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Sample records for homology-dependent interactions determine

  1. Genomic assay reveals tolerance of DNA damage by both translesion DNA synthesis and homology-dependent repair in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Izhar, Lior; Ziv, Omer; Cohen, Isadora S; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Livneh, Zvi

    2013-04-16

    DNA lesions can block replication forks and lead to the formation of single-stranded gaps. These replication complications are mitigated by DNA damage tolerance mechanisms, which prevent deleterious outcomes such as cell death, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis. The two main tolerance strategies are translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), in which low-fidelity DNA polymerases bypass the blocking lesion, and homology-dependent repair (HDR; postreplication repair), which is based on the homologous sister chromatid. Here we describe a unique high-resolution method for the simultaneous analysis of TLS and HDR across defined DNA lesions in mammalian genomes. The method is based on insertion of plasmids carrying defined site-specific DNA lesions into mammalian chromosomes, using phage integrase-mediated integration. Using this method we show that mammalian cells use HDR to tolerate DNA damage in their genome. Moreover, analysis of the tolerance of the UV light-induced 6-4 photoproduct, the tobacco smoke-induced benzo[a]pyrene-guanine adduct, and an artificial trimethylene insert shows that each of these three lesions is tolerated by both TLS and HDR. We also determined the specificity of nucleotide insertion opposite these lesions during TLS in human genomes. This unique method will be useful in elucidating the mechanism of DNA damage tolerance in mammalian chromosomes and their connection to pathological processes such as carcinogenesis. PMID:23530190

  2. Germinal Excisions of the Maize Transposon Activator Do Not Stimulate Meiotic Recombination or Homology-Dependent Repair at the Bz Locus

    PubMed Central

    Dooner, H. K.; Martinez-Ferez, I. M.

    1997-01-01

    Double-strand breaks have been implicated both in the initiation of meiotic recombination in yeast and as intermediates in the transposition process of nonreplicative transposons. Some transposons of this class, notably P of Drosophila and Tc1 of Caenorhabditis elegans, promote a form of homology-dependent premeiotic gene conversion upon excision. In this work, we have looked for evidence of an interaction between Ac transposition and meiotic recombination at the bz locus in maize. We find that the frequency of meiotic recombination between homologues is not enhanced by the presence of Ac in one of the bz heteroalleles and, conversely, that the presence of a homologous sequence in either trans (homologous chromosome) or cis (tandem duplication) does not promote conversion of the Ac insertion site. However, a tandem duplication of the bz locus may be destabilized by the insertion of Ac. We discuss possible reasons for the lack of interaction between Ac excision and homologous meiotic recombination in maize. PMID:9409847

  3. Identification of viruses and viroids by next-generation sequencing and homology-dependent and homology-independent algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingfa; Ding, Shou-Wei; Zhang, Yongjiang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    A fast, accurate, and full indexing of viruses and viroids in a sample for the inspection and quarantine services and disease management is desirable but was unrealistic until recently. This article reviews the rapid and exciting recent progress in the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for the identification of viruses and viroids in plants. A total of four viroids/viroid-like RNAs and 49 new plant RNA and DNA viruses from 18 known or unassigned virus families have been identified from plants since 2009. A comparison of enrichment strategies reveals that full indexing of RNA and DNA viruses as well as viroids in a plant sample at single-nucleotide resolution is made possible by one NGS run of total small RNAs, followed by data mining with homology-dependent and homology-independent computational algorithms. Major challenges in the application of NGS technologies to pathogen discovery are discussed. PMID:26047558

  4. Homology-dependent repair is involved in 45S rDNA loss in plant CAF-1 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Muchová, Veronika; Amiard, Simon; Mozgová, Iva; Dvořáčková, Martina; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles; Fajkus, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in FAS1 and FAS2 subunits of chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF1) show progressive loss of 45S rDNA copies and telomeres. We hypothesized that homology-dependent DNA damage repair (HDR) may contribute to the loss of these repeats in fas mutants. To test this, we generated double mutants by crossing fas mutants with knock-out mutants in RAD51B, one of the Rad51 paralogs of A. thaliana. Our results show that the absence of RAD51B decreases the rate of rDNA loss, confirming the implication of RAD51B-dependent recombination in rDNA loss in the CAF1 mutants. Interestingly, this effect is not observed for telomeric repeat loss, which thus differs from that acting in rDNA loss. Involvement of DNA damage repair in rDNA dynamics in fas mutants is further supported by accumulation of double-stranded breaks (measured as γ-H2AX foci) in 45S rDNA. Occurrence of the foci is not specific for S-phase, and is ATM-independent. While the foci in fas mutants occur both in the transcribed (intranucleolar) and non-transcribed (nucleoplasmic) fraction of rDNA, double fas rad51b mutants show a specific increase in the number of the intranucleolar foci. These results suggest that the repair of double-stranded breaks present in the transcribed rDNA region is RAD51B dependent and that this contributes to rDNA repeat loss in fas mutants, presumably via the single-stranded annealing recombination pathway. Our results also highlight the importance of proper chromatin assembly in the maintenance of genome stability. PMID:25359579

  5. A determinant based full configuration interaction program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Peter J.; Handy, Nicholas C.

    1989-04-01

    The program FCI solves the Full Configuration Interaction (Full CI) problem of quantum chemistry, in which the electronic Schrödinger equation is solved exactly within a given one particle basis set. The Slater determinant based algorithm leads to highly efficient implementation on a vector computer, and has enabled Full CI calculations of dimension more than 10 7 to be performed.

  6. Interspecies interactions are an integral determinant of microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Fatma A A; Suzuki, Kenshi; Ohtaki, Akihiro; Sagegami, Keita; Hirai, Hidetaka; Seno, Jun; Mizuno, Naoko; Inuzuka, Yuma; Saito, Yasuhisa; Tashiro, Yosuke; Hiraishi, Akira; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors that determine the dynamics of bacterial communities in a complex system using multidisciplinary methods. Since natural and engineered microbial ecosystems are too complex to study, six types of synthetic microbial ecosystems (SMEs) were constructed under chemostat conditions with phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. Two to four phenol-degrading, phylogenetically and physiologically different bacterial strains were used in each SME. Phylogeny was based on the nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA genes, while physiologic traits were based on kinetic and growth parameters on phenol. Two indices, J parameter and "interspecies interaction," were compared to predict which strain would become dominant in an SME. The J parameter was calculated from kinetic and growth parameters. On the other hand, "interspecies interaction," a new index proposed in this study, was evaluated by measuring the specific growth activity, which was determined on the basis of relative growth of a strain with or without the supernatant prepared from other bacterial cultures. Population densities of strains used in SMEs were enumerated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting the gene encoding the large subunit of phenol hydroxylase and were compared to predictions made from J parameter and interspecies interaction calculations. In 4 of 6 SEMs tested the final dominant strain shown by real-time qPCR analyses coincided with the strain predicted by both the J parameter and the interspecies interaction. However, in SMEII-2 and SMEII-3 the final dominant Variovorax strains coincided with prediction of the interspecies interaction but not the J parameter. These results demonstrate that the effects of interspecies interactions within microbial communities contribute to determining the dynamics of the microbial ecosystem. PMID:26539177

  7. Interspecies interactions are an integral determinant of microbial community dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Fatma A. A.; Suzuki, Kenshi; Ohtaki, Akihiro; Sagegami, Keita; Hirai, Hidetaka; Seno, Jun; Mizuno, Naoko; Inuzuka, Yuma; Saito, Yasuhisa; Tashiro, Yosuke; Hiraishi, Akira; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors that determine the dynamics of bacterial communities in a complex system using multidisciplinary methods. Since natural and engineered microbial ecosystems are too complex to study, six types of synthetic microbial ecosystems (SMEs) were constructed under chemostat conditions with phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. Two to four phenol-degrading, phylogenetically and physiologically different bacterial strains were used in each SME. Phylogeny was based on the nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA genes, while physiologic traits were based on kinetic and growth parameters on phenol. Two indices, J parameter and “interspecies interaction,” were compared to predict which strain would become dominant in an SME. The J parameter was calculated from kinetic and growth parameters. On the other hand, “interspecies interaction,” a new index proposed in this study, was evaluated by measuring the specific growth activity, which was determined on the basis of relative growth of a strain with or without the supernatant prepared from other bacterial cultures. Population densities of strains used in SMEs were enumerated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting the gene encoding the large subunit of phenol hydroxylase and were compared to predictions made from J parameter and interspecies interaction calculations. In 4 of 6 SEMs tested the final dominant strain shown by real-time qPCR analyses coincided with the strain predicted by both the J parameter and the interspecies interaction. However, in SMEII-2 and SMEII-3 the final dominant Variovorax strains coincided with prediction of the interspecies interaction but not the J parameter. These results demonstrate that the effects of interspecies interactions within microbial communities contribute to determining the dynamics of the microbial ecosystem. PMID:26539177

  8. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Moses, Alan M.; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2015-01-01

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families. PMID:26527718

  9. Particle-Surface Interaction Model and Method of Determining Particle-Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method and model of predicting particle-surface interactions with a surface, such as the surface of a spacecraft. The method includes the steps of: determining a trajectory path of a plurality of moving particles; predicting whether any of the moving particles will intersect a surface; predicting whether any of the particles will be captured by the surface and/or; predicting a reflected trajectory and velocity of particles reflected from the surface.

  10. Interactions among thermal parameters determine offspring sex under temperature-dependent sex determination

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Daniel A.; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    In many animals, temperatures experienced by developing embryos determine offspring sex (e.g. temperature-dependent sex determination, TSD), but most studies focus strictly on the effects of mean temperature, with little emphasis on the importance of thermal fluctuations. In the jacky dragon (Amphibolurus muricatus), an Australian lizard with TSD, data from nests in the field demonstrate that offspring sex ratios are predictable from thermal fluctuations but not from mean nest temperatures. To clarify this paradox, we incubated eggs in a factorial experiment with two levels of mean temperature and three levels of diel fluctuation. We show that offspring sex is determined by an interaction between these critical thermal parameters. Intriguingly, because these two thermal descriptors shift in opposing directions throughout the incubation season, this interactive effect inhibits seasonal shifts in sex ratio. Hence, our results suggest that TSD can yield offspring sex ratios that resemble those produced under genotypic sex-determining systems. These findings raise important considerations for understanding the diversity of TSD reaction norms, for designing experiments that evaluate the evolutionary significance of TSD, and for predicting sex ratios under past and future climate change scenarios. PMID:20685704

  11. Determination and characterization of metronidazole–kaolin interaction

    PubMed Central

    Aleanizy, Fadilah Sfouq; Alqahtani, Fulwah; Al Gohary, Omaimah; El Tahir, Eram; Al Shalabi, Rania

    2014-01-01

    The needs for safe, therapeutically effective antidiarrheal combination continuously lead to effective treatment. When administered simultaneously, metronidazole–kaolin interactions have been reported by FDA but not studied. This paper is the first to study metronidazole–kaolin interactions. Adsorption isotherms of a metronidazole–kaolin antidiarrheal combination from aqueous solutions at an in vivo simulated pH conditions were obtained at 37 ± 0.5 °C. Langmuir constants for the adsorption are 10.8225, 41.3223 mg g−1 and 11.60, 2.56 l g−1 aimed at the monolayer capacity, and the equilibrium constant at pH 1.2 and 6.8, respectively. pH effect on adsorption of known concentration of metronidazole by kaolin was also studied over the range 1.2–8. A gradual increase in the adsorbed amount was noted with increasing the pH. Elution studies by different eluents showed that drug recovery from adsorbent surface was pH-dependent via competitive mechanism. The elution followed the sequence: 0.1 M HCl > 0.1 M NaCl > H2O. Adsorption–desorption studies revealed physical adsorption. The equilibrium concentration of metronidazole decreased as the adsorbent concentration was increased in the systems. The dissolution profiles (USP) of commercially available tablets (Riazole® 500 mg) were obtained alone and in the presence of either (ORS®) rehydration salts and 9 or 18 g of kaolin powder. The percentage drug released versus time: 95.01% in 25 min, 101.02% in 30 min, 67.63% in 60 min, 60.59% in 60 min, respectively. The percentage drug released versus time was increased with ORS® due to common ion effect [Cl−], while, it was decreased with kaolin due to adsorption. The mechanism of reaction of Riazole® (500 mg) tablets in the different dissolution media, confirms with Korsmeyer–Peppas model. The interaction between metronidazole and kaolin was characterized by melting point determinations, differential scanning calorimetry analysis and

  12. Thunderstorm-environment interactions determined with three-dimensional trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    Diagnostically determined three dimensional trajectories were used to reveal some of the scale interaction processes that occur between convective storms and their environment. Data from NASA's fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment are analyzed. Two intense squall lines and numerous reports of severe weather occurred during the period. Convective storm systems with good temporal and spatial continuity are shown to be related to the development and movement of short wave circulation systems aloft that propagate eastward within a zonal mid tropospheric wind pattern. These short wave systems are found to produce the potential instability and dynamic triggering needed for thunderstorm formation. The environmental flow patterns, relative to convective storm systems, are shown to produce large upward air parcel movements in excess of 50 mb/3h in the immediate vicinity of the storms. The air undergoing strong lifting originates as potentially unstable low level air traveling into the storm environment from southern and southwestern directions. The thermo and hydrodynamical processes that lead to changes in atmospheric structure before, during, and after convective storm formation are described using total time derivatives of pressure or net vertical displacement, potential temperature, and vector wind calculated by following air parcels.

  13. Interaction Determined Electron Energy Levels in One-Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Michael; Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, Kalarikad; Smith, Luke; Creeth, Graham; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David; Jones, Geraint; Jonathan, Griffiths; UCL Collaboration; Cavendish Laboratory Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated electron transport in a quasi-one dimensional electron gas in the GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructure designed so that the confinement potential can be progressively weakened. This causes the energy levels to decrease in energy relative to each other, however this decrease occurs at different rates, a feature attributed to the energy being determined by both confinement and the electron-electron repulsion which varies with the shape of the wavefunction. It is found that the initial ground state crosses the higher levels so resulting in missing plateaux of quantised conductance. A change in the nature of the ground state to a more extended form causes an increase in the capacitance between the confining gates and the electrons. Both crossings and anti-crossings of the levels are found and these will be discussed along with other consequences of the form of the level interactions. The effects of level crossing on the spin dependent 0.7 structure will be presented. Supported by EPSRC (UK).

  14. Apparatus and method for determining microscale interactions based on compressive sensors such as crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, Harley; AlQuraishi, Mohammed

    2015-04-21

    Techniques for determining values for a metric of microscale interactions include determining a mesoscale metric for a plurality of mesoscale interaction types, wherein a value of the mesoscale metric for each mesoscale interaction type is based on a corresponding function of values of the microscale metric for the plurality of the microscale interaction types. A plurality of observations that indicate the values of the mesoscale metric are determined for the plurality of mesoscale interaction types. Values of the microscale metric are determined for the plurality of microscale interaction types based on the plurality of observations and the corresponding functions and compressed sensing.

  15. Sequence of arrival determines plant-mediated interactions between herbivores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Summary 1. Induced changes in plant quality are important factors mediating indirect interactions between herbivores. Although the sequence of attack has been shown to influence plant responses, little is known about how it may affect the outcome of insect-plant-insect interactions. 2. We therefore...

  16. Determinants of Spousal Interaction: Marital Structure or Marital Happiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lynn K.

    1983-01-01

    Examined factors associated with marital interaction, particularly women's employment and marital happiness, in a nationwide sample of 2,034 men and women. Results suggested interaction is reduced by both men's and women's job involvement, children, and a traditional division of household labor. Marital quality was the most important predictor.…

  17. Ideology and Interaction: Debating Determinisms in Literacy Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross; Street, Brian V.

    2014-01-01

    In this exchange, Street and Collin debate the merits of the interaction model of literacy that Collin outlined in a recent issue of Reading Research Quarterly. Built as a complement and a counter to Street's ideological model of literacy, Collin's interaction model defines literacies as technologies that coevolve with sociocultural…

  18. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  19. Experimental determination of sound and high-speed flow interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumsdaine, E.; Silcox, R.

    1976-01-01

    A facility that was used to measure the interaction of flow with sound at high Mach numbers is described. Four inlets with different area variations (or axial gradients) were tested. Sound of selected frequencies and modes (0,0), (1,0), (2,0) was generated with eight circumferential acoustic drivers.

  20. An ancient protein-DNA interaction underlying metazoan sex determination

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Mark W.; Lee, John K.; Rojo, Sandra; Gearhart, Micah D.; Kurahashi, Kayo; Banerjee, Surajit; Loeuille, Guy-André; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Kenneth; Zarkower, David; Aihara, Hideki; Bardwell, Vivian J.

    2015-01-01

    DMRT transcription factors are deeply conserved regulators of metazoan sexual development. They share the DM DNA binding domain, a unique intertwined double zinc-binding module followed by a C-terminal recognition helix, which binds to a pseudopalindromic target DNA. Here we show that DMRT proteins employ a unique binding interaction, inserting two adjacent antiparallel recognition helices into a widened DNA major groove to make base-specific contacts. Versatility in how specific base contacts are made allows human DMRT1 to employ multiple DNA binding modes (tetramer, trimer, dimer). ChIP-Exo indicates that multiple DNA binding modes also are used in vivo. We show that mutations affecting residues crucial for DNA recognition are associated with an intersex phenotype in flies and in male-to-female sex reversal in humans. Our results illuminate an ancient molecular interaction that underlies much of metazoan sexual development. PMID:26005864

  1. Identifying Interactions that Determine Fragment Binding at Protein Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Radoux, Chris J; Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Pitt, Will R; Groom, Colin R; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-05-12

    Locating a ligand-binding site is an important first step in structure-guided drug discovery, but current methods do little to suggest which interactions within a pocket are the most important for binding. Here we illustrate a method that samples atomic hotspots with simple molecular probes to produce fragment hotspot maps. These maps specifically highlight fragment-binding sites and their corresponding pharmacophores. For ligand-bound structures, they provide an intuitive visual guide within the binding site, directing medicinal chemists where to grow the molecule and alerting them to suboptimal interactions within the original hit. The fragment hotspot map calculation is validated using experimental binding positions of 21 fragments and subsequent lead molecules. The ligands are found in high scoring areas of the fragment hotspot maps, with fragment atoms having a median percentage rank of 97%. Protein kinase B and pantothenate synthetase are examined in detail. In each case, the fragment hotspot maps are able to rationalize a Free-Wilson analysis of SAR data from a fragment-based drug design project. PMID:27043011

  2. Determining Interactions in PSA models: Application to a Space PSA

    SciTech Connect

    C. Smith; E. Borgonovo

    2010-06-01

    This paper addresses use of an importance measure interaction study of a probabilistic risk analysis (PSA) performed for a hypothetical aerospace lunar mission. The PSA methods used in this study follow the general guidance provided in the NASA Probabilistic Risk Assessment Procedures Guide for NASA Managers and Practitioners. For the PSA portion, we used phased-based event tree and fault tree logic structures are used to model a lunar mission, including multiple phases (from launch to return to the Earth surface) and multiple critical systems. Details of the analysis results are not provided in this paper – instead specific basic events are denoted by number (e.g., the first event is 1, the second is 2, and so on). However, in the model, we used approximately 150 fault trees and over 800 basic events. Following analysis and truncation of cut sets, we were left with about 400 basic events to evaluate. We used this model to explore interactions between different basic events and systems. These sensitivity studies provide high-level insights into features of the PSA for the hypothetical lunar mission.

  3. Determination of the CD148-Interacting Region in Thrombospondin-1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rosie; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.; Chen, Jin; Mernaugh, Raymond L.; Takahashi, Takamune

    2016-01-01

    CD148 is a transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase that is expressed in multiple cell types, including vascular endothelial cells and duct epithelial cells. Previous studies have shown a prominent role of CD148 to reduce growth factor signals and suppress cell proliferation and transformation. Further, we have recently shown that thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) serves as a functionally important ligand for CD148. TSP1 has multiple structural elements and interacts with various cell surface receptors that exhibit differing effects. In order to create the CD148-specific TSP1 fragment, here we investigated the CD148-interacting region in TSP1 using a series of TSP1 fragments and biochemical and biological assays. Our results demonstrate that: 1) CD148 binds to the 1st type 1 repeat in TSP1; 2) Trimeric TSP1 fragments that contain the 1st type repeat inhibit cell proliferation in A431D cells that stably express wild-type CD148 (A431D/CD148wt cells), while they show no effects in A431D cells that lack CD148 or express a catalytically inactive form of CD148. The anti-proliferative effect of the TSP1 fragment in A431D/CD148wt cells was largely abolished by CD148 knockdown and antagonized by the 1st, but not the 2nd and 3rd, type 1 repeat fragment. Furthermore, the trimeric TSP1 fragments containing the 1st type repeat increased the catalytic activity of CD148 and reduced phospho-tyrosine contents of EGFR and ERK1/2, defined CD148 substrates. These effects were not observed in the TSP1 fragments that lack the 1st type 1 repeat. Last, we demonstrate that the trimeric TSP1 fragment containing the 1st type 1 repeat inhibits endothelial cell proliferation in culture and angiogenesis in vivo. These effects were largely abolished by CD148 knockdown or deficiency. Collectively, these findings indicate that the 1st type 1 repeat interacts with CD148, reducing growth factor signals and inhibiting epithelial or endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. PMID:27149518

  4. Charged group surface accessibility determines micelleplexes formation and cellular interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yang; Sen, Soumyo; Král, Petr; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2015-04-01

    Micelleplexes are a class of nucleic acid carriers that have gained acceptance due to their size, stability, and ability to synergistically carry small molecules. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA gene regulator that is consists of 19-22 nucleotides. Altered expression of miRNAs plays an important role in many human diseases. Using a model 22-nucleotide miRNA sequence, we investigated the interaction between charged groups on the micelle surface and miRNA. The model micelle system was formed from methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide) (mPEG-PLA) mixed with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide)-b-oligoarginine (mPEG-PLA-Rx, x = 8 or 15). Surface properties of the micelles were varied by controlling the oligoarginine block length and conjugation density. Micelles were observed to have a core-shell conformation in the aqueous environment where the PLA block constituted the hydrophobic core, mPEG and oligoarginine formed a hydrophilic corona. Significantly different thermodynamic behaviors were observed during the interaction of single stranded miRNA with micelles of different surface properties, and the resulting micelleplexes mediated substantial cellular association. Depending upon the oligoarginine length and density, micelles exhibited miRNA loading capacity directly related to the presentation of charged groups on the surface. The effect of charged group accessibility of cationic micelle on micelleplex properties provides guidance on future miRNA delivery system design.Micelleplexes are a class of nucleic acid carriers that have gained acceptance due to their size, stability, and ability to synergistically carry small molecules. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA gene regulator that is consists of 19-22 nucleotides. Altered expression of miRNAs plays an important role in many human diseases. Using a model 22-nucleotide miRNA sequence, we investigated the interaction between charged groups on the micelle surface and miRNA. The

  5. Determining protein function and interaction from genome analysis

    DOEpatents

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Yeates, Todd O.

    2004-08-03

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  6. Determining robot actions for tasks requiring sensor interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budenske, John; Gini, Maria

    1989-01-01

    The performance of non-trivial tasks by a mobile robot has been a long term objective of robotic research. One of the major stumbling blocks to this goal is the conversion of the high-level planning goals and commands into the actuator and sensor processing controls. In order for a mobile robot to accomplish a non-trivial task, the task must be described in terms of primitive actions of the robot's actuators. Most non-trivial tasks require the robot to interact with its environment; thus necessitating coordination of sensor processing and actuator control to accomplish the task. The main contention is that the transformation from the high level description of the task to the primitive actions should be performed primarily at execution time, when knowledge about the environment can be obtained through sensors. It is proposed to produce the detailed plan of primitive actions by using a collection of low-level planning components that contain domain specific knowledge and knowledge about the available sensors, actuators, and sensor/actuator processing. This collection will perform signal and control processing as well as serve as a control interface between an actual mobile robot and a high-level planning system. Previous research has shown the usefulness of high-level planning systems to plan the coordination of activities such to achieve a goal, but none have been fully applied to actual mobile robots due to the complexity of interacting with sensors and actuators. This control interface is currently being implemented on a LABMATE mobile robot connected to a SUN workstation and will be developed such to enable the LABMATE to perform non-trivial, sensor-intensive tasks as specified by a planning system.

  7. Structural determinants of cooperativity in acto-myosin interactions.

    PubMed

    Moraczewska, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of muscle contraction is a very cooperative process. The presence of tropomyosin on the thin filament is both necessary and sufficient for cooperativity to occur. Data recently obtained with various tropomyosin isoforms and mutants help us to understand better the structural requirements in the thin filament for cooperative protein interactions. Forming an end-to-end overlap between neighboring tropomyosin molecules is not necessary for the cooperativity of the thin filament activation. When direct contacts between tropomyosin molecules are disrupted, the conformational changes in the filament are most probably transmitted cooperatively through actin subunits, although the exact nature of these changes is not known. The function of tropomyosin ends, alternatively expressed in various isoforms, is to confer specific actin affinity. Tropomyosin's affinity or actin is directly related to the size of the apparent cooperative unit defined as the number of actin subunits turned into the active state by binding of one myosin head. Inner sequences of tropomyosin, particularly actin-binding periods 3 to 5, play crucial role in myosin-induced activation of the thin filament. A plausible mechanism of tropomyosin function in this process is that inner tropomyosin regions are either specifically recognized by myosin or they define the right actin conformation required for tropomyosin movement from its blocking position. PMID:12545187

  8. Processing of PDGF gene products determines interactions with glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Lustig, F; Hoebeke, J; Simonson, C; Ostergren-Lundén, G; Bondjers, G; Rüetchi, U; Fager, G

    1999-01-01

    The platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a mitogen for mesenchymal cells, may be bound to and inhibited by heparin and other glycosaminoglycans. PDGF is a homo- or heterodimer of A- and B-chains. They occur as short (A109 and B110) and long (A125 and B160) isoforms. The latter contain basic carboxyl-terminal extensions. Dimeric A125 binds to heparin through its basic extension in a two-step reaction. The mechanism involves a conformational change and is consistent with a Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model. Previous indirect experiments suggested that three critical amino acids (basic R111, K116 and polar T125) might be involved. Here, direct binding experiments using dimeric full-length mutants in surface plasmon resonanse analysis showed that all three critical amino acids in an R(X)4K(X)8T-motif contributed in a concerted manner to the high affinity binding. Mutations of these amino acids to alanine resulted in large thermodynamic changes, loss of the allosteric mechanism and order(s) of magnitude lower binding affinity. The binding mechanism and affinity of long dimeric rB were similar to the mutants. Short dimeric rA109 and rB110 showed 100 times lower binding affinity than rA125. Consequently, interactions with glycosaminoglycans in tissues varies between PDGF isoforms and may influence their local accumulation and activity. PMID:10398402

  9. Interaction of growth-determining systems with gravity.

    PubMed

    Merkys, A; Laurinavicius, R; Bendoraityte, D; Svegzdiene, D; Rupainiene, O

    1986-01-01

    The experiments have been carried out with lettuce shoots on board the Salyut-7 orbital station the Kosmos-1667 biological satellite and under ground conditions at 180 degrees plant inversion. By means of the centrifuge Biogravistat-1M the threshold value of gravitational sensitivity of lettuce shoots has been determined on board the Salyut-7 station. It was found to be equal to 2.9 x 10(-3)g for hypocotyls and 1.5 x 10(-4)g for roots. The following results have been received in the experiment performed on board the Kosmos-1667 satellite: a) under microgravity the proliferation of the meristem cells and the growth of roots did not differ from the control; b) the growth of hypocotyls in length was significantly enhanced in microgravity; c) under microgravity transverse growth of hypocotyls (increase in cross sectional area) was significantly increased due to enhancement of cortical parenchyma cell growth. At 180 degrees inversion in Earth's gravity root extension growth and rate of cell division in the root apical meristem were decreased. The determination of DNA-fuchsin value in the nuclei of the cell root apexes showed that inversion affected processes of the cell cycle preceding cytokinesis. PMID:11537846

  10. Interaction of growth-determining systems with gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkys, A.; Laurinavičius, R.; Bendoraityté, D.; Švegždiené, D.; Rupainiené, O.

    The experiments have been carried out with lettuce shoots on board the Salyut-7 orbital station, the Kosmos-1667 biological satellite and under ground conditions at 180° plant inversion. By means of the centrifuge Biogravistat-1M the threshold value of gravitational sensitivity of lettuce shoots has been determined on board the Salyut-7 station. It was found to be equal to 2.9 × 10-3g for hypocotyls and 1.5 × 10-4g for roots. The following results have been received in the experiment performed on board the Kosmos-1667 satellite: a) under microgravity the proliferation of the meristem cells and the growth of roots did not differ from the control; b) the growth of hypocotyls in length was significantly enhanced in microgravity; c) under microgravity transverse growth of hypocotyls (increase in cross sectional area) was significantly increased due to enhancement of cortical parenchyma cell growth. At 180° inversion in Earth's gravity root extension growth and rate of cell division in the root apical meristem were decreased. The determination of DNA-fuchsin value in the nuclei of the cell root apexes showed that inversion affected processess of the cell cycle preceeding cytokinesis.

  11. Political dynamics determined by interactions between political leaders and voters.

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Michael Lewis; Bier, Asmeret; Backus, George A.; Hills, Richard Guy

    2010-03-01

    The political dynamics associated with an election are typically a function of the interplay between political leaders and voters, as well as endogenous and exogenous factors that impact the perceptions and goals of the electorate. This paper describes an effort by Sandia National Laboratories to model the attitudes and behaviors of various political groups along with that population's primary influencers, such as government leaders. To accomplish this, Sandia National Laboratories is creating a hybrid system dynamics-cognitive model to simulate systems- and individual-level political dynamics in a hypothetical society. The model is based on well-established psychological theory, applied to both individuals and groups within the modeled society. Confidence management processes are being incorporated into the model design process to increase the utility of the tool and assess its performance. This project will enhance understanding of how political dynamics are determined in democratic society.

  12. Attractive interactions among intermediate filaments determine network mechanics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pawelzyk, Paul; Mücke, Norbert; Herrmann, Harald; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical and structural properties of K8/K18 and vimentin intermediate filament (IF) networks have been investigated using bulk mechanical rheometry and optical microrheology including diffusing wave spectroscopy and multiple particle tracking. A high elastic modulus G0 at low protein concentration c, a weak concentration dependency of G0 (G0 ∼ c(0.5 ± 0.1)) and pronounced strain stiffening are found for these systems even without external crossbridgers. Strong attractive interactions among filaments are required to maintain these characteristic mechanical features, which have also been reported for various other IF networks. Filament assembly, the persistence length of the filaments and the network mesh size remain essentially unaffected when a nonionic surfactant is added, but strain stiffening is completely suppressed, G0 drops by orders of magnitude and exhibits a scaling G0 ∼ c(1.9 ± 0.2) in agreement with microrheological measurements and as expected for entangled networks of semi-flexible polymers. Tailless K8Δ/K18ΔT and various other tailless filament networks do not exhibit strain stiffening, but still show high G0 values. Therefore, two binding sites are proposed to exist in IF networks. A weaker one mediated by hydrophobic amino acid clusters in the central rod prevents stretched filaments between adjacent cross-links from thermal equilibration and thus provides the high G0 values. Another strong one facilitating strain stiffening is located in the tail domain with its high fraction of hydrophobic amino acid sequences. Strain stiffening is less pronounced for vimentin than for K8/K18 due to electrostatic repulsion forces partly compensating the strong attraction at filament contact points. PMID:24690778

  13. Combined Electrostatics and Hydrogen Bonding Determine PIP2 Intermolecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Levental, Ilya; Cebers, Andrejs; Janmey, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane lipids are active contributors to cell function as key mediators in signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, migration, and proliferation. Recent work on multimolecular lipid structures suggests a critical role for lipid organization in regulating the function of both lipids and proteins. Of particular interest in this context are the polyphosphoinositides (PPI’s), specifically phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate (PIP2). The cellular functions of PIP2 are numerous but the factors controlling targeting of PIP2 to specific proteins and organization of PIP2 in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane remain poorly understood. To analyze the organization of PIP2 in a simplified planar system, we used Langmuir monolayers to study the effects of subphase conditions on monolayers of purified naturally derived PIP2 and other anionic or zwitterionic phospholipids. We report a significant molecular area expanding effect of subphase monovalent salts on PIP2 at biologically relevant surface densities. This effect is shown to be specific to PIP2 and independent of subphase pH. Chaotropic agents (e.g. salts, trehalose, urea, temperature) that disrupt water structure and the ability of water to mediate intermolecular hydrogen bonding also specifically expanded PIP2 monolayers. These results suggest a combination of water-mediated hydrogen bonding and headgroup charge in determining the organization of PIP2, and may provide an explanation for the unique functionality of PIP2 compared to other anionic phospholipids. PMID:18572937

  14. Determinant based configuration interaction algorithms for complete and restricted configuration interaction spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Jeppe; Roos, Björn O.; Jørgensen, Poul; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.

    1988-08-01

    A restricted active space (RAS) wave function is introduced, which encompasses many commonly used restricted CI expansions. A highly vectorized algorithm is developed for full CI and other RAS calculations. The algorithm is based on Slater determinants expressed as products of alphastrings and betastrings and lends itself to a matrix indexing C(Iα, Iβ ) of the CI vector. The major features are: (1) The intermediate summation over determinants is replaced by two intermediate summations over strings, the number of which is only the square root of the number of determinants. (2) Intermediate summations over strings outside the RAS CI space is avoided and RAS calculations are therefore almost as efficient as full CI calculations with the same number of determinants. (3) An additional simplification is devised for MS =0 states, halving the number of operations. For a case with all single and double replacements out from 415 206 Slater determinants yielding 1 136 838 Slater determinants each CI iteration takes 161 s on an IBM 3090/150(VF).

