Science.gov

Sample records for horizontal bottom surface

  1. Experimental and numerical investigation of transition to turbulent flow and heat transfer inside a horizontal smooth rectangular duct under uniform bottom surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Kamil; Onur, Nevzat

    2013-07-01

    In this study, steady-state turbulent forced flow and heat transfer in a horizontal smooth rectangular duct both experimentally and numerically investigated. The study was carried out in the transition to turbulence region where Reynolds numbers range from 2,323 to 9,899. Flow is hydrodynamically and thermally developing (simultaneously developing flow) under uniform bottom surface temperature condition. A commercial CFD program Ansys Fluent 12.1 with different turbulent models was used to carry out the numerical study. Based on the present experimental data and three-dimensional numerical solutions, new engineering correlations were presented for the heat transfer and friction coefficients in the form of {{Nu}} = {{C}}2 {{Re}}^{{{{n}}_{ 1} }} and {{f}} = {{C}}3 {{Re}}^{{{{n}}3 }} , respectively. The results have shown that as the Reynolds number increases heat transfer coefficient increases but Darcy friction factor decreases. It is seen that there is a good agreement between the present experimental and numerical results. Examination of heat and mass transfer in rectangular cross-sectioned duct for different duct aspect ratio (α) was also carried out in this study. Average Nusselt number and average Darcy friction factor were expressed with graphics and correlations for different duct aspect ratios.

  2. 10. VIEW EAST, RECESS AREA WITH BOTTOM HORIZONTAL BEAM FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW EAST, RECESS AREA WITH BOTTOM HORIZONTAL BEAM FOR EAST GATE - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  3. Inversion for Sound Speed Profile by Using a Bottom Mounted Horizontal Line Array in Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Ren-He

    2010-08-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography is an appealing technique for remote monitoring of the ocean environment. In shallow water, matched field processing (MFP) with a vertical line array is one of the widely used methods for inverting the sound speed profile (SSP) of water column. The approach adopted is to invert the SSP with a bottom mounted horizontal line array (HLA) based on MFP. Empirical orthonormal functions are used to express the SSP, and perturbation theory is used in the forward sound field calculation. This inversion method is applied to the data measured in a shallow water acoustic experiment performed in 2003. Successful results show that the bottom mounted HLA is able to estimate the SSP. One of the most important advantages of the inversion method with bottom mounted HLA is that the bottom mounted HLA can keep a stable array shape and is safe in a relatively long period.

  4. Decontamination of large horizontal concrete surfaces outdoors

    SciTech Connect

    Barbier, M.M.; Chester, C.V.

    1980-01-01

    A study is being conducted of the resources and planning that would be required to clean up an extensive contamination of the outdoor environment. As part of this study, an assessment of the fleet of machines needed for decontaminating large outdoor surfaces of horizontal concrete will be attempted. The operations required are described. The performance of applicable existing equipment is analyzed in terms of area cleaned per unit time, and the comprehensive cost of decontamination per unit area is derived. Shielded equipment for measuring directional radiation and continuously monitoring decontamination work are described. Shielding of drivers' cabs and remote control vehicles is addressed.

  5. Vertical gas injection into liquid cross-stream beneath horizontal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Ho; Makiharju, Simo; Lee, Inwon; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steve

    2013-11-01

    Skin friction drag reduction on flat bottomed ships and barges can be achieved by creating an air layer immediately beneath the horizontal surface. The simplest way of introducing the gas is through circular orifices; however the dynamics of gas injection into liquid cross-streams under horizontal surfaces is not well understood. Experiments were conducted to investigate the development of the gas topology following its vertical injection through a horizontal surface. The liquid cross-flow, orifice diameter and gas flow rate were varied to investigate the effect of different ratios of momentum fluxes. The testing was performed on a 4.3 m long and 0.73 m wide barge model with air injection through a hole in the transparent bottom hull. The incoming boundary layer was measured via a pitot tube. Downstream distance based Reynolds number at the injection location was 5 × 105 through 4 × 106 . To observe the flow topology, still images and video were recorded from above the model (i.e. through the transparent hull), from beneath the bottom facing upward, and from the side at an oblique angle. The transition point of the flow topology was determined and analyzed.

  6. Estimating the acoustic characteristics of surface layers of the sea bottom using four-component vector-scalar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. I.; Kuznetsov, G. N.

    2016-03-01

    It is shown that scalar, horizontal, and vertical vector receivers efficiently split modes of different numbers, which makes it possible to analyze the mode structure and estimate the characteristics of surface layers of a shallow sea bottom. To analyze the mode structure of propagating pulses from a towed pneumatic source, Winger transform was applied, with which seven modes were isolated by vertical vector receivers, whereas the scalar receivers and horizontal vector receivers isolated only three modes. It is established that the use of four-component vector-scalar receivers makes it possible to increase the accuracy in estimating the parameters of a layered bottom model.

  7. A horizontal sampler for collection of water samples near the bottom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joeris, Leonard S.

    1964-01-01

    The need to obtain adequate water samples immediately above a lake bottom or at a precisely defined depth is not new. The problem is of particular concern in a large section of central Lake Erie, where dissolved oxygen concentration may be reduced to 1 ppm or less in the hypolimnion and where the metalimnion frequently extends to or within 30 or 60 cm of the bottom (Becton 1963; Cam 1962).It is impossible to sample the hypolimnrtic waters satisfactorily with the usual Nanscn, Kemmerer, and Frautschy bottles (Carr 1962). Although the 500-ml sampler described here was designed, constructed, and used extensively and successfully to meet the particular problem in Lake Erie, it should be equally useful in a varirty of situations.

  8. The effect of tip shields on a horizontal tail surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dronin, Paul V; Ramsden, Earl I; Higgins, George J

    1928-01-01

    A series of experiments made in the wind tunnel of the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aeronautics, New York University, on the effect of tip shields on a horizontal tail surface are described and discussed. It was found that some aerodynamic gain can be obtained by the use of tip shields though it is considered doubtful whether their use would be practical.

  9. Parameterizing Ocean Eddy Transports From Surface to Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiki, H.; Jacobson, T.; Yamagata, T.

