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Sample records for hood river counties

  1. Hood River Production Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Patty

    1991-07-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program authorizes the development of artificial production facilities to raise chinook salmon and steelhead for enhancement in the Hood, Umatilla, Walla Walla, Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers and elsewhere. On February 26, 1991 the Council agreed to disaggregate Hood River from the Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, and instead, link the Hood River Master Plan (now the Hood River Production Plan) to the Pelton Ladder Project (Pelton Ladder Master Plan 1991).

  2. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  3. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  4. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  5. Mineral and geothermal resource potential of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Clackamas and Hood River Counties, Oregon. Summary report and map

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The potential for near-surface mineral resources in the Mount Hood Wilderness is low. Geochemical data suggest two areas of weak epithermal mineralization in the Zigzag Mountain part of the wilderness: (1) the Lost Creek-Burnt Lake-Cast Creek-Short Creek area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver mineralization occurs; and (2) the Lady Creek-Laurel Hill area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has associated propylitic alteration resulting in some porphyry-type copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc mineralization. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F, 120/sup 0/C) hot-water systems in the wilderness is moderate to high. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) and two parts have been included in geothermal lease areas. Rock and gravel sources are present within the wilderness; however, quantities of similar and more accessible deposits are available outside the wilderness. Deposits outside the wilderness are large enough to supply local demand in the foreseeable future.

  6. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  7. Hood River Pelton Ladder Studies : Annual Report 1995.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik A.; French, Rod A.; Ritchey, Alan D.

    1996-09-01

    Data collected from this program will provide the baseline information needed to (1) evaluate various management options for implementing the Hood River Production Plan and (2) determine any post-project impacts the Hood River Production Plan has on indigenous populations of resident fish.

  8. Hood River Production Program : Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Coccoli, Holly; Lambert, Michael

    2000-02-01

    Effective habitat protection and rehabilitation are essential to the long-term recovery of anadromous fish populations in the Hood River subbasin. This Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was prepared to advance the goals of the Hood River Production Program (HRRP) which include restoring self-sustaining runs of spring chinook salmon and winter and summer steelhead. The HRPP is a fish supplementation and monitoring and evaluation program initiated in 1991 and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program. The HRPP is a joint effort of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Using recent watershed assessment and federal watershed analysis reports, this Plan reviews the historic and current condition of riparian, instream and upland habitats; natural watershed processes; anadromous and resident fish populations; identifies limiting factors, and indicates those subbasin areas that need protection or are likely to respond to restoration. Primary habitat restoration needs were identified as (1) improved fish screening and upstream adult passage at water diversions; (2) improved spawning gravel availability, instream habitat structure and diversity; and (3) improved water quality and riparian conditions. While several early action projects have been initiated in the Hood River subbasin since the mid 1990s, this Plan outlines additional projects and strategies needed to protect existing high quality habitat, correct known fish survival problems, and improve the habitat capacity for natural production to meet HRPP goals.

  9. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1998-08-01

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  10. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik A.; French, Rod A.; Ritchey, Alan D.

    1995-09-01

    In 1992, the Northwest Power Planning Council approved the Hood River and Pelton ladder master plans within the framework of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The master plans define an approach for implementing a hatchery supplementation program in the Hood River subbasin. The hatchery program as defined in the master plans is called the Hood River Hatchery Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP will be phased in over several years and will be jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs (CTWS) Reservation. In December 1991, a monitoring and evaluation program was implemented in the Hood River subbasin to collect life history and production information on stocks of anadromous salmonids returning to the Hood River subbasin. The program was implemented to provide the baseline information needed to: (1) evaluate various management options for implementing the HRPP and (2) determine any post-project impacts the HRPP has on indigenous populations of resident fish. Information collected during the 1992-94 fiscal years will also be used to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) evaluating the program`s impact on the human environment. To begin construction on project facilities, it was proposed that the HRPP be implemented in two phases. Phase I would include work that would fall under a {open_quotes}categorical exclusion{close_quotes} from NEPA, and Phase II would include work requiring an EIS prior to implementation. This report summarizes the life history and escapement data collected in the Hood River subbasin and the status work of implemented under Phase I of the HR Life history and escapement data will be used to: (1) test the assumptions on which harvest and escapement goals for the Hood River and Pelton ladder master plans are based and (2) develop biologically based management recommendations for implementing the HRPP.

  11. Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

    2003-12-01

    This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

  12. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation : Annual Reports for 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik A.; French, Rod A.; Lambert, Michael B.

    1998-01-01

    The primary goals of the Hood River Production Program is to (1) increase subbasin production of wild summer and winter steelhead and (2) reintroduce spring chinook salmon into the Hood River subbasin.

  13. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies and Hood River Fish Habitat Project, 1998 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Michael B.; McCanna, Joseph P.; Jennings, Mick

    1999-12-01

    The Hood River subbasin is home to four species of anadromous salmonids: chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and sea run cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki). Indigenous spring chinook salmon were extirpated during the late 1960's. The naturally spawning spring chinook salmon currently present in the subbasin are progeny of Deschutes stock. Historically, the Hood River subbasin hatchery steelhead program utilized out-of-basin stocks for many years. Indigenous stocks of summer and winter steelhead were listed in March 1998 by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a ''Threatened'' Species along with similar genetically similar steelhead in the Lower Columbia Basin.

  14. Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Ken; Cain, Thomas C.; Heller, David A.

    1988-03-01

    Fisheries habitat improvement work is being done on priority drainages in the Clackamas and Rood River sub-basins under program measure 704(c), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This report describes the work completed in 1987 for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) project number 84-11, the Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program. The program is composed of six projects: Collawash River Habitat Improvement Project; Collawash River Falls Passage Improvement Project, Oak Grove Fork Habitat Improvement Project; Lake Branch/West Fork Hood River Habitat Improvement Project; Fifteenmile Creek Habitat Improvement Project; and Abundance, Behavior, and Habitat Utilization by Coho Salmon and Steelhead Trout in Fish Creek, Oregon, As Influenced by Habitat Enhancement. This ongoing program was initiated in 1984, although some of the projects were begun with BPA funding support as early as 1983. The projects are complemented by a variety of habitat improvement and management activities funded from a variety of Forest Service sources. This report describes the activities implemented for five of the six projects. A separate annual report on the 1987 habitat improvement and monitoring/evaluation efforts in the Fish Creek drainage has been prepared. Species for management emphasis include spring chinook and coho salmon, and summer and winter steelhead trout. Project work in 1987 primarily focused on increasing the quantity and quality of available rearing habitat, and improving access at passage barriers. The underlying theme of the improvement work has been to increase habitat diversity through the introduction of ''structure''. Structure provided by logs and boulders serves to deflect, pond, or otherwise disrupt flow patterns within a stream channel. This alteration of flow patterns results in formation of an increased number of habitat niches (i.e. pools, glides, alcoves, etc. ) in which a

  15. The Hood River Story : Marketing a Conservation Project : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplon, Shellie

    1987-09-01

    This report presents the marketing efforts behind the Hood River Conservation Project (the Project). The Project was a research effort designed to identify and systematically document the effects and retrofit potential of conservation when rapidly implemented within a limited geographic area. Super-weatherization measures were installed in 85 percent of all qualified households at virtually no cost to the homeowner. The goals of the project were to determine the maximum penetration rate of weatherization participation and measures within a limited period of time; the relative effectiveness of various approaches to conservation marketing; the characteristics of community social interaction and impacts under maximum conservation conditions; the costs associated with the development and conduct of a maximum conservation effort; and the effects of conservation on distribution and transmission systems, load management, and savings. The purpose of this volume is to present the marketing efforts of the Project (drawing from the community assessment, marketing plan, and promotional plan) and their impact in achieving program goals (defined as participation, measures penetration, and pre- and posttest survey results). 20 refs, 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Portland, Mount Hood, & Columbia River Gorge, Oregon, Perspective View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Portland, the largest city in Oregon, is located on the Columbia River at the northern end of the Willamette Valley. On clear days, Mount Hood highlights the Cascade Mountains backdrop to the east. The Columbia is the largest river in the American Northwest and is navigable up to and well beyond Portland. It is also the only river to fully cross the Cascade Range, and has carved the Columbia River Gorge, which is seen in the left-central part of this view. A series of dams along the river, at topographically favorable sites, provide substantial hydroelectric power to the region.

    This perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a Landsat satellite image, and a false sky. Topographic expression is vertically exaggerated two times.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data substantially help in analyzing Landsat images by revealing the third dimension of Earth's surface, topographic height. The Landsat archive is managed by the U.S. Geological Survey's Eros Data Center (USGS EDC).

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet

  17. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Monitoring and Evaluation Project and Hood River Fish Habitat Project : Annual Progress Report 1999-2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Michael B.; McCanna, Joseph P.; Jennings, Mick

    2001-02-01

    The Hood River subbasin is home to four species of anadromous salmonids: chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and sea run cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki). Indigenous spring chinook salmon were extirpated during the late 1960's. The naturally spawning spring chinook salmon currently present in the subbasin are progeny of Deschutes stock. Historically, the Hood River subbasin hatchery steelhead program utilized out-of-basin stocks for many years. Indigenous stocks of summer and winter steelhead were listed in March 1998 by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a ''Threatened'' Species along with similar genetically similar steelhead in the Lower Columbia Basin. This annual report summarizes work for two consecutive contract periods: the fiscal year (FY) 1999 contract period was 1 October, 1998 through 30 September, 1999 and 1 October, 1999 through 30 September, 2000 for FY 2000. Work implemented during FY 1999 and FY 2000 included (1) acclimation of hatchery spring chinook salmon and hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts, (2) spring chinook salmon spawning ground surveys on the West Fork Hood River (3) genetic analysis of steelhead and cutthroat [contractual service with the ODFW], (4) Hood River water temperature studies, (5) Oak Springs Hatchery (OSH) and Round Butte Hatchery (RBH) coded-wire tagging and clipping evaluation, (6) preparation of the Hood River Watershed Assessment (Coccoli et al., December 1999) and the Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan (Coccoli et al., February 2000), (7) project implementation of early action habitat protection and restoration projects, (8) Pelton Ladder evaluation studies, (9) management oversight and guidance to BPA and ODFW engineering on HRPP facilities, and (10) preparation of an annual report summarizing project objectives for FY 1999 and FY 2000.

  18. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik

    2009-09-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded the development of two master plans which outline the rationale, and general approach, for implementing a defined group of projects that are an integral part of a comprehensive watershed goal to 'Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of anadromous and resident fish within the Hood River Subbasin'. The Hood River Production Master Plan and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1992. Action items identified in the two master plans, as well as in a later document entitled 'Hood River/Pelton Ladder Master Agreement' (ODFW and CTWSRO Undated), are designed to achieve two biological fish objectives: (1) to increase production of wild summer and winter steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to levels commensurate with the subbasins current carrying capacity and (2) re-establishing a self-sustaining population of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Numerical fish objectives for subbasin escapement, spawner escapement, and subbasin harvest are defined for each of these species in Coccoli (2000). Several projects are presently funded by the BPA to achieve the Hood River subbasin's numerical fish objectives for summer and winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon. They include BPA project numbers 1998-021-00 (Hood River Fish Habitat), 1998-053-03 (Hood River Production Program - CTWSRO: M&E), 1998-053-07 (Parkdale Fish Facility), 1998-053-08 (Powerdale/Oak Springs O&M), and 1998-053-12 (Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study). Collectively, they are implemented under the umbrella of what has come to be defined as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO). Strategies for achieving the HRPP's biological fish objectives for the Hood River subbasin were initially

  19. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, 2008 Annual Report : October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Robert E.; Olsen, Erik A.

    2009-09-28

    This report summarizes the life history and production data collected in the Hood River subbasin during FY 2008. Included is a summary of jack and adult life history data collected at the Powerdale Dam trap on seventeen complete run years of winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon, and on fifteen complete run years of summer steelhead. Also included are summaries of (1) the hatchery winter steelhead broodstock collection program; (2) hatchery production releases in the Hood River subbasin; (3) subbasin wild summer and winter steelhead smolt production, (4) numbers of hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts leaving the subbasin; (5) smolt migration timing past Bonneville Dam, (6) wild and hatchery steelhead smolt-to-adult survival rates; (7) wild summer and winter steelhead egg to smolt survival rates; and (8) streamflow at selected locations in the Hood River subbasin. Data will be used in part to (1) evaluate the HRPP relative to its impact on indigenous populations of resident and anadromous salmonids (see Ardren Draft), (2) evaluate the HRPP's progress towards achieving the biological fish objectives defined in the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) and the Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program (HDR|FishPro, ODFW, and CTWSRO 2008), (3) refine spawner escapement objectives to more accurately reflect subbasin carrying capacity, and (4) refine estimates of subbasin smolt production capacity to more accurately reflect current and potential subbasin carrying capacity.

  20. Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Program, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Scott

    1989-04-01

    The Collawash Falls Fish Passage Project began in August of 1987, and resulted in completion of Phase I of the construction of the fish passage facility. A core team of Forest Service personnel. led by fish passage specialists from R-10, Alaska, excavated a trench in the bedrock face of the falls that is approximately 95 feet long, 8 feet deep and 10 feet wide. Implementation of Phase II of the project was put on hold in July of 1988. when 50 yards of rock from the adjacent headwall sloughed into the trench. During September and October of 1988 the larger rocks were reduced in size by blasting. High water flows in November moved the blasted rock from the trench. The project is being done by the Mt. Hood National Forest with funds supplied by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703(c). Action Item 4.2, in consultation with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W). Successful modification of the Collawash Falls will allow anadromous fish full access to over 10 miles of acknowledged high quality spawning and rearing habitat. The total anadromous fish production benefits gained from utilization of this habitat, assuming a 10 year project life with a 4% discount factor is $1,690,019.00. In 1974, several partial barriers to anadromous fish in the form of small falls and cataracts located immediately above the trench, were modified for full passage by blasting. This work conducted by the Forest Service was fully successful in allowing fish passage through all but the main barrier in Collawash Falls. Other Collawash River fisheries projects include the 1984 construction of a fish liberation access site above the falls for the PGE/ODFW spring chinook trap and haul program. Funding for the project came from revenues generated by an adjacent Forest Service timber sale. In summer of 1985, 30,000 spring chinook presmolts were stocked at this liberation site. In spring of 1987. 10,000 coho pre-smolts were

  1. 10. LOOKING SOUTH IN BOP SHOP AT FUME HOOD AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. LOOKING SOUTH IN BOP SHOP AT FUME HOOD AND SPARE OXYGEN LANCES ON THE SERVICE FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  2. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik

    2000-09-01

    This report summarizes the life history and production data collected in the Hood River subbasin during FY 1998 and 1999. Included is a summary of jack and adult life history data collected at the Powerdale Dam trap on eight complete run years of winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon, and on seven complete run years of summer steelhead. Also included are summaries of (1) the hatchery winter steelhead broodstock collection program; (2) hatchery production releases in the Hood River subbasin; (3) the number of outmigrant wild rainbow-steelhead and hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts; and (4) streamflow at selected locations in the Hood River subbasin. Data will be used in part to (1) evaluate the HRPP with respect to its impact on indigenous populations of resident and anadromous salmonids, (2) refine spawner escapement objectives to more accurately reflect subbasin carrying capacity, and (3) refine estimates of subbasin smolt production capacity to more accurately reflect current and potential subbasin carrying capacity. Baseline information on indigenous populations of resident and anadromous salmonids will continue to be collected for several years prior to full implementation of the Hood River Production Program.

  3. Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01

    The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) project strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if project goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the project, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.

  4. Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

    2008-04-28

    The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt

  5. Clackamas/Hood River Habitat Enhancement Project; Implementation Plan, 1988-1992 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Medel, Ron; Hohler, David B.; MacDonald, Ken

    1988-01-01

    An Implementation Plan and Statement of Work is provided for high priority work in the Clackamas. Hood River and Fifteenmile sub-basins. These documents describe fish habitat improvement opportunities that can be implemented by the 1991 deadline established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. The Clackamas/Hood River Enhancement Program is an on-going project initiated in 1984. It is being cooperatively funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Wt. Hood National Forest. Species for management emphasis include spring chinook and coho salmon, and summer and winter steelhead trout. Improvement activities are designed to improve access at passage barriers and increase the quality and quantity of available rearing habitat. Project work will result in improved access to about 12.5 miles of high quality habitat, creation of nearly 70,000 square feet of off-channel habitat, and the addition of structure to approximately 32 miles of stream. At completion of the project, annual production capability from these two sub-basins will be increased by 85-100,000 smolts. Details of a monitoring and evaluation effort consistent with measure 200(d)(l) of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program are also provided.

  6. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2003-11-01

    Project No. 1998-021-00. There are only two culverts on Baldwin Creek that will be eliminated or modified. Work was initiated on the removal of one of these culverts, and the replacement of the other. The landowner was agreeable and NEPA was initiated. The modification/elimination of these culverts is scheduled for FY 04. The culvert on Graham Creek is a county road, and will be addressed as a fish passage barrier by Hood River County. The Evans Creek culvert was prepared for modification in FY 02, however due to a lengthy permitting process the instream work period was missed. This project is on the schedule for the instream work period of 2003. OBJECTIVE 7--Construct riparian fence to stabilize and improve the riparian zone along the East Fork Hood River and tributaries. Two riparian fencing projects were completed on East Fork Hood River tributaries. The first was on Baldwin Creek, and the second was on Shelly Creek.

  7. Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study; Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Hood River, Final Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, Michael

    2003-05-01

    There is a considerable interest in using hatcheries to speed the recovery of wild populations. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), under the authority of the Northwest Power Planning Act, is currently funding several hatchery programs in the Columbia Basin as off-site mitigation for impacts to salmon and steelhead caused by the Columbia River federal hydropower system. One such project is located on the Hood River, an Oregon tributary of the Columbia. These hatchery programs cost the region millions of dollars. However, whether such programs actually improve the status of wild fish remains untested. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hood River hatchery program as required by the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, by the Oregon Plan for Coastal Salmonids, by NMFS ESA Section 4(d) rulings, and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Wild Fish Management Policy (OAR 635-07-525 through 529) and the ODFW Hatchery Fish Gene Resource Management Policy (OAR 635-07-540 through 541). The Hood River supports two populations of steelhead, a summer run and a winter run. They spawn only above the Powerdale Dam, which is a complete barrier to all salmonids. Since 1991 every adult passed above the dam has been measured, cataloged and sampled for scales. Therefore, we have a DNA sample from every adult steelhead that went over the dam to potentially spawn in the Hood River from 1991 to the present. Similar numbers of hatchery and wild fish have been passed above the dam during the last decade. During the 1990's 'old' domesticated hatchery stocks of each run (multiple generations in the hatchery, out-of-basin origin; hereafter H{sub old}) were phased out, and conservation hatchery programs were started for the purpose of supplementing the two wild populations (hereafter 'new' hatchery stocks, H{sub new}). These samples gave us the unprecedented ability to estimate, via microsatellite-based pedigree

  8. Post-glacial lahars of the Sandy River Basin, Mount Hood, Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, K.A.; Pringle, P.

    1986-01-01

    Within the last 10 000 years, three significant lahar-producing periods have occurred at Mount Hood, Oregon. The Timberline eruptive period occurred between 1400 and 1800 years BP. It was by far the most voluminous of the three periods, producing enough clastic debris to bury the glacial topography of the southwest face of the mountain beneath a smooth debris fan. Timberline-age lahars traveled the length of the Zigzag and Sandy Rivers, a distance in excess of 90 km. Between 400 and 600 years BP, the Zigzag eruptive period produced deposits along the middle reaches of the Zigzag River and the upper Sandy River. The Old Maid eruptive period occurred between 180 and 270 years BP. A single lahar flowed down the Sandy River at least as far as Brightwood, 30 km from Crater Rock. -from Authors

  9. 78 FR 56650 - Boundary Description and Final Map for Roaring Wild and Scenic River, Mount Hood National Forest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Forest Service Boundary Description and Final Map for Roaring Wild and Scenic River, Mount Hood National... transmitting the final boundary description and map of the Roaring Wild and Scenic River to Congress. DATES... Stat. 906 as amended; 16 U.S.C. 1274), the detailed boundary descriptions and final maps were...

  10. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  11. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE), SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTHEAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  12. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01

    This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water

  13. Hood River PIT-tag interrogation system efficiency study. Annual report of U.S. Geological Survey activities: November 2010-October 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jezorek, Ian G.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    An additional USGS-CRRL task, under contract number 50150, was to build three antennas for use with Destron-Fearing 2001F-ISO PIT tag readers. These antennas would be 5 used at the East Fork Hood River Acclimation site. They would be placed in the outflow channel to inform managers about the number of PIT tagged steelhead smolts released to the Hood River after a period of acclimation when some mortality and predation might occur. 

  14. Persistence of the impact of the Hood River Conservation Project on typical and peak loads three years after weatherization

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.L.; Stovall, T.K.; Tonn, B.E.

