compared with controls. Moreover, homocysteine increased by 30% and around two-fold, respectively, the Comet-positive cell number and DNA damage indexes (tail length, T-DNA, olive tail moment) compared with controls. Cell response to homocysteine-induced DNA damage involved the up-regulation of Bax and, at a greater extent, Bcl-2, but not caspase-3, in association with a p53-independent increase of p21 levels; concomitantly, also p16 levels were increased. When looking at time-dependent changes in cyclin expression, we found that a significant up-regulation of cyclins D1, A1, E1, but not B1, concomitant with p21 down-regulation, occurred in cells incubated with homocysteine for three days. However, in line with the observed increase of p21 and p16 levels, a five days incubation with homocysteine induced cyclin down-regulation accompanied by a strong reduction of phosphorylated pRB amounts. These results suggest that, when prolonged, the exposure of neuronal-like cells to mildly elevated homocysteine concentrations triggers oxidative and genotoxic stress involving an early induction of cyclins, that is late repressed by G1-S check-point regulators. PMID:24867323

  7. Multipotent neurogenic fate of mesenchymal stem cell is determined by Cdk4-mediated hypophosphorylation of Smad-STAT3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Janet; Kang, Dongrim; Lee, Do-Hyeong; Kim, Yoon-Ja; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Dong-Ik; Lee, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) in complex with a corresponding cyclin plays a pivotal role in neurogenic differentiation. In particular, Cdk4 activity acts as a signaling switch to direct human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to neural transdifferentiation. However, the molecular evidence of how Cdk4 activity converts MSCs to neurogenic lineage remains unknown. Here, we found that Cdk4 inhibition in human MSCs enriches the populations of neural stem and progenitor pools rather than differentiated glial and neuronal cell pools. Interestingly, Cdk4 inhibition directly inactivates Smads and subsequently STAT3 signaling by hypophosphorylation, and both Cdk4 and Smads levels are linked during the processes of neural transdifferentiation and differentiation. In summary, our results provide novel molecular evidence in which Cdk4 inhibition leads to directing human MSCs to a multipotent neurogenic fate by inactivating Smads-STAT3 signaling. PMID:27192561

  8. Homocysteine and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2015-03-01

    The homocysteine theory of arteriosclerosis was discovered by study of arteriosclerotic plaques occurring in homocystinuria, a disease caused by deficiencies of cystathionine synthase, methionine synthase or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. According to the homocysteine theory, metabolic and nutritional abnormalities leading to elevation of plasma homocysteine cause atherosclerosis in the general population without these rare enzymatic abnormalities. Through studies of metabolism of homocysteine thiolactone, the anhydride of homocysteine, in cell cultures from homocystinuric children, the pathway for synthesis of sulfate was found to be dependent upon thioretinamide, the amide formed from retinoic acid and homocysteine thiolactone. Two molecules of thioretinamide form the complex thioretinaco with cobalamin, and oxidative phosphorylation is catalyzed by reduction of oxygen, which is bound to thioretinaco ozonide, by electrons from electron transport particles. Atherogenesis is attributed to formation of aggregates of homocysteinylated lipoproteins with microorganisms, which obstruct the vasa vasorum during formation of arterial vulnerable plaques. PMID:25653125

  9. Onsite naked eye determination of cysteine and homocysteine using quencher displacement-induced fluorescence recovery of the dual-emission hybrid probes with desired intensity ratio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kan; Qian, Jing; Jiang, Ding; Yang, Zhengting; Du, Xiaojiao; Wang, Kun

    2015-03-15

    Simple, inexpensive, portable sensing strategies for those clinically relevant molecules have attained a significant positive impact on the health care system. Herein, we have prepared a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescence probe with desired intensity ratio and demonstrated its efficiency for onsite naked eye determination of cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy). The hybrid probe has been designed by hybridizing two differently sized CdTe quantum dots (QDs), in which the red-emitting CdTe QDs (rQDs) entrapped in the silica sphere acting as the reference signal, and the green-emitting CdTe QDs (gQDs) covalently attached on the silica surface serving as the response signal. When 1,10-phenanthroline with strong coordination ability to Cd atoms in gQDs was introduced, the fluorescence of the gQDs was effectively quenched, while the fluorescence of the rQDs stayed constant. Upon exposure to different contents of Cys or Hcy, the fluorescence of gQDs can be recovered gradually due to the displacement of the quencher. Based on the background signal of rQDs, the variations of the sensing system display continuous fluorescence color changes from red to green, which can be easily observed by the naked eye. The assay requires ∼20min and has a detection limit of 2.5 and 1.7μM for Cys and Hcy, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this sensing scheme can be fully integrated in a filter paper-based assay, thus enabling a potential point-of-care application featuring easy operation, low power consumption, and low fabrication costs. PMID:25461142

  10. Homocysteine and cognitive function in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Angeles; Zanibbi, Katherine

    2004-10-12

    Dementia is highly prevalent among elderly people, and projections show that the number of people affected might triple over the next 50 years, mainly because of a large increase in the oldest-old segment of the population. Because of this and the disease's devastating effects, measures for the prevention and early detection of dementia are crucial. Age and years of education are among the most relevant risk factors for dementia, but in recent years the role of homocysteine has also been investigated. Homocysteine is an amino acid produced in the metabolism of methionine, a process dependent on the B vitamins cobalamin, vitamin B6 and folic acid. There is evidence that increased serum homocysteine levels are associated with declining cognitive function and dementia. We review this evidence in addition to the potential mechanisms through which homocysteine acts on the brain to cause cognitive dysfunction, the metabolism of homocysteine and factors associated with alteration of the normal metabolism. PMID:15477631

  11. The Effects of Acute Exercise and Exercise Training on Plasma Homocysteine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deminice, Rafael; Ribeiro, Diogo Farias; Frajacomo, Fernando Tadeu Trevisan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although studies have demonstrated that physical exercise alters homocysteine levels in the blood, meta-analyses of the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine blood concentration have not been performed, especially regarding the duration and intensity of exercise, which could affect homocysteine levels differently. Objective The aim of this meta-analysis was to ascertain the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine levels in the blood. Method A review was conducted according to the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses using the online databases PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and SciELO to identify relevant studies published through June 2015. Review Manager was used to calculate the effect size of acute exercise and exercise training using the change in Hcy plasmaserum concentration from baseline to post-acute exercise and trained vs. sedentary control groups, respectively. Weighted mean differences were calculated using random effect models. Results Given the abundance of studies, acute exercise trials were divided into two subgroups according to exercise volume and intensity, whereas the effects of exercise training were analyzed together. Overall, 22 studies with a total of 520 participants indicated increased plasma homocysteine concentration after acute exercise (1.18 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.71 to 1.65, p < .01). Results of a subgroup analysis indicated that either long-term exercise of low-to-moderate intensity (1.39 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.9 to 1.89, p < .01) or short-term exercise of high intensity (0.83 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.19 to 1.40, p < .01) elevated homocysteine levels in the blood. Increased homocysteine induced by exercise was significantly associated with volume of exercise, but not intensity. By contrast, resistance training reduced plasma homocysteine concentration (-1.53 μmol/L, 95% CI: -2.77 to -0.28, p = .02), though aerobic training did not. The cumulative

  12. Population PK/PD model of homocysteine concentrations after high-dose methotrexate treatment in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rühs, Hauke; Becker, Achim; Drescher, Anne; Panetta, John C; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V; Jaehde, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Elevated homocysteine concentrations have been associated with methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity. Based on methotrexate and homocysteine plasma concentrations of 494 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with high-dose methotrexate in the TOTAL XV study, a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was built with NONMEM. Several compartment and indirect response models were investigated. The pharmacokinetic disposition of methotrexate was best described by a two-compartment model. Homocysteine concentrations were included by an indirect response model where methotrexate inhibition of the homocysteine elimination rate was described by an E(max) model. The homocysteine baseline level was found to be age-dependent. Simulations revealed that folinate rescue therapy does not affect peak concentrations of homocysteine but leads to a modestly reduced homocysteine exposure. In conclusion, our PK/PD model describes the increase of methotrexate-induced HCY concentrations with satisfactory precision and can be applied to assess the effect of folinate regimens on the HCY concentration-time course. PMID:23049924

  13. Methyl Vitamin B12 but not methylfolate rescues a motor neuron-like cell line from homocysteine-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Hemendinger, Richelle A; Armstrong, Edward J; Brooks, Benjamin Rix

    2011-03-15

    Homocysteine is an excitatory amino acid implicated in multiple diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Information on the toxicity of homocysteine in motor neurons is limited and few studies have examined how this toxicity can be modulated. In NSC-34D cells (a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma), homocysteine induces apoptotic cell death in the millimolar range with a TC₅₀ (toxic concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is achieved) of 2.2 mM, confirmed by activation of caspase 3/7. Induction of apoptosis was independent of short-term reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Methyl Vitamin B12 (MeCbl) and methyl tetrahydrofolate (MTHF), used clinically to treat elevated homocysteine levels, were tested for their ability to reverse homocysteine-mediated motor neuron cell death. MeCbl in the micromolar range was able to provide neuroprotection (2 h pretreatment prior to homocysteine) and neurorescue (simultaneous exposure with homocysteine) against millimolar homocysteine with an IC₅₀ (concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is inhibited) of 0.6 μM and 0.4 μM, respectively. In contrast, MTHF (up to 10 μM) had no effect on homocysteine-mediated cell death. MeCbl inhibited caspase 3/7 activation by homocysteine in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas MTHF had no effect. We conclude that MeCbl is effective against homocysteine-induced cell death in motor neurons in a ROS-independent manner, via a reduction in caspase activation and apoptosis. MeCbl decreases Hcy induced motor neuron death in vitro in a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma and may play a role in the treatment of late stage ALS where HCy levels are increased in animal models of ALS. PMID:21237187

  14. Methyl Vitamin B12 but not methylfolate rescues a motor neuron-like cell line from homocysteine-mediated cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Hemendinger, Richelle A. Armstrong, Edward J.; Brooks, Benjamin Rix

    2011-03-15

    Homocysteine is an excitatory amino acid implicated in multiple diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Information on the toxicity of homocysteine in motor neurons is limited and few studies have examined how this toxicity can be modulated. In NSC-34D cells (a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma), homocysteine induces apoptotic cell death in the millimolar range with a TC{sub 50} (toxic concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is achieved) of 2.2 mM, confirmed by activation of caspase 3/7. Induction of apoptosis was independent of short-term reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Methyl Vitamin B12 (MeCbl) and methyl tetrahydrofolate (MTHF), used clinically to treat elevated homocysteine levels, were tested for their ability to reverse homocysteine-mediated motor neuron cell death. MeCbl in the micromolar range was able to provide neuroprotection (2 h pretreatment prior to homocysteine) and neurorescue (simultaneous exposure with homocysteine) against millimolar homocysteine with an IC{sub 50} (concentration at which 50% of maximal cell death is inhibited) of 0.6 {mu}M and 0.4 {mu}M, respectively. In contrast, MTHF (up to 10 {mu}M) had no effect on homocysteine-mediated cell death. MeCbl inhibited caspase 3/7 activation by homocysteine in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas MTHF had no effect. We conclude that MeCbl is effective against homocysteine-induced cell death in motor neurons in a ROS-independent manner, via a reduction in caspase activation and apoptosis. MeCbl decreases Hcy induced motor neuron death in vitro in a hybrid cell line derived from motor neuron-neuroblastoma and may play a role in the treatment of late stage ALS where HCy levels are increased in animal models of ALS.

  15. Homocysteine, Cortisol, Diabetes Mellitus, and Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Kontoangelos, K.; Papageorgiou, C. C.; Raptis, A. E.; Tsiotra, P.; Lambadiari, V.; Papadimitriou, G. N.; Rabavilas, A. D.; Dimitriadis, G.; Raptis, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study investigates the association of homocysteine and cortisol with psychological factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Method. Homocysteine, cortisol, and psychological variables were analyzed from 131 diabetic patients. Psychological factors were assessed with the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), Hostility and Direction of Hostility Questionnaire (HDHQ), the Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL 90-R), the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZDRS), and the Maudsley O-C Inventory Questionnaire (MOCI). Blood samples were taken by measuring homocysteine and cortisol in both subgroups during the initial phase of the study (T0). One year later (T1), the uncontrolled diabetic patients were reevaluated with the use of the same psychometric instruments and with an identical blood analysis. Results. The relation of psychoticism and homocysteine is positive among controlled diabetic patients (P value = 0.006 < 0.05) and negative among uncontrolled ones (P value = 0.137). Higher values of cortisol correspond to lower scores on extraversion subscale (rp = −0.223, P value = 0.010). Controlled diabetic patients showed a statistically significant negative relationship between homocysteine and the act-out hostility subscale (rsp = −0.247, P = 0.023). There is a statistically significant relationship between homocysteine and somatization (rsp = −0.220, P = 0.043). Conclusions. These findings support the notion that homocysteine and cortisol are related to trait and state psychological factors in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:25722989

  16. Homocysteine excess: delineating the possible mechanism of neurotoxicity and depression.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Pankaj; Singh, Nirmal

    2015-12-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a nonproteogenic sulfur containing amino acid derived from dietary methionine through demethylation. Homocysteine can be re-methylated to methionine [precursor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)] via the re-methylation or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate pathway or undergoes transsulfuration to form cysteine by the action of metabolic enzymes and cofactors. Impaired metabolism due to genetic alteration in metabolic enzymes (methionine synthase, methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), cystathionine β-synthase (CβS), and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CγL) or deficiency in cofactors (vitamin B6 , B12 , folate) may lead to acquired metabolic anomaly known as hyperhomocysteinemia. Hcy excess decreases the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent synthesis of catecholamines, viz. dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and noncatecholamine, viz. serotonin (5-HT), due to genetic alteration in key enzyme MTHFR in the homocysteine metabolism pathway that leads to depression. Thus, hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy)-induced SAM level is influenced by the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) MTHFR C677T. Furthermore, HHcy leads to production of precarious neurotoxic product homocysteic acid (HCA) and cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA) which acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist and has neurotoxic effects on dopaminergic neurons. In the current review, an attempt has been made to discuss the neurotoxic effects of HHcy in the pathogenesis of depression. PMID:26376956

  17. Detection of Homocysteine and Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weihua; Xu, Xiangyang; Kim, Kyu Kwang; Escobedo, Jorge O.; Fakayode, Sayo O.; Fletcher, Kristin A.; Lowry, Mark; Schowalter, Corin M.; Lawrence, Candace M.; Fronczek, Frank R.; Warner, Isiah M.

    2012-01-01

    At elevated levels, homocysteine (Hcy, 1) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, neural tube defects, and osteoporosis. Both 1 and cysteine (Cys, 3) are linked to neurotoxicity. The biochemical mechanisms by which 1 and 3 are involved in disease states are relatively unclear. Herein, we describe simple methods for detecting either Hcy or Cys in the visible spectral region with the highest selectivity reported to date without using biochemical techniques or preparative separations. Simple methods and readily available reagents allow for the detection of Cys and Hcy in the range of their physiologically relevant levels. New HPLC postcolumn detection methods for biological thiols are reported. The potential biomedical relevance of the chemical mechanisms involved in the detection of 1 is described. PMID:16277539

  18. Homocysteine levels in acromegaly patients.

    PubMed

    Hekimsoy, Zeliha; Ozmen, Bilgin; Ulusoy, Sadik

    2005-12-01

    Acromegaly is associated with a two to three-fold increase in mortality related predominantly to cardiovascular disease. The excess mortality is associated most closely with higher levels of growth hormone (GH). Survival in acromegaly may be normalized to a control age-matched rate by controlling GH levels; in particular, GH levels less than 2.5 ng/mL are associated with survival rates equal to those of the general population. Hyperhomocysteinemia has also been recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, yet there are limited data on the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with acromegaly. Eighteen acromegaly patients (7 male, 11 female, mean age 42.8 +/- 11.0 years) in our endocrine clinic consented to having the following tests performed: complete blood count (CBC), thyroid hormones, folic acid, vitamin B12, plasma homocysteine levels, uric acid, fibrinogen, CRP, fasting glucose, insulin, C-peptide, total serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, GH, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and GH levels after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). By history, fourteen had macroadenomas and four had microadenomas; eight had hypertension; two had glucose intolerance, and four had diabetes. Fifteen had had transsphenoidal or transfrontal surgery: two had been cured, but 13 others were taking long-acting octreotide. Five patients had undergone radiotherapy and the acromegaly in two was treated primarily with long-acting octreotide. CBC, thyroid hormone, folic acid, and vit B12 levels were normal in all patients. We divided the patients into two groups according to mean GH levels after an OGTT: Group 1 (GH<2.5 ng/mL, n=10), and Group 2 (GH<2.5 ng/mL, n=8). Comparison of the two groups using Mann-Whitney U testing revealed statistically significant lower levels in Group 1 of the following parameters: GH (1.91 +/- 0.90 vs. 8.58 +/- 5.55 ng/mL, p=0.002), IGF-1 (338.30 +/- 217.90 vs. 509.60 +/- 293.58 ng/dL, p=0.06), GH after

  19. Reversal by Growth Hormone of Homocysteine-induced Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition through Membrane Raft-Redox Signaling in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cai-Xia; Xia, Min; Han, Wei-Qing; Li, Xiao-Xue; Zhang, Chun; Boini, Krishna M.; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Li, Pin-Lan

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is an important pathogenic mechanism mediating glomerular injury or sclerosis in a variety of renal and systemic diseases such as hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys). The present study was designed to test whether Hcys-induced EMT in podocytes is reversed by growth hormone (GH), a hormone regulating cell differentiation and growth and to explore the cellular and molecular mechanism mediating its action. It was found that Hcys induced significant EMT in podocytes, as shown by marked decreases in slit diaphragm-associated protein P-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 as epithelial markers and by dramatic increases in the expression of mesenchymal markers, fibroblast specific protein-1 and α-smooth muscle actin, which were detected by all examinations via immunocytochemistry, real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. When podocytes were treated with GH at 25 ng/mL, however, Hcys failed to induce podocyte EMT. Using electromagnetic spin resonance spectrometry, Hcys-induced superoxide (O2.−) production via NADPH oxidase was found to be significantly inhibited by GH (66%). Functionally, GH was shown to substantially inhibit Hcys-induced increases in the permeability of podocyte monolayers and to block the decrease in podocin expression in these cells. In addition, NADPH oxidase subunit, gp91phox and GH receptors aggregated in membrane raft clusters, which produced O2.− in response to Hcys and could be blocked by GH, membrane raft disruptors filipin and MCD or NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin. It is concluded that Hcys-induced podocyte EMT is associated with transmembrane membrane raft-redox signaling and that GH reverses this Hcys-induced EMT protecting podocytes from functional disturbance. PMID:21691087

  20. Interactions Between Nuclear receptor SHP and FOXA1 Maintain Oscillatory Homocysteine Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Lee, Sangmin; Renga, Barbara; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Yang, Zhihong; Orena, Stephen J.; Goedken, Michael J.; Zhang, Yuxia; Kong, B; Lebofsky, Margitta; Rudraiah, Swetha; Smalling, Rana; Guo, Grace; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zeisel, Steven H.; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Hyperhomocysteinemia is often associated with liver and metabolic diseases. We studied nuclear receptors that mediate oscillatory control of homocysteine homeostasis in mice. METHODS We studied mice with disruptions in Nr0b2 (called SHP-null mice) Bhmt, or both genes (BHMT-null/SHP-null mice), along with mice with wild-type copies of these genes (controls). Hyperhomocysteinemia was induced by feeding mice alcohol (the NIAAA binge model) or chow diets along with water containing 0.18% DL-homocysteine. Some mice were placed on diets containing cholic acid (1%) or cholestyramine (2%), or high-fat diets (60%). Serum and livers were collected over a 24 hr light–dark cycle and analyzed by RNA-seq, metabolomic, and quantitative PCR, immunoblot, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. RESULTS SHP-null mice had altered timing in expression of genes that regulate homocysteine metabolism, compared with control mice. Oscillatory production of S-adenosylmethionine, betaine, choline, phosphocholine, glyceophosphocholine, cystathionine, cysteine, hydrogen sulfide, glutathione disulfide, and glutathione, differed between SHP-null mice and control mice. SHP inhibited transcriptional activation of Bhmt and Cth by FOXA1. Expression of Bhmt and Cth was decreased when mice were fed cholic acid but increased when they were placed on diets containing cholestyramine or high-fat content. Diets containing ethanol or homocysteine induced hyperhomocysteinemia and glucose intolerance in control but not SHP-null mice. In BHMT-null and BHMT-null/SHP-null mice fed a control liquid, lipid vacuoles were observed in livers. Ethanol feeding induced accumulation of macrovesicular lipid vacuoles to the greatest extent in BHMT-null and BHMT-null/SHP-null mice. CONCLUSIONS Disruption of Shp in mice alters timing of expression of genes that regulate homocysteine metabolism and the liver responses to ethanol and homocysteine. SHP inhibits the transcriptional activation of Bhmt and Cth

  1. Liver-X-receptor activator prevents homocysteine-induced production of IgG antibodies from murine B lymphocytes via the ROS-NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Lina; Zhang, Zhenmin; Li Wenjing; Dai Jing; Guan Youfei; Wang Xian . E-mail: xwang@bjmu.edu.cn

    2007-06-08

    Our previous study showed that homosysteine (Hcy) promotes proliferation of mouse splenic B lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated whether Hcy could stimulate the production of IgG antibodies. Hcy significantly increased the production of IgG antibodies from resting B lymphocytes. B lymphocytes from ApoE-knockout mice with hyperhomocysteinemia showed elevated IgG secretion at either the basal Hcy level or in response to lipopolysaccharide. Hcy promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and free radical scavengers, MnTMPyP decreased Hcy-induced IgG secretion. The inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B (MG132) also significantly reduced Hcy-induced IgG secretion. Furthermore, Hcy-induced formation of ROS, activation of NF-{kappa}B, and secretion of IgG could be inhibited by the liver-X-receptor (LXR) agonist TO 901317. Thus, our data provide strong evidence that HHcy induces IgG production from murine splenic B lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism might be through the ROS-NF-{kappa}B pathway and can be attenuated by the activation of LXR.

  2. Hypophosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 is a molecular mechanism underlying ischemic tolerance induced by either hibernation or preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Shin-ichi; Wakita, Hideaki; Bernstock, Joshua D; Castri, Paola; Ruetzler, Christl; Miyake, Junko; Lee, Yang-Ja; Hallenbeck, John M

    2015-12-01

    Thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) have an extraordinary capacity to withstand prolonged and profound reductions in blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain without incurring any cellular damage. As such, the hibernation torpor of I. tridecemlineatus provides a valuable model of tolerance to ischemic stress. Herein, we report that during hibernation torpor, a marked reduction in the phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) occurs within the brains of I. tridecemlineatus. Of note, rpS6 phosphorylation was shown to increase in the brains of rats that underwent an occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. However, such an increase was attenuated after the implementation of an ischemic preconditioning paradigm. In addition, cultured cortical neurons treated with the rpS6 kinase (S6K) inhibitors, D-glucosamine or PF4708671, displayed a decrease in rpS6 phosphorylation and a subsequent increase in tolerance to oxygen/glucose deprivation, an in vitro model of ischemic stroke. Collectively, such evidence suggests that the down-regulation of rpS6 signal transduction may account for a substantial part of the observed increase in cellular tolerance to brain ischemia that occurs during hibernation torpor and after ischemic preconditioning. Further identification and characterization of the mechanisms used by hibernating species to increase ischemic tolerance may eventually clarify how the loss of homeostatic control that occurs during and after cerebral ischemia in the clinic can ultimately be minimized and/or prevented. Mammalian hibernation provides a valuable model of tolerance to ischemic stress. Herein, we demonstrate that marked reductions in the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), extracellular signal-regulated kinase family of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase p44/42 (p44/42MAPK) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) occur within the brains of both hibernating squirrels and rats, which have undergone an ischemic preconditioning paradigm. We therefore propose that the down-regulation of rpS6 signal transduction may account for a substantial part of the observed increase in cellular tolerance to brain ischemia that occurs during hibernation torpor and after ischemic preconditioning, via a suppression of protein synthesis and/or energy consumption. PMID:26375300

  3. The determination of homocysteine-thiolactone in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2002-09-01

    Homocysteine-thiolactone, a cyclic thioester of homocysteine, is synthesized by methionyl-tRNA synthetase in all cell types. A new assay for the determination of homocysteine-thiolactone in biological samples is described. The assay involves separation of homocysteine-thiolactone from macromolecules by ultrafiltration. Homocysteine-thiolactone is further purified and quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography either on a reverse phase or a cation exchange micro-bore column. The detection and quantitation are obtained by monitoring the absorbance at 240 nm, a maximum in a UV spectrum of homocysteine-thiolactone. The sensitivity of detection is 5 pmol. This assay has been applied to bacteria (Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis), the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cultured human vascular endothelial cells, and human plasma. The data support the conclusion that homocysteine-thiolactone is a ubiquitous metabolite whose levels are directly related to homocysteine levels. PMID:12234471

  4. Homocysteine provokes leukocyte-endothelium interaction by downregulation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Pruefer, D; Scalia, R; Lefer, A M

    1999-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that chronic hyperhomocysteinemia, which is found in from 9 to 15% of the general population, is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. We sought to elucidate the mechanism by which exposure of the vascular wall to high levels of homocysteine initiates this inflammatory reaction. We examined the acute effect of homocysteine on endothelial dysfunction in isolated rat arteries and on microcirculatory leukocyte-endothelium interaction in vivo. Intravital microscopy of rat mesenteric venules was performed by superfusing the mesentery with increasing concentrations of homocysteine (1-5 mmol/l). There was a significant concentration- and time-dependent increase in leukocyte rolling, adherence, and extravasation compared with control rats superfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution (p < 0.01). Moreover, immunohistochemical staining demonstrated significantly increased P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on intestinal venules after homocysteine superfusion. In contrast, mesenteric superfusion with the nitric oxide donor 4-hydroxymethyl-furazan-3-carboxylic acid oxide (CAS1609, 1 micromol/l) significantly attenuated homocysteine-induced leukocyte rolling, adherence, and transmigration to control levels (p < 0.01). CAS1609 also attenuated both P-selectin and ICAM-1 expression on mesenteric venules and decreased CD18 expression on isolated leukocytes. Superior mesenteric arteries incubated with 5 mmol/l homocysteine developed significant (p < 0.01) endothelial dysfunction (i.e., impaired relaxation to endothelium-dependent dilators). Acute hyperhomocysteinemia induces endothelial dysfunction, characterized by a loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, leading to an inflammatory state. This state results in increased leukocyte rolling, adherence, and transmigration by upregulation of cell adhesion molecules. Our data suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia inhibits the important homeostatic role of

  5. Alcohol consumption and plasma homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Sakuta, Hidenari; Suzuki, Takashi

    2005-10-01

    A few reports show that consumption of spirits and of wine correlate with elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy), which is associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. We analyzed the relation between tHcy and current daily ethanol consumption cross-sectionally in middle-aged Japanese men (n = 974, age 51-59 years). Plasma tHcy was positively associated with consumption of whiskey but not with consumption of shochu (Japanese spirits), sake, beer, or wine. Odds ratios of an increase in daily intake of 30 ml ethanol (approximately 1 standard deviation) for hyperhomocysteinemia (>14.0 micromol/l) were 2.58 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-5.14) for whiskey, 1.08 (0.78-1.50) for shochu, 0.99 (0.59-1.66) for sake, 0.98 (0.58-1.63) for beer, and 1.70 (0.31-9.50) for wine in a multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for the daily number of cigarettes smoked, physical activity, vegetable consumption, and serum creatinine levels. After inclusion of plasma folate and vitamin B12 in the multivariate analysis model, the association between whiskey ethanol consumption and hyperhomocysteinemia remained significant with odds ratio of 2.79 (1.36-5.72). These results suggest that whiskey consumption correlates with hyperhomocysteinemia independently of plasma folate or vitamin B12 or lifestyle factors in the population studied. PMID:16584970

  6. Homocysteine and arterial thrombosis: Challenge and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, Matteo N D; Tremoli, Elena; Coppola, Antonio; Lupoli, Roberta; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The correlation between homocysteine and vascular disease has been assessed in several clinical studies that demonstrated that elevation of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) was an independent risk factor for atheriosclerotic disease. Major advances of homocysteine metabolism disorders have been made during the last few years, encompassing the rare homozygous enzyme deficiencies, as well as more common milder abnormalities. In experimental and clinical studies, a homocysteine-mediated oxidant stress has been shown to trigger platelet activation, in turn leading to a tendency to thrombosis, in patients with severe hyperhomocysteinaemia. Likewise, the hypomethylation hypothesis on acquired hyperhomocysteinaemia (chronic renal disease) and the interrelationship between hyperhomocysteinaemia and impaired fibrinolysis, have added further biological plausibility to the role for hyperhomocysteinaemia in vascular medicine. However, whether hyperhomocysteinaemia is causal or a marker of vascular disease, and whether plasma tHcy is only an indicator of the metabolic status remains to be clarified. The role of the intake of some vitamins (folic acid, vit.B12, vit.B6) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) is poorly understood: in spite of the lowering of homocysteine (Hcy) levels, vitamin supplementation failed to exert significant effects on cardiovascular risk. On the other hand, although some lipid-modifying treatments increase Hcy levels in diabetics, there is no evidence that this attenuates the beneficial effects of such treatments on the cardiovascular risk. Because of these uncertainties in the area, the data available do not provide support for routine screening and treatment for elevated Hcy to prevent CVD. PMID:20352150

  7. [Mechanisms that protect against homocysteine toxicity].