  15. Perceptual Incongruity and Social Interaction as Determinants of Infants' Reaction to Novel Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, David J.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A study on the effects of birth order on infants' reactions to novel persons was conducted to test the differing predictions of incongruity theory and social interaction theory. Findings indicated that infants' reactions to novel persons are determined by infants' social interaction within the family during the first year rather than by the number…

  16. Determinants of potential drug–drug interaction associated dispensing in community pharmacies in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Matthijs L.; Caspers, Peter W. J.; Kallewaard, Marjon; Bruinink, Riekert J.; Kylstra, Nico B.; Heisterkamp, Siem; de Valk, Vincent; van der Veen, André A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: There are many drug–drug interactions (D–DI) of which some may cause severe adverse patient outcomes. Dispensing interacting drug combinations should be avoided when the risks are higher than the benefits. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of dispensing undesirable interacting drug combinations by community pharmacies in the Netherlands. Methods: A total of 256 Dutch community pharmacies were selected, based on the dispensing of 11 undesirable interacting drug combinations between January 1st, 2001 and October 31st, 2002. These pharmacies were sent a questionnaire by the Inspectorate for Health Care (IHC) concerning their process and structure characteristics. Main outcome measure: The number of times the 11 undesirable interacting drug combinations were dispensed. Results: Two hundred and forty-six questionnaires (response rate 96.1%) were completed. Dispensing determinants were only found for the D–DI between macrolide antibiotics and digoxin but not for the other 10 D–DIs. Pharmacies using different medication surveillance systems differed in the dispensing of this interacting drug combination, and pharmacies, which were part of a health care centre dispensed this interacting drug combination more often. Conclusion: Medication surveillance in Dutch community pharmacies seems to be effective. Although for most D–DIs no determinants were found, process and structure characteristics may have consequences for the dispensing of undesirable interacting drug combinations. PMID:17187223

  17. Human male sex determination and sexual differentiation: pathways, molecular interactions and genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Kucinskas, Laimutis; Just, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The complex mechanisms are responsible for male sex determination and differentiation. The steps of formation of the testes are dependent on a series of Y-linked, X-linked and autosomal genes actions and interactions. After formation of testes the gonads secrete hormones, which are essential for the formation of the male genitalia. Hormones are transcription regulators, which function by specific receptors. Ambiguous genitalia are result of disruption of genetic interaction. This review describes the mechanisms, which lead to differentiation of male sex and ways by which the determination and differentiation may be interrupted by naturally occurring mutations, causing different syndromes and diseases. PMID:16160410

  18. Truncated-determinant diagrammatic Monte Carlo for fermions with contact interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourovski, Evgueni; Prokof'Ev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    2004-11-01

    For some models of interacting fermions the known solution to the notorious sign problem in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is to work with macroscopic fermionic determinants; the price, however, is a macroscopic scaling of the numerical effort spent on elementary local updates. We find that the ratio of two macroscopic determinants can be found with any desired accuracy by considering truncated (local in space and time) matices. In this respect, MC for interacting fermionic systems becomes similar to that for the sign-problem-free bosonic systems with system-size independent update cost. We demonstrate the utility of the truncated-determinant method by simulating the attractive Hubbard model within the MC scheme based on partially summed Feynman diagrams. We conjecture that similar approach may be useful in other implementations of the sign-free determinant schemes.

  19. Determination of the neutral to charged current cross-section ratio for antineutrino interactions on protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, J.; Van Doninck, W.; Alamatsaz, H.; Armenise, N.; Azemoon, T.; Bartley, J. H.; Baton, J. P.; Belusevic, R.; Bertrand, D.; Brisson, V.; Calicchio, M.; Colley, D. C.; Cooper, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fogli-muciaccia, M. T.; Gerbier, G.; Guy, J. G.; Jones, G. T.; Kochowski, C.; Michette, A. G.; Natali, S.; Neveu, M.; Nuzzo, S.; O'Neale, S.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Ruggieri, F.; Sacton, J.; Sewell, S.; Tyndel, M.; Vander Velde, G.; Venus, W.; Vortuba, M. F.; BEBC TST Neutrino Collaboration

    1984-04-01

    An exposure of BEBC equipped with the hydrogen-filled TST to the overlinevμ wide band beam at the CERN SPS has been used to study overlinevμ interactions on free protons. About neutral induced interactions have been observed inside the hydrogen and separated into charged current, neutral current and neutral hadron interactions using a multivariate discriminant analysis based on the kinematics of the events. The neutral to charged current cross-section ratio has been determined to be R poverlinev = 0.33 ± 0.04 . When combined with the value of Rpv previously determined in the same experiment, the result is compatible with the prediction of the standard SU (2) × U (1) model for sin 2θW = 0.24 -0.08+0.06 and ρ = 1.07 -0.08+0.06. Fixing the parameter ρ = 1 yields sin 2θW = 0.18 ± 0.04.

  20. The influence of bonding agents in improving interactions in composite propellants determined using image analysis.

    PubMed

    Dostanić, J; Husović, T V; Usćumlić, G; Heinemann, R J; Mijin, D

    2008-12-01

    Binder-oxidizer interactions in rocket composite propellants can be improved using adequate bonding agents. In the present work, the effectiveness of different 1,3,5-trisubstituted isocyanurates was determined by stereo and metallographic microscopy and using the software package Image-Pro Plus. The chemical analysis of samples was performed by a scanning electron microscope equipped for energy dispersive spectrometry. PMID:19094035

  1. Cell-cell interactions determine the dorsoventral axis in embryos of an equally cleaving opisthobranch mollusc.

    PubMed

    Boring, L

    1989-11-01

    Dorsoventral polarity in molluscan embryos can arise by two distinct mechanisms, where the mechanism employed is strongly correlated with the cleavage pattern of the early embryo. In species with unequal cleavage, the dorsal lineage, or "D quadrant", is determined in a cell-autonomous manner by the inheritance of cytoplasmic determinants. However, in gastropod molluscs with equal cleavage, cell-cell interactions are required to specify the fate of the dorsal blastomere. During the fifth cleavage interval in equally cleaving embryos, one of the vegetal macromeres makes exclusive contacts with the animal micromeres, and this macromere will give rise to the mesodermal precursor cell at the next division, thereby identifying the dorsal quadrant. This study examines D-quadrant determination in an equally cleaving species from a group of previously uninvestigated gastropods, the subclass Opisthobranchia. Blastomere ablation experiments were performed on embryos of Haminoea callidegenita to (i) determine the developmental potential of macromeres before and after fifth cleavage, and (ii) examine the role of micromere-macromere interactions in the establishment of bilateral symmetry. The results suggest that the macromeres are developmentally equivalent prior to fifth cleavage, but become nonequivalent soon afterward. The dorsoventral axis corresponds to the displacement of the micromeres over one macromere early in the fifth cleavage interval. This unusual cellular topology is hypothesized to result from constraints imposed on micromere-macromere interactions in an embryo that develops from a large egg and forms a stereoblastula (no cleavage cavity). Ablation of the entire first quarter of micromeres results in embryos which remain radially symmetrical in the vegetal hemisphere, indicating that micromere-macromere interactions are required for the elaboration of bilateral symmetry properties. Therefore, inductive interactions between cells may represent a general strategy

  2. HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vif Interact with Human APOBEC3 Proteins Using Completely Different Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica L.; Izumi, Taisuke; Borbet, Timothy C.; Hagedorn, Ariel N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human APOBEC3 (A3) restriction factors provide intrinsic immunity against zoonotic transmission of pathogenic viruses. A3D, A3F, A3G, and A3H haplotype II (A3H-hapII) can be packaged into virion infectivity factor (Vif)-deficient HIVs to inhibit viral replication. To overcome these restriction factors, Vif binds to the A3 proteins in viral producer cells to target them for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus preventing their packaging into assembling virions. Therefore, the Vif-A3 interactions are attractive targets for novel drug development. HIV-1 and HIV-2 arose via distinct zoonotic transmission events of simian immunodeficiency viruses from chimpanzees and sooty mangabeys, respectively, and Vifs from these viruses have limited homology. To gain insights into the evolution of virus-host interactions that led to successful cross-species transmission of lentiviruses, we characterized the determinants of the interaction between HIV-2 Vif (Vif2) with human A3 proteins and compared them to the previously identified HIV-1 Vif (Vif1) interactions with the A3 proteins. We found that A3G, A3F, and A3H-hapII, but not A3D, were susceptible to Vif2-induced degradation. Alanine-scanning mutational analysis of the first 62 amino acids of Vif2 indicated that Vif2 determinants important for degradation of A3G and A3F are completely distinct from these regions in Vif1, as are the determinants in A3G and A3F that are critical for Vif2-induced degradation. These observations suggest that distinct Vif-A3 interactions evolved independently in different SIVs and their nonhuman primate hosts and conservation of the A3 determinants targeted by the SIV Vif proteins resulted in successful zoonotic transmission into humans. IMPORTANCE Primate APOBEC3 proteins provide innate immunity against invading pathogens, and Vif proteins of primate lentiviruses have evolved to overcome these host defenses by interacting with them and inducing their proteasomal degradation. HIV

  3. Quantifying Functional Group Interactions that Determine Urea Effects on Nucleic Acid Helix Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Emily J.; Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Cha, Hyo Keun; McDevitt, Joseph L.; Merker, Wolf E.; Ritzer, Ryan; Muth, Gregory W.; Engelsgjerd, Samuel W.; Mangold, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Perry J.; Kerins, Michael J.; Record, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Urea destabilizes helical and folded conformations of nucleic acids and proteins, as well as protein-nucleic acid complexes. To understand these effects, extend previous characterizations of interactions of urea with protein functional groups, and thereby develop urea as a probe of conformational changes in protein and nucleic acid processes, we obtain chemical potential derivatives (μ23 = dμ2/dm3) quantifying interactions of urea (component 3) with nucleic acid bases, base analogs, nucleosides and nucleotide monophosphates (component 2) using osmometry and hexanol-water distribution assays. Dissection of these μ23 yields interaction potentials quantifying interactions of urea with unit surface areas of nucleic acid functional groups (heterocyclic aromatic ring, ring methyl, carbonyl and phosphate O, amino N, sugar (C,O)); urea interacts favorably with all these groups, relative to interactions with water. Interactions of urea with heterocyclic aromatic rings and attached methyl groups (as on thymine) are particularly favorable, as previously observed for urea-homocyclic aromatic ring interactions. Urea m-values determined for double helix formation by DNA dodecamers near 25°C are in the range 0.72 to 0.85 kcal mol−1 m−1 and exhibit little systematic dependence on nucleobase composition (17–42% GC). Interpretation of these results using the urea interaction potentials indicates that extensive (60–90%) stacking of nucleobases in the separated strands in the transition region is required to explain the m-value. Results for RNA and DNA dodecamers obtained at higher temperatures, and literature data, are consistent with this conclusion. This demonstrates the utility of urea as a quantitative probe of changes in surface area (ΔASA) in nucleic acid processes. PMID:23510511

  4. Interactions between ether phospholipids and cholesterol as determined by scattering and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heberle, Frederick A; Mostofian, Barmak; Kučerka, Norbert; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John

    2012-12-27

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol's molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup's phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules. PMID:23199292

  5. Interactions between Ether Phospholipids and Cholesterol as Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heberle, Frederick A; Mostofian, Barmak; Kucerka, Norbert; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol s molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and Xray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup s phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules.

  6. Determination of the neutral to charged current cross section ratio for neutrino interactions on protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ruggieri, F.; Belusevic, R.; Colley, D. C.; Jones, G. T.; O'Neale, S.; Sewell, S.; Votruba, M. F.; Bertrand, D.; Moreels, J.; Sacton, J.; Vander Velde-Wilquet, C.; Van Doninck, W.; Brisson, V.; Francois, T.; Petiau, P.; Cooper, A. M.; Guy, J. G.; Michette, A. G.; Tyndel, M.; Venus, W.; Baton, J. P.; Gerbier, G.; Kochowski, C.; Neveu, M.; Alamatsaz, H.; Azemoon, T.; Bartley, J. H.; Parker, M. A.; BEBC TST Neutrino Collaboration

    1983-03-01

    About 2000 neutral induced interactions observed inside the hydrogen filled TST in BEBC have been analysed. The data were obtained from an exposure to the vμ wide band beam at the CERN SPS. A separation of these events into charged current, neutral current and neutral hadron induced interactions have been achieved using a multidimensional kinematic analysis. The neutral to charged current cross section ratio for vμ interactions on free protons has been determined avoiding the drastic cuts on the data inherent in previous experiments. The result RPv = 0.47 ± 0.04 is compatible with those measurements and the prediction of the standard SU (2) × U (1) model for sin 2θW = 0.18 ± 0.04.

  7. Determination of solute-polymer interaction properties and their application to parenteral product container compatibility evaluations.

    PubMed

    Kenley, R A; Jenke, D R

    1990-09-01

    Kinetic and thermodynamic interaction properties between dialkyl phthalate test compounds and a polyolefin polymer were examined via a permeation-cell experimental design. Disappearance and appearance rates of solute in the receptor and donor solutions, as well as the equilibrium composition of the test system, are used to determine sorption and diffusion coefficients and the solute/polymer equilibrium binding constant. Sorption rate constants and diffusion coefficients exhibit Arrenhius-type behavior. The binding constants obtained correlate well with the solute's octanol-water partition coefficient. The kinetic and thermodynamic data generated combine with proposed interaction models to identify solute/polymer interactions (binding and leaching) pertinent to evaluating container/solution compatibility for parenteral products. PMID:2235889

  8. fourSig: a method for determining chromosomal interactions in 4C-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Rex L.; Starmer, Joshua; Mugford, Joshua W.; Calabrese, J. Mauro; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2014-01-01

    The ability to correlate chromosome conformation and gene expression gives a great deal of information regarding the strategies used by a cell to properly regulate gene activity. 4C-Seq is a relatively new and increasingly popular technology where the set of genomic interactions generated by a single point in the genome can be determined. 4C-Seq experiments generate large, complicated data sets and it is imperative that signal is properly distinguished from noise. Currently, there are a limited number of methods for analyzing 4C-Seq data. Here, we present a new method, fourSig, which in addition to being precise and simple to use also includes a new feature that prioritizes detected interactions. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of fourSig with previously published and novel 4C-Seq data sets and show that our significance prioritization correlates with the ability to reproducibly detect interactions among replicates. PMID:24561615

  9. fourSig: a method for determining chromosomal interactions in 4C-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rex L; Starmer, Joshua; Mugford, Joshua W; Calabrese, J Mauro; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2014-04-01

    The ability to correlate chromosome conformation and gene expression gives a great deal of information regarding the strategies used by a cell to properly regulate gene activity. 4C-Seq is a relatively new and increasingly popular technology where the set of genomic interactions generated by a single point in the genome can be determined. 4C-Seq experiments generate large, complicated data sets and it is imperative that signal is properly distinguished from noise. Currently, there are a limited number of methods for analyzing 4C-Seq data. Here, we present a new method, fourSig, which in addition to being precise and simple to use also includes a new feature that prioritizes detected interactions. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of fourSig with previously published and novel 4C-Seq data sets and show that our significance prioritization correlates with the ability to reproducibly detect interactions among replicates. PMID:24561615

  10. Determination of half-maximal inhibitory concentration using biosensor-based protein interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Aykul, Senem; Martinez-Hackert, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) is the most widely used and informative measure of a drug's efficacy. It indicates how much drug is needed to inhibit a biological process by half, thus providing a measure of potency of an antagonist drug in pharmacological research. Most approaches to determine IC50 of a pharmacological compound are based on assays that utilize whole cell systems. While they generally provide outstanding potency information, results can depend on the experimental cell line used and may not differentiate a compound's ability to inhibit specific interactions. Here we show using the secreted Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) family ligand BMP-4 and its receptors as example that surface plasmon resonance can be used to accurately determine IC50 values of individual ligand-receptor pairings. The molecular resolution achievable wih this approach can help distinguish inhibitors that specifically target individual complexes, or that can inhibit multiple functional interactions at the same time. PMID:27365221

  11. Life history determines genetic structure and evolutionary potential of host–parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Luke G.; Thrall, Peter H.; Burdon, Jeremy J.; Linde, Celeste C.

    2009-01-01

    Measures of population genetic structure and diversity of disease-causing organisms are commonly used to draw inferences regarding their evolutionary history and potential to generate new variation in traits that determine interactions with their hosts. Parasite species exhibit a range of population structures and life-history strategies, including different transmission modes, life-cycle complexity, off-host survival mechanisms and dispersal ability. These are important determinants of the frequency and predictability of interactions with host species. Yet the complex causal relationships between spatial structure, life history and the evolutionary dynamics of parasite populations are not well understood. We demonstrate that a clear picture of the evolutionary potential of parasitic organisms and their demographic and evolutionary histories can only come from understanding the role of life history and spatial structure in influencing population dynamics and epidemiological patterns. PMID:18947899

  12. Unusual role of epilayer–substrate interactions in determining orientational relations in van der Waals epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Siegel, David A.; Chen, Wei; Liu, Peizhi; Guo, Junjie; Duscher, Gerd; Zhao, Chong; Wang, Hao; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; McCarty, Kevin F.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Gu, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Using selected-area low-energy electron diffraction analysis, we showed strict orientational alignment of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) crystallites with Cu(100) surface lattices of Cu foil substrates during atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. In sharp contrast, the graphene–Cu(100) system is well-known to assume a wide range of rotations despite graphene’s crystallographic similarity to h-BN. Our density functional theory calculations uncovered the origin of this surprising difference: The crystallite orientation is determined during nucleation by interactions between the cluster’s edges and the substrate. Unlike the weaker B– and N–Cu interactions, strong C–Cu interactions rearrange surface Cu atoms, resulting in the aligned geometry not being a distinct minimum in total energy. The discovery made in this specific case runs counter to the conventional wisdom that strong epilayer–substrate interactions enhance orientational alignment in epitaxy and sheds light on the factors that determine orientational relation in van der Waals epitaxy of 2D materials. PMID:25385622

  13. Determination of the interaction enthalpy between microemulsion droplets by isothermal titration microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peizhu; Ma, Yuanming; Peng, Xuhong; Yin, Tianxiang; An, Xueqin; Shen, Weiguo

    2011-10-18

    A new experimental design for the measurement of the real heat of dilution of the microemulsion droplets by isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) has been reported and used to study the interaction enthalpies of the droplets for the system of water/sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)-sulfosuccinate (AOT)/toluene. The results are in good agreement with those determined from light-scattering experiments. PMID:21913718

  14. A pipeline for determining protein-protein interactions and proximities in the cellular milieu.

    PubMed

    Subbotin, Roman I; Chait, Brian T

    2014-11-01

    It remains extraordinarily challenging to elucidate endogenous protein-protein interactions and proximities within the cellular milieu. The dynamic nature and the large range of affinities of these interactions augment the difficulty of this undertaking. Among the most useful tools for extracting such information are those based on affinity capture of target bait proteins in combination with mass spectrometric readout of the co-isolated species. Although highly enabling, the utility of affinity-based methods is generally limited by difficulties in distinguishing specific from nonspecific interactors, preserving and isolating all unique interactions including those that are weak, transient, or rapidly exchanging, and differentiating proximal interactions from those that are more distal. Here, we have devised and optimized a set of methods to address these challenges. The resulting pipeline involves flash-freezing cells in liquid nitrogen to preserve the cellular environment at the moment of freezing; cryomilling to fracture the frozen cells into intact micron chunks to allow for rapid access of a chemical reagent and to stabilize the intact endogenous subcellular assemblies and interactors upon thawing; and utilizing the high reactivity of glutaraldehyde to achieve sufficiently rapid stabilization at low temperatures to preserve native cellular interactions. In the course of this work, we determined that relatively low molar ratios of glutaraldehyde to reactive amines within the cellular milieu were sufficient to preserve even labile and transient interactions. This mild treatment enables efficient and rapid affinity capture of the protein assemblies of interest under nondenaturing conditions, followed by bottom-up MS to identify and quantify the protein constituents. For convenience, we have termed this approach Stabilized Affinity Capture Mass Spectrometry. Here, we demonstrate that Stabilized Affinity Capture Mass Spectrometry allows us to stabilize and elucidate

  15. Abundance and phenology patterns of two pond-breeding salamanders determine species interactions in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas L; Hocking, Daniel J; Conner, Christopher A; Earl, Julia E; Harper, Elizabeth B; Osbourn, Michael S; Peterman, William E; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2015-03-01

    Phenology often determines the outcome of interspecific interactions, where early-arriving species often dominate interactions over those arriving later. The effects of phenology on species interactions are especially pronounced in aquatic systems, but the evidence is largely derived from experimental studies. We examined whether differences in breeding phenology between two pond-breeding salamanders (Ambystoma annulatum and A. maculatum) affected metamorph recruitment and demographic traits within natural populations, with the expectation that the fall-breeding A. annulatum would negatively affect the spring-breeding A. maculatum. We monitored populations of each species at five ponds over 4 years using drift fences. Metamorph abundance and survival of A. annulatum were affected by intra- and interspecific processes, whereas metamorph size and date of emigration were primarily influenced by intraspecific effects. Metamorph abundance, snout-vent length, date of emigration and survival for A. maculatum were all predicted by combinations of intra- and interspecific effects, but often showed negative relationships with A. annulatum metamorph traits and abundance. Size and date of metamorphosis were strongly correlated within each species, but in opposite patterns (negative for A. annulatum and positive for A. maculatum), suggesting that the two species use alternative strategies to enhance terrestrial survival and that these factors may influence their interactions. Our results match predictions from experimental studies that suggest recruitment is influenced by intra- and interspecific processes which are determined by phenological differences between species. Incorporating spatiotemporal variability when modeling population dynamics is necessary to understand the importance of phenology in species interactions, especially as shifts in phenology occur under climate change. PMID:25413866

  16. Interactions and Diffusion in Fine-Stranded β-lactoglobulin Gels Determined via FRAP and Binding

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Erich; Hermansson, Anne-Marie; Öhgren, Camilla; Rudemo, Mats; Lorén, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    The effects of electrostatic interactions and obstruction by the microstructure on probe diffusion were determined in positively charged hydrogels. Probe diffusion in fine-stranded gels and solutions of β-lactoglobulin at pH 3.5 was determined using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and binding, which is widely used in biophysics. The microstructures of the β-lactoglobulin gels were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The effects of probe size and charge (negatively charged Na2-fluorescein (376Da) and weakly anionic 70kDa FITC-dextran), probe concentration (50 to 200 ppm), and β-lactoglobulin concentration (9% to 12% w/w) on the diffusion properties and the electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged probes and the positively charged gels or solutions were evaluated. The results show that the diffusion of negatively charged Na2-fluorescein is strongly influenced by electrostatic interactions in the positively charged β-lactoglobulin systems. A linear relationship between the pseudo-on binding rate constant and the β-lactoglobulin concentration for three different probe concentrations was found. This validates an important assumption of existing biophysical FRAP and binding models, namely that the pseudo-on binding rate constant equals the product of the molecular binding rate constant and the concentration of the free binding sites. Indicators were established to clarify whether FRAP data should be analyzed using a binding-diffusion model or an obstruction-diffusion model. PMID:24411257

  17. Interactions and diffusion in fine-stranded β-lactoglobulin gels determined via FRAP and binding.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Erich; Hermansson, Anne-Marie; Ohgren, Camilla; Rudemo, Mats; Lorén, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    The effects of electrostatic interactions and obstruction by the microstructure on probe diffusion were determined in positively charged hydrogels. Probe diffusion in fine-stranded gels and solutions of β-lactoglobulin at pH 3.5 was determined using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and binding, which is widely used in biophysics. The microstructures of the β-lactoglobulin gels were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The effects of probe size and charge (negatively charged Na2-fluorescein (376Da) and weakly anionic 70kDa FITC-dextran), probe concentration (50 to 200 ppm), and β-lactoglobulin concentration (9% to 12% w/w) on the diffusion properties and the electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged probes and the positively charged gels or solutions were evaluated. The results show that the diffusion of negatively charged Na2-fluorescein is strongly influenced by electrostatic interactions in the positively charged β-lactoglobulin systems. A linear relationship between the pseudo-on binding rate constant and the β-lactoglobulin concentration for three different probe concentrations was found. This validates an important assumption of existing biophysical FRAP and binding models, namely that the pseudo-on binding rate constant equals the product of the molecular binding rate constant and the concentration of the free binding sites. Indicators were established to clarify whether FRAP data should be analyzed using a binding-diffusion model or an obstruction-diffusion model. PMID:24411257

  18. Amino acid-dependent NPRL2 interaction with Raptor determines mTOR Complex 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sang Su; Kang, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Seyun; Lee, Seoeun; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Jin Woo; Byun, Boohyeong; Meadows, Gary G; Joe, Cheol O

    2016-02-01

    We assign a new function to a tumor suppressor NPRL2 that activates the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity. The positive regulation of mTORC1 activity by NPRL2 is mediated through NPRL2 interaction with Raptor. While NPRL2 interacts with Rag GTPases, RagD in particular, to interfere with mTORC1 activity in amino acid scarcity, NPRL2 interacts with Raptor in amino acid sufficiency to activate mTORC1. A reciprocal relationship exists between NPRL2 binding to Rag GTPases and Raptor. NPRL2 majorly locates in the lysosomal membranes and has a higher binding affinity to the dominant negative mutant heterodimer of RagA(GDP)/RagD(GTP) that inactivates mTORC1. However, the binding affinity of NPRL2 with Raptor is much less pronounced in cells expressing the dominant negative mutant heterodimer of RagA(GDP)/RagD(GTP) than in cells expressing the dominant positive mutant heterodimer, RagA(GTP)/RagD(GDP). The positive effect of NPRL2 on TORC1 pathway was also evidenced in Drosophila animal model. Here, we propose a 'seesaw' model in which the interactive behavior of NPRL2 with Raptor determines mTORC1 activation by amino acid signaling in animal cells. PMID:26582740

  19. Determination of the interaction using FTIR within the composite gel polymer electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yun; Ma, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xu; Liang, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    In the previous research, the gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) which consisted of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix, propylene carbonate (PC), LiClO4 and OREC (Rectorite modified with dodecyl benzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), achieved satisfactory properties. In the paper, the interaction between components was quantitatively determined. Characterization of interaction of Cdbnd O in PC and PMMA with Li+ and OH group on OREC surface has been thoroughly examined using FTIR, respectively. The quantitative analysis of FTIR shows that the absorptivity coefficient a of PMMA/LiClO4, PC/LiClO4, PC/OREC and PMMA/OREC is 0.902, 0.113, 0.430 and 0.753, respectively, which means that the Li+ or OH bonded Cdbnd O is more sensitive than the free Cdbnd O in FTIR spectra. The limit value of bonded Cdbnd O equivalent fraction of PMMA/LiClO4, PC/LiClO4, PC/OREC and PMMA/OREC is 17%, 94%, 57% and 20%, respectively, which implies that all the interaction within the components is reversible and the intensity of interaction is ordered as PC/LiClO4, PC/OREC, PMMA/OREC and PMMA/LiClO4.

  20. Comparison of signaling interactions determining annual and perennial plant growth in response to low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wingler, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature inhibits plant growth despite the fact that considerable rates of photosynthetic activity can be maintained. Instead of lower rates of photosynthesis, active inhibition of cell division and expansion is primarily responsible for reduced growth. This results in sink limitation and enables plants to accumulate carbohydrates that act as compatible solutes or are stored throughout the winter to enable re-growth in spring. Regulation of growth in response to temperature therefore requires coordination with carbon metabolism, e.g., via the signaling metabolite trehalose-6-phosphate. The phytohormones gibberellin (GA) and jasmonate (JA) play an important role in regulating growth in response to temperature. Growth restriction at low temperature is mainly mediated by DELLA proteins, whose degradation is promoted by GA. For annual plants, it has been shown that the GA/DELLA pathway interacts with JA signaling and C-repeat binding factor dependent cold acclimation, but these interactions have not been explored in detail for perennials. Growth regulation in response to seasonal factors is, however, particularly important in perennials, especially at high latitudes. In autumn, growth cessation in trees is caused by shortening of the daylength in interaction with phytohormone signaling. In perennial grasses seasonal differences in the sensitivity to GA may enable enhanced growth in spring. This review provides an overview of the signaling interactions that determine plant growth at low temperature and highlights gaps in our knowledge, especially concerning the seasonality of signaling responses in perennial plants. PMID:25628637

  1. Determination of heat transfer coefficient for an interaction of sub-cooled gas and metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi Sidek, Mohd; Syahidan Kamarudin, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for a hot metal surface and their surrounding is one of the need be defined parameter in hot forming process. This study has been conducted to determine the HTC for an interaction between sub-cooled gas sprayed on a hot metal surface. Both experiments and finite element have been adopted in this work. Initially, the designated experiment was conducted to obtain temperature history of spray cooling process. Then, an inverse method was adopted to calculate the HTC value before we validate in a finite element simulation model. The result shows that the heat transfer coefficient for interaction of subcooled gas and hot metal surface is 1000 W/m2K.

  2. The possibility of determining the spin-orbit interaction constants using scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotkevych, N. V.; Vovk, N. R.; Kolesnichenko, Yu. A.

    2016-04-01

    A study of electron tunneling from quasi-two-dimensional (surface) states with spin-orbit interaction into bulk-mode states, within the framework of a model of an infinitely thin inhomogeneous tunnel magnetic barrier between two conductors. We analyze how the scattering of quasi-two-dimensional electrons on a single magnetic defect affects the tunneling current in this system. We also obtain an analytical expression for the conductance of the tunnel point-contact, as a function of its distance from the defect. It is shown that analyzing local magnetization oscillations around the defect using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy allows us to determine the spin-orbit interaction constant.

  3. Age, growth and size interact with stress to determine life span and mortality.

    PubMed

    Roach, Deborah Ann

    2012-10-01

    Individuals in a large experimental field population, of the short-lived perennial species Plantago lanceolata, were followed to determine the sources of variation that influence mortality and life span. The design included multiple age groups with initially similar genetic structure, which made it possible to separate age effects from period effects and to identify the genetic component to variation in life span. During a period of stress, individuals of all ages showed parallel increases in mortality but different cohorts experienced this period of high mortality at different ages. This then influenced the distribution of life spans across cohorts. Age and size-age interactions influenced mortality during the period of stress. Smaller individuals died but only if they were old. Additionally, growth and age interacted with stress such that older individuals had negative growth and high mortality whereas younger individuals had positive growth and relatively lower mortality during stress. The results of this study show that it is not simply the environment that can have a major impact on demography in natural populations; rather, age, size and growth can interact with the environment to influence mortality and life span when the environment is stressful. PMID:22664575

  4. Transporters and drug-drug interactions: important determinants of drug disposition and effects.

    PubMed

    König, Jörg; Müller, Fabian; Fromm, Martin F

    2013-07-01

    Uptake and efflux transporters determine plasma and tissue concentrations of a broad variety of drugs. They are localized in organs such as small intestine, liver, and kidney, which are critical for drug absorption and elimination. Moreover, they can be found in important blood-tissue barriers such as the blood-brain barrier. Inhibition or induction of drug transporters by coadministered drugs can alter pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the victim drugs. This review will summarize in particular clinically observed drug-drug interactions attributable to inhibition or induction of intestinal export transporters [P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)], to inhibition of hepatic uptake transporters [organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)], or to inhibition of transporter-mediated [organic anion transporters (OATs), organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs), P-gp] renal secretion of xenobiotics. Available data on the impact of nutrition on transport processes as well as genotype-dependent, transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions will be discussed. We will also present and discuss data on the variable extent to which information on the impact of transporters on drug disposition is included in summaries of product characteristics of selected countries (SPCs). Further work is required regarding a better understanding of the role of the drug metabolism-drug transport interplay for drug-drug interactions and on the extrapolation of in vitro findings to the in vivo (human) situation. PMID:23686349

  5. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  6. Abiotic and biotic interactions determine whether increased colonization is beneficial or detrimental to metapopulation management.

    PubMed

    Southwell, Darren M; Rhodes, Jonathan R; McDonald-Madden, Eve; Nicol, Sam; Helmstedt, Kate J; McCarthy, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the colonization rate of metapopulations can improve persistence, but can also increase exposure to threats. To make good decisions, managers must understand whether increased colonization is beneficial or detrimental to metapopulation persistence. While a number of studies have examined interactions between metapopulations, colonization, and threats, they have assumed that threat dynamics respond linearly to changes in colonization. Here, we determined when to increase colonization while explicitly accounting for non-linear dependencies between a metapopulation and its threats. We developed patch occupancy metapopulation models for species susceptible to abiotic, generalist, and specialist threats and modeled the total derivative of the equilibrium proportion of patches occupied by each metapopulation with respect to the colonization rate. By using the total derivative, we developed a rule for determining when to increase metapopulation colonization. This rule was applied to a simulated metapopulation where the dynamics of each threat responded to increased colonization following a power function. Before modifying colonization, we show that managers must understand: (1) whether a metapopulation is susceptible to a threat; (2) the type of threat acting on a metapopulation; (3) which component of threat dynamics might depend on colonization, and; (4) the likely response of a threat-dependent variable to changes in colonization. The sensitivity of management decisions to these interactions increases uncertainty in conservation planning decisions. PMID:26948289

  7. Iron/Brønsted Acid Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation: Mechanism and Selectivity-Determining Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hopmann, Kathrin H

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogenation catalysts involving abundant base metals such as cobalt or iron are promising alternatives to precious metal systems. Despite rapid progress in this field, base metal catalysts do not yet achieve the activity and selectivity levels of their precious metal counterparts. Rational improvement of base metal complexes is facilitated by detailed knowledge about their mechanisms and selectivity-determining factors. The mechanism for asymmetric imine hydrogenation with Knölker's iron complex in the presence of chiral phosphoric acids is here investigated computationally at the DFT-D level of theory, with models of up to 160 atoms. The resting state of the system is found to be an adduct between the iron complex and the deprotonated acid. Rate-limiting H2 splitting is followed by a stepwise hydrogenation mechanism, in which the phosphoric acid acts as the proton donor. C-H⋅⋅⋅O interactions between the phosphoric acid and the substrate are involved in the stereocontrol at the final hydride transfer step. Computed enantiomeric ratios show excellent agreement with experimental values, indicating that DFT-D is able to correctly capture the selectivity-determining interactions of this system. PMID:26039958

  8. Protein-nanoparticle interactions evaluation by immunomethods: Surfactants can disturb quantitative determinations.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-08-01

    The adsorption of proteins on nanoparticle surface is one of the first events that occur when nanoparticles enter in the blood stream, which influences nanoparticles lifetime and further biodistribution. Albumin, which is the most abundant protein in serum and which has been deeply characterized, is an interesting model protein to investigate nanoparticle-protein interactions. Therefore, the interaction of nanoparticles with serum albumin has been widely studied. Immunomethods were suggested for the investigation of adsorption isotherms because of their ease to quantify the non-adsorbed bovine serum albumin without the need of applying separation methods that could modify the balance between the adsorbed and non-adsorbed proteins. The present work revealed that this method should be applied with caution. Artifacts in the determination of free protein can be generated by the presence of surfactants such as polysorbate 80, widely used in the pharmaceutical and biomedical field, that are needed to preserve the stability of nanoparticle dispersions. It was shown that the presence of traces of polysorbate 80 in the dispersion leads to an overestimation of the amount of bovine serum albumin remaining free in the dispersion medium when determined by both radial immunodiffusion and rocket immunoelectrophoresis. However, traces of poloxamer 188 did not result in clear perturbed migrations. These methods are not appropriate to perform adsorption isotherms of proteins on nanoparticle dispersions containing traces of remaining free surfactant. They should only be applied on dispersions that are free of surfactant that is not associated with nanoparticles. PMID:26070388

  9. Micelle-enhanced and terbium-sensitized spectrofluorimetric determination of gatifloxacin and its interaction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Changchuan; Wang, Lei; Hou, Zhun; Jiang, Wei; Sang, Lihong

    2009-05-01

    A terbium-sensitized spectrofluorimetric method using an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), was developed for the determination of gatifloxacin (GFLX). A coordination complex system of GFLX-Tb 3+-SDBS was studied. It was found that SDBS significantly enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the complex (about 11-fold). Optimal experimental conditions were determined as follows: excitation and emission wavelengths of 331 and 547 nm, pH 7.0, 2.0 × 10 -4 mol l -1 terbium (III), and 2.0 × 10 -4 mol l -1 SDBS. The enhanced fluorescence intensity of the system (Δ If) showed a good linear relationship with the concentration of GFLX over the range of 5.0 × 10 -10 to 5.0 × 10 -8 mol l -1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996. The detection limit (3 σ) was determined as 6.0 × 10 -11 mol l -1. This method has been successfully applied to the determination of GFLX in pharmaceuticals and human urine/serum samples. Compared with most of other methods reported, the rapid and simple procedure proposed in the text offers higher sensitivity, wider linear range, and better stability. The interaction mechanism of the system is also studied by the research of ultraviolet absorption spectra, surface tension, solution polarity and fluorescence polarization.