    1992-02-01

    The Hood River Conservation Project (HRCP) was a major residential retrofit demonstration project, operated by Pacific Power Light Company (Pacific Power) between 1984 and 1988, and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). The project was designed to install as many cost-effective retrofit measures in as many electrically heated homes as possible in the community of Hood River, Oregon. The Pacific Power HRCP planners statistically selected a special group of 320 Hood River homes that represented a cross-section of the community. The end-use loads (electric space heating, electric water heating, and woodfuel space heating) and the interior temperatures of these homes were monitored for one year before weatherization and three years after weatherization. After more than four years of submetered data collection, 220 single-family, detached homes were available for analysis in the second load study. Weather was normalized for the four heating seasons by matching one day from the pre-program year with one day from each postretrofit year.

  15. Persistence of the impact of the Hood River Conservation Project on typical and peak loads three years after weatherization

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.L.; Stovall, T.K.; Tonn, B.E.

    1992-02-01

    The Hood River Conservation Project (HRCP) was a major residential retrofit demonstration project, operated by Pacific Power & Light Company (Pacific Power) between 1984 and 1988, and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). The project was designed to install as many cost-effective retrofit measures in as many electrically heated homes as possible in the community of Hood River, Oregon. The Pacific Power HRCP planners statistically selected a special group of 320 Hood River homes that represented a cross-section of the community. The end-use loads (electric space heating, electric water heating, and woodfuel space heating) and the interior temperatures of these homes were monitored for one year before weatherization and three years after weatherization. After more than four years of submetered data collection, 220 single-family, detached homes were available for analysis in the second load study. Weather was normalized for the four heating seasons by matching one day from the pre-program year with one day from each postretrofit year.

  16. Lidar-enhanced geologic mapping, examples from the Medford and Hood River areas, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, T. J.; McClaughry, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Lidar-based 3-foot digital elevation models (DEMs) and derivatives (slopeshade, hillshade, contours) were used to help map geology across 1700 km2 (650 mi2) near Hood River and Medford, Oregon. Techniques classically applied to interpret coarse DEMs and small-scale topographic maps were adapted to take advantage of lidar's high resolution. Penetration and discrimination of plant cover by the laser system allowed recognition of fine patterns and textures related to underlying geologic units and associated soils. Surficial geologic maps were improved by the ability to examine tiny variations in elevation and slope. Recognition of low-relief features of all sizes was enhanced where pixel elevation ranges of centimeters to meters, established by knowledge of the site or by trial, were displayed using thousands of sequential colors. Features can also be depicted relative to stream level by preparing a DEM that compensates for gradient. Near Medford, lidar-derived contour maps with 1- to 3-foot intervals revealed incised bajada with young, distal lobes defined by concentric contour lines. Bedrock geologic maps were improved by recognizing geologic features associated with surface textures and patterns or topographic anomalies. In sedimentary and volcanic terrain, structure was revealed by outcrops or horizons lying at one stratigraphic level. Creating a triangulated irregular network (TIN) facet from positions of three or more such points gives strike and dip. Each map area benefited from hundreds of these measurements. A more extensive DEM in the plane of the TIN facet can be subtracted from surface elevation (lidar DEM) to make a DEM with elevation zero where the stratigraphic horizon lies at the surface. The distribution of higher and lower stratigraphic horizons can be shown by highlighting areas similarly higher or lower on the same DEM. Poor fit of contacts or faults projected between field traverses suggest the nature and amount of intervening geologic structure

  17. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING TYPICAL STEEL COLUMN BENTS, FACING EAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  18. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING TYPICAL EXTERIOR ELEVATION OF GUARDRAIL, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTH - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  19. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING BEGINNING OF CURVE TOWARD SOUTH, SOUTH SIDE, FACING EAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  20. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) AT ROAD LEVEL (SR 20), FACING NORTH - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  1. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING SOLID CONCRETE BENT, WEST SIDE, FACING EAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  2. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING TYPICAL STEEL COLUMN BENTS AND ROAD SUBSTRUCTURE, FACING SOUTHEAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  3. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING TYPICAL SPAN BETWEEN STEEL COLUMN BENTS, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTH - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  4. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) SPANNING THE BAYOU, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTHEAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  5. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) AT ROAD LEVEL (SR 20), FACING WEST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  6. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) AT ROAD LEVEL (SR 20), FACING SOUTHEAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  7. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) AT ROAD LEVEL (SR 20), FACING NORTHEAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  8. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING SPAN (BAY) BETWEEN SOLID CONCRETE BENT AND STEEL COLUMN BENT, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTH - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  9. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING X-BRACED STEEL "TOWER" BENT, WEST SIDE, FACING NORTHEAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  10. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 – September 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstenberger, Ryan

    2009-07-27

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  11. The 1980 Polallie Creek debris flow and subsequent dam-break flood, East Fork Hood River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallino, Gary L.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1984-01-01

    At approximately 9 p.m. on December 25, 1980, intense rainfall and extremely wet antecedent conditions combined to trigger a landslide of approximately 5,000 cubic yards at the head of Polallie Creek Canyon on the northeast flank of Mount Hood. The landslide was transformed rapidly into a debris flow, which surged down the channel at velocities between about 40 and 50 ft/s, eroding and incorporating large volumes of channel fill and uprooted vegetation. When it reached the debris fan at the confluence with the East Fork Hood River, the debris flow deposited approximately 100,000 cubic yards of saturated, poorly sorted debris to a maximum thickness of 35 ft, forming a 750-ft-long temporary dam across the channel. Within approximately 12 minutes, a lake of 85 acre-feet formed behind the blockage, breached the dam, and sent a flood wave down the East Fork Hood River. The combined debris flow and flood resulted in one fatality and over $13 million in damage to a highway, bridges, parks, and a water-supply pipeline. Application of simple momentum- and energy-balance equations, and uniform flow equations resulted in debris flow peak discharges ranging from 50,000 ft3/s to 300,000 ft3/s at different locations in the Polallie Creek Canyon. This wide range is attributed to temporary damming at the boulder- and log-rich flow front in narrow, curving reaches of the channel. When the volume of the solid debris was subtracted out, assuming a minimum peak debris-flow discharge of 100,000 ft3/s at the canyon mouth, a minimum peak-water discharge of 40,000 ft3/s was obtained. A computer dam-break model simulated peak flow for the outbreak flood on the East Fork Hood River in the range of 20,000 to 30,000 ft3/s using various breach shapes and durations of breach between 5 and 15 minutes. A slope conveyance computation 0.25 mi downstream from the dam gave a peak water discharge (solids subtracted out) for the debris-laden flood of 12,000 to 20,000 ft3/s, depending on the channel

  12. Residential and service-population exposure to multiple natural hazards in the Mount Hood region of Clackamas County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathie, Amy M.; Wood, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to document residential and service-population exposure to natural hazards in the rural communities of Clackamas County, Oregon, near Mount Hood. The Mount Hood region of Clackamas County has a long history of natural events that have impacted its small, tourism-based communities. To support preparedness and emergency-management planning in the region, a geospatial analysis of population exposure was used to determine the number and type of residents and service populations in flood-, wildfire-, and volcano-related hazard zones. Service populations are a mix of residents and tourists temporarily benefitting from local services, such as retail, education, or recreation. In this study, service population includes day-use visitors at recreational sites, overnight visitors at hotels and resorts, children at schools, and community-center visitors. Although the heavily-forested, rural landscape suggests few people are in the area, there are seasonal peaks of thousands of visitors to the region. “Intelligent” dasymetric mapping efforts using 30-meter resolution land-cover imagery and U.S. Census Bureau data proved ineffective at adequately capturing either the spatial distribution or magnitude of population at risk. Consequently, an address-point-based hybrid dasymetric methodology of assigning population to the physical location of buildings mapped with a global positioning system was employed. The resulting maps of the population (1) provide more precise spatial distributions for hazard-vulnerability assessments, (2) depict appropriate clustering due to higher density structures, such as apartment complexes and multi-unit commercial buildings, and (3) provide new information on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of people utilizing services within the study area. Estimates of population exposure to flooding, wildfire, and volcanic hazards were determined by using overlay analysis in a geographic information system

  13. 15. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919,' showing general plan, plan of top chord, elevation of main girder, transverse section, plan section at deck level. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  14. 17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing plan of bars in top flange, elevation of girder reinforcement, plan of bars in bottom flange - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  15. 18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing elevation of center pier, elevation and plan of north and south abutments, sections of abutments, pier, and pier footings - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  16. Identifying the Sources of Methane in Shallow Groundwaters in Parker and Hood Counties, Texas through Noble Gas Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Nicot, J. P.; Hall, C. M.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    With rising demands for cleaner domestic energy resources, horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques in unconventional hydrocarbon exploration have been extensively developed. However, the observation that some water wells have showed elevated concentrations of dissolved methane and other light hydrocarbons has caused public concern regarding unconventional energy extraction. In this contribution, we present noble gas data of production shale gases from the Barnett and Strawn Formations, as well as nearby groundwater samples in south-central Texas. The Barnett Shale located in the Fort Worth Basin at an average depth of ~2300 m is one of the most prominent shale gas plays in the U.S. This DOE-sponsored study explores the potential of noble gases for fingerprinting shale gas and thus, for identifying the sources of gas in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale, due either to natural hydrocarbon occurrences or potentially related to gas production from unconventional energy resources. A total of 35 groundwater samples were collected in Parker and Hood counties in areas where high amounts of methane (>10 mg/L) were detected in shallow groundwater. Two gas samples were also collected directly from groundwater wells where bubbling methane was present. Preliminary results show that He concentrations in water samples, in excess of up to three orders of magnitude higher than expected atmospheric values are directly correlated with methane concentrations. 3He/4He ratio values vary from 0.030 to 0.889 times the atmospheric ratio with the lowest, more pure radiogenic contributions being associated with highest methane levels. The presence of crustally-produced radiogenic 40Ar is also apparent in groundwater samples with 40Ar/36Ar ratios up to 316. A combined analysis of 40Ar/36Ar ratios from groundwater wells bubbling gas and that of shale gas suggests that the source of this methane is not the heavily exploited Barnett Shale, but rather, the Strawn Formation.

  17. 2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the north, looking over the flooded fields between Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, just upstream of the Prado Dam site. File number written on negative: R & H 80 024. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  18. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING SPAN (OR BAY) BETWEEN X-BRACED STEEL COLUMN BENT AND X-BRACED STEEL "TOWER" BENT, WEST SIDE, FACING NORTHEAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  19. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING SPAN (OR BAY) BETWEEN X-BRACED STEEL COLUMN BENT AND PIER 6, WEST SIDE, FACING NORTHEAST - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  20. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE), NORTH SIDE AT GRADE, FACING NORTHWEST. SAME SOLID CONCRETE BENT IN PHOTOGRAPH 18 IS IN FOREGROUND OF THIS PHOTOGRAPH - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  1. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE EAST APPROACH (LIBERTY COUNTY SIDE), NORTH SIDE AT GRADE, FACING SOUTHEAST. TYPICAL STEEL COLUMN BENTS ARE IN BACKGROUND AND SOLID CONCRETE BENT IS IN FOREGROUND - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  2. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-62)and the Hood River Fisheries Project Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0241)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2001-09-14

    The project area is located on the Hood River, near river-mile 11 (Township 2 North, Range 9 East, Section 29). The Hood River flows south to north, adjacent to the project area with Joe's Creek entering on the east bank. Joe's Creek is an intermittent stream approximately 1,000 feet long on a high alluvial terrace at the base of a talus slope. Farmers Irrigation District (FID) proposes modifying the intake and flume of the irrigation district's canal in order to reduce sediment that enters the canal. The modification consists of redistributing boulders and stream bottom material to shift the existing thalweg of Hood River toward the west, away from the intake, and installing two sediment excluder sills in the upper portion of the canal. The FID also proposes installing a new transmission water line, which will replace an existing trestle and flume that presently links the irrigation district intake to a canal system that transports water into the low croplands of the Hood River Valley. In addition to the new transmission water line, a new fish screen would be constructed which necessitates a fish bypass that returns fish back to the Hood River. The existing fish screen is an older obsolete concept and the existing fish bypass consists of a small diameter flexible culvert. FID proposes a bypass system that not only returns fish to the Hood River but also increases fisheries habitat availability in the watershed. To accomplish this, a new channel would be created between the existing irrigation canal and Joe's Creek. The area of proposed new channel construction is entirely upland. Proposed alterations in Joe's Creek consist of rearing pool creation, the installation of two culverts (one under an existing road and one near the outlet to Hood River), creation of a plunge pool at the outlet of the upper culvert and a series of jump pools extending 50 feet east of the confluence with the Hood River. The existing channel would be recontoured to handle bypass flows and

  3. 16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919,' showing detail of floor beam at central pier, half section of cantilever slab at end of bridge, floor beam end panels, slab reinforcing, plan of slab reinforcing, diagram of slab bars, typical floor girder. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  4. Distinguishing Features of Atmospheric River Storms Linked to Debris Flow Initiation on Mt. Hood, Oregon and Mt. Rainier, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desrochers, J.; Nolin, A. W.

    2011-12-01

    Strong eastern Pacific storms characterized by tropical-sourced moisture and heat are often referred to as Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) and are associated with the triggering of debris flows in the Cascade Mountain Range, USA primarily in the fall season. These storms typically feature freezing levels above 3000 m and heavy precipitation that can saturate slopes and rapidly melt shallow early season snowpack. In a study of periglacial debris flows on Mt. Hood, Oregon and Mt. Rainier, Washington, this combination of factors is proposed to initiate slope failure and subsequent debris flows. However, not all ARs trigger debris flows and other storms not associated with ARs may also lead to debris flows. The presence of these non-triggering storms has led to the question: what features distinguish the storms that trigger debris flows, and do these conditions differ between ARs and other storms? ACARS soundings are used to develop temporally detailed information about freezing levels and storm structure. Supplemental data from the SNOTEL network and NWS WSR-88D radar sites allow for better delineation of storm features and their impact on the ground. Antecedent snowpack, atmospheric temperature profiles, precipitation, and oragraphic enhancement are examined for storms associated with debris flows and those that failed to trigger events to determine what characteristics best differentiate the storms from one another. Specific features within the triggering storms, such as the presence of temperature inversions, are also examined for links to the elevation and geomorphic character of these periglacial debris flow initiation sites.

  5. 1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the northeast taken from the northeast extremity of the canyon, showing, in the middle distance, the confluence of Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, site of the future Prado Dam. File number written on negative: R & H 80 026. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  6. Updating Older Fume Hoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, G. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Provides information on updating older fume hoods. Areas addressed include: (1) adjustment of the hood's back baffle; (2) hood air leakage; (3) light level; (4) hood location in relation to room traffic and room air; and (5) establishing and maintaining hood performance. (JN)

  7. 'Cobra Hoods'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation flips back and forth between left and right eye images of the odd rock formation dubbed 'Cobra Hoods' (center top). The images were taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Rover scientists say this resistant rock is unlike anything they've seen on Mars so far. Spirit will investigate the rock in coming sols. These pictures was captured on sol 156 (June 11, 2004).

  8. Eruption-related lahars and sedimentation response downstream of Mount Hood: Field guide to volcaniclastic deposits along the Sandy River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Tom C.; Scott, William E.; Vallance, James W.; Pringle, Patrick T.

    2009-01-01

    Late Holocene dome-building eruptions at Mount Hood during the Timberline and Old Maid eruptive periods resulted in numerous dome-collapse pyroclastic flows and lahars that moved large volumes of volcaniclastic sediment into temporary storage in headwater canyons of the Sandy River. During each eruptive period, accelerated sediment loading to the river through erosion and remobilization of volcanic fragmental debris resulted in very high sediment-transport rates in the Sandy River during rain- and snowmelt-induced floods. Large sediment loads in excess of the river's transport capacity led to channel aggradation, channel widening, and change to a braided channel form in the lowermost reach of the river, between 61 and 87 km downstream from the volcano. The post-eruption sediment load moved as a broad bed-material wave, which in the case of the Old Maid eruption took ~2 decades to crest 83 km downstream. Maximum post-eruption aggradation levels of at least 28 and 23 m were achieved in response to Timberline and Old Maid eruptions. In each case, downstream aggradation cycles were initiated by lahars, but the bulk of the aggradation was achieved by fluvial sediment transport and deposition. When the high rates of sediment supply began to diminish, the river degraded, incising the channel fills and forming progressively lower sets of degradational terraces. A variety of debris-flow, hyperconcentrated-flow, and fluvial (upper and lower flow regime) deposits record the downstream passage of the sediment waves that were initiated by these eruptions. The deposits also presage a hazard that may be faced by communities along the Sandy River when volcanic activity at Mount Hood resumes.

  9. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards of the Mount Hood Region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Scott, W.E.; Pierson, T.C.; Costa, J.E.; Gardner, C.A.; Vallance, J.W.; Major, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Snow-clad Mount Hood dominates the Cascade skyline from the Portland metropolitan area to the wheat fields of Wasco and Sherman Counties. The mountain contributes valuable water, scenic, and recreational resources that help sustain the agricultural and tourist segments of the economies of surrounding cities and counties. Mount Hood is also one of the major volcanoes of the Cascade Range, having erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, most recently during two episodes in the past 1,500 yr. The last episode ended shortly before the arrival of Lewis and Clark in 1805. When Mount Hood erupts again, it will severely affect areas on its flanks and far downstream in the major river valleys that head on the volcano. Volcanic ash may fall on areas up to several hundred kilometers downwind. The purpose of the volcano hazard report USGS Open-File Report 97-89 (Scott and others, 1997) is to describe the kinds of hazardous geologic events that have happened at Mount Hood in the past and to show which areas will be at risk when such events occur in the future. This data release contains the geographic information system (GIS) data layers used to produce the Mount Hood volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-89. Both proximal and distal hazard zones were delineated by scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory and depict various volcano hazard areas around the mountain. A second data layer contains points that indicate estimated travel times of lahars.

  10. PALOUSE RIVER STUDY, LETAH COUNTY, IDAHO, WATER YEAR 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    During water year 1979, a water quality study was conducted on the Palouse River in Latah County (17060108) to determine the present water quality status of the river at Princeton and to obtain background information for the development of effluent limitations for the Hampton-Pr...

  11. BOISE RIVER STUDY IN ADA COUNTY IDAHO, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of present point sources on the river and to obtain background information to develop effluent limitations for the City of Boise wastewater treatment facilities. The study was conducted on the Boise River (Ada County, ID) from L...

  12. Good Practices for Hood Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikell, William G.; Drinkard, William C.

    1984-01-01

    Describes safety practices for laboratory fume hoods based on certain assumptions of hood design and performance. Also discusses the procedures in preparing to work at a hood. A checklist of good hood practices is included. (JM)

  13. Low flow fume hood

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Feustel, Helmut E.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

    2002-01-01

    A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

  14. 13. View of interior, north wall featuring fume hood, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of interior, north wall featuring fume hood, facing north (Note: B/W scale on fume hood is in 1/2 ft increments) - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  15. WEISER RIVER STUDY, ADAMS AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES, IDAHO, 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the 1979 water year, a water quality study was conducted on the Weiser and Little Weiser Rivers (17050124) in Washington and Adams Counties, Idaho. The study was completed to obtain background information on effluent limitations for the cities of Cambridge and Council and...

  16. CUB RIVER, FRANKLIN COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY SUMMARY, 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Water Year 1979, a water quality study was conducted on the Cub River in Franklin County, Idaho (16010202) to determine the present condition of the stream and to assess the impact of the Del Monte Corporation vegetable processing discharge. The study involved approximately m...

  17. 13. Southwest corner of burning hood and incinerator. North wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Southwest corner of burning hood and incinerator. North wall of scrubber cell room. Looking southwest. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

  18. DETAIL OF EAVES AND HOODS OVER WINDOWS ON NORTHEAST END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF EAVES AND HOODS OVER WINDOWS ON NORTHEAST END OF NORTHWEST SIDE, WITH SEABEE STATUE IN BACKGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Building No. 905, showing typical aqua medias or rain hoods ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building No. 905, showing typical aqua medias or rain hoods - Presidio of San Francisco, Enlisted Men's Barracks Type, West end of Crissy Field, between Pearce & Maudlin Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. 78 FR 56650 - Boundary Description and Final Map for Sandy Wild and Scenic River, Upper Portion, Mount Hood...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Forest Service Boundary Description and Final Map for Sandy Wild and Scenic River, Upper Portion, Mount..., is transmitting the final boundary description and map of the Sandy Wild and Scenic River, Upper... descriptions and final maps were forwarded on August 21, 2013. ADDRESSES: Documents may be viewed at...