    PubMed

    Zimny, Jarosław

    2008-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) in human tissues have been correlated with some diseases, such as cardio-vascular, neurodegenerative, and kidney disorders. Hcy occurs in human blood in several forms. The most reactive is homocysteine thiolactone (HcyTl). It spontaneously homocysteinylates proteins impairing their functions. As has been evidenced recently, organisms developed protective mechanisms against the HcyTl toxicity. The first mechanism discovered was the calcium-dependent enzyme occurring in mammalian sera, known till then as paraoxonase, which hydrolyzes HcyTl to Hcy. Chronologically second mechanism discovered was urinary excretion of HcyTl. The third protective mechanism is the HcyTl hydrolysis catalyzed by intracellular enzyme known as bleomycin hydrolase. This review outlines current knowledge of the Hcy toxicity and of the three aforementioned protective mechanisms, emphasizing the role of bleomycin hydrolase/ homocysteine-thiolactonase. PMID:18610586

  8. Homocysteine thiolactone affects protein ubiquitination in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bretes, Ewa; Zimny, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    The formation of homocysteine thiolactone (HcyTl) from homocysteine occurs in all examined so far organisms including bacteria, yeast, and humans. Protein N-homocysteinylation at the ε-amino group of lysine is an adverse result of HcyTl accumulation. Since tagging of proteins by ubiquitination before their proteasomal degradation takes place at the same residue, we wondered how N-homocysteinylation may affect the ubiquitination of proteins. We used different yeast strains carrying mutations in genes involved in the homocysteine metabolism. We found positive correlation between the concentration of endogenous HcyTl and the concentration of ubiquitinated proteins. This suggests that N-homocysteinylation of proteins apparently does not preclude but rather promotes their decomposition. PMID:24051443

  9. Plasma homocysteine levels in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Turgan, N; Boydak, B; Habif, S; Apakkan, S; Ozmen, D; Mutaf, I; Bayindir, O

    1999-11-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is currently regarded as an independent and modifiable risk factor for ischemic vascular diseases and thrombosis. We measured fasting plasma total homocysteine levels by HPLC with fluorescence detection in 30 patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes and 30 age and sex-matched control subjects. Demographic data, classical risk factors (systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, smoking, ethanol intake, family history of ischaemic heart disease) and life-style habits were recorded. Lipid fractions including total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio, serum creatinine, LDL-cholesterol and vitamins involved in the metabolism of homocysteine, folic acid and vitamin B12 were also assessed. Total fasting homocysteine concentrations were significantly higher in the patient group (12.2 +/- 1.01 micromol/l) than in the control subjects (7.05 +/- 0.36 micromol/l; p < 0.0001). Homocysteine correlated positively with age (r = 0.617; p < 0.01) and serum creatinine (r = 0.457; p < 0.01) in the patient group. Hyperhomocysteinemia was not associated with vitamin B12 or folate deficiency states. Vitamin B12 concentration was 273 +/- 16.4 ng/l in the control group and 284.3 +/- 32.2 ng/l in the patient group (p = NS). Serum folate concentration also was not significantly different between controls and patients; 7.57 +/- 0.58 microg/l and 8.05 +/- 0.72 microg/l, respectively. Since no significant difference was observed in the lipid parameters between patients and controls, the hyperhomocysteinemia in the patient group supports the view that homocysteine is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Our results strongly suggest that elevated homocysteine levels are among the interacting factors in the complex, multifactorial pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease. PMID:10737556

  10. Soy extract has different effects compared with the isolated isoflavones on the proteome of homocysteine-stressed endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Dagmar; Dirscherl, Barbara; Schroot, Joyce H; Daniel, Hannelore; Wenzel, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that soy consumption may provide a protection in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. It is under debate, however, whether the soy isoflavones or other compounds are the "active principle". As apoptosis is a driving force in the process of atherosclerosis, we tested whether a soy extract or a combination of the two predominant isoflavones genistein and daidzein, in concentrations as found in the extract, exert similar or different effects on apoptosis in EA.hy 926 endothelial cells after exposure to the endothelial stressor homocysteine. Plasma membrane disintegration and nuclear fragmentation served as relevant apoptosis markers. To assess whether the extract and the genistein/daidzein mixture differently affect cellular target proteins changed in amount by homocysteine treatment, proteome analysis was performed by two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting of regulated protein spots. Homocysteine induced apoptosis in the cells, and both extract and genistein/daidzein inhibited apoptosis to a comparable extent. Whereas the extract prevented for 10 proteins the changes in expression levels as caused by homocysteine, the genistein/daidzein mixture reversed the homocysteine effects on the proteome for 13 proteins. The cytoskeletal protein matrin 3 and a U5 snRNP-specific 40-kDa protein were the only protein entities where both extract and genistein/daidzein reversed the homocysteine-induced changes in a common way. In conclusion, our studies provide evidence that an isoflavone containing soy extract and isolated isoflavones, despite similar effects on inhibition of homocysteine-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells, affect a quite different spectrum of cellular target proteins. PMID:16502433

  11. Constitutive hypophosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 and down-regulation of c-Jun in human gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Joe Yiu; Yu Le; Li Zhijie; Chu, Kent Man; Cho, C.H.

    2008-08-22

    Hyperphosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases-1/2 (ERK1/2) is known to promote cancer cell proliferation. We therefore investigated the constitutive phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and the expression of its downstream targets c-Fos, c-Jun, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in biopsied human gastric cancer tissues. Results showed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation and c-Jun expression were significantly lowered in gastric cancer compared with the non-cancer adjacent tissues. The expression of c-Fos, however, was not altered while COX-2 was significantly up-regulated. To conclude, we demonstrate that hypophosphorylation of ERK1/2 may occur in gastric cancer. Such discovery may have implication in the application of pathway-directed therapy for this malignant disease.

  12. Copper deficiency decreases plasma homocysteine in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of copper deficiency on key aspects of homocysteine metabolism that involve methionine recycling and transsulfuration. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN-93-G-based diets containing <1 or approximately 6 mg Cu/kg. After 6 wk (experim...

  13. Public health significance of elevated homocysteine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homocysteine is a sulfur amino acid whose metabolism stands at the intersection of two pathways: remethylation, which requires folic acid and vitamin B12 coenzymes; and transsulfuration, which requires pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, the vitamin B6 coenzyme. Data from a number of laboratories suggest that m...

  14. The determination of homocysteine-thiolactone in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Chwatko, Grazyna; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2005-02-15

    The thioester homocysteine-thiolactone, a reactive metabolite of homocysteine, has been implicated in human cardiovascular disease. However, data on the levels of homocysteine-thiolactone in humans are limited, mostly due to a lack of facile and reliable assays. Here we describe a sensitive assay for the determination of plasma homocysteine-thiolactone and demonstrate its utility with a cohort of 60 healthy human subjects. Plasma homocysteine-thiolactone is first separated from macromolecules by ultrafiltration and then selectively extracted with chloroform/methanol. Further purification of plasma homocysteine-thiolactone is achieved by high-performance liquid chromatography on a cation exchange microbore column. The detection and quantification is by monitoring fluorescence after postcolumn derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde. The limit of detection is 0.36 nM. Using this assay, homocysteine-thiolactone concentrations in plasma from normal healthy human subjects (n=60) were found to vary from zero to 34.8 nM, with an average of 2.82+/-6.13 nM. In 29 of the 60 human plasma samples analyzed, homocysteine-thiolactone levels were below the detection limit. Homocysteine-thiolactone represented from 0 to 0.28%, on average 0.023+/-0.05%, of plasma total homocysteine. PMID:15691507

  15. B Vitamins, Homocysteine and Bone Health

    PubMed Central

    Fratoni, Valentina; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition is one of the most important modifiable factors involved in the development and maintenance of good bone health. Calcium and Vitamin D have confirmed and established roles in the maintenance of proper bone health. However, other nutritional factors could also be implicated. This review will explore the emerging evidence of the supporting role of certain B Vitamins as modifiable factors associated with bone health. Individuals with high levels of homocysteine (hcy) exhibit reduced bone mineral density (BMD), alteration in microarchitecture and increased bone fragility. The pathophysiology caused by high serum homocysteine is not completely clear regarding fractures, but it may involve factors, such as bone mineral density, bone turnover, bone blood flow and collagen cross-linking. It is uncertain whether supplementation with B Vitamins, such as folate, Vitamin B1, and Vitamin B6, could decrease hip fracture incidence, but the results of further clinical trials should be awaited before a conclusion is drawn. PMID:25830943

  16. Homocysteine and Familial Longevity: The Leiden Longevity Study

    PubMed Central

    Wijsman, Carolien A.; van Heemst, Diana; Rozing, Maarten P.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Beekman, Marian; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Maier, Andrea B.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Blom, Henk J.; Mooijaart, Simon P.

    2011-01-01

    Homocysteine concentrations are a read-out of methionine metabolism and have been related to changes in lifespan in animal models. In humans, high homocysteine concentrations are an important predictor of age related disease. We aimed to explore the association of homocysteine with familial longevity by testing whether homocysteine is lower in individuals that are genetically enriched for longevity. We measured concentrations of total homocysteine in 1907 subjects from the Leiden Longevity Study consisting of 1309 offspring of nonagenarian siblings, who are enriched with familial factors promoting longevity, and 598 partners thereof as population controls. We found that homocysteine was related to age, creatinine, folate, vitamin B levels and medical history of hypertension and stroke in both groups (all p<0.001). However, levels of homocysteine did not differ between offspring enriched for longevity and their partners, and no differences in the age-related rise in homocysteine levels were found between groups (p for interaction 0.63). The results suggest that homocysteine metabolism is not likely to predict familial longevity. PMID:21408159

  17. Characterization of homocysteine metabolism in the rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    House, J D; Brosnan, M E; Brosnan, J T

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have provided strong evidence that an elevated plasma homocysteine concentration is an important independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have shown, in the rat, that the kidney is a major site for the removal and subsequent metabolism of plasma homocysteine [Bostom, Brosnan, Hall, Nadeau and Selhub (1995) Atherosclerosis 116, 59-62]. To characterize the role of the kidney in homocysteine metabolism further, we measured the disappearance of homocysteine in isolated renal cortical tubules of the rat. Renal tubules metabolized homocysteine primarily through the transulphuration pathway, producing cystathionine and cysteine (78% of homocysteine disappearance). Methionine production accounted for less than 2% of the disappearance of homocysteine. Cystathionine, and subsequently cysteine, production rates, as well as the rate of disappearance of homocysteine, were sensitive to the level of serine in the incubation medium, as increased serine concentrations permitted higher rates of cystathionine and cysteine production. On the basis of enrichment profiles of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase, in comparison with marker enzymes of known location, we concluded that cystathionine beta-synthase was enriched in the outer cortex, specifically in cells of the proximal convoluted tubule. Cystathionine gamma-lyase exhibited higher enrichment patterns in the inner cortex and outer medulla, with strong evidence of an enrichment in cells of the proximal straight tubule. These studies indicate that factors that influence the transulphuration of homocysteine may influence the renal clearance of this amino acid. PMID:9359866

  18. Preparation of CuO/ZnO nanocomposite and its application as a cysteine/homocysteine colorimetric and fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Šimšíková, Michaela; Čechal, Jan; Zorkovská, Anna; Antalík, Marián; Šikola, Tomáš

    2014-11-01

    Cysteine and homocysteine play a crucial role in many biological functions but abnormal levels of these amino acids may lead to various forms of pathogenesis. Therefore, selective and easy-to-use methods for the detection of cysteine and homocysteine are essential for the early diagnosis of developing diseases. In this paper we report on a rapid, straightforward and highly selective method for the detection of cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy) which uses a CuO/ZnO nanocomposite as a dual colorimetric and fluorometric assay. The presence of Cys and Hcy in a solution of these nanorods (NRs) induces a change in its color from light blue to dark grey which is visible to the naked eye. This is accompanied by a blue shift in the absorption spectra from 725 nm to 650 nm and a decrease in the intensity of CuO/ZnO nanocomposite emission. These changes are ascribed to the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(0), and the oxidation of cysteine (homocysteine) and subsequent formation of the disulfide bond. This novel assay method does not respond to any other amino-acid which is present in living organisms; therefore the selective determination of cysteine (homocysteine) with a lower analyte limit of 40 μM (4.8 μg mL(-1)) can be carried out in aqueous solutions without the need for any sophisticated instrumentation, fluorophore molecules or complicated procedures. PMID:25465753

  19. Homocysteine, B Vitamins, and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Smith, A David; Refsum, Helga

    2016-07-17

    Moderately elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) is a strong modifiable risk factor for vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Prospectively, elevated tHcy is associated with cognitive decline, white matter damage, brain atrophy, neurofibrillary tangles, and dementia. Most homocysteine-lowering trials with folate and vitamins B6 and/or B12 tested as protective agents against cognitive decline were poorly designed by including subjects unlikely to benefit during the trial period. In contrast, trials in high-risk subjects, which have taken into account the baseline B vitamin status, show a slowing of cognitive decline and of atrophy in critical brain regions, results that are consistent with modification of the Alzheimer's disease process. Homocysteine may interact with both risk factors and protective factors, thereby identifying people at risk but also providing potential strategies for early intervention. Public health steps to slow cognitive decline should be promoted in individuals who are at risk of dementia, and more trials are needed to see if simple interventions with nutrients can prevent progression to dementia. PMID:27431367

  20. HOMOCYSTEINE AND COGNITIVE DECLINE: EVIDENCE FROM POPULATION STUDIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated homocysteine has been associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unclear if observed associations are causal and, if so, what the mechanisms are. Because the effects of homocysteine on the vasculature that contribute to heart disease and stroke are a...

  1. Increased CSF Homocysteine in Pathological Gamblers Compared with Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordin, Conny; Sjodin, Ingemar

    2009-01-01

    Neurocognitive disturbances suggesting a frontal lobe dysfunction have been observed in pathological gamblers and alcohol dependents. Given that a high homocysteine level has been suggested to be a mediating factor in alcohol-related cognitive decline, we have determined homocysteine and cobalamine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 11…

  2. Genetic variation in homocysteine metabolism, cognition, and white matter lesions.

    PubMed

    de Lau, Lonneke M L; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Uitterlinden, André G; Smith, A David; Refsum, Helga; Johnston, Carole; Breteler, Monique M B

    2010-11-01

    Several studies have shown an association between homocysteine concentration and cognitive performance or cerebral white matter lesions. However, variations in genes encoding for enzymes and other proteins that play a role in homocysteine metabolism have hardly been evaluated in relation to these outcome measures. In the population-based Rotterdam Scan Study, we examined the association of seven polymorphisms of genes involved in homocysteine metabolism (MTHFR 677C>T, MTHFR 1298A>C, RFC 80G>A, TC 776C>G, MTR 2756A>G, MTRR 66A>G, and CBS 844ins68) with plasma total homocysteine, cognitive performance, and cerebral white matter lesions among 1011 non-demented elderly participants. Of all the studied polymorphisms, only MTHFR 677C>T was associated with homocysteine concentration. No significant relationship was observed for any of the polymorphisms with cognitive performance or severity of cerebral white matter lesions. PMID:19019492

  3. [Gastrointestinal disease with elevated plasma homocysteine level].

    PubMed

    Coll, P; Guttormsen, A B; Berstad, A

    1999-10-10

    Elevated plasma homocystein (tHcy) is a marker for functional deficiency of folate and/or cobalamin. Malabsorption of these vitamins occurs in various gastroenterologic diseases. A frequent mutation (C677T) in the gene coding for the enzyme methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is often associated with elevated values of tHcy. We have investigated 24 patients with tHcy > 40 mumol/l for gastrointestinal disease that can contribute to such elevation. Of these, 19 were homozygous for mutated MTHFR, four were heterozygous and one was normal. We found two cases of probable celiac disease, one case of Crohn's disease and one case of ulcerative colitis. These four were homozygous for the C667T mutation. Furthermore, we found eight persons who were anacidic; four homozygous, three heterozygous and one normal. All had gastritis histologically, six had serum gastrin > 50 pmol/l, and four were already on treatment with cobalamin injections. Helicobacter pylori-infection was found in nine out of 22 persons. Gastrointestinal disease occurs frequently in patients with tHcy > 40 mumol/l, but with the exception of conditions resulting in serious deficiency of cobalamin, these diseases alone do not seem sufficient to cause such high levels. We suggest that a reasonable approach to patients with homocystein values above 40 mumol/l is to exclude cobalamin deficiency, and that further investigations should be based upon thorough anamnesis and symptoms. PMID:10563175

  4. [Homocysteine--a routine biochemical parameter in cardiovascular diseases?].

    PubMed

    Gábor, D; Hrnciar, J; Hricová, I; Zacharová, M

    1999-01-01

    An elevated level of total homocysteine (tHcy) in blood-hyperhomocysteinemia, is prevalent and strong risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease in the coronary, cerebral and peripheral vessels and for thromboembolism (arterial and venous). Elevated total homocysteine confers a graded risk with no threshold, is independent of but may enhance the effect of conventional risk factors. Hyperhomocysteinemia seems to be a particularly strong predictor of cardiovaskular mortality. Supplementation with B-vitamins, in particular with folic acid, is an efficient, safe and inexpensive means to reduce an elevated total homocysteine level. PMID:10422525

  5. S-ALKYLATED HOMOCYSTEINE DERIVATIVES: NEW INHIBITORS OF HUMAN BETAINE-HOMOCYSTEINE S-METHYLTRANSFERASE

    PubMed Central

    Jiráček, Jiří; Collinsová, Michaela; Rosenberg, Ivan; Buděšínský, Miloš; Protivínská, Eva; Netušilová, Hana; Garrow, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    A series of S-alkylated derivatives of homocysteine were synthesized and characterized as inhibitors of human recombinant betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT). Some of these compounds inhibit BHMT with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. BHMT is very sensitive to the structure of substituents on the sulfur atom of homocysteine. The S-Carboxybutyl and S-carboxypentyl derivatives make the most potent inhibitors, and an additional sulfur atom in the alkyl chain is well tolerated. The respective (R,S)-5-(3-amino-3-carboxy-propylsulfanyl)-pentanoic, (R,S)-6-(3-amino-3-carboxy-propylsulfanyl)-hexanoic and (R,S)-2-amino-4-(2-carboxymethylsulfanyl-ethylsulfanyl)-butyric acids are very potent inhibitors and are the strongest ever reported. We determined that (R,S)-5-(3-amino-3-carboxy-propylsulfanyl)-pentanoic acid displays competitive inhibition with respect to betaine binding with a Kiapp of 12 nM. Some of these compounds are currently being tested in mice to study the influence of BHMT on the metabolism of sulfur amino acids in vivo. PMID:16789755

  6. Homocysteine and Cognitive Performance in Elders with Self-Neglect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, J.; Smith, S.M.; Aung, K.; Dyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine has been associated with altered cognitive performance in older adults. Elders referred to Adult Protective Services (APS) for self-neglect have been reported to have elevated plasma homocysteine levels and to suffer from cognitive impairment. This study assesses the association, if any, between plasma homocysteine and cognitive performance among elders with self-neglect. Methods: Sixty-five community-living adults, 65 years of age and older, reported to Adult Protective Services for self-neglect and 55 matched controls (matched for age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status) consented and participated in this study. The research team conducted in-home comprehensive geriatric assessments which included the mini-mental state exam (MMSE), the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS), the Wolf-Klein Clock Drawing Tests (CDT) and a comprehensive nutritional biochemistry panel, which included plasma homocysteine. Student s t tests and Pearson correlations were conducted to assess for bivariate associations. Results: Elders with self-neglect had significantly higher plasma homocysteine levels (M=12.68umol/L, sd=4.4) compared to the controls (M=10.40umol/L, sd=3.61;t=3.21, df=127, p=.002). There were no statistically significant associations between cognitive performance and plasma homocysteine in the self-neglect group, however there was a significant correlation between plasma homocysteine and the CDT among the controls (r=-.296, p=.022). Conclusion: Mean plasma homocysteine levels were significantly higher in elders with self-neglect, however, they do not appear to be related to cognitive performance, indicating that cognitive impairment in elder self-neglect involve mechanisms other than hyperhomocysteinemia. These findings warrant further investigation

  7. A Protein Extract from Chicken Reduces Plasma Homocysteine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lysne, Vegard; Bjørndal, Bodil; Vik, Rita; Nordrehaug, Jan Erik; Skorve, Jon; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf K.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate effects of a water-soluble protein fraction of chicken (CP), with a low methionine/glycine ratio, on plasma homocysteine and metabolites related to homocysteine metabolism. Male Wistar rats were fed either a control diet with 20% w/w casein as the protein source, or an experimental diet where 6, 14 or 20% w/w of the casein was replaced with the same amount of CP for four weeks. Rats fed CP had reduced plasma total homocysteine level and markedly increased levels of the choline pathway metabolites betaine, dimethylglycine, sarcosine, glycine and serine, as well as the transsulfuration pathway metabolites cystathionine and cysteine. Hepatic mRNA level of enzymes involved in homocysteine remethylation, methionine synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, were unchanged, whereas cystathionine gamma-lyase of the transsulfuration pathway was increased in the CP treated rats. Plasma concentrations of vitamin B2, folate, cobalamin, and the B-6 catabolite pyridoxic acid were increased in the 20% CP-treated rats. In conclusion, the CP diet was associated with lower plasma homocysteine concentration and higher levels of serine, choline oxidation and transsulfuration metabolites compared to a casein diet. The status of related B-vitamins was also affected by CP. PMID:26053618

  8. A Protein Extract from Chicken Reduces Plasma Homocysteine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lysne, Vegard; Bjørndal, Bodil; Vik, Rita; Nordrehaug, Jan Erik; Skorve, Jon; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf K

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate effects of a water-soluble protein fraction of chicken (CP), with a low methionine/glycine ratio, on plasma homocysteine and metabolites related to homocysteine metabolism. Male Wistar rats were fed either a control diet with 20% w/w casein as the protein source, or an experimental diet where 6, 14 or 20% w/w of the casein was replaced with the same amount of CP for four weeks. Rats fed CP had reduced plasma total homocysteine level and markedly increased levels of the choline pathway metabolites betaine, dimethylglycine, sarcosine, glycine and serine, as well as the transsulfuration pathway metabolites cystathionine and cysteine. Hepatic mRNA level of enzymes involved in homocysteine remethylation, methionine synthase and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, were unchanged, whereas cystathionine gamma-lyase of the transsulfuration pathway was increased in the CP treated rats. Plasma concentrations of vitamin B2, folate, cobalamin, and the B-6 catabolite pyridoxic acid were increased in the 20% CP-treated rats. In conclusion, the CP diet was associated with lower plasma homocysteine concentration and higher levels of serine, choline oxidation and transsulfuration metabolites compared to a casein diet. The status of related B-vitamins was also affected by CP. PMID:26053618

  9. Homocysteine and inflammation: predictors of cognitive decline in older persons?

    PubMed

    van den Kommer, T N; Dik, M G; Comijs, H C; Jonker, C; Deeg, D J H

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the association between homocysteine and 6-year cognitive decline, and the modifying role of the inflammatory markers Interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP) and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT). Data were collected within the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (ages >or=65 years) and analyzed using multiple longitudinal regression models (N=1257 of whom N=1076 had longitudinal data). Cognition was measured with the Mini-Mental State Examination (general cognition), Auditory Verbal Learning Test (memory), Coding Task (information processing speed) and Raven Coloured Progressive Matrices (fluid intelligence). Higher homocysteine at baseline was negatively associated with prolonged lower cognitive functioning and a faster rate of decline in information processing speed and fluid intelligence. The negative association between higher homocysteine and immediate recall was strongest in persons with a high level of IL-6. Only in the highest tertile of CRP, higher homocysteine was negatively associated with retention. In the middle tertile of ACT, higher homocysteine was associated with lower information processing speed and faster decline. Both in the lower and middle tertile of CRP, higher homocysteine was associated with a faster rate of decline in information processing speed. The results implicate that a combination of both risk factors may be used as a marker for cognitive impairment. PMID:19004529

  10. Homocysteine Levels in Parkinson's Disease: Is Entacapone Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Hayat; Comoglu, Selim Selcuk

    2016-01-01

    Plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels may increase in levodopa-treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) as a consequence of levodopa methylation via catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). Results from previous studies that assessed the effect of COMT inhibitors on levodopa-induced hyperhomocysteinemia are conflicting. We aimed to evaluate the effects of levodopa and entacapone on plasma Hcy levels. A hundred PD patients were enrolled to the study and divided into three treatment groups (group I: levodopa and/or dopamine agonists; group II: levodopa, entacapone, and/or a dopamine agonist; and group III: dopamine agonist alone). We measured the serum B12, folic acid, and Hcy levels in all patients. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of modified Hoehn and Yahr stages, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale II/III, Standardized Mini-Mental Test scores, and serum vitamin B12 and folic acid levels. Plasma median Hcy levels were found above the normal laboratory values in groups I and II, but they were normal in group III. However, there was no statistically significant difference in plasma Hcy levels between groups. Our results showed that levodopa treatment may cause a slight increase in the Hcy levels in PD compared with dopamine agonists and that COMT inhibitors may not have a significant effect on preventing hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:27493964

  11. Homocysteine lowering interventions for preventing cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan; Lathyris, Dimitrios; Salanti, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease such as coronary artery disease, stroke and congestive heart failure, is a leading cause of death worldwide. A postulated risk factor is elevated circulating total homocysteine (tHcy) levels which is influenced mainly by blood levels of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12), folic acid (vitamin B9) and pyridoxine (vitamin B6). There is uncertainty regarding the strength of association between tHcy and the risk of cardiovascular disease. Objectives To assess the clinical effectiveness of homocysteine-lowering interventions (HLI) in people with or without pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library (issue 3 2008), MEDLINE (1950 to August 2008), EMBASE (1988 to August 2008), and LILACS (1982 to September 2, 2008). We also searched in Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED; 1985 to August 2008), ISI Web of Science (1993 to August 2008), and the Cochrane Stroke Group Specialised Register (April 2007). We hand searched pertinent journals and the reference lists of included papers. We also contacted researchers in the field. There was no language restriction in the search. Selection criteria We included randomised clinical trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of HLI for preventing cardiovascular events with a follow-up period of 1 year or longer. We considered myocardial infarction and stroke as the primary outcomes. We excluded studies in patients with end-stage renal disease. Data collection and analysis We independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We estimated relative risks (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using I2. We used a random-effects model to synthesise the findings. Main results We included eight RCTs involving 24,210 participants with a low risk of bias in general terms. HLI did not reduce the risk of non-fatal or fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, or

  12. Involvement of homocysteine, homocysteine thiolactone, and paraoxonase type 1 (PON-1) in the etiology of defective human sperm function.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R J; Flanagan, H M; Connaughton, H; Whiting, S; Hedges, A; Baker, M A

    2016-03-01

    This study reports, for the first time, the significant (p ≤ 0.01) accumulation of homocysteine residues in low density, defective sperm suspensions isolated from patients attending an infertility clinic. This overabundance of homocysteine was not related to a deficiency in folate availability but may have been a reflection of the oxidative stress that characterizes such defective sperm populations. Direct addition of the homocysteine cyclic congener, homocysteine thiolactone, to human spermatozoa resulted in the rapid induction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (p < 0.001), the stimulation of lipid peroxidation (p < 0.01), the promotion of tyrosine phosphorylation (p < 0.001), and the suppression of sperm motility (p < 0.001) in the absence of any significant impact on DNA integrity. The parent homocysteine molecule was less active and took 24 h to stimulate mitochondrial ROS production possibly because of the need to convert this compound to the corresponding thiolactone before it could exert a measureable biological effect. Thiolactone was also effective in suppressing the carboxymethylation of key proteins in the sperm tail, which are thought to be involved in the regulation of sperm movement. The major enzyme responsible for removing thiolactone from proteins, paraoxonase (PON-1), was shown to be a major target for alkylation by lipid aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxynonenal, generated as a consequence of oxidative stress. Exposure of human spermatozoa to such aldehydes resulted in a dose-dependent accumulation of homocysteine in spermatozoa (p < 0.03). These results suggest that one of the consequences of oxidative stress in mammalian spermatozoa is the inhibition of PON-1, which then enhances the availability of homocysteine thiolactone to interact with the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues on sperm proteins, triggering a raft of significant biological changes in these cells that ultimately compromise sperm function. PMID:26825875

  13. Homocysteine, Iron and Cardiovascular Disease: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Baggott, Joseph E.; Tamura, Tsunenobu

    2015-01-01

    Elevated circulating total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations (hyperhomocysteinemia) have been regarded as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, several large clinical trials to correct hyperhomocysteinemia using B-vitamin supplements (particularly folic acid) have largely failed to reduce the risk of CVD. There is no doubt that a large segment of patients with CVD have hyperhomocysteinemia; therefore, it is reasonable to postulate that circulating tHcy concentrations are in part a surrogate marker for another, yet-to-be-identified risk factor(s) for CVD. We found that iron catalyzes the formation of Hcy from methionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine and cystathionine. Based on these findings, we propose that an elevated amount of non-protein-bound iron (free Fe) increases circulating tHcy. Free Fe catalyzes the formation of oxygen free radicals, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein is a well-established risk factor for vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our findings on iron-catalyzed formation of Hcy from thioethers as well as recent findings by other investigators on this issue. Collectively, these support our hypothesis that circulating tHcy is in part a surrogate marker for free Fe, which is one of the independent risk factors for CVD. PMID:25668155

  14. Gas-Phase Unimolecular Dissociation Reveals Dominant Base Property of Protonated Homocysteine Sulfinyl Radical Ions.

    PubMed

    Love-Nkansah, Chasity B; Tan, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2016-01-18

    Homocysteine sulfinyl radical ((SO⋅) Hcy) is a reactive intermediate involved during oxidative damage of DNA in the presence of high concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy). The short lifetime of (SO⋅) Hcy makes its preparation, isolation, and characterization challenging using traditional chemical measurement tools. Herein, we demonstrate the first study on mass-selected protonated (SO⋅) Hcy ions in the gas phase by investigating its unimolecular dissociation pathways from low energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), stable-isotope labeling, and theoretical calculations were employed to rationalize the observed fragmentation pathways. The dominant dissociation channel of protonated (SO⋅) Hcy was a charge-directed H2 O loss from the protonated sulfinyl radical (-SO⋅) moiety, forming a thiyl radical (-S⋅), which further triggered sequential radical-directed ⋅SH loss through multiple pathways. Compared to cysteine sulfinyl radical ((SO⋅) Cys), the small structural change induced by one additional methylene group in the side chain of (SO⋅) Hcy significantly promotes its base property while reducing the radical reactivity of sulfinyl radical. This observation provides new insight into studying reactions of (SO⋅) Hcy with biomolecules, which are critical in understanding toxicity induced by high levels of Hcy in biological conditions. PMID:26531146

  15. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and risk of CA...