  10. Orbit Determination and Navigation of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinelli, Patrick; Cosgrove, jennifer; Blizzard, Mike; Nicholson, Ann; Robertson, Mika

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the launch and early orbit activities performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) in support of five probes comprising the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. The FDF was tasked to support THEMIS in a limited capacity providing backup orbit determination support for validation purposes for all five THEMIS probes during launch plus 30 days in coordination with University of California Berkeley Flight Dynamics Center (UCB/FDC). The FDF's orbit determination responsibilities were originally planned to be as a backup to the UCB/FDC for validation purposes only. However, various challenges early on in the mission and a Spacecraft Emergency declared thirty hours after launch placed the FDF team in the role of providing the orbit solutions that enabled contact with each of the probes and the eventual termination of the Spacecraft Emergency. This paper details the challenges and various techniques used by the GSFC FDF team to successfully perform orbit determination for all five THEMIS probes during the early mission. In addition, actual THEMIS orbit determination results are presented spanning the launch and early orbit mission phase. Lastly, this paper enumerates lessons learned from the THEMIS mission, as well as demonstrates the broad range of resources and capabilities within the FDF for supporting critical launch and early orbit navigation activities, especially challenging for constellation missions.

  11. Orbit Determination and Navigation of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morinelli, Patrick; Cosgrove, Jennifer; Blizzard, Mike; Robertson, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the launch and early orbit activities performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) in support of five probes comprising the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. The FDF was tasked to support THEMIS in a limited capacity providing backup orbit determination support for validation purposes for all five THEMIS probes during launch plus 30 days in coordination with University of California Berkeley Flight Dynamics Center (UCB/FDC)2. The FDF's orbit determination responsibilities were originally planned to be as a backup to the UCB/FDC for validation purposes only. However, various challenges early on in the mission and a Spacecraft Emergency declared thirty hours after launch placed the FDF team in the role of providing the orbit solutions that enabled contact with each of the probes and the eventual termination of the Spacecraft Emergency. This paper details the challenges and various techniques used by the GSFC FDF team to successfully perform orbit determination for all five THEMIS probes during the early mission. In addition, actual THEMIS orbit determination results are presented spanning the launch and early orbit mission phase. Lastly, this paper enumerates lessons learned from the THEMIS mission, as well as demonstrates the broad range of resources and capabilities within the FDF for supporting critical launch and early orbit navigation activities, especially challenging for constellation missions.

  12. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X J

    2016-03-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near T c, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below T c, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high T c: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order. PMID:26973872

  13. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M.; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X. J.

    2016-01-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near Tc, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below Tc, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high Tc: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order. PMID:26973872

  14. Climate warming and agricultural stressors interact to determine stream periphyton community composition.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Jeremy J; Salis, Romana K; Lear, Gavin; Townsend, Colin R; Matthaei, Christoph D

    2015-01-01

    Lack of knowledge about how the various drivers of global climate change will interact with multiple stressors already affecting ecosystems is the basis for great uncertainty in projections of future biological change. Despite concerns about the impacts of changes in land use, eutrophication and climate warming in running waters, the interactive effects of these stressors on stream periphyton are largely unknown. We manipulated nutrients (simulating agricultural runoff), deposited fine sediment (simulating agricultural erosion) (two levels each) and water temperature (eight levels, 0-6 °C above ambient) simultaneously in 128 streamside mesocosms. Our aim was to determine the individual and combined effects of the three stressors on the algal and bacterial constituents of the periphyton. All three stressors had pervasive individual effects, but in combination frequently produced synergisms at the population level and antagonisms at the community level. Depending on sediment and nutrient conditions, the effect of raised temperature frequently produced contrasting response patterns, with stronger or opposing effects when one or both stressors were augmented. Thus, warming tended to interact negatively with nutrients or sediment by weakening or reversing positive temperature effects or strengthening negative ones. Five classes of algal growth morphology were all affected in complex ways by raised temperature, suggesting that these measures may prove unreliable in biomonitoring programs in a warming climate. The evenness and diversity of the most abundant bacterial taxa increased with temperature at ambient but not with enriched nutrient levels, indicating that warming coupled with nutrient limitation may lead to a more evenly distributed bacterial community as temperatures rise. Freshwater management decisions that seek to avoid or mitigate the negative effects of agricultural land use on stream periphyton should be informed by knowledge of the interactive effects of

  15. Temperature, precipitation and biotic interactions as determinants of tree seedling recruitment across the tree line ecotone.

    PubMed

    Tingstad, Lise; Olsen, Siri Lie; Klanderud, Kari; Vandvik, Vigdis; Ohlson, Mikael

    2015-10-01

    Seedling recruitment is a critical life history stage for trees, and successful recruitment is tightly linked to both abiotic factors and biotic interactions. In order to better understand how tree species' distributions may change in response to anticipated climate change, more knowledge of the effects of complex climate and biotic interactions is needed. We conducted a seed-sowing experiment to investigate how temperature, precipitation and biotic interactions impact recruitment of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings in southern Norway. Seeds were sown into intact vegetation and experimentally created gaps. To study the combined effects of temperature and precipitation, the experiment was replicated across 12 sites, spanning a natural climate gradient from boreal to alpine and from sub-continental to oceanic. Seedling emergence and survival were assessed 12 and 16 months after sowing, respectively, and above-ground biomass and height were determined at the end of the experiment. Interestingly, very few seedlings were detected in the boreal sites, and the highest number of seedlings emerged and established in the alpine sites, indicating that low temperature did not limit seedling recruitment. Site precipitation had an overall positive effect on seedling recruitment, especially at intermediate precipitation levels. Seedling emergence, establishment and biomass were higher in gap plots compared to intact vegetation at all temperature levels. These results suggest that biotic interactions in the form of competition may be more important than temperature as a limiting factor for tree seedling recruitment in the sub- and low-alpine zone of southern Norway. PMID:26065402

  16. Determination of major phlorotannins in Eisenia bicyclis using hydrophilic interaction chromatography: seasonal variation and extraction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Min; Kang, Suk Woo; Jeon, Je-Seung; Jung, Yu-Jin; Kim, Woo-Ri; Kim, Chul Young; Um, Byung-Hun

    2013-06-15

    In this study, a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) condition was developed for the simultaneous determination of five major phlorotannins from an extract of Eisenia bicyclis (Kjellman) Setchell with good linearity (r(2)>0.999). Based on this method, the seasonal variations and extraction characteristics, in terms of total extraction yield and the content of the phlorotannins, were investigated under various extraction conditions. In results, the yields and phlorotannins were increased two-to-four times in summer (June-October) and then, were decreased to normal levels in winter (November-March). In the extraction of E. bicyclis, ethanol percentage in water, extraction time and washing time significantly affected the yield of the extract and the phlorotannins, whereas the temperature and the sample/solvent ratio impacted the extraction to a lesser degree. These results will be useful information in the application of this macroalga in the commercial areas related to nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, and cosmeceuticals. PMID:23497901

  17. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV.

  18. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation

    PubMed Central

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV. PMID:26879249

  19. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation.

    PubMed

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV. PMID:26879249

  20. Genome-wide analysis captures the determinants of the antibiotic cross-resistance interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Lázár, Viktória; Nagy, István; Spohn, Réka; Csörgő, Bálint; Györkei, Ádám; Nyerges, Ákos; Horváth, Balázs; Vörös, Andrea; Busa-Fekete, Róbert; Hrtyan, Mónika; Bogos, Balázs; Méhi, Orsolya; Fekete, Gergely; Szappanos, Balázs; Kégl, Balázs; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how evolution of antimicrobial resistance increases resistance to other drugs is a challenge of profound importance. By combining experimental evolution and genome sequencing of 63 laboratory-evolved lines, we charted a map of cross-resistance interactions between antibiotics in Escherichia coli, and explored the driving evolutionary principles. Here, we show that (1) convergent molecular evolution is prevalent across antibiotic treatments, (2) resistance conferring mutations simultaneously enhance sensitivity to many other drugs and (3) 27% of the accumulated mutations generate proteins with compromised activities, suggesting that antibiotic adaptation can partly be achieved without gain of novel function. By using knowledge on antibiotic properties, we examined the determinants of cross-resistance and identified chemogenomic profile similarity between antibiotics as the strongest predictor. In contrast, cross-resistance between two antibiotics is independent of whether they show synergistic effects in combination. These results have important implications on the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:25000950

  1. Structural Stereochemistry of Androstene Hormones Determines Interactions with Human Androgen, Estrogen, and Glucocorticoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shaak, Thomas L.; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Diegelmann, Robert F.; Ward, Kevin R.; Loria, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    DHEA, 17α-AED, 17β-AED, and 17β-AET exhibit strong biological activity that has been attributed to androgenic, estrogenic, or antiglucocorticoid activity in vivo and in vitro. This study compared DHEA, 17α-AED, 17β-AED, and 17β-AET for their ability to activate the human AR, ER, and GR and determine the relative androgenicity, estrogenicity, and glucocorticoid activity. The results show that, at the receptor level, these androstene hormones are weak AR and even weaker ER activators. Direct androstene hormone activation of the human AR, ERα, and ERβ may not be essential for their biological function. Similarly, these hormones indirectly activated the human GR, only in the presence of high dexamethasone concentrations. These results underscore the major difference between androstene hormone interactions with these nuclear receptors and their biological effects. PMID:24729874

  2. General purpose computer program for interacting supersonic configurations. User's manual. [determining unsteady aerodynamic foreces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crill, W.; Dale, B.

    1977-01-01

    The input data required to execute the computer program ISCON are described. The program generates a numerical procedure for the determination of unsteady aerodynamic forces on arbitrarily interacting wings and tails in supersonic flow. A velocity potential gradient method is used. Constant Mach number is assumed throughout the flow field. Lifting surfaces are represented by trapezoidal elements which can be generated automatically by the program. The wake field is represented by rectangular strip elements. The formulation is reviewed as well as input overview and input format. Instruction on how to use ISCON, a sample problem, and the restart feature are discussed. Program size limitations, computer program flow, and error messages are also included along with a description of the SS31 program used to compute the coefficients of surface spline.

  3. Genome-wide analysis captures the determinants of the antibiotic cross-resistance interaction network.

    PubMed

    Lázár, Viktória; Nagy, István; Spohn, Réka; Csörgő, Bálint; Györkei, Ádám; Nyerges, Ákos; Horváth, Balázs; Vörös, Andrea; Busa-Fekete, Róbert; Hrtyan, Mónika; Bogos, Balázs; Méhi, Orsolya; Fekete, Gergely; Szappanos, Balázs; Kégl, Balázs; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how evolution of antimicrobial resistance increases resistance to other drugs is a challenge of profound importance. By combining experimental evolution and genome sequencing of 63 laboratory-evolved lines, we charted a map of cross-resistance interactions between antibiotics in Escherichia coli, and explored the driving evolutionary principles. Here, we show that (1) convergent molecular evolution is prevalent across antibiotic treatments, (2) resistance conferring mutations simultaneously enhance sensitivity to many other drugs and (3) 27% of the accumulated mutations generate proteins with compromised activities, suggesting that antibiotic adaptation can partly be achieved without gain of novel function. By using knowledge on antibiotic properties, we examined the determinants of cross-resistance and identified chemogenomic profile similarity between antibiotics as the strongest predictor. In contrast, cross-resistance between two antibiotics is independent of whether they show synergistic effects in combination. These results have important implications on the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:25000950

  4. Intershell Interaction in a Double Wall Carbon Nanotube with Determined Chiral Indices under a Torsional Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Letian; Cui, Taoran; Washburn, Sean; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2011-03-01

    We have used a double wall carbon nanotube to build a torsional pendulum. The nanotube worked as a torsional bearing for a metal block. An external electric field was used to rotate the metal block to cause a fully elastic torsional deformation on the nanotube. Nano-beam electron diffraction patterns were taken before and while the nanotube was twisted. By analysis of the shift of the diffraction patterns, we were able to determine the nanotube chiral indices and measure the inner-shell torisonal responses to the torsional stress applied on the outer-shell. The inter-shell interactions and nanotube shear modulus were also calculated and discussed in connection to the theoretical estimations.

  5. Rigorous surface charge method for determining electrostatic interaction energies in biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, T. P.; Obolensky, O. I.; Ogurtsov, A. Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-03-01

    Classical electrostatics plays a crucial role in bimolecular systems, dominating the interactions that determine the formation and dissolution of complexes responsible for the operation of cells. For systems that can be modeled as a set of piecewise-constant dielectric bodies, surface charge methods are usually preferable in both analytical and numerical contexts. We present a numerical implementation of a surface charge method previously used in analytical contexts. The method is applied to a realistic model of trypsin, an important protein involved in digesting other proteins, and one of its inhibitors, benzamidine. The classical calculations are complemented by density function theory calculations at short separations for which the classical model is inappropriate. We find that the surface charge method correctly distinguishes between correct and incorrect docking sites. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, National Library of Medicine.

  6. A practical method for depth of interaction determination in monolithic scintillator PET detectors.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Herman T; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J; Schaart, Dennis R

    2011-07-01

    Several new methods for determining the depth of interaction (DOI) of annihilation photons in monolithic scintillator detectors with single-sided, multi-pixel readout are investigated. The aim is to develop a DOI decoding method that allows for practical implementation in a positron emission tomography system. Specifically, calibration data, obtained with perpendicularly incident gamma photons only, are being used. Furthermore, neither detector modifications nor a priori knowledge of the light transport and/or signal variances is required. For this purpose, a clustering approach is utilized in combination with different parameters correlated with the DOI, such as the degree of similarity to a set of reference light distributions, the measured intensity on the sensor pixel(s) closest to the interaction position and the peak intensity of the measured light distribution. The proposed methods were tested experimentally on a detector comprised of a 20 mm × 20 mm × 12 mm polished LYSO:Ce crystal coupled to a 4 × 4 multi-anode photomultiplier. The method based on the linearly interpolated measured intensities on the sensor pixels closest to the estimated (x, y)-coordinate outperformed the other methods, yielding DOI resolutions between ∼1 and ∼4.5 mm FWHM depending on the DOI, the (x, y) resolution and the amount of reference data used. PMID:21693789

  7. Discovery of Novel Plant Interaction Determinants from the Genomes of 163 Root Nodule Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne G.; Ardley, Julie K.; Tennessen, Kristin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2015-01-01

    Root nodule bacteria (RNB) or “rhizobia” are a type of plant growth promoting bacteria, typified by their ability to fix nitrogen for their plant host, fixing nearly 65% of the nitrogen currently utilized in sustainable agricultural production of legume crops and pastures. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of 110 RNB from diverse hosts and biogeographical regions, and undertook a global exploration of all available RNB genera with the aim of identifying novel genetic determinants of symbiotic association and plant growth promotion. Specifically, we performed a subtractive comparative analysis with non-RNB genomes, employed relevant transcriptomic data, and leveraged phylogenetic distribution patterns and sequence signatures based on known precepts of symbiotic- and host-microbe interactions. A total of 184 protein families were delineated, including known factors for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, and candidates with previously unexplored functions, for which a role in host-interaction, -regulation, biocontrol, and more, could be posited. These analyses expand our knowledge of the RNB purview and provide novel targets for strain improvement in the ultimate quest to enhance plant productivity and agricultural sustainability. PMID:26584898

  8. Stoichiometry determined exchange interactions in amorphous ternary transition metal oxides: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shu-jun; Yan, Shi-shen Zhang, Yun-peng; Zhao, Ming-wen; Kang, Shi-shou; Mei, Liang-mo

    2014-07-28

    Amorphous transition metal oxides exhibit exotic transport and magnetic properties, while the absence of periodic structure has long been a major obstacle for the understanding of their electronic structure and exchange interaction. In this paper, we have formulated a theoretical approach, which combines the melt-quench approach and the spin dynamic Monte-Carlo simulations, and based on it, we explored amorphous Co{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}O{sub 1−y} ternary transition metal oxides. Our theoretical results reveal that the microstructure, the magnetic properties, and the exchange interactions of Co{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}O{sub 1−y} are strongly determined by the oxygen stoichiometry. In the oxygen-deficient sample (y > 0), we have observed the long-range ferromagnetic spin ordering which is associated with the non-stoichiometric cobalt-rich region rather than metallic clusters. On the other hand, the microstructure of stoichiometric sample takes the form of continuous random networks, and no long-range ferromagnetism has been observed in it. Magnetization characterization of experimental synthesized Co{sub 0.61}Zn{sub 0.39}O{sub 1−y} films verifies the relation between the spin ordering and the oxygen stoichiometry. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of electrical transport shows a typical feature of semiconductors, in agreement with our theoretical results.

  9. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects on Mineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, Thea L.; Zhu, Zihua; Lehmann, Johannes C.

    2014-10-31

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a critical and active pool in the global C cycle, and the addition of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) has been shown to change SOC cycling, increasing or decreasing mineralization rates (often referred to as priming). We adjusted the amount of easily mineralizable C in the soil, through 1-day and 6-month pre-incubations, and in PyOM made from maple wood at 350°C, through extraction. We investigated the impact of these adjustments on C mineralization interactions, excluding pH and nutrient effects and minimizing physical effects. We found short-term increases (+20-30%) in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions in the soil pre-incubated for 6 months. Over the longer term, both the 6-month and 1-day pre-incubated soils experienced net ~10% decreases in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions. This was possibly due to stabilization of SOC on PyOM surfaces, suggested by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry. Additionally, the duration of pre-incubation affected priming interactions, indicating that there may be no optimal pre-incubation time for SOC mineralization studies. We show conclusively that relative mineralizability of SOC in relation to PyOM-24 C is an important determinant of the effect of PyOM additions on SOC mineralization.

  10. Pollutant threshold concentration determination in marine ecosystems using an ecological interaction endpoint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changyou; Liang, Shengkang; Guo, Wenting; Yu, Hua; Xing, Wenhui

    2015-09-01

    The threshold concentrations of pollutants are determined by extrapolating single-species effect data to community-level effects. This assumes the most sensitive endpoint of the life cycle of individuals and the species sensitivity distribution from single-species toxic effect tests, thus, ignoring the ecological interactions. The uncertainties due to this extrapolation can be partially overcome using the equilibrium point of a customized ecosystem. This method incorporates ecological interactions and integrates the effects on growth, survival, and ingestion into a single effect measure, the equilibrium point excursion in the customized ecosystem, in order to describe the toxic effects on plankton. A case study showed that the threshold concentration of copper calculated with the endpoint of the equilibrium point was 10 μg L(-1), which is significantly different from the threshold calculated with a single-species endpoint. The endpoint calculated using this method provides a more relevant measure of the ecological impact than any single individual-level endpoint. PMID:25982547

  11. Discovery of novel plant interaction determinants from the genomes of 163 root nodule bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne G.; Ardley, Julie K.; Tennessen, Kristin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2015-11-20

    Root nodule bacteria (RNB) or “rhizobia” are a type of plant growth promoting bacteria, typified by their ability to fix nitrogen for their plant host, fixing nearly 65% of the nitrogen currently utilized in sustainable agricultural production of legume crops and pastures. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of 110 RNB from diverse hosts and biogeographical regions, and undertook a global exploration of all available RNB genera with the aim of identifying novel genetic determinants of symbiotic association and plant growth promotion. Specifically, we performed a subtractive comparative analysis with non-RNB genomes, employed relevant transcriptomic data, and leveraged phylogeneticmore » distribution patterns and sequence signatures based on known precepts of symbioticand host-microbe interactions. A total of 184 protein families were delineated, including known factors for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, and candidates with previously unexplored functions, for which a role in host-interaction, -regulation, biocontrol, and more, could be posited. Lastly, these analyses expand our knowledge of the RNB purview and provide novel targets for strain improvement in the ultimate quest to enhance plant productivity and agricultural sustainability.« less

  12. Discovery of novel plant interaction determinants from the genomes of 163 root nodule bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne G.; Ardley, Julie K.; Tennessen, Kristin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.

    2015-11-20

    Root nodule bacteria (RNB) or “rhizobia” are a type of plant growth promoting bacteria, typified by their ability to fix nitrogen for their plant host, fixing nearly 65% of the nitrogen currently utilized in sustainable agricultural production of legume crops and pastures. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of 110 RNB from diverse hosts and biogeographical regions, and undertook a global exploration of all available RNB genera with the aim of identifying novel genetic determinants of symbiotic association and plant growth promotion. Specifically, we performed a subtractive comparative analysis with non-RNB genomes, employed relevant transcriptomic data, and leveraged phylogenetic distribution patterns and sequence signatures based on known precepts of symbioticand host-microbe interactions. A total of 184 protein families were delineated, including known factors for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, and candidates with previously unexplored functions, for which a role in host-interaction, -regulation, biocontrol, and more, could be posited. Lastly, these analyses expand our knowledge of the RNB purview and provide novel targets for strain improvement in the ultimate quest to enhance plant productivity and agricultural sustainability.

  13. Vortices determine the dynamics of biodiversity in cyclical interactions with protection spillovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-11-01

    If rock beats scissors and scissors beat paper, one might assume that rock beats paper too. But this is not the case for intransitive relationships that make up the famous rock-paper-scissors game. However, the sole presence of paper might prevent rock from beating scissors, simply because paper beats rock. This is the blueprint for the rock-paper-scissors game with protection spillovers, which has recently been introduced as a new paradigm for biodiversity in well-mixed microbial populations. Here we study the game in structured populations, demonstrating that protection spillovers give rise to spatial patterns that are impossible to observe in the classical rock-paper-scissors game. We show that the spatiotemporal dynamics of the system is determined by the density of stable vortices, which may ultimately transform to frozen states, to propagating waves, or to target waves with reversed propagation direction, depending further on the degree and type of randomness in the interactions among the species. If vortices are rare, the fixation to waves and complex oscillatory solutions is likelier. Moreover, annealed randomness in interactions favors the emergence of target waves, while quenched randomness favors collective synchronization. Our results demonstrate that protection spillovers may fundamentally change the dynamics of cyclic dominance in structured populations, and they outline the possibility of programming pattern formation in microbial populations.

  14. A test of the role of electrostatic interactions in determining the CO stretch frequency in carbonmonoxymyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Decatur, S M; Boxer, S G

    1995-07-01

    The vibrational frequency of CO bound to myoglobin can be varied by up to 60 cm-1 by making site-specific mutations in the distal pocket. These changes may result from specific chemical interactions between distal amino acids and the CO or from changes in the electrostatic field of the distal pocket. In this paper, we separate the relative contributions of these two effects by comparing the IR spectra of the carbonmonoxy complexes of human myoglobin mutants V68N, V68D, and V68E. The effect of replacing valine with these polar amino acids on the electrostatic environment of the distal heme pocket has been independently determined earlier by measurements of the heme reduction potential and electronic absorption spectral band shifts. While all three mutations result in a negative dipole pointing towards the CO ligand, the CO stretch frequency shifts differently in each case. These differences are attributed to specific chemical interactions between the amino acids and the CO ligand. PMID:7612000

  15. Non-invasive determination of external forces in vortex-pair-cylinder interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, D.; Schröder, W.; Shashikanth, B. N.

    2012-06-01

    Expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta of a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system are derived. Based on the knowledge of the flow velocity field, these expressions allow the determination of the external forces exerted on a body moving in the fluid such as, e.g., swimming fish. The verification of the derived conserved quantities is done numerically. The interaction of a vortex pair with a circular cylinder in various configurations of motions representing a generic test case for a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system is investigated in a weakly compressible Navier-Stokes setting using a Cartesian cut-cell method, i.e., the moving circular cylinder is represented by cut cells on a moving mesh. The objectives of this study are twofold. The first objective is to show the robustness of the derived expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta with respect to bounded and discrete data sets. The second objective is to study the coupled dynamics of the vortex pair and a neutrally buoyant cylinder free to move in response to the fluid stresses exerted on its surface. A comparison of the vortex-body interaction with the case of a fixed circular cylinder evidences significant differences in the vortex dynamics. When the cylinder is fixed strong secondary vorticity is generated resulting in a repeating process between the primary vortex pair and the cylinder. In the neutrally buoyant cylinder case, a stable structure consisting of the primary vortex pair and secondary vorticity shear layers stays attached to the moving cylinder. In addition to these fundamental cases, the vortex-pair-cylinder interaction is studied for locomotion at constant speed and locomotion at constant thrust. It is shown that a similar vortex structure like in the neutrally buoyant cylinder case is obtained when the cylinder moves away from the approaching vortex pair at a constant speed smaller than the vortex pair translational velocity. Finally, the idealized

  16. Relative electron density determination using a physics based parameterization of photon interactions in medical DECT.

    PubMed

    van Abbema, Joanne K; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Greuter, Marcel J W; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Brandenburg, Sytze; van der Graaf, Emiel R

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy and particle therapy treatment planning require accurate knowledge of the electron density and elemental composition of the tissues in the beam path to predict the local dose deposition. We describe a method for the analysis of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) images that provides the electron densities and effective atomic numbers of tissues. The CT measurement process is modelled by system weighting functions, which apply an energy dependent weighting to the parameterization of the total cross section for photon interactions with matter. This detailed parameterization is based on the theoretical analysis of Jackson and Hawkes and deviates, at most, 0.3% from the tabulated NIST values for the elements H to Zn. To account for beam hardening in the object as present in the CT image we implemented an iterative process employing a local weighting function, derived from the method proposed by Heismann and Balda. With this method effective atomic numbers between 1 and 30 can be determined. The method has been experimentally validated on a commercially available tissue characterization phantom with 16 inserts made of tissue substitutes and aluminium that has been scanned on a dual source CT system with tube potentials of 100 kV and 140 kV using a clinical scan protocol. Relative electron densities of all tissue substitutes have been determined with accuracy better than 1%. The presented DECT analysis method thus provides high accuracy electron densities and effective atomic numbers for radiotherapy and especially particle therapy treatment planning. PMID:25905890

  17. Relative electron density determination using a physics based parameterization of photon interactions in medical DECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Abbema, Joanne K.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Brandenburg, Sytze; van der Graaf, Emiel R.

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy and particle therapy treatment planning require accurate knowledge of the electron density and elemental composition of the tissues in the beam path to predict the local dose deposition. We describe a method for the analysis of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) images that provides the electron densities and effective atomic numbers of tissues. The CT measurement process is modelled by system weighting functions, which apply an energy dependent weighting to the parameterization of the total cross section for photon interactions with matter. This detailed parameterization is based on the theoretical analysis of Jackson and Hawkes and deviates, at most, 0.3% from the tabulated NIST values for the elements H to Zn. To account for beam hardening in the object as present in the CT image we implemented an iterative process employing a local weighting function, derived from the method proposed by Heismann and Balda. With this method effective atomic numbers between 1 and 30 can be determined. The method has been experimentally validated on a commercially available tissue characterization phantom with 16 inserts made of tissue substitutes and aluminium that has been scanned on a dual source CT system with tube potentials of 100 kV and 140 kV using a clinical scan protocol. Relative electron densities of all tissue substitutes have been determined with accuracy better than 1%. The presented DECT analysis method thus provides high accuracy electron densities and effective atomic numbers for radiotherapy and especially particle therapy treatment planning.

  18. Direct determination of amino acids by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with charged aerosol detection.

    PubMed

    Socia, Adam; Foley, Joe P

    2016-05-13

    A chromatographic analytical method for the direct determination of amino acids by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was developed. A dual gradient simultaneously varying the pH 3.2 ammonium formate buffer concentration and level of acetonitrile (ACN) in the mobile phase was employed. Using a charged aerosol detector (CAD) and a 2(nd) order regression analysis, the fit of the calibration curve showed R(2) values between 0.9997 and 0.9985 from 1.5mg/mL to 50μg/mL (600ng to 20ng on column). Analyte chromatographic parameters such as the sensitivity of retention to the water fraction in the mobile phase values (mHILIC) were determined as part of method development. A degradation product of glutamine (5-pyrrolidone-2-carboxylic acid; pGlu) was observed and resolved chromatographically with no method modifications. The separation was used to quantitate amino acid content in acid hydrolysates of various protein samples. PMID:27059400

  19. Enhanced spectrophotometric determination of Losartan potassium based on its physicochemical interaction with cationic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Laila; Abdel-Aziz, Lobna; Gaied, Mariam

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method was developed for determination of Losartan potassium (LST K), an angiotensin-II receptor (type AT1) antagonist, in presence of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The physicochemical interaction of LST K with CTAB was investigated. The effect of cationic micelles on the spectroscopic and acid-base properties of LST K was studied at pH 7.4. The binding constant (Kb) and the partition coefficient (Kx) of LST K-CTAB were 1.62 × 105 M-1 and 1.38 × 105; respectively. The binding of LST K to CTAB micelles implied a shift in drug acidity constant (ΔpKa = 0.422). The developed method is linear over the range 0.5-28 μg mL-1. The accuracy was evaluated and was found to be 99.79 ± 0.509% and the relative standard deviation for intraday and interday precision was 0.821 and 0.963; respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine LST K in pharmaceutical formulations.

  20. Density-based Energy Decomposition Analysis for Intermolecular Interactions with Variationally Determined Intermediate State Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Ayers, P.W.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-10-28

    The first purely density-based energy decomposition analysis (EDA) for intermolecular binding is developed within the density functional theory. The most important feature of this scheme is to variationally determine the frozen density energy, based on a constrained search formalism and implemented with the Wu-Yang algorithm [Q. Wu and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2498 (2003) ]. This variational process dispenses with the Heitler-London antisymmetrization of wave functions used in most previous methods and calculates the electrostatic and Pauli repulsion energies together without any distortion of the frozen density, an important fact that enables a clean separation of these two terms from the relaxation (i.e., polarization and charge transfer) terms. The new EDA also employs the constrained density functional theory approach [Q. Wu and T. Van Voorhis, Phys. Rev. A 72, 24502 (2005)] to separate out charge transfer effects. Because the charge transfer energy is based on the density flow in real space, it has a small basis set dependence. Applications of this decomposition to hydrogen bonding in the water dimer and the formamide dimer show that the frozen density energy dominates the binding in these systems, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the interactions. A more detailed examination reveals how the interplay of electrostatics and the Pauli repulsion determines the distance and angular dependence of these hydrogen bonds.

  1. Enhanced spectrophotometric determination of Losartan potassium based on its physicochemical interaction with cationic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, Laila; Abdel-Aziz, Lobna; Gaied, Mariam

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method was developed for determination of Losartan potassium (LST K), an angiotensin-II receptor (type AT1) antagonist, in presence of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The physicochemical interaction of LST K with CTAB was investigated. The effect of cationic micelles on the spectroscopic and acid-base properties of LST K was studied at pH 7.4. The binding constant (Kb) and the partition coefficient (Kx) of LST K-CTAB were 1.62×10(5) M(-1) and 1.38×10(5); respectively. The binding of LST K to CTAB micelles implied a shift in drug acidity constant (ΔpKa=0.422). The developed method is linear over the range 0.5-28 μg mL(-1). The accuracy was evaluated and was found to be 99.79±0.509% and the relative standard deviation for intraday and interday precision was 0.821 and 0.963; respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine LST K in pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:25315864

  2. Using SEM Analysis on Ion-Milled Shale Surface to Determine Shale-Fracturing Fluid Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Mickler, P. J.; Nicot, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to document and assess shale-fluid interaction during hydraulic fracturing (HF) in order to understand its impact on flowback water chemistry and rock property. A series of autoclave experiments were conducted to react shale samples from major oil and gas shales with synthetic HF containing various additives. To better determine mineral dissolution and precipitation at the rock-fluid interface, ion-milling technique was applied to create extremely flat rock surfaces that were examined before and after the autoclave experiments using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detectors. This method is able to reveal a level of detail not observable on broken surface or mechanically polished surface. It allows direct comparison of the same mineral and organic matter particles before and after the reaction experiments. Minerals undergone dissolution and newly precipitated materials are readily determined by comparing to the exact locations before reaction. The dissolution porosity and the thickness of precipitates can be quantified by tracing and measuring the geometry of the pores and precipitates. Changes in porosity and permeability were confirmed by mercury intrusion capillary tests.