  1. Hood: Answers in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood Coll., Frederick, MD.

    The president of Hood College, a liberal arts college for women located in Frederick, Maryland, considers the challenges confronting American higher education and describes what one college is doing to meet them. A description of Hood College and American higher education is provided. Seven sections focus on the following: (1) matters of equity…

  2. Hydrologic data: south branch Casselman River, Garrett County, and Marsh Run, Washington County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilleary, John T.

    1984-01-01

    This report is a compilation of well construction data, lithologic and geophysical logs, and water level and water quality data for selected wells and springs in the South Branch Casselman River and Marsh Run drainage basins, Garrett and Washington Counties, Maryland. The report contains, for the two areas combined, records of 202 wells and 57 springs; periodic water level measurements and field determinations of specific conductance, pH, and water temperature for 33 wells and 7 springs; geophysical logs for 1 well and lithologic logs for 113 wells; and multi-year water-level data for 9 observation wells. (USGS)

  3. Testing containment of laboratory hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, G.W.

    1987-06-01

    Laboratory fume hoods often do not adequately provide protection to a chemist or technician at the hood. The reason for failure of the hoods to perform adequately are varied and, in many instances, difficult to determine. In some cases, the laboratory hood manufacturer has provided equipment that does not reflect the state of art in controlling laboratory exposures. In other cases, the architect or engineer has disregarded the function of the hood thus the design of the installation is faulty and the hood will not work. The contractor may have installed the system so poorly that it will not adequately function. Finally, the chemist or technician may misuse the hood, causing poor performance. This paper considers a method of evaluating the performance of laboratory fume hoods. Using the method, the paper examines several instances where the laboratory fume hood performed inadequately, quantifies the performance and identifies the cause of poor performance.

  4. Year-round monitoring of contaminants in Neal and Rogers Creeks, Hood River Basin, Oregon, 2011-12, and assessment of risks to salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Temple, Whitney B.; Morace, Jennifer L.; Nilsen, Elena B.; Alvarez, David; Masterson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide presence in streams is a potential threat to Endangered Species Act listed salmonids in the Hood River basin, Oregon, a primarily forested and agricultural basin. Two types of passive samplers, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), were simultaneously deployed at four sites in the basin during Mar. 2011–Mar. 2012 to measure the presence of pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The year-round use of passive samplers is a novel approach and offers several new insights. Currently used pesticides and legacy contaminants, including many chlorinated pesticides and PBDEs, were present throughout the year in the basin’s streams. PCBs were not detected. Time-weighted average water concentrations for the 2-month deployment periods were estimated from concentrations of chemicals measured in the passive samplers. Currently used pesticide concentrations peaked during spring and were detected beyond their seasons of expected use. Summed concentrations of legacy contaminants in Neal Creek were highest during July–Sept., the period with the lowest streamflows. Endosulfan was the only pesticide detected in passive samplers at concentrations exceeding Oregon or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality thresholds. A Sensitive Pesticide Toxicity Index (SPTI) was used to estimate the relative acute potential toxicity among sample mixtures. The acute potential toxicity of the detected mixtures was likely greater for invertebrates than for fish and for all samples in Neal Creek compared to Rogers Creek, but the indices appear to be low overall (<0.1). Endosulfans and pyrethroid insecticides were the largest contributors to the SPTIs for both sites. SPTIs of some discrete (grab) samples from the basin that were used for comparison exceeded 0.1 when some insecticides (azinphos methyl, chlorpyrifos, malathion) were detected at concentrations near or

  5. Year-Round Monitoring of Contaminants in Neal and Rogers Creeks, Hood River Basin, Oregon, 2011-12, and Assessment of Risks to Salmonids

    PubMed Central

    Hapke, Whitney B.; Morace, Jennifer L.; Nilsen, Elena B.; Alvarez, David A.; Masterson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide presence in streams is a potential threat to Endangered Species Act listed salmonids in the Hood River basin, Oregon, a primarily forested and agricultural basin. Two types of passive samplers, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), were simultaneously deployed at four sites in the basin during Mar. 2011–Mar. 2012 to measure the presence of pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The year-round use of passive samplers is a novel approach and offers several new insights. Currently used pesticides and legacy contaminants, including many chlorinated pesticides and PBDEs, were present throughout the year in the basin’s streams. PCBs were not detected. Time-weighted average water concentrations for the 2-month deployment periods were estimated from concentrations of chemicals measured in the passive samplers. Currently used pesticide concentrations peaked during spring and were detected beyond their seasons of expected use. Summed concentrations of legacy contaminants in Neal Creek were highest during July–Sept., the period with the lowest streamflows. Endosulfan was the only pesticide detected in passive samplers at concentrations exceeding Oregon or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality thresholds. A Sensitive Pesticide Toxicity Index (SPTI) was used to estimate the relative acute potential toxicity among sample mixtures. The acute potential toxicity of the detected mixtures was likely greater for invertebrates than for fish and for all samples in Neal Creek compared to Rogers Creek, but the indices appear to be low overall (<0.1). Endosulfans and pyrethroid insecticides were the largest contributors to the SPTIs for both sites. SPTIs of some discrete (grab) samples from the basin that were used for comparison exceeded 0.1 when some insecticides (azinphos methyl, chlorpyrifos, malathion) were detected at concentrations near or

  6. Year-Round Monitoring of Contaminants in Neal and Rogers Creeks, Hood River Basin, Oregon, 2011-12, and Assessment of Risks to Salmonids.

    PubMed

    Hapke, Whitney B; Morace, Jennifer L; Nilsen, Elena B; Alvarez, David A; Masterson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide presence in streams is a potential threat to Endangered Species Act listed salmonids in the Hood River basin, Oregon, a primarily forested and agricultural basin. Two types of passive samplers, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), were simultaneously deployed at four sites in the basin during Mar. 2011-Mar. 2012 to measure the presence of pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The year-round use of passive samplers is a novel approach and offers several new insights. Currently used pesticides and legacy contaminants, including many chlorinated pesticides and PBDEs, were present throughout the year in the basin's streams. PCBs were not detected. Time-weighted average water concentrations for the 2-month deployment periods were estimated from concentrations of chemicals measured in the passive samplers. Currently used pesticide concentrations peaked during spring and were detected beyond their seasons of expected use. Summed concentrations of legacy contaminants in Neal Creek were highest during July-Sept., the period with the lowest streamflows. Endosulfan was the only pesticide detected in passive samplers at concentrations exceeding Oregon or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality thresholds. A Sensitive Pesticide Toxicity Index (SPTI) was used to estimate the relative acute potential toxicity among sample mixtures. The acute potential toxicity of the detected mixtures was likely greater for invertebrates than for fish and for all samples in Neal Creek compared to Rogers Creek, but the indices appear to be low overall (<0.1). Endosulfans and pyrethroid insecticides were the largest contributors to the SPTIs for both sites. SPTIs of some discrete (grab) samples from the basin that were used for comparison exceeded 0.1 when some insecticides (azinphos methyl, chlorpyrifos, malathion) were detected at concentrations near or exceeding

  7. Hoods for Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Harold; and others

    Detailed discussions are presented dealing with the selection and design of fume hoods for science laboratories. Areas covered include--(1) air flow design, (2) materials properties, (3) location in the laboratory, (4) testing and adjustment, (5) exhaust systems, and (6) hazards of fume discharges. (JT)

  8. Energy efficient laboratory fume hood

    DOEpatents

    Feustel, Helmut E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a low energy consumption fume hood that provides an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A low-flow fume hood in accordance with the present invention works on the principal of providing an air supply, preferably with low turbulence intensity, in the face of the hood. The air flow supplied displaces the volume currently present in the hood's face without significant mixing between the two volumes and with minimum injection of air from either side of the flow. This air flow provides a protective layer of clean air between the contaminated low-flow fume hood work chamber and the laboratory room. Because this protective layer of air will be free of contaminants, even temporary mixing between the air in the face of the fume hood and room air, which may result from short term pressure fluctuations or turbulence in the laboratory, will keep contaminants contained within the hood. Protection of the face of the hood by an air flow with low turbulence intensity in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 75% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance.

  9. Indian River County Environmental Education Instructional Guide. Social Studies, Eighth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    The teaching guide presents social studies activities for eighth graders to learn about environmental concepts, problems, and responsibilities. Part of a series for teachers, students, and community members, it is based on the Indian River County environment in Florida. The introduction identifies the county's natural resources, wildlife, and…

  10. 81. Neg. No. F63, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, HOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    81. Neg. No. F-63, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HOOD DEPARTMENT - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 75 FR 77826 - White River National Forest; Eagle County, CO; Beaver Creek Mountain Improvements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... Forest Service White River National Forest; Eagle County, CO; Beaver Creek Mountain Improvements AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: The White River National Forest is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to consider...

  12. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, LOWER WEISER RIVER, WASHINGTON COUNTY, IDAHO, 1983 - 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lower Weiser River, Crane Creek to the mouth at Weiser (17050124), Washington County, Idaho and its tributaries and selected irrigation inflows were the subject of a water quality survey for one year during 1983-84. The Weiser River contributes nearly 260,000 tons of annual ...

  13. 75 FR 61417 - South River Watershed Dam No. 10A, Augusta County, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation Service South River Watershed Dam No. 10A, Augusta County, VA AGENCY... not being prepared for the rehabilitation of South River Watershed Dam No. 10A, Augusta...

  14. 6. VIEW OF THE BRIQUETTING PRESS AND CHIP CLEANING HOOD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF THE BRIQUETTING PRESS AND CHIP CLEANING HOOD. SCRAPS OF ENRICHED URANIUM FROM MACHINING OPERATIONS WERE CLEANED IN A SOLVENT BATH, THEN PRESSED INTO BRIQUETTS. THE BRIQUETTS WERE USED AS FEED MATERIAL FOR THE FOUNDRY. (4/4/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 5. VIEW OF SITE A FROM SOUTH END OF HOOD, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF SITE A FROM SOUTH END OF HOOD, FACING NORTH (BUILDINGS 117, 120, 122, 116, 128, and 121 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  16. 21. May 1985. DETAIL OF CALL BELLS (Located under hood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. May 1985. DETAIL OF CALL BELLS (Located under hood of back porch, each bell is mechanically rung and has a tone specific to one of several rooms on the first floor) - Borough House, West Side State Route 261, about .1 mile south side of junction with old Garners Ferry Road, Stateburg, Sumter County, SC

  17. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, CROOKED RIVER, IDAHO COUNTY IDAHO, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crooked River (17060305), a primary anadromous fisheries resource, is located approximately 120 miles southeast of Lewiston, Idaho. Dredging operations between 1936 and 1948 left large piles of gravel in the natural watercourse, causing the river to meander. Impoundments of wat...

  18. KOOTENAI RIVER, BOUNDARY COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Kootenai River (17010104) is a major tributary to the Columbia River, draining southern British Columbia, northwestern Montana, and portions of northern Idaho. One-third of the river lies in the United States, its source and mouth are in Canada. The vast majority of the dra...

  19. Geologic and hydrogeologic information for a geodatabase for the Brazos River Alluvium Aquifer, Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shah, Sachin D.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2007-01-01

    During July-October 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), developed geologic and hydrogeologic information for a geodatabase for use in development of a Groundwater Availability Model (GAM) of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer along the Brazos River from Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas. The report provides geologic and hydrogeologic information for a study area that encompasses the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, a 1/2-mile-wide lateral buffer surrounding the aquifer, and the rocks immediately underlying the aquifer. The geodatabase involves use of a thematic approach to create layers of feature data using a geographic information system. Feature classes represent the various types of data that are keyed to spatial location and related to one another within the geodatabase. The 1/2-mile-wide buffer surrounding the aquifer was applied to include data from wells constructed primarily in alluvium but outside the boundary of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer. A 1/2- by 1/2-mile grid was generated on the study area to facilitate uniform distribution of data for eventual input into the GAM. Data were compiled primarily from drillers and borehole geophysical logs from government agencies and universities, hydrogeologic sections and maps from published reports, and agency files. The geodatabase contains 450 points with geologic data and 280 points with hydrogeologic data.

  20. 76 FR 22140 - Parker River and Thacher Island National Wildlife Refuges, Essex County, MA; Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    .... The refuge occupies 4,653 acres on Plum Island, a 9-mile-long barrier island off the northeastern... issues. Concerns about the management of the barrier island system as a unit involves issues of public... Fish and Wildlife Service Parker River and Thacher Island National Wildlife Refuges, Essex County,...

  1. LIGHTNING CREEK, PACK RIVER, AND SAND CREEK, BONNER COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY SUMMARY, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Water Year 1978, water quality studies were conducted on Lightning Creek, Pack River, and Sand Creek in Bonner County, Idaho (17010214, 17010213) to determine the present status of the streams. Water quality in Lightning Creek was generally very high. No violations of standa...

  2. 77 FR 47058 - Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency; Notice of Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency; Notice of Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Public Meetings a. Date and Time of Meetings: Tuesday, August 28, 2012, from 9:00 a.m. to...

  3. Process Hood Stand Support Steel

    SciTech Connect

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-04-03

    This package is written to comply with EN-6-035-00 for upgrade dedication of commercial grade items (CGI). The SNF-5953 CGI package provides the Technical evaluation to identify the critical characteristics and the acceptance criteria associated with the safety function of the Hood Stand Support Steel. Completion of the technical and quality requirements identified in the dedication package will provide enough data to be reasonably assured that CGI Hood Stand Support Steel will perform its SC function.

  4. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  5. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  6. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  7. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  8. Streamflow and water quality of the Grand Calumet River, Lake County, Indiana, and Cook County, Illinois, October 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.G.; Wangsness, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    A diel water-quality survey was done to investigate the sources of dry-weather waste inputs attributable to other than permitted point-source effluent and to evaluate the waste-load assimilative capacity of the Grand Calumet River, Lake County, Indiana, and Cook County, Illinois, in October 1984. Flow in the Grand Calumet River consists almost entirely of municipal and industrial effluents which comprised more than 90% of the 500 cu ft/sec flow observed at the confluence of the East Branch Grand Calumet River and the Indiana Harbor Ship Canal during the study. At the time of the study, virtually all of the flow in the West Branch Grand Calumet River was municipal effluent. Diel variations in streamflow of as much as 300 cu ft/sec were observed in the East Branch near the ship canal. The diel variation diminished at the upstream sampling sites in the East Branch. In the West Branch, the diel variation in flow was quite drastic. Average dissolved-oxygen concentrations at stations in the East Branch ranged from 5.7 to 8.2 mg/L and at stations in the West Branch from 0.8 to 6.6 mg/L. Concentrations of dissolved solids, suspended solids, biochemical-oxygen demand, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and phosphorus were substantially higher in the West Branch than in the East Branch. In the East Branch, only the Indiana Stream Pollution Control Board water-quality standards for total phosphorus and phenol were exceeded. In the West Branch, water-quality standards for total ammonia, chloride, cyanide, dissolved solids, fluoride, total phosphorus, mercury, and phenol were exceeded and dissolved oxygen was less than the minimum allowable. 25 refs., 65 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. 222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    RUELAS, B.H.

    2007-03-26

    The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory.

  10. Effects of bank storage and well pumping on base flow, Carmel River, Monterey County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Maloney, L. M.; Williams, J. G.

    1987-06-01

    Bank storage contributions to base flow may be important on alluvial rivers with highly permeable bank materials, such as the lower Carmel River, Monterey County, California. The recharge phase of bank storage occurs during flood stage in the river when a hydraulic gradient exists from the river into the banks. In general, discharge from bank storage is most important on the recession limb of individual floods, with most stored water typically being discharged within 2-3 flood periods. As the river stage continues to fall, a hydraulic gradient from the banks to the river will be maintained and stored water will drain from the banks. On the Carmel River, the seasonal recession limb provides conditions of a gradually declining stage over several months. In 1982, a moderately wet year, bank storage contributions were detected two months after the last peak flow of the winter rainy season, during a period of critical importance to steelhead trout and probably to riparian vegetation. However, in 1983, an extremely wet year, bank storage was undetectable two months after the season's last peak flow, probably because the sustained base flow from the upper basin overwhelmed the more transient bank storage contribution. Groundwater withdrawal from the alluvial aquifer locally lowered the water table so that streamflow was influent to the banks in the reach of major pumping wells. This effect was striking in its persistence, whether the Carmel River was gaining or losing overall in its alluvial reach. Pumping rates were roughly comparable to flow losses across the well field.

  11. 77 FR 26825 - Iowa River Railroad, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Marshall and Hardin Counties, IA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... Counties, IA On April 17, 2012, Iowa River Railroad, Inc. (IRR) filed with the Surface Transportation Board...; and (2) T. Scott Bannister, 111- SW 56th Street, Des Moines, IA 50312. Replies to the petition are...

  12. Design for a Miniature Portable Fume Hood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Ronald A.; Wait, Samuel C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the design of undergraduate chemical laboratory fume hoods. Proves that folding the sides and top permit the hood and its duct hose to be stored in a standard 18-inch-wide laboratory cabinet. (WRM)

  13. Geochemical map of the North Fork John Day River Roadless Area, Grant County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.

    1986-01-01

    The North Fork John Day River Roadless Area comprised 21,210 acres in the Umatilla and Wallowa-Whitman National Forests, Grant County, Oregon, about 30 miles northwest of Baker, Oregon. The irregularly shaped area extends for about 1 mile on both sides of a 25-mile segment of the North Fork John Day River from Big Creek on the west to North Fork John Day Campground on the east. Most of the roadless area is in the northern half of the Desolation Butte 15-minute quadrangle. The eastern end of the area is in parts of the Granite and Trout Meadows 7½-minute quadrangles.

  14. Geomorphology of the Trinity River floodplain in Dallas County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugen, B. D.; Roig-Silva, C.; Manning, A. R.; Harrelson, D. W.; Olsen, R. S.; Dunbar, J. P.; Pearson, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    Data from more than 1,800 geologic borings and over 500 cone penetrometer tests (CPTs) were used to characterize the geomorphology of the Trinity River floodplain in the Dallas Metropolitan Area. Historical maps, aerial photographs and other published information were used to prepare a preliminary geomorphic map. Boring logs and CPT data were then used to refine the preliminary map, produce a series of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cross sections, and interpret the recent geologic history of the area. Geomorphologic interpretations - most importantly the locations of paleo-channel deposits of sands and gravels - were used to identify reaches of the levees managed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the City of Dallas that may be at significant risk for under-seepage. Boring logs and CPT data collected atop the levees were used to assess through-seepage risks. Local bedrock is comprised of cretaceous-age Eagle Ford Shale and Austin Chalk. Depth to bedrock in the study area averaged 14.6 m (47.8 ft). The uppermost surface of bedrock has been deeply incised by a meandering river. Vertical relief between the shallowest bedrock sections and deepest portion of the incised paleo-channel is more than 15 m (50 ft). In places the incised paleo-channel is more than 0.8 km (0.5 mi) wide. These data confirm the presence of an erosional unconformity between local bedrock and overlying quaternary floodplain deposits. The observed erosional unconformity is attributed to a higher-energy fluvial environment that occurred as a result of a drop in base level. Recent floodplain deposits consist of interlobate point bar, channel and overbank sediments that are generally distributed in a fining-upward sequence. Buried channel dimensions vary widely, but are more than 250 m (820 ft) in some areas - much larger than the current channel. A semi-continuous basal layer of quaternary sands and gravels approximately 2 to 5 m (7 to 16 ft) thick exists in

  15. A reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Clarion River Roadless Area, Allegheny National Forest, Elk County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickling, N.L.; Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Adrian, Betty M.

    1983-01-01

    Semiquantitative emission spectrographic analyses for 31 elements were determined on 9 stream-sediment samples and 18 bedrock samples from the Clarion River Roadless Area, Elk County, Pennsylvania. All sample localities are given in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. Brief descriptions of bedrock samples are also included. Rocks analyzed are mostly sandstone, and siltstone. The analytical data do not indicate the presence of mineralized rock in the study area.

  16. Is Robin Hood Alive in Your Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royer, Sharon E.

    2002-01-01

    Considers whether the tales of Robin Hood should be presented as fact or fiction. Discusses the appropriateness of the tales for use in literature programs. Presents arguments for Robin Hood as fact and arguments for Robin Hood as fiction. Considers different versions of the tale. (SG)

  17. 78 FR 4377 - Idaho Panhandle National Forests, Coeur d'Alene River Ranger District, Shoshone County, ID...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... Forest Service Idaho Panhandle National Forests, Coeur d'Alene River Ranger District, Shoshone County, ID... written comments to the Coeur d'Alene River Ranger District, Attn: Project Leader Lauren Goschke, 2502 E Sherman Avenue, Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814. Comments may also be sent via email to...

  18. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  19. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  20. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  1. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  2. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey. 165.552 Section 165.552 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River,...

  3. 33 CFR 165.553 - Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey. 165.553 Section 165.553 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.553 Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation...: the waters of the Delaware River in the vicinity of the Salem and Hope Creek Generation...