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection, vitamin B12 and homocysteine. A review.

    PubMed

    Dierkes, Jutta; Ebert, Matthias; Malfertheiner, Peter; Luley, Claus

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that there is an association between Helicobacter pylori infection, reduced cobalamin absorption and cobalamin status and, consequently, elevated homocysteine levels. This would offer an explanation why H. pylori infection is associated with coronary heart disease. To date, more than 25 studies have been published that either deal with H. pylori infection and homocysteine, H. pylori infection and cobalamin status, or both. The design of these studies differs widely in terms of definition of H. pylori status, measuring cobalamin status, selection of study cohorts and geographical study areas. Therefore, results are fairly inconclusive at present and do not suggest a major role of H. pylori infection in the development of cobalamin deficiency and elevated homocysteine levels. PMID:14571097

  17. Embryonic exposures of lithium and homocysteine and folate protection affect lipid metabolism during mouse cardiogenesis and placentation.

    PubMed

    Han, Mingda; Evsikov, Alexei V; Zhang, Lifeng; Lastra-Vicente, Rosana; Linask, Kersti K

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic exposures can increase the risk of congenital cardiac birth defects and adult disease. The present study identifies the predominant pathways modulated by an acute embryonic mouse exposure during gastrulation to lithium or homocysteine that induces cardiac defects. High dose periconceptional folate supplementation normalized development. Microarray bioinformatic analysis of gene expression demonstrated that primarily lipid metabolism is altered after the acute exposures. The lipid-related modulation demonstrated a gender bias with male embryos showing greater number of lipid-related Gene Ontology biological processes altered than in female embryos. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated significant change of the fatty acid oxidation gene Acadm with homocysteine exposure primarily in male embryos than in female. The perturbations resulting from the exposures resulted in growth-restricted placentas with disorganized cellular lipid droplet distribution indicating lipids have a critical role in cardiac-placental abnormal development. High folate supplementation protected normal heart-placental function, gene expression and lipid localization. PMID:26993217

  18. Plasma homocysteine concentration changes after renal transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Aicha; Delvin, Edgar E; Genest, Jacques; Rozen, Rima; Lambert, Marie

    2002-07-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia, a risk factor for vascular disease, is found in children as well as in 80% of adult patients with end-stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in plasma homocysteine concentrations after renal transplantation (RT). Plasma homocysteine, vitamin B(12), and folate concentrations were prospectively measured in six patients at three points, before and post transplantation (6 months, 4 years), and compared with controls using standardized scores (Z score) for each of these parameters. Folic acid supplementation was introduced after the evaluation at 6 months. Patients had elevated median plasma homocysteine Z scores during dialysis (4.12). When assessed at 6 months and 4 years, median plasma homocysteine Z scores were, respectively, 2.35 and 0.29. Median folate Z scores were 1.89 during dialysis, -0.26 at 6 months, and 3.26 at 4 years post RT. Median vitamin B(12) Z score was 2.12 during dialysis, 0.58 at 6 months, and -0.07 at 4 years post RT. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) improved after RT, with median GFR of 84.5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) at 6 months. This stabilized to a value of 70.5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) at 4 years. When comparing values before and after RT at 6 months, changes were observed only for GFR ( P<0.03) and vitamin B(12) ( P<0.05). There were no changes in plasma homocysteine, folate, and serum albumin. At 4 years, a significant decrease in plasma homocysteine was observed ( P<0.05) with increased GFR ( P<0.03). No significant changes were observed in plasma albumin, folate, and vitamin B(12) concentrations. In conclusion, elevated plasma homocysteine in children during dialysis persists after RT despite a significant improvement in renal function. However, normalization was attained when patients were supplemented with folic acid. Further controlled studies are required to evaluate the determinants and treatment of elevated plasma homocysteine in pediatric transplant patients. PMID:12172766

  19. Homocysteine, B-vitamins and CVD.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Helene; Pentieva, Kristina; Hoey, Leane; Ward, Mary

    2008-05-01

    There is considerable interest in plasma homocysteine (tHcy) as a CVD risk factor. Although the secondary prevention trials published to date have been inconclusive in confirming a benefit of tHcy-lowering treatment with B-vitamins on CVD events generally, such studies are widely recognised to have been insufficiently powered to detect a significant effect for the predicted magnitude of association between tHcy and heart disease risk, and therefore cannot be interpreted as evidence that no relationship exists. In fact, a recent meta-analysis of clinical trials has confirmed that folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of stroke, particularly in individuals without a history of stroke. Evidence supporting a causal relationship between elevated tHcy and heart disease also comes from genetic studies. The most important genetic determinant of tHcy in the general population is the common C677T variant in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) that results in higher tHcy. Individuals with the homozygous mutant (TT) genotype have a significantly higher (14-21%) risk of heart disease. Plasma tHcy is very responsive to intervention with the B-vitamins required for its metabolism, in particular folic acid, and to a lesser extent vitamins B12 and B6. Thus, although primarily aimed at reducing neural-tube defects, folic acid fortification may have an important role in the primary prevention of CVD via tHcy lowering. Besides folate, riboflavin is required as a cofactor for MTHFR and enhanced riboflavin status results in a marked lowering in tHcy specifically in individuals with the TT genotype, presumably by neutralising the variant form of the enzyme. About 10% of the UK and Irish populations have the TT genotype. In the present paper the potential role of folate and related B-vitamins in the primary prevention of CVD and the implications for nutrition policy are explored. PMID:18412997

  20. Increased plasma homocysteine in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Bosy-Westphal, A; Petersen, S; Hinrichsen, H; Czech, N; J Müller, M

    2001-05-01

    Background: Homocysteine (Hcy), is an atherogenic and thrombogenic risk factor which has also been proposed to be involved in hepatic fibrinogenesis. Hcy metabolism, depends on the cofactors folate, vit. B12, and the vit. B6 vitamer pyridoxalphosphate (PLP). Metabolism of these vitamins is frequently disturbed in cirrhotics, but little is known about plasma Hcy levels in these patients. Methods: Plasma levels of Hcy, methionine, serine, cysteine, PLP, vit. B12 and folate, and standard clinical/biochemical parameters of liver disease were measured in 43 postabsorptive patients with biopsy proven cirrhosis of different origin. Results: 74% of the patients had elevated plasma Hcy levels defined as >13.4 µmol/l (mean+2SD of healthy age matched controls). Increased plasma Hcy concentrations were seen in alcoholic as well as in non-alcoholic cirrhosis. Excluding patients with impaired renal function (n=7), Hcy concentrations remained elevated in 69% of the patients. We found a high prevalence of pathological plasma vitamin concentrations of 33% for increased vit. B12 levels and 5% and 80% for decreased folate and vit. B6 levels, respectively. Mean plasma vitamin B12 concentrations increased, folate remained unchanged and PLP concentrations decreased with deteriorating liver function. Hcy concentrations were correlated with levels of creatinine (r=0.44, P<0.01), serine (r=-0.46, P<0.01), and cysteine (r=0.38, P<0.05), but showed no association with parameters of liver function and with plasma levels of folate, vit. B12 und vit. B6. This was contrary to data obtained in healthy individuals. In a stepwise multiple regression serine and cysteine best explained the variance in Hcy levels. Conclusions: Elevated basal Hcy-plasma levels are frequently seen cirrhotic patients. Variations of Hcy concentration in liver cirrhosis are not explained by plasma levels of cofactors of Hcy metabolism. PMID:11282484

  1. Effects of betaine intake on plasma homocysteine concentrations and consequences for health.

    PubMed

    Olthof, M R; Verhoef, P

    2005-02-01

    High plasma concentrations of homocysteine may increase risk of cardiovascular disease. Folic acid lowers plasma homocysteine by 25% maximally, because 5-methyltetrahydrofolate is a methyl donor in the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. Betaine (trimethylglycine) is also a methyl donor in homocysteine remethylation, but effects on homocysteine have been less thoroughly investigated. Betaine in high doses (6 g/d and higher) is used as homocysteine-lowering therapy for people with hyperhomocysteinemia due to inborn errors in the homocysteine metabolism. Betaine intake from foods is estimated at 0.5-2 g/d. Betaine can also be synthesized endogenously from its precursor choline. Studies in healthy volunteers with plasma homocysteine concentrations in the normal range show that betaine supplementation lowers plasma fasting homocysteine dose-dependently to up to 20% for a dose of 6 g/d of betaine. Moreover, betaine acutely reduces the increase in homocysteine after methionine loading by up to 50%, whereas folic acid has no effect. Betaine doses in the range of dietary intake also lower homocysteine. This implies that betaine can be an important food component that attenuates homocysteine rises after meals. If homocysteine plays a causal role in the development of cardiovascular disease, a diet rich in betaine or choline might benefit cardiovascular health through its homocysteine-lowering effects. However betaine and choline may adversely affect serum lipid concentrations, which can of course increase risk of cardiovascular disease. However, whether the potential beneficial health effects of betaine and choline outweigh the possible adverse effects on serum lipids is as yet unclear. PMID:15720203

  2. Folic acid and the methylation of homocysteine by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Salem, A. R.; Pattison, J. R.; Foster, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    1. Cell-free extracts of Bacillus subtilis synthesize methionine from serine and homocysteine without added folate. The endogenous folate may be replaced by tetrahydropteroyltriglutamate or an extract of heated Escherichia coli for the overall C1 transfer, but tetrahydropteroylmonoglutamate is relatively inactive. 2. Extracts of B. subtilis contain serine transhydroxymethylase and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, which are non-specific with respect to the glutamate content of the folate substrates. Methyl transfer to homocysteine requires a polyglutamate folate as methyl donor. These properties are not affected by growth of the organism with added vitamin B12. 3. The synthesis of methionine from 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate and homocysteine has the characteristics of the cobalamin-independent reaction of E. coli. No evidence for a cobalamin-dependent transmethylation was obtained. 4. S-Adenosylmethionine was not a significant precursor of the methyl group of methionine with cell-free extracts, neither was S-adenosylmethionine generated by methylation of S-adenosylhomocysteine by 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. 5. A procedure for the isolation and analysis of folic acid derivatives from natural sources is described. 6. The folates isolated from lysozyme extracts of B. subtilis are sensitive to folic acid conjugase. One has been identified as 5-formyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate; the other is possibly a diglutamate folate. 7. A sequence is proposed for methionine biosynthesis in B. subtilis in which methyl groups are generated from serine and transferred to homocysteine by means of a cobalamin-independent pathway mediated by conjugated folate coenzymes. PMID:4627401

  3. Homocysteine and disability in hospitalized geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Cossi, Stefania; De Martinis, Monica; Calabrese, Paolo A; Orini, Stefania; Grassi, Vittorio

    2004-08-01

    Elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations have been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease and dementia in old age. The present study was performed to identify the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and to analyze the association between tHcy concentration and sociodemographic characteristics, nutritional parameters, and cognitive and functional status in this sample of hospitalized geriatric patients. A total of 214 patients (77% females) 65+ years old admitted into an acute care geriatric ward of an internal medical department in the Northern Italy were studied. tHcy concentration was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-F). Information about nutrition (body mass index [BMI], serum albumin, cholesterol, and transferrin) was collected on admission. Functional status was investigated with the Basic Activities of Daily Living scale (ADL) and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale (IADL); cognitive and affective status were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Evaluation (MMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The mean tHcy concentration was 18.4 +/- 13.1 micromol/L; 74.2% of males and 68.9% of females had HHcy (> 12 micromol/L). Sixty-four percent of patients with normal serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations had HHcy. Elevated tHcy concentrations were associated with older age, male gender, increasing serum creatinine, lower MMSE score, and disability. The mean tHcy concentration depended on the occurrence of different diseases. Patients affected by atherosclerotic diseases, such as ischemic heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and dementia had higher mean tHcy concentration than those without diagnosed vascular diseases. In multivariate analysis, vitamin B12, folate, serum albumin, creatinine, and disability emerged as factors associated with tHcy, adjusted for age, gender, education, MMSE score, and atherosclerotic diseases. Our results suggest that the

  4. Biochemistry of homocysteine in health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, S; Sulochana, K N; Lakshmi, S; Selvi, R; Angayarkanni, N

    2006-10-01

    The amino acid homocysteine (Hcy), formed from methionine has profound importance in health and diseases. In normal circumstances, it is converted to cysteine and partly remethylated to methionine with the help of vit B12 and folate. However, when normal metabolism is disturbed, due to deficiency of cystathionine-beta-synthase, which requires vit B6 for activation, Hcy is accumulated in the blood with an increase of methionine, resulting into mental retardation (homocystinuria type I). A decrease of cysteine may cause eye diseases, due to decrease in the synthesis of glutathione (antioxidant). In homocystinurias type II, III and IV, there is accumulation of Hcy, but a decrease of methionine, thus, there is no mental retardation. Homocysteinemia is found in Marfan syndrome, some cases of type I diabetes and is also linked to smoking and has genetic basis too. In hyperhomocysteinemias (HHcys), clinical manifestations are mental retardation and seizures (type I only), ectopia lentis, secondary glaucoma, optic atrophy, retinal detachment, skeletal abnormalities, osteoporosis, vascular changes, neurological dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms. Thrombotic and cardiovascular diseases may also be encountered. The harmful effects of homocysteinemias are due to (i) production of oxidants (reactive oxygen species) generated during oxidation of Hcy to homocystine and disulphides in the blood. These could oxidize membrane lipids and proteins. (ii) Hcy can react with proteins with their thiols and form disulphides (thiolation), (iii) it can also be converted to highly reactive thiolactone which could react with the proteins forming -NH-CO- adducts, thus affecting the body proteins and enzymes. Homocystinuria type I is very rare (1 in 12 lakhs only) and is treated with supplementation of vit B6 and cystine. Others are more common and are treated with folate, vit B12 and in selected cases as in methionine synthase deficiency, methionine, avoiding excess. In this review, the role

  5. Homocysteine enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via ERK and Akt signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Yi Sle; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, Gyu Hee; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2012-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) at elevated levels is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hcy on the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in murine macrophages. Among the MMP known to regulate the activities of collagenase and gelatinase, Hcy exclusively increased the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 in J774A.1 cells as well as in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, this activity was found to be correlated with Western blot findings in J774A.1 cells, which showed that MMP-9 expression was concentration- and time-dependently increased by Hcy. Inhibition of the ERK and Akt pathways led to a significant decrease in Hcy-induced MMP-9 expression, and combined treatment with inhibitors of the ERK and Akt pathways showed an additive effects. Activity assays for ERK and Akt showed that Hcy increased the phosphorylation of both, but these phosphorylation were not affected by inhibitors of the Akt and ERK pathways. In line with these findings, the molecular inhibition of ERK and Akt using siRNA did not affect the Hcy-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages by separately activating the ERK and Akt signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Homocysteine (Hcy) induced MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. ► Hcy induced MMP-9 production through ERK and Akt signaling pathways. ► ERK and Akt signaling pathways were activated by Hcy in murine macrophages. ► ERK and Akt pathways were additively act on Hcy-induced MMP-9 production. ► Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in macrophages via activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways in an independent manner.

  6. Homocysteine Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Non Proliferative, Proliferative and without Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, Caterina; Giordano, Maria; Vacante, Marco; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio; Motta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine has been associated with extracellular matrix changes. The diabetic retinopathy is a neurovascular complication of diabetes mellitus and it is the leading cause of vision loss among working adults worldwide. In this study, we evaluate the role of homocysteine in diabetic retinopathy analyzing the plasma levels of homocysteine in 63 diabetic type 2 patients with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR), 62 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 50 healthy subjects used as control group, and 75 randomly selected patients. PMID:24877066

  7. Homocystein as a Risk Factor for Developing Complications in Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Biljana; Gasic, Branislav; Kovacevic, Pedja; Rajkovaca, Zvezdana; Kovacevic, Tijana

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Cardiovascular diseases are leading cause of death in patients with chronic renal failure. The aim of our study was to establish connection between levels of homocysteine and traditional and nontraditional risk factors for developing cardiovascular diseases in dialysis and pre dialysis patients. Methods: We included 33 pre dialysis (23 in stage three and 10 in stage four of chronic kidney disease) and 43 patients receiving hemodialysis longer than six months. Besides standard laboratory parameters, levels of homocysteine and blood pressure were measured in all patients. Glomerular filtration rate was measured in pre dialysis patients and dialysis quality parameters in dialysis patients. Results: Homocysteine levels were elevated in all patients (19±5.42mmol/l). The connection between homocysteine levels and other cardiovascular diseases risk factors was not established in pre dialysis patients. In patients treated with hemodialysis we found negative correlation between homocysteine levels and patients’ age (p<0.05) and positive correlation between homocysteine levels and length of dialysis (p<0.01) as well as between homocysteine and anemia parameters (erythrocytes, hemoglobin), (p<0.01). Homocysteine and LDL (and total cholesterol) were in negative correlation (p<0.01). Conclusion: Homocysteine, as one of nontraditional cardiovascular diseases risk factors, is elevated in all patients with chronic renal failure and it’s positive correlation with some other risk factors was found. PMID:26005384

  8. Adverse vascular effects of homocysteine are modulated by endothelium-derived relaxing factor and related oxides of nitrogen.

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, J S; Osborne, J A; Jaraki, O; Rabbani, L E; Mullins, M; Singel, D; Loscalzo, J

    1993-01-01

    Elevated levels of homocysteine are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The reactivity of the sulfhydryl group of homocysteine has been implicated in molecular mechanisms underlying this increased risk. There is also increasingly compelling evidence that thiols react in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) to form S-nitrosothiols, compounds with potent vasodilatory and antiplatelet effects. We, therefore, hypothesized that S-nitrosation of homocysteine would confer these beneficial bioactivities to the thiol, and at the same time attenuate its pathogenicity. We found that prolonged (> 3 h) exposure of endothelial cells to homocysteine results in impaired EDRF responses. By contrast, brief (15 min) exposure of endothelial cells, stimulated to secrete EDRF, to homocysteine results in the formation of S-NO-homocysteine, a potent antiplatelet agent and vasodilator. In contrast to homocysteine, S-NO-homocysteine does not support H2O2 generation and does not undergo conversion to homocysteine thiolactone, reaction products believed to contribute to endothelial toxicity. These results suggest that the normal endothelium modulates the potential, adverse effects of homocysteine by releasing EDRF and forming the adduct S-NO-homocysteine. The adverse vascular properties of homocysteine may result from an inability to sustain S-NO formation owing to a progressive imbalance between the production of NO by progressively dysfunctional endothelial cells and the levels of homocysteine. PMID:8380812

  9. Serum homocysteine level in vegetarians in District Tharparker, Sindh

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Aneel; Zuberi, Nudrat Anwar; Rathore, M. Imran; Baig, Mukhtiar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of present study was to investigate serum homocysteine levels in apparently healthy vegetarians and ominvores in Mithi, district Tharparker, Sindh, Pakistan. Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Biochemistry, Basic Medical Sciences Institute (BMSI), Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center (JPMC), Karachi and blood samples were collected from Mithi, district Tharparker, Sindh, Pakistan, in 2012. One hundred vegetarian and one hundred omnivores (age ranging from 20-40 years) were enrolled for this study. Serum homocysteine levels were measured by the chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay method. Results: Serum homocysteine (Hcy) level was considerably higher (p<0.001) in vegetarian group compared to omnivores. We further grouped and analyzed our study subjects according to their gender and according to Hcy level (greater than or lower than 15µmol/L). A considerable number of vegetarian subjects 30% were having Hcy >15µmol/L compared to omnivores 6%, (p<0.001). Gender-wise comparison showed that 27.02% male and 38.46% females had >15µmol/L serum Hcy level in vegetarian group and 6.9% male and 3.5% females had >15µmol/L serum Hcy level in omnivores group, but the difference was not significant in any group. Conclusion: Vegetarians are more prone to develop hyperhomocysteinemia, so they are at high risk to develop cardiovascular disease. PMID:25878628

  10. Relationship between paraoxonase and homocysteine: crossroads of oxidative diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an accepted independent risk factor for several major pathologies including cardiovascular disease, birth defects, osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease, and renal failure. Interestingly, many of the pathologies associated with homocysteine are also linked to oxidative stress. The enzyme paraoxonase (PON1) – so named because of its ability to hydrolyse the toxic metabolite of parathion, paraoxon – was also shown early after its identification to manifest arylesterase activity. Although the preferred endogenous substrate of PON1 remains unknown, lactones comprise one possible candidate class. Homocysteine-thiolactone can be disposed of by enzymatic hydrolysis by the serum Hcy-thiolactonase/paraoxonase carried on high-density lipoprotein (HDL). In this review, Hcy and the PON1 enzyme family were scrutinized from different points of view in the literature and the recent articles on these subjects were examined to determine whether these two molecular groups are related to each other like a coin with two different sides, so close and yet so different and so opposite. PMID:22457688

  11. Homocysteine, B vitamins, and the incidence of dementia and cognitive impairment: results from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Folic acid supplementation reduces homocysteine (HCY). Recent studies have linked elevated homocysteine (HCY) to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, cognitive decline and underlying brain pathology, independently of B vitamins. Objective: To evaluate the association betw...

  12. Plasma homocysteine concentration in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Lambert, M; Delvin, E E; Genest, J; Robitaille, P; Rozen, R

    2001-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia, a risk factor for vascular disease, is commonly found in adult patients with end-stage renal disease. Major determinants of elevated plasma homocysteine levels in these patients include deficiencies in folate and vitamin B12, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype and renal function. Little information is available for children with chronic renal failure (CRF). The prevalence and the factors that affect plasma homocysteine concentration were determined in children. Twenty-nine children with various degrees of CRF (15 were dialyzed, 14 were not dialyzed) were compared with 57 age- and sex-matched healthy children. Homocysteine concentrations were higher in patients than controls (17.3 micromol/l vs 6.8 micromol/l, P<0.0001) and hyperhomocysteinemia (>95th percentile for controls: 14.0 micromol/l) was seen in 62.0% of patients and 5.2% of controls. Folate concentrations were lower in patients (9.9 nmol/l) than controls (13.5 nmol/l), P<0.01. Vitamin B12 was similar in patients (322 pmol/l) and controls (284 pmol/l). Dialyzed patients have a higher prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia than nondialyzed patients (87% vs 35%). Dialyzed patients with MTHFR mutation have higher plasma homocysteine (28.5 micromol/l) than nondialyzed patients with the mutation (10.7 micromol/l), P<0.002. In our study, differences between controls and patients in plasma homocysteine concentrations are observed when age is greater then 92 months, folate less than 21.6 nmol/l and vitamin B12 less than 522 pmol/l. Our study shows that hyperhomocysteinemia is common in children with CRF and is associated with low folate and normal vitamin B12 status, compared to normal children. Among the patients, the dialyzed patients with the MTHFR mutation are particularly at risk for hyperhomocysteinemia. Further studies are needed to investigate therapeutic interventions and the potential link with vascular complications in these patients. PMID:11605787

  13. Plasma homocysteine levels in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chacko, K A

    1998-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is being identified as a risk factor for coronary heart disease but its role among Asian Indians has not been studied. This has practical importance because (1) the data generated in the West may not represent Indian population, and (2) the condition is remediable. To assess the magnitude of this problem, we studied 56 patients with coronary heart disease, and 53 control subjects. Details of diet, smoking, medication, hypertension and diabetes were recorded; lipids and sugar levels were estimated in all. Patients with renal and liver diseases were excluded. Serum homocysteine was estimated using liquid chromatography. Both the groups were comparable by age and sex. Higher, but statistically insignificant homocysteine levels were seen in patients with coronary heart disease: 10.98 +/- 9.04 nmol/ml vs 9.41 +/- 3.60 nmol/ml in control subjects. Among males, higher, but statistically insignificant levels were seen in coronary heart disease patients: 11.96 +/- 9.41 nmol/ml vs 9.87 +/- 3.50 nmol/ ml in control subjects; among females, the levels were lower though not significant: 5.10 +/- 1.64 nmol/ml vs 6.39 +/- 2.99 nmol/ml. Sub-group analysis with age 40 as dividing point did not show significant difference. Six (10.7%) patients with coronary heart disease and three (5.7%) control subjects had homocysteine levels above 95th percentile of control subjects (p = NS). Twenty-three (41.1%) coronary heart disease patients and 19 (35.9%) control subjects had levels above 10 nmol/ml (p = NS). We conclude that homocysteine is not a major risk factor for coronary heart disease in the study population. The lack of statistical significance could be due to inadequate sample size although some past studies reporting statistically significant association between coronary heart disease and homocysteine involved similar or smaller number of subjects. Larger studies are warranted to see if ethnic differences also have any role. PMID:9753851

  14. Are dietary choline and betaine intakes determinants of total homocysteine concentration?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated homocysteine concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and a decline in cognitive function. Intakes of choline and betaine, as methyl donors, may affect homocysteine concentrations. The objective was to examine whether choline and betaine intakes, assess...

  15. GNMT expression increases hepatic folate contents and folate-dependent methionine synthase-mediated homocysteine remethylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Yan-Jun; Liu, Shih-Ping; Chiang, En-Pei Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is a major hepatic enzyme that converts S-adenosylmethionine to S-adenosylhomocysteine while generating sarcosine from glycine, hence it can regulate mediating methyl group availability in mammalian cells. GNMT is also a major hepatic folate binding protein that binds to, and, subsequently, may be inhibited by 5-methyltetrafolate. GNMT is commonly diminished in human hepatoma; yet its role in cellular folate metabolism, in tumorigenesis and antifolate therapies, is not understood completely. In the present study, we investigated the impacts of GNMT expression on cell growth, folate status, methylfolate-dependent reactions and antifolate cytotoxicity. GNMT-diminished hepatoma cell lines transfected with GNMT were cultured under folate abundance or restriction. Folate-dependent homocysteine remethylation fluxes were investigated using stable isotopic tracers and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Folate status was compared between wild-type (WT), GNMT transgenic (GNMT(tg)) and GNMT knockout (GNMT(ko)) mice. In the cell model, GNMT expression increased folate concentration, induced folate-dependent homocysteine remethylation, and reduced antifolate methotrexate cytotoxicity. In the mouse models, GNMT(tg) had increased hepatic folate significantly, whereas GNMT(ko) had reduced folate. Liver folate levels correlated well with GNMT expressions (r = 0.53, P = 0.002); and methionine synthase expression was reduced significantly in GNMT(ko), demonstrating impaired methylfolate-dependent metabolism by GNMT deletion. In conclusion, we demonstrated novel findings that restoring GNMT assists methylfolate-dependent reactions and ameliorates the consequences of folate depletion. GNMT expression in vivo improves folate retention and bioavailability in the liver. Studies on how GNMT expression impacts the distribution of different folate cofactors and the regulation of specific folate dependent reactions are underway. PMID:21210071

  16. Serum homocysteine, folate level and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677, 1298 gene polymorphism in Korean schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sik; Han, Doug Hyun; Jeon, Chang Moo; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Na, Chul; Chae, Seok Lae; Cho, Soo Churl

    2006-05-15

    High homocysteine serum level has been regarded as one of the important factors that influence the development of schizophrenia. Genetic variations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, which is a main enzyme reducing homocysteine level, are reported in schizophrenic patients. We measured the serum level of homocysteine/folate and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T/A1298C gene polymorphism in 235 patients with schizophrenia. Plasma homocysteine levels were higher and folate levels were lower in patients than in comparison subjects. Variations of C677T were more frequent in patients than in comparison subjects. Patients with the 677TT genotype showed higher homocysteine levels than patients with the CC and CT genotypes. These findings suggest that folate supplement may be beneficial to some schizophrenic patients with homocysteinemia due to the genetic defect of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. PMID:16641680

  17. Correlation of serum homocysteine levels with the severity of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Vijetha; Mehendale, Veena; Prabhu, Krishnananda; Shetty, Ranjan; Rao, Pragna

    2014-07-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has become the most common cause of mortality in the entire world. Homocysteine is implicated as an early atherosclerotic promoter. We studied the relationship between levels of serum homocysteine with severity of coronary artery disease. Total of 70 subjects who scheduled for coronary angiogram consented to participate in this study. In all the patients Gensini scoring system was used to assess the severity of CAD. Venous samples were taken from the patients in fasting state before angiography. Homocysteine levels in patients were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbant method and were compared with respective Genseni scores of participants. Fasting serum homocysteine levels in CAD patients were significantly higher than patients without coronary artery disease (p < 0.001). Also Homocyseine levels correlated significantly with increasing severity of CAD (p < 0.001). Serum homocysteine levels correlated well with the severity of CAD. PMID:24966483

  18. Palmitate activates mTOR/p70S6K through AMPK inhibition and hypophosphorylation of raptor in skeletal muscle cells: Reversal by oleate is similar to metformin.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bumsup; Querfurth, Henry W