    2004-12-01

    To improve subgrid-scale physics of climate ocean models, in particular near the top and bottom boundaries, we consider new parameterization schemes for the extra transport velocity by waves and eddies in baroclinic instability. These come in the form of elliptic equations, previously unmentioned, which we derive for the eddy-induced overturning stream function. They guarantee decrease of the mean field potential energy. Our principal example gives a relationship between the vertical shear of the overturning velocity and the buoyancy torque of the main geostrophic current. Interestingly the parameterized velocity is nonsingular at the bottom and the sea surface, contrasting with the constant-coefficient Gent and McWilliams (1990)scheme. Idealized two-dimensional numerical experiments uccessfully reproduce meridional overturning circulation even when the background density gradient is uniform everywhere (the Eady problem) or when the bottom is steeply sloped. We further demonstrate that adding an eddy form drag (wave tress) term in the TRM momentum equations yields overturning of the velocity field.

  10. Nonplanar conductive surfaces via "bottom-up" nanostructured gold coating.

    PubMed

    Vinod, T P; Jelinek, Raz

    2014-03-12

    Development of technologies for the construction of bent, curved, and flexible conductive surfaces is among the most important albeit challenging goals in the promising field of "flexible electronics". We present a generic solution-based "bottom-up" approach for assembling conductive gold nanostructured layers on nonplanar polymer surfaces. The simple two-step experimental scheme is based upon incubation of an amine-displaying polymer [the abundantly used poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), selected here as a proof of concept] with Au(SCN)4(-), followed by a brief treatment with a conductive polymer [poly(3,4-thylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate)] solution. Importantly, no reducing agent is co-added to the gold complex solution. The resultant surfaces are conductive and exhibit a unique "nanoribbon" gold morphology. The scheme yields conductive layers upon PDMS in varied configurations: planar, "wrinkled", and mechanically bent surfaces. The technology is simple, inexpensive, and easy to implement for varied polymer surfaces (and other substances), opening the way for practical applications in flexible electronics and related fields. PMID:24548243

  11. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  12. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  13. Boiling on horizontal surfaces coated with porous metal wicks

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Zyan, H.Z.; Plumb, O.A.

    1997-07-01

    Boiling experiments intended to simulate heat pipe operating conditions were conducted on a copper surface covered with copper foametal and nickel fiber wicks 3.175 and 4.760 mm thick. The experiments were conducted on a horizontal surface open to the atmosphere with water as the working fluid. The experimental surface was operated like a heat pipe with distilled water supplied upstream of the heated section and transported by capillary action across a section which was adiabatic to the heated section where boiling took place. At low excess temperature, less than 10 to 20 C, the heat flux from the porous coated surfaces is comparable to or greater than that predicted for a smooth surface using the Rohsenow correlation. At higher excess temperatures corresponding to heat fluxes between 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} the increase in heat flux with excess temperature is much less than that predicted by the Rohsenow correlation. When the wicks were vented by cutting slots covering 10 to 20% of the total surface area the heat flux increased, in some cases by a factor of three, for a given excess temperature. The heat flux at which the slope of the boiling curve decreased also increased for the vented surfaces. This is attributed to the provision of a low resistance path for the steam to escape providing a surface that is more highly wetted. A mathematical model for the transport with boiling in the porous wick is developed in an attempt to gain further understanding of the processes involved. The model predicts dryout conditions that are in reasonable agreement with experimental observations. However, the model predicts decreasing vapor pressure, and hence temperature, adjacent to the heated surface with increasing heat flux as a result of the decrease in relative permeability of the partially saturated wick.

  14. Free Surface Wave Interaction with a Horizontal Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshkai, P.; Rockwell, D.

    1999-10-01

    Classes of vortex formation from a horizontal cylinder adjacent to an undulating free-surface wave are characterized using high-image-density particle image velocimetry. Instantaneous representations of the velocity field, streamline topology and vorticity patterns yield insight into the origin of unsteady loading of the cylinder. For sufficiently deep submergence of the cylinder, the orbital nature of the wave motion results in multiple sites of vortex development, i.e., onset of vorticity concentrations, along the surface of the cylinder, followed by distinctive types of shedding from the cylinder. All of these concentrations of vorticity then exhibit orbital motion about the cylinder. Their contributions to the instantaneous values of the force coefficients are assessed by calculating moments of vorticity. It is shown that large contributions to the moments and their rate of change with time can occur for those vorticity concentrations having relatively small amplitude orbital trajectories. In a limiting case, collision with the surface of the cylinder can occur. Such vortex-cylinder interactions exhibit abrupt changes in the streamline topology during the wave cycle, including abrupt switching of the location of saddle points in the wave. The effect of nominal depth of submergence of the cylinder is characterized in terms of the time history of patterns of vorticity generated from the cylinder and the free surface. Generally speaking, generic types of vorticity concentrations are formed from the cylinder during the cycle of the wave motion for all values of submergence. The proximity of the free surface, however, can exert a remarkable influence on the initial formation, the eventual strength, and the subsequent motion of concentrations of vorticity. For sufficiently shallow submergence, large-scale vortex formation from the upper surface of the cylinder is inhibited and, in contrast, that from the lower surface of the cylinder is intensified. Moreover

  15. Natural convection heat transfer from a horizontal wavy surface in a porous enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, P.V.S.N.; Kumar, B.V.R.; Singh, P.

    1997-02-07

    The effect of surface undulations on the natural convection heat transfer from an isothermal surface in a Darcian fluid-saturated porous enclosure has been numerically analyzed using the finite element method on a graded nonuniform mesh system. The flow-driving Rayleigh number Ra together with the geometrical parameters of wave amplitude a, wave phase {phi}, and the number of waves N considered in the horizontal dimension of the cavity are found to influence the flow and heat transfer process in the enclosure. For Ra around 50 and above, the phenomenon of flow separation and reattachment is noticed on the walls of the enclosure. A periodic shift in the reattachment point from the bottom wall to the adjacent walls in the clockwise direction, leading to the manifestation of cycles of unicellular and bicellular clockwise and counterclockwise flows, is observed, with the phase varying between 0{degree} and 350{degree}. The counterflow in the secondary circulation zone is intensified with the increase in the value of Ra. The counterflow on the wavy wall hinders the heat transfer into the system. An increase in either wave amplitude or the number of waves considered per unit length decreases the global heat flux into the system. Only marginal changes in global heat flux are noticed with increasing Ra. On the whole, the comparison of global heat flux results in the wavy wall case with those of the horizontal flat wall case shows that, in a porous enclosure, the wavy wall reduces the heat transfer into the system.