  3. Learning with Interactive Whiteboards: Determining the Factors on Promoting Interactive Whiteboards to Students by Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Eylem; Güler, Çetin; Çelik, H. Eray; Tatli, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which might affect the intention to use interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by university students, using Technology Acceptance Model by the structural equation modeling approach. The following hypothesis guided the current study: H1. There is a positive relationship between IWB…

  4. An Interactive network of long non-coding RNAs facilitates the Drosophila sex determination decision

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Brett B.; Olcese, Ursula; Cabrera, Janel R.; Horabin, Jamila I.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis in several eukaryotes shows a surprising number of transcripts which do not encode conventional messenger RNAs. Once considered noise, these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) appear capable of controlling gene expression by various means. We find Drosophila sex determination, specifically the master-switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl), is regulated by long ncRNAs (>200 nt). The lncRNAs influence the dose sensitive establishment promoter of Sxl, SxlPe, which must be activated to specify female sex. They are primarily from two regions, R1 and R2, upstream of SxlPeand show a dynamic developmental profile. Of the four lncRNA strands only one, R2 antisense, has its peak coincident with SxlPe transcription, suggesting it may promote activation. Indeed, its expression is regulated by the X chromosome counting genes, whose dose determines whether SxlPe is transcribed. Transgenic lines which ectopically express each of the lncRNAs show they can act in trans, impacting the process of sex determination but also altering the levels of the other lncRNAs. Generally, expression of R1 is negative whereas R2 is positive to females. This ectopic expression also results in a change in the local chromatin marks, affecting the timing and strength of SxlPe transcription. The chromatin marks are those deposited by the Polycomb and Trithorax groups of chromatin modifying proteins, which we find bind to the lncRNAs. We suggest the increasing numbers of non-coding transcripts being identified are a harbinger of interacting networks similar to the one we describe. PMID:24954180

  5. Oxygen and energy availability interact to determine flight performance in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Toby; Melvin, Richard G; Ikonen, Suvi; Ruokolainen, Annukka; Woestmann, Luisa; Hietakangas, Ville; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-05-15

    Flying insects have the highest known mass-specific demand for oxygen, which makes it likely that reduced availability of oxygen might limit sustained flight, either instead of or in addition to the limitation due to metabolite resources. The Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) occurs as a large metapopulation in which adult butterflies frequently disperse between small local populations. Here, we examine how the interaction between oxygen availability and fuel use affects flight performance in the Glanville fritillary. Individuals were flown under either normoxic (21 kPa O2) or hypoxic (10 kPa O2) conditions and their flight metabolism was measured. To determine resource use, levels of circulating glucose, trehalose and whole-body triglyceride were recorded after flight. Flight performance was significantly reduced in hypoxic conditions. When flown under normoxic conditions, we observed a positive correlation among individuals between post-flight circulating trehalose levels and flight metabolic rate, suggesting that low levels of circulating trehalose constrains flight metabolism. To test this hypothesis experimentally, we measured the flight metabolic rate of individuals injected with a trehalase inhibitor. In support of the hypothesis, experimental butterflies showed significantly reduced flight metabolic rate, but not resting metabolic rate, in comparison to control individuals. By contrast, under hypoxia there was no relationship between trehalose and flight metabolic rate. Additionally, in this case, flight metabolic rate was reduced in spite of circulating trehalose levels that were high enough to support high flight metabolic rate under normoxic conditions. These results demonstrate a significant interaction between oxygen and energy availability for the control of flight performance. PMID:26944488

  6. Climate warming and agricultural stressors interact to determine stream macroinvertebrate community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Jeremy J; Townsend, Colin R; Matthaei, Christoph D

    2015-05-01

    Global climate change is likely to modify the ecological consequences of currently acting stressors, but potentially important interactions between climate warming and land-use related stressors remain largely unknown. Agriculture affects streams and rivers worldwide, including via nutrient enrichment and increased fine sediment input. We manipulated nutrients (simulating agricultural run-off) and deposited fine sediment (simulating agricultural erosion) (two levels each) and water temperature (eight levels, 0-6°C above ambient) simultaneously in 128 streamside mesocosms to determine the individual and combined effects of the three stressors on macroinvertebrate community dynamics (community composition and body size structure of benthic, drift and insect emergence assemblages). All three stressors had pervasive individual effects, but in combination often produced additive or antagonistic outcomes. Changes in benthic community composition showed a complex interplay among habitat quality (with or without sediment), resource availability (with or without nutrient enrichment) and the behavioural/physiological tendency to drift or emerge as temperature rose. The presence of sediment and raised temperature both resulted in a community of smaller organisms. Deposited fine sediment strongly increased the propensity to drift. Stressor effects were most prominent in the benthic assemblage, frequently reflected by opposite patterns in individuals quitting the benthos (in terms of their propensity to drift or emerge). Of particular importance is that community measures of stream health routinely used around the world (taxon richness, EPT richness and diversity) all showed complex three-way interactions, with either a consistently stronger temperature response or a reversal of its direction when one or both agricultural stressors were also in operation. The negative effects of added fine sediment, which were often stronger at raised temperatures, suggest that streams already

  7. An Evolving Genetic Architecture Interacts with Hill-Robertson Interference to Determine the Benefit of Sex.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Alexander O B; Peck, Kayla M; Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Burch, Christina L

    2016-06-01

    Sex is ubiquitous in the natural world, but the nature of its benefits remains controversial. Previous studies have suggested that a major advantage of sex is its ability to eliminate interference between selection on linked mutations, a phenomenon known as Hill-Robertson interference. However, those studies may have missed both important advantages and important disadvantages of sexual reproduction because they did not allow the distributions of mutational effects and interactions (i.e., the genetic architecture) to evolve. Here we investigate how Hill-Robertson interference interacts with an evolving genetic architecture to affect the evolutionary origin and maintenance of sex by simulating evolution in populations of artificial gene networks. We observed a long-term advantage of sex-equilibrium mean fitness of sexual populations exceeded that of asexual populations-that did not depend on population size. We also observed a short-term advantage of sex-sexual modifier mutations readily invaded asexual populations-that increased with population size, as was observed in previous studies. We show that the long- and short-term advantages of sex were both determined by differences between sexual and asexual populations in the evolutionary dynamics of two properties of the genetic architecture: the deleterious mutation rate ([Formula: see text]) and recombination load ([Formula: see text]). These differences resulted from a combination of selection to minimize [Formula: see text] which is experienced only by sexuals, and Hill-Robertson interference experienced primarily by asexuals. In contrast to the previous studies, in which Hill-Robertson interference had only a direct impact on the fitness advantages of sex, the impact of Hill-Robertson interference in our simulations was mediated additionally by an indirect impact on the efficiency with which selection acted to reduce [Formula: see text]. PMID:27098911

  8. Determining an Effective Shear Modulus in Tubular Organs for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisena, Robert; Brasseur, James; Costanzo, Francesco; Gregersen, Hans; Zhao, Jingbo

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is central to the mechanics of fluid-filled tubular organs such as the intestine and esophagus. The motions of fluid chyme are driven by a muscularis wall layer of circular and longitudinal muscle fibers. The coupled motions of the fluid and elastic solid phases result from a local balance between active and passive muscle stress components, fluid pressure, and fluid viscous stresses. Model predictions depend on the passive elastic response of the muscularis layer, which is typically parameterized with an average isotropic elastic modulus (EM), currently measured in vivo and in vitro with estimates for total hoop stress within a distension experiment. We have shown that this approach contains serious error due to the overwhelming influence of incompressibility on the hydrostatic component. We present a new approach in which an effective shear modulus, containing only deviatoric contributions, is measured to overcome this serious error. Using in vitro measurements from pig intestines, we compare our new approach to the current method, showing vastly different predictions. We will also report on our current analysis which aims to determine the influence of residual stress on the EM measurements and comment on it use in FSI simulations.

  9. Aerosol-cloud interaction determined by satellite data over the Baltic Sea countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponaro, Giulia; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigates the use of long-term satellite data to assess the influence of aerosols upon cloud parameters over the Baltic Sea region. This particular area offers the contrast of a very clean environment (Fennoscandia) against a more polluted one (Germany, Poland). The datasets consists of Collection 6 Level 3 daily observations from 2002 to 2014 collected by the NASA's Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on-board the Aqua platform. The MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) product is used as a proxy for the number concentration of aerosol particles while the cloud effective radius (CER) and cloud optical thickness (COT) describe cloud microphysical and optical properties respectively. Satellite data have certain limitations, such as the restriction to summer season due to solar zenith angle restrictions and the known problem of the ambiguity of the aerosol-cloud interface, for instance. Through the analysis of a 12-years dataset, distribution maps provide information on a regional scale about the first aerosol indirect effect (AIE) by determining the aerosol-cloud interaction (ACI). The ACI is defined as the change in cloud optical depth or effective radius as a function of aerosol load for a fixed liquid water path (LWP). The focusing point of the current study is the evaluation of regional trends of ACI over the observed area of the Baltic Sea.

  10. Virus versus Host Plant MicroRNAs: Who Determines the Outcome of the Interaction?

    PubMed Central

    Maghuly, Fatemeh; Ramkat, Rose C.; Laimer, Margit

    2014-01-01

    Considering the importance of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of essential processes in plant pathogen interactions, it is not surprising that, while plant miRNA sequences counteract viral attack via antiviral RNA silencing, viruses in turn have developed antihost defense mechanisms blocking these RNA silencing pathways and establish a counter-defense. In the current study, computational and stem-loop Reverse Transcription – Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) approaches were employed to a) predict and validate virus encoded mature miRNAs (miRs) in 39 DNA-A sequences of the bipartite genomes of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus-Uganda (EACMV-UG) isolates, b) determine whether virus encoded miRs/miRs* generated from the 5′/3′ harpin arms have the capacity to bind to genomic sequences of the host plants Jatropha or cassava and c) investigate whether plant encoded miR/miR* sequences have the potential to bind to the viral genomes. Different viral pre-miRNA hairpin sequences and viral miR/miR* length variants occurring as isomiRs were predicted in both viruses. These miRNAs were located in three Open Reading Frames (ORFs) and in the Intergenic Region (IR). Moreover, various target genes for miRNAs from both viruses were predicted and annotated in the host plant genomes indicating that they are involved in biotic response, metabolic pathways and transcription factors. Plant miRs/miRs* from conserved and highly expressed families were identified, which were shown to have potential targets in the genome of both begomoviruses, representing potential plant miRNAs mediating antiviral defense. This is the first assessment of predicted viral miRs/miRs* of ACMV and EACMV-UG and host plant miRNAs, providing a reference point for miRNA identification in pathogens and their hosts. These findings will improve the understanding of host- pathogen interaction pathways and the function of viral miRNAs in Euphorbiaceous crop plants. PMID

  11. Assessment of Magnetostatic Interaction Effects on Thellier Paleointensity Determination by Experimental Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z.; Zhao, X.

    2009-05-01

    The ability to control magnetic interactions between grains is of fundamental importance in paleointensity studies. We continued to perform experimental simulations to help understand the effect of magnetostatic interaction on Thellier type paleointensity experiments, using artificial synthesized magnetite grains mixed with both pseudo-single domain (PSD) and multidomain (MD) particles. Magnetite powders were mixed either with an Aron ceramic or were dispersed in matrix of Seto porcelain clay. The effects of interaction between grains can be observed from the magnetic behavior of specimens with different inter-grain distances. The maximum effect of domain's interaction can be estimated by comparing the behavior of specimens with large inter-grain distance (i.e., mostly dispersed-grains) with that of ideal non-interacting SD grains. Our results clearly show that (1) the interaction between grains (rather than domain's interaction) has particular disastrous effects on the Thellier-Coe paleointensity experiment; (2) interaction of large inter- grain distance samples adds an almost negative constant value to the applied external field (i.e., acting as an internal demagnetizing field); (3) interaction in shorter inter-grain distance samples mainly generates the difference in blocking and unblocking temperatures of the sample. Detailed results will be presented and discussed at the meeting.

  12. [Determination of melamine and ammeline in eggs and meat using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Li, Yanzhao; Hao, Weiqiang; Wang, Yubo; Chen, Qiang; Li, Jinchun; Sun, Xiaoli

    2012-07-01

    A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic (HILIC) method for the determination of melamine and its degradation product ammeline in eggs and meat has been developed. The separation was carried out on a ZIC-HILIC column with 3 mmol/L NH4H2PO4 (pH 6.9)-acetonitrile (20: 80, v/v) as mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, and detected at 220 nm. Compared with the reversed-phase liquid chromatography, this method can avoid the use of ion pair reagents and thus simplify the composition of mobile phase. Under the above chromatographic conditions, melamine and ammeline had good peak shapes and moderate retention times. Good separation between these compounds and the substances that were naturally contained in the samples can be achieved. For the sample preparation, the analytes were first extracted with 0.1% phosphoric acid due to the basicity of melamine and ammeline. Then, metaphosphoric acid and acetonitrile were used to remove proteins and saccharides by precipitation. After the filtration and removal of acetonitrile by rotary evaporation under vacuum, the filtrate was cleaned-up by solid-phase extraction (SPE) technique in which a cation exchange column was used. The SPE column was activated by using methanol and 0.1% phosphoric acid. A solution of 5% ammonia methanol was chosen as eluent. The residues obtained from the eluant by evaporating the solvent were resolved in the mobile phase. It was found that there was a good linear relationship between concentration and detector response within the range of 0.4-40 mg/L. The limits of detection were 2 mg/kg for both melamine and ammeline. The average recoveries were between 80% and 105% in the spiked range of 2-10 mg/kg. The relative standard deviations were not more than 10%. The solutions of melamine and ammeline were stable in a month. The established method can be used in practice to determine melamine and ammeline simultaneously in egg and meat samples. PMID:23189668

  13. Critical Evaluation and Compilation of Physicochemical Determinants and Membrane Interactions of MMGP1 Antifungal Peptide.

    PubMed

    Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Pooja, Sharma; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-05-01

    A growing issue of pathogen resistance to antibiotics has fostered the development of innovative approaches for novel drug development. Here, we report the physicochemical and biological properties of an antifungal peptide, MMGP1, based on computational analysis. Computation of physicochemical properties has revealed that the natural biological activities of MMGP1 are coordinated by its intrinsic properties such as net positive charge (+5.04), amphipathicity, high hydrophobicity, low hydrophobic moment, and higher isoelectric point (11.915). Prediction of aggregation hot spots in MMGP1 had revealed the presence of potentially aggregation-prone segments that can nucleate in vivo aggregation (on the membrane), whereas no aggregating regions were predicted for in vitro aggregation (in solutions) of MMGP1. This ability of MMGP1 to form oligomeric aggregates on membrane further substantiates its direct-cell penetrating potency. Monte Carlo simulation of the interactions of MMGP1 in the aqueous phase and different membrane environments revealed that increasing the proportion of acidic lipids on membrane had led to increase in the peptide helicity. Furthermore, the peptide adopts energetically favorable transmembrane configuration, by inserting peptide loop and helix termini into the membrane containing >60% of anionic lipids. The charged lipid-based insertion of MMGP1 into membrane might be responsible for the selectivity of peptide toward fungal cells. Additionally, MMGP1 possessed DNA-binding property. Computational docking has identified DNA-binding residues (TRP3, SER4, MET7, ARG8, PHE10, ALA11, GLY20, THR21, ARG22, MET23, TRP34, and LYS36) in MMGP1 crucial for its DNA-binding property. Furthermore, computational mutation analysis revealed that aromatic amino acids are crucial for in vivo aggregation, membrane insertion, and DNA-binding property of MMGP1. These data provide new insight into the molecular determinants of MMGP1 antifungal activity and also serves as

  14. Characteristics of the interaction of calcium with casein submicelles as determined by analytical affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, H.D.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-12-01

    Interaction of calcium with casein submicelles was investigated in CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers and with synthetic milk salt solutions using the technique of analytical affinity chromatography. Micelles that had been prepared by size exclusion chromatography with glycerolpropyl controlled-pore glass from fresh raw skim milk that had never been cooled, were dialyzed at room temperature against calcium-free imidazole buffer, pH 6.7. Resulting submicelles were covalently immobilized on succinamidopropyl controlled-pore glass (300-nm pore size). Using 45Ca to monitor the elution retardation, the affinity of free Ca2+ and calcium salt species was determined at temperatures of 20 to 40 degrees C and pH 6.0 to 7.5. Increasing the pH in this range or increasing the temperature strengthened the binding of calcium to submicelles, similar to previous observations with individual caseins. However, the enthalpy change obtained from the temperature dependence was considerably greater than that reported for alpha s1- and beta-caseins. Furthermore, the elution profiles for 45Ca in milk salt solutions were decidedly different from those in CaCl2 or calcium phosphate buffers and the affinities were also greater. For example, at pH 6.7 and 30 degrees C the average dissociation constant for the submicelle-calcium complex is 0.074 mM for CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers, vs 0.016 mM for the milk salt solution. The asymmetric frontal boundaries and higher average affinities observed with milk salts may be due to binding of calcium salts with greater affinity in addition to the binding of free Ca2+ in these solutions.

  15. N terminus determinants of MinC from Neisseria gonorrhoeae mediate interaction with FtsZ but do not affect interaction with MinD or homodimerization.

    PubMed

    Greco-Stewart, V; Ramirez-Arcos, S; Liao, M; Dillon, J R

    2007-06-01

    While bacterial cell division has been widely studied in rod-shaped bacteria, the mechanism of cell division in round (coccal) bacteria remains largely enigmatic. In the present study, interaction between the cell division inhibitor MinC from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (MinC(Ng)) and the gonococcal cell division proteins MinD(Ng) and FtsZ(Ng) are demonstrated. Protein truncation and site-directed mutagenic approaches determined which N-terminal residues were essential for cell division inhibition by MinC(Ng) using cell morphology as an indicator of protein functionality. Truncation from or mutation at the 13th amino acid of the N terminus of MinC(Ng) resulted in loss of protein function. Bioinformatic analyses predicted that point mutations of L35P and L68P would affect the alpha-helical conformation of the protein and we experimentally showed that these mutations alter the functionality of MinC(Ng). The bacterial two-hybrid system showed that interaction of MinC(Ng) with FtsZ(Ng) is abrogated upon truncation of 13 N-terminal residues while MinC(Ng)-MinD(Ng) interaction or MinC(Ng) homodimerization is unaffected. These data confirm interactions among gonococcal cell division proteins and determine the necessity of the 13th amino acid for MinC(Ng) function. PMID:17287984

  16. Learning Sequence Determinants of Protein:Protein Interaction Specificity with Sparse Graphical Models

    PubMed Central

    Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Ghosh, Bornika; Langmead, Christopher James; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In studying the strength and specificity of interaction between members of two protein families, key questions center on which pairs of possible partners actually interact, how well they interact, and why they interact while others do not. The advent of large-scale experimental studies of interactions between members of a target family and a diverse set of possible interaction partners offers the opportunity to address these questions. We develop here a method, DgSpi (data-driven graphical models of specificity in protein:protein interactions), for learning and using graphical models that explicitly represent the amino acid basis for interaction specificity (why) and extend earlier classification-oriented approaches (which) to predict the ΔG of binding (how well). We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in analyzing and predicting interactions between a set of 82 PDZ recognition modules against a panel of 217 possible peptide partners, based on data from MacBeath and colleagues. Our predicted ΔG values are highly predictive of the experimentally measured ones, reaching correlation coefficients of 0.69 in 10-fold cross-validation and 0.63 in leave-one-PDZ-out cross-validation. Furthermore, the model serves as a compact representation of amino acid constraints underlying the interactions, enabling protein-level ΔG predictions to be naturally understood in terms of residue-level constraints. Finally, the model DgSpi readily enables the design of new interacting partners, and we demonstrate that designed ligands are novel and diverse. PMID:25973864

  17. Interactions between RNA polymerase and the core recognition element are a determinant of transcription start site selection.

    PubMed

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Zhang, Yuanchao; Taylor, Deanne M; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2016-05-24

    During transcription initiation, RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme unwinds ∼13 bp of promoter DNA, forming an RNAP-promoter open complex (RPo) containing a single-stranded transcription bubble, and selects a template-strand nucleotide to serve as the transcription start site (TSS). In RPo, RNAP core enzyme makes sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions with the downstream part of the nontemplate strand of the transcription bubble ("core recognition element," CRE). Here, we investigated whether sequence-specific RNAP-CRE interactions affect TSS selection. To do this, we used two next-generation sequencing-based approaches to compare the TSS profile of WT RNAP to that of an RNAP derivative defective in sequence-specific RNAP-CRE interactions. First, using massively systematic transcript end readout, MASTER, we assessed effects of RNAP-CRE interactions on TSS selection in vitro and in vivo for a library of 4(7) (∼16,000) consensus promoters containing different TSS region sequences, and we observed that the TSS profile of the RNAP derivative defective in RNAP-CRE interactions differed from that of WT RNAP, in a manner that correlated with the presence of consensus CRE sequences in the TSS region. Second, using 5' merodiploid native-elongating-transcript sequencing, 5' mNET-seq, we assessed effects of RNAP-CRE interactions at natural promoters in Escherichia coli, and we identified 39 promoters at which RNAP-CRE interactions determine TSS selection. Our findings establish RNAP-CRE interactions are a functional determinant of TSS selection. We propose that RNAP-CRE interactions modulate the position of the downstream end of the transcription bubble in RPo, and thereby modulate TSS selection, which involves transcription bubble expansion or transcription bubble contraction (scrunching or antiscrunching). PMID:27162333

  18. Using Lamm-Equation Modeling of Sedimentation Velocity Data to Determine the Kinetic and Thermodynamic Properties of Macromolecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of macromolecules with themselves and with other macromolecules is fundamental to the functioning of living systems. Recent advances in the analysis of sedimentation velocity (SV) data obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation allow the experimenter to determine important features of such interactions, including the equilibrium association constant and information about the kinetic off-rate of the interaction. The determination of these parameters is made possible by the ability of modern software to fit numerical solutions of the Lamm Equation with kinetic considerations directly to SV data. Herein, the SV analytical advances implemented in the software package SEDPHAT are summarized. Detailed analyses of SV data using these strategies are presented. Finally, a few highlights of recent literature reports that feature this type of SV data analysis are surveyed. PMID:21187153

  19. Development and validation of a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic method for determination of aromatic amines in environmental water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, precise, and accurate hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic (HILIC) method has been developed for the determination of 5 aromatic amines in environmental water samples. Chromatography was carried out on a bare silica column, using a mixture of acetonitrile: phosphate buffer (10 mM...

  20. Contextual interactions determine whether the Drosophila homeodomain protein, Vnd, acts as a repressor or activator

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongxin; Syu, Li-Jyun; Mellerick, Dervla M.

    2005-01-01

    At the molecular level, members of the NKx2.2 family of transcription factors establish neural compartment boundaries by repressing the expression of homeobox genes specific for adjacent domains [Muhr et al. (2001) Cell, 104, 861–873; Weiss et al. (1998) Genes Dev., 12, 3591–3602]. The Drosophila homologue, vnd, interacts genetically with the high-mobility group protein, Dichaete, in a manner suggesting co-operative activation [Zhao and Skeath (2002) Development, 129, 1165–1174]. However, evidence for direct interactions and transcriptional activation is lacking. Here, we present molecular evidence for the interaction of Vnd and Dichaete that leads to the activation of target gene expression. Two-hybrid interaction assays indicate that Dichaete binds the Vnd homeodomain, and additional Vnd sequences stabilize this interaction. In addition, Vnd has two activation domains that are typically masked in the intact protein. Whether vnd can activate or repress transcription is context-dependent. Full-length Vnd, when expressed as a Gal4 fusion protein, acts as a repressor containing multiple repression domains. A divergent domain in the N-terminus, not found in vertebrate Vnd-like proteins, causes the strongest repression. The co-repressor, Groucho, enhances Vnd repression, and these two proteins physically interact. The data presented indicate that the activation and repression domains of Vnd are complex, and whether Vnd functions as a transcriptional repressor or activator depends on both intra- and inter-molecular interactions. PMID:15640442

  1. Species distribution models contribute to determine the effect of climate and interspecific interactions in moving hybrid zones.

    PubMed

    Engler, J O; Rödder, D; Elle, O; Hochkirch, A; Secondi, J

    2013-11-01

    Climate is a major factor delimiting species' distributions. However, biotic interactions may also be prominent in shaping geographical ranges, especially for parapatric species forming hybrid zones. Determining the relative effect of each factor and their interaction of the contact zone location has been difficult due to the lack of broad scale environmental data. Recent developments in species distribution modelling (SDM) now allow disentangling the relative contributions of climate and species' interactions in hybrid zones and their responses to future climate change. We investigated the moving hybrid zone between the breeding ranges of two parapatric passerines in Europe. We conducted SDMs representing the climatic conditions during the breeding season. Our results show a large mismatch between the realized and potential distributions of the two species, suggesting that interspecific interactions, not climate, account for the present location of the contact zone. The SDM scenarios show that the southerly distributed species, Hippolais polyglotta, might lose large parts of its southern distribution under climate change, but a similar gain of novel habitat along the hybrid zone seems unlikely, because interactions with the other species (H. icterina) constrain its range expansion. Thus, whenever biotic interactions limit range expansion, species may become 'trapped' if range loss due to climate change is faster than the movement of the contact zone. An increasing number of moving hybrid zones are being reported, but the proximate causes of movement often remain unclear. In a global context of climate change, we call for more interest in their interactions with climate change. PMID:24016292

  2. Determinants of RNA polymerase alpha subunit for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma subunits: hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Heyduk, T; Heyduk, E; Severinov, K; Tang, H; Ebright, R H

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha subunit serves as the initiator for RNAP assembly, which proceeds according to the pathway 2 alpha-->alpha 2-->alpha 2 beta-->alpha 2 beta beta'-->alpha 2 beta beta' sigma. In this work, we have used hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting to define determinants of alpha for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma. Our results indicate that amino acids 30-75 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta (i.e., in alpha 2 beta, alpha 2 beta beta', and alpha 2 beta beta' sigma), and amino acids 175-210 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta' (i.e., in alpha 2 beta beta' and alpha 2 beta beta' sigma). The protected regions are conserved in the alpha homologs of prokaryotic, eukaryotic, archaeal, and chloroplast RNAPs and contain sites of substitutions that affect RNAP assembly. We conclude that the protected regions define determinants of alpha for direct functional interaction with beta and beta'. The observed maximal magnitude of protection upon interaction with beta and the observed maximal magnitude of protection upon interaction with beta' both correspond to the expected value for complete protection of one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP (i.e., 50% protection). We propose that only one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP interacts with beta and that only one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP interacts with beta'. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8816769

  3. The genomic determinants of genotype × environment interactions in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Vladislav; Yanai, Itai

    2013-08-01

    Predicting phenotype from genotype is greatly complicated by the polygenic nature of most traits and by the complex interactions between phenotype and the environment. Here, we review recent whole-genome approaches to understand the underlying principles, mechanisms, and evolutionary impacts of genotype × environment (G×E) interactions, defined as genotype-specific phenotypic responses to different environments. There is accumulating evidence that G×E interactions are ubiquitous, accounting perhaps for the greater part of the phenotypic variation seen across genotypes. Such interactions appear to be the consequence of changes to upstream regulators as opposed to local changes to promoters. Moreover, genes are not equally likely to exhibit G×E interactions; promoter architecture, expression level, regulatory complexity, and essentiality correlate with the differential regulation of a gene by the environment. One implication of this correlation is that expression variation across genotypes alone could be used as a proxy for G×E interactions in those experimental cases where identifying environmental variation is costly or impossible. PMID:23769209

  4. Molecular simulation of carbon dioxide, brine, and clay mineral interactions and determination of contact angles.

    PubMed

    Tenney, Craig M; Cygan, Randall T

    2014-01-01

    Capture and subsequent geologic storage of CO2 in deep brine reservoirs plays a significant role in plans to reduce atmospheric carbon emission and resulting global climate change. The interaction of CO2 and brine species with mineral surfaces controls the ultimate fate of injected CO2 at the nanoscale via geochemistry, at the pore-scale via capillary trapping, and at the field-scale via relative permeability. We used large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the behavior of supercritical CO2 and aqueous fluids on both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic basal surfaces of kaolinite, a common clay mineral. In the presence of a bulk aqueous phase, supercritical CO2 forms a nonwetting droplet above the hydrophilic surface of kaolinite. This CO2 droplet is separated from the mineral surface by distinct layers of water, which prevent the CO2 droplet from interacting directly with the mineral surface. Conversely, both CO2 and H2O molecules interact directly with the hydrophobic surface of kaolinite. In the presence of bulk supercritical CO2, nonwetting aqueous droplets interact with the hydrophobic surface of kaolinite via a mixture of adsorbed CO2 and H2O molecules. Because nucleation and precipitation of minerals should depend strongly on the local distribution of CO2, H2O, and ion species, these nanoscale surface interactions are expected to influence long-term mineralization of injected carbon dioxide. PMID:24410258

  5. Aggrecan nanoscale solid-fluid interactions are a primary determinant of cartilage dynamic mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Bozchalooi, Iman Soltani; Roughley, Peter; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine

    2015-03-24

    Poroelastic interactions between interstitial fluid and the extracellular matrix of connective tissues are critical to biological and pathophysiological functions involving solute transport, energy dissipation, self-stiffening and lubrication. However, the molecular origins of poroelasticity at the nanoscale are largely unknown. Here, the broad-spectrum dynamic nanomechanical behavior of cartilage aggrecan monolayer is revealed for the first time, including the equilibrium and instantaneous moduli and the peak in the phase angle of the complex modulus. By performing a length scale study and comparing the experimental results to theoretical predictions, we confirm that the mechanism underlying the observed dynamic nanomechanics is due to solid-fluid interactions (poroelasticity) at the molecular scale. Utilizing finite element modeling, the molecular-scale hydraulic permeability of the aggrecan assembly was quantified (kaggrecan = (4.8 ± 2.8) × 10(-15) m(4)/N·s) and found to be similar to the nanoscale hydraulic permeability of intact normal cartilage tissue but much lower than that of early diseased tissue. The mechanisms underlying aggrecan poroelasticity were further investigated by altering electrostatic interactions between the molecule's constituent glycosaminoglycan chains: electrostatic interactions dominated steric interactions in governing molecular behavior. While the hydraulic permeability of aggrecan layers does not change across species and age, aggrecan from adult human cartilage is stiffer than the aggrecan from newborn human tissue. PMID:25758717

  6. The role of solvent heterogeneity in determining the dispersion interaction between nanoassemblies.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jaehun; Mundy, Christopher J; Schenter, Gregory K

    2015-05-01

    Understanding fundamental nanoassembly processes on intermediate scales between molecular and continuum scales requires an in-depth analysis of the coupling between particle interactions and molecular details. This is because the discrete nature of the solvent becomes comparable to the characteristic length scales of assembly. Utilizing the spatial density response of a solvent to a surface in conjunction with the Clausius-Mossotti equation, we present a simple theory relating the discrete nature of solvent to dispersion interactions. Our study reveals that dispersion interactions are indeed sensitive to the spatial variation of solvent density, manifesting in dramatic deviations in van der Waals forces from the conventional formulation (e.g., with uniform solvent density). This study provides the first steps toward relating molecular scale principles, namely the detailed nature of solvent response to an interface, to the underlying hydration forces between surfaces. PMID:25872971

  7. Interfacial and intermolecular interactions determining the rotational orientation of C60 adsorbed on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paßens, Michael; Karthäuser, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Close-packed monolayers of fullerenes on metallic substrates are very rich systems with respect to their rotational degrees of freedom and possible interactions with different adsorption sites or next neighbours. In this connection, we report in detail on the (2√3 × 2√3)R30°-superstructure of C60 with respect to the Au(111)-surface. We use molecular orbital imaging in systematic UHV-STM studies to reveal the delicate balance of interfacial and intermolecular interactions in this system. Thus, bright C60-molecules in 5:6-top and 6:6-top geometries are observed depending on the respective next neighbours. Moreover, tiny changes in the appearance of the unoccupied molecular orbitals of dim C60-molecules in hex-vac positions are identified which are caused by the respective interaction with the facets surrounding the Au-vacancy.

  8. Experimentally determined swelling pressures and geochemical interactions of compacted Wyoming bentonite with highly alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Nilsson, Ulf; Sellin, Patrik

    The estimated quantity of cement for construction and sealing purposes is around 9E5 kg in the planned Swedish KBS3 repository for nuclear waste. The highly alkaline cement pore fluid (pH > 12) may affect other components in the repository, and especially the bentonite buffer is of concern. In this study, we simulated possible interactions between cement and bentonite by contacting highly compacted bentonite with high molar hydroxide solutions in a series of laboratory experiments. Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) and purified homo-ionic Na- and Ca-montmorillonite were used for tests with 0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 M NaOH, and saturated Ca(OH) 2 solutions. Pressure cells with permeable filters were loaded with compacted discs of bentonite at the proposed buffer density (2000 kg/m 3 at full water saturation). A hydroxide solution was circulated on one side of the cell and an isotonic chloride solution on the other during a minimum of 45 days. Swelling pressure and solution pH were monitored during the tests and the change in the solution composition and bentonite mineralogy were determined after completed tests. No effect on swelling pressure was observed in tests with 0.1 M NaOH (pH 12.9) or saturated Ca(OH) 2 solutions (pH 12.4) and the mineralogical/chemical changes of the clay were minimal. The bentonite swelling pressure was significantly reduced in the tests with 0.3 (pH 13.3) and 1.0 M (pH 13.8) NaOH solutions. The reduction seems to be due to an instant osmotic effect, and to a continuous dissolution of silica minerals, resulting in mass loss and, consequently, a decrease in density. At these high pH, the release of silica was dominating and the CEC of the clay increased by 20-25%. The structural formula of the smectite and X-ray diffraction tests for non-expandability (Greene-Kelly test) provided strong evidence that the dissolution of montmorillonite proceeds incongruently through an initial step of beidellitization. The calculated rate of silica release from

  9. Preferential interactions determine protein solubility in three-component solutions: the MgCl2 system.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, T; Bhat, R; Timasheff, S N

    1990-02-20

    The correlation between protein solubility and the preferential interactions of proteins with solvent components was critically examined with aqueous MgCl2 as the solvent system. Preferential interaction and solubility measurements with three proteins, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme, resulted in similar patterns of interaction. At acid pH (pH 2-3) and lower salt concentrations (less than 2 M), the proteins were preferentially hydrated, while at higher salt concentrations, the interaction was either that of preferential salt binding or low salt exclusion. At pH 4.5-5, all three proteins exhibited either very low preferential hydration or preferential binding of MgCl2. These results were analyzed in terms of the balance between salt binding and salt exclusion attributed to the increase in the surface tension of water by salts, which is invariant with conditions. It was shown that the increase in salt binding at high salt concentration is a reflection of mass action, while its decrease at acid pH is due to the electrostatic repulsion between Mg2+ ions and the high net positive charge on the protein. The preferential interaction pattern was paralleled by the variation of protein solubility with solvent conditions. Calculation of the transfer free energies from water to the salt solutions for proteins in solution and in the precipitate showed dependencies on salt concentration. This indicates that the nature of interactions between proteins and solvent components is the same in solution and in the solid state, which implies no change in protein structure during precipitation. Analysis of the transfer free energies and preferential interaction parameter in terms of the salting-in, salting-out, and weak ion binding contributions has led to the conclusions that, when the weak ion binding contribution is small, the predominant protein-salt interaction must be that of preferential salt exclusion most probably caused by the increase of the surface

  10. Species interactions determine the spatial mortality patterns emerging in plant communities after extreme events

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jinbao; Bogaert, Jan; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Gap disturbance is assumed to maintain species diversity by creating environmental heterogeneity. However, little is known about how interactions with neighbours, such as competition and facilitation, alter the emerging gap patterns after extreme events. Using a spatially explicit community model we demonstrate that negative interactions, especially intraspecific competition, greatly promote both average gap size and gap-size diversity relative to positive interspecific interaction. This suggests that competition would promote diversity maintenance but also increase community invasibility, as large gaps with a wide size variety provide more diverse niches for both local and exotic species. Under interspecific competition, both gap metrics interestingly increased with species richness, while they were reduced under intraspecific competition. Having a wider range of species interaction strengths led to a smaller average gap size only under intraspecific competition. Increasing conspecific clumping induced larger gaps with more variable sizes under intraspecific competition, in contrast to interspecific competition. Given the range of intraspecific clumping in real communities, models or experiments based on randomly synthesized communities may yield biased estimates of the opportunities for potential colonizers to fill gaps. Overall, our “static” model on gap formation offers perspectives to better predict recolonization opportunity and thus community secondary succession under extreme event regimes. PMID:26054061

  11. The Sex Differentiated Interaction of Environmental and Hereditary Determinants of Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaver, Judith W.

    This paper examines evidence supporting the hypothesis that environment differentially affects intelligence in a sex-specific manner. The current position that environment and heredity contribute interactively to intelligence obscures the greater vulnerability and exposure of males to environmental influences and the reciprocal lack of equivalent…

  12. Determinants of Mobile Wireless Technology for Promoting Interactivity in Lecture Sessions: An Empirical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Chin Lay; Balakrishnan, Vimala

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify adoption factors of mobile wireless technology to increase interactivity between lecturers and students during lectures. A theoretical framework to ascertain lecturers' intentions to use mobile wireless technology during lectures (dependent variable) is proposed with seven independent variables. The…

  13. An Interactive Classroom Activity Demonstrating Reaction Mechanisms and Rate-Determining Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Laura D.; Keller, Steven W.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive classroom activity that includes two-step reaction of unwrapping and eating chocolate candies is described which brings not only the reaction intermediate, but also the reactants and products into macroscopic view. The qualitative activation barriers of both steps can be adjusted independently.