    2015-11-01

    Excessive saturated free fatty acids (SFFAs; e.g. palmitate) in blood are a pathogenic factor in diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and liver failure. In contrast, monounsaturated free fatty acids (e.g. oleate) prevent the toxic effect of SFFAs in various types of cells. The mechanism is poorly understood and involvement of the mTOR complex is untested. In the present study, we demonstrate that oleate preconditioning, as well as coincubation, completely prevented palmitate-induced markers of inflammatory signaling, insulin resistance and cytotoxicity in C2C12 myotubes. We then examined the effect of palmitate and/or oleate on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal path and whether their link is mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Palmitate decreased the phosphorylation of raptor and 4E-BP1 while increasing the phosphorylation of p70S6K. Palmitate also inhibited phosphorylation of AMPK, but did not change the phosphorylated levels of mTOR or rictor. Oleate completely prevented the palmitate-induced dysregulation of mTOR components and restored pAMPK whereas alone it produced no signaling changes. To understand this more, we show activation of AMPK by metformin also prevented palmitate-induced changes in the phosphorylations of raptor and p70S6K, confirming that the mTORC1/p70S6K signaling pathway is responsive to AMPK activity. By contrast, inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation by Compound C worsened palmitate-induced changes and correspondingly blocked the protective effect of oleate. Finally, metformin modestly attenuated palmitate-induced insulin resistance and cytotoxicity, as did oleate. Our findings indicate that palmitate activates mTORC1/p70S6K signaling by AMPK inhibition and phosphorylation of raptor. Oleate reverses these effects through a metformin-like facilitation of AMPK. PMID:26344902

  19. Combined effect of folate and adiposity on homocysteine in children at three years of age

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Ah; Park, Bo Hyun; Ha, Eun Hee; Kim, Young Ju; Park, Eun Ae; Park, Hyesook

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Cardiovascular diseases is a major cause of death and is responsible for 23.8% of deaths in Korea. Clinical symptoms manifest in adulthood, but susceptibility begins in utero. Elevated homocysteine levels and adiposity might be linked to a greater risk in children as well as adults. We hypothesized that those who have simultaneous risk for folate and adiposity would be affected with elevated homocysteine levels at 3 years of age. SUBJECTS/METHODS From the ongoing birth cohort at Ewha Womans University Mok-Dong Hospital, we compared adiposity parameters, serum homocysteine, and folate levels in 238 children (118 boys and 120 girls) at three years of age. The relationship between birth outcome, current weight and body mass index (BMI), postnatal growth, and homocysteine level were assessed using correlation and general linear model. Additionally, we assessed the combined effect between blood folate status and adiposity on current homocysteine levels. RESULTS Birth characteristics were not correlated with homocysteine. Current weight, BMI, upper-arm circumference, skinfold thickness, waist circumference, and hip circumference were positively correlated with homocysteine at three years of age (P < 0.05). Folate level was negatively correlated with homocysteine at three years of age (P < 0.0001). A relative high anthropometric measure which is compatible with adiposity and low folate level was associated with high homocysteine levels. CONCLUSION We found a combined effect of adiposity and folate levels with homocysteine levels at three years of age. This implicates the beneficial role of folate supplementation in the high-risk population at an early age. PMID:26865919

  20. Central cardiovascular actions of L-homocysteine microinjected into ventrolateral medullary autonomic areas of the rat.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Yumi

    2016-09-01

    Elevated L-homocysteine concentrations in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are related to cardiovascular and neuronal diseases, and could contribute to disease development. However, the central cardiovascular actions of L-homocysteine in two important autonomic regulating areas remain unknown: the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), including pre-sympathetic neurons, and the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM), including interneurons projecting to pre-sympathetic neurons in the RVLM. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to examine the influence of L-homocysteine microinjected into the RVLM and CVLM areas on changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR) of anesthetized rats, as well as the influence of ionotropic excitatory amino acid (iEAA) receptors on the central actions of L-homocysteine. L-Homocysteine solutions were microinjected into the RVLM and CVLM, which were defined according to pressor and depressor responses to L-glutamate microinjections, respectively. ABP and HR increased in the RVLM and decreased in the CVLM after microinjection with L-homocysteine, similar to L-glutamate, in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting mediation of EAA receptors. Prior microinjection of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) iEAA receptor antagonist MK801, but not the non-NMDA receptor antagonist CNQX, abolished the observed responses to L-homocysteine in both the RVLM and CVLM. These results indicate the central cardiovascular actions of L-homocysteine via MK801-sensitive receptors of the medullary autonomic neurons in the rat RVLM and CVLM. It remains unknown if the central cardiovascular actions are related to cardiovascular diseases after endogenously and locally augmented L-homocysteine production by disordered metabolism. Further studies on functional significance of L-homocysteine may provide some clue to understand its toxic mechanism. PMID:27178024

  1. The influence of homocysteine and oxidative stress on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Micle, O; Muresan, M; Antal, L; Bodog, F; Bodog, A

    2012-02-22

    Oxidative stress in utero-placental tissues plays an important role in the development of placental-related diseases. Maternal hiperhomocysteinemia is associated with placental mediated diseases, such as preeclampsia, spontaneous abortion and placental abruption. The aim of our study is to appreciate the clinical usefulness of the dosage serum homocysteine and malondialdehyde, as an oxidative stress marker, in the pregnancies complicated with risk of abortion or preterm birth. The study was performed at the Obstetric Gynecology Clinical Hospital Oradea from December 2009 until April 2010. It included 18 patients with risk of abortion (group 1), 22 with preterm birth (group 2). The results were compared with a control group composed by 14 healthy pregnant women. Serum homocysteine level was measured by an enzymatic method, on the instrument Hitachi 912, Roche, reagent: Axis-Shield Enzymatic. For proving the oxidative stress we established the level of malondialdehyde using a method with thiobarbituric acid TBA (Kei Satoh 1978) and the level of ceruloplasmin with the Ravin method .Also AST, ALT,CRP, iron, uric acid, urea were assessed.High level of homocysteine in both groups of study in comparison with the control group was found. The concentration of MDA was significantly higher in pregnancies complicated with risk of abortion and preterm birth compared to the control group (p=0.040, p=0.031). Considerable differences of ceruloplasmin concentration between group 1 and group 2 (p=0.045), and between group 2 and control group (p=0.034), was noticed but not any important differences between group 1 and control group (p=0.683). In women with risk of abortion or with preterm birth an oxidative stress and a hyperhomocysteinemia are present. PMID:22574089

  2. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A.

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  3. Defective Homocysteine Metabolism: Potential Implications for Skeletal Muscle Malfunction

    PubMed Central

    Veeranki, Sudhakar; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is a systemic medical condition and has been attributed to multi-organ pathologies. Genetic, nutritional, hormonal, age and gender differences are involved in abnormal homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism that produces HHcy. Homocysteine is an intermediate for many key processes such as cellular methylation and cellular antioxidant potential and imbalances in Hcy production and/or catabolism impacts gene expression and cell signaling including GPCR signaling. Furthermore, HHcy might damage the vagus nerve and superior cervical ganglion and affects various GPCR functions; therefore it can impair both the parasympathetic and sympathetic regulation in the blood vessels of skeletal muscle and affect long-term muscle function. Understanding cellular targets of Hcy during HHcy in different contexts and its role either as a primary risk factor or as an aggravator of certain disease conditions would provide better interventions. In this review we have provided recent Hcy mediated mechanistic insights into different diseases and presented potential implications in the context of reduced muscle function and integrity. Overall, the impact of HHcy in various skeletal muscle malfunctions is underappreciated; future studies in this area will provide deeper insights and improve our understanding of the association between HHcy and diminished physical function. PMID:23873298

  4. Homocysteine and Carotid Plaque Stability: A Cross-Sectional Study in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Anxin; Guo, Yuming; Li, Wen; Zhao, Xingquan; Liang, Wannian

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study aimed to explore the possible association of plasma total homocysteine with carotid plaque stability. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from 2010 to 2011. A stratified random sample of 2,919 Chinese participants aged 40 years or older was enrolled. Plasma total homocysteine levels were measured and carotid plaques were evaluated by ultrasonography. Logistic regression model was used to analyze the association of homocysteine levels to the progression of carotid plaque development, while adjusting for demographics and vascular risk factors. Results The mean level of plasma homocysteine in the subjects was 14.9 µmol/l. Along with increase in homocysteine level, the risk of advanced carotid plaque elevated (odds ratio = 1.28; 95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.51) after adjusting for age, sex, and other potential confounders. Stratified by sex, higher homocysteine level was strongly associated with advanced carotid plaque in men (OR = 1.41; 95% confidence interval = 1.17–1.70), but not in women. Conclusion The findings suggest that plasma level of homocysteine may be associated with advanced carotid plaque, which constitutes high risks of stroke, in male Chinese adults. PMID:24736609

  5. Effect of lipopenic and hypotensive treatment on homocysteine levels in type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Oudi, Mabrouka El; Aouni, Zied; Ouertani, Haroun; Mazigh, Chakib; Machghoul, Salem

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Evaluate the effect of lipopenic and hypotensive treatment on homocysteine levels. Methods: We recruited 145 type 2 diabetics and 130 control subjects. Thirty-seven diabetics had no complications, 54 had microvascular complications and 54 had macrovascular complications. We determined the parameters homocysteine of lipid, vitamin B12, triglycerides, and folates for all subjects. Associated treatments used one or more of the following drugs, statin, fibrate, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and beta-blockers. Results: Hyperhomocysteinemia was present in 35.6% of patients. Diabetics had elevated serum levels of triglycerides (P < 0.001), homocysteine (P < 0.01), folates (P < 0.01) and vitamin B12 (P < 0.001). A strong association was found between type 2 diabetes and hyperhomocysteinemia (P < 0.001). Diabetics with associated treatment had elevated homocysteine, vitamin B12 and folate levels when compared to diabetes-free controls. For diabetics with macrovascular complications, we found significant differences in homocysteine (P = 0.010) and folate (P = 0.014) between those taking associated drugs and those who did not. For diabetics with microvascular complications, a significant difference was found in folate only (P = 0.012). Conclusion: Drugs used for hypertension and hyperlipidemia may have an effect on homocysteine levels, for this reason the interaction between drug action and homocysteine levels should be taken into consideration. PMID:20531951

  6. Impaired homocysteine metabolism in patients with alcoholic liver disease in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yi-Wen; Chen, Ya-Ling; Peng, Hsiang-Chi; Hu, Jui-Ting; Yang, Sien-Sing; Yang, Suh-Ching

    2016-08-01

    ​Impaired homocysteine metabolism plays an important role in alcoholic liver disease (ALD); however, there are limited data about its relationship with the risk and severity of patients with ALD in Taiwan. To understand plasma homocysteine and related vitamin concentrations in patients with ALD in Taiwan, we recruited 50 male patients with ALD from Cathay General Hospital, with 49 age-and gender-matched healthy adults as the control group. The Institutional Review Board for Human Studies approved the study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients prior to blood collection. Significantly higher plasma homocysteine concentrations but lower folate concentrations were obtained from patients with ALD. In addition, patients with ALD showed a significant lower erythrocyte reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio but higher plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) concentration, which indicated that oxidative stress was occurring in patients with ALD. A negative correlation between plasma folate and homocysteine was observed in all subjects. There was also a negative correlation between plasma homocysteine and the erythrocyte GSH/GSSG ratio which indicated impaired homocysteine metabolism may have disrupted the antioxidative status. In addition, patients in Child-Pugh Class B and C showed higher plasma vitamin B12 concentrations than did patients without cirrhosis and patients in Child-Pugh Class A. These findings show that impaired homocysteine metabolism was observed in patients with ALD in Taiwan. In addition, the plasma vitamin B12 concentration may reflect the degree of liver injury. PMID:27565754

  7. Beta blocker effects on plasma homocysteine levels in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Atar, Ilyas; Korkmaz, Mehmet Emin; Demircan, Senol; Atar, Inci Asli; Bozbaş, Hüseyin; Aydinalp, Alp; Ozin, Bülent; Yildirir, Aylin; Müderrisoğlu, Haldun

    2005-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that hyperhomocysteinemia might play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The effects of antihypertensive agents on plasma homocysteine levels have not been tested extensively. We investigated the effects of beta-blocker therapy on homocysteine levels in patients with hypertension. In the study, 120 patients with newly diagnosed hypertension were enrolled. All patients received metoprolol succinate 100 mg/day initially. If blood pressure was above normal on the 15th day of follow-up, the metoprolol dosage was doubled. Before initiation of the antihypertensive medication and after the fourth month of treatment, homocysteine levels were measured. Of the 120 patients enrolled, 39 could not complete the study. Homocysteine levels decreased significantly by the end of the fourth month when compared with basal values (13.5+/-4.5 micromol/l versus 12.4+/-4.9 micromol/l; P = 0.001). There was no relation between homocysteine level and blood pressure control. There was a significant decrease in homocysteine levels in the women treated in this study (P = 0.001); however, this effect was absent in men (P = 0.185). We demonstrate that metoprolol succinate treatment significantly decreases plasma homocysteine levels in patients with hypertension, especially in women. PMID:16039296

  8. The development of a new class of inhibitors for betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Pícha, Jan; Vaněk, Václav; Buděšínský, Miloš; Mládková, Jana; Garrow, Timothy A; Jiráček, Jiří

    2013-07-01

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is an important zinc-dependent methyltransferase that uses betaine as the methyl donor for the remethylation of homocysteine to form methionine. In the liver, BHMT performs to half of the homocysteine remethylation. In this study, we systematically investigated the tolerance of the enzyme for modifications at the "homocysteine" part of the previously reported potent inhibitor (R,S)-5-(3-amino-3-carboxy-propylsulfanyl)-pentanoic acid (1). In the new compounds, which are S-alkylated homocysteine derivatives, we replaced the carboxylic group in the "homocysteine" part of inhibitor 1 with different isosteric moieties (tetrazole and oxadiazolone); we suppressed the carboxylic negative charge by amidations; we enhanced acidity by replacing the carboxylate with phosphonic or phosphinic acids; and we introduced pyrrolidine steric constraints. Some of these compounds display high affinity toward human BHMT and may be useful for further pharmacological studies of this enzyme. Although none of the new compounds were more potent inhibitors than the reference inhibitor 1, this study helped to completely define the structural requirements of the active site of BHMT and revealed the remarkable selectivity of the enzyme for homocysteine. PMID:23727536

  9. Plasma homocysteine, Alzheimer and cerebrovascular pathology: a population-based autopsy study

    PubMed Central

    Polvikoski, Tuomo; Kivipelto, Miia; Tanskanen, Maarit; Myllykangas, Liisa; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Mäkelä, Mira; Oinas, Minna; Paetau, Anders; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elizabeth C. W.; Sulkava, Raimo; Solomon, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine is associated with increased risk of dementia/Alzheimer’s disease, but underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are not fully understood. This study investigated possible links between baseline homocysteine, and post-mortem neuropathological and magnetic resonance imaging findings up to 10 years later in the Vantaa 85+ population including people aged ≥85 years. Two hundred and sixty-five individuals had homocysteine and autopsy data, of which 103 had post-mortem brain magnetic resonance imaging scans. Methenamine silver staining was used for amyloid-β and modified Bielschowsky method for neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. Macroscopic infarcts were identified from cerebral hemispheres, brainstem and cerebellum slices. Standardized methods were used to determine microscopic infarcts, cerebral amyoloid angiopathy, and α-synuclein pathology. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for visual ratings of the degree of medial temporal lobe atrophy, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities. Elevated baseline homocysteine was associated with increased neurofibrillary tangles count at the time of death: for the highest homocysteine quartile, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.60 (1.28–5.28). The association was observed particularly in people with dementia, in the presence of cerebral infarcts, and with longer time between the baseline homocysteine assessment and death. Also, elevated homocysteine tended to relate to amyloid-β accumulation, but this was seen only with longer baseline-death interval: odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.52 (0.88–7.19) for the highest homocysteine quartile. On post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging, for the highest homocysteine quartile odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 3.78 (1.12–12.79) for more severe medial temporal atrophy and 4.69 (1.14–19.33) for more severe periventricular white matter hyperintensities. All associations were independent of

  10. Is there a causal role for homocysteine concentration in blood pressure? A Mendelian randomization study12

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Fernando P; Oliveira, Isabel O; Horta, Bernardo L

    2016-01-01

    Background: An understanding of whether homocysteine is a cause or a marker of increased blood pressure is relevant because blood homocysteine can be effectively lowered by safe and inexpensive interventions (e.g., vitamin B-6, B-9, and B-12 supplementation). Objective: The aim was to assess the causal influence of homocysteine on systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively) in adults with the use of Mendelian randomization (MR). Design: Data from the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort (Brazil) were used. A total of 4297 subjects were evaluated in 2004–2005 (mean age: 22.8 y). The association of homocysteine concentration with SBP and DBP was assessed by conventional ordinary least-squares (OLS) linear regression and 2-stage least-squares (2SLS) regression (MR analysis). The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T (rs1801133) was used as proxy for homocysteine concentration. We also applied MR to data from the International Consortium for Blood Pressure (ICBP) genomewide association studies (>69,000 participants) using rs1801133 and additional homocysteine-associated SNPs as instruments. Results: In OLS regression, a 1-SD unit increase in log homocysteine concentration was associated with an increase of 0.9 (95% CI: 0.4, 1.4) mm Hg in SBP and of 1.0 (95% CI: 0.6, 1.4) mm Hg in DBP. In 2SLS regression, for the same increase in homocysteine, the coefficients were −1.8 mm Hg for SBP (95% CI: −3.9, 0.4 mm Hg; P = 0.01) and 0.1 mm Hg for DBP (95% CI: −1.5, 1.7 mm Hg; P = 0.24). In the MR analysis of ICBP data, homocysteine concentration was not associated with SBP (β = 0.6 mm Hg for each 1-SD unit increase in log homocysteine; 95% CI: −0.8, 1.9 mm Hg) but was positively associated with DBP (β = 1.1 mm Hg; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.9 mm Hg). The association of genetically increased homocysteine with DBP was not consistent across different SNPs. Conclusion: Overall, the present findings do not corroborate the

  11. A colorimetric, ratiometric and water-soluble fluorescent probe for simultaneously sensing glutathione and cysteine/homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xi; Wang, Zhao-Yang; Du, Zhi-Fang; Cui, Jie; Miao, Jun-Ying; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    A chlorinated coumarin-aldehyde was developed as a colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent probe for distinguishing glutathione (GSH), cystenine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy). The GSH-induced substitution-cyclization and Cys/Hcy-induced substitution-rearrangement cascades lead to the corresponding thiol-coumarin-iminium cation and amino-coumarin-aldehyde with distinct photophysical properties. The probe can be used to simultaneously detect GSH and Cys/Hcy by visual determination based on distinct different colors - red and pale-yellow in PBS buffer solution by two reaction sites. From the linear relationship of fluorescence intensity and biothiols concentrations, it was determined that the limits of detection for GSH, Hcy and Cys are 0.08, 0.09 and 0.18 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the probe was successfully used in living cell imaging with low cell toxicity. PMID:26572845

  12. The potential physiological crosstalk and interrelationship between two sovereign endogenous amines, melatonin and homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rajib; Borah, Anupom

    2015-10-15

    The antioxidant melatonin and the non-proteinogenic excitotoxic amino acid homocysteine (Hcy) are very distinct but related reciprocally to each other in their mode of action. The elevated Hcy level has been implicated in several disease pathologies ranging from cardio- and cerebro-vascular diseases to neurodegeneration owing largely to its free radical generating potency. Interestingly, melatonin administration potentially normalizes the elevated Hcy level, thereby protecting the cells from the undesired Hcy-induced excitotoxicity and cell death. However, the exact mechanism and between them remain obscure. Through literature survey we have found an indistinct but a vital link between melatonin and Hcy i.e., the existence of reciprocal regulation between them, and this aspect has been thoroughly described herein. In this review, we focus on all the possibilities of co-regulation of melatonin and Hcy at the level of their production and metabolism both in basal and in pathological conditions, and appraised the potential of melatonin in ameliorating homocysteinemia-induced cellular stresses. Also, we have summarized the differential mode of action of melatonin and Hcy on health and disease states. PMID:26281918

  13. Exercise decreases susceptibility to homocysteine seizures: the role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hrncic, D; Rasic-Markovic, A; Lekovic, J; Krstic, D; Colovic, M; Macut, D; Susic, V; Djuric, D; Stanojlovic, O

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of chronic exercise training on seizures induced by homocysteine thiolactone (HCT) in adult rats. Rats were assigned to: sedentary control; exercise control; sedentary+HCT; exercise+HCT group. Animals in the exercise groups ran 30 min daily on a treadmill for 30 consecutive days (belt speed 20 m/min), while sedentary rats spent the same time on the treadmill (speed 0 m/min). On the 31st day, the HCT groups received HCT (8.0 mmol/kg), while the control groups received vehicle. Afterwards, convulsive behavior and EEG activity were registered. Lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity were ascertained in the rat hippocampus. No signs of seizures were registered in sedentary and exercise control rats. Seizure latency was increased, while number of seizure episodes and spike-and-wave discharges (SWD) in EEG were decreased in the exercise+HCT compared to the sedentary+HCT group. Seizure incidence, the severity thereof and duration of SWDs were not significantly different between these groups. Exercise partly prevented increase of lipid peroxidation and decrease of the SOD and CAT activity after HCT administration. These results indicate beneficial effects of exercise in model of HCT-induced seizures in rats, what could be, at least in part, a consequence of improved antioxidant enzymes activity. PMID:24227119

  14. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:23295243

  15. The role of Homocysteine as a predictor for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Lühmann, Dagmar; Schramm, Susanne; Raspe, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective There is an ongoing debate on the role of the cytotoxic aminoacid homocysteine as a causal risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. Results from multiple case control-studies demonstrate, that there is a strong association between high plasma levels of homoysteine and prevalent coronary heart disease, independent of other classic risk factors. Furthermore, results from interventional studies point out that elevated plasma levels of homocysteine may effectively be lowered by the intake of folic acid and B vitamins. In order to use this information for the construction of a new preventive strategy against coronary heart disease, more information is needed: first, whether homocysteine actually is a causal risk factor with relevant predictive properties and, second, whether by lowering elevated homocysteine plasma concentrations cardiac morbidity can be reduced. Currently in Germany the determination of homocysteine plasma levels is reimbursed for by statutory health insurance in patients with manifest coronary heart disease and in patients at high risk for coronary heart disease but not for screening purposes in asymptomatic low risk populations. Against this background the following assessment sets out to answer four questions: Is an elevated homocysteine plasma concentration a strong, consistent and independent (of other classic risk factors) predictor for coronary heart disease? Does a therapeutic lowering of elevated homoysteine plasma levels reduce the risk of developing coronary events? What is the cost-effectiveness relationship of homocysteine testing for preventive purposes? Are there morally, socially or legally relevant aspects that should be considered when implementing a preventive strategy as outlined above? Methods In order to answer the first question, a systematic overview of prospective studies and metaanalyses of prospective studies is undertaken. Studies are included that analyse the association of

  16. Cobalamin, folate, methylmalonic acid, homocysteine, and gastritis markers in dementia.

    PubMed

    Nägga, K; Rajani, R; Mårdh, E; Borch, K; Mårdh, S; Marcusson, J

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia disorders, cobalamin and/or folate deficiency as well as gastritis increases with age. To investigate whether there is an association between these conditions, plasma homocysteine (Hcy), serum methylmalonic acid, serum cobalamin and blood folate concentrations were measured. Gastritis was indirectly diagnosed by measuring serum antibodies against H,K-ATPase, HELICOBACTER PYLORI and intrinsic factor, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The studied groups consisted of 47 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 9 with AD pathology in combination with additive vascular lesions, 59 with vascular dementia, 8 who were cognitively impaired, and 101 control cases. Plasma Hcy concentrations were significantly elevated in the dementia groups, with the highest levels in patients with vascular pathology. We conclude that hyperhomocysteinemia is a common finding in patients with dementia disorders of different etiologies. The markers for gastritis did not contribute to an elucidation of a possible connection between this condition, dementia disorders, or cobalamin/folate deficiency. PMID:14512723

  17. Association between Plasma Homocysteine Levels and Neuronal Injury in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ahlgren, Erika; Hagberg, Lars; Fuchs, Dietmar; Andersson, Lars-Magnus; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Gisslén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of homocysteine in neuronal injury in HIV infection. Methods Using a cross-sectional design and archived samples, we compared concentrations of plasma homocysteine and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light protein (NFL), a sensitive marker of neuronal injury, in 83 HIV-1-infected subjects without antiretroviral treatment. We also analyzed plasma vitamin B12, serum folate, CSF, and plasma HIV RNA, the immune activation marker neopterin in CSF and serum, and albumin ratio as a marker of blood-brain barrier integrity. Twenty-two subjects provided a second sample median of 12.5 months after antiretroviral treatment initiation. Results A significant correlation was found between plasma homocysteine and CSF NFL concentrations in untreated individuals (r = 0.52, p < 0.0001). As expected, there was a significant inverse correlation between homocysteine and B12 (r = –0.41, p < 0.001) and folate (r = –0.40, p = < 0.001) levels. In a multiple linear regression analysis homocysteine stood out as an independent predictor of CSF NFL in HIV-1-infected individuals. The correlation of plasma homocysteine and CSF NFL was also present in the group receiving antiretroviral therapy (r = 0.51, p = 0.016). Conclusion A correlation between plasma homocysteine and axonal injury, as measured by CSF NFL, was found in both untreated and treated HIV. While this study is not able to prove a causal link, homocysteine and functional B12/folate deficiency appear to play a role in neural injury in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27441551

  18. Associations between Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and Lipids, Lipoprotein Cholesterols, and Homocysteine

    PubMed Central

    Glueck, Charles J.; Jetty, Vybhav; Rothschild, Matan; Duhon, Gregory; Shah, Parth; Prince, Marloe; Lee, Kevin; Goldenberg, Michael; Kumar, Ashwin; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serum 25(OH) vitamin D levels are inversely associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, mediated in part by independent positive relationships with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) and inverse relationships with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), triglyceride, and homocysteine. Aims: In this study, we assessed relationships between fasting serum vitamin D and lipids, lipoprotein cholesterols, and homocysteine. Materials and Methods: We studied 1534 patients sequentially referred to our center from 2007 to 2016. Fasting serum total 25(OH) vitamin D, plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, HDLC, LDLC, and homocysteine were measured. Stepwise regression models were used with total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDLC, LDLC, and homocysteine as dependent variables and explanatory variables age, race, gender, body mass index (BMI), and serum vitamin D levels. Relationships between quintiles of serum vitamin D and triglycerides, HDLC, LDLC, and homocysteine were assessed after covariance adjusting for age, race, gender, and BMI. Results: Fasting serum vitamin D was positively correlated with age, HDLC, and White race, and was inversely correlated with BMI, total and LDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and fasting serum homocysteine (P ≤ 0.0001 for all). Serum vitamin D was a significant independent inverse explanatory variable for total cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol, and accounted for the largest amount of variance in serum total cholesterol (partial R2 =3.6%), triglyceride (partial R2 =3.1%), and LDLC (partial R2 =2.9%) (P < 0.0001 for all). Serum vitamin D was a significant positive explanatory variable for HDLC (partial R2 = 1.4%, P < 0.0001), and a significant inverse explanatory variable for homocysteine (partial R2 = 6.0–12.6%). Conclusions: In hyperlipidemic patients, serum vitamin D was a significant independent inverse determinant of total cholesterol, LDLC, triglyceride, and homocysteine, and a significant

  19. Sex Difference in the Association between Serum Homocysteine Level and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Won, Bo-Youn; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Yun, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Moon-Jong; Park, Kye-Seon; Kim, Young-Sang; Haam, Ji-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Yuk; Kim, Hye-Jung; Park, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between serum homocysteine levels and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the sex-specific relationship between serum homocysteine level and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the Korean population. Methods This cross-sectional study included 150 men and 132 women who participated in medical examination programs in Korea from January 2014 to December 2014. Patients were screened for fatty liver by abdominal ultrasound and patient blood samples were collected to measure homocysteine levels. Patients that consumed more than 20 grams of alcohol per day were excluded from this study. Results The homocysteine level (11.56 vs. 8.05 nmol/L) and the proportion of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (60.7% vs. 19.7%) were significantly higher in men than in women. In men, elevated serum homocysteine levels were associated with a greater prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (quartile 1, 43.6%; quartile 4, 80.6%; P=0.01); however, in females, there was no significant association between serum homocysteine levels and the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In the logistic regression model adjusted for age and potential confounding parameters, the odds ratio for men was significantly higher in the uppermost quartile (model 3, quartile 4: odds ratio, 6.78; 95% confidential interval, 1.67 to 27.56); however, serum homocysteine levels in women were not associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the crude model or in models adjusted for confounders. Conclusion Serum homocysteine levels were associated with the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in men. PMID:27468343

  20. S-Inosyl-l-Homocysteine Hydrolase, a Novel Enzyme Involved in S-Adenosyl-l-Methionine Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Danielle; Xu, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT S-Adenosyl-l-homocysteine, the product of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) methyltransferases, is known to be a strong feedback inhibitor of these enzymes. A hydrolase specific for S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine produces l-homocysteine, which is remethylated to methionine and can be used to regenerate SAM. Here, we show that the annotated S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii is specific for the hydrolysis and synthesis of S-inosyl-l-homocysteine, not S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine. This is the first report of an enzyme specific for S-inosyl-l-homocysteine. As with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase, which shares greater than 45% sequence identity with the M. jannaschii homologue, the M. jannaschii enzyme was found to copurify with bound NAD+ and has Km values of 0.64 ± 0.4 mM, 0.0054 ± 0.006 mM, and 0.22 ± 0.11 mM for inosine, l-homocysteine, and S-inosyl-l-homocysteine, respectively. No enzymatic activity was detected with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine as the substrate in either the synthesis or hydrolysis direction. These results prompted us to redesignate the M. jannaschii enzyme an S-inosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (SIHH). Identification of SIHH demonstrates a modified pathway in this methanogen for the regeneration of SAM from S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine that uses the deamination of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine to form S-inosyl-l-homocysteine. IMPORTANCE In strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea, such as Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, canonical metabolic pathways are often not present, and instead, unique pathways that are deeply rooted on the phylogenetic tree are utilized by the organisms. Here, we discuss the recycling pathway for S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine, produced from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent methylation reactions, which uses a hydrolase specific for S-inosyl-l-homocysteine, an uncommon metabolite. Identification of the pathways and the enzymes involved in the unique pathways in the methanogens will provide insight