  16. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  17. Effects of bottom bracings on torsional dynamic characteristics of horizontally curved twin I-girder bridges with different curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awall, Md. Robiul; Hayashikawa, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; He, Xingwen

    2012-03-01

    Curved twin I-girder bridges (CTIGBs) have low torsional stiffness that makes them vulnerable to dynamic loads. This study investigates the effects of bottom bracings on the torsional dynamic characteristics of CTIGBs. Five types of bottom bracings are designed to investigate their effects on the dynamic characteristics of CTIGBs with different curvatures under free and forced vibrations. To perform numerical investigations, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element (FE) bridge and vehicle models are established using commercial ANSYS code, and then a vehicle-bridge interaction analysis approach is proposed. Road roughness profiles generated from power spectral density and cross spectral functions are also taken into account in the analyses. The numerical results show that torsional frequencies increase significantly after providing bottom bracings, and the increasing rate depends on the type of bottom bracings and their locations of installation. Bottom bracings can act as load transmitting members from one main girder to the others. Large negative bearing forces that have occurred in bridges with small radii of curvatures can be remarkably reduced by providing bottom bracing systems. It is found that the performances of several bottom bracing systems are effective in improving the torsional dynamic characteristics of the bridges in this study.

  18. A model for diffuse and global irradiation on horizontal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, P.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The intensity of the direct radiation and the diffuse radiation at any time on a horizontal surface are each expressed as fractions of the intensity of the extraterrestrial radiation. Using these and assuming a random distribution of the bright sunshine hours and not too wide variations in the values of the transmission coefficients, a number of relations for estimating the global and the diffuse irradiation are derived. Two of the relations derived, including the Angstroem correlation for estimating the global irradiation, are already known empirically while several new correlations have been derived. The relations derived in this paper are: (i) H{sub d}/H{sub o} = a{sub 1} + b{sub 1} (S/S{sub o}); (ii) H/H{sub o} = A{sub 2} + b{sub 2} (S/S{sub o}); (iii) H{sub D}/H{sub o} = a{sub 3} + b{sub 3} (H/H{sub o}); (iv) H{sub D}/H = a{sub 4} + b{sub 4} (h{sub o}/) (v) H/(H{minus}H{sub D}) = a{sub 5} + b{sub 5} (S{sub o}/S); (vi) H{sub D}/(H{minus}H{sub D}) = A{sub 6} + b{sub 6} (S{sub o}/S); (vii) H/H{sub D} = a{sub 7} + b{sub 7} (S/S{sub o}); (viii) H/H{sub D} = A{sub 1} + A{sub 2} (S/S{sub o}) + A{sub 3} (S/S{sub o}){sup 2}. The study identifies three independent basic parameters and the constants appearing in the various equations as simple functions of these three basic parameters. This provides unification and inter-relationships between the various constants. Experimental data for the diffuse irradiation, the global irradiation and the bright sunshine duration for Macerata (Italy), Salisbury and Bulawayo (Zimbabwe) is found to show good correlation for the linear eqns (i) to (vii), and the nature and the interrelationships of the constants is found to be as predicted by theory.

  19. A Theoretical Approach for Determining Irregularities of the Bottom of the Tillage Layer Caused by Horizontal Axis Rotary Tillers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horizontal axis rotary tillers can cause irregularities in soil tilling depth when they are not used in appropriate operational and constructional conditions. In such cases, mixing and breaking of soil through tilling depth will not be in the same degree and some untilled ridges will remain on the ...

  20. Use of vortex generators and ribs for heat transfer enhancement at the top surface of a uniformly heated horizontal channel with mixed convection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, J.R.; Incropera, F.P. )

    1991-05-01

    Although secondary flows driven by buoyancy forces enhance heat transfer from the bottom surface of a heated, horizontal channel, heat transfer coefficients at the upper surface are known to remain near forced convection levels. In situations where performance is limited by the maximum local temperature, such as the cooling of electronic circuitry, enhanced heat transfer at one surface may be of little advantage if approximately equivalent enhancement does not exist at the opposite surface. Hence differences between top and bottom surface conditions may prevent a designer from taking full advantage of buoyancy-driven flows. This note reports on exploratory experiments to assess the feasibility of using mechanical vortex generators or perforated ribs at the top surface of a uniformly heated channel to provide comparable enhancement at both surfaces.

  1. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  2. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, Patricia L.; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2008-10-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the "effective" forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  3. The Pressure Distribution Over the Horizontal Tail Surfaces of an Airplane I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H

    1923-01-01

    This work was undertaken to determine as completely as possible the distribution of pressure over the horizontal tail surfaces of an airplane, and to analyze the relation of this pressure to the structural loads and the longitudinal stability. The investigation is divided into three parts, of which this the first. The first part of the investigation is for the purpose of determining the pressure distribution over two horizontal tail surfaces in uniform free flight; the second part to conduct tests of similar tail planes in the wind tunnel; and the third part to determine the pressure distribution on the horizontal tail surfaces during accelerated flight on the full-size airplane.

  4. Axisymmetric model of drop spreading on a horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Aashutosh; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-09-01

    Spreading of an initially spherical liquid drop over a textured surface is analyzed by solving an integral form of the governing equations. The mathematical model extends Navier-Stokes equations by including surface tension at the gas-liquid boundary and a force distribution at the three phase contact line. While interfacial tension scales with drop curvature, the motion of the contact line depends on the departure of instantaneous contact angle from its equilibrium value. The numerical solution is obtained by discretizing the spreading drop into disk elements. The Bond number range considered is 0.01-1. Results obtained for sessile drops are in conformity with limiting cases reported in the literature [J. C. Bird et al., "Short-time dynamics of partial wetting," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 234501 (2008)]. They further reveal multiple time scales that are reported in experiments [K. G. Winkels et al., "Initial spreading of low-viscosity drops on partially wetting surfaces," Phys. Rev. E 85, 055301 (2012) and A. Eddi et al., "Short time dynamics of viscous drop spreading," Phys. Fluids 25, 013102 (2013)]. Spreading of water and glycerin drops over fully and partially wetting surfaces is studied in terms of excess pressure, wall shear stress, and the dimensions of the footprint. Contact line motion is seen to be correctly captured in the simulations. Water drops show oscillations during spreading while glycerin spreads uniformly over the surface.