  4. 33 CFR 165.553 - Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey. 165.553 Section 165.553 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.553 Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation...: the waters of the Delaware River in the vicinity of the Salem and Hope Creek Generation...

  5. 33 CFR 165.553 - Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey. 165.553 Section 165.553 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.553 Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation...: the waters of the Delaware River in the vicinity of the Salem and Hope Creek Generation...

  6. 33 CFR 165.553 - Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey. 165.553 Section 165.553 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.553 Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation...: the waters of the Delaware River in the vicinity of the Salem and Hope Creek Generation...

  7. 33 CFR 165.553 - Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Creek Generation Stations, Delaware River, Salem County, New Jersey. 165.553 Section 165.553 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.553 Security Zone; Salem and Hope Creek Generation...: the waters of the Delaware River in the vicinity of the Salem and Hope Creek Generation...

  8. Robin Hood Comes of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhouse, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    Considers how while some Robin Hood books are clearly intended for young readers, others blur the boundaries, sometimes in ways that help break down artificial boundaries dividing fiction for children from that for adults. Explores the legend's long history to help understand why the story lends itself to such a wide variety of retellings.…

  9. Sources of springs supplying base flow to the Verde River headwaters, Yavapai County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wirt, Laurie; Hjalmarson, H.W.

    1999-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence were used to identify source aquifers, quantify their respective contributions, and trace the ground-water flow paths that supply base flow to the uppermost reach of the Verde River in Yavapai County, Arizona. Ground-water discharge via springs provides base flow for a 24-mile long reach from the mouth of Granite Creek (river mile 2.0) to Perkinsville (river mile 26). The flowing reach is important to downstream water users, maintains critical habitat for the recovery of native fish species, and has been designated a Wild and Scenic River. Sources of base flow are deduced from (a) geologic information, (b) ground-water levels, (c) precipitation and streamflow records, (d) downstream changes in base-flow measurements, (e) hydrologic analysis of water-budget components, and (f) stableisotope geochemistry of ground water, surface water, and springs. Combined, this information clearly indicates that interconnected aquifers in Big Chino Valley are the primary source of Big Chino Springs, presently supplying at least 80 percent of the upper Verde River?s base flow.

  10. Sediment cores and chemistry for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon Habitat Restoration Project, Boundary County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Gary J.; Weakland, Rhonda J.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Cox, Stephen E.; Williams, Marshall L.

    2012-01-01

    The Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, in cooperation with local, State, Federal, and Canadian agency co-managers and scientists, is assessing the feasibility of a Kootenai River habitat restoration project in Boundary County, Idaho. This project is oriented toward recovery of the endangered Kootenai River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population, and simultaneously targets habitat-based recovery of other native river biota. Projects currently (2010) under consideration include modifying the channel and flood plain, installing in-stream structures, and creating wetlands to improve the physical and biological functions of the ecosystem. River restoration is a complex undertaking that requires a thorough understanding of the river. To assist in evaluating the feasibility of this endeavor, the U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed the physical and chemical nature of sediment cores collected at 24 locations in the river. Core depths ranged from 4.6 to 15.2 meters; 21 cores reached a depth of 15.2 meters. The sediment was screened for the presence of chemical constituents that could have harmful effects if released during restoration activities. The analysis shows that concentrations of harmful chemical constituents do not exceed guideline limits that were published by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2006.

  11. Current distribution of North American river otters in central and eastern Oklahoma, with seven new county records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrett, Dominic A.; Leslie,, David M., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    In 1984 and 1985, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation reintroduced North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) from coastal Louisiana into eastern Oklahoma. Those reintroductions and immigration from Arkansas and possibly northeastern Texas allowed river otters to become reestablished in eastern Oklahoma. Our goals were to determine the contemporary distribution of river otters in central and eastern Oklahoma with voucher specimens, sign surveys, and mail surveys and to compare proportion of positive detections among watersheds. We report new distributional records with voucher specimens from seven counties (Adair, Bryan, Coal, Johnston, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Tulsa) in Oklahoma. We also provide locality information for specimens collected from four counties (Haskell, McCurtain, Muskogee, Wagoner) where river otters were described in published literature but no voucher specimens existed. During winter and spring 2006 and 2007, we visited 340 bridge sites in 28 watersheds in eastern and central Oklahoma and identified river otter signs in 16 counties where river otters were not previously documented in published literature or by voucher specimens. Proportion of positive sites within each watershed ranged 0–100%. Mail surveys suggested that river otters occurred in eight additional counties where they were not previously documented by published literature, voucher specimens, or sign-survey efforts.

  12. Water-Quality Data for the Lower Russian River Basin, Sonoma County, California, 2003-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anders, Robert; Davidek, Karl; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sonoma County Water Agency, began a study to determine the chemical, microbiological, and isotopic composition of the surface water and ground water in selected areas of the Lower Russian River Basin, Sonoma County, California. This report is a compilation of the hydrologic and water-quality data collected from 10 Russian River sites, 1 gravel-terrace pit site, 12 ground-water sites, 11 tributary sites including Mark West Creek, and 2 estuary sites between the city of Healdsburg and the Pacific Ocean, for the period August 2003 to September 2004. Field measurements made included streamflow, barometric pressure, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, and turbidity. Water samples were analyzed for nutrients, major ions, total and dissolved organic carbon, trace elements, mercury, wastewater compounds, total coliform, Escherichia coli, Enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Discharge measurements and sampling techniques were modified to accommodate the very low summer flows at most of the tributaries, and discharge measurements were made with an acoustic Doppler velocity meter at the estuary river site to overcome the complexities associated with tidal influences.

  13. 15. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,312(463AM4)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory FacilityHood VentilationMechanical' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,312(463A-M-4)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory Facility-Hood Ventilation-Mechanical' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Battery Test Office & Storage Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  14. Kitchen hood performance in food service operations.

    PubMed

    Keil, Charles B; Kassa, Hailu; Fent, Kenny

    2004-12-01

    Cooking processes at food service operations release fumes that present risks of food contamination, fire, and employee exposure to hazardous chemicals. Local exhaust ventilation in the form of kitchen hoods is commonly used to control these risks. State codes often refer to the need for adequate ventilation, but hoods are not an explicit point on most inspection sheets and are rarely quantitatively assessed to determine if flow rates meet recommended levels. For this article, the flow rates of 89 hoods in 60 restaurants were measured and compared with appropriate flow rate guidelines. It was found that 39 percent of the hoods met the guidelines of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists and 24 percent met the guidelines of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Inspecting sanitarians identified inadequate flow rates in less than 4 percent of the cases. Hoods used to control heavy-duty operations such as upright broilers, charbroilers, and woks had the lowest pass rate, 18 percent. The researchers also graded the hoods in terms of cleanliness. These ratings did not correlate with hood cleanliness notes on the sanitarians' inspection reports. Overall risks from cooking fumes could be reduced by regular systematic inspections of kitchen hoods, with hoods perhaps included as an independent item on inspection sheets. Quantitative assessment of flow rates is time consuming and is probably not feasible for all inspections. Periodic inspections of hoods on heavy-duty operations could be a workable way to reduce risks. PMID:15628193

  15. Floods on Yahara River, Lake Mendota to Lake Kegonsa, Dane County, Wisconsin, 1971

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmstrom, Barry K.; Lawrence, Carl L.

    1971-01-01

    The profile and an approximate outline of the flooded area for the regional (100-year) flood has been determined for a 21.3-mile reach of the Yahara River, Dane County, Wisconsin, from State Highway 113 at the head of Lake Mendota downstream to the dam at the outlet of Lake Kegonsa. The reach consists principally of lake surface, which results in large amounts of flood-storage volume. The regional-flood profile ranges from 1.7 feet to 3.1 feet above normal low-water elevation.

  16. Mineral resources of the Encampment River Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    du Bray, E.A.; Bankey, V.; Hill, R.H.; Ryan, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Encampment River Canyon Wilderness Study Area is about 4 mi south of Encampment, in Carbon County, Wyoming. This study area is underlain by Archean felsic gneiss and early Proterozoic quartzite; both are intruded by minor middle Proterozoic mafic plutonic rock. Gneiss occurs throughout the eastern and northwestern parts of the study area; whereas, quartzite occurs in the western and southwestern parts. This study area has no identified resources and no potential for energy resources. Resource potential for all undiscovered metallic commodities and for undiscovered industrial minerals is low.

  17. 'Cobra Hoods' Coming At You

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D image taken by the left and right eyes of the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the odd rock formation dubbed 'Cobra Hoods' (center). Rover scientists say this resistant rock is unlike anything they've seen on Mars so far. Spirit will investigate the rock in coming sols. The stereo pictures making up this image were captured on sol 156 (June 11, 2004).

  18. 3. VIEW OF SITE A FROM HOOD AVENUE, FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF SITE A FROM HOOD AVENUE, FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST. (BUILDINGS 116, 117, 120, 118, 128, AND 122 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  19. Flood of February 1980 along the Agua Fria River, Maricopa County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomsen, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The flood of February 20, 1980, along the Agua Fria River below Waddell Dam, Maricopa County, Ariz., was caused by heavy rains during February 13-20. The runoff filled Lake Pleasant and resulted in the largest release--66,600 cubic feet per second--from the reservoir since it was built in 1927; the maximum inflow to the reservoir was about 73,300 cubic feet per second. The area inundated by the releases includes about 28 miles along the channel from the mouth of the Agua Fria River to the Beardsley Canal flume crossing 5 miles downstream from Waddell Dam. The flood of 1980 into Lake Pleasant has a recurrence interval of about 47 years, whereas the flood of record (1919) has a recurrence interval of about 100 years. (USGS)

  20. Numerical model of the salt-wedge reach of the Duwamish River estuary, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prych, Edmund A.; Haushild, W.L.; Stoner, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical model of a salt-wedge estuary developed by Fischer (1974) has been expanded and used to calculate the distributions of salinity, temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved-oxygen concentration in the Duwamish River estuary, King County, Wash. The model was used to predict the dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Duwamish River estuary when the Renton Treatment Plant sewage-effluent discharge is increased to its proposed maximum of 223 cubic feet per second. The computed monthly average dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the estuary decreased by a maximum of 2 milligrams per liter when compared with computations for the summer of 1971, when the effluent discharge averaged 37 cubic feet per second. The increase in effluent discharge is not expected to cause large changes in phytoplankton concentrations in the estuary. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Dissolved-oxygen regime of the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the Jordan River in Salt Lake County decrease considerably as the river flows northward. Mean concentrations of dissolved oxygen decreased from 8.1 milligrams per liter at the Jordan Narrows to 4.7 milligrams per liter at 500 North Street during April 1981 to September 1982. Coincident with the decrease, the biochemical-oxygen demand increased from 5 to 7 milligrams per liter. About 50 percent of the dissolved-oxygen concentrations and 90 percent of the 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand measured downstream from 1700 South Street exceeded the State intended-use standards. An estimated 6. million pounds of oxygen-demanding substances as measured by 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand were discharged to the Jordan River during 1981 from point sources downstream from 9000 South Street. Seven wastewater-treatment plants contributed 77 percent of this load, nonstorm base flows contributed 22 percent, and storm flows less than 1 percent. The Surplus Canal diversion at 2100 South Street removed about 70 percent of this load, and travel time of about 1 day also decreased the actual effects of the load on the river. Reaeration rates during September and October were quite high (average K2 at 20 degrees Celsius was about 12 per day) between the Jordan Narrows and 9000 South Street, but they decreased to 2.4 per day in the reach from 1330 South to 1800 North Streets. (USGS)

  2. Experimental salinity alleviation at Malaga Bend of the Pecos River, Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Havens, John S.; Wilkins, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    Upward-leaking brine, from a confined aquifer at the base of the Rustler Formation, mixes with fresher water in a shallow aquifer , resulting in discharge to the Pecos River in southern Eddy County, New Mexico, of about 0.5 cubic feet per second of saturated brine. Pumping brine from the aquifer at a rate greater than 0.5 cubic feet per second lowered the potentiometric head in the confined aquifer. From July 22, 1963, through December 1968, approximately 3,878 acre-feet of brine had been pumped into the Northeast Depression. The depression leaked brine to the Pecos River. Water downgradient of the depression increased in specific conductance ranging from 1,500 to 99,400 milligrams per liter chloride and water levels near the depression increased over 3 feet from 1963 to 1968. For water years 1952-63, the Pecos River gained about 240 tons per day of chloride in the reach from Malaga gaging station to Pierce Canyon Crossing. The average chloride gain to the Pecos River from July 1963 to August 1966 was 167 tons per day; the 1967-68 gain increased to 256 tons per day after a major flood in August 1966. (USGS)

  3. The functional morphology of hooding in cobras.

    PubMed

    Young, Bruce A; Kardong, Kenneth V

    2010-05-01

    Many snakes, particularly cobras, form as part of a defensive display, a hood, an active lateral expansion of their neck skin and underlying musculature and ribs. We identified muscle groups possibly involved in hooding based on their attachments on the specialized ribs of the neck. We then used a combination of morphology, kinematic analysis, morphometrics, electromyography and muscle stimulation to test hypotheses about the functional basis of hooding. We confirmed that hood protraction and erection is an active process that begins cranially and extends caudally, often in stages, through the combined action of several sets of muscles. One set of axial muscles (levator costae and supracostalis lateralis superior) coursing along a line of action to rib displacement are the prime erectors acting to lift the hood. However, a second set of muscles connecting ribs to skin primarily keep the skin taut, rather than to displace the ribs relative to the vertebrae. A third set of muscles coursing between ribs function primarily to transmit forces between adjacent ribs rather than to move ribs. The maintenance of the erect hood requires continued muscle activity. Hood relaxation is due to both active muscle contraction of a fourth set of axial muscles and to passive recoil events in the costovertebral ligaments. The shape of the fully erect hood is reflective of the morphometrics of the underlying ribs, while the duration and kinematics of hood erection and relaxation are related to the behavioral context of the display. PMID:20400637

  4. Potential impact of Dare County landfills on Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Augspurger, T.

    2005-01-01

    Runoff of leachate from East Lake and Dare County Construction and Demolition Debris landfills has the potential to impact wildlife resources at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Dare and Hyde Counties, North Carolina. Sediment quality of samples collected in August 2000 at 14 locations down-gradient from the landfills was assessed by measuring metal and organic contaminants in the sediments, chronic toxicity of solid-phase sediment (28-d static-renewal exposures; survival and growth as test endpoints) and acute toxicity of sediment porewater (96-h static exposures) to Hyalella azteca (Crustacea: Amphipoda). In addition, contaminant bioaccumulation from 4 sediments was determined using 28-d exposures of Lumbriculus variegatus (freshwater oligochaete). Although survival was not impaired, length of H. azteca was significantly reduced in sediments from 5 locations. Pore water from 4 locations was acutely toxic to H. azteca. Metals and a few polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were bioaccumulated by L. variegatus from the sediments. Several metals and PAHs exceeded sediment quality guidelines, and metals in porewater from several sites exceeded water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic wildlife. Runoff of leachate from the landfills has reduced sediment quality and has the potential to adversely affect wildlife resources at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.

  5. Geology of the Canyon Reservoir site on the Guadalupe River, Comal County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, William O.; Welder, Frank A.

    1955-01-01

    In response to a request by Colonel Harry O. Fisher, District Engineer of the Fort Worth District of the Corps of Engineers, United States Army (letter of Dec. 13, 1954), a reconnaissance investigation was made of the geology of the Canyon (F-1) reservoir site on the Guadalupe River in Comal County, Tex. The purpose of the investigation was to study the geology in relation to possible leakage - particularly leakage of water that might then be lost from the drainage area of the Guadalupe River - and to add to the general knowledge of the ground-water hydrology of the San Antonio area. The dam (F-1) was originally designed for flood control and conservation only, with provision for the addition of a power unit if feasible. Since the completion of the investigation by the Corps of Engineers, the city of San Antonio has expressed an interest in the reservoir as a possible source of public water supply. The Corps of Engineers has made a thorough engineering and geologic study of the dam site (Corps of Engineers, 1950), which has Congressional approval. The geology and water resources of Comal County have been studied by George (1952). The rocks studied are those within the reservoir area and generally below the 1,000-foot contour as shown on the Smithson Valley quadrangle of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  6. Water-surface elevations and channel characteristics for a selected reach of the Applegate River, Jackson County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, David Dell; Alexander, Clyde W.

    1970-01-01

    In land-use planning for the Applegate River and its flood plain, consideration should be given to (1) preservation of the recreational attributes of the area, (2) allowance for optimum development of the flood plain's natural resources, and (3) protection of the rights of private landowners. Major factors that influence evaluation of the above considerations are the elevations and characteristics of floods. Heretofore, such flood data for the Applegate River have been inadequate to evaluate the flood potential or to use as a basis for delineating reasonable land-use zones. Therefore, at the request of Jackson County, this study was made to provide flood elevations, water-surface profiles, and channel characteristics (geometry and slope) for a reach of the Applegate River from the Jackson-Josephine County line upstream to the Applegate damsite (fig. 1). A similar study was previously made for reaches of adjacent Rogue River and Elk Creek (Harris, 1970).

  7. Genetics of barley hooded suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Cristina; Pozzi, Carlo; Santi, Luca; Müller, Judith; Wang, Yamei; Stile, Maria Rosaria; Rossini, Laura; Stanca, Michele; Salamini, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    The molecular basis of the barley dominant Hooded (K) mutant is a duplication of 305 bp in intron IV of the homeobox gene Bkn3. A chemical mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify genetical factors that participate in Bkn3 intron-mediated gene regulation. Plants from recurrently mutagenized KK seeds were examined for the suppression of the hooded awn phenotype induced by the K allele and, in total, 41 suK (suppressor of K) recessive mutants were identified. Complementation tests established the existence of five suK loci, and alleles suKB-4, suKC-33, suKD-25, suKE-74, and suKF-76 were studied in detail. All K-suppressed mutants showed a short-awn phenotype. The suK loci have been mapped by bulked segregant analysis nested in a standard mapping procedure based on AFLP markers. K suppressor loci suKB, B, E, and F all map in a short interval of chromosome 7H, while the locus suKD is assigned to chromosome 5H. A complementation test between the four suK mutants mapping on chromosome 7H and the short-awn mutant lks2, located nearby, excluded the allelism between suK loci and lks2. The last experiment made clear that the short-awn phenotype of suK mutants is due to a specific dominant function of the K allele, a function that is independent from the control on hood formation. The suK loci are discussed as candidate participants in the regulation of Bkn3 expression. PMID:15166167

  8. 33 CFR 117.1045 - Hood Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hood Canal. 117.1045 Section 117.1045 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1045 Hood Canal. The draw of the...

  9. 33 CFR 117.1045 - Hood Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hood Canal. 117.1045 Section 117.1045 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1045 Hood Canal. The draw of the...

  10. Hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the county road a disposal site on the Bad River Indian Reservation, Ashland County, Wisconsin: 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunning, C.P.; Yeskis, Douglas J.

    2001-01-01

    The County Road A disposal site, located on the Bad River Indian Reservation, Ashland County, Wisconsin, contains papermill sludge generated by a former mill in the City of Ashland. Since the time of disposal (1968-1970) the site has been the subject of investigations by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and private consultants. During 1997- 1998, an investigation was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Natural Resources Department of the Bad River Indian Tribe, to evaluate the hydrogeology and groundwater quality of the disposal site, particularly with respect to the hydraulic connection between two ponds at the site and the shallow ground-waterflow system. Additional monitoring wells and well points were installed, and additional hydrogeologic, ground-water quality, and geophysical data were collected. The data from this and previous studies were integrated and interpreted.

  11. Occurrence, transport, and fate of trace elements, Blue River Basin, Summit County, Colorado: an integrated approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.; Driver, N.E.; Bails, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Mining activities in the Blue River Basin, Summit County, Colorado, have affected the trace-element chemistry and biota along French Gulch and the Blue River. Elevated concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were present in the bed and suspended sediments. Bed sediment trace-element concentrations were high in the streams in and near mining activities in the basin and remained high as water flowed into Dillon Reservoir about 3.5 km downstream. Bed-sediment (< 63 μm) data were useful in assessing the distribution of trace elements in the basin. Suspended-sediment measurements provided information as to the transport of the trace elements. Filtered (< 0.45 μm) water-column trace-element concentrations were orders of magnitude less than the sediment concentrations. Concentrations of Cd and Zn in the water column at some sites exceeded stream water-quality standards. Elevated trace-element concentrations in the sediment and water column are a source of contamination and must be considered in water-quality management of the Blue River Basin.

  12. Quaternary eolian dunes in the Savannah River valley, Jasper County, South Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swezey, Christopher S.; Schultz, Arthur P.; González, Wilma Alemán; Bernhardt, Christopher E.; Doar, William R.; Garrity, Christopher P.; Mahan, Shannon A.; McGeehin, John P.