  1. Serum homocysteine level in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Başkan, Bedriye Mermerci; Sivas, Filiz; Aktekin, Lale Akbulut; Doğan, Yasemin Pekin; Ozoran, Kürşat; Bodur, Hatice

    2009-10-01

    In this study serum homocystein (Hcy) level was measured and its relationship with disease activity criteria and treatment protocols was investigated in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Ninety-two AS patients and 58 healthy individuals were recruited. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum C-reactive protein were determined. Bath AS disease activity index and Bath AS functional index were calculated. Serum Hcy levels >15 micromol/l were considered as hyperhomocysteinemia. The mean serum homocysteine levels were 14.40 and 12.60 micromol/l in patients with AS and the control group, respectively, and the difference between two groups was significant. While there was no significant difference between the sulfasalazine (SSZ) group with 14.25 micromol/l mean Hcy level and the methotrexate (MTX)/SSZ group with 16.05 micromol/l, there was a statistically significant difference between the Hcy levels of these two groups and Hcy level of 12.15 micromol/l of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs group, and 12.60 micromol/l Hcy level of the control group. Mean serum Hcy level was 13.65 micromol/l in patients with active AS and 14.60 micromol/l in patients with inactive AS, and there was no significant difference between the groups. In our study serum Hcy level was found to be significantly higher in patients with AS than in healthy control subjects. Especially for the AS patients receiving MTX and SSZ treatment without folic acid supplementation, addition of folic acid to their therapy may decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease which in turn decreases the mortality in these patients, but further prospective studies are needed for supporting these results. PMID:19288264

  2. Reciprocal modulation of Aβ42 aggregation by copper and homocysteine

    PubMed Central

    Keskitalo, Salla; Farkas, Melinda; Hanenberg, Michael; Szodorai, Anita; Kulic, Luka; Semmler, Alexander; Weller, Michael; Nitsch, Roger M.; Linnebank, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Both homocysteine (Hcy) and amyloid β (Aβ), which accumulates in the brain of AD patients, bind copper. Aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the association of Hcy and AD results from a molecular interaction between Hcy and Aβ that is mediated by copper. We established a microtiter plate format thioflavin T aggregation assay to monitor Aβ42 fibrillization. Copper (5 μM) completely prevented Aβ42 (5 μM) fibrillization. Homocysteine in the absence of copper did not impact Aβ42 fibrillization, but physiological concentrations of Hcy (10–100 μM) attenuated the inhibitory effect of copper on Aβ42 fibril formation. These results were qualitatively confirmed by electron microscopy, which did not reveal morphological differences. To compare the toxicity of fibrillar and non-fibrillar Aβ42 exposed to copper or Hcy, rat primary cortical neurons were treated in vitro with 5 μM Aβ42 for 72 h. After incubation with 5 μM Aβ42 that had been aggregating in the absence of Hcy or copper, cell viability was reduced to 40%. Incubation with 5 μM Aβ42, in which fibril formation had been prevented or reverted by the addition of 5 μM copper, resulted in cell viability of approximately 25%. Accordingly, viability was reduced to 25% after incubation with 5 μM monomeric, i.e., non-fibrillized, Aβ42. The addition of Hcy plus copper to 5 μM Aβ42 yielded 50% viability. In conclusion, copper prevents and reverts Aβ fibril formation leading rather to formation of lower order oligomers or amorphous aggregates, and Hcy reduces these effects. Such mechanisms may explain the association of hyperhomocysteinemia and AD, leading to novel therapeutic strategies in the prevention and treatment of this disease. PMID:25249976

  3. Betaine supplementation decreases plasma homocysteine in healthy adult participants: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Marc P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Betaine supplementation has been shown to be an effective agent for decreasing plasma homocysteine in healthy adults. Studies in healthy volunteers show that 6 g/d of betaine lowers plasma homocysteine concentrations by 5% to 20%. The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials that used daily betaine supplementation to identify the range in betaine's effects on lowering homocysteine. Methods Five randomized controlled trials published between 2002 and 2010 were identified using MEDLINE and a manual search. All 5 studies used health adult participants who were supplemented with at least 4 g/d of betaine for between 6 and 24 weeks. A meta-analysis was carried out using a random-effects model, and the overall effect size was calculated for changes in plasma homocysteine. Results The pooled estimate of effect for betaine supplementation on plasma homocysteine was a reduction of 1.23 μmol/L, which was statistically significant (95% confidence interval, − 1.61 to − 0.85; P = .01). Conclusion Supplementation with at least 4g/d of betaine for a minimum of 6 weeks can lower plasma homocysteine. PMID:23997720

  4. Homocysteine and cognitive performance: modification by the ApoE genotype.

    PubMed

    Elias, Merrill F; Robbins, Michael A; Budge, Marc M; Elias, Penelope K; Dore, Gregory A; Brennan, Suzanne L; Johnston, Carole; Nagy, Zsuzsanna

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that the magnitude of the association between plasma homocysteine concentration and cognitive performance is larger for ApoE-epsilon4 carriers than for non-carriers. Nine hundred eleven dementia-free and stroke-free subjects (59% women) from the Maine-Syracuse study (26-98 years old) were stratified into no-ApoE-epsilon4 (n=667) and ApoE-epsilon4 carrier (n=244) cohorts. Employing a cross-sectional design and multiple regression analyses, plasma homocysteine was related to multiple domains of cognitive performance within these cohorts. When unadjusted, and with adjustment for age, education, gender, ethnicity, and previous cognitive examinations, homocysteine concentrations were inversely related to cognitive performance within both ApoE cohorts, with higher magnitude of associations within the ApoE-epsilon4 cohort. With adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors, cardiovascular disease, and B-vitamin concentrations, the higher magnitude of associations between plasma homocysteine and cognitive performance within the ApoE-epsilon4 cohort relative to the no-ApoE-epsilon4 cohort persisted; but associations of plasma homocysteine and cognitive performance were attenuated and no longer significant within the no-ApoE-epsilon4 cohort. Presence of the ApoE-epsilon4 allele modifies the relation between plasma homocysteine and cognitive performance. PMID:18023533

  5. Association of blood lead and homocysteine levels among lead exposed subjects in Vietnam and Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Sin Eng; Ali, Safiyya Mohamed; Lee, Bee Lan; Lim, Gek Hsiang; Jin, Su; Dong, Nguyen‐Viet; Tu, Nguyen Thi Hong; Ong, Choon Nam; Chia, Kee Seng

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Lead and homocysteine are both linked to cardiovascular disease. With this in mind, the authors evaluated the relation between blood lead and homocysteine in people aged 19–66 years in two Asian populations. Methods This cross‐sectional study comprised 183 workers from a lead stabiliser factory in Singapore and 323 workers from a battery factory in Vietnam. Workers were occupationally exposed to lead. Blood lead was analysed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry while plasma homocysteine was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Results Chinese subjects had the lowest blood lead levels while the Indians had the highest. Controlling for age, sex and race, an increase of 1 μg/dl in blood lead was associated with an increase of 0.04 μmol/l of homocysteine on the log scale. Gender and ethnicity seemed to be strongly associated with the relation between lead and homocysteine. The positive relation between lead and homocysteine among the Vietnamese subjects was significant (Pearson's r = 0.254, p<0.01). When blood lead levels were divided by quartiles, the correlation coefficient between blood lead levels in the 4th quartile and homocysteine among the Vietnamese was higher (r = 0.405, p<0.01). Overall, an increase of 1 μg/dl in blood lead in all the Vietnamese subjects was associated with an increase of 0.05 μmol/l increase in homocysteine on the log scale. However, in the 4th quartile, the same increase was associated with an increase of 0.41 μmol/l of homocysteine on the log scale. Conclusions Blood lead was found to be associated with homocysteine levels in this Asian sample. Although we cannot determine causality from cross‐sectional data, it is sensible to consider the probability that this relation could explain one of the mechanisms of the impact of lead on the cardiovascular system. More studies would be needed to confirm this inference. PMID:17449564

  6. Are dietary choline and betaine intakes determinants of total homocysteine concentration?1234

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun; Jacques, Paul F; Dougherty, Lauren; Selhub, Jacob; Giovannucci, Edward; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-01-01

    Background: Elevated homocysteine concentrations are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and a decline in cognitive function. Intakes of choline and betaine, as methyl donors, may affect homocysteine concentrations. Objective: The objective was to examine whether choline and betaine intakes, assessed from food-frequency questionnaires, are associated with total plasma homocysteine concentrations under both fasting and post–methionine-load conditions in both pre– and post–folic acid fortification periods in the United States. Design: We assessed the association between choline and betaine intakes and fasting and post–methionine-load homocysteine concentrations using the US Department of Agriculture revised food-composition tables and evaluated whether the associations varied by folic acid fortification periods in 1325 male and 1407 female participants in the sixth examination (1995–1998) of the Framingham Offspring Study. Results: A higher choline-plus-betaine intake was associated with lower concentrations of post–methionine-load homocysteine; the multivariate geometric means were 24.1 μmol/L (95% CI: 23.4, 24.9 μmol/L) in the top quintile of intake and 25.0 μmol/L (95% CI: 24.2, 25.7 μmol/L) in the bottom quintile (P for trend = 0.01). We found an inverse association between choline-plus-betaine intake and fasting homocysteine concentrations; the multivariate geometric mean fasting homocysteine concentrations were 9.6 μmol/L (95% CI: 9.3, 9.9 μmol/L) in the top quintile and 10.1 μmol/L (95% CI: 9.8, 10.4 μmol/L) in the bottom quintile (P for trend < 0.001). When we stratified by plasma folate and vitamin B-12 concentrations, the inverse association was limited to participants with low plasma folate or vitamin B-12 concentrations. In the postfortification period, the inverse association between choline-plus-betaine intake and either fasting or post–methionine-load homocysteine was no longer present. Conclusions: Choline

  7. Homocysteine levels in schizophrenia and affective disorders—focus on cognition

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Hewedi, Doaa H.; Eissa, Abeer M.; Frydecka, Dorota; Misiak, Błażej

    2014-01-01

    Although homocysteine (Hcy) has been widely implicated in the etiology of various physical health impairments, especially cardiovascular diseases, overwhelming evidence indicates that Hcy is also involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and affective disorders. There are several mechanisms linking Hcy to biological underpinnings of psychiatric disorders. It has been found that Hcy interacts with NMDA receptors, initiates oxidative stress, induces apoptosis, triggers mitochondrial dysfunction and leads to vascular damage. Elevated Hcy levels might also contribute to cognitive impairment that is widely observed among patients with affective disorders and schizophrenia. Supplementation of vitamins B and folic acid has been proved to be effective in lowering Hcy levels. There are also studies showing that this supplementation strategy might be beneficial for schizophrenia patients with respect to alleviating negative symptoms. However, there are no studies addressing the influence of add-on therapies with folate and vitamins B on cognitive performance of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders. In this article, we provide an overview of Hcy metabolism in psychiatric disorders focusing on cognitive correlates and indicating future directions and perspectives. PMID:25339876

  8. [Homocysteine and alcohol consumption. An ambiguous relationship and a new paradox].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2003-02-15

    HOMOCYSTEINEMIA AND ITS VARIATIONS: The increase in plasma concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) is a factor of cardiovascular risk. Its determinants are multifactorial, genetic and environmental. Out of the ingestion of dietary supplements containing vitamin B6, folates and B12, other substances such as coffee or alcohol contribute in the increase in Hcy. THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL: The alcohol-Hcy interaction is complex and ambiguous. Although chronic alcoholism clearly increases Hcy concentration, the effects of moderate and regular consumption of alcohol are debated in epidemiological studies. Following adjustment of various parameters, it is now admitted that alcohol moderately increases Hcy levels. This is paradoxical since the coronary protective effects of alcoholic beverages has been well established. THE PARTICULAR CASE OF BEER: However, a negative correlation between Hcy and alcoholic beverages has been described in some studies, more especially in beer-drinkers. The hypothesis of a reduction in Hcy induced by the beer contents has been described in an interventional study. The vitamins contained in beer, particularly B6, may well be at the origin of this beneficial effect. PMID:12610455

  9. Association of serum calcium concentrations with fibrinogen and homocysteine in nondiabetic Korean subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Sun; Lee, Sung Won; Shin, Juyoung; Moon, Sung Dae; Han, Je Ho; Cha, Bong Yun; Kim, Eun Sook

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Considerable evidence shows that increased serum calcium levels are associated with metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease, and increased mortality. This study investigated whether serum calcium, within a normal range, is significantly associated with serum fibrinogen and homocysteine, markers of increased cardiovascular disease risk in nondiabetic Korean subjects. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on 1096 subjects (mean age, 55.1 ± 11.1 years; 36.1% women) undergoing a general health checkup. Serum biochemistry was analyzed including serum albumin-corrected calcium (Cac), insulin resistance (IR, using homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]), fibrinogen, and homocysteine. Compared with patients within the lowest Cac quartile, those with higher Cac levels had increased fibrinogen and homocysteine levels as well as an increased proportion of smoking, dyslipidemia, and HOMA-IR. Correlation analyses revealed linear relationships for Cac with fibrinogen and homocysteine in both genders. After adjustment for confounding factors, serum Cac was significantly associated with high fibrinogen (odds ratio [OR] for the highest vs the lowest quartile = 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09–2.83, P = 0.02) and homocysteine (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.07–3.11, P = 0.027). Multivariate regression models showed that Cac was linearly associated with fibrinogen (standardized β = 0.14, P < 0.001) and homocysteine (standardized β = 0.07, P = 0.009). High normal calcium concentrations were independently associated with increased levels of fibrinogen and homocysteine. Further investigation is needed to validate whether slightly increased calcium levels within the normal range indicate a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27310988

  10. Serum homocysteine levels are correlated with behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Homocysteine has been associated with cognitive impairment and various psychiatric symptoms. This study was designed to clarify whether a relationship exists between the serum levels of homocysteine and the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Methods Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (n=77) and control subjects (n=37) were included in this study. History taking, physical examination, and cognitive assessment were carried out as part of the investigation for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. The Mini-Mental State Examination, Global Deterioration Scale, Clinical Dementia Rating, and the Korean version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory were applied to all patients. The patients’ serum homocysteine, folate, and vitamin B12 levels were measured. Results Patients with Alzheimer’s disease had statistically significantly lower Mini-Mental State Examination scores and higher serum homocysteine levels compared to the control subjects. Mean serum folate and vitamin B12 concentration were significantly lower in patients with Alzheimer’s disease compared to control subjects. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the serum homocysteine levels and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory subdomains, including delusion, agitation/aggression, depression/dysphoria, elation/euphoria, apathy/indifference, and disinhibition. No statistically significant correlation was found between the serum homocysteine concentration and the Mini-Mental State Examination, Global Deterioration Scale, or Clinical Dementia Rating. Conclusion Associations between the serum homocysteine levels and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia were observed, raising the possibility of an etiological role. However, the correlations between the folate or vitamin B12 levels and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory scores were not significant. The pathophysiological

  11. Plasma homocysteine and B vitamins levels in Nigerian children with nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Orimadegun, Bose Etaniamhe; Orimadegun, Adebola Emmanuel; Ademola, Adebowale Dele; Agbedana, Emmanuel Oluyemi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Available data on plasma homocysteine level in patients with nephrotic syndrome (NS) are controversial with increased, decreased and unchanged values reported. Therefore, plasma homocysteine and serum B vitamins in Nigerian children with NS were assessed in this study Methods Fasting blood samples were analysed for plasma homocysteine, serum folate and B vitamins in 42 children with NS and 42 age and sex-matched healthy controls in this case control study. Data were compared between NS and control using t test and Chi square. Relationships were tested with regression analysis with p set at 0.05. Results Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinaemia, low folate and cyanocobalamin in NS was 57.1%, 14.3% and 9.5% respectively. The mean homocysteine level was significantly higher in NS than control (11.3±2.6µmol/L versus 5.5±2.3µmol/L). Also, NS had lower folate and cyanocobalamin than control: 9.1±3.9ng/mL versus 11.2±3.1ng/dL and 268.5±95.7pg/mL versus 316±117.2pg/mL respectively. Weak but significant correlation between homocysteine and serum albumin (r = 0.347), folate (r = -0.607) and vitamin B12 (r = -0.185) were found in the NS group. Significant relationship was also found between homocysteine and vitamin B12 (ß = -0.64, 95% CI = -1.20, -0.08) after controlling for folate and vitamin B6 levels. Conclusion Clinically important hyperhomocysteinaemia and low B vitamins occur in Nigerian children with nephrotic syndrome. This data suggest that potential usefulness of folate and vitamin B supplementation for reducing high homocysteine levels in nephrotic syndrome need to be further investigated PMID:25404967

  12. Maternal homocysteine in pregnancy and offspring birthweight: epidemiological associations and Mendelian randomization analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Chandak, Giriraj R; Joglekar, Charudatta; Katre, Prachi; Bhat, Dattatray S; Singh, Suraj N; Janipalli, Charles S; Refsum, Helga; Krishnaveni, Ghattu; Veena, Sargoor; Osmond, Clive; Fall, Caroline HD

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disturbed one-carbon (1-C) metabolism in the mother is associated with poor fetal growth but causality of this relationship has not been established. Methods: We studied the association between maternal total homocysteine and offspring birthweight in the Pune Maternal Nutrition Study (PMNS, Pune, India) and Parthenon Cohort Study (Mysore, India). We tested for evidence of causality within a Mendelian randomization framework, using a methylenetetrahydrofolatereductase (MTHFR) gene variant rs1801133 (earlier known as 677C→T) by instrumental variable and triangulation analysis, separately and using meta-analysis. Results: Median (IQR) homocysteine concentration and mean (SD) birthweight were 8.6 µmol/l (6.7,10.8) and 2642 g (379) in the PMNS and 6.0 µmol/l (5.1,7.1) and 2871 g (443) in the Parthenon study. Offspring birthweight was inversely related to maternal homocysteine concentration—PMNS: –22 g/SD [95% confidence interval (CI): (–50, 5), adjusted for gestational age and offspring gender]; Parthenon: –57 g (–92, –21); meta-analysis: –40 g (–62, –17)]. Maternal risk genotype at rs1801133 predicted higher homocysteine concentration [PMNS: 0.30 SD/allele (0.14, 0.46); Parthenon: 0.21 SD (0.02, 0.40); meta-analysis: 0.26 SD (0.14, 0.39)]; and lower birthweight [PMNS: –46 g (–102, 11, adjusted for gestational age, offspring gender and rs1801133 genotype); Parthenon: –78 g (–170, 15); meta-analysis: –61 g (–111, –10)]. Instrumental variable and triangulation analysis supported a causal association between maternal homocysteine concentration and offspring birthweight. Conclusions: Our findings suggest a causal role for maternal homocysteine (1-C metabolism) in fetal growth. Reducing maternal homocysteine concentrations may improve fetal growth. PMID:25052622

  13. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease in the Caerphilly cohort: a 10 year follow up

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, U; Ben-Shlomo, Y; Elwood, P; Ubbink, J; Smith, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Prospective assessment of the risk of coronary heart disease associated with total serum homocyst(e)ine (homocysteine) concentration.
DESIGN—Nested case-control study.
SETTING—Caerphilly and surrounding villages in south Wales, UK.
PARTICIPANTS—2290 men who participated in phase II of the study in 1984. After a mean follow up of 10 years, 312 men developed coronary heart disease and were compared with 1248 randomly selected, age frequency matched controls.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE—Acute myocardial infarction or death from coronary heart disease.
RESULTS—The geometric mean serum homocysteine concentration was higher in cases (12.2 µmol/l, 95% confidence interval (CI) 11.8 to 12.6 µmol/l) than in controls (11.8 µmol/l, 95% CI 11.3 to 12.5 µmol/l) (p = 0.09). There was a graded increase in the odds ratio of coronary heart disease across quintiles of the homocysteine concentration distribution compared with the first (p = 0.04), which was attenuated when adjusted for confounding variables (p = 0.4). There was a small but non-significant increase in the adjusted odds ratio of coronary heart disease per standard deviation change in the log distribution of homocysteine concentration (OR = 1.07 (95% CI .93 to 1.24), p = 0.34). Comparing the top quintile of the homocysteine concentration with the remaining 80%, the adjusted odds ratio of coronary heart disease was 1.03 (95% CI 0.73 to 1.45) (p = 0.8) and comparing the top 5% with the remaining 95% it was 1.05 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.95) (p = 0.9).
CONCLUSIONS—These findings do not support the hypothesis that a raised homocysteine concentration is a strong independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Randomised controlled trials of homocysteine lowering treatment such as folic acid are needed before generalising the early positive results of observational studies.


Keywords: homocysteine; coronary heart disease; cohort PMID:11156664

  14. Investigation of Homocysteine-Pathway-Related Variants in Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fowdar, Javed Y.; Lason, Marta V.; Szvetko, Attila L.; Lea, Rodney A.; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcy) has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Essential hypertension (EH), a polygenic condition, has also been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular related disorders. To investigate the role of the homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism pathway in hypertension we conducted a case-control association study of Hcy pathway gene variants in a cohort of Caucasian hypertensives and age- and sex-matched normotensives. We genotyped two polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C), one polymorphism in the methionine synthase reductase gene (MTRR A66G), and one polymorphism in the methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 gene (MTHFD1 G1958A) and assessed their association with hypertension using chi-square analysis. We also performed a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis to investigate any potential epistatic interactions among the four polymorphisms and EH. None of the four polymorphisms was significantly associated with EH and although we found a moderate synergistic interaction between MTHFR A1298C and MTRR A66G, the association of the interaction model with EH was not statistically significant (P = 0.2367). Our findings therefore suggest no individual or interactive association between four prominent Hcy pathway markers and EH. PMID:23133742

  15. A Mendelian Randomization Study of Plasma Homocysteine and Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yang; Li, Xiao-Hong; Hu, Zhong-Qian; Teng, Zhi-Mei; Hu, Dao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies have demonstrated an association between elevated homocysteine (Hcy) level and risk of multiple myeloma (MM). However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is causal. We conducted a Mendelian randomization (MR) study to evaluate whether genetically increased Hcy level influences the risk of MM. We used the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism as an instrumental variable, which affects the plasma Hcy levels. Estimate of its effect on plasma Hcy level was based on a recent genome-wide meta-analysis of 44,147 individuals, while estimate of its effect on MM risk was obtained through meta-analysis of case-control studies with 2,092 cases and 4,954 controls. By combining these two estimates, we found that per one standard-deviation (SD) increase in natural log-transformed plasma Hcy levels conferred a 2.67-fold increase in risk for MM (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-6.38; P = 2.7 × 10(-2)). Our study suggests that elevated Hcy levels are causally associated with an increased risk of developing MM. Whether Hcy-lowering therapy can prevent MM merits further investigation in long-term randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PMID:27126524

  16. Homocysteine Metabolism in ZDF (Type 2) Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wijekoon, Enoka P.; Hall, Beatrice; Ratnam, Shobhitha; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Zeisel, Steven H.; Brosnan, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for many diseases, including cardiovascular disease. We determined the effects of insulin resistance and of type 2 diabetes on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism using Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF/Gmi fa/fa and ZDF/Gmi fa/?). Plasma total Hcy was reduced in ZDF fa/fa rats by 24% in the pre-diabetic insulin-resistant stage, while in the frank diabetic stage there was a 59% reduction. Hepatic activities of several enzymes that play a role in the removal of Hcy: cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase, and betaine:Hcy methyltransferase (BHMT) were increased as was methionine adenosyltransferase. CBS and BHMT mRNA levels and the hepatic level of S-adenosylmethionine were also increased in the ZDF fa/fa rats. Studies with primary hepatocytes showed that Hcy export and the transsulfuration flux in cells from ZDF fa/fa rats were particularly sensitive to betaine. Interestingly, liver betaine concentration was found to be significantly lower in the ZDf fa/fa rats at both 5 and 11 weeks. These results emphasize the importance of betaine metabolism in determining plasma Hcy levels in type 2 diabetes. PMID:16249451

  17. A Mendelian Randomization Study of Plasma Homocysteine and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Yang; Li, Xiao-Hong; Hu, Zhong-Qian; Teng, Zhi-Mei; Hu, Dao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies have demonstrated an association between elevated homocysteine (Hcy) level and risk of multiple myeloma (MM). However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is causal. We conducted a Mendelian randomization (MR) study to evaluate whether genetically increased Hcy level influences the risk of MM. We used the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism as an instrumental variable, which affects the plasma Hcy levels. Estimate of its effect on plasma Hcy level was based on a recent genome-wide meta-analysis of 44,147 individuals, while estimate of its effect on MM risk was obtained through meta-analysis of case-control studies with 2,092 cases and 4,954 controls. By combining these two estimates, we found that per one standard-deviation (SD) increase in natural log-transformed plasma Hcy levels conferred a 2.67-fold increase in risk for MM (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12–6.38; P = 2.7 × 10−2). Our study suggests that elevated Hcy levels are causally associated with an increased risk of developing MM. Whether Hcy-lowering therapy can prevent MM merits further investigation in long-term randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PMID:27126524

  18. Increased levels of homocysteine in patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Sabiye; Altiparmak, Emin; Topal, Firdevs; Ozaslan, Ersan; Kucukazman, Metin; Yonem, Ozlem

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate serum levels of homocysteine (Hcys) and the risk that altered levels carry for thrombosis development in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. METHODS: 55 UC patients and 45 healthy adults were included. Hcys, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were measured in both groups. Clinical history and thromboembolic events were investigated. RESULTS: The average Hcys level in the UC patients was 13.3 ± 1.93 μmmol/L (range 4.60-87) and was higher than the average Hcys level of the control group which was 11.2 ± 3.58 μmmol/L (range 4.00-20.8) (P < 0.001). Vitamin B12 and folic acid average values were also lower in the UC group (P < 0.001). When multivariate regression analysis was performed, it was seen that folic acid deficiency was the only risk factor for hyperhomocysteinemia. Frequencies of thromboembolic complications were not statistically significantly different in UC and control groups. When those with and without a thrombosis history in the UC group were compared according to Hcys levels, it was seen that there were no statistically significant differences. A negative linear relationship was found between folic acid levels and Hcys. CONCLUSION: We could not find any correlations between Hcys levels and history of prior thromboembolic events. PMID:20480528

  19. Protective mechanisms against homocysteine toxicity: the role of bleomycin hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Zimny, Jaroslaw; Sikora, Marta; Guranowski, Andrzej; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2006-08-11

    Homocysteine (Hcy) editing by methionyl-tRNA synthetase results in the formation of Hcy-thiolactone and initiates a pathway that has been implicated in human disease. In addition to being cleared from the circulation by urinary excretion, Hcy-thiolactone is detoxified by the serum Hcy-thiolactonase/paraoxonase carried on high density lipoprotein. Whether Hcy-thiolactone is detoxified inside cells was unknown. Here we show that Hcy-thiolactone is hydrolyzed by an intracellular enzyme, which we have purified to homogeneity from human placenta and identified by proteomic analyses as human bleomycin hydrolase (hBLH). We have also purified an Hcy-thiolactonase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified it as yeast bleomycin hydrolase (yBLH). BLH belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved cysteine aminopeptidases, and its only known biologically relevant function was deamidation of the anticancer drug bleomycin. Recombinant hBLH or yBLH, expressed in Escherichia coli, exhibits Hcy-thiolactonase activity similar to that of the native enzymes. Active site mutations, C73A for hBLH and H369A for yBLH, inactivate Hcy-thiolactonase activities. Yeast blh1 mutants are deficient in Hcy-thiolactonase activity in vitro and in vivo, produce more Hcy-thiolactone, and exhibit greater sensitivity to Hcy toxicity than wild type yeast cells. Our data suggest that BLH protects cells against Hcy toxicity by hydrolyzing intracellular Hcy-thiolactone. PMID:16769724

  20. What is the influence of hormone therapy on homocysteine and crp levels in postmenopausal women?

    PubMed Central

    Lakryc, Eli Marcelo; Machado, Rogério Bonassi; Soares, José Maria; Fernandes, César Eduardo; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of estrogen therapy and estrogen-progestin therapy on homocysteine and C-reactive protein levels in postmenopausal women. METHODS: In total, 99 postmenopausal women were included in this double-blind, randomized clinical trial and divided into three groups: Group A used estrogen therapy alone (2.0 mg of 17β-estradiol), Group B received estrogen-progestin therapy (2.0 mg of 17 β-estradiol +1.0 mg of norethisterone acetate) and Group C received a placebo (control). The length of treatment was six months. Serum measurements of homocysteine and C-reactive protein were carried out prior to the onset of treatment and following six months of therapy. RESULTS: After six months of treatment, there was a 20.7% reduction in homocysteine levels and a 100.5% increase in C-reactive protein levels in the group of women who used estrogen therapy. With respect to the estrogen-progestin group, there was a 12.2% decrease in homocysteine levels and a 93.5% increase in C-reactive protein levels. CONCLUSION: Our data suggested that hormone therapy (unopposed estrogen or estrogen associated with progestin) may have a positive influence on decreasing cardiovascular risk due to a significant reduction in homocysteine levels. PMID:25789519

  1. Creation of catalytically active particles from enzymes crosslinked with a natural bifunctional agent--homocysteine thiolactone.