  14. Species interactions determine the spatial mortality patterns emerging in plant communities after extreme events.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jinbao; Bogaert, Jan; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Gap disturbance is assumed to maintain species diversity by creating environmental heterogeneity. However, little is known about how interactions with neighbours, such as competition and facilitation, alter the emerging gap patterns after extreme events. Using a spatially explicit community model we demonstrate that negative interactions, especially intraspecific competition, greatly promote both average gap size and gap-size diversity relative to positive interspecific interaction. This suggests that competition would promote diversity maintenance but also increase community invasibility, as large gaps with a wide size variety provide more diverse niches for both local and exotic species. Under interspecific competition, both gap metrics interestingly increased with species richness, while they were reduced under intraspecific competition. Having a wider range of species interaction strengths led to a smaller average gap size only under intraspecific competition. Increasing conspecific clumping induced larger gaps with more variable sizes under intraspecific competition, in contrast to interspecific competition. Given the range of intraspecific clumping in real communities, models or experiments based on randomly synthesized communities may yield biased estimates of the opportunities for potential colonizers to fill gaps. Overall, our "static" model on gap formation offers perspectives to better predict recolonization opportunity and thus community secondary succession under extreme event regimes. PMID:26054061

  15. π–π Interaction Energies as Determinants of the Photodimerization of Mono-, Di-, and Triazastilbenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the quantitative [2 + 2] photocycloaddition of crystalline trans-2,4-dichloro-6-styrylpyrimidine to produce the corresponding htt r-ctt cyclobutane dimer, and we present 1H NMR analysis of the photolysis of this and six other mono-, di-, and triazastilbenes in solid and solution states. Density functional (M06-2X) and correlated ab initio (MP2) calculations were used to obtain interaction energies between two monomers of each azastilbene. These energies mirror the relative polarization of the stilbene moieties and can be quantitatively correlated with the rate of reaction and selective formation of the htt r-ctt dimers. In the solid state, poor correlation is observed between interaction energy and reactivity/selectivity. This lack of correlation is explained through X-ray analysis of the azastilbene monomers and is shown to be in accordance with the principles of Schmidt’s topochemical postulate. Conversely, in solution there is a strong positive correlation (R2 = 0.96) between interaction energies and formation of the htt r-ctt dimer. These results are the first to show this correlation and to demonstrate the utility of calculated interaction energies as a tool for the prediction of stereo- and regioselectivity in solution-state stilbene-type photocycloadditions. PMID:24837276

  16. Quality of Adolescent Mother-Infant Interactions and Clinical Determinations of Risk Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy-Herb, Holly E.; Honig, Alice Sterling

    1999-01-01

    Observed 37 pairs of low-income adolescent mothers and infants over a 6-month period to determine efficacy of clinical determinations of risk. Found that maternal-risk status was significantly associated with more sensitive parenting behaviors including responsiveness to infant cues and to infant distress, and social, emotional, and cognitive…

  17. Determining Plant – Leaf Miner – Parasitoid Interactions: A DNA Barcoding Approach

    PubMed Central

    Derocles, Stéphane A. P.; Evans, Darren M.; Nichols, Paul C.; Evans, S. Aifionn; Lunt, David H.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in network ecology is to describe the full-range of species interactions in a community to create highly-resolved food-webs. We developed a molecular approach based on DNA full barcoding and mini-barcoding to describe difficult to observe plant – leaf miner – parasitoid interactions, consisting of animals commonly regarded as agricultural pests and their natural enemies. We tested the ability of universal primers to amplify the remaining DNA inside leaf miner mines after the emergence of the insect. We compared the results of a) morphological identification of adult specimens; b) identification based on the shape of the mines; c) the COI Mini-barcode (130 bp) and d) the COI full barcode (658 bp) fragments to accurately identify the leaf-miner species. We used the molecular approach to build and analyse a tri-partite ecological network of plant – leaf miner – parasitoid interactions. We were able to detect the DNA of leaf-mining insects within their feeding mines on a range of host plants using mini-barcoding primers: 6% for the leaves collected empty and 33% success after we observed the emergence of the leaf miner. We suggest that the low amplification success of leaf mines collected empty was mainly due to the time since the adult emerged and discuss methodological improvements. Nevertheless our approach provided new species-interaction data for the ecological network. We found that the 130 bp fragment is variable enough to identify all the species included in this study. Both COI fragments reveal that some leaf miner species could be composed of cryptic species. The network built using the molecular approach was more accurate in describing tri-partite interactions compared with traditional approaches based on morphological criteria. PMID:25710377

  18. Interaction Mechanism of Oil-in-Water Emulsions with Asphaltenes Determined Using Droplet Probe AFM.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Zhang, Ling; Xie, Lei; Lu, Xi; Liu, Qingxia; Mantilla, Cesar A; van den Berg, Frans G A; Zeng, Hongbo

    2016-03-15

    Emulsions with interface-active components at the oil/water interface have long been of fundamental and practical interest in many fields. In this work, the interaction forces between two oil droplets in water in the absence/presence of asphaltenes were directly measured using droplet probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed using a theoretical model based on Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effects of disjoining pressure. It was revealed that the interaction forces measured between two pristine oil droplets (i.e., toluene) could be well described by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, while an additional steric interaction should be included in the presence of asphaltenes in the oil. The surface interaction and the stability of oil droplets in aqueous solution were demonstrated to be significantly influenced by the asphaltenes concentration in oil, salt concentration, pH, and presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+)) in water. Adsorbed asphaltenes at the oil/water interface led to more negative surface potential of the oil/water interface and also induced steric repulsion between oil droplets, inhibiting the drop coalescence and stabilizing the oil-in-water emulsion. Lower pH of aqueous solution could lead to less negative surface potential and weaken the repulsion between oil droplets. Addition of divalent ions (Ca(2+)) was found to disrupt the protecting effects of adsorbed asphaltenes at oil/water interface and induce coalescence of oil droplets. Our results provide a useful methodology for quantifying the interaction forces and investigating the properties of asphaltenes at the oil/water interfaces and provide insights into the stabilization mechanism of oil-in-water emulsions due to asphaltenes in oil production and water treatment. PMID:26901396

  19. Experimental Determination of the Electrostatic Nature of Carbonyl Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions Using IR-NMR Correlations.

    PubMed

    Kashid, Somnath M; Bagchi, Sayan

    2014-09-18

    Hydrogen-bonding plays a fundamental role in the structure, function, and dynamics of various chemical and biological systems. Understanding the physical nature of interactions and the role of electrostatics in hydrogen-bonding has been the focus of several theoretical and computational research. We present an experimental approach involving IR-(13)C NMR correlations to determine the electrostatic nature of carbonyl hydrogen-bonding interactions. This report provides a direct experimental evidence of the classical nature of hydrogen-bonding interaction in carbonyls, independent of any theoretical approximation. These results have important implications in chemistry and biology and can be applied to probe the reaction mechanisms involving carbonyl activation/stabilization by hydrogen bonds using spectroscopic techniques. PMID:26276334

  20. Interactions of solutes and streambed sediment. 2. A dynamic analysis of coupled hydrologic and chemical processes that determine solute transport.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Solute transport in streams is determined by the interaction of physical and chemical processes. Data from an injection experiment for chloride and several cations indicate significant influence of solute-streambed processes on transport in a mountain stream. These data are interpreted in terms of transient storage processes for all tracers and sorption processes for the cations. Process parameter values are estimated with simulations based on coupled quasi-two-dimensional transport and first-order mass transfer sorption. Comparative simulations demonstrate the relative roles of the physical and chemical processes in determining solute transport. -from Author

  1. Evolution of species interactions determines microbial community productivity in new environments.

    PubMed

    Fiegna, Francesca; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Bell, Thomas; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2015-05-01

    Diversity generally increases ecosystem productivity over short timescales. Over longer timescales, both ecological and evolutionary responses to new environments could alter productivity and diversity-productivity relationships. In turn, diversity might affect how component species adapt to new conditions. We tested these ideas by culturing artificial microbial communities containing between 1 and 12 species in three different environments for ∼60 generations. The relationship between community yields and diversity became steeper over time in one environment. This occurred despite a general tendency for the separate yields of isolates of constituent species to be lower at the end if they had evolved in a more diverse community. Statistical comparisons of community and species yields showed that species interactions had evolved to be less negative over time, especially in more diverse communities. Diversity and evolution therefore interacted to enhance community productivity in a new environment. PMID:25387206

  2. Evolution of species interactions determines microbial community productivity in new environments

    PubMed Central

    Fiegna, Francesca; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Bell, Thomas; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Diversity generally increases ecosystem productivity over short timescales. Over longer timescales, both ecological and evolutionary responses to new environments could alter productivity and diversity–productivity relationships. In turn, diversity might affect how component species adapt to new conditions. We tested these ideas by culturing artificial microbial communities containing between 1 and 12 species in three different environments for ∼60 generations. The relationship between community yields and diversity became steeper over time in one environment. This occurred despite a general tendency for the separate yields of isolates of constituent species to be lower at the end if they had evolved in a more diverse community. Statistical comparisons of community and species yields showed that species interactions had evolved to be less negative over time, especially in more diverse communities. Diversity and evolution therefore interacted to enhance community productivity in a new environment. PMID:25387206

  3. Direct Determination of Multiple Ligand Interactions with the Extracellular Domain of the Calcium-sensing Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Zhuo, You; Moniz, Heather A.; Wang, Shuo; Moremen, Kelley W.; Prestegard, James H.; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous in vivo functional studies have indicated that the dimeric extracellular domain (ECD) of the CaSR plays a crucial role in regulating Ca2+ homeostasis by sensing Ca2+ and l-Phe. However, direct interaction of Ca2+ and Phe with the ECD of the receptor and the resultant impact on its structure and associated conformational changes have been hampered by the large size of the ECD, its high degree of glycosylation, and the lack of biophysical methods to monitor weak interactions in solution. In the present study, we purified the glycosylated extracellular domain of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) (ECD) (residues 20–612), containing either complex or high mannose N-glycan structures depending on the host cell line employed for recombinant expression. Both glycosylated forms of the CaSR ECD were purified as dimers and exhibit similar secondary structures with ∼50% α-helix, ∼20% β-sheet content, and a well buried Trp environment. Using various spectroscopic methods, we have shown that both protein variants bind Ca2+ with a Kd of 3.0–5.0 mm. The local conformational changes of the proteins induced by their interactions with Ca2+ were visualized by NMR with specific 15N Phe-labeled forms of the ECD. Saturation transfer difference NMR approaches demonstrated for the first time a direct interaction between the CaSR ECD and l-Phe. We further demonstrated that l-Phe increases the binding affinity of the CaSR ECD for Ca2+. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms by which Ca2+ and amino acids regulate the CaSR and may pave the way for exploration of the structural properties of CaSR and other members of family C of the GPCR superfamily. PMID:25305020

  4. Determination of accurate dissociation limits and interatomic interactions at large internuclear distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Verma, K. K.; Rajaei-Rizi, A.; Bahns, J. T.; Harding, D. R.

    This paper illustrates (using the molecules LiH, Li2 and Na2) how laser-induced fluorescence can be used to greatly expand the range of observed vibrational levels in ground electronic states. This expanded vibrational range leads to the determination of virtually the full well of the potential energy curve. This also leads to improved determination of the dissociation limit and serves as a severe test for highly accurate ab initio calculations now available for many small molecules.

  5. Determination of accurate dissociation limits and interatomic interactions at large internuclear distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Verma, K. K.; Rajaei-Rizi, A.; Bahns, J. T.; Harding, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper illustrates (using the molecules LiH, Li2 and Na2) how laser-induced fluorescence can be used to greatly expand the range of observed vibrational levels in ground electronic states. This expanded vibrational range leads to the determination of virtually the full well of the potential energy curve. This also leads to improved determination of the dissociation limit and serves as a severe test for highly accurate ab initio calculations now available for many small molecules.

  6. Molecular determinants of α–synuclein mutants’ oligomerization and membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tsigelny, Igor F.; Sharikov, Yuriy; Kouznetsova, Valentina L.; Greenberg, Jerry P.; Wrasidlo, Wolf; Overk, Cassia; Gonzalez, Tania; Trejo, Margarita; Spencer, Brian; Kosberg, Kori; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with the formation of toxic α-synuclein oligomers and their penetration the cell membrane. Familial forms of PD are caused by the point mutations A53T, A30P, E46K, and H50Q. Artificial point mutations E35K and E57K also increase oligomerization and pore formation. We generated structural conformations of α-synuclein and the abovementioned mutants using molecular dynamics. We elucidated four main regions in these conformers contacting the membrane and found that the region including residues 37–45 (Zone2) may have maximum membrane penetration. E57K mutant had the highest rate of interaction with the membrane by Zone2, followed by A53T, E46K, E35K mutants, and wt α-synuclein. The mutant A30P had the smallest percentage of conformers that contact the membrane than all other mutants and wt α-synuclein. These results were confirmed by experiments. We identified the key amino acids that can interact with the membrane (Y38, E62, and N65 (1st hydrophilic layer); E104, E105, and D115 (2nd hydrophilic layer), and V15 and V26 (central hydrophobic layer)) and the residues that are involved in the interprotein contacts (L38, V48, V49, Q62, and T64). Understanding the molecular interactions of α-synuclein mutants is important for the design of compounds blocking the formation of toxic oligomers. PMID:25561023

  7. Microcalorimetric and SAXS determination of PEO-SDS interactions: the effect of cosolutes formed by ions.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Aparecida Mageste; Santos, Igor José Boggione; Ferreira, Guilherme Max Dias; da Silva, Maria do Carmo Hespanhol; Teixeira, Alvaro Vianna Novaes de Carvalho; da Silva, Luis Henrique Mendes

    2010-09-23

    The effect of different ionic cosolutes (NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), Li(2)SO(4), NaSCN, Na(2)[Fe(CN)(5)NO], and Na(3)[Co(NO)(6)]) on the interaction between sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and isothermal titration calorimetric techniques. The critical aggregation concentration values (cac), the saturation concentration (C(2)), the integral enthalpy change for aggregate formation (ΔH(agg)(int)) and the standard free energy change of micelle adsorption on the macromolecule chain (ΔΔG(agg)) were derived from the calorimetric titration curves. In the presence of 1.00 mmol L(-1) cosolute, no changes in the parameters were observed when compared with those obtained for SDS-PEO interactions in pure water. For NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), Li(2)SO(4), and NaSCN at 10.0 and 100 mmol L(-1), the cosolute presence lowered cac, increased C(2), and the PEO-SDS aggregate became more stable. In the presence of Na(2)[Fe(CN)(5)NO], the calorimetric titration curves changed drastically, showing a possible reduction in the PEO-SDS degree of interaction, possibility disrupting the formed nanostructure; however, the SAXS data confirmed, independent of the small energy observed, the presence of aggregates adsorbed on the polymer chain. PMID:20806942

  8. Antigen availability determines CD8+ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P.; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L.; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mazo, Irina B.; Haining, William N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary T cells are activated by antigen (Ag) bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in 3 phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8+ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, while higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation, but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12h and 24h. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics. PMID:24054328

  9. Determination of Lipid-Protein Interactions in Lung Surfactants Using Computer Simulations and Structural Bioinformatics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaznessis, Yiannis

    2001-06-01

    Proteins are the primary components of the networks that conduct the flows of mass, energy and information in living organisms. The discovery of the principles of protein structure and function allows the development of design rules for biological activities. The microscopic nature of the operating mechanisms of protein activity, and the vast complexity of the networks of interaction call for the employment of powerful computational methodologies that can decipher the physicochemical and evolutionary principles underlying protein structure and function. An example will be presented that reflects the strength of computational approaches. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and structural bioinformatics tools are employed to investigate the interactions between the first 25 N-terminal residues of surfactant protein B (SP-B 1-25) and the lipid components of the lung surfactant (LS). An understanding of the molecular level interactions between the LS components is essential for the establishment of design rules for the development of synthetic LS and the treatment of the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, which results from deficiency or inactivation of LS.

  10. Molecular interactions of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) with metalloporphyrins: Determination of the binding mechanism by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suyi; Yang, Limin; Huo, Danqun; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Juan; Fa, Huanbao; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Changjun

    2012-03-01

    The molecular interactions of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphine zinc (ZnTPP) and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine cobalt(II) (CoTPP) with dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) have been investigated by absorption/absorption difference spectroscopy. The interactions between the metalloporphyrins and DMMP change the absorbance characteristics of the porphyrins resulted from the formation of the metalloporphyrin-DMMP complexes. According to the Benesi-Hildebrand (B-H) equation, the equilibrium constants and stoichiometries of the binding systems at four different temperatures (288, 293, 298 and 303 K) were obtained. Experimental results showed that both ZnTPP and CoTPP bind to DMMP via axial coordination, resulting in the formation of 1:1 metalloporphyrin-DMMP complexes. However, it was found that ZnTPP showed stronger binding capacity with the equilibrium constant (K) of 83.864 M-1 at room temperature, while CoTPP exhibited weaker binding with K of 24.904 M-1. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔHmθ), entropy change (ΔSmθ) and free energy changes (ΔGmθ) were also studied for the interactions, indicating that the formation of the metalloporphyrins-DMMP complex was an exothermic reaction.

  11. A selective determination of azide by ion-interaction reversed-phase HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    Gennaro, M.C.; Abrigo, C.; Marengo, E.; Liberatori, A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for the analysis of sodium azide, based on the use of ion-interaction reversed-phase HPLC chromatography. A C-18 reversed-phase is the stationary phase and octylammonium ortho-phosphate at different pH values is the interaction reagent. Spectrophotometric detection at 230 nm is employed. The analysis is free from interference by acetate, carbonate, chloride, fluoride, sulfite, hydrazine, hydroxylamine, nitrate, bromide, iodide, sulfide, thiocyanate and nitrite. A good correlation (r[sup 2] = 0.9782) is obtained between peak area and concentration in the range between 1 and 250 ppb. Samples of tap water spiked with sodium azide (in the range within 25 and 250 ppb) gave per cent average recovery of 98%. The method sensitivity, expressed as signal-to-noise ratio equal to 3, is 50 ppb when the pH of the interaction reagent is equal to 3.0, 30 ppb for pH 6.4 and 10 ppb at pH 8.0.

  12. A methodology for determining interactions in probabilistic safety assessment models by varying one parameter at a time.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Emanuele

    2010-03-01

    In risk analysis problems, the decision-making process is supported by the utilization of quantitative models. Assessing the relevance of interactions is an essential information in the interpretation of model results. By such knowledge, analysts and decisionmakers are able to understand whether risk is apportioned by individual factor contributions or by their joint action. However, models are oftentimes large, requiring a high number of input parameters, and complex, with individual model runs being time consuming. Computational complexity leads analysts to utilize one-parameter-at-a-time sensitivity methods, which prevent one from assessing interactions. In this work, we illustrate a methodology to quantify interactions in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) models by varying one parameter at a time. The method is based on a property of the functional ANOVA decomposition of a finite change that allows to exactly determine the relevance of factors when considered individually or together with their interactions with all other factors. A set of test cases illustrates the technique. We apply the methodology to the analysis of the core damage frequency of the large loss of coolant accident of a nuclear reactor. Numerical results reveal the nonadditive model structure, allow to quantify the relevance of interactions, and to identify the direction of change (increase or decrease in risk) implied by individual factor variations and by their cooperation. PMID:20199656

  13. Potentiometric Determination of Phytic Acid and Investigations of Phytate Interactions with Some Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Marolt, Gregor; Pihlar, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Determination of correct amount (concentration) of phytic acid is of vital importance when dealing with protonation and/or metal complexation equilibria. A novel approach for precise and reliable assay of phytic acid, based on the difference between end points by potentiometric titration, has been presented. Twelve phytic acid protons are classified into three groups of acidity, which enables detection of 2 to 3 distinct equivalent points (EPs) depending on experimental conditions, e.g. counter-ion concentration. Using the differences between individual EPs enables correct phytate determination as well as identification of potential contamination and/or determination of initial protonation degree. Impact of uncertainty of phytate amount on the calculation of protonation constants has been evaluated using computer simulation program (Hyperquad2013). With the analysis of titration curves different binding sites on phytate ligand have been proposed for complexation of Ca2+ and Fe3+ ions. PMID:26085413

  14. Interactive forces between lignin and cellulase as determined by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignin is a complex polymer which inhibits the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose in lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production. Cellulase enzymes irreversibly bind to lignin, deactivating the enzyme and lowering the overall activity of the hydrolyzing reaction solution. Within this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to compare the adhesion forces between cellulase and lignin with the forces between cellulase and cellulose, and to study the moiety groups involved in binding of cellulase to lignin. Results Trichoderma reesei, ATCC 26921, a commercial cellulase system, was immobilized onto silicon wafers and used as a substrate to measure forces involved in cellulase non-productive binding to lignin. Attraction forces between cellulase and lignin, and between cellulase and cellulose were compared using kraft lignin- and hydroxypropyl cellulose-coated tips with the immobilized cellulase substrate. The measured adhesion forces between kraft lignin and cellulase were on average 45% higher than forces between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase. Specialized AFM tips with hydrophobic, -OH, and -COOH chemical characteristics were used with immobilized cellulase to represent hydrophobic, H-bonding, and charge-charge interactions, respectively. Forces between hydrophobic tips and cellulase were on average 43% and 13% higher than forces between cellulase with tips exhibiting OH and COOH groups, respectively. A strong attractive force during the AFM tip approach to the immobilized cellulase was observed with the hydrophobic tip. Conclusions This work shows that there is a greater overall attraction between kraft lignin and cellulase than between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase, which may have implications during the enzymatic reaction process. Furthermore, hydrophobic interactions appear to be the dominating attraction force in cellulase binding to lignin, while a number of other interactions may establish the irreversible binding

  15. Trophic interactions determine the effects of drought on an aquatic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Amundrud, Sarah L; Srivastava, Diane S

    2016-06-01

    Species interactions can be important mediators of community and ecosystem responses to environmental stressors. However, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of the indirect ecological effects of stress that arise via altered species interactions. To understand how species interactions will be altered by environmental stressors, we need to know if the species that are vulnerable to such stressors also have large impacts on the ecosystem. As predators often exhibit certain traits that are linked to a high vulnerability to stress (e.g., large body size, long generation time), as well as having large effects on communities (e.g., top-down trophic effects), predators may be particularly likely to mediate ecological effects of environmental stress. Other functional groups, like facilitators, are known to have large impacts on communities, but their vulnerability to perturbations remains undocumented. Here, we use aquatic insect communities in bromeliads to examine the indirect effects of an important stressor (drought) on community and ecosystem responses. In a microcosm experiment, we manipulated predatory and facilitative taxa under a range of experimental droughts, and quantified effects on community structure and ecosystem function. Drought, by adversely affecting the top predator, had indirect cascading effects on the entire food web, altering community composition and decomposition. We identified the likely pathway of how drought cascaded through the food web from the top-down as drought -->predator --> shredder --> decomposition. This stress-induced cascade depended on predators exhibiting both a strong vulnerability to drought and large impacts on prey (especially shredders), as well as shredders exhibiting high functional importance as decomposers. PMID:27459778

  16. Determination of cluster size in particle-nucleus interactions at 50 and 400 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, M.; Khushnood, H.; Shakeel, A.; Zafar, M.; Shafi, M.

    1984-07-01

    We have investigated the formation of clusters and their sizes in 50-GeV ..pi../sup -/-nucleus and 400-GeV proton-nucleus interactions. The maximum multiplicity of charged shower particles constituting the clusters at the two incident energies is observed to be four. Furthermore, the cluster size has been found to be independent of the gray-particle multiplicity and hence the target mass. The cluster size has also been observed to be independent of the energy and identity of the impinging hadrons.

  17. Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Determine Thermodynamic Parameters of Protein–Glycosaminoglycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Amit K.; Rösgen, Jörg; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    It has now become increasingly clear that a complete atomic description of how biomacromolecules recognize each other requires knowledge not only of the structures of the complexes but also of how kinetics and thermodynamics drive the binding process. In particular, such knowledge is lacking for protein–glycosaminoglycan (GAG) complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique that can provide various thermodynamic parameters—enthalpy, entropy, free energy (binding constant), and stoichiometry—from a single experiment. Here we describe different factors that must be taken into consideration in carrying out ITC titrations to obtain meaningful thermodynamic data of protein–GAG interactions. PMID:25325962

  18. How van der Waals interactions determine the unique properties of water.

    PubMed

    Morawietz, Tobias; Singraber, Andreas; Dellago, Christoph; Behler, Jörg

    2016-07-26

    Whereas the interactions between water molecules are dominated by strongly directional hydrogen bonds (HBs), it was recently proposed that relatively weak, isotropic van der Waals (vdW) forces are essential for understanding the properties of liquid water and ice. This insight was derived from ab initio computer simulations, which provide an unbiased description of water at the atomic level and yield information on the underlying molecular forces. However, the high computational cost of such simulations prevents the systematic investigation of the influence of vdW forces on the thermodynamic anomalies of water. Here, we develop efficient ab initio-quality neural network potentials and use them to demonstrate that vdW interactions are crucial for the formation of water's density maximum and its negative volume of melting. Both phenomena can be explained by the flexibility of the HB network, which is the result of a delicate balance of weak vdW forces, causing, e.g., a pronounced expansion of the second solvation shell upon cooling that induces the density maximum. PMID:27402761

  19. Triple SILAC to determine stimulus specific interactions in the Wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Maximiliane; Mann, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Many important regulatory functions are performed by dynamic multiprotein complexes that adapt their composition and activity in response to different stimuli. Here we employ quantitative affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry to efficiently separate background from specific interactors but add an additional quantitative dimension to explicitly characterize stimulus-dependent interactions. This is accomplished by SILAC in a triple-labeling format, in which pull-downs with bait, with bait and stimulus, and without bait are quantified against each other. As baits, we use full-length proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein and expressed under endogenous control. We applied this technology to Wnt signaling, which is important in development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer, and investigated interactions of the key components APC, Axin-1, DVL2, and CtBP2 with differential pathway activation. Our screens identify many known Wnt signaling complex components and link novel candidates to Wnt signaling, including FAM83B and Girdin, which we found as interactors to multiple Wnt pathway players. Girdin binds to DVL2 independent of stimulation with the ligand Wnt3a but to Axin-1 and APC in a stimulus-dependent manner. The core destruction complex itself, which regulates beta-catenin stability as the key step in canonical Wnt signaling, remained essentially unchanged. PMID:22011079

  20. Jacalin-carbohydrate interactions: distortion of the ligand molecule as a determinant of affinity.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Kaushal; Swaminathan, C P; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2015-02-01

    Jacalin is among the most thoroughly studied lectins. Its carbohydrate-binding site has also been well characterized. It has been postulated that the lower affinity of β-galactosides for jacalin compared with α-galactosides is caused by steric interactions of the substituents in the former with the protein. This issue has been explored energetically and structurally using different appropriate carbohydrate complexes of jacalin. It turns out that the earlier postulation is not correct. The interactions of the substituent with the binding site remain essentially the same irrespective of the anomeric nature of the substitution. This is achieved through a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The difference in energy, and therefore in affinity, is caused by a distortion of the sugar ring in β-galactosides. The elucidation of this unprecedented distortion of the ligand as a strategy for modulating affinity is of general interest. The crystal structures also provide a rationale for the relative affinities of the different carbohydrate ligands for jacalin. PMID:25664742

  1. Message frames interact with motivational systems to determine depth of message processing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lijiang; Dillard, James Price

    2009-09-01

    Although several theoretical perspectives predict that negatively framed messages will be processed more deeply than positively framed messages, a recent meta-analysis found no such difference. In this article, the authors explore 2 explanations for this inconsistency. One possibility is methodological: the statistics used in the primary studies underestimated framing effects on depth of message processing because the data were maldistributed. The other is theoretical: the absence of a main effect is veridical, but framing interacts with individual differences that predispose individuals to greater or lesser depth of processing. Data from 2 experiments (Ns = 286 and 252) were analyzed via tobit regression, a technique designed to overcome the limitations of maldistributed data. One study showed the predicted main effect for framing, but the other did not. Both studies showed the anticipated interaction: Depth of processing correlated positively with a measure of the behavioral activation system in the advantage framing condition, whereas depth of processing correlated positively with the behavioral inhibition system in the disadvantage framing condition. PMID:19735028

  2. Which shape characteristics of the intermolecular interaction of liquid water determine its compressibility ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutomi, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We consider a fluid of spherical particles with a pair potential given by a hard core repulsion and a tail, and show that the isothermal compressibility of liquid water is determined by the degree of steepness of the soft repulsion near the hard-core contact. This helps us understand the thermodynamic mechanism that causes the compressibility anomaly of liquid water.

  3. The Determinants of Negative Maternal Parenting Behaviours: Maternal, Child, and Paternal Characteristics and Their Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopala-Sibley, Daniel C.; Zuroff, David C.; Koestner, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study tested Belsky's determinants of parenting, namely maternal characteristics, child characteristics, and contextual issues, namely the mother's perception of the husband as a father, husband, and person. Three hundred and seventy-nine mothers first investigated by Sears, Maccoby, and Levin completed a standardised interview to assess…

  4. Gene-to-gene interaction between sodium channel-related genes in determining the risk of antiepileptic drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Lee, Kee-Ra; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Yo-Sik

    2009-02-01

    The pathogenesis of antiepileptic drug (AED) resistance is multifactorial. However, most candidate gene association studies typically assess the effects of candidate genes independently of each other, which is partly because of the limitations of the parametric-statistical methods for detecting the gene-to-gene interactions. A total of 200 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and 200 patients with drug-responsive epilepsy were genotyped for 3 representative the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the voltage-gated sodium channel genes (SCN1A, SCN1B, and SCN2A) by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing analysis. Besides the typical parametric statistical method, a new statistical method (multifactor dimensionality reduction [MDR]) was used to determine whether gene-to-gene interactions increase the risk of AED resistance. None of the individual genotypes or alleles tested in the present study showed a significant association with AED resistance, regardless of their theoretical functional value. With the MDR method, of three possible 2-locus genotype combinations, the combination of SCN2A-PM with SCN1B-PM was the best model for predicting susceptibility to AED resistance, with a p value of 0.0547. MDR, as an analysis paradigm for investigating multi-locus effects in complex disorders, may be a useful statistical method for determining the role of gene-to-gene interactions in the pathogenesis of AED resistance. PMID:19270815

  5. Comparison of zonal elution and nonlinear chromatography in determination of the interaction between seven drugs and immobilised β(2)-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Jing; Zheng, Yuqing Yuan; Yang, Lingjian; Zhang, Yajun; Bian, Liujiao; Zheng, Jianbin; Li, Zijian; Zhao, Xinfeng; Zhang, Youyi

    2015-07-01

    Zonal elution and nonlinear chromatography are two mainstream models for the determination of drug-protein interaction in affinity chromatography. This work intended to compare the results by zonal elution with that by nonlinear chromatography when it comes to the analysis of the interaction between seven drugs and immobilised β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR). The results of the zonal elution showed that clorprenaline, clenbuterol, methoxyphenamine, salbutamol, terbutaline, tulobuterol and bambuterol have only one type of binding site on immobilised β2-AR, while nonlinear chromatography confirmed the existence of at least two types of binding sites between β2-AR and clorprenaline, clenbuterol and bambuterol. On these sites, both zonal elution and nonlinear chromatography presented the same rank order for the association constants of the seven drugs. Compared with the data from zonal elution, the association constants calculated using nonlinear chromatography gave a good linear response to the corresponding values by radio-ligand binding assay. The sampling efficiencies of nonlinear chromatography were clearly higher than zonal elution. Nonlinear chromatography will probably become a powerful alternative for the high throughput determination of drug-protein interaction. PMID:26002106

  6. Analytical method for determining iminoctadine triacetate by LC/ESI/MS using hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Yano, Miho; Makihata, Nobuko

    2006-04-01

    A target value for iminoctadine triacetate residues in tap water was set at 6 microg/l in Japan. We have developed a highly selective and sensitive analytical method for iminoctadine triacetate by solid phase extraction LC/ESI/MS using hydrophilic interaction chromatography. The recovery rates at concentration of 0.06, 0.6, and 6 microg/l in distilled water, tap water, and raw water were 77.1 - 96.7%, and CV were 3.7 - 13.2%. The quantitation limit of the present method was 0.04 microg/l, and it was able to measure even one-hundredth of the target value of iminoctadine triacetate quantitatively. PMID:16760588

  7. Weak and Transient Protein Interactions Determined by Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Dannatt, Hugh R W; Felletti, Michele; Jehle, Stefan; Wang, Yao; Emsley, Lyndon; Dixon, Nicholas E; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Despite their roles in controlling many cellular processes, weak and transient interactions between large structured macromolecules and disordered protein segments cannot currently be characterized at atomic resolution by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR. Solid-state NMR does not suffer from the molecular size limitations affecting solution NMR, and it can be applied to molecules in different aggregation states, including non-crystalline precipitates and sediments. A solid-state NMR approach based on high magnetic fields, fast magic-angle sample spinning, and deuteration provides chemical-shift and relaxation mapping that enabled the characterization of the structure and dynamics of the transient association between two regions in an 80 kDa protein assembly. This led to direct verification of a mechanism of regulation of E. coli DNA metabolism. PMID:27101578

  8. Basic Physicochemical Properties of Polyethylene Glycol Coated Gold Nanoparticles that Determine Their Interaction with Cells.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Pablo; Yang, Fang; Pelaz, Beatriz; Zhang, Qian; Kantner, Karsten; Hartmann, Raimo; Martinez de Baroja, Natalia; Gallego, Marta; Möller, Marco; Manshian, Bella B; Soenen, Stefaan J; Riedel, René; Hampp, Norbert; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-04-25

    A homologous nanoparticle library was synthesized in which gold nanoparticles were coated with polyethylene glycol, whereby the diameter of the gold cores, as well as the thickness of the shell of polyethylene glycol, was varied. Basic physicochemical parameters of this two-dimensional nanoparticle library, such as size, ζ-potential, hydrophilicity, elasticity, and catalytic activity ,were determined. Cell uptake of selected nanoparticles with equal size yet varying thickness of the polymer shell and their effect on basic structural and functional cell parameters was determined. Data indicates that thinner, more hydrophilic coatings, combined with the partial functionalization with quaternary ammonium cations, result in a more efficient uptake, which relates to significant effects on structural and functional cell parameters. PMID:27028669

  9. Interactions between Social Structure, Demography, and Transmission Determine Disease Persistence in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Sadie J.; Jones, James H.; Dobson, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Catastrophic declines in African great ape populations due to disease outbreaks have been reported in recent years, yet we rarely hear of similar disease impacts for the more solitary Asian great apes, or for smaller primates. We used an age-structured model of different primate social systems to illustrate that interactions between social structure and demography create ‘dynamic constraints’ on the pathogens that can establish and persist in primate host species with different social systems. We showed that this varies by disease transmission mode. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) require high rates of transmissibility to persist within a primate population. In particular, for a unimale social system, STIs require extremely high rates of transmissibility for persistence, and remain at extremely low prevalence in small primates, but this is less constrained in longer-lived, larger-bodied primates. In contrast, aerosol transmitted infections (ATIs) spread and persist at high prevalence in medium and large primates with moderate transmissibility;, establishment and persistence in small-bodied primates require higher relative rates of transmissibility. Intragroup contact structure – the social network - creates different constraints for different transmission modes, and our model underscores the importance of intragroup contacts on infection prior to intergroup movement in a structured population. When alpha males dominate sexual encounters, the resulting disease transmission dynamics differ from when social interactions are dominated by mother-infant grooming events, for example. This has important repercussions for pathogen spread across populations. Our framework reveals essential social and demographic characteristics of primates that predispose them to different disease risks that will be important for disease management and conservation planning for protected primate populations. PMID:24204688

  10. Determination of the Polymer-Solvent Interaction Parameter for PEG Hydrogels in Water: Application of a Self Learning Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Akalp, Umut; Chu, Stanley; Skaalure, Stacey C.; Bryant, Stephanie J.; Doostan, Alireza; Vernerey, Franck J.