    2013-09-01

    Sand hills in the Savannah River valley in Jasper County (South Carolina, USA) are interpreted as the remnants of parabolic eolian dunes composed of sand derived from the Savannah River and stabilized by vegetation under prevailing climate conditions. Optically stimulated luminescence ages reveal that most of the dunes were active ca. 40 to 19 ka ago, coincident with the last glacial maximum (LGM) through early deglaciation. Modern surface winds are not sufficient for sustained eolian sand transport. When the dunes were active, winds blew at velocities of at least 4 m/s from west to east, and some vegetation was present. The ratio of annual precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (P:PE) was less than the modern ratio of 1.23 and may have been < 0.30, caused by stronger winds (which would have resulted in greater evaporation) and/or reduced precipitation. The Savannah River dunes are part of a larger assemblage of eolian dunes that were active in the eastern United States during and immediately after the LGM, suggesting that eolian sediment behavior in this region has been controlled by regional forcing mechanisms during the Quaternary.

  13. Channel-changing processes on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Lateral channel change on the mainly ephemeral Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, causes damage and has spawned costly efforts to control bank erosion. Aerial photographs, historical data, and field observations are used to document the history of channel change since 1936. Variability in the nature and degree of channel change over time and space is shown. Three major channel change processes are: (1) migration by bank erosion during meander migration or initiation; (2) avulsion by overbank flooding and flood plain incision; (3) widening by erosion of low, cohesionless banks during floods and arroyo widening by undercutting and mass wasting of deeply incised vertical walls. The first process generally is a product of low to moderate flows or waning high flows; the others result mainly from higher flows, though sensitive arroyo walls may erode during relatively low flows. Channel morphology, bank resistance, and hydrology are factors determining the dominant channel-changing process on a particular reach of the river. Present river morphology reflects high flows since the 1960's.

  14. Base Flow (1966-2005) and Streamflow Gain and Loss (2006) of the Brazos River, McLennan County to Fort Bend County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turco, Michael J.; East, Jeffery W.; Milburn, Matthew S.

    2007-01-01

    During 2006?07, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, did a study to quantify historical (water years 1966?2005) base flow and streamflow gains and losses from two streamflow-measuring surveys (March and August 2006) in the Brazos River from McLennan County to Fort Bend County, Texas. The Brazos River is hydraulically connected to the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, which in turn is hydraulically connected to several underlying aquifers, the outcrops of which occur in laterally adjacent layers generally parallel to the coast (major aquifers, Carrizo-Wilcox and Gulf Coast, and minor aquifers, Queen City, Sparta, and Yegua-Jackson). Hydrograph separation was done using the USGS computer program Hydrograph Separation and Analysis with historical streamflow from 10 USGS gaging stations, three on the Brazos River and seven on selected tributaries to the Brazos River. Streamflow data for computation of gains and losses were collected in March 2006 from 36 sites on the Brazos River and 19 sites on 19 tributaries to the Brazos River; and in August 2006 from 28 sites on the Brazos River and 16 sites on tributaries. Hydrograph separation and associated analyses indicate an appreciable increase in base flow as a percentage of streamflow in the reach of the Brazos River that crosses the outcrops of the Carrizo-Wilcox, Queen City, Sparta, and Yegua-Jackson aquifers compared to that in the adjacent upstream reach (on average from about 43 percent to about 60 percent). No increase in base flow as a percentage of streamflow in the reach of the Brazos River crossing the Gulf Coast aquifer compared to that in the adjacent upstream reach was indicated. Streamflow gains and losses computed for March 2006 for 35 reaches defined by pairs of sites on the Brazos River indicated that five reaches were verifiably gaining streamflow (computed gain exceeded potential flow measurement error) and none were verifiably losing streamflow. Four of

  15. 75 FR 53264 - Restricted Area in Cape Fear River and Tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION... regulation for the restricted area in the Cape Fear River and its tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal... facility, including vessels loading and offloading at the Sunny Point Army Terminal. In the ``Rules...

  16. Appraisal of water-quality conditions, lower Black River, Windsor County, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toppin, K.W.

    1983-01-01

    Six hydroelectric power dams are planned along a 22-mile reach of the lower Black River in southeastern Windsor County, Vermont. Data were collected at 10 stations, during water years 1977-81, to appraise quality conditions before construction. Average specific conductance of Black River is 101 micromhos indicating low concentrations of dissolved solids. Concentrations of common constituents and minor elements were generally low and within safe levels for aquatic life. Near-saturated dissolved oxygen concentrations and relatively low mean total organic carbon concentrations indicate little oxygen-consuming substances in Black River. Mean total nitrogen concentrations ranged from 0.31 mg/L (milligrams per liter) to 0.61 mg/L. The highest concentrations were most likely due to secondary waste discharges entering the river. Nitrate was the primary form of inorganic nitrogen, mean concentrations ranged from 0.13 to 0.27 mg/L. Concentrations seem high enough to promote excessive algal growth in the proposed Hawks Mountain Reservoir. Mean concentrations of total phosphorus ranged from 0.014 to 0.112 mg/L as P. Maximum concentrations at all stations generally exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency suggested levels for water entering lakes and reservoirs. Mean orthophosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.005 to 0.029 mg/L, suggesting a potential for nuisance algal conditions to develop in the proposed reservoir. Mean algal growth potential concentrations ranged from 1.3 to 8.8 mg/L, falling within the moderately high to high productivity range. No pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls were detected. (USGS)

  17. Bathymetry and Near-River Topography of the Naches and Yakima Rivers at Union Gap and Selah Gap, Yakima County, Washington, August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, M.C.; Fosness, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Yakima County is collaborating with the Bureau of Reclamation on a study of the hydraulics and sediment-transport in the lower Naches River and in the Yakima River between Union Gap and Selah Gap in Washington. River bathymetry and topographic data of the river channels are needed for the study to construct hydraulic models. River survey data were available for most of the study area, but river bathymetry and near-river topography were not available for Selah Gap, near the confluence of the Naches and Yakima Rivers, and for Union Gap. In August 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey surveyed the areas where data were not available. If possible, the surveys were made with a boat-mounted, single-beam echo sounder attached to a survey-grade Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) global positioning system (GPS). An RTK GPS rover was used on a walking survey of the river banks, shallow river areas, and river bed areas that were impenetrable to the echo sounder because of high densities of macrophytes. After the data were edited, 95,654 bathymetric points from the boat survey with the echo sounder and 1,069 points from the walking survey with the GPS rover were used in the study. The points covered 4.6 kilometers on the Yakima River and 0.6 kilometers on the Naches River. GPS-surveyed points checked within 0.014 to 0.047 meters in the horizontal direction and -0.036 to 0.078 meters in the vertical direction compared to previously established survey control points

  18. Circulatory mobility in post-Mao China: temporary migrants in Kaiping county, Pearl River Delta region.

    PubMed

    Woon, Y

    1993-01-01

    "Since the 1980s, it has been possible for the Chinese peasant household to diversify its economic base by making use of its social networks to place members in a distant community as migrant workers. Through a microstudy of 50 such migrants in Kaiping County in the Pearl River Delta region, this article illustrates the interplay between macro, meso, and micro factors in the causes and processes of circulatory mobility in post-Mao China. It is found that Hong Kong's search for cheap labor, the PRC's household registration system, and Kaiping's strong localism provide the context in which migrants and their households have to adjust. The particular behavior pattern of these migrants also bears the stamp of their rational household decision-making processes as well as their feelings of moral obligation toward their kin in their community of origin." PMID:12287570

  19. Hydrogeology and water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    A growing user population within the Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma, has increased the need for drinking water. The North Canadian River alluvium is a reliable source of ground water for agriculture, industry, and cities in Canadian County and is the only ground-water source capable of meeting large demands. This study was undertaken to collect and analyze data to describe the hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium within the Concho Reserve. The alluvium forms a band about 2 miles long and 0.5 mile wide along the southern edge of the Concho Reserve. Thickness of the alluvium ranges from 19 to 75 feet thick and averages about 45 feet in the study area. Well cuttings and natural gamma-ray logs indicate the alluvium consists of interfingering lenses of clay, silt, and sand. The increase of coarse-grained sand and the decrease of clay and silt with depth suggests that the water-bearing properties of the aquifer within the study area improve with depth. A clay layer in the upper part of the aquifer may be partially responsible for surface water ponding in low areas after above normal precipitation and may delay the infiltration of potentially contaminated water from land surface. Specific conductance measurements indicate the ground-water quality improves in a northern direction towards the terrace. Water-quality properties, bacteria counts, major ion and nutrient concentrations, trace-element and radionuclide concentrations, and organic compound concentrations were measured in one ground-water sample at the southern edge of the Concho Reserve and comply with the primary drinking-water standards. Measured concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and total dissolved solids exceed the secondary maximum contaminant levels set for drinking water. The ground water is a calcium sulfate bicarbonate type and is considered very hard, with a hardness of 570 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

  20. 33 CFR 334.450 - Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, N.C.; restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Fear River and tributaries... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.450 Cape Fear River and tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, N.C.; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of Cape Fear River due west of the...

  1. Calibration of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority, developed a validated two-dimensional Resource Management Associates2 (RMA2) hydrodynamic model of parts of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (Three Rivers) to help assess the effects of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) on the rivers. The hydrodynamic model was used to drive a water-quality model of the study area that was capable of simulating the transport and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria and chemical constituents under open-water conditions. The study area includes 14 tributary streams and parts of the Three Rivers where they enter and exit Allegheny County, an area of approximately 730 square miles (mi2). The city of Pittsburgh is near the center of the county, where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers join to form the headwaters of the Ohio River. The Three Rivers are regulated by a series of fixed-crest dams, gated dams, and radial (tainter) gates and serve as the receiving waters for tributary streams, CSOs, and SSOs. The RMA2 model was separated into four individual segments on the basis of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigational pools in the study area (Dashields; Emsworth; Allegheny River, Pool 2; and Braddock), which were calibrated individually using measured water-surface slope, velocity, and discharge during high- and low-flow conditions. The model calibration process included the comparison of water-surface elevations at five locations and velocity profiles at more than 80 cross sections in the study area. On the basis of the calibration and validation results that included water-surface elevations and velocities, the model is a representative simulation of the Three Rivers flow patterns for discharges ranging from 4,050 to 47,400 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) on the Allegheny River, 2,550 to 40,000 ft3/s on the Monongahela River, and 10,900 to 99,000 ft3/s on the Ohio River. The Monongahela River was

  2. Numerical simulation of laboratory fume hood airflow performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.T.; Reither, R.

    1998-12-31

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been used to predict airflow patterns in laboratory fume hoods. The simulation includes bypass fume hood primary operational features including the top and bottom bypasses, front airfoils, and rear-slotted baffles. All results were validated experimentally, and the simulation was found to adequately predict fume hood airflow patterns. The results indicate that fume hood flow patterns are highly dependent on inlet flow boundary conditions so that the computation must include the near field room airflow. Additionally, the study included the effects on the fume hood airflow of sash height changes, an operator positioned outside the fume hood, and equipment within the main fume hood chamber. It was shown that for conditions of a fully open sash height, a person in front of the fume hood, and an object inside the fume hood, the fume hood experiences a loss of containment of the flow.

  3. Petrographic investigation of River Gem Coal, Whitley County, eastern Kentucky Coal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, J.D.; Hower, J.C.

    1987-09-01

    The River Gem coal of the Breathitt Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) was studied at three sites in a surface mine in the Holly Hill quadrangle, Whitley County, Kentucky. The River Gem coal is correlative with the Lily and Manchester coals in neighboring Knox, Laurel, and Clay Counties, Kentucky, and the Clintwood coal in Pike County, Kentucky. At the northern site, a 14-cm rider is separated from the 92.5-cm seam by 22 cm of shale. At the two southern sites, the rider is missing. At the latter sites, the 10 cm thick top bench of the seam is separated from the lower 63 cm of the seam by a 14-cm bony lithotype not found at the northern site. The lower 63 cm of the seam in the south and the main seam in the north are characterized by moderate ash and sulfur percentages (4.4-6.8% ash, 1.4-2.3% total sulfur, 0.6-1.1% pyritic sulfur, 74-81% vitrinite, 23-32% Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 2.3-4.5% CaO). In contrast, the upper bench in the south and the rider have 18.7-27.0% ash, 8.8-11.4% total sulfur, 5.1-6.4% pyritic sulfur, 92.3-93.6% vitrinite, 45.7-57.8% Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 0.13-0.20% CaO. The bone has over 26% ash, 5.5% total sulfur, 3.2% pyritic sulfur, and 93.1% vitrinite. The overall similarity of the seam and rider characteristics between the north and south suggests that the southern bone is the lateral equivalent of the northern shale. The sulfide in the upper bench or rider and in the bone consists of fine (generally less than 10 ..mu..m), euhedral and framboidal pyrite with common massive pyrite. Massive pyrite appears as an overgrowth of fine pyrite in some places. Massive forms of marcasite, less abundant than pyrite, exhibit some evidence of developing later than the massive pyrite. A variety of < 2-..mu..m pyrite occurs as abundant, but isolated, unidimensional to tabular grains within corpocollinite, some of which is transitional to resinite.

  4. Petrographic analyses of Knobloch coal seam (Paleocene), Powder River County, southeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    A single core of Knobloch coal from Powder River County, southeast Montana, was drilled to obtain samples for coal quality studies. The coal occurs in the lower Tongue River Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The Knobloch coal core (63 ft long) was divided into 1-ft increments and analyzed using chemical and petrographic methods. Definite variations in maceral content were seen. Preliminary studies show relationship between ash, gelinite, inertinite, and humodetrinite contents. A zone of low gelinite, low humodetrinite, and high inertinite, located in the lower quarter of the seam, implies a period of severe oxidation occurred, possibly as swamp fires. Four zones of high inertinite and high humodetrinite (three in the upper half and one in the lower half of the seam) indicate fluctuations in the water table, allowing moderate oxidation and weathering of plant material and subsequent mechanical reworking of humic grains. Near the center of the seam, a zone of high inertinite, high humodetrinite, and high ash content suggests water levels were high enough to allow significant sediment influx as well as reworking of the humic materials. These conclusions suggest the Knobloch coal is autochthonous and hypautochthonous in origin, a result of several water-table fluctuations and/or climatic changes due to drought.

  5. Geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer, Garden County, Western Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, Gregory V.; Cannia, James C.

    1995-01-01

    In 1993, a 3-year study was begun to describe the geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer near Oshkosh, Garden County, Nebraska. The study's objectives are to evaluate the geohydrologic characteristics of the alluvial aquifer and to establish a network of observation wells for long-term monitoring of temporal variations and spatial distributions of nitrate and major-ion concentrations. Monitor wells were installed at 11 sites near Oshkosh. The geohydrology of the aquifer was characterized based on water-level measurements and two short-term aquifer tests. Bimonthly water samples were collected and analyzed for pH, specific conductivity, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients that included dissolved nitrate. Concentrations of major ions were defined from analyses of semiannual water samples. Analyses of the geohydrologic and water-quality data indicate that the aquifer is vulnerable to nitrate contamination. These data also show that nitrate concentrations in ground water flowing into and out of the study area are less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Concentration Level of 10 milligrams per liter for drinking water. Ground water from Lost Creek Valley may be mixing with ground water in the North Platte River Valley, somewhat moderating nitrate concentrations near Oshkosh.

  6. Ecological studies of a regulated stream: Huntington River, Emery County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Winget, R.N.

    1984-04-30

    A 36.9 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ reservoir constructed on Huntington River, Emery County, Utah, resulted in changes in physical habitat, water quality, temperature, and flow regime. The greatest changes in physical habitat resulted from: (1) sediment additions from dam and road construction plus erosion of reservoir basin during filling; and (2) changing stream flow from a spring high runoff regime to a moderated flow regime. Elimination of spring nutrient concentration peaks and overall reduction of total dissolved nutrient availability in the river plus moderate reductions in pH were the most apparent water quality changes below the reservoir. Water temperature changes were an increased diurnal and seasonal constancy, summer depression, and winter elevation, generally limited to a 10-12 km reach below the dam. Physical and chemical changes altered macroinvertebrate community structure, with changes greatest near the dam and progressively less as distance downstream increased. Below the dam: (1) more environmentally tolerant taxa increased their dominance; (2) relative numbers of smaller sized individuals increased in relation to larger individuals; and (3) filter feeding, collector/gatherers, and scapers gained an advantage over shredders. Macroinvertebrate taxa with small instar larvae present from late summer to early fall were negatively impacted by the unnaturally high July and August flows. The reservoir became a physical barrier to downstream larval drift and upcanyon and downcanyon immigration of adults, resulting in reduced numbers of several species above and below the reservoir. 50 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Permian and Triassic rocks near Quinn River Crossing, Humboldt County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketner, Keith B.; Wardlaw, Bruce R.

    1981-03-01

    Permian and Triassic rocks near Quinn River Crossing, Humboldt County, Nevada, consist of four structural blocks: (1) a Lower Permian volcanic block; (2) a Permian(?) chert-arenite block; (3) a Lower Permian limestone block; and (4) a Permian and Triassic block. The contacts between the Permian volcanic block and the others are interpreted as thrust faults or glide surfaces. None of these rocks are metamorphosed, in contrast to those of the surrounding mountain ranges. Each of the blocks is lithically similar in some respects to rocks of the Osgood Mountains area 80 km to the southeast. The fusulinid and brachiopod faunas of two of the blocks display affinities to those of the McCloud Limestone of northern California and the Coyote Butte Limestone of central Oregon, and the fauna of another block has elements in common with autochthonous rocks of eastern Nevada and Utah. All four blocks probably are allochthonous with respect to the rocks exposed in the surrounding mountain ranges, but their points of origin remain obscure. The rocks at Quinn River Crossing provide a link among the Permian rocks of north-central Nevada, northern California, and central Oregon and a possible key to their original relations, but more comparative data are needed.

  8. Base-flow investigation on the Sacramento River, September 25, 1985, near Sunspot, Otero County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagel, Clint D.

    1990-01-01

    On September 25, 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a base-flow investigation to better define the surface-water resources of the Sacramento River drainage basin in Otero County , south-central New Mexico. The investigation included all flow in the Sacramento River from the initial point of flow to the point of zero flow 20.1 river miles downstream. A total of 12 discharge measurements, 3 observations of zero flow and 2 observations of initial flow were obtained during this investigation. Discharge measurements and observations showed a general increase in discharge from river mile 22.4 to a discharge of 6.69 cu ft/sec at river mile 8.4. Discharge then decreased from river mile 8.4 to zero flow at river mile 3.3. Specific conductance and water temperature also were taken concurrently with the discharge measurements. Specific conductance of water generally decreased in a downstream direction from 600 microsiemens/cm at 25 C at river mile 21.9 to 330 microsiemens/cm at 25C at river mile 4.6. (USGS)

  9. Development of an Impervious-Surface Database for the Little Blackwater River Watershed, Dorchester County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milheim, Lesley E.; Jones, John W.; Barlow, Roger A.

    2007-01-01

    Many agricultural and forested areas in proximity to National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) are under increasing economic pressure for commercial or residential development. The upper portion of the Little Blackwater River watershed - a 27 square mile area within largely low-lying Dorchester County, Maryland, on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay - is important to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) because it flows toward the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (BNWR), and developmental impacts of areas upstream from the BNWR are unknown. One of the primary concerns for the Refuge is how storm-water runoff may affect living resources downstream. The Egypt Road project (fig. 1), for which approximately 600 residential units have been approved, has the potential to markedly change the land use and land cover on the west bank of the Little Blackwater River. In an effort to limit anticipated impacts, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (Maryland DNR) recently decided to purchase some of the lands previously slated for development. Local topography, a high water table (typically 1 foot or less below the land surface), and hydric soils present a challenge for the best management of storm-water flow from developed surfaces. A spatial data coordination group was formed by the Dorchester County Soil and Conservation District to collect data to aid decisionmakers in watershed management and on the possible impacts of development on this watershed. Determination of streamflow combined with land cover and impervious-surface baselines will allow linking of hydrologic and geologic factors that influence the land surface. This baseline information will help planners, refuge managers, and developers discuss issues and formulate best management practices to mitigate development impacts on the refuge. In consultation with the Eastern Region Geospatial Information Office, the dataset selected to be that baseline land cover source was the June-July 2005 National

  10. A Simple, Transparent Fume Hood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredericks, John

    1998-10-01

    An inexpensive transparent fume hood can be constructed from a clear-plastic two-liter soft drink bottle that is cut just above the base. A length of vacuum tubing is secured to the opening of the bottle using black electrical tape. The tubing is then connected to a water aspirator. Beakers or flasks easily fit inside the bottle, and the bottle may be secured with a clamp and ring stand for added stability. This device has been used to collect the noxious NO2 gas generated from the reaction of copper metal with nitric acid. It also may be used in the collection of other gases. It should not be used to collect gases that are not water-soluble or in experiments that involve open flames.