    PubMed

    Stroylova, Yulia Y; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Asriyantz, Regina A; Gaillard, Cedric; Haertlé, Thomas; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2014-09-01

    The current study describes an approach to creation of catalytically active particles with increased stability from enzymes by N-homocysteinylation, a naturally presented protein modification. Enzymatic activities and properties of two globular tetrameric enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were studied before and after N-homocysteinylation. Modification of these proteins concerns the accessible lysine residues and introduces an average of 2-2,5 homocysteine residues per protein monomer. Formation of a range of aggregates was observed for both enzymes, which assemble via formation of intermolecular noncovalent bonds and by disulfide bonds. It was demonstrated that both studied enzymes retain their catalytic activities on modification and the subsequent formation of oligomeric forms. At low concentrations of homocysteine thiolactone, modification of GAPDH leads not only to prevention of spontaneous inactivation but also increases thermal stability of this enzyme on heating to 80°C. A moderate reduction of the activity of GAPDH observed in case of its crosslinking with 50-fold excess of homocysteine thiolactone per lysine is probably caused by hindered substrate diffusion. Spherical particles of 100 nm and larger diameters were observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscope techniques after modification of GAPDH with different homocysteine thiolactone concentrations. In case of LDH, branched fibril-like aggregates were observed under the same conditions. Interestingly, crosslinked samples of both proteins were found to have reversible thermal denaturation profiles, indicating that modification with homocysteine thiolactone stabilizes the spatial structure of these enzymes. PMID:24912753

  2. Vitamin C protects low-density lipoprotein from homocysteine-mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Alul, Rushdi H; Wood, Michael; Longo, Joseph; Marcotte, Anthony L; Campione, Allan L; Moore, Michael K; Lynch, Sean M

    2003-04-01

    Homocysteine, an atherogenic amino acid, promotes iron-dependent oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). We investigated whether vitamin C, a physiological antioxidant, could protect LDL from homocysteine-mediated oxidation. LDL (0.2 mg of protein/ml) was incubated at 37 degrees C with homocysteine (1000 microM) and ferric iron (10-100 microM) in either the absence (control) or presence of vitamin C (5-250 microM). Under these conditions, vitamin C protected LDL from oxidation as evidenced by an increased lag time preceding lipid diene formation (> or = 5 vs. 2.5 h for control), decreased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances accumulation (< or = 19 +/- 1 nmol/mg when vitamin C > or = 10 microM vs. 32 +/- 3 nmol/mg for control, p <.01), and decreased lipoprotein anodic electrophoretic mobility. Near-maximal protection was observed at vitamin C concentrations similar to those in human blood (50-100 microM); also, some protection was observed even at low concentrations (5-10 microM). This effect resulted neither from altered iron redox chemistry nor enhanced recycling of vitamin E in LDL. Instead, similar to previous reports for copper-dependent LDL oxidation, we found that vitamin C protected LDL from homocysteine-mediated oxidation through covalent lipoprotein modification involving dehydroascorbic acid. Protection of LDL from homocysteine-mediated oxidation by vitamin C may have implications for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:12654477

  3. Effects of Metformin Treatment on Homocysteine Levels and Metabolic Parameters of Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Riahinejad, Soheila; Mirdamadi, Ahmad; Alizadeh, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women. Metformin is a biguanide commonly used to improve PCOS symptoms. Effect of metformin on the levels of serum homocysteine (Hcy) in PCOS women is unclear. The aim of this study is evaluating the effect of metformin administration on serum Hcy levels and metabolic parameters of PCOS patients. Materials and methods: Thirty three patients with PCOS were enrolled in this study who were selected randomly. All patients received metformin from the fifth day of menstrual cycle at a dose of 850 mg (one tablet daily) for 3 months. Body mass index, Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), fasting blood sugar and homocysteine levels were recorded at entry into the study and after 3 months treatment. Results: BMI, plasma Homocysteine concentrations and fasting blood sugar levels were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after the treatment period. No significant changes were observed in the lipid profiles of patients. There was a weak negative correlation between homocysteine and LDL cholesterol serum levels (p = 0.04, r = -0.27). Conclusion: Treatment with metformin in PCOS women may lead to beneficial effects in terms of BMI, plasma homocysteine concentrations and fasting blood sugar with no remarkable effect on lipid profile. PMID:27047563

  4. Prospective Study of Plasma Homocysteine Level and Risk of Age-related Macular Degeneration in Women

    PubMed Central

    Christen, William G.; Cook, Nancy R.; Ridker, Paul M.; Buring, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prospective data to examine the association of homocysteine and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are limited. We examined the prospective relation of plasma homocysteine level and AMD in a large cohort of apparently healthy women. Methods We evaluated the relationship between baseline levels of plasma homocysteine and incident AMD among 27,479 female health professionals aged 40 years or older. Main outcome measures were total AMD, defined as a self-report documented by medical record evidence of an initial diagnosis after randomization, and visually significant AMD, defined as confirmed incident AMD with visual acuity of 20/30 or worse attributable to this condition. Results During an average of 10 years of follow-up, a total of 452 cases of AMD, including 182 cases of visually-significant AMD, were documented. Women in the highest versus lowest quartile of plasma homocysteine had modestly, but statistically non-significant, increased risks of total (hazard ratio [HR], 1.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95–1.63; p for trend, 0.07) and visually-significant AMD (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.92–2.17; p for trend, 0.052) in age- and treatment-adjusted analyses. Conclusions These prospective data from a large cohort of apparently-healthy women do not support a strong role for homocysteine in AMD occurrence. PMID:25777307

  5. A Sensitive Ratiometric Long-Wavelength Fluorescent Probe for Selective Determination of Cysteine/Homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Manibalan, Kesavan; Chen, Sin-Ming; Mani, Veerappan; Huang, Tsung-Tao; Huang, Sheng-Tung

    2016-07-01

    The development of sensitive fluorescence probes to detect biothiols such as cysteine and homocysteine has attracted great attention in recent times. Herein, we described the design and synthesis of coumarin based long-wavelength fluorescence probe, Bromo-2-benzothiazolyl-3-cyano-7-hydroxy coumarin (BBCH, 2) for selective detections of cysteine and homocysteine. The probe is rationally designed in such a way that both sulfhydryl and adjacent amino groups of thiols are involved in sensing process. Only cysteine/homocysteine able to react with BBCH to release fluorescence reporter (BCH, 1); while, glutathione and other amino acids unable to react with BBCH due to the absence of adjacent amino groups. In presence of cysteine, the color of BBCH is turns from colorless to red and thus BBCH is a naked eye fluorescence indicator for cysteine. Besides, BBCH can discriminate cysteine and homocysteine based on color changes and different reaction rates. The described sensing platform showed good sensing performances to detect cysteine and homocysteine with detection limits of 0.87 and 0.19 μM, respectively. Practical applicability was verified in biological and pharmaceutical samples. PMID:27290640

  6. Folic acid mitigated cardiac dysfunction by normalizing the levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase and homocysteine-metabolizing enzymes postmyocardial infarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qipshidze, Natia; Tyagi, Neetu; Sen, Utpal; Givvimani, Srikanth; Metreveli, Naira; Lominadze, David

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) results in significant metabolic derangement, causing accumulation of metabolic by product, such as homocysteine (Hcy). Hcy is a nonprotein amino acid generated during nucleic acid methylation and demethylation of methionine. Folic acid (FA) decreases Hcy levels by remethylating the Hcy to methionine, by 5-methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (5-MTHFR). Although clinical trials were inconclusive regarding the role of Hcy in MI, in animal models, the levels of 5-MTHFR were decreased, and FA mitigated the MI injury. We hypothesized that FA mitigated MI-induced injury, in part, by mitigating cardiac remodeling during chronic heart failure. Thus, MI was induced in 12-wk-old male C57BL/J mice by ligating the left anterior descending artery, and FA (0.03 g/l in drinking water) was administered for 4 wk after the surgery. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and by a Millar pressure-volume catheter. The levels of Hcy-metabolizing enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 5-MTHFR, were estimated by Western blot analyses. The results suggest that FA administered post-MI significantly improved cardiac ejection fraction and induced tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase, CBS, CSE, and 5-MTHFR. We showed that FA supplementation resulted in significant improvement of myocardial function after MI. The study eluted the importance of homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism and FA supplementation in cardiovascular disease. PMID:20802128

  7. Comparison of Protein N-Homocysteinylation in Rat Plasma under Elevated Homocysteine Using a Specific Chemical Labeling Method.

    PubMed

    Zang, Tianzhu; Pottenplackel, Ligi Paul; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph; Dai, Shujia; Deth, Richard C; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny; Ma, Jisheng

    2016-01-01

    Elevated blood concentrations of homocysteine have been well established as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and neuropsychiatric diseases, yet the etiologic relationship of homocysteine to these disorders remains poorly understood. Protein N-homocysteinylation has been hypothesized as a contributing factor; however, it has not been examined globally owing to the lack of suitable detection methods. We recently developed a selective chemical method to label N-homocysteinylated proteins with a biotin-aldehyde tag followed by Western blotting analysis, which was further optimized in this study. We then investigated the variation of protein N-homocysteinylation in plasma from rats on a vitamin B12 deficient diet. Elevated "total homocysteine" concentrations were determined in rats with a vitamin B12 deficient diet. Correspondingly, overall levels of plasma protein N-homocysteinylation displayed an increased trend, and furthermore, more pronounced and statistically significant changes (e.g., 1.8-fold, p-value: 0.03) were observed for some individual protein bands. Our results suggest that, as expected, a general metabolic correlation exists between "total homocysteine" and N-homocysteinylation, although other factors are involved in homocysteine/homocysteine thiolactone metabolism, such as the transsulfuration of homocysteine by cystathionine β-synthase or the hydrolysis of homocysteine thiolactone by paraoxonase 1 (PON1), may play more significant or direct roles in determining the level of N-homocysteinylation. PMID:27617989

  8. Plasma B vitamins, homocysteine and their relation with bone loss and hip fracture in elderly men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated homocysteine is a strong risk factor for osteoporotic fractures among elders, yet it may be a marker for low B vitamin status. Objective: To examine the associations of plasma concentrations of folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6 and homocysteine with bone loss and hip fracture risk in elderly...

  9. Improved antioxidative defence protects insulin-producing cells against homocysteine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Siobhan M; Hahn, Claudine; Tyka, Karolina; Flatt, Peter R; McClenaghan, Neville H; Lenzen, Sigurd; Gurgul-Convey, Ewa

    2016-08-25

    Homocysteine (HC) is considered to play an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome complications. Insulin-producing cells are prone to HC toxicity and this has been linked to oxidative stress. However, the exact mechanisms remain unknown. Therefore it was the aim of this study to determine the nature of reactive oxygen species responsible for HC toxicity. Chronic exposure of RINm5F and INS1E insulin-producing cells to HC decreased cell viability and glucose-induced insulin secretion in a concentration-dependent manner and led to a significant induction of hydrogen peroxide generation in the cytosolic, but not the mitochondrial compartment of the cell. Cytosolic overexpression of catalase, a hydrogen peroxide detoxifying enzyme, provided a significant protection against viability loss and hydrogen peroxide generation, while mitochondrial overexpression of catalase did not protect against HC toxicity. Overexpression of CuZnSOD, a cytosolic superoxide dismutating enzyme, also protected against HC toxicity. However, the best protection was achieved in the case of a combined overexpression of CuZnSOD and catalase. Incubation of cells in combination with alloxan resulted in a significant increase of HC toxicity and an increase of hydrogen peroxide generation. Overexpression of CuZnSOD or catalase protected against the toxicity of HC plus alloxan, with a superior protection achieved again by combined overexpression. The results indicate that HC induces oxidative stress in insulin-producing cells by stimulation of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide generation in the cytoplasm. The low antioxidative defence status makes the insulin-producing cells very vulnerable to HC toxicity. PMID:27317948

  10. Effects of homocysteine on mesenchymal cell proliferation and differentiation during chondrogenesis on limb development.

    PubMed

    Bourckhardt, Gilian Fernando; Cecchini, Manuela Sozo; Ammar, Dib; Kobus-Bianchini, Karoline; Müller, Yara Maria Rauh; Nazari, Evelise Maria

    2015-11-01

    High levels of homocysteine (Hcy) are related to an increased risk of the occurrence of congenital anomalies, including limb defects. However, few evaluations about how toxic levels of Hcy affect limb development have been reported. We investigated whether Hcy can affect the cell cycle proteins and proteins involved in mesenchymal cell differentiation during limb development, in a chicken embryo model. Embryos were treated with 20 µmol d-l Hcy/50 µl saline at embryonic day 2 and analyzed at embryonic day 6. Untreated control embryos received exclusively 50 µl saline solution. To identify cells in proliferation and cell cycle proteins, as well as Pax1/9 and Sox9 proteins, we performed immunolocalization and flow cytometry analyses using the antibodies anti-phosphohistone H3, anti-p53, anti-p21, anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen, anti-Pax1, anti-Pax9 and anti-Sox9. No significant differences in cell proliferation were observed between Hcy-treated and untreated embryos. We observed a decrease of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen and p21 proteins, both involved in the G1 phase of cell cycle progression. On the other hand, in mesenchymal cells of the limbs, Hcy induces an increase of p53 protein, which can be activated by DNA damage. In cell differentiation, Hcy induced an increase mainly of Pax9 and Sox9 proteins. Our data indicate that the treatment with Hcy changes the mesenchymal cell dynamics during limb development, but does not change the morphology of the cartilage molds. These findings provide information to understand better the cellular basis of the toxicity of Hcy on chondrogenesis during limb development. PMID:25619733

  11. Immunoprotective responses of T helper type 1 stimulatory protein-S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Khare, P; Jaiswal, A K; Tripathi, C D P; Sundar, S; Dube, A

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that a patient in clinical remission of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) remains immune to reinfection, which provides a rationale for the feasibility of a vaccine against this deadly disease. In earlier studies, observation of significant cellular responses in treated Leishmania patients as well as in hamsters against leishmanial antigens from different fractions led to its further proteomic characterization, wherein S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (AdoHcy) was identified as a helper type 1 (Th1) stimulatory protein. The present study includes immunological characterization of this protein, its cellular responses [lymphoproliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production and cytokine responses] in treated Leishmania-infected hamsters and patients as well as prophylactic efficacy against Leishmania challenge in hamsters and the immune responses generated thereof. Significantly higher cellular responses were noticed against recombinant L. donovani S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (rLdAdoHcy) compared to soluble L. donovani antigen in treated samples. Moreover, stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with rLdAdoHcy up-regulated the levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12 and down-regulated IL-10. Furthermore, vaccination with rLdAdoHcy generated perceptible delayed-type hypersensitivity response and exerted considerably good prophylactic efficacy (∼70% inhibition) against L. donovani challenge. The efficacy was confirmed by the increased expression levels of inducible NO synthase and Th1-type cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-12 and down-regulation of IL-4, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The results indicate the potentiality of rLdAdoHcy protein as a suitable vaccine candidate against VL. PMID:26898994

  12. [Homocysteine, vitamin B-12, folic acid and the cognitive decline in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Smach, M A; Naffeti, S; Charfeddine, B; Ben Abdallah, J; Othmen, L B; Letaef, A; Limem, K

    2013-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for neurological diseases, but the underlying pathophysiology has not been adequately explained. Mild hyperhomocysteinemia, which is sometimes associated with a low plasma level of vitamin B9, B12 and folic acid, is responsible in the toxicity in neural cell by activating NMDA receptor. Indeed, even if vitamin supplementation has clearly proven its efficiency on lowering plasma levels of homocysteine, recent studies do not show any positive effect of vitamin therapy on cognitive function. The hypothesis that this therapy is inefficient has been recently reinforced by two randomized trials on the effects of vitamin supplementation. Several hypotheses still need to be explored: Mechanisms of homocysteine toxicity and that of total uselessness of vitamin supplementation; the possible need to complete the actual data with further, more powerful studies in order to prove the role of homocysteine in the development of neurodegenerative diseases and a clinical effect of vitamin therapy. PMID:22647793

  13. Transcriptional regulation of methionine synthase by homocysteine and choline in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzak, Magdalena M; Lewandowska, Irmina; Matthews, Rowena G; Paszewski, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Roles played by homocysteine and choline in the regulation of MS (methionine synthase) have been examined in fungi. The Aspergillus nidulans metH gene encoding MS was cloned and characterized. Its transcription was not regulated by methionine, but was enhanced by homocysteine and repressed by choline and betaine. MS activity levels were regulated in a similar way. The repression by betaine was due to its metabolic conversion to choline, which was found to be very efficient in A. nidulans. Betaine and choline supplementation stimulated growth of leaky metH mutants apparently by decreasing the demand for methyl groups and thus saving methionine and S -adenosylmethionine. We have also found that homocysteine stimulates transcription of MS-encoding genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. PMID:12954077

  14. A fluorescence enhancement probe based on BODIPY for the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Gong, Deyan; Tian, Yuejun; Yang, Chengduan; Iqbal, Anam; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu; Zhu, Xiangtao; Guo, Huichen

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a fluorescent probe BODIPY-based glyoxal hydrazone (BODIPY-GH) (1) for cysteine based on inhibiting of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) quenching process upon reaction with the unsaturated aldehyde has been synthesized, which exhibits longer excitation wavelength, selective and sensitive colorimetric and fluorimetric response toward cysteine in natural media. The probe shows highly selectivity towards cysteine over homocysteine and glutathione as well as other amino acids with a significant fluorescence enhancement response within 15min In the presence of 50 equiv. of homocysteine, the emission increased slightly within 15min and completed in 2.5h to reach its maximum intensity. Therefore, the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione can be achieved through detection of probe 1. It shows low cytotoxicity and excellent membrane permeability toward living cells, which was successfully applied to detect and image intracellular cysteine effectively by confocal fluorescence imaging. PMID:27176916

  15. The Effect of Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D on Elevated Homocysteine Concentrations in Participants of a Preventive Health Program.

    PubMed

    Pham, Truong-Minh; Ekwaru, John Paul; Mastroeni, Silmara S; Mastroeni, Marco F; Loehr, Sarah A; Veugelers, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Both lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and elevated homocysteine concentrations are potential risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). A recent analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reported an inverse association of serum 25(OH)D with homocysteine, however, the longitudinal relationship has yet to be investigated. We hypothesized and examined whether a temporal increase in 25(OH)D concentrations is paralleled by a reduction in the risk for elevated homocysteine. We analyzed data of 4475 participants with repeated assessments of serum 25(OH)D and homocysteine concentrations who enrolled in a preventive health program that encourages vitamin D supplementation and monitors serum 25(OH)D and homocysteine concentrations. We defined elevated homocysteine as concentrations greater than 13 micromoles per liter. Logistic regression was applied to assess the association of temporal changes in serum 25(OH)D with the risk of elevated homocysteine. We observed an inverse gradient whereby greater increases in 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with a lower prevalence of elevated homocysteine. Relative to those without temporal increases in 25(OH)D, participants who showed improvements in their serum 25(OH)D concentrations of "<25", "25-50", "50-75", and "≥75" nanomoles per liter at follow up were 0.92 (95% confidence interval: 0.62-1.37), 0.52 (0.33-0.80), 0.34 (0.20-0.58), and 0.32 (0.19-0.54) times as likely to have elevated homocysteine, respectively. These observations suggest that temporal improvements in vitamin D status reduce serum homocysteine concentrations, and therefore may potentially contribute to the primary prevention of CVD. PMID:27548258

  16. The Effect of Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D on Elevated Homocysteine Concentrations in Participants of a Preventive Health Program

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Truong-Minh; Ekwaru, John Paul; Mastroeni, Silmara S.; Mastroeni, Marco F.; Loehr, Sarah A.; Veugelers, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Both lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and elevated homocysteine concentrations are potential risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). A recent analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reported an inverse association of serum 25(OH)D with homocysteine, however, the longitudinal relationship has yet to be investigated. We hypothesized and examined whether a temporal increase in 25(OH)D concentrations is paralleled by a reduction in the risk for elevated homocysteine. We analyzed data of 4475 participants with repeated assessments of serum 25(OH)D and homocysteine concentrations who enrolled in a preventive health program that encourages vitamin D supplementation and monitors serum 25(OH)D and homocysteine concentrations. We defined elevated homocysteine as concentrations greater than 13 micromoles per liter. Logistic regression was applied to assess the association of temporal changes in serum 25(OH)D with the risk of elevated homocysteine. We observed an inverse gradient whereby greater increases in 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with a lower prevalence of elevated homocysteine. Relative to those without temporal increases in 25(OH)D, participants who showed improvements in their serum 25(OH)D concentrations of “<25”, “25–50”, “50–75”, and “≥75” nanomoles per liter at follow up were 0.92 (95% confidence interval: 0.62–1.37), 0.52 (0.33–0.80), 0.34 (0.20–0.58), and 0.32 (0.19–0.54) times as likely to have elevated homocysteine, respectively. These observations suggest that temporal improvements in vitamin D status reduce serum homocysteine concentrations, and therefore may potentially contribute to the primary prevention of CVD. PMID:27548258

  17. Homocysteine levels are associated with MTHFR A1298C polymorphism in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitender; Das, Swapan K; Sharma, Priyanka; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2005-01-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and is associated with other complex disorders. Homocysteine levels can be elevated due to dietary and/or genetic factors. A majority of Indian population have a low level of vitamin B12 (presumably due to vegetarian diet)--a critical nutritional factor, deficiency of which results in hyperhomocysteinemia. Hence, polymorphisms in the genes responsible for homocysteine metabolism can be perceived to have a greater impact in relation to hyperhomocysteinemia in Indian population. For this reason, the effects of diet and/or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism were assessed in 200 individuals having varying homocysteine levels. Homocysteine levels were significantly elevated in individuals adhering to a vegetarian diet (P = 0.019) or having MTHFR A1298C polymorphism (P = 0.006). The minor allele frequency (MAF) of MTHFR C677T and A1298C was 0.15 and 0.44 respectively in this cohort. Since the MAF of these polymorphisms differed considerably from Caucasian and other Asian populations, frequencies of these polymorphisms were also determined in more than 400 individuals from different ethnic populations, selected from the entire country based on their geographical location and linguistic lineage, and was found to be similar to that of our cohort. The fact that MTHFR A1298C polymorphism is significantly associated with homocysteine levels, and that the CC genotype is present at a higher frequency in the Indian population, makes it extremely relevant in terms of its potential impact on hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:16244782

  18. Chemical pathology of homocysteine. V. Thioretinamide, thioretinaco, and cystathionine synthase function in degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2011-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia was first associated with degenerative disease by observation of accelerated arteriosclerosis in children with inherited disorders of cystathionine synthase, methionine synthase, and methylene tetrohydrofolate reductase. The metabolic blockade of sulfate synthesis from homocysteine thiolactone in malignant cells is ascribed to a deficiency of a chemopreventive derivative of homocysteine thiolactone that occurs in normal cells. Its chemical structure was elucidated by the organic synthesis of thioretinamide from retinoic acid and homocysteine thiolactone. Oxidation of the sulfur atom of homocysteine is inhibited in scorbutic guinea pigs, demonstrating ascorbate function in sulfate synthesis from homocysteine. Studies of homocysteine metabolism in protein energy malnutrition led to the conclusion that the biosynthesis of thioretinamide from the retinol of transthyretin is catalyzed by dehydroascorbate and superoxide generated from the heme oxygenase group of cystathionine synthase. Newly synthesized thioretinamide is complexed with cobalamin to form thioretinaco, which is activated by ozone and oxygen to function as the active site of oxidative phosphorylation. In accordance with the trophoblastic theory of cancer, pancreatic enzymes are believed to be oncolytic because they hydrolyze the homocysteinylated proteins, nucleic acids and glycosaminoglycans of malignant tissues. The clonal selection of malignant cells that are deficient in the heme oxygenase function of cystathionine synthase produces cells dependent upon glycolysis for ATP synthesis, since they are deficient in synthesis of thioretinamide, thioretinaco and thioretinaco ozonide. The vulnerable plaque of arteriosclerosis originates from complexes of microbes with homocysteinylated lipoproteins, obstructing vasa vasorum narrowed by endothelial dysfunction, causing arterial ischemia, and intimal micro-abscesses. Degenerative diseases may be ameliorated by a proposed therapeutic protocol

  19. Association between Homocysteine and Bone Mineral Density according to Age and Sex in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Il; Moon, Ji Hyun; Chung, Hye Won; Kong, Mi Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several studies about the relationship between serum homocysteine levels and bone mineral density (BMD), but the results are varied, and the studies are limited in Korea. In our study, the relationship between serum homocysteine levels and BMD by part according to age and sex is investigated. Methods From March 2012 to July 2015, the 3,337 healthy adults who took a medical examination were recruited. Subjects filled in the self-recording type questionnaire and physical examination, blood test, BMD of lumbar spine and femur were measured. After sorting by aging (≤49 year old, 50-59 year old, ≥60 year old) and sex, the results were adjusted with age and body mass index (BMI) and the relationship between serum homocysteine levels and BMD by lumbar spine and femur was analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results As results of analysis, with the adjustment with age and BMI, all age groups of men had no significant relationship between log-converted serum homocysteine levels and BMD. In women aged under 50, there were significantly negative relationships at lumbar spine (β=-0.028, P=0.038), femur neck (β=-0.062, P=0.001), and total hip (β=-0.076, P<0.001), but there was no significant relationship in other age groups (50-59 year old and ≥60 year old). Conclusions As the serum homocysteine levels increased in women aged under 50, BMD of the lumbar spine and femur decreased, and correlations between homocysteine and BMD were different by sex and age. PMID:27622176

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Total Plasma Homocysteine by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Libin; Sharer, J Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Homocysteine is a nonessential, sulfur-containing amino acid involved in one-carbon (folate) metabolism. A number of inherited and acquired conditions cause increased accumulation of this metabolite in blood (homocysteinemia) and other biofluids. Homocysteinemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, including recurrent thrombosis. Accurate measurement of total plasma homocysteine is an important element in the diagnostic evaluation of these disorders. While a number of different methods have been developed for this purpose, the focus of this unit will be on a specific technique utilizing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, which provides several advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, and specificity. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27037487

  1. Involvement of hydrogen sulfide and homocysteine transsulfuration pathway in the progression of kidney fibrosis after ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyong-Jin; Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Han, Sang Jun; Park, Jeen-Woo; Park, Kwon Moo

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) in the transsulfuration pathway of homocysteine plays a number of pathophysiological roles. Hyperhomocysteinemia is involved in kidney fibrosis. However, the role of H2S in kidney fibrosis remains to be defined. Here, we investigated the role of H2S and its acting mechanism in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UO)-induced kidney fibrosis in mice. UO decreased expressions of CBS and CSE in the kidney with decrease of H2S concentration. Treatment with sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS, a H2S producer) during UO reduced UO-induced oxidative stress with preservations of catalase, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) expression, and glutathione level. In addition, NaHS mitigated decreases of CBS and CSE expressions, and H2S concentration in the kidney. NaHS treatment attenuated UO-induced increases in levels of TGF-β1, activated Smad3, and activated NF-κB. This study provided the first evidence of involvement of the transsulfuration pathway and H2S in UO-induced kidney fibrosis, suggesting that H2S and its transsulfuration pathway may be a potential target for development of therapeutics for fibrosis-related diseases. PMID:23846016

  2. Age dependent levels of plasma homocysteine and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Aruna; Ilango, K; Singh, Praveen K; Karmakar, Dipankar; Singh, G P I; Kumari, Rinki; Dubey, G P

    2015-04-15

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (hcy) levels, also known as hyperhomocysteinemia (hhcy), have been associated with cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative disorders. Hhcy has been attributed to deficiency of B vitamins which can adversely affect the brain and result in memory loss and poor attention power. Monitoring hcy levels and the use of vitamin supplementation to treat hhcy may therefore prove advantageous for the prevention and management of cognitive impairment. With this in consideration, we measured plasma hcy, folate and vitamin B12 levels in 639 subjects from different age groups in two sub-regions of India. Cognitive function was also measured using attention span and immediate and delayed memory recall tests. Depression scores were obtained using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and functional impairment was assessed using the functional activities questionnaire (FAQ) score. As hhcy has also been linked to inflammation, plasma levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were also measured. The results demonstrated significant negative correlations between hcy levels and folic acid levels, vitamin B12 levels and cognitive performance (attention span and delayed but not immediate memory recall) along with significant positive correlations between hcy levels and depression scores and hsCRP (but not IL-6) levels. A positive correlation was also observed between hcy levels and FAQ scores, however this was not found to be significant. Based on these results, folic acid and vitamin B12 intervention in people with elevated hcy levels in India could prove to be effective in lowering hcy levels and help maintain or improve cognitive function. PMID:25601573

  3. Subacute methotrexate neurotoxicity and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in a 12-year-old with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism: homocysteine-mediated methotrexate neurotoxicity via direct endothelial injury.

    PubMed

    Mahadeo, Kris M; Dhall, Girish; Panigrahy, Ashok; Lastra, Carlos; Ettinger, Lawrence J

    2010-02-01

    From as early as the 1970s methotrexate has been associated with disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy and other neurotoxic sequelae. Yet, a clear mechanism for methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity has not been established. The authors describe the case of a 12-year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a homozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation, who developed subacute methotrexate-induced toxicity and cerebral venous thrombosis after receiving intrathecal methotrexate. The role of homocysteine as a possible mediator in methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity via direct endothelial injury is discussed. PMID:20121554

  4. Oxidative markers, nitric oxide and homocysteine alteration in hypercholesterolimic rats: role of atorvastatine and cinnamon.