  5. Alignment tool facilitates pin placement on irregular horizontal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, J. V.

    1966-01-01

    Alignment tool facilitates spotting and cementing plastic pins on the true vertical to irregular concave and convex surfaces. The tool consists of a wood tripod with individually adjustable legs, a wood block with a hole for placing the pins and two spirit levels at a 90 degree angle for easy alignment.

  6. Optimal Image Stitching for Concrete Bridge Bottom Surfaces Aided by 3d Structure Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yahui; Yao, Jian; Liu, Kang; Lu, Xiaohu; Xia, Menghan

    2016-06-01

    Crack detection for bridge bottom surfaces via remote sensing techniques is undergoing a revolution in the last few years. For such applications, a large amount of images, acquired with high-resolution industrial cameras close to the bottom surfaces with some mobile platform, are required to be stitched into a wide-view single composite image. The conventional idea of stitching a panorama with the affine model or the homographic model always suffers a series of serious problems due to poor texture and out-of-focus blurring introduced by depth of field. In this paper, we present a novel method to seamlessly stitch these images aided by 3D structure lines of bridge bottom surfaces, which are extracted from 3D camera data. First, we propose to initially align each image in geometry based on its rough position and orientation acquired with both a laser range finder (LRF) and a high-precision incremental encoder, and these images are divided into several groups with the rough position and orientation data. Secondly, the 3D structure lines of bridge bottom surfaces are extracted from the 3D cloud points acquired with 3D cameras, which impose additional strong constraints on geometrical alignment of structure lines in adjacent images to perform a position and orientation optimization in each group to increase the local consistency. Thirdly, a homographic refinement between groups is applied to increase the global consistency. Finally, we apply a multi-band blending algorithm to generate a large-view single composite image as seamlessly as possible, which greatly eliminates both the luminance differences and the color deviations between images and further conceals image parallax. Experimental results on a set of representative images acquired from real bridge bottom surfaces illustrate the superiority of our proposed approaches.

  7. Quantitative estimation of surface ocean productivity and bottom water oxygen concentration using benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubere, Paul

    1994-10-01

    An electronic supplement of this material may be obtained on adiskette or Anonymous FTP from KOSMOS.AGU.ORG. (LOGIN toAGU's FTP account using ANONYMOUS as the usemame andGUEST as the password. Go to the right directory by typing CDAPEND. Type LS to see what files are available. Type GET and thename of the file to get it. Finally, type EXIT to leave the system.)(Paper 94PA01624, Quantitative estimation of surface oceanproductivity and bottom water concentration using benthicforaminifera, by P. Loubere). Diskette may be ordered from AmericanGeophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC20009; $15.00. Payment must accompany order.Quantitative estimation of surface ocean productivity and bottom water oxygen concentration with benthic foraminifera was attempted using 70 samples from equatorial and North Pacific surface sediments. These samples come from a well defined depth range in the ocean, between 2200 and 3200 m, so that depth related factors do not interfere with the estimation. Samples were selected so that foraminifera were well preserved in the sediments and temperature and salinity were nearly uniform (T = 1.5° C; S = 34.6‰). The sample set was also assembled so as to minimize the correlation often seen between surface ocean productivity and bottom water oxygen values (r² = 0.23 for prediction purposes in this case). This procedure reduced the chances of spurious results due to correlations between the environmental variables. The samples encompass a range of productivities from about 25 to >300 gC m-2 yr-1, and a bottom water oxygen range from 1.8 to 3.5 ml/L. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages were quantified using the >62 µm fraction of the sediments and 46 taxon categories. MANOVA multivariate regression was used to project the faunal matrix onto the two environmental dimensions using published values for productivity and bottom water oxygen to calibrate this operation. The success of this regression was measured with the multivariate r

  8. On the observability of bottom topography from measurements of tidal sea surface height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaron, Edward D.

    2016-06-01

    The question of whether features of the ocean bottom topography can be identified from measurements of water level is investigated using a simplified one-dimensional barotropic model. Because of the nonlinear dependence of the sea surface height on the water depth, a linearized analysis is performed concerning the identification of a Gaussian bump within two specific depth profiles, (1) a constant depth domain, and, (2) a constant depth domain adjoining a near-resonant continental shelf. Observability is quantified by examining the estimation error in a series of identical-twin experiments varying data density, tide wavelength, assumed (versus actual) topographic correlation scale, and friction. For measurements of sea surface height that resolve the scale of the topographic perturbation, the fractional error in the bottom topography is approximately a factor of 10 larger than the fractional error of the sea surface height. Domain-scale and shelf-scale resonances may lead to inaccurate topography estimates due to a reduction in the effective number of degrees of freedom in the dynamics, and the amplification of nonlinearity. A realizability condition for the variance of the topography error in the limit of zero bottom depth is proposed which is interpreted as a bound on the fractional error of the topography. Appropriately designed spatial covariance models partly ameliorate the negative impact of shelf-scale near-resonance, and highlight the importance of spatial covariance modeling for bottom topography estimation.

  9. Unbounded wall flow with free surface waves and horizontal shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary; McHugh, John

    2015-11-01

    Free surface waves in the presence of a non-uniform shear flow are treated. The shear flow of interest varies with both the transverse and vertical coordinates, U (y , z) . Initial results treat a mean flow varying only with the transverse, U (y) . The domain is bounded on one side by a flat rigid vertical wall and is unbounded on the other side. The mean flows considered here are nonzero near the vertical wall and approach zero far from the wall, e.g. U =e-γy . The flowfield is treated as inviscid but rotational. Linear solutions are obtained using a nonuniform coordinate transformation that converts the free surface boundary condition into a modified Bessel equation. Velocity components are expanded in modified Bessel functions of the first kind of purely imaginary order. The dispersion relation for steady waves are found with wavespeeds outside the range of U, matching previous results for a flow bounded on both sides. Corresponding eigenvectors show a sequence of wave profiles of increasing complexity near the wall. The wave amplitude approaches zero far from the wall.