  11. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  12. Transport and deposition of asbestos-rich sediment in the Sumas River, Whatcom County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Anderson, Scott W.; Barbash, Jack E.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Cox, Stephen E.; Norton, Katherine K.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Spanjer, Andrew R.; Foreman, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy sediment loads in the Sumas River of Whatcom County, Washington, increase seasonal turbidity and cause locally acute sedimentation. Most sediment in the Sumas River is derived from a deep-seated landslide of serpentinite that is located on Sumas Mountain and drained by Swift Creek, a tributary to the Sumas River. This mafic sediment contains high amounts of naturally occurring asbestiform chrysotile. A known human-health hazard, asbestiform chrysotile comprises 0.25–37 percent, by mass, of the total suspended sediment sampled from the Sumas River as part of this study, which included part of water year 2011 and all of water years 2012 and 2013. The suspended-sediment load in the Sumas River at South Pass Road, 0.6 kilometers (km) downstream of the confluence with Swift Creek, was 22,000 tonnes (t) in water year 2012 and 49,000 t in water year 2013. The suspended‑sediment load at Telegraph Road, 18.8 km downstream of the Swift Creek confluence, was 22,000 t in water year 2012 and 27,000 t in water year 2013. Although hydrologic conditions during the study were wetter than normal overall, the 2-year flood peak was only modestly exceeded in water years 2011 and 2013; runoff‑driven geomorphic disturbance to the watershed, which might have involved mass wasting from the landslide, seemed unexceptional. In water year 2012, flood peaks were modest, and the annual streamflow was normal. The fact that suspended-sediment loads in water year 2012 were equivalent at sites 0.6 and 18.8 km downstream of the sediment source indicates that the conservation of suspended‑sediment load can occur under normal hydrologic conditions. The substantial decrease in suspended-sediment load in the downstream direction in water year 2013 was attributed to either sedimentation in the intervening river reach, transfer to bedload as an alternate mode of sediment transport, or both.The sediment in the Sumas River is distinct from sediment in most other river systems because of the

  13. Ground-water resources of the White River basin, Madison County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapham, Wayne W.

    1981-01-01

    The ground-water resources of the White River basin in and near Madison County, Ind., were investigated by mapping the aquifers, estimating their hydraulic properties, determining the distribution of potentiometric head in the aquifers, and estimating some of the components of the ground-water budget from data collected in the field. This information was used to construct and calibrate a five-layer digital groundwater flow model. The model was used to provide estimates of the ground-water potential in terms of yield, drawdown, and streamflow depletion. Four confined sand and gravel aquifers interbedded in the glacial drift, a bedrock aquifer, and an unconfined outwash aquifer are the three most important aquifer systems in the study area. Model analysis of eight pumping plans provide a general assessment of the water-yielding potential of the three major aquifer systems in the study area. Model results indicate that, at some locations, yields of as much as 2.5 million gallons per day can be developed. Model simulations also indicate that only pumping near the small streams will reduce streamflow by more than a few percent. In developing the ground-water system in the area, use of many small, scattered well fields that produce less than about 3 million gallons per day, may be more favorable hydrologically than a few, heavily pumped well fields, like the well field northwest of Anderson. (USGS)

  14. Quality of water and time of travel in Yockanookany River, Choctaw County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bednar, Gene A.

    1980-01-01

    An intensive water-quality study along a 3.3 mile reach of the Yockanookany River, Choctaw County, Miss., was conducted on August 29-31, 1978. Water-quality data were collected during a period of generally low streamflow and seasonally high air temperatures. The dissolved-solids concentrations were less than 50 milligrams per liter. In the water leaving the study reach, the ammonia nitrogen concentration ranged from 0.10 to 0.40 milligrams per liter and total phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.14 to 0.43 milligrams per liter. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand was generally less than 6.0 milligrams per liter and dissolved-oxygen concentrations ranged from 5.5 to 8.1 milligrams per liter. Fecal bacteria densities were high. Fecal streptococcal bacteria in the water leaving the study reach ranged from 460 to 13,000 colonies per 100 milliliters. The rate of solute travel was 0.15 miles per hour through the study reach. (USGS)

  15. Fort Hood solar energy project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-30

    During the period April 1975 to March 1978, the American Technological University (ATU) of Killeen, Texas, was awarded several follow-on contracts by the Division of Solar Energy (DSE), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), which subsequently became the Division of Solar Technology (DST), Department of Energy (DOE). The contracts were to design a solar total energy system for use at Fort Hood, Texas. A review encompassing the period of the project from January 1975 to March 1978, was conducted by the Office of Inspector General (IG), DOE. The review examined both the management of the project by ATU and ERDA personnel and the award and administration by ERDA of the contracts to ATU for support of the project. The IG review found that: (1) there was a lack of continuity in the management of the project by both ATU and ERDA; (2) ERDA failed to maintain control of the project and failed to issue specific project direction to ATU; (3) ERDA failed to follow existing procurement regulations for the review and acceptance of unsolicited proposals from ATU; (4) the ERDA Headquarters program Manager and the Contract Administrator for the conceptual design phase of the project had failed to ensure that all the tasks which had been funded were performed by ATU; and (5) the decision by the Director, ERDA/DSE, to award successive contracts to ATU was questionable in view of ATU's performance on the project.

  16. Preliminary Assessment of Landslides Along the Florida River Downstream from Lemon Reservoir, La Plata County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, William H.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, William L.; Kibler, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly two-dozen shallow landslides were active during spring 2005 on a hillside located along the east side of the Florida River about one kilometer downstream from Lemon Reservoir in La Plata County, southwestern Colorado. Landslides on the hillside directly threaten human safety, residential structures, a county roadway, utilities, and the Florida River, and indirectly threaten downstream areas and Lemon Dam. Most of the area where the landslides occurred was burned during the 2002 Missionary Ridge wildfire. We performed geologic mapping, subsurface exploration and sampling, radiocarbon dating, and shallow ground-water and ground-displacement monitoring to assess landslide activity. Active landslides during spring 2005 were as large as 35,000 m3 and confined to colluvium. Debris flows were mobilized from most of the landslides, were as large as 1,500 m3, and traveled as far as 250 m. Landslide activity was triggered by elevated ground-water pressures within the colluvium caused by infiltration of snowmelt. Landslide activity ceased as ground-water pressures dropped during the summer. Shallow landslides on the hillside appear to be much more likely following the Missionary Ridge fire because of the loss of tree root strength and evapotranspiration. We used monitoring data and observations to develop preliminary, approximate rainfall/snowmelt thresholds above which shallow landslide activity can be expected. Landslides triggered during spring 2005 occurred within a 1.97 x 107 m3 older landslide that extends, on average, about 40 m into bedrock. The south end of this older landslide appears to have experienced deep secondary landsliding. Radiocarbon dating of sediments at the head of the older landslide suggests that the landslide was active about 1,424-1,696 years ago. A relatively widespread wildfire may have preceded the older landslide, and the landslide may have occurred during a wetter time. The wetter climate and effects of the wildfire would likely have

  17. Determination of channel capacity of the Sacramento River between Ordbend and Glenn, Butte and Glenn counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    The adequacy of an 8.5-mi reach of the Sacramento River to carry flood flows is evaluated. The reach studied is in Butte and Glenn Counties, California, and extends northward from the present east-bank Sacramento River Flood Control Project levee near Glenn upstream to the Ord Ferry gaging station near Ordbend. There is a west-bank levee throughout the study reach. Flows analyzed range from 11,500 to 265,000 cfs. Computed water-surface elevations are based on topography obtained during September through November 1974. The present Sacramento River Flood Control Project levees at the downstream end of the study reach near Glenn are designed to contain flows up to 150,000 cfs. Water-surface elevations computed for flows of this magnitude are about 6 to 8 ft below the top of the existing west-bank levee throughout the study reach. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Geohydrology and model analysis of stream-aquifer system along the Arkansas River in Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlap, L.E.; Lindgren, Richard J.; Sauer, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made, in cooperation with the Division of Water Resources, Kansas State Board of Agriculture, to determine geohydrologic conditions in an area comprising nearly 850,000 acres along the Arkansas River valley in Kearny and Finney Counties, southwestern Kansas. The Arkansas River meanders atop and interacts hydraulically with the area's multilayered, unconsolidated aquifer system. Declines in static water levels in wells in the heavily pumped lower aquifer ranged from 20 to 80 feet during 1974-80. The river is dry in much of the area. A digital computer model was calibrated to simulate the trends of historic water levels. Simulated 1974-80 conditions depicted an average annual recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system of 66,900 acre-feet from precipitation and 36,200 acre-feet from river and canal seepage and boundary inflow. Simulated average annual discharge consisted of 634,800 acre-feet from pumpage and boundary outflow. Simulated average annual recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system was 531,700 acre-feet less than average annual discharge, indicating the ground-water resource is currently (1982) being mined in the study area. Simulation also indicated that there would be sufficient saturated thickness in 2005 for irrigation if 1980 hydrologic conditions continued. Seepage losses from the Arkansas River and irrigation canals are a major source of recharge to the unconsolidated aquifer system. Therefore, the amount of flow in the Arkansas River would be important in determining the rate of future water-level declines in the study area. Streamflow seepage losses could be decreased by (1) decreasing the number of wells pumping in the study area in order to reduce downward leakage from the valley aquifer, or (2) increasing streamflow discharge in order to recharge the valley aquifer. The rate and direction of flow between the river and the valley aquifer depend on the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed and the hydraulic gradient between the

  19. Workplace protection factors--supplied air hood.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T J; Wheeler, T H; Mustard, T S

    2001-01-01

    Several organizations list assigned protection factors. For supplied air hoods, the value of the assigned protection factors varies from <10 to 2,000 depending on the organization. Workplace protection factors (WPFs) of a supplied air hood were measured during aircraft sanding and painting operations on several types of aircraft to evaluate whether the American National Standard Z88.2 (1992) assigned protection factor of 1,000 was realistic. The primary contaminant during these activities is strontium chromate. Samples collected inside the hood show that employees during sanding and painting operations were not exposed to strontium. The respirator performed adequately. This study is consistent with other simulated and WPF studies in that the ANSI Z88.2 WPF of 1,000 is supported. PMID:11258874

  20. Analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Bruneau River, Jarbidge River, and Sheep Creek West Wilderness Study Areas, Owyhee County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.S.; Bradley, L.A.; Gent, C.A.; King, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving the analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Bruneau River, Jarbidge River, and Sheep Creek West Wilderness Study Areas, Owyhee County, Idaho.

  1. Aquifer model of the Susquehanna River valley in southwestern Broome County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Randall, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    A finite-difference model of groundwater flow within stratified drift in the 14 mi reach of the Susquehanna River valley from Binghamton west to Tioga County line (including Johnson City, Endicott, and Vestal) has been developed. Outwash is the most permeable and extensive type of stratified drift in the valley but has only small saturated thickness except where it is downwarped beneath ice-block depressions. The outwash is commonly underlain by extensive beds of silt and clay deposited in proglacial lakes. Older ice-contact deposits are also extensive and provide the largest yields to wells but are highly variable in thickness and commonly siltier than the outwash. The ice-contact deposits seem to occur mainly as ridges that parallel the axis of major valleys and are buried beneath later lacustrine and outwash sediments. The model simulates horizontal flow in two layers-the upper layer generally represents outwash, the lower layer generally represents older ice-contact deposits; and vertical flow between those layers through the beds of silt and clay or, where the two aquifer layers are in direct contact, through sand and gravel. The model has been calibrated to reproduce observed water levels that represent steady-state conditions. The model was calibrated for average steady-state conditions from data for April 1981, when water levels remained fairly stable for nearly 2 months. Recharge from precipitation on the aquifer during this period was determined to be about 1.28 in/mo. Transmissivity of the lower aquifer, as determined by calibration of the model for areas influenced by pumping, was significantly less than transmissivity values calculated from pumping records or geologic logs of individual wells. This difference is attributed to scattered silty layers that reduce average transmissivity of generally permeable materials. Data are available for transient calibration, including: (1) semiannual water level measurements that reflect seasonal changes in river

  2. 46 CFR 181.425 - Galley hood fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. (a) A grease extraction hood required by 46 CFR 181.400 must meet UL 710 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) or other standard specified by the Commandant. (b) A grease extraction hood must be equipped with a dry or wet chemical fire extinguishing...

  3. 46 CFR 181.425 - Galley hood fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Galley hood fire extinguishing systems. (a) A grease extraction hood required by 46 CFR 181.400 must meet UL 710 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 175.600) or other standard specified by the Commandant. (b) A grease extraction hood must be equipped with a dry or wet chemical fire extinguishing...

  4. 76 FR 19314 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Salem, Oregon... Connie Athman, Mt. Hood National Forest, 16400 Champion Way, Sandy, Oregon 97055. Comments may also...

  5. 75 FR 21220 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Action of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on Tuesday... meeting, contact Connie Athman; Mt. Hood National Forest; 16400 Champion Way; Sandy, Oregon 97055;...

  6. 76 FR 53114 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Sandy, Oregon. The... September 26, 2011, and begin at 10 a.m ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at Mt. Hood National...

  7. 75 FR 18144 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on... INFORMATION CONTACT: For more information regarding this meeting, contact Connie Athman; Mt. Hood...

  8. 77 FR 50676 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Salem, Oregon. The... for public inspection and copying. The public may inspect comments received at Mt. Hood...

  9. 76 FR 58768 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting location change. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in... Home, Oregon; (541) 367-5168. Written comments should be sent to Connie Athman, Mt.Hood National...

  10. Study of how sash movement affects performance of fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, T.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted to determine how sash movements affect the performance of fume hoods. The performance of two fume hoods was studied as the sashes were moved from closed to open position at speeds of 2 ft/s, 1.5 ft/s, and 1 ft/s. The tests were conducted with fume hoods operated at both constant volume and variable air volume. The tests indicate that sash movements can disturb airflow patterns at the face of the hood and potentially affect the performance of the hood. The effect of the sash movement varied with hood type and speed of sash movement. The faster sash movements of 2 ft/s and 1.5 ft/s had a greater effect on the performance of the hoods than the slower movement of 1 ft/s. Constant-volume hoods and variable-air-volume hoods were both affected by sash movements. Constant-volume hoods set to a full open face velocity of 60 ft/min were more susceptible to the sash movement than at 100 ft/min full open face velocity. The performance of variable-air-volume hoods is affected not only by sash movement speed but also by the response time of the controller. The drop in face velocity that occurs when the sash is moved is determined by the speed of the VAV controller. The required response time for containment depends on the fume hood design and the speed of the sash movement.

  11. Geochemical and palynological indicators of the paleoecology of the River Gem coal bed, Whitley County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Ruppert, L.F.; Eble, C.F.; Graham, U.M.

    1996-01-01

    The River Gem coal bed (upper Westphalian A) was sampled at five sites in a single mine in Whitley County, Kentucky. Previous petrographic and sulfur analyses of the collected interval samples showed that the coal bed could be divided into a basal low-sulfur lithotype, a middle high-sulfur bone lithotype and an upper high-sulfur lithotype. At one location a high-sulfur rider unit is present. In this study we have conducted detailed palynological analyses on all of the interval samples and ash geochemistry on the upper high-sulfur lithotype intervals and two of the basal high-sulfur basal lithotype intervals. Geochemical analyses show that As and Pb are generally high in the high-sulfur upper lithotypes from all five sites. Carbonates, having associated high levels of Ba and Sr, are important in the ash geochemistry of the lower, low-sulfur lithotypes. Ga, Ge and W are enriched in the higher vitrinite lithotypes among the low-sulfur samples. The basal lithotype at each of two sites, which was analyzed in detail, is enriched in yttrium plus the lighter rare earth elements. The basal low-sulfur lithotypes are dominated by arboreous lycopod spores. The middle, low-sulfur portion of the bed is dominated by herbaceous lycopsids (Densosporites) at the base of the unit and becomes increasingly enriched in Lycospora towards the top of the unit indicating that the peat-forming environment became wetter. The greatest arboreous lycopod spore abundances in the upper, high-sulfur portion the bed, along with an overlying marine roof, indicates that peat deposition was terminated by a marine inundation.

  12. Geomorphic response to channel modifications of Skuna River at the State Highway 9 crossing at Bruce, Calhoun County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.V., Jr.; Turnipseed, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    Skuna River at State Highway 9 at Bruce, Calhoun County, Mississippi, has geomorphically responded to channel modifications by lowering of the channel bed through degradation, which heightened and steepened channel banks and induced widening. Skuna River Canal (Skuna River) has typically degraded about 16.5 feet and widened about 150 feet from 1925 (when constructed) to 1992. Old Skuna River has degraded and widened about 11 feet and 40 feet, respectively, from 1921 to 1991. Skuna River Canal tributary has degraded about 6 feet from 1921 to 1991. Most of the geomorphic response on the Old River and the tributary seems to be a consequence of modifications of the canal. The bankfull discharge of the canal has increased about 1,450 percent, and the channel slope has decreased about 34 percent from 1925 to 1989. The bankfull stream power has been decreasing since 1980. The bankfull channel width-depth ratio has been increasing since 1975, which indicates the canal has been widening more than degrading since 1975. As much as 1 foot of additional degradation and 40 feet of additional widening are projected through 2010 on Skuna River Canal in the vicinity of State Highway 9. About 70 feet of additional widening could occur before the canal reaches quasi-equilibrium, which will likely be reached after 2010. If Old Skuna River and Skuna River Canal tributary degrade as much as the canal, which is doubtful, then about 6 and 11 feet of additional degradation could occur by 2010 on the Old Skuna River and the tributary, respectively, at State Highway 9. Old Skuna River and the tributary could both widen an additional 30 feet in the next 10 to 20 years. The channel low-stage thalweg of Skuna River Canal is beginning to meander around sandbars inducing lateral erosion of the channel banks. The widening projections in this report do not directly account for lateral erosion and are considered to be a minimum for the typical channel reach. Lateral erosion will likely have a

  13. Map showing geochemical summary for the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas, Butte and Plumas counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jocelyn A.; Sorensen, Martin L.

    1985-01-01

    The Bald Rock Roadless Area consists of 3,850 acres in Butte County, Calif. The Middle Rock Feather River Roadless Area consists of 29,300 acres ub Butte and Plumas Counties, Calif. Both roadless areas are in the Plumas National Forest and are on the west slope of the northern Sierra Nevada southwest of Quincy, Calif. (fig. 1). The two roadless areas are alined along the Middle Fork of the Feather River where they include the narrow canyon bottoms and precipitous sidewalls of the Middle Fork and several tributary drainages. Altitudes range from 800 ft in the canyon of the Middle Fork to approximately 6,600 ft at the northwest corner of the map area. The geology of the roadless areas has been briefly summarized by Sorenson and Pietropaoll (1982). This paper summarizes and interprets the semiquantitative emission spectrographic analyses of 106 rock sample and 165 samples of nonmagnetics heavy-mineral stream-sediment concentrates from the Blad Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area (Sorenson and others, 1982).

  14. An analysis of wintertime surface wind fields in the Upper Green River Basin of Sublette County, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Brittni R.

    Observations of high ozone mixing ratios in Sublette County, Wyoming, recently resulted in the region being designated to be in marginal non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone. Many interrelated factors influence the frequency and extent of elevated ozone episodes, including meteorological factors, through their effect on pollutant dilution and dispersion. Surface wind field patterns in the Upper Green River Basin (UGRB) of Sublette County, Wyoming, were therefore examined using observations from a network of surface monitoring stations for 2011, when many ozone episodes occurred, and for 2012, when, in contrast, there were none. The synoptic conditions associated with each pattern are described using output from the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model. Five patterns are described. They confirm that elevated ozone is often associated with light and variable winds. However, there are also days when moderate afternoon southeasterly flow leads to observations of elevated ozone on the west side of the basin. These southeasterly winds are identified as barrier winds caused by southwesterly flow at 700mb. Recognition of this wind pattern facilitates future forecasting of periods likely to experience potentially elevated ozone in the region. The merit of adding additional monitoring sites from the Upper Green River Basin Wintertime Ozone Wind Field Investigation (O3w) and the Upper Green River Ozone Study (UGWOS) of 2012 to the current monitoring network is also discussed.