    2015-01-01

    Concentrating on the case of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels, this paper introduces a methodology that enables a natural integration between the development of a so-called mechanistic model and experimental data relating material’s processing to response. In a nutshell, we develop a data-driven modeling component that is able to learn and indirectly infer its own parameters and structure by observing experimental data. Using this method, we investigate the relationship between processing conditions, microstructure and chemistry (cross-link density and polymer-solvent interactions) and response (swelling and elasticity) of non-degradable and degradable PEG hydrogels. We show that the method not only enables the determination of the polymer-solvent interaction parameter, but also it predicts that this parameter, among others, varies with processing conditions and degradation. The proposed methodology therefore offers a new approach that accounts for subtle changes in the hydrogel processing. PMID:25999615

  11. Measurable differences between sequential and parallel diagnostic decision processes for determining stroke subtype: a representation of interacting pathologies.

    PubMed

    Helgason, Cathy M; Watkins, Fred A; Jobe, Thomas H

    2002-08-01

    Stroke diagnosis depends on causal subtype. The accepted classification procedure is a succession of diagnostic tests administered in an order based on prior reported frequencies of the subtypes. The first positive test result completely determines diagnosis. An alternative approach tests multiple concomitant diagnostic hypotheses in parallel. This method permits multiple simultaneous pathologies in the patient. These two diagnostic procedures can be compared by novel numeric criteria presented here. Thrombosis, a type of ischemic stroke, results from interaction between endothelium, blood flow and blood components. We tested for ischemic stroke on thirty patients using both methods. For each patient the procedure produced an assessment of severity as an ordered set of three numbers in the interval [0, 1]. We measured the difference in diagnosis between the sequential and parallel diagnostic algorithms. The computations reveal systematic differences: The sequential procedure tends to under-diagnose and excludes any measure of interaction between pathologic elements. PMID:12195691

  12. Determination of ethyl glucuronide in human hair by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yaldiz, Fadile; Daglioglu, Nebile; Hilal, Ahmet; Keten, Alper; Gülmen, Mete Korkut

    2013-10-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is a direct metabolite of ethanol and has been utilized as a marker for alcohol intake. This study presents development, validation and application of a new hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) method for the analysis of EtG in human hair samples. The linearity was assessed in the range of 5-2000 pg/mg hair, with a correlation coefficient of >0.99. The method was selective and sensitive, with a limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 0.05 pg/mg and 0.18 pg/mg in hair, respectively. Differently from the extraction procedures in the literature, a fast and simple liquid-liquid method was used and highest recoveries and cleanest extracts were obtained. The method was successfully applied to 30 human hair samples which were taken from those who state they consume alcohol. EtG concentrations in the hair samples of alcohol users participated in this study, ranged between 1.34 and 82.73 pg/mg. From the concentration of EtG in hair strands 20 of the 30 subjects can be considered regular moderate drinkers. PMID:24112322

  13. Ethyl glucuronide determination in meconium and hair by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tarcomnicu, Isabela; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Aerts, Katrien; De Doncker, Mireille; Covaci, Adrian; Neels, Hugo

    2010-03-20

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) detection in non-conventional matrices, such as hair and meconium, can provide useful information on alcohol abuse over a long time frame, for example during pregnancy or after a withdrawal treatment. This study reports on the development, validation and application of a new hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) method for the analysis of EtG in meconium and hair. For each matrix, the sample preparation and the chromatographic separation were thoroughly optimised. Additionally, experiments with reversed-phase liquid chromatography were also performed in the development stages. Analyses were carried out using a Phenomenex Luna HILIC column (150 mm x 3 mm, 5 microm) and a mobile phase composed by ammonium acetate 2mM and acetonitrile, in gradient. Different SPE cartridges (Oasis MAX, Oasis WAX, aminopropyl silica) and solvents were tested in order to obtain the highest recoveries and cleanest extracts. Optimal results were obtained for meconium with aminopropyl cartridges, while for hair an incubation of 16 h with 2 mL of water and acetonitrile (50/50, v/v) provided good results. The analytical method was validated for both matrices (meconium and hair) by assessing linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery and limit of quantification. The calibration curve concentrations ranged from 50 to 1200 pg/mg for meconium and from 20 to 1000 pg/mg for hair. Real meconium and hair samples were analyzed and results were consistent with literature. PMID:20061101

  14. Mycobacterium leprae–host-cell interactions and genetic determinants in leprosy: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; de Souza Salles, Jorgenilce; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Sampaio, Elizabeth Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae in which susceptibility to the mycobacteria and its clinical manifestations are attributed to the host immune response. Even though leprosy prevalence has decreased dramatically, the high number of new cases indicates active transmission. Owing to its singular features, M. leprae infection is an attractive model for investigating the regulation of human immune responses to pathogen-induced disease. Leprosy is one of the most common causes of nontraumatic peripheral neuropathy worldwide. The proportion of patients with disabilities is affected by the type of leprosy and delay in diagnosis. This article briefly reviews the clinical features as well as the immunopathological mechanisms related to the establishment of the different polar forms of leprosy, the mechanisms related to M. leprae–host cell interactions and prophylaxis and diagnosis of this complex disease. Host genetic factors are summarized and the impact of the development of interventions that prevent, reverse or limit leprosy-related nerve impairments are discussed. PMID:21366421

  15. Reproductive and socioeconomic determinants of child survival: confounded, interactive, and age-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Kost, K; Amin, S

    1992-01-01

    Studies of infant and child mortality have evolved to distinguish between two sets of explanatory variables-factors related to reproductive or maternal characteristics and socioeconomic factors, generally described as characteristics of the family or household. Almost all multivariate analyses include variables from each of these two sets, but there has been little consideration of the relationship between them. We examine how these two sets of variables jointly affect mortality. We test first for confounded effects by examining socioeconomic effects while excluding and then including reproductive variables in nested multivariate models. Next, we look for age-dependent effects among the explanatory variables and find that reproductive and socioeconomic factors affect mortality at differing ages of children. Finally, we examine interactive effects of the two sets of variables. We conclude that the higher mortality observed among the low status groups is not a result of greater concentration of poor reproductive patterns in those groups. Instead, higher status groups probably have more resources available for combating the negative effects of the same high-risk reproductive patterns. PMID:1514117

  16. Determination of interaction forces between parallel dislocations by the evaluation of J integrals of plane elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarda, Vlado A.

    2016-03-01

    The Peach-Koehler expressions for the glide and climb components of the force exerted on a straight dislocation in an infinite isotropic medium by another straight dislocation are derived by evaluating the plane and antiplane strain versions of J integrals around the center of the dislocation. After expressing the elastic fields as the sums of elastic fields of each dislocation, the energy momentum tensor is decomposed into three parts. It is shown that only one part, involving mixed products from the two dislocation fields, makes a nonvanishing contribution to J integrals and the corresponding dislocation forces. Three examples are considered, with dislocations on parallel or intersecting slip planes. For two edge dislocations on orthogonal slip planes, there are two equilibrium configurations in which the glide and climb components of the dislocation force simultaneously vanish. The interactions between two different types of screw dislocations and a nearby circular void, as well as between parallel line forces in an infinite or semi-infinite medium, are then evaluated.

  17. Determination of Oxidized Phosphatidylcholines by Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Pia; Pötz, Sandra; Brunner, Martina; Trötzmüller, Martin; Fauland, Alexander; Triebl, Alexander; Hartler, Jürgen; Lankmayr, Ernst; Köfeler, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    A novel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach for analysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholines by an Orbitrap Fourier Transform mass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was developed. This method depends on three selectivity criteria for separation and identification: retention time, exact mass at a resolution of 100,000 and collision induced dissociation (CID) fragment spectra in a linear ion trap. The process of chromatography development showed the best separation properties with a silica-based Kinetex column. This type of chromatography was able to separate all major lipid classes expected in mammalian samples, yielding increased sensitivity of oxidized phosphatidylcholines over reversed phase chromatography. Identification of molecular species was achieved by exact mass on intact molecular ions and CID tandem mass spectra containing characteristic fragments. Due to a lack of commercially available standards, method development was performed with copper induced oxidation products of palmitoyl-arachidonoyl-phosphatidylcholine, which resulted in a plethora of lipid species oxidized at the arachidonoyl moiety. Validation of the method was done with copper oxidized human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) prepared by ultracentrifugation. In these LDL samples we could identify 46 oxidized molecular phosphatidylcholine species out of 99 possible candidates. PMID:25874761

  18. Determination of Base Binding Strength and Base Stacking Interaction of DNA Duplex Using Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  19. Locality interactions with prominence in determining the scope of phrasal lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Dani; Riggs, Daylen

    2009-01-01

    Temporal lengthening of gestures and segments located in a boundary-adjacent syllable has been found in both pre- and postboundary contexts. However, the temporal extent or scope of this lengthening, particularly in the articulatory domain, is not well described. We address the question of scope of prosodic lengthening by considering specifically whether prominence interacts with boundary-related articulatory lengthening in such a way that prominent elements not immediately at a phrase edge are lengthened relative to the same prominent elements phrase-medially (i.e. at a considerable distance from a boundary). Articulatory kinematic data were collected for three subjects to analyze consonant constrictions of prominent syllables located (1) either immediately before or after a boundary and (2) two and three syllables away from that boundary. The results indicate that, as expected, gestures undergo prosodic lengthening when immediately local to the phase boundary. However, some subjects did display prosodic lengthening at a small remove from the boundary for a prominent syllable. This effect was strongest in the postboundary condition. These results suggest that a consideration of prominence may be relevant in understanding the temporal patterning of boundary-related articulatory lengthening. PMID:19888443

  20. Precise, fast, and flexible determination of protein interactions by affinity capillary electrophoresis: part 3: anions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanhong; Redweik, Sabine; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Preu, Lutz; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-08-01

    The binding of physiologically anionic species or negatively charged drug molecules to proteins is of great importance in biochemistry and medicine. Since affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) has already proven to be a suitable analytical tool to study the influence of ions on proteins, this technique was applied here for comprehensively studying the influence of various anions on proteins of BSA, β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, myoglobin, and lysozyme. The analysis was performed using different selected anions of succinate, glutamate, phosphate, acetate, nitrate, iodide, thiocyanate, and pharmaceuticals (salicylic acid, aspirin, and ibuprofen) that exist in the anionic form at physiological pH 7.4. Due to the excellent repeatability and precision of the ACE measurements, not necessarily strong but significant influences of the anions on the proteins were found in many cases. Different influences in the observed bindings indicated change of charge, mass, or conformational changes of the proteins due to the binding with the studied anions. Combining the mobility-shift and pre-equilibrium ACE modes, rapidity and reversibility of the protein-anion bindings were discussed. Further, circular dichroism has been used as an orthogonal approach to characterize the interactions between the studied proteins and anions to confirm the ACE results. Since phosphate and various anions from amino acids and small organic acids such as succinate or acetate are present in very high concentrations in the cellular environment, even weak influences are certainly relevant as well. PMID:24436007

  1. Genes and environment interact to determine the fitness costs of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Ben; Sayyed, Ali H; Wright, Denis J

    2005-01-01

    Genes which provide resistance to novel challenges such as pesticides, toxins or pathogens often impose fitness costs on individuals with a resistant phenotype. Studies of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis and its insecticidal Cry toxins indicate that fitness costs may be variable and cryptic. Using two field populations (Karak and Serd4) of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, we tested the hypothesis that the costs associated with resistance to the B. thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac would be evident when insects were grown under poor environmental conditions, namely limited or poor quality resources. On a poor quality resource, a cultivar of Brassica oleracea var. capitata with varietal resistance to P. xylostella, only one resistant population, Karak, showed reduced fitness. Conversely, when we limited a high quality resource, Brassica pekinensis, by imposing larval competition, only resistant Serd4 insects had reduced survival at high larval densities. Furthermore, Cry1Ac resistance in Serd4 insects declined when reared at high larval densities while resistance at low densities fluctuated but did not decline significantly. These results confirm the hypothesis that resistance costs can appear under stressful conditions and demonstrate that the fitness cost of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis can depend on the particular interaction between genes and the environment. PMID:16011928

  2. Biotic interactions as determinants of ecosystem structure in prairie wetlands: An example using fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, M.A.; Zimmer, K.D.; Butler, Malcolm G.; Tangen, B.A.; Herwig, B.R.; Euliss, N.H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Wetlands are abundant throughout the prairie pothole region (PPR), an area comprising over 700,000 km2 in central North America. Prairie wetland communities are strongly influenced by regional physiography and climate, resulting in extreme spatial and temporal variability relative to other aquatic ecosystems. Given the strong influence of abiotic factors, PPR wetland communities have been viewed traditionally in the context of their responses to chemical and physical features of landscape and climate. Although useful, this physical-chemical paradigm may fail to account for ecosystem variability due to biotic influences, particularly those associated with presence of fish. Spatial and temporal variability in fish populations, in turn, may reflect anthropogenic activities, landscape characteristics, and climate-mediated effects on water levels, surface connectivity, and hydroperiods. We reviewed studies assessing influences of fish on prairie wetlands and examined precipitation patterns and biological data from PPR wetlands in east-central North Dakota and western Minnesota, USA. Our review and analysis indicated that native fish influence many characteristics of permanently flooded prairie wetlands, including water clarity and abundance of phytoplankton, submerged macrophytes, and aquatic invertebrates. We suggest that ecologists and managers will benefit from conceptual paradigms that better meld biotic interactions associated with fish, and perhaps other organisms, with chemical and physical influences on prairie wetland communities. ?? 2005, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  3. A new method for depth of interaction determination in PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzichemi, M.; Stringhini, G.; Niknejad, T.; Liu, Z.; Lecoq, P.; Tavernier, S.; Varela, J.; Paganoni, M.; Auffray, E.

    2016-06-01

    A new method for obtaining depth of interaction (DOI) information in PET detectors is presented in this study, based on sharing and redirection of scintillation light among multiple detectors, together with attenuation of light over the length of the crystals. The aim is to obtain continuous DOI encoding with single side readout, and at the same time without the need for one-to-one coupling between scintillators and detectors, allowing the development of a PET scanner with good spatial, energy and timing resolutions while keeping the complexity of the system low. A prototype module has been produced and characterized to test the proposed method, coupling a LYSO scintillator matrix to a commercial SiPMs array. Excellent crystal separation is obtained for all the scintillators in the array, light loss due to depolishing is found to be negligible, energy resolution is shown to be on average 12.7% FWHM. The mean DOI resolution achieved is 4.1 mm FWHM on a 15 mm long crystal and preliminary coincidence time resolution was estimated in 353 ps FWHM.

  4. A new method for depth of interaction determination in PET detectors.

    PubMed

    Pizzichemi, M; Stringhini, G; Niknejad, T; Liu, Z; Lecoq, P; Tavernier, S; Varela, J; Paganoni, M; Auffray, E

    2016-06-21

    A new method for obtaining depth of interaction (DOI) information in PET detectors is presented in this study, based on sharing and redirection of scintillation light among multiple detectors, together with attenuation of light over the length of the crystals. The aim is to obtain continuous DOI encoding with single side readout, and at the same time without the need for one-to-one coupling between scintillators and detectors, allowing the development of a PET scanner with good spatial, energy and timing resolutions while keeping the complexity of the system low. A prototype module has been produced and characterized to test the proposed method, coupling a LYSO scintillator matrix to a commercial SiPMs array. Excellent crystal separation is obtained for all the scintillators in the array, light loss due to depolishing is found to be negligible, energy resolution is shown to be on average 12.7% FWHM. The mean DOI resolution achieved is 4.1 mm FWHM on a 15 mm long crystal and preliminary coincidence time resolution was estimated in 353 ps FWHM. PMID:27245174

  5. Metabolic resource allocation in individual microbes determines ecosystem interactions and spatial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Harcombe, William R.; Riehl, William J.; Dukovski, Ilija; Granger, Brian R.; Betts, Alex; Lang, Alex H.; Bonilla, Gracia; Kar, Amrita; Leiby, Nicholas; Mehta, Pankaj; Marx, Christopher J.; Segrè, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary The inter-species exchange of metabolites plays a key role in the spatio-temporal dynamics of microbial communities. This raises the question whether ecosystem-level behavior of structured communities can be predicted using genome-scale models of metabolism for multiple organisms. We developed a modeling framework that integrates dynamic flux balance analysis with diffusion on a lattice, and applied it to engineered consortia. First, we predicted, and experimentally confirmed, the species-ratio to which a 2-species mutualistic consortium converges, and the equilibrium composition of a newly engineered 3-member community. We next identified a specific spatial arrangement of colonies, which gives rise to what we term the “eclipse dilemma”: does a competitor placed between a colony and its cross-feeding partner benefit or hurt growth of the original colony? Our experimentally validated finding, that the net outcome is beneficial, highlights the complex nature of metabolic interactions in microbial communities, while at the same time demonstrating their predictability. PMID:24794435

  6. Electron-ion interaction cross sections determined by x-ray spectroscopy on EBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Cauble, R.; Chantrenne, S.; Chen, M.; Knapp, D.; Marrs, R.; Phillips, T.; Reed, K.; Schneider, M.; Scofield, J.; Wong, K.; Vogel, D.; Zasadzinski, R. ); Wargelin, B. . Space Sciences Lab.); Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-06-26

    The Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) is used to measure electron-ion interactions with high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy. Measurements are presented of the K{alpha} x-ray emission of heliumlike Fe{sup 24+} that demonstrate the effect of various processes on the spectrum of highly charged heliumlike ions. In particular, we have studied how dielectronic recombination into high-n Rydberg levels and resonance excitation processes contribute to the x-ray emission near threshold for direct electron-impact excitation. From these and other measurements we infer the cross sections for impact excitation of heliumlike titanium, chromium, manganese, and iron. Comparing the results with theoretical cross sections from distorted-wave calculations we find excellent agreement for all transitions but the heliumlike resonance transition from 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} to ground, whose excitation cross section is measured to be 10%--20% smaller than calculated. 36 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Lifetime number of mates interacts with female age to determine reproductive success in female guppies.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    In many species, mating with multiple males confers benefits to females, but these benefits may be offset by the direct and indirect costs associated with elevated mating frequency. Although mating frequency (number of mating events) is often positively associated with the degree of multiple mating (actual number of males mated), most studies have experimentally separated these effects when exploring their implications for female fitness. In this paper I describe an alternative approach using the guppy Poecilia reticulata, a livebearing freshwater fish in which females benefit directly and indirectly from mating with multiple males via consensual matings but incur direct and indirect costs of mating as a consequence of male sexual harassment. In the present study, females were experimentally assigned different numbers of mates throughout their lives in order to explore how elevated mating frequency and multiple mating combine to influence lifetime reproductive success (LRS) and survival (i.e. direct components of female fitness). Under this mating design, survival and LRS were not significantly affected by mating treatment, but there was a significant interaction between brood size and reproductive cycle (a correlate of female age) because females assigned to the high mating treatment produced significantly fewer offspring later in life compared to their low-mating counterparts. This negative effect of mating treatment later in life may be important in these relatively long-lived fishes, and this effect may be further exacerbated by the known cross-generational fitness costs of sexual harassment in guppies. PMID:23071816

  8. Comparison Between Interactive Closest Point and Procrustes Analysis for Determining the Median Sagittal Plane of Three-Dimensional Facial Data

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yuxue; Zhao, Yijiao; Yang, Huifang; Sun, Yucun; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare 2 digital methods to determine median sagittal plane of three-dimensional facial data—the interactive closest point algorithm and Procrustes analysis. Methods: The three-dimensional facial data of the 30 volunteers were got by the Face Scan 3D optical sensor (3D-Shape GmbH, Erlangen, Germany), and then were input to the reverse engineering software Imageware 13.0 (Siemens, Plano, TX) and Geomagic 2012 (Cary, NC). Their mirrored data were acquired and superimposed with the original data by the methods of interactive closest points and Procrustes analysis. The median sagittal planes of the 2 methods were extracted from the original and mirrored facial data respectively, 3 asymmetry indices were measured for comparison. Differences between the facial asymmetry indices of the 2 methods were evaluated using the paired sample t-test. Results: In terms of the 3 asymmetry indices, there were no significant differences between interactive closest points and Procrustes analysis for extracting median sagittal plane from three-dimensional facial data.(t = 0.0.060, P = 0.953 for asymmetry index (AI) 1, t = −0.926, P = 0.362 for AI 2, t = 1.1172, P = 0.0.251 for AI 3). Conclusions: In this evaluation of 30 subjects, the Procrustes analysis and the interactive closest point median-sagittal planes were similar in terms of the 3 asymmetry indices. Thus, Procrustes analysis and interactive closest point can both be used to abstract median sagittal plane from three-dimensional facial data. PMID:26825747

  9. Preparation of a new nanobiosensor for the determination of some biogenic polyamines and investigation of their interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Bagheryan, Zahra; Noori, Abolhassan; Zahra Bathaie, S; Yousef-Elahi, Mozhdeh; Mousavi, Mir F

    2016-03-15

    Biogenic polyamines are small organic polycations involving in a variety of biological processes. They form high affinity complexes with DNA. Here, we have followed two different novel approaches, either fabrication of an electrochemical nanobiosensor for determination of three of the most important biogenic polyamines; spermine (SPM), spermidine (SPD) and putrescine (PUT), or electrochemical investigation of their interaction with DNA. Strong binding of polyamines to DNA makes the DNA a suitable recognition element for construction of a sensitive biosensor. The fabricated biosensor responded to SPM, SPD and PUT over an extended dynamic range of 0.04-100 μM, 0.01-24 μM, and 0.08-100 μM respectively, with low detection limits of a few nM. We also studied the interaction of polyamines with three different DNA sequences with base composition of 100% AT, 80% AT and 100% GC in the presence of [Ru(NH3)6]3(+) as a redox probe. The highest kb values were obtained in the interaction of polyamines with 80% AT (mixed) DNA sequence. The kb values were 5.24 × 10(5), 4.17 × 10(5) and 1.46 × 10(5)M(-1) for SPM, SPD and PUT, respectively, which correlated well with their increasing number of amino groups. In addition, competition study showed the impotence of SPD to replace with histone H1 in histone H1-DNA complex, which indicates the more potent interaction of histone H1 with DNA. In this proof-of-principle study, we have proposed an approach for simple, cost-effective, miniaturizable, and direct-readout detection of polyamines, as well as the understanding of the modes of interaction between polyamines and DNA. PMID:26513283

  10. Individual and social determinants of obesity in strategic health messages: Interaction with political ideology.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Hinnant, Amanda; Leshner, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Antiobesity health communication campaigns often target individual behavior, but these ads might inflate the role of individual responsibility at the expense of other health determinants. In a 2 × 2 full-factorial, randomized, online experiment, 162 American adults viewed antiobesity advertisements that varied in emphasizing social or individual causation for obesity through text and images. Locus for attribution of responsibility for obesity causes and solutions was measured, as was how these responses were moderated by political ideology. Participants who viewed text emphasizing individual responsibility were less likely to agree that genetic factors caused obesity. Conservative participants who viewed images of overweight individuals were less likely than liberal participants to agree that social factors were responsible for causing obesity. In addition, among conservative participants who viewed images of fast food versus images of overweight individuals, agreement that the food industry bore some responsibility mediated support for policy solutions to obesity. These findings, among others, demonstrate that awareness of multilevel determinants of health outcomes can be a precursor of support for policy solutions to obesity among those not politically inclined to support antiobesity policy. In addition, stigmatizing images of overweight individuals in antiobesity campaigns might overemphasize the role of individual behavior in obesity at the expense of other factors. PMID:26698295

  11. Full configuration interaction pseudopotential determination of the ground-state potential energy curves of Li2 and LiH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniero, Angelo M.; Acioli, Paulo H.

    A full configuration interaction (CI) with a norm-conserving pseudopotential procedure to determine potential energy surfaces is proposed. Analysis of the potentiality and the possible sources of inaccuracies of the methodology is given in terms of its application to the generation of the ground-state potential energy curves of the LiH and Li2 molecules. The vibrational energy levels were obtained using the discrete variable representation. The agreement between our results and those from Rydberg-Klein-Ress-derived potentials is very good. The extension of this procedure to larger systems is straightforward.

  12. Rapid hydrophilic interaction chromatography determination of lysine in pharmaceutical preparations with fluorescence detection after postcolumn derivatization with o-phtaldialdehyde.

    PubMed

    Douša, Michal; Břicháč, Jiří; Gibala, Petr; Lehnert, Petr

    2011-04-01

    A rapid procedure for the determination of lysine based on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) separation of arginine and lysine with fluorescence detection has been developed. The separation conditions and parameters of lysine postcolumn derivatization with o-phtaldialdehyde (OPA)/2-mercaptoethanol were studied. The various HILIC columns were employed using isocratic elution. Fluorescence detection was performed at excitation and emission wavelength of 345 nm and 450 nm, respectively. An advantage of the reported method is a simple sample pre-treatment and a quick and very sensitive HPLC method. The developed method was successfully applied for analysis of commercial samples of Ibalgin Fast tablets (Zentiva, Czech Republic). PMID:21163603

  13. Tree species identity and interactions with neighbors determine nutrient leaching in model tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Ewel, John J; Bigelow, Seth W

    2011-12-01

    An ecosystem containing a mixture of species that differ in phenology, morphology, and physiology might be expected to resist leaching of soil nutrients to a greater extent than one composed of a single species. We tested the effects of species identity and plant-life-form richness on nutrient leaching at a lowland tropical site where deep infiltration averages >2 m year(-1). Three indigenous tree species with contrasting leafing phenologies (evergreen, dry-season deciduous, and wet-season deciduous) were grown in monoculture and together with two other life-forms with which they commonly occur in tropical forests: a palm and a giant, perennial herb. To calculate nutrient leaching over an 11-year period, concentrations of nutrients in soil water were multiplied by drainage rates estimated from a water balance. The effect of plant-life-form richness on retention differed according to tree species identity and nutrient. Nitrate retention was greater in polycultures of the dry-season deciduous tree species (mean of 7.4 kg ha(-1) year(-1) of NO(3)-N lost compared to 12.7 in monoculture), and calcium and magnesium retention were greater in polycultures of the evergreen and wet-season deciduous tree species. Complementary use of light led to intensification of soil exploitation by roots, the main agent responsible for enhanced nutrient retention in some polycultures. Other mechanisms included differences in nutrient demand among species, and avoidance of catastrophic failure due to episodic weather events or pest outbreaks. Even unrealistically simple multi-life-form mimics of tropical forest can safeguard a site's nutrient capital if careful attention is paid to species' characteristics and temporal changes in interspecific interactions. PMID:21691855

  14. Evolutionary History and Novel Biotic Interactions Determine Plant Responses to Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Wooliver, Rachel; Senior, John K.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M.; Langley, J. Adam; Chapman, Samantha K.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2014-01-01

    A major frontier in global change research is predicting how multiple agents of global change will alter plant productivity, a critical component of the carbon cycle. Recent research has shown that plant responses to climate change are phylogenetically conserved such that species within some lineages are more productive than those within other lineages in changing environments. However, it remains unclear how phylogenetic patterns in plant responses to changing abiotic conditions may be altered by another agent of global change, the introduction of non-native species. Using a system of 28 native Tasmanian Eucalyptus species belonging to two subgenera, Symphyomyrtus and Eucalyptus, we hypothesized that productivity responses to abiotic agents of global change (elevated CO2 and increased soil N) are unique to lineages, but that novel interactions with a non-native species mediate these responses. We tested this hypothesis by examining productivity of 1) native species monocultures and 2) mixtures of native species with an introduced hardwood plantation species, Eucalyptus nitens, to experimentally manipulated soil N and atmospheric CO2. Consistent with past research, we found that N limits productivity overall, especially in elevated CO2 conditions. However, monocultures of species within the Symphyomyrtus subgenus showed the strongest response to N (gained 127% more total biomass) in elevated CO2 conditions, whereas those within the Eucalyptus subgenus did not respond to N. Root:shoot ratio (an indicator of resource use) was on average greater in species pairs containing Symphyomyrtus species, suggesting that functional traits important for resource uptake are phylogenetically conserved and explaining the phylogenetic pattern in plant response to changing environmental conditions. Yet, native species mixtures with E. nitens exhibited responses to CO2 and N that differed from those of monocultures, supporting our hypothesis and highlighting that both plant

  15. Evolutionary history and novel biotic interactions determine plant responses to elevated CO2 and nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Wooliver, Rachel; Senior, John K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M; Langley, J Adam; Chapman, Samantha K; Bailey, Joseph K

    2014-01-01

    A major frontier in global change research is predicting how multiple agents of global change will alter plant productivity, a critical component of the carbon cycle. Recent research has shown that plant responses to climate change are phylogenetically conserved such that species within some lineages are more productive than those within other lineages in changing environments. However, it remains unclear how phylogenetic patterns in plant responses to changing abiotic conditions may be altered by another agent of global change, the introduction of non-native species. Using a system of 28 native Tasmanian Eucalyptus species belonging to two subgenera, Symphyomyrtus and Eucalyptus, we hypothesized that productivity responses to abiotic agents of global change (elevated CO2 and increased soil N) are unique to lineages, but that novel interactions with a non-native species mediate these responses. We tested this hypothesis by examining productivity of 1) native species monocultures and 2) mixtures of native species with an introduced hardwood plantation species, Eucalyptus nitens, to experimentally manipulated soil N and atmospheric CO2. Consistent with past research, we found that N limits productivity overall, especially in elevated CO2 conditions. However, monocultures of species within the Symphyomyrtus subgenus showed the strongest response to N (gained 127% more total biomass) in elevated CO2 conditions, whereas those within the Eucalyptus subgenus did not respond to N. Root:shoot ratio (an indicator of resource use) was on average greater in species pairs containing Symphyomyrtus species, suggesting that functional traits important for resource uptake are phylogenetically conserved and explaining the phylogenetic pattern in plant response to changing environmental conditions. Yet, native species mixtures with E. nitens exhibited responses to CO2 and N that differed from those of monocultures, supporting our hypothesis and highlighting that both plant

  16. HIV-1 Capsid-Cyclophilin Interactions Determine Nuclear Import Pathway, Integration Targeting and Replication Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Torsten; Ocwieja, Karen E.; Rasaiyaah, Jane; Price, Amanda J.; Brady, Troy L.; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Hué, Stéphane; Fletcher, Adam J.; Lee, KyeongEun; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Jenner, Richard G.; James, Leo C.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Towers, Greg J.

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses such as HIV-1 traverse nuclear pore complexes (NPC) and infect terminally differentiated non-dividing cells, but how they do this is unclear. The cytoplasmic NPC protein Nup358/RanBP2 was identified as an HIV-1 co-factor in previous studies. Here we report that HIV-1 capsid (CA) binds directly to the cyclophilin domain of Nup358/RanBP2. Fusion of the Nup358/RanBP2 cyclophilin (Cyp) domain to the tripartite motif of TRIM5 created a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 replication, consistent with an interaction in vivo. In contrast to CypA binding to HIV-1 CA, Nup358 binding is insensitive to inhibition with cyclosporine, allowing contributions from CypA and Nup358 to be distinguished. Inhibition of CypA reduced dependence on Nup358 and the nuclear basket protein Nup153, suggesting that CypA regulates the choice of the nuclear import machinery that is engaged by the virus. HIV-1 cyclophilin-binding mutants CA G89V and P90A favored integration in genomic regions with a higher density of transcription units and associated features than wild type virus. Integration preference of wild type virus in the presence of cyclosporine was similarly altered to regions of higher transcription density. In contrast, HIV-1 CA alterations in another patch on the capsid surface that render the virus less sensitive to Nup358 or TRN-SR2 depletion (CA N74D, N57A) resulted in integration in genomic regions sparse in transcription units. Both groups of CA mutants are impaired in replication in HeLa cells and human monocyte derived macrophages. Our findings link HIV-1 engagement of cyclophilins with both integration targeting and replication efficiency and provide insight into the conservation of viral cyclophilin recruitment. PMID:22174692

  17. Determining Phosphorus-sediment Interactions in a Groundwater-fed River through In Situ Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullinger, N. J.; Heathwaite, L.; Zhang, H.; Keenan, P. O.