    PubMed

    Amin, Kamal A; Abd El-Twab, Thanaa M

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effects of atorvastatin and cinnamon on serum lipid profile, oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, hepatic enzymes activities, nitric oxide (NO) as well as homocysteine (Hcy) in hypercholesterolemic rats, 48 male albino rats, weighing 130-190 gm were divided into 2 groups, normal group fed on basal rat chow diet (n=12) and high cholesterol group (HCD) were fed on 1% cholesterol-enriched diet for 15 day (n=36). Hypercholesterolemic rats were divided into 3 subgroups (n=12 for each) fed the same diet and treated with atorvastatine (HCD+Atorvastatin) or cinnamon extract (HCD+cinnamon) or none treated (HCD) for 3&6 weeks. Serum triglycerides (TG), Total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), ALT, AST, NO, Hcy, hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH), Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes, Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity were measured. Results showed that HCD increased significantly TG, TC, LDL-C, ALT, AST, Hcy and hepatic MDA, while lowered significantly antioxidant enzyme activities and NO levels. Atorvastatin therapy significantly increased HDL-C, NO and antioxidant activity while decreased LDL-C, MDA and Hcy concentrations. Serum TG, TC, LDL-C, ALT, AST and hepatic MDA levels were significantly lowered meanwhile, serum HDL, NO values and hepatic antioxidant activities were significantly, higher in cinnamon-treated than untreated group. These results indicate that lipid abnormalities, oxidative injury and hyperhomocystienemia were induced by HCD and this study recommend that administration of atorvastatine or cinnamon provided protection against the lipemic-oxidative disorder and act as hypocholesterolemic, hepatoprotective agent and improve cardiovascular function through modulation of oxidative stress, NO and Hcy. PMID:19918318

  5. Role of homocysteine in age-related vascular and non-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Parnetti, L; Bottiglieri, T; Lowenthal, D

    1997-08-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) may represent a metabolic link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular diseases and old-age dementias. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease, and is also associated with cerebrovascular disease; specifically, the risk of extracranial carotid atherosclerosis significantly increases in relation to Hcy levels. Hcy is a reliable marker of vitamin B12 deficiency, a common condition in the elderly which is known to induce neurological deficits including cognitive impairment; a high prevalence of folate deficiency has been reported in psychogeriatric patients suffering from depression and dementia. Both these vitamins occupy a key position in the remethylation and synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), a major methyl donor in CNS; therefore, deficiencies in either of these vitamins lead to a decrease in SAMe and increase in Hcy, which can be critical in the aging brain. Another pathogenetic mechanism linking high Hcy levels to reduced cognitive performances in the elderly might be represented by excitotoxicity, since hyperhomocysteinemia may lead to an excessive production of homocysteic acid and cysteine sulphinic acid, which act as endogenous agonists of NMDA receptors. Considering the reasonably high prevalence in the general population of a genetic predisposition to a thermolabile form of the enzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), hyperhomocysteinemia can be seen as the result of multiple genetic and environmental factors leading to vascular and/or neurodegenerative disorders where age-related involutive phenomena represent a common pathogenetic ground. Systematic studies in different psychogeriatric conditions monitoring Hcy levels and clinical features before and after vitamin supplementation are therefore highly recommended. PMID:9359935

  6. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation to an osteogenic phenotype involves matrix metalloproteinase-2 modulation by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingjiao; Lin, Jinghan; Ju, Ting; Chu, Lei; Zhang, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Arterial calcification is common in vascular diseases and involves conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to an osteoblast phenotype. Clinical studies suggest that the development of atherosclerosis can be promoted by homocysteine (HCY), but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we determined whether increases in HCY levels lead to an increase in VSMC calcification and differentiation, and examined the role of an extracellular matrix remodeler, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Rat VSMCs were exposed to calcification medium in the absence or presence of HCY (10, 100 or 200 μmol/L) or an MMP-2 inhibitor (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L). MTT assays were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of the MMP-2 inhibitor in calcification medium containing 200 μmol/L HCY. Calcification was assessed by measurements of calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as von Kossa staining. Expression of osteocalcin, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, and osteopontin, and MMP-2 was determined by immunoblotting. Calcification medium induced osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs. HCY promoted calcification, increased osteocalcin and BMP-2 expression, and decreased expression of osteopontin. MMP-2 expression was increased by HCY in a dose-dependent manner in VSMCs exposed to both control and calcification medium. The MMP-2 inhibitor decreased the calcium content and ALP activity, and attenuated the osteoblastic phenotype of VSMCs. Vascular calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs were positively regulated by HCY through increased/restored MMP-2 expression, increased expression of calcification proteins, and decreased anti-calcification protein levels. In summary, MMP-2 inhibition may be a protective strategy against VSMC calcification. PMID:25987498

  7. Oxidative markers, nitric oxide and homocysteine alteration in hypercholesterolimic rats: role of atorvastatine and cinnamon

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kamal A.; Abd El-Twab, Thanaa M.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effects of atorvastatin and cinnamon on serum lipid profile, oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, hepatic enzymes activities, nitric oxide (NO) as well as homocysteine (Hcy) in hypercholesterolemic rats, 48 male albino rats, weighing 130–190 gm were divided into 2 groups, normal group fed on basal rat chow diet (n=12) and high cholesterol group (HCD) were fed on 1% cholesterol-enriched diet for 15 day (n=36). Hypercholesterolemic rats were divided into 3 subgroups (n=12 for each) fed the same diet and treated with atorvastatine (HCD+Atorvastatin) or cinnamon extract (HCD+cinnamon) or none treated (HCD) for 3&6 weeks. Serum triglycerides (TG), Total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), ALT, AST, NO, Hcy, hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH), Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes, Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity were measured. Results showed that HCD increased significantly TG, TC, LDL-C, ALT, AST, Hcy and hepatic MDA, while lowered significantly antioxidant enzyme activities and NO levels. Atorvastatin therapy significantly increased HDL-C, NO and antioxidant activity while decreased LDL-C, MDA and Hcy concentrations. Serum TG, TC, LDL-C, ALT, AST and hepatic MDA levels were significantly lowered meanwhile, serum HDL, NO values and hepatic antioxidant activities were significantly, higher in cinnamon-treated than untreated group. These results indicate that lipid abnormalities, oxidative injury and hyperhomocystienemia were induced by HCD and this study recommend that administration of atorvastatine or cinnamon provided protection against the lipemic-oxidative disorder and act as hypocholesterolemic, hepatoprotective agent and improve cardiovascular function through modulation of oxidative stress, NO and Hcy. PMID:19918318

  8. Treatable high homocysteine alone or in concert with five other thrombophilias in 1014 patients with thrombotic events.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Smith, Domonique; Gandhi, Niral; Hemachandra, Kailash; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In 1014 patients with thrombotic events, we determined how often treatable high serum homocysteine alone, or in concert with five other thrombophilias, was associated with thrombotic events. We studied 1014 outpatients sequentially referred for evaluation of thrombotic events, all having six measures of thrombophilia--three PCR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T-A1298C, factor V Leiden G506A, prothrombin G20210A), and three serologic (factors VIII, XI, homocysteine). Of the 1014 patients, 198 (20%) had atherothrombosis, 199 (20%) ocular vascular thrombosis, 211 (21%) osteonecrosis, 180 (18%) pseudotumor cerebri, and 123 (12%) recurrent miscarriage. In 434 of 1014 (43%) patients, all six thrombophilic measures were normal. High homocysteine, present in 126 of 1014 patients (12.4%), was the sole thrombophilia in 50 (5%), accompanied only by methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygosity-compound heterozygosity in 22 (2.2%), and accompanied by other thrombophilias in 54 (5%). Patients were more likely than 110 healthy controls to have high homocysteine (12 vs. 5%; P = 0.02) and high factor VIII (21 vs. 7%; P = 0.0003). On treatment for a median of 18 months with L-methyl folate (5 mg), vitamin B6 (100 mg), and vitamin B12 (2 mg/day), in 74 homocysteinemic patients, median homocysteine fell from 15.6 to 10.0 μmol/l (P < 0.0001), and in 56 (76%), homocysteine fell to normal on treatment. When homocysteinemia was the sole thrombophilia, normalization of homocysteine was accompanied by freedom from new thrombotic events in 38 of 41 patients (93%). In evaluation of 1014 patients with thrombotic events, 126 (12%) had treatable high serum homocysteine, and in 50 (5%), high homocysteine was the sole treatable thrombophilia. PMID:25699608

  9. Dietary selenium (Se) and copper (Cu) interact to affect homocysteine metabolism in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we reported that both Se deficiency (SeD) and Cu deficiency (CuD) decreased plasma homocysteine (pHcys) and increased plasma glutathione (pGSH) in rats. We also showed that the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gclc), which catalyzes the rate limiting step in glutathione bio...

  10. Quercetin Increases Hepatic Homocysteine Remethylation and Transsulfuration in Rats Fed a Methionine-Enriched Diet

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Bin; Gao, Weina; Wei, Jingyu; Pu, Lingling; Tang, Zhenchuang; Guo, Changjiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effects of quercetin on mRNA expression and activity of critical enzymes in homocysteine metabolism in rats fed a methionine-enriched diet. Rats were fed for 6 weeks the following diets, that is, control, 0.5% quercetin, 1.0% methionine, and 1.0% methionine plus 0.5% quercetin diets. Serum homocysteine was significantly increased after methionine treatment and decreased after the addition of quercetin. The mRNA expression of methionine synthase was significantly increased after methionine or methionine plus quercetin supplementation, while its enzymatic activity was significantly increased after methionine plus quercetin supplementation. The mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase were upregulated after quercetin, methionine, or quercetin plus methionine treatment and a more significant increase was observed for hepatic cystathionine β-synthase in the methionine plus quercetin treated rats, suggesting an interaction between methionine and quercetin. Meanwhile, hepatic ratio of S-adenosylmethionine to S-adenosylhomocysteine was significantly decreased in response to methionine supplementation and normalized after the addition of quercetin. It is concluded that quercetin reduces serum homocysteine by increasing remethylation and transsulfuration of homocysteine in rats exposed to a methionine-enriched diet. PMID:26558284

  11. Homocysteine, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, folate status and atherothrombosis: A mechanistic and clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Davì, Giovanni; Patrono, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    Observational studies consistently reported an association between plasma total homocysteine concentrations and the risk of vascular events. In contrast, data from randomized trials largely support the hypothesis that mild elevations in homocysteine level have a modest effect on cardiovascular risk. A substantial body of evidence suggests that platelet activation is, at least in part, a transducer of the effects of high homocysteine in promoting atherothrombosis. The larger treatment effect recorded in several supplementation trials by subjects not on antiplatelet agents may support this hypothesis and justify, at least in part, the success of folate therapy in primary prevention. Circulating folate and homocysteine levels as well as MTHFR genotype, while emerging as major predictors of the risk of vascular events and of the efficacy of folic acid therapy, have also proved to be determinants of an interindividual variability in the degree of lipid peroxidation and platelet activation, and of the extent of their downregulation by folic acid. This may justify a variability in folate requirements, to be further characterized with dose-finding studies using biochemical endpoints. The combination of low-dose aspirin and low-dose folate would appear to be ideally suited for the primary prevention of both coronary and cerebrovascular events, and additional clinical trials should assess the efficacy and safety of these agents. PMID:26111718

  12. Total plasma homocysteine and arteriosclerotic outcomes in type 2 diabetes with nephropathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total serum homocysteine (tHcy) has been shown to predict de novo and recurrent cardiovascular events in many studies. However, results in diabetic populations with minimal nephropathy are mixed. The independent relationship between tHcy and arteriosclerotic outcomes and congestive heart failure (CH...

  13. A Community Based Study of the Relationship Between Homocysteine and Some of the Life Style Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ghose, M.; Borah, N. C.; Choudhury, N.

    2010-01-01

    Till date no community based data on plasma homocysteine is available in North Eastern Region. Hence, the present study was conducted to analyze and correlate the plasma homocysteine level with some life style factors like diet, alcohol intake, smoking habit and body weight, in a cross-section of population. 12 h fasting samples of 970 apparently healthy, Assamese population of both genders in the age group of 35–86 years, mostly from the urban area of Assam were tested for plasma total homocysteine level over a period of 3 years. Out of 970 volunteers, hyperhomocysteinemia was detected in 533 (55%) individuals with a mean value of 18.41 μmol/l. Of that hyperhomocysteinemia, 89.1% were in the range of moderately high and rest 10.9% were intermediate high. Another finding was that males had a tendency towards greater value (mean = 20.36 μmol/l) than females (mean = 16.37 μmol/l). It was observed that the relationship of homocysteine levels to gender and some of the life style factors were also significant. PMID:21731201

  14. Boron deprivation increases plasma homocysteine, a factor negatively associated with bone composition and strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron (B) deprivation decreases trabecular bone in vertebrae of rats. Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) has been associated with decreased trabecular bone. S-adenosylmethionine, an intermediate in the formation of Hcy, has the highest known affinity for B of all mammalian biocompounds examined. Thu...

  15. The Association of Homocysteine and Related Factors to Brachial Artery Diameter and Flow-Mediated Dilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD) has been proposed as a measurement of the degree and severity of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the associations between BAFMD and homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, (2) examine the influence of 5,10-me...

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of plant S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (Lupinus luteus)

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Bujacz, Grzegorz; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2008-07-01

    Single crystals of recombinant S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase from L. luteus in complex with adenosine diffract X-rays to 1.17 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals are tetragonal, space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, and contain one copy of the dimeric enzyme in the asymmetric unit. By degrading S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine, which is a byproduct of S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methylation reactions, S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHase) acts as a regulator of cellular methylation processes. S-Adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase from the leguminose plant yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus), LlSAHase, which is composed of 485 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 55 kDa, has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals of LlSAHase in complex with adenosine were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 20%(w/v) PEG 4000 and 10%(v/v) 2-propanol as precipitants in 0.1 M Tris–HCl buffer pH 8.0. The crystals were tetragonal, space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.4, c = 126.5 Å and contained two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit, corresponding to the functional dimeric form of the enzyme. Atomic resolution (1.17 Å) X-ray diffraction data have been collected using synchrotron radiation.

  17. Relationship of Circulating Total Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein to Trabecular Bone in Postmenopausal Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homocysteine (Hcy) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are novel risk factors for osteoporosis. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the relationship of Hcy and CRP to volumetric trabecular bone, but also to assess their relationship to areal composite bone in healthy postmenopausal women (N=184)....

  18. Trials That Matter: Should We Routinely Measure Homocysteine Levels and “Treat” Mild Hyperhomocysteinemia?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several observational studies involving healthy populations in the 1990s showed positive associations between elevated homocysteine level and increased risk for ischemic heart disease and stroke. Several small trials conducted in western populations in the early and mid-1990s suggested that “daily s...

  19. Dietary selenium affects homocysteine metabolism differently in Fisher-344 rats and CD-1 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous work showed that plasma and tissue homocysteine concentrations are decreased by selenium deprivation in rats. The purpose of this study was to follow up and expand on that work by determining the effects of selenium status (deficient, adequate, and supranutritional) on key aspects of ho...

  20. ESTROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY REDUCES TOTAL PLASMA HOMOCYSTEINE AND CONCURRENTLY ENHANCES GENOMIC DNA METHYLATION IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), which can affect the risk of major cancers, has been known to reduce total plasma homocysteine concentrations in postmenopausal women, the mechanisms and subsequent molecular changes have not yet been defined. To investigate the effect of ERT on homocyste...

  1. Effects of betaine on body composition, performance, and homocysteine thiolactone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects of long term betaine supplementation on body composition, performance, and homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL) in experienced strength trained men. Methods Twenty-three subjects were matched for training experience (4.8 ± 2.3 years) and body fat percentage (BF%: 16.9 ± 8.0%), randomly assigned to either a placebo (PL; n = 12) or betaine group (BET; n = 11; 2.5 g/day), and completed a 6 week periodized training program consisting of 3 two-week micro-cycles. Bench press and back squat training volumes were recorded and changes in training volume were assessed at each micro-cycle. Fasting urine was collected at baseline (BL), weeks 2, 4 and 6, and assayed for HCTL. Subjects were tested prior to and following 6 weeks of treatment. Arm and thigh cross sectional area (CSA) was estimated via girth and skin fold measurements. Body density was estimated via skin fold calipers and used to estimate BF%, fat mass (FM), and lean body mass (LBM). Performance was assessed via vertical jump (VJ), bench press 1 RM (BP), and back squat 1 RM (BS). Results Arm CSA increased significantly (p < .05) in BET but not PL. No differences existed between group and time for changes in thigh CSA. Back squat training volume increased significantly (p < .05) for both groups throughout training. Bench press training volume was significantly (p < .05) improved for BET compared to PL at microcycles one and three. Body composition (BF%, FM, LBM) improved significantly (p < .05) in BET but not PL. No differences were found in performance variables (BP, BS, VJ) between groups, except there was a trend (p = .07) for increased VJ power in BET versus PL. A significant interaction (p < .05) existed for HCTL, with increases from BL to week 2 in PL, but not BET. Additionally, HCTL remained elevated at week 4 in PL, but not BET. Conclusion Six-weeks of betaine supplementation improved body composition, arm size, bench press

  2. Homocysteine lowering for stroke prevention: Unravelling the complexity of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2016-10-01

    Elevated levels of total homocysteine impair endothelial dysfunction and increase thrombosis. Homocysteine is causal in animal models, and in human studies, elevated total homocysteine is significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis, lacunar infarction, and markedly increased risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Because two of the early large trials of B vitamin therapy (Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention and the Norwegian Vitamin Study) did not show any reduction of stroke, and the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation 2 trial was mistakenly interpreted as not showing a reduction of stroke (because the authors could not think of a biological difference between stroke and myocardial infarction), there has been widespread pessimism regarding treatment to lower total homocysteine for stroke prevention. However, the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation 2 trial, the French trial of folic acid and omega three oils, the Vitamins to Prevent Stroke subgroup excluding antiplatelet therapy all showed a significant reduction of stroke. Reasons why the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention trial were negative included folate fortification in North America, provision of injections of B12 to patients with low baseline serum B12, and as it turns out, harm from cyanide in cyanocobalamin among participants with impaired renal function. In the Diabetic Intervention with Vitamins in Nephropathy trial, B vitamins including cyanocobalamin were harmful, and in a Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention subgroup excluding participants who received B12 injections and those with impaired renal function, there was a statistically significant reduction of stroke/myocardial infarction/vascular death. In 2015, the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT), in over 20,000 participants followed for 5 years, showed a significant reduction of stroke with folic acid in a setting where folate fortification has not been implemented. In the setting of folate fortification

  3. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells involved in the modulation of calcium sensing receptor in high homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwen; Wang, Xiyao; Liang, Xiaohui; Wu, Jichao; Dong, Shiyun; Li, Hongzhu; Jin, Meili; Sun, Dianjun; Zhang, Weihua; Zhong, Xin

    2016-09-10

    Hyperhomocysteinemia induces the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits the phenotype switch of VSMCs and calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulated the production of endogenous H2S. However, whether CaSR inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs by regulating the endogenous cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H2S) pathway in high homocysteine (HHcy) has not been previously investigated. The intracellular calcium concentration, the concentration of H2S, the cell viability, the proliferation and the expression of proteins of cultured VSMCs from rat thoracic aortas were measured, respectively. The results showed that the [Ca(2+)]i and the expression of p-CaMK and CSE increased upon treatment with CaSR agonist. In HHcy, the H2S concentration decrease, the proliferation and migration rate increased, the expression of Cyclin D1, PCNA, Osteopontin and p-Erk1/2 increased while the α-SM actin, P21(Cip/WAK-1) and Calponin decreased. The CaSR agonist or exogenous H2S significantly reversed the changes of VSMCs caused by HHcy. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CaSR regulate the endogenous CSE/H2S is related to the PLC-IP3 receptor and CaM signal pathways which inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs, and the latter is involved in the Erk1/2 dependent signal pathway in high homocysteine. PMID:27502588

  4. Erythrocyte fatty acid profiles and plasma homocysteine, folate and vitamin B6 and B12 in recurrent depression: Implications for co-morbidity with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Assies, Johanna; Mocking, Roel J T; Lok, Anja; Koeter, Maarten W J; Bockting, Claudi L H; Visser, Ieke; Pouwer, François; Ruhé, Henricus G; Schene, Aart H

    2015-10-30

    Oxidative stress induced interactions between fatty acid (FA) and one-carbon metabolism may be involved in co-occurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), which have been scarcely studied together. In 137 recurrent MDD-patients vs. 73 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, we simultaneously measured key components of one-carbon metabolism in plasma (homocysteine, folate, vitamins B6 and B12), and of FA-metabolism in red blood cell membranes [main polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (AA) and structural FA-indices (chain length, unsaturation, peroxidation)]. Results show significant positive associations of folate with EPA, DHA, and the peroxidation index, which were similar in patients and controls. After correction for confounders, these associations were lost except for EPA. Associations between B-vitamins and FA-parameters were non-significant, but also similar in patients and controls. Homocysteine and DHA were significantly less negatively associated in patients than in controls. In conclusion, these data indicate similarities but also differences in associations between parameters of one-carbon and FA-metabolism in recurrent MDD patients vs. controls, which may reflect differences in handling of oxidative stress. Further research should test the consequences of these differences, particularly the premature development of CVD in MDD. PMID:26260568

  5. The worldwide challenge of the dementias: a role for B vitamins and homocysteine?

    PubMed

    Smith, A David

    2008-06-01

    Dementia has reached epidemic proportions, with an estimated 4.6 million new cases worldwide each year. With an aging world population, the prevalence of dementia will increase dramatically in the next few decades. Of the predicted 114 million who will have dementia in 2050, about three-quarters will live in less developed regions. Although strongly age-related, dementia is not an inevitable part of aging but is a true disease, caused by exposure to several genetic and nongenetic risk factors. Prevention will be possible when the nongenetic risk factors have been identified. Apart from age, more than 20 nongenetic risk factors have been postulated, but very few have been established by randomized intervention studies. Elevated blood concentrations of total homocysteine and low-normal concentrations of B vitamins (folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6) are candidate risk factors for both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Seventy-seven cross-sectional studies on more than 34,000 subjects and 33 prospective studies on more than 12,000 subjects have shown associations between cognitive deficit or dementia and homocysteine and/or B vitamins. Biologically plausible mechanisms have been proposed to account for these associations, including atrophy of the cerebral cortex, but a definite causal pathway has yet to be shown. Raised plasma total homocysteine is a strong prognostic marker of future cognitive decline, and is common in world populations. Low-normal concentrations of the B vitamins, the main determinant of homocysteine concentrations, are also common and occur in particularly vulnerable sections of the population, such as infants and elderly. Large-scale randomized trials of homocysteine-lowering vitamins are needed to see if a proportion of dementia in the world can be prevented. PMID:18709889

  6. Effective homocysteine metabolism may protect South African blacks against coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ubbink, J B; Vermaak, W J; Delport, R; van der Merwe, A; Becker, P J; Potgieter, H

    1995-10-01

    L-Methionine (0.1 g/kg body wt) was administered to young white [n = 18; mean (+/- SD) age 20.0 +/- 1.0 y] and black [n = 12; mean (+/- SD) age 22.0 +/- 1.3 y] volunteers who had a similar lifestyle and who did not differ significantly from each other with respect to plasma folate or vitamin B-12 concentrations. Blacks, however, had significantly lower plasma pyridoxal-5'-phosphate concentrations compared with whites (P < 0.001). Fasting plasma homocysteine concentrations in blacks and whites were not significantly different. The mean (+/- SD) maximum increase in plasma homocysteine concentration measured after methionine loading was significantly lower (P < 0.01) in blacks (11.0 +/- 3.6 mumol/L) than in whites (18.0 +/- 6.2 mumol/L). Six weeks of vitamin supplementation (1.0 mg folic acid, 400 micrograms vitamin B-12, and 10 mg pyridoxine/d) reduced the mean (+/- SD) fasting plasma homocysteine concentration from 9.6 +/- 3.5 to 7.2 +/- 1.6 mumol/L in whites (P < 0.05) and from 8.4 +/- 2.4 to 5.6 +/- 1.4 mumol/L in blacks (P < 0.01). The mean (+/- SD) maximum increase in plasma homocysteine concentration after methionine loading declined from 18.0 +/- 6.2 to 11.1 +/- 2.3 mumol/L (P < 0.01) in whites, but vitamin supplementation did not have a significant effect on the methionine-load test in black volunteers. A significant race-by-time interaction shows that blacks metabolized homocysteine more effectively than did whites, which may partly explain their relative resistance against coronary heart disease despite a high prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and smoking. PMID:7572713

  7. Homocysteine Triggers Inflammatory Responses in Macrophages through Inhibiting CSE-H2S Signaling via DNA Hypermethylation of CSE Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Qian; Du, Hua-Ping; Wang, Ya-Li; You, Shou-Jiang; Wang, Fen; Xu, Xing-Shun; Cheng, Jian; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. Unfortunately, Hcy-lowering strategies were found to have limited effects in reducing cardiovascular events. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Increasing evidence reveals a role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of HHcy. Homocysteine (Hcy) is a precursor of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is formed via the transsulfuration pathway catalyzed by cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and serves as a novel modulator of inflammation. In the present study, we showed that methionine supplementation induced mild HHcy in mice, associated with the elevations of TNF-α and IL-1β in the plasma and reductions of plasma H2S level and CSE expression in the peritoneal macrophages. H2S-releasing compound GYY4137 attenuated the increases of TNF-α and IL-1β in the plasma of HHcy mice and Hcy-treated raw264.7 cells while CSE inhibitor PAG exacerbated it. Moreover, the in vitro study showed that Hcy inhibited CSE expression and H2S production in macrophages, accompanied by the increases of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) expression and DNA hypermethylation in cse promoter region. DNMT inhibition or knockdown reversed the decrease of CSE transcription induced by Hcy in macrophages. In sum, our findings demonstrate that Hcy may trigger inflammation through inhibiting CSE-H2S signaling, associated with increased promoter DNA methylation and transcriptional repression of cse in macrophages. PMID:26047341

  8. Novel Clinical Evidence of an Association between Homocysteine and Insulin Resistance in Patients with Hypothyroidism or Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Gao, Xia; Fan, Hui; Hu, Yanjin; Zhang, Heng; Xu, Yuan; Qu, Aijuan; Wang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypothyroidism (HO) can induce significant metabolic dysfunction and increase cardiovascular disease risk. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between homocysteine (Hcy) and insulin resistance (IR) in patients with HO or subclinical hypothyroidism (SHO). Methods A total of 270 subjects were enrolled. All subjects were divided into the following three groups: HO, SHO and control. Plasma levels of Hcy were measured, and each patient’s homeostatic index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. Statistical analyses were carried out to evaluate the correlations among groups and to determine the predictors of IR in patients with HO or SHO. Results The HOMA-IR value was significantly higher in the HO group than in the SHO and control groups. Plasma levels of Hcy were markedly increased in the HO group compared with those of the SHO group and controls. In addition, plasma levels of Hcy were positively correlated with the HOMA-IR values in both the HO and SHO groups. Multiple linear regression models showed that plasma levels of Hcy and free thyroxine (FT4) were the only predictors of HOMA-IR in patients with HO or SHO. Conclusions Plasma levels of Hcy and HOMA-IR were increased in patients with HO or SHO. Our results suggest that HO and SHO may increase the risk for atherogenesis and cardiovascular disease by increased IR. The increased IR induced by hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with HO or SHO may partially explain this adverse effect. PMID:25938439

  9. Molecular characterization of betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase 1 from the liver, and effects of aestivation on its expressions and homocysteine concentrations in the liver, kidney and muscle, of the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jasmine L Y; Woo, Jia M; Hiong, Kum C; Ching, Biyun; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F; Ip, Yuen K

    2015-05-01

    Homocysteine accumulation has numerous deleterious effects, and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) catalyses the synthesis of methionine from homocysteine and betaine. This study aimed to determine homocysteine concentrations, and mRNA expression levels and protein abundances of bhmt1/Bhmt1 in the liver, kidney and muscle of the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens, during the induction (6 days), maintenance (6 months) or arousal (3 days after arousal) phase of aestivation. The homocysteine concentration decreased significantly in the liver of P. annectens after 6 days or 6 months of aestivation, but it returned to the control level upon arousal. By contrast, homocysteine concentrations in the kidney and muscle remained unchanged during the three phases of aestivation. The complete coding cDNA sequence of bhmt1 from P. annectens consisted of 1236 bp, coding for 412 amino acids. The Bhmt1 from P. annectens had a close phylogenetic relationship with those from tetrapods and Callorhinchus milii. The expression of bhmt1 was detected in multiple organs/tissues of P. annectens, and this is the first report on the expression of bhmt1/Bhmt1 in animal skeletal muscle. The mRNA and protein expression levels of bhmt1/Bhmt1 were up-regulated in the liver of P. annectens during the induction and maintenance phases of aestivation, possibly to regulate the hepatic homocysteine concentration. The significant increase in hepatic Bhmt1 protein abundance during the arousal phase could be a response to increased cellular methylation for the purpose of tissue reconstruction. Unlike the liver, Bhmt1 expression in the kidney and muscle of P. annectens was regulated translationally, and its up-regulation could be crucial to prevent homocysteine accumulation. PMID:25575738

  10. Lead Exposure, B Vitamins, and Plasma Homocysteine in Men 55 Years of Age and Older: The VA Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Kyun; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Tucker, Katherine L.; Sparrow, David; Spiro, Avron; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Nie, Linda Huiling; Hu, Howard; Weuve, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lead (Pb) exposure may influence the plasma concentration of homocysteine, a one-carbon metabolite associated with cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Little is known about the associations between Pb and homocysteine over time, or the potential influence of dietary factors. Objectives: We examined the longitudinal association of recent and cumulative Pb exposure with homocysteine concentrations and the potential modifying effect of dietary nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism. Methods: In a subcohort of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Normative Aging Study (1,056 men with 2,301 total observations between 1993 and 2011), we used mixed-effects models to estimate differences in repeated measures of total plasma homocysteine across concentrations of Pb in blood and tibia bone, assessing recent and cumulative Pb exposure, respectively. We also assessed effect modification by dietary intake and plasma concentrations of folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. Results: An interquartile range (IQR) increment in blood Pb (3 μg/dL) was associated with a 6.3% higher homocysteine concentration (95% CI: 4.8, 7.8%). An IQR increment in tibia bone Pb (14 μg/g) was associated with a 3.7% higher homocysteine (95% CI: 1.6, 5.6%), which was attenuated to 1.5% (95% CI: –0.5, 3.6%) after adjusting for blood Pb. For comparison, a 5-year increase in time from baseline was associated with a 5.7% increase in homocysteine (95% CI: 4.3, 7.1%). The association between blood Pb and homocysteine was significantly stronger among participants with estimated dietary intakes of vitamin B6 and folate below (vs. above) the study population medians, which were similar to the U.S. recommended dietary allowance intakes. Conclusions: Pb exposure was positively associated with plasma homocysteine concentration. This association was stronger among men with below-median dietary intakes of vitamins B6 and folate. These findings suggest that increasing intake of folate and B6 might