  15. Population sizes and group characteristics of Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) in Poyang Lake Wetland

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, Ming-Qin; GUO, Hong; JIANG, Jian-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Both the Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) have limited population sizes and are considered endangered by domestic Chinese and international agencies. To document the current size of their respective populations and characterize their groups, between October 2012 and April 2013 we undertook fieldwork at four nature reserve areas within the Poyang Lake wetlands. We divided Poyanghu National Nature Reserve (PYH) into the Wucheng (PWC) and Hengfeng areas (PHF), because each are each located in different counties. Our fieldwork showed that the Siberian Crane occurred mainly in PYH (364 in the PHF, 158 in the PWC) and the Nanjishan Wetland National Nature Reserve (NJS, with 200 individuals). The Hooded Crane was mainly distributed in PYH (302 in the PHF and 154 in the PWC). Family groups accounted for more than 50% of the total number of groups among both species, with Hooded Cranes forming more family groups than Siberian Cranes. Typically, these groups were formed of two adults with one offspring (Siberian Crane), and two adults with two offspring (Hooded Crane), with the mean family group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane being respectively 2.65±0.53 (n=43) and 3.09±0.86 (n=47) individuals per group. The mean collective group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane included 28.09±24.94 (n=23) and 28.94±27.97 (n=16) individuals per group, respectively, with the proportion of juveniles among Hooded Cranes being more than double that seen among the Siberian Cranes. PMID:25297076

  16. Growth of age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Bellgraph, Brian J.; Thompson, Bradley E.; Hayes, Daniel B.; Riley, Timothy S.

    2006-12-01

    We sampled ten sites within the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan. In 2001, age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were collected to determine growth rates. In 2002, emergence dates of steelhead were determined by observational studies and age-0 steelhead and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) were collected to determine growth rates. Steelhead emergence occurred from late June to mid-July 2002. Growth rates of both species varied among branches within the watershed (P<0.05). Steelhead growth varied from 0.24 to 0.42 mm/day and brook trout growth varied from 0.22 to 0.37 mm/day.

  17. Persistence of Change: Fume Hood Campaign Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feder, Elah; Robinson, Jennifer; Wakefield, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability initiatives typically operate for a limited time period, but it is often unclear whether they have lasting effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine a laboratory fume hood campaign, in order to identify factors that might contribute or detract from long-term change persistence. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  18. Pollutant Removal Efficiency of Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Sherman, Alexander D.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2011-07-01

    Capture efficiency (CE) of exhaust from a natural gas cooking range was quantified for three common designs of residential range hoods in laboratory experiments: (A) microwave exhaust combination; (B) short hood with grease-screen-covered air inlet at bottom; and (C) deep, open hood exhausting at top. Devices were evaluated at varying installation heights, at highest and lowest fan settings, and with the hood installed 15 cm away from back wall with intent to improve CE for front burners. Each configuration was evaluated for the oven and for three cooktop burner combinations (two back, two front, one front and one back). At highest fan settings and standard installation against the wall, Hoods A and C captured back cooktop burner exhaust at > 90 percent and Hood B at > 80 percent. In this configuration, CE for front burner exhaust was 73-78 percent for Hoods A and C but only 46-63 percent for Hood B. CEs followed similar patterns but were substantially lower on the lowest fan speed. Installing the hood away from the wall improved CE for oven and front burners on Hood A at low speed, but substantially reduced CE for back burners for all hoods at low and high speed.

  19. Reconnaissance survey of site 7 of the proposed Three Rivers Regional Landfill and Technology Center, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Cabak, M.A.; Beck, M.L.; Gillam, C.; Sassaman, K.E.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the archaeological investigation of Site 7 of the proposed Three Rivers Regional Landfill and Technology Center in Aiken County on the United States Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Pedestrian and subsurface survey techniques were used to investigate the 1,403-acre project area. Survey resulted in the discovery of 23 previously unrecorded sites and 11 occurrences; six previously recorded sites were also investigated. These sites consist of six prehistoric sites, nine historic sites, and 14 sites with both prehistoric and historic components. Sites locations and project area boundaries are provided on a facsimile of a USGS 7.5 topographic map. The prehistoric components consist of very small, low-density lithic and ceramic scatters; most contain less than 10 artifacts. Six of the prehistoric components are of unknown cultural affiliation, the remaining prehistoric sites were occupied predominately in the Woodland period. The historic sites are dominated by postbellum/modem home places of tenant and yeoman farmers but four historic sites were locations of antebellum house sites (38AK136, 38AK613, 38AK660, and 38AK674). The historic sites also include an African-American school (38AK677).

  20. 77 FR 39675 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... River Mining AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Correction--Notice of intent to prepare a supplement... changed to the Whitman District Ranger. This 2012 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision will replace and supercede the 2004 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision only where necessary...

  1. Geology and structure of the Pine River, Florida River, Carbon Junction, and Basin Creek gas seeps, La Plata County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fassett, James E.; Condon, Steven M.; Huffman, A. Curtis, Jr.; Taylor, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: This study was commissioned by a consortium consisting of the Bureau of Land Management, Durango Office; the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission; La Plata County; and all of the major gas-producing companies operating in La Plata County, Colorado. The gas-seep study project consisted of four parts; 1) detailed surface mapping of Fruitland Formation coal outcrops in the above listed seep areas, 2) detailed measurement of joint and fracture patterns in the seep areas, 3) detailed coal-bed correlation of Fruitland coals in the subsurface adjacent to the seep areas, and 4) studies of deep-seated seismic patterns in those seep areas where seismic data was available. This report is divided into three chapters labeled 1, 2, and 3. Chapter 1 contains the results of the subsurface coal-bed correla-tion study, chapter 2 contains the results of the surface geologic mapping and joint measurement study, and chapter 3, contains the results of the deep-seismic study. A preliminary draft of this report was submitted to the La Plata County Group in September 1996. All of the members of the La Plata Group were given an opportunity to critically review the draft report and their comments were the basis for revising the first draft to create this final version of a geologic report on the major La Plata County gas seeps located north of the Southern Ute Indian Reservation.

  2. Flow pattern in regional aquifers and flow relations between the lower Colorado River valley and regional aquifers in six counties of southeastern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    The lower Colorado River discussed in this report consists of the 318- river-mile reach from Mansfield Dam near Austin, Texas, to the Gulf of Mexico. The river is underlain directly or indirectly by six regional aquifers the Trinity Group, Edwards, Carrizo-Wilcox, Queen City, Sparta, and Gulf Coast; the Trinity Group aquifer is further subdivided into the lower Trinity, middle Trinity, and upper Trinity aquifers. Generalized potentiometric-surface maps of each regional aquifer show the ground-water-flow pattern near the river valley. Each regional aquifer discharges water to the lower Colorado River valley, particularly in the outcrop area of each aquifer. Only the Gulf Coast aquifer in central Wharton County appears to be recharged by water in the river valley. A summary map shows those subreaches of the lower Colorado River that gain water from the aquifers and those subreaches that lose water to the aquifers.

  3. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  4. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for the counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District in Florida, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.; Berry, Darbi R.

    2016-01-01

    The irrigated acreage that was field verified in 2015 for the 13 counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District (113,134 acres) is about 6 percent higher than the estimated acreage published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (107,217 acres) for 2012; however, this 2012 value represents acreage for the entire portion of all 13 counties, not just the Suwannee River Water Management District portion. Differences between the 2015 field-verified acreage totals and those published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for 2012 may occur because (1) irrigated acreage for some specific crops increased or decreased substantially during the 3-year interval due to commodity prices or economic changes, (2) calculated field-verified irrigated acreage may be an overestimate because irrigation was assumed if an irrigation system was present and therefore the acreage was counted as irrigated, when in fact that may not have been the case as some farmers may not have used their irrigation systems during this growing period even if they had a crop in the field, or (3) the amount of irrigated acreages published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for selected crops may be underestimated in some cases.

  5. Synthesis of historical archaeological sites on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The object of this report is to provide historical synthesis of the Savannah River Plant region integrated with the historical archeological record. The first chapter discusses the historic research concerns of the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program, the Physical Geography of the Savannah River Plant in regard to climate, coil, and vegetation, and the Human Geography of the region. Chapter 2 presents the Chronology of historic sites from the archarological record on the Savannah River Plant. Chapter 3 discusses the Settlement of the Savannah River Valley and the Agricultural Land use on the Savannah River Plant. Chapter 4 presents the results of historic research into the Mill Dams located on the Savannah River Plant their political importance and location. Chapter 5 discribes the Archaeological Methodology used and the Archaeological Resources of the Savannah River Plant. Chapter 6 present the Conclusions and Recommendations of the Savannah River Plant Archaeological Research Program in regards to the historical archeological sites on the Savannah River Plant. 80 refs., 13 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Data summary report on short-term turbidity monitoring of pipeline river crossings in the Moyie River, Boundary County, Idaho: PGT-PG&E Pipeline Expansion Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gowdy, M.J.; Smits, M.P.; Wilkey, P.L.; Miller, S.F.

    1994-03-01

    A water-quality monitoring program was implemented for Bechtel Corporation to measure the short-term increases in turbidity in the Moyie River caused by construction activities of the Pacific Gas Transmission-Pacific Gas & Electric Pipeline Expansion Project. Construction of the buried, 42-in.-diameter, steel pipeline, during the summer of 1992, involved eight wet crossings of the Moyie River along the 13-mi section of pipeline immediately south of the Canadian-United States border in Boundary County, Idaho. This report summarizes the sampling and analysis protocol used and gives the results and observations for each of the eight crossings. The data obtained from this monitoring program, in addition to satisfying regulatory requirements for the Pipeline Expansion Project, will contribute to an ongoing long-term study of the Moyie River crossings being performed for the Gas Research Institute by Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this document is strictly limited to reporting the results of the monitoring program. Interpretation of the data is not within the scope of this report.

  7. Containment testing for occupied and unoccupied laboratory chemical hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Greenley, P.L.; DiBerardinis, L.J.; Lorch, F.A.

    1999-07-01

    Containment of hazards in a laboratory chemical hood is based on the principle that air drawn through the face area of the hood is sufficient to overcome the many challenges at or near the opening. Challenges to overcome include, but are not limited to, air velocities near the hood, movement of the researcher, people walking past the hood, location of equipment inside the hood, size of the sash opening, and the shape and configuration of entrance conditions. To overcome these challenges, a sufficient face velocity must be maintained. Determining that proper face velocity must be maintained. Determining that proper face velocity for a given hood should be resolved by the system designer, facility safety officer, and researcher with these and other issues in mind. This research tests for containment at 100 feet per minute (fpm) face velocity on occupied hoods and tests the same hoods for containment at the reduced velocity of 60 fpm when unoccupied. Three laboratory chemical hoods of different sizes with several ash positions are used. The test results show that under ideal conditions in a test laboratory, an unoccupied hood (without a manikin) at 60 fpm contains as good as, if not better than, an occupied hood (with a manikin) at 100 fpm, as measured by the tracer gas tests specified in ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995, Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods (ASHRAE 1995). Further testing is needed to determine if this relationship is the same under conditions of actual use, i.e., cluttered hoods and presence of cross-drafts.

  8. Floodplain disconnection, changes in river corridor complexity, and implications for river restoration along lower Deer Creek, Tehama County, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Tompkins, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    River channels and floodplains are inextricably linked elements of river ecosystems, and hydrologic inter- connections sustain geomorphic and ecological values. Many river channels and floodplains have been disconnected in California, prompting river managers to consider floodplain reconnection to restore degraded waterways. Deer Creek, a 600 km2 tributary to the Sacramento River still supports reproduction of native spring-run Chinook salmon in its upper reaches. However, its lower, alluvial reaches were channelized, cleared, and partially leveed by a 1949 US Army Corps of Engineers flood control project. The catchment of Deer Creek is largely undisturbed, so its flow regime and sediment load are largely unimpaired. Thus the potential exists to restore lower Deer Creek to something like its complex, ecologically-productive pre-disturbance conditions if artificial constraints are removed, and thus levee setbacks have been proposed for Deer Creek to reduce concentration of flows in the main channel and allow the main channel to become more hydraulically rough with vegetation and gravel bars. We made detailed measurements of pre- disturbance channel conditions from 1938 aerial photographs and compared those measurements with recent aerial photographs to document the project-induced changes. We measured decreases in riffle habitat (up to 84%), pool habitat (up to 100%), cumulative channel length (up to 72%), shaded riverine aquatic habitat (up to 81%) and riparian vegetation (up to 94%), and increases in riffle spacing (up to 1162%), pool spacing (up to 178%), and low flow channel width (up to 84%) between 1938 and 1999. These results suggest that significant and persistent reductions in river corridor complexity can be associated with floodplain disconnection, and provide an estimate of restoration potential for floodplain reconnection on lower Deer Creek.

  9. Bank Topography, Bathymetry, and Current Velocity of the Lower Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington, May 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Dinehart, Randal L.; Moran, Edward H.

    2008-01-01

    The removal of two dams from the mainstem of the Elwha River is expected to cause a broad range of changes to the river and nearby coastal ecosystem. The U.S. Geological Survey has documented aspects of the condition of the river to allow analysis of ecological responses to dam removal. This report documents the bank topography, river bathymetry, and current velocity data collected along the lower 0.5 kilometer of the Elwha River, May 15-17, 2006. This information supplements nearshore and beach surveys done in 2006 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound program near the Elwha River delta in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington.

  10. Geology and ground water in Russian River Valley areas and in Round, Laytonville, and Little Lake Valleys, Sonoma and Mendocino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardwell, G.T.

    1965-01-01

    This report describes the occurrence, availability, and quality of ground water in seven valley areas along the course of the Russian River in Sonoma and Mendocino Counties, Calif., and in three valleys in the upper drainage reach of the Eel River in Mendocino County. Except for the westward-trending lower Russian River valley, the remaining valley areas along the Russian River (Healdsburg, Alexander, Cloverdale, Sanel, Ukiah, and Potter Valleys) lie in northwest-trending structurally controlled depressions formed in marine rocks of Jurassic and Cretaceous age. The principal aquifer in all the valleys is the alluvium of Recent age, which includes highly permeable channel deposits of gravel and sand. Water for domestic, irrigation, industrial, and other uses is developed by (1) direct diversion from the Russian River and its tributaries, (2) withdrawal of ground water and river water from shallow wells near the river, and (3) withdrawals of ground water from wells in alluvial deposits at varying distances from the river. Surface water in the Russian River and most tributaries is of good chemical quality. The water is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type and contains 75,200 parts per million of dissolved solids. Ground water is also of good chemical quality throughout most of the drainage basin, but the concentration of dissolved solids (100-300 parts per million) is somewhat higher than that in the surface water. Round, Laytonville, and Little Lake Valleys are in central and northern Mendocino County in the drainage basin of the northwestward flowing Eel River. In Round Valley the alluvium of Recent age yields water of good chemical quality in large quantities. Yields are lower and the chemical quality poorer in Laytonville Valley. Ground water in Little Lake Valley is relatively undeveloped. Selected descriptions of wells, drillers' logs, chemical analyses, and hydrographs showing water-level fluctuations are included in the report. Accompanying maps show the

  11. Statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.

    1998-01-01

    To better understand flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 28-mile reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. Dye was injected at a site on Piru Creek, and fluorescence of river water was measured continuously at four sites and intermittently at two sites. Discharge measurements were also made at the six sites. The time of travel of the dye, peak dye concentration, and time-variance of time-concentration curves were obtained at each site. The long tails of the time-concentration curves are indicative of sources/sinks within the river, such as riffles and pools, or transient bank storage. A statistical analysis of the data indicates that, in general, the transport characteristics follow Fickian theory. These data and previously collected discharge data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). DAFLOW solves a simplified form of the diffusion-wave equation and uses empirical relations between flow rate and cross-sectional area, and flow rate and channel width. BLTM uses the velocity data from DAFLOW and solves the advection-dispersion transport equation, including first-order decay. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of dye mass in the middle, ephemeral, subreaches, and (2) ground-water recharge does not explain the loss of dye mass in the uppermost and lowermost, perennial, subreaches. This loss of mass was simulated using a linear decay term. The loss of mass in the perennial subreaches may be caused by a combination of photodecay or adsorption/desorption.

  12. 35. Photocopy of original drawing in possession of the County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of original drawing in possession of the County Auditor, Johnson County, Iowa. SPECIFICATIONS FOR BRIDGE OVER THE CEDAR RIVER AT SUTLIFF'S FERRY JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA - Sutliff's Ferry Bridge, Spanning Cedar River (Cedar Township), Solon, Johnson County, IA

  13. Fecal-Indicator Bacteria in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers and Selected Tributaries, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckwalter, Theodore F.; Zimmerman, Tammy M.; Fulton, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria were determined in 1,027 water-quality samples collected from July 2001 through August 2005 during dry- (72-hour dry antecedent period) and wet-weather (48-hour dry antecedent period and at least 0.3 inch of rain in a 24-hour period) conditions in the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio Rivers (locally referred to as the Three Rivers) and selected tributaries in Allegheny County. Samples were collected at five sampling sites on the Three Rivers and at eight sites on four tributaries to the Three Rivers having combined sewer overflows. Water samples were analyzed for three fecal-indicator organisms fecal coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci bacteria. Left-bank and right-bank surface-water samples were collected in addition to a cross-section composite sample at each site. Concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci were detected in 98.6, 98.5, and 87.7 percent of all samples, respectively. The maximum fecal-indicator bacteria concentrations were collected from Sawmill Run, a tributary to the Ohio River; Sawmill Run at Duquesne Heights had concentrations of fecal coliform, E. coli, and enterococci of 410,000, 510,000, and 180,000 col/100 mL, respectively, following a large storm. The samples collected in the Three Rivers and selected tributaries frequently exceeded established recreational standards and criteria for bacteria. Concentrations of fecal coliform exceeded the Pennsylvania water-quality standard (200 col/100 mL) in approximately 63 percent of the samples. Sample concentrations of E. coli and enterococci exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) water-quality criteria (235 and 61 col/100 mL, respectively) in about 53 and 47 percent, respectively, of the samples. Fecal-indicator bacteria were most strongly correlated with streamflow, specific conductance, and turbidity. These correlations most frequently were observed in samples collected from tributary sites. Fecal

  14. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, OWYHEE RIVER, OWYHEE COUNTY, ID, 1976-1977.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality survey of the Owyhee River in SW Idaho (17050104, 17050105, 17050106) was conducted from August 1976 to April 1977 by the State of Idaho, Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Environment. The survey was conducted to help determine if the Owyhee River in ...

  15. Determination of channel capacity of the Merced River downstream from Merced Falls Dam, Merced County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, J.C.; Bertoldi, G.L.

    1968-01-01

    Peak flows in Dry Creek, as measured 18.7 miles upstream from the mouth of Dry Creek, will be attenuated due to channel storage and will increase the discharge of the Merced River at Cressey by only about 50 per cent of t he Dry Creek peak discharge. Furthermore, Dry Creek seldom carries floodflows during periods of high water on the Merced River.

  16. 76 FR 15214 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, Charles County, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... (76 FR 1381). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was requested, and none... Guard is establishing special local regulations during the ``Potomac River Sharkfest Swim'' amateur swim..., California, will sponsor an amateur swim across the Potomac River between Newburg, Maryland and King...

  17. 76 FR 1381 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, Charles County, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do...'' amateur swim, a marine event to be held on the waters of the Potomac River on May 22, 2011. These special... amateur swim across the Potomac River between Newburg, Maryland and King George, VA. The event consists...

  18. POTLATCH RIVER WATERSHED, LATAH, CLEARWATER, AND NEZ PERCE COUNTIES, IDAHO - BENEFICIAL USE RECONNAISSANCE PROJECT, 1994

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted during the 1994 summer to determine the beneficial uses and status of those uses in the Potlatch River watershed, Idaho (17060306). Data were collected on the mainstem, East Fork and West Fork Potlatch River, Little Potlatch and Middle Potlatch Creeks, B...

  19. 75 FR 52360 - Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project, El Dorado County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project, El Dorado.../EIS for the Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project (Project... golf course use, removal of the entire Lake Tahoe Golf Course, or reconfiguration of the golf course...

  20. Chemical quality of the Saw Mill River, Westchester County, New York, 1981-83

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Surface waters, bottom sediments and coatings formed on artificial substrates (ceramic tiles) were analyzed to evaluate the chemical quality of the Saw Mill River, New York. Heavy metals, nutrients, and organic contaminants were studied. Dissolved orthophosphate concentrations were highest in the lower third of the river. Dissolved manganese was the only metal to exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria. Arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations were highest in waters from the lowest 4 river miles. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc in bottom sediments from the lowest 3 river miles were greater than in upstream sediments. Concentrations of nine heavy metals were higher on tiles emplaced below river mile 3 than on tiles upstream. Few organic compounds were detected in the water column; none persisted at all sites. Chlordane, DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) were found in bottom sediments throughout the basin. PCB concentrations were highest in the lowest 6 river miles; the other organic compounds exhibited no spatial patterns. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were most abundant in bottom sediments from the lowest 2 river miles. Collectively the distribution of contaminants indicates that river quality deteriorates in the lower, more heavily urbanized reach. (USGS)

  1. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

    2008-06-30

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  2. Geomorphic history of a portion of the Savannah River flood plain, Barnwell County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, A.E.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of an intensive archeological survey undertaken on the Plant, the Savannah River Valley has become the focus of an effort to tie the history of the Savannah River with cultural trends observed in the surrounding highlands. The flood-plain swamp contains well-preserved remnant sedimentologic evidence of former Savannah River occupations. This study utilizes geomorphic detail obtained from low level infra-red aerial photographs of the Savannah River flood plain in the area to interpret and distinguish various types of alluvial depositional environments. Relative temporal succession of the Savannah River across the modern (Holocene) valley floor is determined by evaluation of fluvial trends and their cross-cutting relationships. Sampling of sedimentary deposits for general alluvial stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating of plant detritus determine geomorphic trends and their absolute temporal relationships.