  10. HORIZONTAL DROP OF THE NAVAL SNF LONG WASTE PACKAGE ON UNYIELDING SURFACE

    SciTech Connect

    T. Schmitt

    2000-05-23

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Long Waste Package (WP) subjected to a 2.4-m horizontal drop on an unyielding surface (US). The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of maximum stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Waste Package Design section in accordance with the development plan for ''Horizontal Drop of the Naval SNF Long Waste Package on Unyielding Surface''.

  11. The impact of the spatial variability in bottom roughness on tidal dynamics and energetics, a case study: the M 2 surface tide in the North European Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Boris A.; Sofina, Ekaterina V.; Rashidi, Ebrahim

    2012-12-01

    A modified version of the 3D finite-element hydrostatic model QUODDY-4 is used to quantify the changes in the dynamics and energetics of the M 2 surface tide in the North European Basin, induced by the spatial variability in bottom roughness. This version differs from the original one, as it introduces a module providing evaluation of the drag coefficient in the bottom boundary layer (BBL) and by accounting for the equilibrium tide. The drag coefficient is found from the resistance laws for an oscillatory rotating turbulent BBL over hydrodynamically rough and incompletely rough underlying surfaces, describing how the wave friction factor as well as other resistance characteristics depend on the dimensionless similarity parameters for the BBL. It is shown that the influence of the spatial variability in bottom roughness is responsible for some specific changes in the tidal amplitudes, phases, and the maximum tidal velocities. These changes are within the model noise, while the changes in the averaged (over a tidal cycle) horizontal wave transport and the averaged dissipation of barotropic tidal energy may be of the same orders of magnitude as are the above energetic characteristics as such. Thus, contrary to present views, ignoring the spatial variability in bottom roughness at least in the North European Basin is only partially correct: it is valid for the tidal dynamics, but is liable to break down for the tidal energetics.

  12. Plasma-surface interactions for top-down and bottom-up nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Kouichi

    2015-09-01

    Plasma processing is now widely employed for the fabrication of nanostructures in diverse fields of micro/nanoelectronic, optoelectronic, energy conversion, and sensing devices. The top-down plasma processes are indispensable in today's microelectronics industry, relying on the use of primarily anisotropic plasma etching following the lithography to define mask patterns; in some cases, self-assembled masks are served for the subsequent etching. The bottom-up ones are often employed to synthesize nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanowires, relying on the use of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and plasma sputtering on self-assembled as well as lithographically formed patterns of metal catalysts. Moreover, the mask-less top-down approaches have recently been demonstrated to form nanopillars and periodic nanoripples, and the catalyst-free bottom-up approaches have been demonstrated to form nanowires. This talk is concerned with the current understanding and future prospects for plasma-surface interactions responsible for these top-down and bottom-up plasma nanofabrication processes, with attention placed on the fabrication of nanoscale fins and gates and also nanowires of silicon. On nanometer scale, ions and neutrals incident on surfaces are few in number during processing; thus, the nanoscale plasma-surface interactions concerned are stochastic, owing to the temporal as well as spatial uniformity of the incident flux and angle of them on surfaces being processed at nanoscale.

  13. Improving horizontal resolution of high-frequency surface-wave methods using travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaofei; Xu, Hongrui; Wang, Limin; Hu, Yue; Shen, Chao; Sun, Shida

    2016-03-01

    In surface-wave methods, horizontal resolution can be defined as the ability to distinguish anomalous objects that are laterally displaced from each other. The horizontal length of a recognizable geological anomalous body is measured by the lateral variation of shear (S)-wave velocity. Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) is an efficient tool to determine near-surface S-wave velocities. The acquisition of the MASW method involves the same source-receiver configuration moved successively by a fixed distance interval (a few to several stations) along a linear survey line, which is called a roll-along acquisition geometry. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section is constructed by aligning 1D models, and each inverted 1D S-wave velocity model reflects the vertical S-wave velocity variation at the midpoint of each geophone spread. Although the MASW method can improve the horizontal resolution of S-wave velocity sections to some degree, the amount of fieldwork is increased by the roll-along acquisition geometry. We propose surface-wave tomography method to investigate horizontal resolution of surface-wave exploration. Phase-velocity dispersion curves are calculated by a pair of traces within a multichannel record through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. Then with the utilization of travel-time tomography, we can obtain high resolution pure-path dispersion curves with diverse sizes of grids at different frequencies. Finally, the pseudo-2D S-wave velocity structure is reconstructed by inverting the pure-path dispersion curves. Travel-time tomography of surface waves can extract accurate dispersion curves from a record with a short receiver spacing, and it can effectively enhance the ability of random noise immunity. Synthetic tests and a real-world example have indicated that travel-time tomography has a great potential for improving the horizontal resolution of surface waves using multi-channel analysis.

  14. Understanding of Bath Surface Wave in Bottom Blown Copper Smelting Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Lang; Cui, Zhixiang; Ma, Xiaodong; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Nguyen, Anh V.; Zhao, Baojun

    2016-02-01

    The waves formed on bath surface play an important role in the bottom blown copper smelting furnace operations. Simulation experiments have been carried out on model of the bottom blown furnace to investigate features of the waves formed on bath surface. It was found that the ripples, the 1st asymmetric standing wave and the 1st symmetric standing wave were able to occur in this model, and empirical occurrence boundaries have been determined. The amplitude and frequency of the standing waves have been systematically investigated. It was found that the amplitude of the 1st asymmetric standing wave is much greater than the 1st symmetric standing wave and the ripples; and the amplitude is found to increase with increasing bath height and flowrate but decrease with blowing angle. The frequency of the 1st asymmetric standing wave is found increasing with bath height but independent of flowrate and blowing angle.