    2011-12-01

    In stream processing is potentially important in the regulation and availability of nutrients to riverine flora and also in attenuating point and non-point source inputs to rivers, such as wastewater outflows and agricultural runoff. Phosphorus is an important macronutrient and often cited as a limiting factor to plant and algal growth in freshwater systems. The particle-reactive nature of the orthophosphate anion means that river sediments can play an important role in phosphorus attenuation and availability in rivers. However, it is also known that plant root exudates can also affect the mobilisation of sediment adsorbed phosphorus. Results are presented from high resolution (centimetre) measurements of vertical riverbed pore water profiles at a field site in the River Leith, Cumbria, UK. The River Leith is a sub-catchment of the River Eden and is characterised by significant groundwater-surface water interactions at the monitoring site. In situ measurements of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) in riverbed pore waters were made using passive sampling diffusive gradient and diffusive equilibration in thin film (DGT and DET) probes. These probes allow in situ measurements of riverbed pore waters to be made to a depth of 30 cm below the riverbed at centimetre resolution. The resulting profiles provide information on the variability in phosphorus pore waters for vegetated and non-vegetated regions of the riverbed. The impact of vegetated root zones in riverbed sediments is poorly characterised for hyporheic exchanges. Comparison of the vertical profiles obtained by DGT and DET probes identifies the potential of sediments to act sources or sinks of in stream phosphorus. Simultaneous analysis for redox sensitive elements provides additional information on the redox status of riverbed sediments. Initial results show spatial and temporal variability of phosphorus in different sedimentary environments and also between vegetated and non-vegetated areas of the riverbed

  18. The behavior of multiple independent managers and ecological traits interact to determine prevalence of weeds.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Shaun R; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2013-04-01

    Management of damaging invasive plants is often undertaken by multiple decision makers, each managing only a small part of the invader's population. As weeds can move between properties and re-infest eradicated sites from unmanaged sources, the dynamics of multiple decision makers plays a significant role in weed prevalence and invasion risk at the landscape scale. We used a spatially explicit agent-based simulation to determine how individual agent behavior, in concert with weed population ecology, determined weed prevalence. We compared two invasive grass species that differ in ecology, control methods, and costs: Nassella trichotoma (serrated tussock) and Eragrostis curvula (African love grass). The way decision makers reacted to the benefit of management had a large effect on the extent of a weed. If benefits of weed control outweighed the costs, and either net benefit was very large or all agents were very sensitive to net benefits, then agents tended to act synchronously, reducing the pool of infested agents available to spread the weed. As N. trichotoma was more damaging than E. curvula and had more effective control methods, agents chose to manage it more often, which resulted in lower prevalence of N. trichotoma. A relatively low number of agents who were intrinsically less motivated to control weeds led to increased prevalence of both species. This was particularly apparent when long-distance dispersal meant each infested agent increased the invasion risk for a large portion of the landscape. In this case, a small proportion of land mangers reluctant to control, regardless of costs and benefits, could lead to the whole landscape being infested, even when local control stopped new infestations. Social pressure was important, but only if it was independent of weed prevalence, suggesting that early access to information, and incentives to act on that information, may be crucial in stopping a weed from infesting large areas. The response of our model to both

  19. Few Residues within an Extensive Binding Interface Drive Receptor Interaction and Determine the Specificity of Arrestin Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Gimenez, Luis E.; Francis, Derek J.; Hanson, Susan M.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Klug, Candice S.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2011-01-01

    Arrestins bind active phosphorylated forms of G protein-coupled receptors, terminating G protein activation, orchestrating receptor trafficking, and redirecting signaling to alternative pathways. Visual arrestin-1 preferentially binds rhodopsin, whereas the two non-visual arrestins interact with hundreds of G protein-coupled receptor subtypes. Here we show that an extensive surface on the concave side of both arrestin-2 domains is involved in receptor binding. We also identified a small number of residues on the receptor binding surface of the N- and C-domains that largely determine the receptor specificity of arrestins. We show that alanine substitution of these residues blocks the binding of arrestin-1 to rhodopsin in vitro and of arrestin-2 and -3 to β2-adrenergic, M2 muscarinic cholinergic, and D2 dopamine receptors in intact cells, suggesting that these elements critically contribute to the energy of the interaction. Thus, in contrast to arrestin-1, where direct phosphate binding is crucial, the interaction of non-visual arrestins with their cognate receptors depends to a lesser extent on phosphate binding and more on the binding to non-phosphorylated receptor elements. PMID:21471193

  20. Questioning the answer: questioning style, choice and self-determination in interactions with young people with intellectual disabilities*

    PubMed Central

    Pilnick, Alison; Clegg, Jennifer; Murphy, Elizabeth; Almack, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    For young people with intellectual disabilities (ID), the transition from children's to adult services has long been recognised as a challenging move. One of the aims of the White Paper Valuing People (2001) was to address some of the problems associated with this transition. This paper reports on data from a project which examines the impact of these service changes, and the ways in which transition is negotiated by carers, professionals and users. It presents a conversation analysis of eight tape-recorded formal review meetings at which transition to adult services is discussed. It takes as its starting point the existing interactional work on ID and the way in which this demonstrates the effects of the local and contextual specifics of particular kinds of interaction on the eventual outcomes (e.g. Rapley 2004, Antaki 2001, Maynard and Marlaire 1992). We show that an attempt to allow self-determination in the context of transitions can paradoxically result in undermining user choice and control. We also argue that, while a rule-based approach to practice may offer moral clarity for professionals, it can result in interactional and practical difficulties which cannot be easily reconciled. PMID:20415789

  1. Reliable Determinations of Protein-Ligand Interactions by Direct ESI-MS Measurements. Are We There Yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitova, Elena N.; El-Hawiet, Amr; Schnier, Paul D.; Klassen, John S.

    2012-03-01

    The association-dissociation of noncovalent interactions between protein and ligands, such as other proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, DNA, or small molecules, are critical events in many biological processes. The discovery and characterization of these interactions is essential to a complete understanding of biochemical reactions and pathways and to the design of novel therapeutic agents that may be used to treat a variety of diseases and infections. Over the last 20 y, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has emerged as a versatile tool for the identification and quantification of protein-ligand interactions in vitro. Here, we describe the implementation of the direct ESI-MS assay for the determination of protein-ligand binding stoichiometry and affinity. Additionally, we outline common sources of error encountered with these measurements and various strategies to overcome them. Finally, we comment on some of the outstanding challenges associated with the implementation of the assay and highlight new areas where direct ESI-MS measurements are expected to make significant contributions in the future.

  2. Molecular determinants and interaction data of cyclic peptide inhibitor with the extracellular domain of TrkB receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chitranshi, Nitin; Gupta, Vivek; Dheer, Yogita; Gupta, Veer; Vander Wall, Roshana; Graham, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    TrkB is a high affinity receptor for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its phosphorylation stimulates activation of several intracellular signalling pathways linked to cellular growth, differentiation and maintenance. Identification of various activators and inhibitors of the TrkB receptor and greater understanding their binding mechanisms is critical to elucidate the biochemical and pharmacological pathways and analyse various protein crystallization studies. The data presented here is related to the research article entitled “Brain Derived neurotrophic factor is involved in the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) signalling” [1]. Cyclotraxin B (CTXB) is a disulphide bridge linked cyclic peptide molecule that interacts with TrkB receptor and inhibits the BDNF/TrkB downstream signalling. This article reports for the first time binding mechanism and interaction parameters of CTXB with the TrkB receptor. The molecular model of CTXB has been generated and it’s docking with TrkB domain carried out to determine the critical residues involved in the protein peptide interaction. PMID:26909388

  3. Selective determination of thiram residues in fruit and vegetables by hydrophilic interaction LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ringli, Daniela; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Thiram belongs to the most important class of dithiocarbamate (DTC) fungicides including dimethyldithiocarbamates (DMDs), ethylenebis(dithiocarbamtes) (EBDs) and propylenebis(dithiocarbamates) (PBDs). During the surface extraction of fruit and vegetables for the LC-MS determination of residues of DMDs, EBDs and PBDs, thiram is reduced by the penicillamine buffer to the DMD anion, thus resulting in false-positive findings of DMD fungicides like ziram. Therefore, an alkaline sulfite buffer was applied for surface extraction, quantitatively transforming thiram into the DMD anion and a stable DMD-sulfite adduct that was used as a selective marker for thiram. Separation was performed isocratically on a ZIC-pHILIC column with acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium hydroxide solution (85/15). Mass selective detection was carried out on a single-quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to an electrospray ionisation interface operating in negative mode. Using d12-thiram as the internal standard, recoveries of 80-108% were obtained from apples, tomatoes, grapes and sweet peppers, spiked in the range of 0.02-1 mg kg(-1). Limits of detection and quantification were 0.6 and 2 µg kg(-1), respectively. PMID:24070320

  4. Genetic Determinants of Cardio-Metabolic Risk: A Proposed Model for Phenotype Association and Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Blackett, Piers R; Sanghera, Dharambir K

    2012-01-01

    This review provides a translational and unifying summary of metabolic syndrome genetics and highlights evidence that genetic studies are starting to unravel and untangle origins of the complex and challenging cluster of disease phenotypes. The associated genes effectively express in the brain, liver, kidney, arterial endothelium, adipocytes, myocytes and β cells. Progression of syndrome traits has been associated with ectopic lipid accumulation in the arterial wall, visceral adipocytes, myocytes, and liver. Thus it follows that the genetics of dyslipidemia, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) disease are central in triggering progression of the syndrome to overt expression of disease traits, and have become a key focus of interest for early detection and for designing prevention and treatments. To support the “birds’ eye view” approach we provide a road-map depicting commonality and interrelationships between the traits and their genetic and environmental determinants based on known risk factors, metabolic pathways, pharmacological targets, treatment responses, gene networks, pleiotropy, and association with circadian rhythm. Although only a small portion of the known heritability is accounted for and there is insufficient support for clinical application of gene-based prediction models, there is direction and encouraging progress in a rapidly moving field that is beginning to show clinical relevance. PMID:23351585

  5. Intramitochondrial positions of cytochrome haem groups determined by dipolar interactions with paramagnetic cations.

    PubMed Central

    Case, G D; Leigh, J S

    1976-01-01

    E.p.r.(electron-paramagnetic-resonance) spectra of the ferricytochromes were studied in normal and 'nickel-plated' pigeon heart mitochondria and pigeon heart submitochondrial particles. NiCL2 added to either mitochondria or particles was bound completely to the membranes, but none was transported across the vesicles. Hence, any perturbations of the haem e.p.r. spectra by Ni(II) should occur only for those cytochromes in close proximity to the exterior surface. Whenever Ni(II) can approach to within 1 nm of cytochrome haem. the consequent acceleration of the haem e.p.r. relaxation kinetics should elicit dipolar line broadening. Relaxation acceleration should also increase the incident power level required to saturate the haem e.p.r. signal. In pigeon heart mitochondria, at least three e.p.r. resonances, attributable in part to cytochromes c1, bK and br, are observed at gz=3.3 resonance. In these submitochondrial particles, the peak at gz=3.5 is missing, and the resonance at gz=3.6 resolves into two components, neither of which is sensitive to added Ni(ii). Addition of free haemin (ferric, a paramagnetic anion) to intact mitochondria elicits the same e.p.r. signal changes as does a preparation of submitochondrial particles. Saturation curves for cytochrome oxidase obtained for e.p.r. spectra of the high-spin form (g = 6) and the low-spin form (gz=3.1) also reveal no effect of Ni(II) on the haem e.p.r. relaxation in either mitochondria or inverted submitochondrial particles. Further, Ni(II) fails to alter the spectra or saturation properties of cytochrome c in either mitochondria or submitochondrial particles therefrom. Only with a 50-fold molar excess of Ni(II) can one accelerate the e.p.r. relaxation of cytochrome c in aqueous solution, although other more subtle types of magnetic interactions may occur between the cytochrome and either Ni(II) or ferricyanide. Addition of haemin to mitochondria likewise failed to alter the e.p.r. characteristics of either cytochrome

  6. Spectroscopic and functional determination of the interaction of Pb2+ with GATA proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghering, Amy B; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Schenck, Brandy L; Deo, Sandhya; Mayer, R Aeryn; Pikaart, Michael J; Omichinski, James G; Godwin, Hilary A

    2005-03-23

    GATA proteins are transcription factors that bind GATA DNA elements through Cys4 structural zinc-binding domains and play critical regulatory roles in neurological and urogenital development and the development of cardiac disease. To evaluate GATA proteins as potential targets for lead, spectroscopically monitored metal-binding titrations were used to measure the affinity of Pb2+ for the C-terminal zinc-binding domain from chicken GATA-1 (CF) and the double-finger domain from human GATA-1 (DF). Using this method, Pb2+ coordinating to CF and DF was directly observed through the appearance of intense bands in the near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum (250-380 nm). Absorption data collected from these experiments were best fit to a 1:1 Pb2+ -CF model and a 2:1 Pb2+ -DF model. Competition experiments using Zn2+ were used to determine the absolute affinities of Pb2+ for these proteins. These studies reveal that Pb2+ forms tight complexes with cysteine residues in the zinc-binding sites in GATA proteins, beta1Pb = 6.4 (+/- 2.0) x 10(9) M(-1) for CF and beta2 = 6.3 (+/- 6.3) x 10(19) M(-2) for Pb(2+)2-DF, and within an order of magnitude of the affinity of Zn2+ for these proteins. Furthermore, Pb2+ was able to displace bound Zn2+ from CF and DF. Upon addition of Pb2+, GATA shows a decreased ability to bind to DNA and subsequently activate transcription. Therefore, the DNA binding and transcriptional activity of GATA proteins are most likely to be targeted by Pb2+ in cells and tissues that sequester Pb2+ in vivo, which include the brain and the heart. PMID:15771509

  7. A truly human interface: interacting face-to-face with someone whose words are determined by a computer program

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Kevin; Gillespie, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We use speech shadowing to create situations wherein people converse in person with a human whose words are determined by a conversational agent computer program. Speech shadowing involves a person (the shadower) repeating vocal stimuli originating from a separate communication source in real-time. Humans shadowing for conversational agent sources (e.g., chat bots) become hybrid agents (“echoborgs”) capable of face-to-face interlocution. We report three studies that investigated people’s experiences interacting with echoborgs and the extent to which echoborgs pass as autonomous humans. First, participants in a Turing Test spoke with a chat bot via either a text interface or an echoborg. Human shadowing did not improve the chat bot’s chance of passing but did increase interrogators’ ratings of how human-like the chat bot seemed. In our second study, participants had to decide whether their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot or simply pretended to be one. Compared to those who engaged a text interface, participants who engaged an echoborg were more likely to perceive their interlocutor as pretending to be a chat bot. In our third study, participants were naïve to the fact that their interlocutor produced words generated by a chat bot. Unlike those who engaged a text interface, the vast majority of participants who engaged an echoborg did not sense a robotic interaction. These findings have implications for android science, the Turing Test paradigm, and human–computer interaction. The human body, as the delivery mechanism of communication, fundamentally alters the social psychological dynamics of interactions with machine intelligence. PMID:26042066

  8. Interactions between ultraviolet light and MC1R and OCA2 variants are determinants of childhood nevus and freckle phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Barón, Anna E.; Asdigian, Nancy L.; Gonzalez, Victoria; Aalborg, Jenny; Terzian, Tamara; Stiegmann, Regan A.; C.Torchia, Enrique; Berwick, Marianne; Dellavalle, Robert P.; G.Morelli, Joseph; Mokrohisky, Stefan T.; Crane, Lori A.; Box, Neil F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Melanocytic nevi (moles) and freckles are well known biomarkers of melanoma risk, and they are influenced by similar ultraviolet (UV) light exposures and genetic susceptibilities to those that increase melanoma risk. Nevertheless, the selective interactions between UV exposures and nevus and freckling genes remain largely undescribed. Methods We conducted a longitudinal study from ages 6 through 10 in 477 Colorado children who had annual information collected for sun exposure, sun protection behaviors, and full body skin exams. MC1R and HERC2/OCA2 rs12913832 were genotyped and linear mixed models were used to identify main and interaction effects. Results All measures of sun exposure (chronic, sunburns and waterside vacations) contributed to total nevus counts, and cumulative chronic exposure acted as the major driver of nevus development. Waterside vacations strongly increased total nevus counts in children with rs12913832 blue eye color alleles and facial freckling scores in those with MC1R red hair color variants. Sunburns increased numbers of larger nevi (≥2 mm) in subjects with certain MC1R and rs12913832 genotypes. Conclusions Complex interactions between different UV exposure profiles and genotype combinations determine nevus numbers and size, and the degree of facial freckling. Impact Our findings emphasize the importance of implementing sun-protective behavior in childhood regardless of genetic make-up; although children with particular genetic variants may benefit from specifically targeted preventive measures to counteract their inherent risk of melanoma. Moreover, we demonstrate, for the first time, that longitudinal studies are a highly powered tool to uncover new gene-environment interactions that increase cancer risk. PMID:25410285

  9. A fast, simple, and reliable hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography method for the determination of ascorbic and isoascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Barros, Ana I R N A; Silva, Ana P; Gonçalves, Berta; Nunes, Fernando M

    2010-03-01

    A reliable method for the determination of total vitamin C must be able to resolve ascorbic acid (AA) and the epimeric isoascorbic acid (IAA) and determine the sum of AA and its oxidized form dehydroascorbic acid. AA and IAA are polar molecules with a low retention time in conventional reversed phase systems, and hence of difficult resolution. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography using a TSKgel Amide-80 stationary phase with isocratic elution was successful in resolving the two epimers. The column was compatible with injections of high concentrations of metaphosphoric acid, tris(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine, and EDTA without drift of baseline and retention time. Total AA and IAA were extracted, stabilized, and reduced in one step at 40 °C, using 5% m-phosphoric acid, 2 mM of EDTA, and 2 mM of tris(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine as reducing agent. This simple, fast, and robust hydrophilic interaction chromatography-DAD method was applied for the analysis of food products namely fruit juices, chestnut, and ham and also in pharmaceutical and multivitamin tablets. Method validation was performed on the food products, including parameters of precision, accuracy, linearity, limit of detection, and quantification (LOQ). The absence of matrix interferences was assessed by the standard addition method and Youden calibration. The method was fast, accurate, and precise with a LOQ(AA) of 1.5 mg/L and LOQ(IAA) of 3.7 mg/L. The simple experimental procedure, completed in 1 h, the possibility of using IAA as an internal standard, and low probability of artifacts are the major advantages of the proposed method for the routine determination of these compounds in a large number of samples. PMID:20091158

  10. Study of photorespiration in marine microalgae through the determination of glycolic acid using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rigobello-Masini, Marilda; Penteado, José C P; Tiba, Maurício; Masini, Jorge C

    2012-01-01

    Determination of organic acids in intracellular extracts and in the cultivation media of marine microalgae aid investigations about metabolic routes related to assimilation of atmospheric carbon by these organisms, which are known by their role in the carbon dioxide sink. The separation of these acids was investigated by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) using isocratic elution with a mobile phase composed of 70:30 v/v acetonitrile/20 mmol/L ammonium acetate buffer (pH 6.8) and detection at 220 nm. HILIC allowed the determinations of glycolic acid, the most important metabolite for the evaluation of the photorespiration process in algae, to be made with better selectivity than that achieved by reversed phase liquid chromatography, but with less detectability. The concentration of glycolic acid was determined in the cultivation media and in intracellular extracts of the algae Tetraselmis gracilis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum submitted to different conditions of aeration: (i) without forced aeration, (ii) aeration with atmospheric air, and (iii) bubbling with N(2). The concentration of glycolic acid had a higher increase as the cultures were aerated with nitrogen, showing higher photorespiratory flux than that occurring in the cultures aerated with atmospheric air. PMID:22128110

  11. Determination of glutathione and cysteine in yeasts by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by on-line postcolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D; Themelis, Demetrius G

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, we report a new method for the determination of two primary thiols, cysteine (CYS) and glutathione (GSH), by hydrophilic interaction LC. The polar analytes are separated isocratically using a mobile phase consisting of 65% acetonitrile/35% ammonium acetate (15 mmol/L, pH 2.0) and are detected at 285 nm following on-line postcolumn derivatization by the thiol-selective reagent methyl propiolate. The main figures of merit included linearity in the range of 5-200 μmol/L and an LOD 0.6 μmol/L for both compounds. The absence of matrix effect allowed the determination of CYS and GSH in various yeast samples. GSH was present in most of the samples at levels ranging between 0.9 and 3.1 mg/g, whereas CYS was determined in only one sample at a significantly lower concentration. In terms of accuracy, the percent recoveries ranged between 91.2 and 105.6% for GSH, and 91.6 and 106.9% for CYS. PMID:23559570

  12. Structure and Interactions of a Dimeric Variant of sHIP, a Novel Virulence Determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Carl; Wisniewska, Magdalena; Frick, Inga-Maria; Streicher, Werner; Björck, Lars; Malmström, Johan; Wikström, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is one of the most significant bacterial pathogens in the human population mostly causing superficial and uncomplicated infections (pharyngitis and impetigo) but also invasive and life-threatening disease. We have previously identified a virulence determinant, protein sHIP, which is secreted at higher levels by an invasive compared to a non-invasive strain of S. pyogenes. The present work presents a further characterization of the structural and functional properties of this bacterial protein. Biophysical and structural studies have shown that protein sHIP forms stable tetramers both in the crystal and in solution. The tetramers are composed of four helix-loop-helix motifs with the loop regions connecting the helices displaying a high degree of flexibility. Owing to interactions at the tetramer interface, the observed tetramer can be described as a dimer of dimers. We identified three residues at the tetramer interface (Leu84, Leu88, Tyr95), which due to largely non-polar side-chains, could be important determinants for protein oligomerization. Based on these observations, we produced a sHIP variant in which these residues were mutated to alanines. Biophysical experiments clearly indicated that the sHIP mutant appear only as dimers in solution confirming the importance of the interfacial residues for protein oligomerisation. Furthermore, we could show that the sHIP mutant interacts with intact histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) and the histidine-rich repeats in HRG, and inhibits their antibacterial activity to the same or even higher extent as compared to the wild type protein sHIP. We determined the crystal structure of the sHIP mutant, which, as a result of the high quality of the data, allowed us to improve the existing structural model of the protein. Finally, by employing NMR spectroscopy in solution, we generated a model for the complex between the sHIP mutant and an HRG-derived heparin-binding peptide, providing further molecular

  13. Structure and Interactions of a Dimeric Variant of sHIP, a Novel Virulence Determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Carl; Wisniewska, Magdalena; Frick, Inga-Maria; Streicher, Werner; Björck, Lars; Malmström, Johan; Wikström, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is one of the most significant bacterial pathogens in the human population mostly causing superficial and uncomplicated infections (pharyngitis and impetigo) but also invasive and life-threatening disease. We have previously identified a virulence determinant, protein sHIP, which is secreted at higher levels by an invasive compared to a non-invasive strain of S. pyogenes. The present work presents a further characterization of the structural and functional properties of this bacterial protein. Biophysical and structural studies have shown that protein sHIP forms stable tetramers both in the crystal and in solution. The tetramers are composed of four helix-loop-helix motifs with the loop regions connecting the helices displaying a high degree of flexibility. Owing to interactions at the tetramer interface, the observed tetramer can be described as a dimer of dimers. We identified three residues at the tetramer interface (Leu84, Leu88, Tyr95), which due to largely non-polar side-chains, could be important determinants for protein oligomerization. Based on these observations, we produced a sHIP variant in which these residues were mutated to alanines. Biophysical experiments clearly indicated that the sHIP mutant appear only as dimers in solution confirming the importance of the interfacial residues for protein oligomerisation. Furthermore, we could show that the sHIP mutant interacts with intact histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) and the histidine-rich repeats in HRG, and inhibits their antibacterial activity to the same or even higher extent as compared to the wild type protein sHIP. We determined the crystal structure of the sHIP mutant, which, as a result of the high quality of the data, allowed us to improve the existing structural model of the protein. Finally, by employing NMR spectroscopy in solution, we generated a model for the complex between the sHIP mutant and an HRG-derived heparin-binding peptide, providing further molecular

  14. Food Web Architecture and Basal Resources Interact to Determine Biomass and Stoichiometric Cascades along a Benthic Food Web

    PubMed Central

    Guariento, Rafael D.; Carneiro, Luciana S.; Caliman, Adriano; Leal, João J. F.; Bozelli, Reinaldo L.; Esteves, Francisco A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the effects of predators and resources on primary producers has been a major focus of interest in ecology. Within this context, the trophic cascade concept especially concerning the pelagic zone of lakes has been the focus of the majority of these studies. However, littoral food webs could be especially interesting because base trophic levels may be strongly regulated by consumers and prone to be light limited. In this study, the availability of nutrients and light and the presence of an omnivorous fish (Hyphessobrycon bifasciatus) were manipulated in enclosures placed in a humic coastal lagoon (Cabiúnas Lagoon, Macaé – RJ) to evaluate the individual and interactive effects of resource availability (nutrients and light) and food web configuration on the biomass and stoichiometry of periphyton and benthic grazers. Our findings suggest that light and nutrients interact to determine periphyton biomass and stoichiometry, which propagates to the consumer level. We observed a positive effect of the availability of nutrients on periphytic biomass and grazers' biomass, as well as a reduction of periphytic C∶N∶P ratios and an increase of grazers' N and P content. Low light availability constrained the propagation of nutrient effects on periphyton biomass and induced higher periphytic C∶N∶P ratios. The effects of fish presence strongly interacted with resource availability. In general, a positive effect of fish presence was observed for the total biomass of periphyton and grazer's biomass, especially with high resource availability, but the opposite was found for periphytic autotrophic biomass. Fish also had a significant effect on periphyton stoichiometry, but no effect was observed on grazers' stoichiometric ratios. In summary, we observed that the indirect effect of fish predation on periphyton biomass might be dependent on multiple resources and periphyton nutrient stoichiometric variation can affect consumers' stoichiometry. PMID:21789234

  15. Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Determined by Both in Situ and Satellite Data Over a Northern High-Latitude Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Remer, L. A.

    2009-01-01

    The first aerosol indirect effect over a clean, northern high-latitude site was investigated by determining the aerosol cloud interaction (ACI) using three different approaches; ground-based in situ measurements, combined ground-based in situ measurements 5 and satellite retrievals and using only satellite retrievals. The obtained values of ACI were highest for in situ ground-based data, clearly lower for combined ground-based and satellite data, and lowest for data relying solely on satellite retrievals. One of the key findings of this study was the high sensitivity of ACI to the definition of the aerosol burden. We showed that at least a part of the variability in ACI can be explained by 10 how different investigators have related dierent cloud properties to "aerosol burden".

  16. Analysis of Performance of Jet Engine from Characteristics of Components II : Interaction of Components as Determined from Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Alpert, Sumner; Beede, William; Kovach, Karl

    1949-01-01

    In order to understand the operation and the interaction of jet-engine components during engine operation and to determine how component characteristics may be used to compute engine performance, a method to analyze and to estimate performance of such engines was devised and applied to the study of the characteristics of a research turbojet engine built for this investigation. An attempt was made to correlate turbine performance obtained from engine experiments with that obtained by the simpler procedure of separately calibrating the turbine with cold air as a driving fluid in order to investigate the applicability of component calibration. The system of analysis was also applied to prediction of the engine and component performance with assumed modifications of the burner and bearing characteristics, to prediction of component and engine operation during engine acceleration, and to estimates of the performance of the engine and the components when the exhaust gas was used to drive a power turbine.

  17. 3-Hydroxy-4-pyridinone derivatives designed for fluorescence studies to determine interaction with amyloid protein as well as cell permeability.

    PubMed

    Telpoukhovskaia, Maria A; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Cristina; Scott, Lauren E; Page, Brent D G; Patrick, Brian O; Orvig, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Finding a cure for Alzheimer's disease is an urgent goal. Multifunctional metal binders are used to elucidate its pathological features and investigated as potential therapeutics. The use of physicochemical and TD-DFT calculations constituted successful strategy in the design of 1-(4-(benzo[d]oxazol-2-yl)phenyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4(1H)-one (HL21) and 1-(4-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)phenyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4(1H)-one (HL22). We report the synthesis and full characterization of these compounds, including X-ray crystallography. Using fluorescent signal as the readout, it was determined that HL22 interacts with amyloid-beta protein fibrils, and permeates into bEnd.3 cells used as a mimic of the blood-brain barrier. This provides the first example of direct investigation of our hydroxypyridinone compounds within a biological setting. PMID:26141772

  18. Analytical determination of the reflection coefficient by the evanescent modes model during the wave-current-horizontal plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errifaiy, Meriem; Naasse, Smail; Chahine, Chakib

    2016-07-01

    Our work presents an analytical study of the determination of the reflection coefficient during the interaction between the regular wave current and a horizontal plate. This study was done using the linearized potential flow theory with the evanescent modes model, while searching for complex solutions to the dispersion equation that are neither real pure nor imaginary pure. To validate the established model, it has been confronted with the experimental results of V. Rey and J. Touboul, in a first phase, and then compared to those of the numerical study by H.-X. Lin et al. Then, this model was used to study the effect of current on the reflection coefficient. xml:lang="fr"

  19. Diagnostics of corotating interaction regions with the kinetic properties of iron ions as determined with STEREO/PLASTIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochsler, P.; Lee, M. A.; Karrer, R.; Jian, L. K.; Ellis, L.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Kucharek, H.; Möbius, E.; Popecki, M. A.; Simunac, K. D. C.; Blush, L. M.; Daoudi, H.; Wurz, P.; Klecker, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Thompson, B.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Opitz, A.

    2010-02-01

    STEREO/PLASTIC determines three-dimensional distributions of solar wind iron ions with unprecedented time resolution. Typically 300 to 1000 counts are registered within each 5 min time interval. For the present study we use the information contained in these distributions to characterize CIRs (Corotating Interaction Regions) in two test cases. We perform a consistency test for both the derived physical parameters and for the analytical model of CIRs of Lee (2000). At 1 AU we find that apart from compositional changes the most indicative parameter for marking the time when a CIR passes a spacecraft is the angular deflection of the flow vector of particles. Changes in particle densities and the changes in magnitudes of speeds are apparently less reliable indicators of stream interfaces.

  20. A model-based approach to determine the long-term effects of multiple interacting stressors on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Julie C; Hastings, Alan; Mumby, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    The interaction between multiple stressors on Caribbean coral reefs, namely, fishing effort and hurricane impacts, is a key element in the future sustainability of reefs. We develop an analytic model of coral-algal interactions and explicitly consider grazing by herbivorous reef fish. Further, we consider changes in structural complexity, or rugosity, in addition to the direct impacts of hurricanes, which are implemented as stochastic jump processes. The model simulations consider various levels of fishing effort corresponding to' several hurricane frequencies and impact levels dependent on geographic location. We focus on relatively short time scales so we do not explicitly include changes in ocean temperature, chemistry, or sea level rise. The general features of our approach would, however, apply to these other stressors and to the management of other systems in the face of multiple stressors. It is determined that the appropriate management policy, either local reef restoration or fisheries management, greatly depends on hurricane frequency and impact level. For sufficiently low hurricane impact and macroalgal growth rate, our results indicate that regions with lower-frequency hurricanes require stricter fishing regulations, whereas management in regions with higher-frequency hurricanes might be less concerned with enhancing grazing and instead consider whether local-scale restorative activities to increase vertical structure are cost-effective. PMID:22073655

  1. Interaction of Formulation and Device Factors Determine the In Vitro Performance of Salbutamol Sulphate Dry Powders for Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Muddle, Joanna; Murnane, Darragh; Parisini, Irene; Brown, Marc; Page, Clive; Forbes, Ben

    2015-11-01

    A variety of capsule-based dry powder inhalers were used to evaluate formulation-device interaction. The in vitro deposition of salbutamol sulphate (SS) was compared directly to published data for salmeterol xinafoate (SX). A 3(2) factorial design was used to assess the effect of SS formulations with three blends of different grade coarse lactose supplemented with different levels of fine lactose. These formulations were tested for homogeneity and evaluated for their in vitro deposition using Aeroliser, Handihaler and Rotahaler devices. The performance of the SS-lactose formulations differed across the grade of lactose and amount of fine lactose used compared to the same powder compositions blended with SX. SX had a greater fine particle fraction than SS for most of the comparable formulations, probably because of the different cohesiveness of the drugs. A head-to-head comparison of 'matched' SX and SS formulations when aerosolised from the same three devices demonstrated that formulation-device interactions are as critical in determining the in vitro deposition of drug-lactose blends as the identity of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. This work has revealed the limitations of the interpretative value of published in vitro performance data generated with a single device (even at equivalent aerosolisation force), when designing formulations for a different device. PMID:26220184

  2. A turn-on fluorescence-sensing technique for glucose determination based on graphene oxide-DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hui; Lin, Zihan; Su, Xingguang

    2014-11-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional carbon nanomaterial one atom thick. Interactions between graphene oxide (GO) and ssDNA containing different numbers of bases have been proved to be remarkably different. In this paper we propose a novel approach for turn-on fluorescence sensing determination of glucose. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced by glucose oxidase-catalysed oxidation of glucose. In the presence of ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) the hydroxyl radical (•OH) is generated from H2O2 by the Fenton reaction. This attacks FAM-labelled long ssDNA causing irreversible cleavage, as a result of the oxidative effect of •OH, producing an FAM-linked DNA fragment. Because of the weak interaction between GO and short FAM-linked DNA fragments, restoration of DNA fluorescence can be achieved by addition of glucose. Due to the excellent fluorescence quenching efficiency of GO and the specific catalysis of glucose oxidase, the sensitivity and selectivity of this method for GO-DNA sensing are extremely high. The linear range is from 0.5 to 10 μmol L(-1) and the detection limit for glucose is 0.1 μmol L(-1). The method has been successfully used for analysis of glucose in human serum. PMID:24830395

  3. Delay-specific stimuli and genotype interact to determine temporal discounting in a rapid-acquisition procedure.

    PubMed

    Pope, Derek A; Newland, M Christopher; Hutsell, Blake A

    2015-05-01

    The importance of delay discounting to many socially important behavior problems has stimulated investigations of biological and environmental mechanisms responsible for variations in the form of the discount function. The extant experimental research, however, has yielded disparate results, raising important questions regarding Gene X Environment interactions. The present study determined the influence of stimuli that uniquely signal delays to reinforcement on delay discounting in two inbred mouse strains using a rapid-acquisition procedure. BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice responded under a six-component, concurrent-chained schedule in which the terminal-link delays preceding the larger-reinforcer were presented randomly across components of an individual session. Across conditions, components were presented either with or without delay-specific auditory stimuli, i.e., as multiple or mixed schedules. A generalized matching-based model was used to incorporate the impact of current and previous component reinforcer-delay ratios on current component response allocation. Sensitivity to reinforcer magnitude and delay were higher for BALB/c mice, but within-component preference reached final levels faster for C57Bl/6 mice. For BALB/c mice, acquisition of preference across blocks of a component was faster under the multiple than the mixed schedule, but final levels of sensitivity to reinforcement were unaffected by schedule. The speed of acquisition of preference was not different across schedules for C57Bl/6 mice, but sensitivity to reinforcement was higher under the multiple than the mixed schedule. Overall, differences in the acquisition and final form of the discount function were determined by a Gene X Environment interaction, but the presence of delay-specific stimuli attenuated genotype-dependent differences in magnitude and delay sensitivity. PMID:25869302

  4. Contingent interactions among biofilm-forming bacteria determine preservation or decay in the first steps toward fossilization of marine embryos.