  3. Boundary of the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This vector data set delineates the approximate boundary of the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer (ERWVFA). This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. The boundary of the ERWVFA was developed by combining information from two data sources. The first data source was a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the Leadville quadrangle developed by Day and others (1999). The location of Quaternary sediments was used as a first approximation of the ERWVFA. The boundary of the ERWVFA was further refined by overlaying the geologic map with Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) scanned images of 1:24,000 topographic maps (U.S. Geological Survey, 2001). Where appropriate, the boundary of the ERWVFA was remapped to correspond with the edge of the valley-fill aquifer marked by an abrupt change in topography at the edge of the valley floor throughout the Eagle River watershed. The boundary of the ERWVFA more closely resembles a hydrogeomorphic region presented by Rupert (2003, p. 8) because it is based upon general geographic extents of geologic materials and not on an actual aquifer location as would be determined through a rigorous hydrogeologic investigation.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Pollutants' Transport and Fate in AN Unsteady Flow in Lower Bear River, Box Elder County, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salha, A. A.; Stevens, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents numerical application and statistical development of Stream Water Quality Modeling (SWQM) as a tool to investigate, manage, and research the transport and fate of water pollutants in Lower Bear River, Box elder County, Utah. The concerned segment under study is the Bear River starting from Cutler Dam to its confluence with the Malad River (Subbasin HUC 16010204). Water quality problems arise primarily from high phosphorus and total suspended sediment concentrations that were caused by five permitted point source discharges and complex network of canals and ducts of varying sizes and carrying capacities that transport water (for farming and agriculture uses) from Bear River and then back to it. Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has designated the entire reach of the Bear River between Cutler Reservoir and Great Salt Lake as impaired. Stream water quality modeling (SWQM) requires specification of an appropriate model structure and process formulation according to nature of study area and purpose of investigation. The current model is i) one dimensional (1D), ii) numerical, iii) unsteady, iv) mechanistic, v) dynamic, and vi) spatial (distributed). The basic principle during the study is using mass balance equations and numerical methods (Fickian advection-dispersion approach) for solving the related partial differential equations. Model error decreases and sensitivity increases as a model becomes more complex, as such: i) uncertainty (in parameters, data input and model structure), and ii) model complexity, will be under investigation. Watershed data (water quality parameters together with stream flow, seasonal variations, surrounding landscape, stream temperature, and points/nonpoint sources) were obtained majorly using the HydroDesktop which is a free and open source GIS enabled desktop application to find, download, visualize, and analyze time series of water and climate data registered with the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System

  5. Determination of channel capacity of the Mokelumne River downstream from Camanche Dam, San Joaquin and Sacramento Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.G.

    1972-01-01

    This study evaluates the adequacy of a 39-mile reach of the Mokelumne River in San Joaquin and Sacramento Counties, California, to carry planned flood releases between Camanche Reservoir and the Bensons Ferry Bridge near Thornton. The flood releases from Camanche Reservoir are to be restricted, insofar as possible, so that the flows in the Mokelumne River will not exceed 5,000 cfs (cubic feet per second) as measured at the gaging station below Camanche Dam. Areas of inundation and computed floodwater profiles are based on channel conditions in late 1970 and on observed water-surface profiles during flood releases of about 5,000 cfs in January 1969 and January 1970. The inundated area shown on the maps (appendix A) and the water-surface elevations indicated on the cross sections (appendix G) are for the flood releases of those dates. The following conclusions are contingent on there being no levee failures during periods of high flow and no significant channel changes since the flood release of January 1970. 1. High tides in San Francisco Bay and, to a greater degree, flood stages on the Cosumnes River, cause backwater in the study reach. Severe backwater conditions occurring simultaneously with a flow of 5,000 cfs in the Mokelumne River can increase the flood stage 4 to 6 feet at Bensons Ferry Bridge (cross section 1). Backwater effects decrease in an upstream direction and are less than 0.5 foot at cross section 35, a river distance of 8.6 miles upstream from cross section 1, and 1.5 miles downstream from the Peltier Road bridge. 2. In the reach between cross sections 1 and 35, a 5,000 cfs release from Camanche Reservoir with maximum backwater effect (measured at cross section 1 at the mouth of the Cosumnes River) is confined within the natural or leveed banks except on the right bank flood plain between cross sections 12 and 19. 3. Upstream from cross section 35, there is overbank flooding at a flow of 5,000 cfs between cross sections 48 and 51, and 62 and 67

  6. Flood-plain delineation for Occoquan River, Wolf Run, Sandy Run, Elk Horn Run, Giles Run, Kanes Creek, Racoon Creek, and Thompson Creek, Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soule, Pat LeRoy

    1978-01-01

    Water-surface profiles of the 25-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence interval discharges have been computed for all streams and reaches of channels in Fairfax County, Virginia, having a drainage area greater than 1 square mile except for Dogue Creek, Little Hunting Creek, and that portion of Cameron Run above Lake Barcroft. Maps having a 2-foot contour interval and a horizontal scale of 1 inch equals 100 feet were used for base on which flood boundaries were delineated for 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods to be expected in each basin under ultimate development conditions. This report is one of a series and presents a discussion of techniques employed in computing discharges and profiles as well as the flood profiles and maps on which flood boundaries have been delineated for the Occoquan River and its tributaries within Fairfax County and those streams on Mason Neck within Fairfax County tributary to the Potomac River. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Ground-water reconnaissance of the central Weber River area, Morgan and Summit Counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, Joseph S.; Steiger, Judy I.; Green, Ronald T.

    1984-01-01

    A reconnaissance of ground water in the central Weber River area obtained data to help State administrators devise a policy for acting on applications to appropriate ground water resulting from recent and future influxes of residents.

  8. POTLATCH RIVER, LATAH, CLEARWATER, AND NEZ PERCE COUNTIES, IDAHO - PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION REPORT, 1994

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Latah Soil and Water Conservation District requested assistance from the Soil Conservation Service in the development of appropriate criteria for prioritizing subwatersheds in the Potlatch River Basin, Idaho (17060306) for the implementation of a long term watershed treatment...

  9. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Glaspey, Douglas J.

    2008-01-30

    Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

  10. 40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oregon: Crook County, Deschutes County, Hood River County, Jefferson County, Klamath County, Lake County, Sherman County, Wasco County....

  11. 40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oregon: Crook County, Deschutes County, Hood River County, Jefferson County, Klamath County, Lake County, Sherman County, Wasco County....

  12. 40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oregon: Crook County, Deschutes County, Hood River County, Jefferson County, Klamath County, Lake County, Sherman County, Wasco County....

  13. 40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oregon: Crook County, Deschutes County, Hood River County, Jefferson County, Klamath County, Lake County, Sherman County, Wasco County....

  14. 40 CFR 81.219 - Central Oregon Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oregon: Crook County, Deschutes County, Hood River County, Jefferson County, Klamath County, Lake County, Sherman County, Wasco County....

  15. 77 FR 23599 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, Charles County, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing special local regulations during the ``Potomac River Sharkfest Swim'' amateur swim, a marine event to be held on the waters of the Potomac River on June 2, 2012. These special local regulations are necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the event. This action is intended to temporarily restrict vessel traffic in a portion of the......

  16. Survey of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) population in the Upper Little Tennessee River watershed, Macon and Swain Counties, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    During the months May--November 1992, as part of the Western North Carolina Alliance upper Little Tennessee River watershed survey, streams in the North Carolina portion (Macon and Swain Counties) of the watershed were surveyed for the presence of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). The purposes of this survey were threefold: (1) To use this sensitive, pollution-intolerant species as an indicator organism for high quality waters. (2) To assist the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, the US Forest Service, and private landowners in managing for and protecting this popular game fish. (3) To locate possible stocks of pure ``southern Appalachian strain`` brook trout. Research is currently underway at the University of Tennessee and Auburn University to determine whether there is in fact a distinct southem subspecies or race of S. fontinalis. This author is one of those who is inclined to believe there is.

  17. Phosphorus removal mechanisms at the Yellow River Sweetwater Creek Water Reclamation Facility, Gwinnett County, Georgia. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Borowy, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    This research investigated the capabilities of the Yellow River Sweetwater Creek Water Reclamation Facility in Gwinnett County, GA. to remove phosphorus biologically. Phosphorus levels and removal locations were analyzed in plant operational units (sampling events), while in reactor experiments (pilot studies), waste was subjected to various conditions to promote-biological phosphorus release and uptake. Analysis of plant conditions at the time of experimentation indicates that one-half of the plant phosphorus removal is accomplished biologically through incorporation of phosphorus in microbial cells during growth. It does not appear, however, that enhanced biological phosphorus removal (BPR) is possible due to wastestream characteristics and/or microbial population. It was noted that the basic anaerobic-aerobic sequence associated with enhanced BPR appears to be occurring with the secondary clarifier sludge blanket and return to compartment A of the nitrification basin.

  18. Calibration and potential uses of a digital water-quality model for the Arkansas River in Pueblo County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goddard, Kimball E.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 1-year study to calibrate and demonstrate the use of a steady-state water quality model for a 42-mile reach of the Arkansas River in Pueblo County, Colo. Based on the calibration, the model is capable of accurately predicting concentrations of carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand, total organic nitrogen, total nitrite, and total orthophosphate; predicted concentrations of total ammonia, total nitrate, and dissolved oxygen will be somewhat less accurate. Additional data are needed to determine the model 's capability to predict concentrations of coliform bacteria. Potential uses of the model were demonstrated by simulating the effects of different waste water discharges on streamflow quality, using water-quality and stream-discharge data provided by the Pueblo Area Council of Governments. Selected results for carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and total ammonia from three simulations illustrate the capability of the model. (USGS)

  19. Water-quality conditions near the confluence of the Snake and Boise Rivers, Canyon County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Etheridge, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) have been established under authority of the Federal Clean Water Act for the Snake River-Hells Canyon reach, on the border of Idaho and Oregon, to improve water quality and preserve beneficial uses such as public consumption, recreation, and aquatic habitat. The TMDL sets targets for seasonal average and annual maximum concentrations of chlorophyll-a at 14 and 30 micrograms per liter, respectively. To attain these conditions, the maximum total phosphorus concentration at the mouth of the Boise River in Idaho, a tributary to the Snake River, has been set at 0.07 milligrams per liter. However, interactions among chlorophyll-a, nutrients, and other key water-quality parameters that may affect beneficial uses in the Snake and Boise Rivers are unknown. In addition, contributions of nutrients and chlorophyll-a loads from the Boise River to the Snake River have not been fully characterized. To evaluate seasonal trends and relations among nutrients and other water-quality parameters in the Boise and Snake Rivers, a comprehensive monitoring program was conducted near their confluence in water years (WY) 2009 and 2010. The study also provided information on the relative contribution of nutrient and sediment loads from the Boise River to the Snake River, which has an effect on water-quality conditions in downstream reservoirs. State and site-specific water-quality standards, in addition to those that relate to the Snake River-Hells Canyon TMDL, have been established to protect beneficial uses in both rivers. Measured water-quality conditions in WY2009 and WY2010 exceeded these targets at one or more sites for the following constituents: water temperature, total phosphorus concentrations, total phosphorus loads, dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, and chlorophyll-a concentrations (WY2009 only). All measured total phosphorus concentrations in the Boise River near Parma exceeded the seasonal target of 0.07 milligram per liter. Data collected

  20. Hydrologic data for the San Juan and Animas River valleys in the Farmington, Aztec, Bloomfield, and Cedar Hill areas, San Juan County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, D.P.; Shelton, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    In July 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a three-year study in San Juan County, New Mexico, to determine the concentrations of chemical constituents in the groundwater in the San Juan and Animas River valleys and to determine the direction and rate of groundwater flow and its relation to river stage. The study was conducted in cooperation with the San Juan County Commission and the New Mexico Oil Conservation Division. The data that was collected during the first 1-1/2 yr of the study is completed. The report includes well records for 51 wells and water levels from 23 wells, hydrographs from four observation wells and one river stage site, and available chemical analyses from 50 wells and 14 surface water sites. Water samples from six wells and one surface-water site were analyzed for purgeable organic chemicals; none were detected. (Lantz-PTT)

  1. Seasonal changes in ground-water levels in the shallow aquifer near Hagerman and the Pecos River, Chaves County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garn, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Pecos River near Hagerman in Chaves County, New Mexico, historically has been a gaining stream. In 1938, the slope of the water table in the shallow alluvial aquifer near Hagerman was toward the Pecos River. By 1950, a large water-table depression had formed in the alluvial aquifer southwest of Hagerman. Continued enlargement of this depression could reverse the direction of groundwater flow to the Pecos River. Water levels were measured during 1981-85 in wells along a section extending from the Pecos River to a point within the depression. Although the water-table depression has not caused a perennial change in direction of groundwater flow, it has caused a seasonal reversal in the slope of the water table between the river and the depression during the growing season when pumpage from the shallow aquifer is the greatest. (USGS)

  2. [Tracer gas evaluations of local exhaust hood performance].

    PubMed

    Ojima, Jun

    2007-09-01

    A local exhaust hood is one of the most commonly used controls for harmful contaminants in the working environment. In Japan, the performance of a hood is evaluated by hood velocity measurements, and administrative performance requirements for hoods are provided as control velocities by the Japanese Industrial Safety and Health Law. However, it is doubtful whether the control velocity would be the most suitable velocity for any industrial hood since the control velocity is not substantiated by actual measurements of the containment ability of each hood. In order to examine the suitability of the control velocity as a performance requirement, a hood performance test by the tracer gas method, using carbon dioxide (CO(2)), was conducted with an exterior type hood in a laboratory. In this study, as an index of the hood performance, capture efficiency defined as the ratio of contaminant quantity captured by the hood to the total generated contaminant quantity, was determined by measuring the CO(2) concentrations. When the assumptive capture point of the contaminant was located at a point 30 cm from the hood opening, a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of less than the current control velocity. Without cross draft, a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of 0.2 m/s (corresponding to 40% of the control velocity) at the capture point. Reduction of the suction velocity to 0.2 m/s caused an 80% decrease in exhaust flow rate. The effect of cross draft, set at 0.3 m/s, on the capture efficiency differed according to its direction. When the direction of the cross draft was normal to the hood centerline, the effect was not recognized and a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of 0.2 m/s. A cross draft from a worker's back (at an angle of 45 degrees to the hood centerline) did not affect the capture efficiency, either. When the cross draft blew at an angle of 135 degrees to the hood

  3. Geology, Hydrology, and Water Quality of the Little Blackwater River Watershed, Dorchester County, Maryland, 2006-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, Brandon J.; DeJong, Benjamin D.; Phelan, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The Little Blackwater River watershed is a low-lying tidal watershed in Dorchester County, Maryland. The potential exists for increased residential development in a mostly agricultural watershed that drains into the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. Groundwater and surface-water levels were collected along with water-quality samples to document hydrologic and geochemical conditions within the watershed prior to potential land-use changes. Lithologic logs were collected in the Little Blackwater River watershed and interpreted with existing geophysical logs to conceptualize the shallow groundwater-flow system. A shallow water table exists in much of the watershed as shown by sediment cores and surface geophysical surveys. Water-table wells have seasonal variations of 6 feet, with the lowest water levels occurring in September and October. Seasonally low water-table levels are lower than the stage of the Little Blackwater River, creating the potential for surface-water infiltration into the water table. Two stream gages, each equipped with stage, velocity, specific conductance, and temperature sensors, were installed at the approximate mid-point of the watershed and near the mouth of the Little Blackwater River. The gages recorded data continuously and also were equipped with telemetry. Discharge calculated at the mouth of the Little Blackwater River showed a seasonal pattern, with net positive discharge in the winter and spring months and net negative discharge (flow into the watershed from Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and Fishing Bay) in the summer and fall months. Continuous water-quality records showed an increase in specific conductance during the summer and fall months. Discrete water-quality samples were collected during 2007--08 from 13 of 15 monitoring wells and during 2006--09 from 9 surface-water sites to characterize pre-development conditions and the seasonal variability of inorganic constituents and nutrients. The highest mean values of

  4. Water temperature data analysis and simulation for the Salmon River, Oswego County, New York, Summer, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddle, Terry J.

    1989-01-01

    Research into the temperature effects of operation of the Salmon River Reservoir system of the Niagara Mohawk Power Company was conducted as part of a multi-agency effort to characterize the influences on riverine habitat of power plant operation. Several reports are being prepared to address various parts of the work that has been accomplished. Appendix 1 contains a list of those reports and the reporting entities. The goals of this portion of the research were to determine the magnitude of temperature effects due to power plant operation, and develop methods to predict water temperature in the river under both steady and unsteady flow conditions that are induced by the project operation.

  5. Performance assessment of U.S. residential cooking exhaust hoods.

    PubMed

    Delp, William W; Singer, Brett C

    2012-06-01

    This study assessed the performance of seven new residential cooking exhaust hoods representing common U.S. designs. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine fan curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas capture efficiency for front and back cooktop burners and the oven. Airflow rate sensitivity to duct flow resistance was higher for axial fan devices than for centrifugal fan devices. Pollutant capture efficiency (CE) ranged from <15% to >98%, varying across hoods and with airflow and burner position for each hood. CE was higher for back burners relative to front burners, presumably because most hoods covered only part of the front burners. Open hoods had higher CE than those with grease screen and metal-covered bottoms. The device with the highest CE--exceeding 80% for oven and front burners--had a large, open hood that covered most of the front burners. The airflow rate for this hood surpassed the industry-recommended level of 118 L·s(-1) (250 cfm) and produced sound levels too high for normal conversation. For hoods meeting the sound and fan efficacy criteria for Energy Star, CE was <30% for front and oven burners. PMID:22568807

  6. 75 FR 54846 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Action of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For more information regarding this meeting, contact Connie Athman; Mt....

  7. 76 FR 14897 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Salem, Oregon....

  8. The effect of thermal loading on laboratory fume hood performance.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J D; Chessin, S J; Chesnovar, B W; Lillquist, D R

    2000-11-01

    A modified version of the ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods was used to evaluate the relationship between thermal loading in a laboratory fume hood and subsequent tracer gas leakage. Three types of laboratory burners were used, alone and in combination, to thermally challenge the hood. Heat output from burners was measured in BTU/hr, which was based on the fuel heat capacity and flow rate. Hood leakage was measured between 2824 and 69,342 BTU/hr. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was released at 23.5 LPM for each level of thermal loading. Duct temperature was also measured during the heating process. Results indicate a linear relationship for both BTU/hr vs. hood leakage and duct temperature vs. hood leakage. Under these test conditions, each increase of 10,000 BTU/hr resulted in an additional 4 ppm SF6 in the manikin's breathing zone (r2 = 0.68). An additional 3.1 ppm SF6 was measured for every 25 degrees F increase in duct temperature (r2 = 0.60). Both BTU/hr and duct temperature models showed p < 0.001. For these tests, BTU/hr was a better predictor of hood leakage than duct temperature. The results of this study indicate that heat output may compromise fume hood performance. This finding is consistent with those of previous studies. PMID:11062932

  9. 14 CFR 93.61 - General rules: Lake Hood segment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General rules: Lake Hood segment. 93.61 Section 93.61 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Area § 93.61 General rules: Lake Hood segment. (a) No person may operate an aircraft at an...

  10. Design considerations for fume hoods for process plants.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, H D; Bender, M

    1980-07-01

    Proper design of fume hoods is a necessary requisite for a clean working environment for many industrial processes. Until recently, the design of these hoods has been rather a trial and error approach and not based on sound engineering design principles. Hatch Associates have developed and applied new techniques to establish hood parameters for different industrail processes. The paper reviews the developed techniques and illustrates practical application of these techniques to the solving of difficult and comples fume hood design and operating performance problems. The scope of the paper covers the following subject areas: definitions and general considerations: evaluation of volume and heat flow rates for emission sources; local capture of process emissions; remote capture of process emissions and case studies of fume hood applications. The purpose of the paper is to detail a coherent approach in the analysis of emission problems which will result in the development of an efficient design of a fume capture hood. An efficient fume hood can provide a safe working place as well as a clean external environment. Although the techniques can be applied to smaller sources, the case studies which will be examined will be for fume hoods in the flow design range of 50 000 CFM to +1 000 000 CFM. PMID:7415967