  15. A remote sensing investigation of elevated sub-horizontal topographic surfaces in the Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang

    Multiple elevated horizontal to sub-horizontal topographic surfaces are present in the Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma. Elevated topographic surfaces, developed primarily on granite bedrock with gentle slopes of 0.5 to 7°,were investigated using 1) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) extracted from NAD 27 UTM coordinates, 2) Google Earth imagery, and 3) USGS topographic maps. In the western Wichita Mountains prominent topographic surfaces at elevations of 720 +/- 5 m, 685 +/- 5 m, and 660 +/- 5 m are well preserved on at least four different mountains (e.g., Solder's Peak, King Mt.) and can be correlated with similar surfaces on at least seven different mountains (e.g., Mt. Scott, North Mt.) in the eastern Wichita Mountains. A less well developed surface at 585 +/-5 m is present in the eastern Wichita Mountains and may not be preserved in the western Wichita Mountains. These surfaces are interpreted to be relict pediments or remnants of a more extensive peneplain subsequently dissected as a result of long term time integrated changes in base level, climate, and/or tectonic uplift. Correlation of elevated sub-horizontal surfaces between the western and eastern Wichita Mountains suggests the Wichita Mountains basement behaved as a coherent crustal block since Mid Cenozoic. The presence of multiple elevated, sub-horizontal, regional topographic surfaces throughout the Wichita Mountains complicates direct correlation of these surfaces to the Southern High Plains peneplain using either a linear regression or an exponential fit along a line of projection. Thus, a finer resolution of the timing for individual elevated surfaces in the Wichita Mountains needs to be established.

  16. Water-scattered signal to compensate for the rough sea surface effect on bottom lidar imaging.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Lev S; Luchinin, Alexander G

    2008-12-20

    We investigate the possibility of using the water-backscattered radiation from a bottom sounding airborne imaging light detection and ranging (lidar) system to determine the surface slope at the point where the laser beam intersects the surface. We show that the refraction angle of the beam can be determined using receivers whose sensitivities vary linearly over their field of view. Equations are derived to estimate the statistical mean and variance values of this refracted angle. We demonstrate that the proposed algorithm improves lidar imaging. Numerical examples with reference to typical marine conditions are given. PMID:19104538

  17. Resolving the chemical nature of nanodesigned silica surface obtained via a bottom-up approach.

    PubMed

    Rahma, Hakim; Buffeteau, Thierry; Belin, Colette; Le Bourdon, Gwenaëlle; Degueil, Marie; Bennetau, Bernard; Vellutini, Luc; Heuzé, Karine

    2013-08-14

    The covalent grafting on silica surfaces of a functional dendritic organosilane coupling agent inserted, in a long alkyl chain monolayer, is described. In this paper, we show that depending on experimental parameters, particularly the solvent, it is possible to obtain a nanodesigned surface via a bottom-up approach. Thus, we succeed in the formation of both homogeneous dense monolayer and a heterogeneous dense monolayer, the latter being characterized by a nanosized volcano-type pattern (4-6 nm of height, 100 nm of width, and around 3 volcanos/μm(2)) randomly distributed over the surface. The dendritic attribute of the grafted silylated coupling agent affords enough anchoring sites to immobilize covalently functional gold nanoparticles (GNPs), coated with amino PEG polymer to resolve the chemical nature of the surfaces and especially the volcano type nanopattern structures of the heterogeneous monolayer. Thus, the versatile surface chemistry developed herein is particularly challenging as the nanodesign is straightforward achieved in a bottom-up approach without any specific lithography device. PMID:23855987

  18. Generation of surface waves by an underwater moving bottom: experiments and application to tsunami modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, Leonardo; Jamin, Timothée; Ruiz-Chavarría, Gerardo; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Most of the ocean waves that we observe in nature are generated by processes that take place near the ocean surface. This occurs mainly because fluid layers reduce significantly the transfer of motion between the source and the free surface as the depth increases. In any case, when the disturbances at a deep source are wide and fast enough, a wave can still be generated. The archetype of this kind of process is tsunami generation: during earthquakes, the seabed of the ocean experiences a sudden net vertical displacement that can yield waves capable of flooding entire coastlines. In this talk, we will focus on laboratory experiments concerning the generation of free surface waves in a three-dimensional uniform layer whose bottom uplifts suddenly. Based on simultaneous measurements of the free surface deformation and the velocity field, we analyze the wave generation dependence on the bottom kinematics. Our results display excellent agreement with a classical linear theory of gravity waves. In addition, we develop a new theoretical approach that can be applied to improve real-time numerical simulations used by the tsunami hazard mitigation programs. Supported by the AXA Research Fund.

  19. Coherent polarization stabilization in large-aperture rectangular post bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Ning, Y. Q.; Tian, Z. H.; Zhang, X.; Shi, J. J.; Wang, Z. F.; Zhang, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.; Qin, L.; Wang, L. J.

    2011-03-01

    The output characteristics of large-aperture rectangular post bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) were investigated. It was shown that the output power of the rectangle VCSELs can be up to 660 mW at a current of 5 A. Both H-polarization (horizontal) and V-polarization (vertical) demonstrated a coherent stabilization over the entire range of operation current, and coherent spectrum blue-shift of H-polarization light occurred with respect to V-polarization light at three different injected currents. The polarization states of output light were stabilized in the two orthogonal directions and H-polarization was the most principal polarization which was parallel to the longer side of the rectangular aperture. From the relationship between polarization ratio and aspect ratio of the oxidation confinement aperture (OCA), it was found that the highest polarization ratio (about 2:1) took place when the appropriate aspect ratio was 5:3, which meant better polarization stabilization in large-aperture VCSELs.

  20. Statistical contact angle analyses; "slow moving" drops on a horizontal silicon-oxide surface.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, M; Grub, J; Heib, F

    2015-06-01

    Sessile drop experiments on horizontal surfaces are commonly used to characterise surface properties in science and in industry. The advancing angle and the receding angle are measurable on every solid. Specially on horizontal surfaces even the notions themselves are critically questioned by some authors. Building a standard, reproducible and valid method of measuring and defining specific (advancing/receding) contact angles is an important challenge of surface science. Recently we have developed two/three approaches, by sigmoid fitting, by independent and by dependent statistical analyses, which are practicable for the determination of specific angles/slopes if inclining the sample surface. These approaches lead to contact angle data which are independent on "user-skills" and subjectivity of the operator which is also of urgent need to evaluate dynamic measurements of contact angles. We will show in this contribution that the slightly modified procedures are also applicable to find specific angles for experiments on horizontal surfaces. As an example droplets on a flat freshly cleaned silicon-oxide surface (wafer) are dynamically measured by sessile drop technique while the volume of the liquid is increased/decreased. The triple points, the time, the contact angles during the advancing and the receding of the drop obtained by high-precision drop shape analysis are statistically analysed. As stated in the previous contribution the procedure is called "slow movement" analysis due to the small covered distance and the dominance of data points with low velocity. Even smallest variations in velocity such as the minimal advancing motion during the withdrawing of the liquid are identifiable which confirms the flatness and the chemical homogeneity of the sample surface and the high sensitivity of the presented approaches. PMID:25524007