  11. Dietary eritadenine suppresses guanidinoacetic Acid-induced hyperhomocysteinemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Shin-ichiro; Setoue, Minoru; Morita, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2006-11-01

    We assessed the effect of eritadenine, a hypocholesterolemic factor isolated from the edible mushroom Lentinus edodes, on plasma homocysteine concentration using methyl-group acceptor-induced hyperhomocysteinemic rats. Male Wistar rats were fed a control diet or diets supplemented with a methyl-group acceptor or a precursor of methyl-group acceptor. Diets were supplemented with guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) at 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 g/kg, nicotinic acid (NiA) or ethanolamine (EA) at 5 and 10 g/kg, or glycine at 25 and 50 g/kg, and the rats were fed for 10 d (Expt. 1). Plasma total homocysteine concentration was increased 255 and 421% by 5 and 10 g/kg GAA, respectively, and 39 and 58% by 5 and 10 g/kg NiA, respectively, but not by EA or glycine. GAA supplementation dose-dependently decreased the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) concentration and the activity of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) and increased the hepatic S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and homocysteine concentrations. In another study in which rats were fed 5 g/kg GAA-supplemented diet for 1-10 d, plasma homocysteine and the other variables affected in Expt. 1 were affected in rats fed the GAA-supplemented diet (Expt. 2). We investigated the effect of supplementation of 5 g/kg GAA-supplemented diet with eritadenine (50 mg/kg) on plasma homocysteine concentration (Expt. 3). Eritadenine supplementation significantly suppressed the GAA-induced increase in plasma homocysteine concentration. Eritadenine also restored the decreased SAM concentration and CBS activity in the liver, whereas it further increased hepatic SAH concentration, suggesting that eritadenine might elicit its effect by both slowing homocysteine production and increasing cystathionine formation. The results confirm that GAA is a useful compound to induce experimental hyperhomocysteinemia and indicate that eritadenine can effectively counteract the hyperhomocysteinemic effect of GAA. PMID:17056803

  12. [Some aspects of homocysteine metabolism in hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Bednarek-Skublewska, Anna; Buraczyńska, Monika; Wawrzycki, Sławomir; Baranowicz-Gaszczyk, Iwona; Ksiazek, Andrzej

    2002-11-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a non-protein forming sulfur amino acid, synthesised from methionine (Met), whose metabolism is at the junction of two metabolic pathways: remethylation and transsulfuration. Increased Hcy serum concentration is a well established independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases and a known feature of end stage renal disease. Hcy plasma level is influenced by folate, vitamin B6 and genetic factors. Mutation C677T in gene encoding methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), an enzyme involved in Hcy remethylation has been associated with elevated Hcy in homozygous carriers (TT genotype). Several amino acids take part in metabolism of Hcy. There are abnormalities of concentration of the non essential and essential of amino acids in serum of patients treated with hemodialysis (HD). It is possible that these abnormalities of amino acids can change the Hcy metabolism. The aim of this study was the evaluation of some aspects of Hcy metabolism. We examined the MTHFR gene polymorphism and its relationship with plasma Hcy concentration. The plasma levels of total amino acids and amino acids connected with Hcy metabolism: methionine (Met), seryne (Ser), cysteine (Cyst) and tauryne (Tau) were evaluated in hemodialysis patients. The study was conducted in 71 (35 male, 36 female) patients, mean age 56.2 +/- 12.4 years. They were dialysed for a mean duration of 87.7 +/- 84.7 months (range 2-302). The control group (CG) in which Hcy and amino acids levels were examined consisted of 12 healthy subjects. Serum (EDTA) Hcy levels were measured by EIA-Hcy ELISA kit. The MTHFR gene polymorphism was evaluated by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amino acids were measured by chromatography in amino acid analyser AAA 400. Mean concentration of Hcy was significantly higher in patients than in CG (31.1 +/- 9.1 vs 11.9 +/- 2.9 mumol/L; p < 0.01). Genotype frequencies in patients were: 42.8% for CC, 48.5% for CT and 8.7% for TT. Mean concentration of

  13. Study on relationships among deep vein thrombosis, homocysteine & related B group vitamins

    PubMed Central

    Ekim, Meral; Ekim, Hasan; Yilmaz, Yunus Keser; Kulah, Bahadir; Polat, M. Fevzi; Gocmen, A. Yesim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Hyperhomocysteinemia has been considered as a potential risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) but it is still controversy. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with DVT. Our second objective was to document the prevalence of folate, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin B12 level in this patient population. Methods: Sixty patients with DVT aged from 23 to 84 years, were assessed regarding demographic characteristics, serum levels of homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6. The diagnosis of DVT was based upon Wells scoring system and serum D-dimer level and confirmed by deep venous Doppler ultrasonography of the lower limbs. Results: Mean serum homocysteine levels were found significantly higher in patients over the age of 40 years (10.81±4.26 µmol/L vs 9.13±3.23 µmol/L). Of all the patients, 9 patients had homocysteine level above the 15µmol/L, 26 had folic acid level below 3 ng/ml, one had vitamin B12 level below 150 pmol/L, and two had vitamin B6 level below 30 nmol/L. In the hyperhomocysteinemic group, five patients had low folic acid level, one had low vitamin B12 level, and two had low vitamin B6 level. Conclusions: Hyperhomocysteinemia, in women older than 40 years, may be a risk factor for DVT. Folic acid deficiency may also influence serum homocysteine concentrations. Folate therapy may be offered to the patients with DVT. However further studies are required to clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:26101499

  14. Association of Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase Polymorphism with BMD and Homocysteine in Premenopausal North Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sanjeev Kumar; Singh, Ankur; Polipalli, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Sangeeta; Kapoor, Seema

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Osteoporosis (OP) is a common nutrigenomic disease associated with various genetic components. Observational studies have indicated that mildly elevated homocysteine was a strong risk factor for osteoporotic fractures. Yet there is no clear biologic mechanism for an effect of homocysteine on bone.The aim of this study was to investigate the association of MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms, and to verify the association of these polymorphisms with bone mineral density and homocysteine in premenopausal women of northern India. Material and Methods: We included 402 north Indian patients with altered BMD, both Osteopenic (OPN) and Osteoporosis, and normal controls. Genotype identification for MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP method, correlated with Bone Mineral Density (BMD), Homocysteine (Hcy), Folate and Vitamin B12. Results: The study groups did not differ in terms of age, weight and body mass indices. Prevalence of Genotype frequencies (GFs) for MTHFRC677T OP were (n: 402): CC 361 (89.8%), CT 25 (6.22%), TT 16 (3.98%) and that for MTHFR A1298C were (n: 402) AA 353(87.81%), AC 29(7.21%), CC 20(4.98%). Folate was significantly lower in the OP group than those in both the other groups, while there was no significant difference in Hcy in the OP group relative to OPN, as compared to controls. Conclusion: The GFs for MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were not different between both groups. In conclusion, polymorphism of the MTHFR 677T is associated with small differences in BMD with folate levels. Further, more investigations should be done in larger studies for other epigenetic pathways, that may increase the risk of Osteoporosis. PMID:24551672

  15. Serum homocysteine, vitamin B12, folic acid levels and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Ali; Gunduz, Kamer; Onur, Ece; Calkan, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine serum vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine (Hcy) levels as well as MTHFR (C677, A1298C) gene polymorphisms in patients with vitiligo, and to compare the results with healthy controls. Forty patients with vitiligo and 40 age and sex matched healthy subjects were studied. Serum vitamin B12 and folate levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma Hcy levels and MTHFR polymorphisms were determined by chemiluminescence and real time PCR methods, respectively. Mean serum vitamin B12 and Hcy levels were not significantly different while folic acid levels were significantly lower in the control group. There was no significant relationship between disease activity and vitamin B12, folic acid and homocystein levels. No significant difference in C677T gene polymorphism was detected. Heterozygote A1298C gene polymorphism in the patient group was statistically higher than the control group. There was no significant relationship between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine levels. In conclusion, vitamin B12, folate and Hcy levels are not altered in vitiligo and MTHFR gene mutations (C677T and A1298C) do not seem to create susceptibility for vitiligo. PMID:22846211

  16. Regulation of homocysteine metabolism by Mycobacterium tuberculosis S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Anshika; Arora, Gunjan; Sajid, Andaleeb; Maji, Abhijit; Bhat, Ajay; Virmani, Richa; Upadhyay, Sandeep; Nandicoori, Vinay K.; Sengupta, Shantanu; Singh, Yogendra

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates expression of various metabolism-related genes to adapt in the adverse host environment. The gene coding for M. tuberculosis S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (Mtb-SahH) is essential for optimal growth and the protein product is involved in intermediary metabolism. However, the relevance of SahH in mycobacterial physiology is unknown. In this study, we analyze the role of Mtb-SahH in regulating homocysteine concentration in surrogate host Mycobacterium smegmatis. Mtb-SahH catalyzes reversible hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine to homocysteine and adenosine and we demonstrate that the conserved His363 residue is critical for bi-directional catalysis. Mtb-SahH is regulated by serine/threonine phosphorylation of multiple residues by M. tuberculosis PknB. Major phosphorylation events occur at contiguous residues Thr219, Thr220 and Thr221, which make pivotal contacts with cofactor NAD+. Consequently, phosphorylation negatively modulates affinity of enzyme towards NAD+ as well as SAH-synthesis. Thr219, Thr220 and Thr221 are essential for enzyme activity, and therefore, responsible for SahH-mediated regulation of homocysteine. PMID:23877358

  17. Human valacyclovir hydrolase/biphenyl hydrolase-like protein is a highly efficient homocysteine thiolactonase.

    PubMed

    Marsillach, Judit; Suzuki, Stephanie M; Richter, Rebecca J; McDonald, Matthew G; Rademacher, Peter M; MacCoss, Michael J; Hsieh, Edward J; Rettie, Allan E; Furlong, Clement E

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteinylation of lysine residues by homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL), a reactive homocysteine metabolite, results in protein aggregation and malfunction, and is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular, autoimmune and neurological diseases. Human plasma paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and bleomycin hydrolase (Blmh) have been reported as the physiological HCTL detoxifying enzymes. However, the catalytic efficiency of HCTL hydrolysis by Blmh is low and not saturated at 20 mM HCTL. The catalytic efficiency of PON1 for HCTL hydrolysis is 100-fold lower than that of Blmh. A homocysteine thiolactonase (HCTLase) was purified from human liver and identified by mass spectrometry (MS) as the previously described human biphenyl hydrolase-like protein (BPHL). To further characterize this newly described HCTLase activity, BPHL was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The sequence of the recombinant BPHL (rBPHL) and hydrolytic products of the substrates HCTL and valacyclovir were verified by MS. We found that the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of rBPHL for HCTL hydrolysis was 7.7 × 10(4) M(-1)s(-1), orders of magnitude higher than that of PON1 or Blmh, indicating a more significant physiological role for BPHL in detoxifying HCTL. PMID:25333274

  18. Homocysteine and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Are These the Tools for Early Intervention in the Dementia Spectrum?

    PubMed

    Ansari, Z

    2016-02-01

    Dementia, being a neurodegenerative disease, has devastating consequences not just for the ailing but also for the carers as it has a tremendous negative impact on the quality of life. The pathophysiology of dementia commences far earlier than its diagnosis. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a stage prior to definite dementia. The progression from MCI to dementia is insidious with no definite demarcation, thus making diagnosis clinically difficult at an early stage. This paper attempts to throw light on the epidemiology, risk factors and the aetiopathogenesis of MCI. It further attempts to elaborate on the rate of conversion of MCI to definite dementia and the factors influencing the same. Many established as well as probable, modifiable as well as non-modifiable risk factors influence the progress of MCI to definite dementia. Homocysteine, a sulphur containing amino-acid has been identified as a probable risk factor for the dementia spectrum. Various existing clinical evidences and biological plausibility towards probable link between homocysteine and dementia are discussed in this paper. B vitamin mediated homocysteine reduction and cognitive outcomes demonstrate mixed results. This review attempts to evaluate hyperhomocysteinaemia and MCI as a brain risk marker and assess their potential for future research with a view to attempt early intervention. PMID:26812511

  19. Assessing the association between homocysteine and cognition: reflections on Bradford Hill, meta-analyses, and causality.

    PubMed

    McCaddon, Andrew; Miller, Joshua W

    2015-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a recognized risk factor for cognitive decline and incident dementia in older adults. Two recent reports addressed the cumulative epidemiological evidence for this association but expressed conflicting opinions. Here, the evidence is reviewed in relation to Sir Austin Bradford Hill's criteria for assessing "causality," and the latest meta-analysis of the effects of homocysteine-lowering on cognitive function is critically examined. The meta-analysis included 11 trials, collectively assessing 22,000 individuals, that examined the effects of B vitamin supplements (folic acid, vitamin B12, vitamin B6) on global or domain-specific cognitive decline. It concluded that homocysteine-lowering with B vitamin supplements has no significant effect on cognitive function. However, careful examination of the trials in the meta-analysis indicates that no conclusion can be made regarding the effects of homocysteine-lowering on cognitive decline, since the trials typically did not include individuals who were experiencing such decline. Further definitive trials in older adults experiencing cognitive decline are still urgently needed. PMID:26293664

  20. Chemical pathology of homocysteine. IV. Excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2009-01-01

    This review considers recent advances in the chemical pathology of homocysteine in atherogenesis, oxidative metabolism, and carcinogenesis. Homocysteine is a potent excitatory neurotransmitter that binds to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and leads to oxidative stress, cytoplasmic calcium influx, cellular apoptosis, and endothelial dysfunction. According to the adsorption-induction theory, cytoplasmic calcium influx leads to depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by reaction with cytoplasmic phosphate, leading to calcium apatite deposition. Oxidative stress is caused by failure of ATP synthesis and accumulation of reactive oxygen radicals, theoretically because of inhibition of thioretinaco ozonide function within mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The toxicity of oxygen difluoride is theoretically explained by the displacement of ozone from thioretinaco ozonide, leading to inhibition of cellular respiration. Depletion of thioretinaco ozonide from cellular membranes is suggested to underlie the carcinogenic and atherogenic effects of fluoride and other electrophilic carcinogens. In atherogenesis the acute inflammatory response is related to cellular apoptosis and necrosis, autoantibodies to proteins containing peptide-bound homocysteine and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL), and microbial products and antigens originating from homocysteinylated LDL aggregates trapped within vasa vasorum of developing atherosclerotic plaques. The trapping of lipoprotein aggregates and obstruction of the lumen of vasa vasorum are enhanced by high tissue pressure and by endothelial dysfunction because of narrowing of the lumen by swollen and hyperplastic endothelial cells, leading to the creation of vulnerable plaques. PMID:19667406

  1. Human Valacyclovir Hydrolase/Biphenyl Hydrolase-Like Protein Is a Highly Efficient Homocysteine Thiolactonase

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Matthew G.; Rademacher, Peter M.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Hsieh, Edward J.; Rettie, Allan E.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteinylation of lysine residues by homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL), a reactive homocysteine metabolite, results in protein aggregation and malfunction, and is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular, autoimmune and neurological diseases. Human plasma paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and bleomycin hydrolase (Blmh) have been reported as the physiological HCTL detoxifying enzymes. However, the catalytic efficiency of HCTL hydrolysis by Blmh is low and not saturated at 20 mM HCTL. The catalytic efficiency of PON1 for HCTL hydrolysis is 100-fold lower than that of Blmh. A homocysteine thiolactonase (HCTLase) was purified from human liver and identified by mass spectrometry (MS) as the previously described human biphenyl hydrolase-like protein (BPHL). To further characterize this newly described HCTLase activity, BPHL was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The sequence of the recombinant BPHL (rBPHL) and hydrolytic products of the substrates HCTL and valacyclovir were verified by MS. We found that the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of rBPHL for HCTL hydrolysis was 7.7 × 104 M−1s−1, orders of magnitude higher than that of PON1 or Blmh, indicating a more significant physiological role for BPHL in detoxifying HCTL. PMID:25333274

  2. Serum Homocysteine, Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulphate and Lipoprotein (a) in Alzheimer’s Disease and Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Lopamudra; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Behera, Prajna; Bandyopadhyay, Kausik; Pal, Sandip; Pal, Keya; Basu, Debasis; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VAD) are the major forms of dementia affecting elderly people, in which the levels of many metabolites are altered in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum. These metabolites could be risk factors or potential biomarkers, but the significance of some of these are not clearly understood in the context of the disease pathogenesis. In the present study serum levels of homocysteine, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) and lipoprotein (a) or Lp(a) have been measured by ELISA using commercial kits in AD (n = 40), VAD (n = 40) and age matched control subjects (n = 40). The data are compared by ANOVA and post-hoc analysis. The serum homocysteine is markedly elevated compared to control both in AD and VAD subjects, but to a significantly higher extent in the latter. Lp(a) is increased in the serum of VAD subjects only compared to control. Likewise, serum DHEA-S level is lowered in AD but not in VAD compared to control. The analysis of the present data and those published by others suggest that alterations in homocysteine and Lp(a) in serum are indicators of vascular pathology in AD or VAD, while the lowering of serum DHEA-S is a consequence of AD pathology. PMID:23696950

  3. Serum Homocysteine, Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulphate and Lipoprotein (a) in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Ray, Lopamudra; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Behera, Prajna; Bandyopadhyay, Kausik; Pal, Sandip; Pal, Keya; Basu, Debasis; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VAD) are the major forms of dementia affecting elderly people, in which the levels of many metabolites are altered in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum. These metabolites could be risk factors or potential biomarkers, but the significance of some of these are not clearly understood in the context of the disease pathogenesis. In the present study serum levels of homocysteine, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) and lipoprotein (a) or Lp(a) have been measured by ELISA using commercial kits in AD (n = 40), VAD (n = 40) and age matched control subjects (n = 40). The data are compared by ANOVA and post-hoc analysis. The serum homocysteine is markedly elevated compared to control both in AD and VAD subjects, but to a significantly higher extent in the latter. Lp(a) is increased in the serum of VAD subjects only compared to control. Likewise, serum DHEA-S level is lowered in AD but not in VAD compared to control. The analysis of the present data and those published by others suggest that alterations in homocysteine and Lp(a) in serum are indicators of vascular pathology in AD or VAD, while the lowering of serum DHEA-S is a consequence of AD pathology. PMID:23696950

  4. Effect of plasma homocysteine level and urinary monomethylarsonic acid on the risk of arsenic-associated carotid atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.-M.; Chiou, H.-Y. . E-mail: hychiou@tmu.edu.tw; Hsueh, Y.-M.; Hong, C.-T.; Su, C.-L.; Chang, S.-F.; Huang, W.-L.; Wang, H.-T.; Wang, Y.-H.; Hsieh, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-J.

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic-contaminated well water has been shown to increase the risk of atherosclerosis. Because of involving S-adenosylmethionine, homocysteine may modify the risk by interfering with the biomethylation of ingested arsenic. In this study, we assessed the effect of plasma homocysteine level and urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA{sup V}) on the risk of atherosclerosis associated with arsenic. In total, 163 patients with carotid atherosclerosis and 163 controls were studied. Lifetime cumulative arsenic exposure from well water for study subjects was measured as index of arsenic exposure. Homocysteine level was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Proportion of MMA{sup V} (MMA%) was calculated by dividing with total arsenic species in urine, including arsenite, arsenate, MMA{sup V}, and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}). Results of multiple linear regression analysis show a positive correlation of plasma homocysteine levels to the cumulative arsenic exposure after controlling for atherosclerosis status and nutritional factors (P < 0.05). This correlation, however, did not change substantially the effect of arsenic exposure on the risk of atherosclerosis as analyzed in a subsequent logistic regression model. Logistic regression analyses also show that elevated plasma homocysteine levels did not confer an independent risk for developing atherosclerosis in the study population. However, the risk of having atherosclerosis was increased to 5.4-fold (95% CI, 2.0-15.0) for the study subjects with high MMA% ({>=}16.5%) and high homocysteine levels ({>=}12.7 {mu}mol/l) as compared to those with low MMA% (<9.9%) and low homocysteine levels (<12.7 {mu}mol/l). Elevated homocysteinemia may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis related to arsenic exposure in individuals with high levels of MMA% in urine.

  5. Evaluation of an Association of Blood Homocysteine Levels With Gastric Cancer Risk From 27 Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Cheng, Yuelei; Zhu, Huirong

    2016-05-01

    High blood homocysteine levels may risk gastric cancer. However, observational studies have been plagued by chance, bias, confounding, or reverse causality. In this study, we assessed the relationship between blood homocysteine levels and gastric cancer by using a Mendelian randomization method, which is independent of nongenetic confounding.We took 2 steps to perform Mendelian randomization analysis. First, we evaluated the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T association with gastric cancer by a meta-analysis of case-control studies including 7566 patients with gastric cancer and 10 640 control subjects from 27 Case-Control studies. Second, MTHFR C677T polymorphism, which affects the blood homocysteine levels, was used as an instrumental variable to calculate the risk and estimate the association of gastric cancer with this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We obtained an estimate to the association of blood total homocysteine levels with this SNP from a meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), which comprises a total of 44 147 individuals.In our Mendelian randomization analysis, we demonstrated a significant effect of the blood homocysteine levels on gastric cancer risk, representing an OR of 2.56 (95% CI = 2.41-2.72; P = 5.0×10) for gastric cancer per 1-SD increase in the natural log-transformed blood total homocysteine levels.We proved that there is a causal relationship between blood total homocysteine and risk of gastric cancer, and this study will add insight into the treatment and pathology research of gastric cancer. PMID:27196483

  6. Evaluation of an Association of Blood Homocysteine Levels With Gastric Cancer Risk From 27 Case–Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Cheng, Yuelei; Zhu, Huirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High blood homocysteine levels may risk gastric cancer. However, observational studies have been plagued by chance, bias, confounding, or reverse causality. In this study, we assessed the relationship between blood homocysteine levels and gastric cancer by using a Mendelian randomization method, which is independent of nongenetic confounding. We took 2 steps to perform Mendelian randomization analysis. First, we evaluated the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T association with gastric cancer by a meta-analysis of case-control studies including 7566 patients with gastric cancer and 10 640 control subjects from 27 Case–Control studies. Second, MTHFR C677T polymorphism, which affects the blood homocysteine levels, was used as an instrumental variable to calculate the risk and estimate the association of gastric cancer with this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We obtained an estimate to the association of blood total homocysteine levels with this SNP from a meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), which comprises a total of 44 147 individuals. In our Mendelian randomization analysis, we demonstrated a significant effect of the blood homocysteine levels on gastric cancer risk, representing an OR of 2.56 (95% CI = 2.41–2.72; P = 5.0×10−4) for gastric cancer per 1-SD increase in the natural log-transformed blood total homocysteine levels. We proved that there is a causal relationship between blood total homocysteine and risk of gastric cancer, and this study will add insight into the treatment and pathology research of gastric cancer. PMID:27196483

  7. Polymorphisms in MTHFR, MS and CBS Genes and Homocysteine Levels in a Pakistani Population

    PubMed Central

    Yakub, Mohsin; Moti, Naushad; Parveen, Siddiqa; Chaudhry, Bushra; Azam, Iqbal; Iqbal, Mohammad Perwaiz

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperhomocysteinemia (>15 µmol/L) is highly prevalent in South Asian populations including Pakistan. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of this condition, we studied 6 polymorphisms in genes of 3 enzymes - methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; C677T; A1298C), methionine synthase (MS; A2756G), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS; T833C/844ins68, G919A) involved in homocysteine metabolism and investigated their interactions with nutritional and environmental factors in a Pakistani population. Methodology/Principal Findings In a cross-sectional survey, 872 healthy adults (355 males and 517 females; age 18–60 years) were recruited from a low-income urban population in Karachi. Fasting venous blood was obtained and assessed for plasma/serum homocysteine; folate, vitamin B12, pyridoxal phosphate and blood lead. DNA was isolated and genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP (restriction-fragment-length- polymorphism) based assays. The average changes in homocysteine levels for MTHFR 677CT and TT genotypes were positive [β(SE β), 2.01(0.63) and 16.19(1.8) µmol/L, respectively]. Contrary to MTHFR C677T polymorphism, the average changes in plasma homocysteine levels for MS 2756AG and GG variants were negative [β(SE β), −0.56(0.58) and −0.83(0.99) µmol/L, respectively]. The average change occurring for CBS 844ins68 heterozygous genotype (ancestral/insertion) was −1.88(0.81) µmol/L. The combined effect of MTHFR C677T, MS A2756G and CBS 844ins68 genotypes for plasma homocysteine levels was additive (p value <0.001). Odds of having hyperhomocysteinemia with MTHFR 677TT genotype was 10-fold compared to MTHFR 677CC genotype [OR (95%CI); 10.17(3.6–28.67)]. Protective effect towards hyperhomocysteinemia was observed with heterozygous (ancestral/insertion) genotype of CBS 844ins68 compared to homozygous ancestral type [OR (95% CI); 0.58 (0.34–0.99)]. Individuals with MTHFR 677CT or TT genotypes were at a greater risk of hyperhomocysteinemia in

  8. Correlation between C677T MTHFR gene polymorphism, plasma homocysteine levels and the incidence of CAD.

    PubMed

    Nakai, K; Itoh, C; Nakai, K; Habano, W; Gurwitz, D

    2001-01-01

    The lesions of coronary atherosclerosis represent the result of a complex, multicellular, inflammatory-healing response in the coronary arterial wall. In vivo and in vitro cellular and molecular studies have suggested a role for tissue homocysteine in endothelial cell injury and adverse extra-cellular matrix remodeling. Gene polymorphisms in relation with numerous risk factors might increase the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD). In this review we have focused on the correlations between plasma homocysteine levels, the incidence of cardiovascular disease and the cytosine-to-thymidine substitution at nucleotide 677 (C677T) of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, coding for a key enzyme in methionine-homocysteine metabolism. The role of the C677T MTHFR gene polymorphism in the causation of CAD is controversial. We reviewed 12 recent case-control studies comprising 5370 genotyped patients with CAD and 4961 genotyped participants without CAD. There was no significant difference between those with and without CAD in the frequency of the C677T polymorphism (34.9 vs 33.6%). The frequency of homozygous C677T polymorphism in these groups was 10.9 versus 12.8%, respectively, although there were some ethnic differences in the C677T MTHFR polymorphism. In the analysis of the 12 studies, the odds ratio of CAD associated with the TT genotype (homozygous C677T polymorphism) was 1.18. Only slightly higher plasma homocysteine levels were observed in participants with the val/val (TT) genotype (14.4+/-2.9 micro mol/L in TT genotype vs 11.1+/-1.9 and 11.9+/-2 micro mol/L in CC and CT genotype, respectively). In addition, the relation between homocysteine increase after methionine loading and MTHFR genotypes is also controversial. However, hyperhomocysteinemia because of the C677T MTHFR allele may be corrected with oral folic acid therapy. Further investigations on the relationships between MTHFR genotypes and the incidence of CAD should be based on

  9. High levels of homocysteine downregulate apolipoprotein E expression via nuclear factor kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Trusca, Violeta G; Mihai, Adina D; Fuior, Elena V; Fenyo, Ioana M; Gafencu, Anca V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of high homocysteine (Hcy) levels on apolipoprotein E (apoE) expression and the signaling pathways involved in this gene regulation. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to assess apoE expression in cells treated with various concentrations (50-500 μmol/L) of Hcy. Calcium phosphate-transient transfections were performed in HEK-293 and RAW 264.7 cells to evaluate the effect of Hcy on apoE regulatory elements [promoter and distal multienhancer 2 (ME2)]. To this aim, plasmids containing the proximal apoE promoter [(-500/+73)apoE construct] alone or in the presence of ME2 [ME2/(-500/+73)apoE construct] to drive the expression of the reporter luciferase gene were used. Co-transfection experiments were carried out to investigate the downstream effectors of Hcy-mediated regulation of apoE promoter by using specific inhibitors or a dominant negative form of IKβ. In other co-transfections, the luciferase reporter was under the control of synthetic promoters containing multiple specific binding sites for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay was accomplished to detect the binding of NF-κB p65 subunit to the apoE promoter in HEK-293 treated with 500 μmol/L Hcy. As control, cells were incubated with similar concentration of cysteine. NF-κB p65 proteins bound to DNA were immunoprecipitated with anti-p65 antibodies and DNA was identified by PCR using primers amplifying the region -100/+4 of the apoE gene. RESULTS: RT-PCR revealed that high levels of Hcy (250-750 μmol/L) induced a 2-3 fold decrease in apoE mRNA levels in HEK-293 cells, while apoE gene expression was not significantly affected by treatment with lower concentrations of Hcy (100 μmol/L). Immunoblotting data provided additional evidence for the negative role of Hcy in apoE expression. Hcy decreased apoE promoter

  10. Higher homocysteine associated with thinner cortical gray matter in 803 participants from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Sarah K; Rajagopalan, Priya; Joshi, Shantanu H; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    A significant portion of our risk for dementia in old age is associated with lifestyle factors (diet, exercise, and cardiovascular health) that are modifiable, at least in principle. One such risk factor, high-homocysteine levels in the blood, is known to increase risk for Alzheimer's disease and vascular disorders. Here, we set out to understand how homocysteine levels relate to 3D surface-based maps of cortical gray matter distribution (thickness, volume, and surface area) computed from brain magnetic resonance imaging in 803 elderly subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative data set. Individuals with higher plasma levels of homocysteine had lower gray matter thickness in bilateral frontal, parietal, occipital, and right temporal regions and lower gray matter volumes in left frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital regions, after controlling for diagnosis, age, and sex and after correcting for multiple comparisons. No significant within-group associations were found in cognitively healthy people, patients with mild cognitive impairment, or patients with Alzheimer's disease. These regional differences in gray matter structure may be useful biomarkers to assess the effectiveness of interventions, such as vitamin B supplements, that aim to prevent homocysteine-related brain atrophy by normalizing homocysteine levels. PMID:25444607