    PubMed

    Raff, Elizabeth C; Andrews, Mary E; Turner, F Rudolf; Toh, Evelyn; Nelson, David E; Raff, Rudolf A

    2013-01-01

    Fossils of soft tissues provide important records of early animals and embryos, and there is substantial evidence for a role for microbes in soft tissue fossilization. We are investigating the initial events in interactions of bacteria with freshly dead tissue, using marine embryos as a model system. We previously found that microbial invasion can stabilize embryo tissue that would otherwise disintegrate in hours or days by generating a bacterial pseudomorph, a three dimensional biofilm that both replaces the tissue and replicates its morphology. In this study, we sampled seawater at different times and places near Sydney, Australia, and determined the range and frequency of different taphonomic outcomes. Although destruction was most common, bacteria in 35% of seawater samples yielded morphology‐preserving biofilms. We could replicate the taphonomic pathways seen with seawater bacterial communities using single cultured strains of marine gammaproteobacteria. Each given species reproducibly generated a consistent taphonomic outcome and we identified species that yielded each of the distinct pathways produced by seawater bacterial communities. Once formed,bacterial pseudomorphs are stable for over a year and resist attack by other bacteria and destruction by proteases and other lytic enzymes. Competition studies showed that the initial action of a pseudomorphing strain can be blocked by a strain that destroys tissues. Thus embryo preservation in nature may depend on contingent interactions among bacterial species that determine if pseudomorphing occurs.We used Artemia nauplius larvae to show that bacterial biofilm replacement of tissue is not restricted to embryos, but is relevant for preservation of small multicellular organisms. We present a model for bacterial self‐assembly of large‐scale three‐dimensional tissue pseudomorphs, based on smallscaleinteractions among individual bacterial cells to form local biofilms at structural boundaries within the tissue

  5. Simultaneous determination of residues of dipyrone metabolites in goat tissues by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Lifang; Cao, Suqing; Jiang, Zhaoling; Wu, Hao; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Jiang, Shanxiang; Xue, Feiqun

    2016-04-01

    A reliable LC-MS/MS method with high sensitivity was developed and validated for the determination of dipyrone (DIP) metabolites in goat muscle, fat, liver, and kidney samples. Analytes were extracted using acetonitrile mixed with ammonia solution. After dehydration and evaporation to dryness, extracts were purified using an Oasis MAX cartridge. Chromatographic separation was performed on a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column. The analytes were then detected using triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry in positive electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mode. Calibration plots were constructed using matrix-matched standards and showed good linearity. Limits of quantification for 4-methylaminoantipyrine (MAA), 4-formylaminoantipyrine (FAA), and 4-acetylaminoantipyrone (AAA) ranged from 0.4 μg kg(-1) to 6 μg kg(-1), while those for 4-aminoantipyrone (AA) ranged from 10 μg kg(-1) to 125 μg kg(-1) in all tissues. The developed method was successfully applied in the determination of DIP metabolite residues in actual goat tissues. PMID:26593468

  6. Determination of nicotine and its metabolites accumulated in fish tissue using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yun-Wei; Nguyen, Hien P; Chang, Mike; Burket, S Rebekah; Brooks, Bryan W; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-07-01

    The determination of nicotine and its major metabolites (cotinine and anabasine) in fish tissue was performed using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Marine and freshwater fish were purchased from local grocery stores and were prepared based on a quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe sample preparation protocol. To determine the highly polar compounds, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography was also used. There were modest suppressions on measured nicotine signals (10%) due to the matrix effects from marine fish but no obvious effects on freshwater fish signals. Method validation was incorporated with internal standards and carried out with matrix-matched calibration. The detection limits for nicotine, cotinine, and anabasine were 9.4, 3.0, and 1.5 ng/g in fish, respectively. Precision was quite acceptable returning less than 8% RSD at low, medium, and high concentrations. Acceptable and reproducible extraction recoveries (70-120%) of all three compounds were achieved, except for anabasine at low concentration (61%). The method was then applied to define nicotine bioaccumulation in a fathead minnow model, which resulted in rapid uptake with steady state internal tissue levels, reached within 12 h. This developed method offers a fast, easy, and sensitive way to evaluate nicotine and its metabolite residues in fish tissues. PMID:25953492

  7. Botulinum neurotoxin type A: structure and interaction with the micellar concentration of SDS determined by FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R; Fuller, M P; DasGupta, B R

    1991-12-01

    Secondary structures of botulinum neurotoxin type A have been determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the amide I and amide III frequency regions. Using Fourier self-deconvolution, second derivatization, and curve-fit analysis, the amide I frequency contour was resolved into Gaussian bands at 1678, 1654, 1644, and 1634 cm-1. In the amide III frequency region, several small bands were resolved between 1320 and 1225 cm-1. Assignments of the bands in both amide I and amide III frequency regions to various types of secondary structures and the estimation of spectral band strengths by integrating areas under each band suggested that the neurotoxin contains 29% alpha-helix, 45-49% beta-sheets and 22-26% random coils. These values agreed very well with those determined earlier from CD spectra. The neurotoxin was treated with a micellar concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate to simulate interaction between the protein and the amphipathic molecules. Sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles induced significant alterations both in the spectral band positions, and their strengths suggest refolding of the neurotoxin polypeptides. However, these changes were not entirely reversible, which could implicate the role of the altered structures in the function of the neurotoxin. PMID:1815589

  8. Solution Structure of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) nsp3a and Determinants of the Interaction with MHV Nucleocapsid (N) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-sense, single-stranded, enveloped RNA viruses that infect a variety of vertebrate hosts. The CoV nucleocapsid (N) protein contains two structurally independent RNA binding domains, designated the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the dimeric C-terminal domain (CTD), joined by a charged linker region rich in serine and arginine residues (SR-rich linker). An important goal in unraveling N function is to molecularly characterize N-protein interactions. Recent genetic evidence suggests that N interacts with nsp3a, a component of the viral replicase. Here we present the solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nsp3a and show, using isothermal titration calorimetry, that MHV N219, an N construct that extends into the SR-rich linker (residues 60 to 219), binds cognate nsp3a with high affinity (equilibrium association constant [Ka], [1.4 ± 0.3] × 106 M−1). In contrast, neither N197, an N construct containing only the folded NTD (residues 60 to 197), nor the CTD dimer (residues 260 to 380) binds nsp3a with detectable affinity. This indicates that the key nsp3a binding determinants localize to the SR-rich linker, a finding consistent with those of reverse genetics studies. NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis reveals that the N-terminal region of an MHV N SR-rich linker peptide (residues 198 to 230) binds to the acidic face of MHV nsp3a containing the acidic α2 helix with an affinity (expressed as Ka) of 8.1 × 103 M−1. These studies reveal that the SR-rich linker of MHV N is necessary but not sufficient to maintain this high-affinity binding to N. PMID:23302895

  9. The Defective Prophage Pool of Escherichia coli O157: Prophage–Prophage Interactions Potentiate Horizontal Transfer of Virulence Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Asadulghani, Md; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Ooka, Tadasuke; Itoh, Takehiko; Sawaguchi, Akira; Iguchi, Atsushi; Nakayama, Keisuke; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophages are major genetic factors promoting horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between bacteria. Their roles in dynamic bacterial genome evolution have been increasingly highlighted by the fact that many sequenced bacterial genomes contain multiple prophages carrying a wide range of genes. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 is the most striking case. A sequenced strain (O157 Sakai) possesses 18 prophages (Sp1–Sp18) that encode numerous genes related to O157 virulence, including those for two potent cytotoxins, Shiga toxins (Stx) 1 and 2. However, most of these prophages appeared to contain multiple genetic defects. To understand whether these defective prophages have the potential to act as mobile genetic elements to spread virulence determinants, we looked closely at the Sp1–Sp18 sequences, defined the genetic defects of each Sp, and then systematically analyzed all Sps for their biological activities. We show that many of the defective prophages, including the Stx1 phage, are inducible and released from O157 cells as particulate DNA. In fact, some prophages can even be transferred to other E. coli strains. We also show that new Stx1 phages are generated by recombination between the Stx1 and Stx2 phage genomes. The results indicate that these defective prophages are not simply genetic remnants generated in the course of O157 evolution, but rather genetic elements with a high potential for disseminating virulence-related genes and other genetic traits to other bacteria. We speculate that recombination and various other types of inter-prophage interactions in the O157 prophage pool potentiate such activities. Our data provide new insights into the potential activities of the defective prophages embedded in bacterial genomes and lead to the formulation of a novel concept of inter-prophage interactions in defective prophage communities. PMID:19412337

  10. Determinants and Outcomes of Decision-Making, Group Coordination and Social Interactions during a Foraging Experiment in a Wild Primate

    PubMed Central

    Pyritz, Lennart W.; Fichtel, Claudia; Huchard, Elise; Kappeler, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Social animals have to coordinate joint movements to maintain group cohesion, but the latter is often compromised by diverging individual interests. A widespread behavioral mechanism to achieve coordination relies on shared or unshared consensus decision-making. If consensus costs are high, group fission represents an alternative tactic. Exploring determinants and outcomes of spontaneous group decisions and coordination of free-ranging animals is methodologically challenging. We therefore conducted a foraging experiment with a group of wild redfronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons) to study decision outcomes, coordination of movements, individual foraging benefits and social interactions in response to the presentation of drinking platforms with varying baiting patterns. Behavioral observations were complemented with data from recordings of motion detector cameras installed at the platforms. The animal's behavior in the experimental conditions was compared to natural group movements. We could not determine the type of consensus decision-making because the group visited platforms randomly. The group fissioned during 23.3% of platform visits, and fissioning resulted in more individuals drinking simultaneously. As under natural conditions, adult females initiated most group movements, but overtaking by individuals of different age and sex classes occurred in 67% of movements to platforms, compared to only 18% during other movements. As a result, individual resource intake at the platforms did not depend on departure position, age or sex, but on arrival order. Aggression at the platforms did not affect resource intake, presumably due to low supplanting rates. Our findings highlight the diversity of coordination processes and related consequences for individual foraging benefits in a primate group living under natural conditions. PMID:23326392

  11. Determinants and outcomes of decision-making, group coordination and social interactions during a foraging experiment in a wild primate.

    PubMed

    Pyritz, Lennart W; Fichtel, Claudia; Huchard, Elise; Kappeler, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Social animals have to coordinate joint movements to maintain group cohesion, but the latter is often compromised by diverging individual interests. A widespread behavioral mechanism to achieve coordination relies on shared or unshared consensus decision-making. If consensus costs are high, group fission represents an alternative tactic. Exploring determinants and outcomes of spontaneous group decisions and coordination of free-ranging animals is methodologically challenging. We therefore conducted a foraging experiment with a group of wild redfronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons) to study decision outcomes, coordination of movements, individual foraging benefits and social interactions in response to the presentation of drinking platforms with varying baiting patterns. Behavioral observations were complemented with data from recordings of motion detector cameras installed at the platforms. The animal's behavior in the experimental conditions was compared to natural group movements. We could not determine the type of consensus decision-making because the group visited platforms randomly. The group fissioned during 23.3% of platform visits, and fissioning resulted in more individuals drinking simultaneously. As under natural conditions, adult females initiated most group movements, but overtaking by individuals of different age and sex classes occurred in 67% of movements to platforms, compared to only 18% during other movements. As a result, individual resource intake at the platforms did not depend on departure position, age or sex, but on arrival order. Aggression at the platforms did not affect resource intake, presumably due to low supplanting rates. Our findings highlight the diversity of coordination processes and related consequences for individual foraging benefits in a primate group living under natural conditions. PMID:23326392

  12. Analysis of Usp DNA binding domain targeting reveals critical determinants of the ecdysone receptor complex interaction with the response element.

    PubMed

    Grad, I; Niedziela-Majka, A; Kochman, M; Ozyhar, A

    2001-07-01

    The steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), directs Drosophila metamorphosis via a heterodimeric receptor formed by two members of the nuclear hormone receptors superfamily, the product of the EcR (EcR) and of the ultraspiracle (Usp) genes. Our previous study [Niedziela-Majka, A., Kochman, M., Ozyhar, A. (2000) Eur. J. Biochem. 267, 507-519] on EcR and Usp DNA-binding domains (EcRDBD and UspDBD, respectively) suggested that UspDBD may act as a specific anchor that preferentially binds the 5' half-site of the pseudo-palindromic response element from the hsp27 gene promoter and thus locates the heterocomplex in the defined orientation. Here, we analyzed in detail the determinants of the UspDBD interaction with the hsp27 element. The roles of individual amino acids in the putative DNA recognition alpha helix and the roles of the base pairs of the UspDBD target sequence have been probed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show how the hsp27 element specifies UspDBD binding and thus the polar assembly of the UspDBD/EcRDBD heterocomplex. It is suggested how possible nucleotide deviations within the 5' half-site of the element may be used for the fine-tuning of the 20E-response element specificity and consequently the physiological response. PMID:11432742

  13. Interaction between c-jun and Androgen Receptor Determines the Outcome of Taxane Therapy in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tinzl, Martina; Chen, Binshen; Chen, Shao-Yong; Semenas, Julius; Abrahamsson, Per-Anders; Dizeyi, Nishtman

    2013-01-01

    Taxane based chemotherapy is the standard of care treatment in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is convincing evidence that taxane therapy affects androgen receptor (AR) but the exact mechanisms have to be further elucidated. Our studies identified c-jun as a crucial key player which interacts with AR and thus determines the outcome of the taxane therapy given. Docetaxel (Doc) and paclitaxel (Pac) agents showed different effects on LNCaP and LNb4 evidenced by alteration in the protein and mRNA levels of c-jun, AR and PSA. Docetaxel-induced phophorylation of c-jun occurred before JNK phosphorylation which suggests that c-jun phosphorylation is independent of JNK pathways in prostate cancer cells. A xenograft study showed that mice treated with Pac and bicalutamide showed worse outcome supporting our hypothesis that upregulation of c-jun might act as a potent antiapoptotic factor. We observed in our in vitro studies an inverse regulation of PSA- and AR-mRNA levels in Doc treated LNb4 cells. This was also seen for kallikrein 2 (KLK 2) which followed the same pattern. Given the fact that response to taxane therapy is measured by PSA decrease we have to consider that this might not reflect the true activity of AR in CRPC patients. PMID:24260253

  14. Determination of aminoglycoside residues in kidney and honey samples by hydrophilic interaction chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Rúbies, Antoni; Companyó, Ramon; Centrich, Francesc

    2012-10-01

    Two methods based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were developed for the determination of ten aminoglycosides (streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, spectinomycin, apramycin, paromomycin, kanamycin A, gentamycin C1, gentamycin C2/C2a, gentamycin C1a, and neomycin B) in kidney samples from food-producing animals and in honey samples. The methods involved extraction with an aqueous solution (for the kidney samples) or sample dissolution in water (for the honey samples), solid-phase extraction with a weak cation exchange cartridge and injection of the eluate into a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system. A zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography column was used for separation of aminoglycosides and a triple quadrupole mass analyzer was used for detection. The methods were validated according to Decision 2002/657/EC. The limits of quantitation ranged from 2 to 125 μg/kg in honey and 25 to 264 μg/kg in the kidney samples. Interday precision (RSD%) ranged from 6 to 26% in honey and 2 to 21% in kidney. Trueness, expressed as the percentage of error, ranged from 7 to 20% in honey and 1 to 11% in kidney. PMID:23065931

  15. Determination of the Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction in a (110)-oriented GaAs quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuansen; Faelt, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Salis, Gian

    2014-03-01

    The Dresselhaus spin-orbit (SO) interaction is studied in a (110) -oriented and symmetrically doped GaAs quantum well (QW) by means of time-resolved Kerr rotation with a magnetic field applied along an oblique angle. The nonzero averaged SO field is obtained by introducing a DC current through the QW to shift the Fermi circle of the electron gas. By monitoring the change of the electron Larmor precession frequency induced by the current, we can determine both the magnitude and the direction of the Dresselhaus SO field. In agreement with the theoretical expectation, we find the SO field to be out-of-plane and to linearly increase with a current applied along the [ 1 1 0 ] direction. A negligible SO field is observed for a current along the [ 001 ] direction. The vector sum of the SO field and the in-plane component of an external magnetic field leads to an observable tilting of the spin precession axis. The unidirectional SO field is expected to support a persistent spin helix state in the QW. This work is financially supported by the NCCR QSIT.

  16. Non-Linear Interactions Determine the Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Estuarine Benthic Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Tsuyuko; Raffaelli, David; White, Piran C. L.

    2013-01-01

    Sea-level rise induced by climate change may have significant impacts on the ecosystem functions and ecosystem services provided by intertidal sediment ecosystems. Accelerated sea-level rise is expected to lead to steeper beach slopes, coarser particle sizes and increased wave exposure, with consequent impacts on intertidal ecosystems. We examined the relationships between abundance, biomass, and community metabolism of benthic fauna with beach slope, particle size and exposure, using samples across a range of conditions from three different locations in the UK, to determine the significance of sediment particle size beach slope and wave exposure in affecting benthic fauna and ecosystem function in different ecological contexts. Our results show that abundance, biomass and oxygen consumption of intertidal macrofauna and meiofauna are affected significantly by interactions among sediment particle size, beach slope and wave exposure. For macrofauna on less sloping beaches, the effect of these physical constraints is mediated by the local context, although for meiofauna and for macrofauna on intermediate and steeper beaches, the effects of physical constraints dominate. Steeper beach slopes, coarser particle sizes and increased wave exposure generally result in decreases in abundance, biomass and oxygen consumption, but these relationships are complex and non-linear. Sea-level rise is likely to lead to changes in ecosystem structure with generally negative impacts on ecosystem functions and ecosystem services. However, the impacts of sea-level rise will also be affected by local ecological context, especially for less sloping beaches. PMID:23861863

  17. Interaction of exposure concentration and duration in determining the apoptosis of testis in rats after cigarette smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    He, Lijuan; Gong, Haiyan; Zhang, Jing; Zhong, Chunxue; Huang, Yunfei; Zhang, Chen; Aqeel Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    The effects of differences in smoke concentration and exposure duration in Sprague Dawley rats to determine variation in type and severity of the testis apoptosis were evaluated. The daily dosages were 10, 20 and 30 non-filter cigarettes for a period of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks. Mainstream smoke exposure suppressed body weight gain in all regimens. A dose-related increase in plasma nicotine concentration was observed in smoke-exposed groups for 4, 6, 8 and 12 week regimens. Histopathological examination of the exposed groups showed disturbances in the stages of spermatogenesis, tubules atrophying and these appeared to be dose-related. Cytoplasmic caspase-3 immunostaining was detected both in Sertoli cells and germ cells in smoke-exposure groups. An increase in TUNEL-positive cells of testicular cells was observed after 6 weeks of cigarette exposure. The results indicate that cigarette exposure concentration and duration have interaction effect to induce apoptosis in the rat testes. PMID:27298588

  18. Path-Integral Monte Carlo Determination of the Fourth-Order Virial Coefficient for a Unitary Two-Component Fermi Gas with Zero-Range Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yangqian; Blume, D.

    2016-06-01

    The unitary equal-mass Fermi gas with zero-range interactions constitutes a paradigmatic model system that is relevant to atomic, condensed matter, nuclear, particle, and astrophysics. This work determines the fourth-order virial coefficient b4 of such a strongly interacting Fermi gas using a customized ab initio path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) algorithm. In contrast to earlier theoretical results, which disagreed on the sign and magnitude of b4 , our b4 agrees within error bars with the experimentally determined value, thereby resolving an ongoing literature debate. Utilizing a trap regulator, our PIMC approach determines the fourth-order virial coefficient by directly sampling the partition function. An on-the-fly antisymmetrization avoids the Thomas collapse and, combined with the use of the exact two-body zero-range propagator, establishes an efficient general means to treat small Fermi systems with zero-range interactions.

  19. Path-Integral Monte Carlo Determination of the Fourth-Order Virial Coefficient for a Unitary Two-Component Fermi Gas with Zero-Range Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yangqian; Blume, D

    2016-06-10

    The unitary equal-mass Fermi gas with zero-range interactions constitutes a paradigmatic model system that is relevant to atomic, condensed matter, nuclear, particle, and astrophysics. This work determines the fourth-order virial coefficient b_{4} of such a strongly interacting Fermi gas using a customized ab initio path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) algorithm. In contrast to earlier theoretical results, which disagreed on the sign and magnitude of b_{4}, our b_{4} agrees within error bars with the experimentally determined value, thereby resolving an ongoing literature debate. Utilizing a trap regulator, our PIMC approach determines the fourth-order virial coefficient by directly sampling the partition function. An on-the-fly antisymmetrization avoids the Thomas collapse and, combined with the use of the exact two-body zero-range propagator, establishes an efficient general means to treat small Fermi systems with zero-range interactions. PMID:27341213

  20. Path integral Monte Carlo determination of the fourth-order virial coefficient for unitary two-component Fermi gas with zero-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yangqian; Blume, D.

    2016-05-01

    The unitary equal-mass Fermi gas with zero-range interactions constitutes a paradigmatic model system that is relevant to atomic, condensed matter, nuclear, particle, and astro physics. This work determines the fourth-order virial coefficient b4 of such a strongly-interacting Fermi gas using a customized ab inito path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) algorithm. In contrast to earlier theoretical results, which disagreed on the sign and magnitude of b4, our b4 agrees with the experimentally determined value, thereby resolving an ongoing literature debate. Utilizing a trap regulator, our PIMC approach determines the fourth-order virial coefficient by directly sampling the partition function. An on-the-fly anti-symmetrization avoids the Thomas collapse and, combined with the use of the exact two-body zero-range propagator, establishes an efficient general means to treat small Fermi systems with zero-range interactions. We gratefully acknowledge support by the NSF.

  1. Identification of Three Interactions to Determine the Conformation Change and to Maintain the Function of Kir2.1 Channel Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Wei; Xiao, Shao-Ying; Xie, Xiao-Xiao; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Zhan, Yong; An, Hai-Long

    2015-02-01

    We find that a conserved mutation residue Glu to residue Asp (E303D), which both have the same polar and charged properties, makes Kir2.1 protein lose its function. To understand the mechanism, we identify three interactions which control the conformation change and maintain the function of the Kir2.1 protein by combining homology modeling and molecular dynamics with targeted molecular dynamics. We find that the E303D mutation weakens these interactions and results in the loss of the related function. Our data indicate that not only the amino residues but also the interactions determine the function of proteins.

  2. Next-generation analysis of cataracts: determining knowledge driven gene-gene interactions using biofilter, and gene-environment interactions using the Phenx Toolkit*.

    PubMed

    Pendergrass, Sarah A; Verma, Shefali S; Hall, Molly A; Holzinger, Emily R; Moore, Carrie B; Wallace, John R; Dudek, Scott M; Huggins, Wayne; Kitchner, Terrie; Waudby, Carol; Berg, Richard; Mccarty, Catherine A; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the association between biobank derived genomic data and the information of linked electronic health records (EHRs) is an emerging area of research for dissecting the architecture of complex human traits, where cases and controls for study are defined through the use of electronic phenotyping algorithms deployed in large EHR systems. For our study, cataract cases and controls were identified within the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP) biobank and linked EHR, which is a member of the NHGRI-funded electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network. Our goal was to explore potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions within these data for 527,953 and 527,936 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for gene-gene and gene-environment analyses, respectively, with minor allele frequency > 1%, in order to explore higher level associations with cataract risk beyond investigations of single SNP-phenotype associations. To build our SNP-SNP interaction models we utilized a prior-knowledge driven filtering method called Biofilter to minimize the multiple testing burden of exploring the vast array of interaction models possible from our extensive number of SNPs. Using Biofilter, we developed 57,376 prior-knowledge directed SNP-SNP models to test for association with cataract status. We selected models that required 6 sources of external domain knowledge. We identified 13 statistically significant SNP-SNP models with an interaction with p-value < 1 × 10(-4), as well as an overall model with p-value < 0.01 associated with cataract status. We also conducted gene-environment interaction analyses for all GWAS SNPs and a set of environmental factors from the PhenX Toolkit: smoking, UV exposure, and alcohol use;these environmental factors have been previously associated with the formation of cataracts. We found a total of 782 gene-environment models that exhibit an interaction with a p-value < 1 × 10(-4) associatedwith cataract

  3. Next-generation analysis of cataracts: determining knowledge driven gene-gene interactions using Biofilter, and gene-environment interactions using the PhenX Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Pendergrass, Sarah A; Verma, Shefali S; Holzinger, Emily R; Moore, Carrie B; Wallace, John; Dudek, Scott M; Huggins, Wayne; Kitchner, Terrie; Waudby, Carol; Berg, Richard; McCarty, Catherine A; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2013-01-01

    Investigating the association between biobank derived genomic data and the information of linked electronic health records (EHRs) is an emerging area of research for dissecting the architecture of complex human traits, where cases and controls for study are defined through the use of electronic phenotyping algorithms deployed in large EHR systems. For our study, 2580 cataract cases and 1367 controls were identified within the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP) Biobank and linked EHR, which is a member of the NHGRI-funded electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network. Our goal was to explore potential gene-gene and gene-environment interactions within these data for 529,431 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency > 1%, in order to explore higher level associations with cataract risk beyond investigations of single SNP-phenotype associations. To build our SNP-SNP interaction models we utilized a prior-knowledge driven filtering method called Biofilter to minimize the multiple testing burden of exploring the vast array of interaction models possible from our extensive number of SNPs. Using the Biofilter, we developed 57,376 prior-knowledge directed SNP-SNP models to test for association with cataract status. We selected models that required 6 sources of external domain knowledge. We identified 5 statistically significant models with an interaction term with p-value < 0.05, as well as an overall model with p-value < 0.05 associated with cataract status. We also conducted gene-environment interaction analyses for all GWAS SNPs and a set of environmental factors from the PhenX Toolkit: smoking, UV exposure, and alcohol use; these environmental factors have been previously associated with the formation of cataracts. We found a total of 288 models that exhibit an interaction term with a p-value ≤ 1×10(-4) associated with cataract status. Our results show these approaches enable advanced searches for epistasis

  4. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry to determine artificial sweeteners in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Salas, Daniela; Borrull, Francesc; Fontanals, Núria; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2015-06-01

    Artificial sweeteners are food additives employed as sugar substitutes which are now considered to be emerging organic contaminants. In the present study, a method is developed for the determination of a group of artificial sweeteners in environmental waters. Considering the polar and hydrophilic character of these compounds, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography is proposed for their separation as an alternative to traditional reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Two stationary phases with different chemistry were compared for this purpose. For the detection of the analytes, high-resolution mass spectrometry (Orbitrap) was employed to take advantage of its benefits in terms of reliable quantification and confirmation for the measurement of accurate masses. Solid-phase extraction was chosen as the sample treatment, in which the extract in a mixture of NH4OH:MeOH:ACN (1:4:15) was directly injected into the chromatographic system, simplifying the analytical procedure. The optimized method was validated on river and waste water samples. For example, in the case of effluent water samples, limits of detection ranged from 0.002 to 0.7 μg/L and limits of quantification ranged from 0.004 to 1.5 μg/L. Apparent (whole method) recoveries ranged from 57 to 74% with intra-day precision (%RSD, n = 5) ranging from 6 to 25%. The method was successfully applied to water samples from different rivers in Catalonia and different waste water treatment plants in Tarragona. Acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharine and sucralose were found in several samples. PMID:25428455

  5. Foraging modality and plasticity in foraging traits determine the strength of competitive interactions among carnivorous plants, spiders and toads.

    PubMed

    Jennings, David E; Krupa, James J; Rohr, Jason R

    2016-07-01

    Foraging modalities (e.g. passive, sit-and-wait, active) and traits are plastic in some species, but the extent to which this plasticity affects interspecific competition remains unclear. Using a long-term laboratory mesocosm experiment, we quantified competition strength and the plasticity of foraging traits in a guild of generalist predators of arthropods with a range of foraging modalities. Each mesocosm contained eight passively foraging pink sundews, and we employed an experimental design where treatments were the presence or absence of a sit-and-wait foraging spider and actively foraging toad crossed with five levels of prey abundance. We hypothesized that actively foraging toads would outcompete the other species at low prey abundance, but that spiders and sundews would exhibit plasticity in foraging traits to compensate for strong competition when prey were limited. Results generally supported our hypotheses. Toads had a greater effect on sundews at low prey abundances, and toad presence caused spiders to locate webs higher above the ground. Additionally, the closer large spider webs were to the ground, the greater the trichome densities produced by sundews. Also, spider webs were larger with than without toads and as sundew numbers increased, and these effects were more prominent as resources became limited. Finally, spiders negatively affected toad growth only at low prey abundance. These findings highlight the long-term importance of foraging modality and plasticity of foraging traits in determining the strength of competition within and across taxonomic kingdoms. Future research should assess whether plasticity in foraging traits helps to maintain coexistence within this guild and whether foraging modality can be used as a trait to reliably predict the strength of competitive interactions. PMID:27061175

  6. Interactions between amiodarone and the hERG potassium channel pore determined with mutagenesis and in silico docking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihong; Colenso, Charlotte K; El Harchi, Aziza; Cheng, Hongwei; Witchel, Harry J; Dempsey, Chris E; Hancox, Jules C

    2016-08-01

    The antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone delays cardiac repolarisation through inhibition of hERG-encoded potassium channels responsible for the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr). This study aimed to elucidate molecular determinants of amiodarone binding to the hERG channel. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made at 37°C of ionic current (IhERG) carried by wild-type (WT) or mutant hERG channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Alanine mutagenesis and ligand docking were used to investigate the roles of pore cavity amino-acid residues in amiodarone binding. Amiodarone inhibited WT outward IhERG tails with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of ∼45nM, whilst inward IhERG tails in a high K(+) external solution ([K(+)]e) of 94mM were blocked with an IC50 of 117.8nM. Amiodarone's inhibitory action was contingent upon channel gating. Alanine-mutagenesis identified multiple residues directly or indirectly involved in amiodarone binding. The IC50 for the S6 aromatic Y652A mutation was increased to ∼20-fold that of WT IhERG, similar to the pore helical mutant S624A (∼22-fold WT control). The IC50 for F656A mutant IhERG was ∼17-fold its corresponding WT control. Computational docking using a MthK-based hERG model differentiated residues likely to interact directly with drug and those whose Ala mutation may affect drug block allosterically. The requirements for amiodarone block of aromatic residues F656 and Y652 within the hERG pore cavity are smaller than for other high affinity IhERG inhibitors, with relative importance to amiodarone binding of the residues investigated being S624A∼Y652A>F656A>V659A>G648A>T623A. PMID:27256139

  7. Interaction of cosmic ray muons with spent nuclear fuel dry casks and determination of lower detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidakis, S.; Choi, C. K.; Tsoukalas, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    The potential non-proliferation monitoring of spent nuclear fuel sealed in dry casks interacting continuously with the naturally generated cosmic ray muons is investigated. Treatments on the muon RMS scattering angle by Moliere, Rossi-Greisen, Highland and, Lynch-Dahl were analyzed and compared with simplified Monte Carlo simulations. The Lynch-Dahl expression has the lowest error and appears to be appropriate when performing conceptual calculations for high-Z, thick targets such as dry casks. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate dry casks with various fuel loadings and scattering variance estimates for each case were obtained. The scattering variance estimation was shown to be unbiased and using Chebyshev's inequality, it was found that 106 muons will provide estimates of the scattering variances that are within 1% of the true value at a 99% confidence level. These estimates were used as reference values to calculate scattering distributions and evaluate the asymptotic behavior for small variations on fuel loading. It is shown that the scattering distributions between a fully loaded dry cask and one with a fuel assembly missing initially overlap significantly but their distance eventually increases with increasing number of muons. One missing fuel assembly can be distinguished from a fully loaded cask with a small overlapping between the distributions which is the case of 100,000 muons. This indicates that the removal of a standard fuel assembly can be identified using muons providing that enough muons are collected. A Bayesian algorithm was developed to classify dry casks and provide a decision rule that minimizes the risk of making an incorrect decision. The algorithm performance was evaluated and the lower detection limit was determined.

  8. Land-use history, historical connectivity, and land management interact to determine longleaf pine woodland understory richness and composition.

    SciTech Connect

    Brudvig, Lars A.; Damschen, Ellen L.

    2010-08-13

    Restoration and management activities targeted at recovering biodiversity can lead to unexpected results. In part, this is due to a lack of understanding of how site-level characteristics, landscape factors, and land-use history interact with restoration and management practices to determine patterns of diversity. For plants, such factors may be particularly important since plant populations often exhibit lagged responses to habitat loss and degradation. Here, we assess the importance of site-level, landscape, and historical effects for understory plant species richness and composition across a set of 40 longleaf pine Pinus palustris woodlands undergoing restoration for the federally endangered red-cockaded woodpecker in the southeastern United States. Land-use history had an overarching effect on richness and composition. Relative to historically forested sites, sites with agricultural histories (i.e. former pastures or cultivated fields) supported lower species richness and an altered species composition due to fewer upland longleaf pine woodland community members. Landscape effects did not influence the total number of species in either historically forested or post-agricultural sites; however, understory species composition was affected by historical connectivity, but only for post-agricultural sites. The influences of management and restoration activities were only apparent once land-use history was accounted for. Prescribed burning and mechanical overstory thinning were key drivers of understory composition and promoted understory richness in post-agricultural sites. In historically forested sites these activities had no impact on richness and only prescribed fire influenced composition. Our findings reveal complex interplays between site-level, landscape, and historical effects, suggest fundamentally different controls over plant communities in longleaf pine woodlands with varying land-use history, and underscore the importance of considering land

  9. Fast HPLC method using ion-pair and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography for determination of phenylephrine in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Dousa, Michal; Gibala, Petr

    2010-01-01

    A rapid procedure based on a direct extraction and HPLC determination with fluorescence detection of phenylephrine in pharmaceutical sachets that include a large excess of paracetamol (65 + 1, w/w), ascorbic acid (5 + 1, w/w), and other excipients (aspartame and sucrose) was developed and validated. The final optimized chromatographic method for ion-pair chromatography used an XTerra RP18 column, 3 microm particle size, 50 x 3.0 mm id. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of acetonitrile and buffer (10 mM sodium octane-1-sulfonate, adjusted with H3PO4 to pH 2.2; 200 + 800, v/v), with a constant flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. The separation was carried out at 30 degrees C, and the injection volume was 3 microL. Fluorescence detection was performed at excitation and emission wavelengths of 275 and 310 nm, respectively. The mobile phase parameters, such as the organic solvent fraction (acetonitrile) in mobile phase as an organic modifier, the concentration of sodium octane-1-sulfonate as a counter-ion, temperature, and pH of mobile phase, were studied. As an alternative to ion-pair chromatography, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was investigated using a Luna HILIC column, 3 microm, 100 x 4.6 mm id. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and buffer (5 mM potassium dihydrogen phosphate, adjusted with H3PO4 to pH 2.5; 750 + 250, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The separation was carried out at 25 degrees C, and the injection volume was 5 microL. The proposed method has an advantage of a very simple sample pretreatment, and is much faster than the currently utilized HPLC methods using gradient elution and UV detection. Commercial samples of sachets were successfully analyzed by the proposed HPLC method. PMID:21140654

  10. Multivalent interactions of the SUMO-interaction motifs in RING finger protein 4 determine the specificity for chains of the SUMO

    PubMed Central

    Keusekotten, Kirstin; Bade, Veronika N.; Meyer-Teschendorf, Katrin; Sriramachandran, Annie Miriam; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin; Krause, Anke; Horst, Christiane; Schwarz, Günter; Hofmann, Kay; Dohmen, R. Jürgen; Praefcke, Gerrit J. K.

    2013-01-01

    RNF4 (RING finger protein 4) is a STUbL [SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier)-targeted ubiquitin ligase] controlling PML (promyelocytic leukaemia) nuclear bodies, DNA double strand break repair and other nuclear functions. In the present paper, we describe that the sequence and spacing of the SIMs (SUMO-interaction motifs) in RNF4 regulate the avidity-driven recognition of substrate proteins carrying SUMO chains of variable length. PMID:24151981