  1. Iceberg ploughmark features on bottom surface of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhov, Dmitry; Sivkov, Vadim; Dorokhova, Evgenia; Krechik, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    A detail swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar and acoustic profiling combined with sediment sampling during the 64th cruise of RV "Academic Mstislav Keldysh" (October 2015) allowed to identify new geomorphological features of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea bottom surface. The extended chaotic ploughmarks (furrows) in most cases filled with thin layer of mud were discovered on surface of the Gdansk-Gotland sill glacial deposits. They are observed on the depth of more than 70 m and have depth and width from 1 to 10 m. Most of them are v- or u-shaped stepped depressions. The side-scan records of similar geomorpholoical features are extensively reported from Northern Hemisphere and Antarctica (Goodwin et al., 1985; Dowdeswell et al., 1993). Ploughmarks are attributed to the action of icebergs scouring into the sediment as they touch bottom. We are suggest that furrows discovered in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea are also the result of iceberg scouring during the Baltic Ice Lake stage (more than 11 600 cal yr BP (Bjorck, 2008)). This assumption confirmed by occurrence of fragmental stones and boulders on the sea bottom surface which are good indicators of iceberg rafting (Lisitzin, 2003). Ice ploughmarks at sea bottom surface were not occurred before in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea. The study was financed by Russian Scientific Fund, grant number 14-37-00047. References Bjorck S. The late Quaternary development of the Baltic Sea Basin. In: The BACC Author Team (eds) Assessment of climate change for the Baltic Sea Basin. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 2008. Dowdeswell J. A., Villinger H., Whittington R. J., Marienfeld P. Iceberg scouring in Scoresby Sund and on the East Greenland continental shelf // Marine Geology. V. 111. N. 1-2. 1993. P. 37-53. Goodwin C. R., Finley J. C., Howard L. M. Ice scour bibliography. Environmental Studies Revolving Funds Report No. 010. Ottawa. 1985. 99 pp. Lisitzin A. P. Sea-Ice and Iceberg Sedimentation in the Ocean: Recent and Past. Springer

  2. A new method to estimate average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Soupir, Michelle L.

    2012-10-01

    A new model, Global Solar Radiation on Horizontal Surface (GSRHS), was developed to estimate the average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surfaces (Gh). The GSRHS model uses the transmission function (Tf,ij), which was developed to control hourly global solar radiation, for predicting solar radiation. The inputs of the model were: hour of day, day (Julian) of year, optimized parameter values, solar constant (H0), latitude, and longitude of the location of interest. The parameter values used in the model were optimized at a location (Albuquerque, NM), and these values were applied into the model for predicting average hourly global solar radiations at four different locations (Austin, TX; El Paso, TX; Desert Rock, NV; Seattle, WA) of the United States. The model performance was assessed using correlation coefficient (r), Mean Absolute Bias Error (MABE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), and coefficient of determinations (R2). The sensitivities of parameter to prediction were estimated. Results show that the model performed very well. The correlation coefficients (r) range from 0.96 to 0.99, while coefficients of determination (R2) range from 0.92 to 0.98. For daily and monthly prediction, error percentages (i.e. MABE and RMSE) were less than 20%. The approach we proposed here can be potentially useful for predicting average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surface for different locations, with the use of readily available data (i.e. latitude and longitude of the location) as inputs.

  3. A model for sonar interrogation of complex bottom and surface targets in shallow-water waveguides.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Thomas E; Shirron, Joseph J

    2008-04-01

    Many problems of current interest in underwater acoustics involve low-frequency broadband sonar interrogation of objects near the sea surface or sea floor of a shallow-water environment. When the target is situated near the upper or lower boundary of the water column the acoustic interactions with the target objects are complicated by interactions with the nearby free surface or fluid-sediment interface, respectively. A practical numerical method to address such situations is presented. The model provides high levels of accuracy with the flexibility to handle complex, three-dimensional targets in range-independent environments. The model is demonstrated using several bottom target scenarios, with and without locally undulating seabeds. The impact of interface and boundary interactions is considered with an eye toward using the sonar return signal as the basis for acoustic imaging or spectral classification. PMID:18397010

  4. Dynamic adhesive force measurements under vertical and horizontal motions of interacting rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Chang-Dong; Lee, Sung-Chang; Polycarpou, Andreas A

    2008-01-01

    An instrument to measure dynamic adhesive forces between interacting rough surfaces has been developed. It consists of four parts, namely, main instrument body, vertical positioning system with both micrometer and nanometer positioning accuracies, horizontal positioning system with nanometer positioning accuracy, and custom-built high-resolution, and high dynamic bandwidth capacitive force transducer. The vertical piezoelectric actuator (PZT) controls the vertical (approaching and retracting) motion of the upper specimen, while the horizontal PZT controls the horizontal (reciprocal) motion of the lower specimen. The force transducer is placed in line with the upper specimen and vertical PZT, and directly measures the adhesive forces with a root-mean-square load resolution of 1.7 microN and a dynamic bandwidth of 1.7 kHz. The newly developed instrument enables reliable measurements of near-contact and contact adhesive forces for microscale devices under different dynamic conditions. Using the developed instrument, dynamic pull-in and pull-off force measurements were performed between an aluminum-titanium-carbide sphere and a 10 nm thick carbon film disk sample. Three different levels of contact force were investigated; where for each contact force level the vertical velocity of the upper sample was varied from 0.074 to 5.922 microms, while the lower sample was stationary. It was found that slower approaching and retracting velocities result in higher pull-in and pull-off forces. The noncontact attractive force was also measured during horizontal movement of the lower sample, and it was found that the periodic movements of the lower disk sample also affect the noncontact surface interactions. PMID:18248070

  5. A computer module used to calculate the horizontal control surface size of a conceptual aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Swanson, Stephen Mark

    1990-01-01

    The creation of a computer module used to calculate the size of the horizontal control surfaces of a conceptual aircraft design is discussed. The control surface size is determined by first calculating the size needed to rotate the aircraft during takeoff, and, second, by determining if the calculated size is large enough to maintain stability of the aircraft throughout any specified mission. The tail size needed to rotate during takeoff is calculated from a summation of forces about the main landing gear of the aircraft. The stability of the aircraft is determined from a summation of forces about the center of gravity during different phases of the aircraft's flight. Included in the horizontal control surface analysis are: downwash effects on an aft tail, upwash effects on a forward canard, and effects due to flight in close proximity to the ground. Comparisons of production aircraft with numerical models show good accuracy for control surface sizing. A modified canard design verified the accuracy of the module for canard configurations. Added to this stability and control module is a subroutine that determines one of the three design variables, for a stable vectored thrust aircraft. These include forward thrust nozzle position, aft thrust nozzle angle, and forward thrust split.

  6. Surface and bottom temperature and salinity climatology along the continental shelf off the Canadian and U.S. East Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richaud, Benjamin; Kwon, Young-Oh; Joyce, Terrence M.; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2016-08-01

    A new hydrographic climatology has been created for the continental shelf region, extending from the Labrador shelf to the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The 0.2-degree climatology combines all available observations of surface and bottom temperature and salinity collected between 1950 and 2010 along with the location, depth and date of these measurements. While climatological studies of surface and bottom temperature and salinity have been presented previously for various regions along the Canadian and U.S. shelves, studies also suggest that all these regions are part of one coherent system. This study focuses on the coherent structure of the mean seasonal cycle of surface and bottom temperature and salinity and its variation along the shelf and upper slope. The seasonal cycle of surface temperature is mainly driven by the surface heat flux and exhibits strong dependency on latitude (r≈-0.9). The amplitude of the seasonal cycle of bottom temperature is rather dependent on the depth, while the spatial distribution of bottom temperature is correlated with latitude. The seasonal cycle of surface salinity is influenced by several components, such as sea-ice on the northern shelves and river discharge in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The bottom salinity exhibits no clear seasonal cycle, but its spatial distribution is highly correlated with bathymetry, thus Slope Water and its intrusion on the shelf can be identified by its relatively high salinity compared to shallow, fresher shelf water. Two different regimes can be identified, especially on the shelf, separated by the Laurentian Channel: advection influences the phasing of the seasonal cycle of surface salinity and bottom temperature to the north, while in the southern region, river runoff and air-sea heat flux forcing are dominant, especially over the shallower bathymetry.

  7. Surface and bottom temperature and salinity climatology along the continental shelf off the Canadian and U.S. East Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richaud, Benjamin; Kwon, Young-Oh; Joyce, Terrence M.; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2016-08-01

    A new hydrographic climatology has been created for the continental shelf region, extending from the Labrador shelf to the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The 0.2-degree climatology combines all available observations of surface and bottom temperature and salinity collected between 1950 and 2010 along with the location, depth and date of these measurements. While climatological studies of surface and bottom temperature and salinity have been presented previously for various regions along the Canadian and U.S. shelves, studies also suggest that all these regions are part of one coherent system. This study focuses on the coherent structure of the mean seasonal cycle of surface and bottom temperature and salinity and its variation along the shelf and upper slope. The seasonal cycle of surface temperature is mainly driven by the surface heat flux and exhibits strong dependency on latitude (r≈-0.9). The amplitude of the seasonal cycle of bottom temperature is rather dependent on the depth, while the spatial distribution of bottom temperature is correlated with latitude. The seasonal cycle of surface salinity is influenced by several components, such as sea-ice on the northern shelves and river discharge in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The bottom salinity exhibits no clear seasonal cycle, but its spatial distribution is highly correlated with bathymetry, thus Slope Water and its intrusion on the shelf can be identified by its relatively high salinity compared to shallow, fresher shelf water. Two different regimes can be identified, especially on the shelf, separated by the Laurentian Channel: advection influences the phasing of the seasonal cycle of surface salinity and bottom temperature to the north, while in the southern region, river runoff and air-sea heat flux forcing are dominant, especially over the shallower bathymetry.

  8. Effects of Elevator Nose Shape, Gap, Balance, and Tabs on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Horizontal Tail Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goett, Harry J; Reeder, J P

    1939-01-01

    Results are presented showing the effects of gap, elevator, nose shape, balance, cut-out, and tabs on the aerodynamic characteristics of a horizontal tail surface tested in the NACA full-scale tunnel.

  9. Estimating reef fish discard mortality using surface and bottom tagging: effects of hook injury and barotrauma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudershausen, Paul J.; Buckel, Jeffrey A.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    We estimated survival rates of discarded black sea bass (Centropristis striata) in various release conditions using tag–recapture data. Fish were captured with traps and hook and line from waters 29–34 m deep off coastal North Carolina, USA, marked with internal anchor tags, and observed for release condition. Fish tagged on the bottom using SCUBA served as a control group. Relative return rates for trap-caught fish released at the surface versus bottom provided an estimated survival rate of 0.87 (95% credible interval 0.67–1.18) for surface-released fish. Adjusted for results from the underwater tagging experiment, fish with evidence of external barotrauma had a median survival rate of 0.91 (0.69–1.26) compared with 0.36 (0.17–0.67) for fish with hook trauma and 0.16 (0.08–0.30) for floating or presumably dead fish. Applying these condition-specific estimates of survival to non-tagging fishery data, we estimated a discard survival rate of 0.81 (0.62–1.11) for 11 hook and line data sets from waters 20–35 m deep and 0.86 (0.67–1.17) for 10 trap data sets from waters 11–29 m deep. The tag-return approach using a control group with no fishery-associated trauma represents a method to accurately estimate absolute discard survival of physoclistous reef species.

  10. Statistical Analysis of Nitrogen in the Soil of Constructed Wetland with Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaszek, Anita; Wojciech, Magdalena

    2014-06-01

    The removal of nitrogen compounds in constructed wetlands depends on various physical, chemical and biomechanical factors as well as on conditions of the environment. The paper presents the results of a statistical analysis of the depositing of nitrogen at HSSF (horizontal subsurface flow) construcred wetland. The results of the substrate showed that the highest contents of nitrogen existed in the surface soil layer up to 20 cm of the depth. Nitrogen accumulation decreased in the deposit with depth, and in the direction of the wastewater flow.

  11. Thermocapillary motion of a liquid drop on a horizontal solid surface.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Vikram; Moumen, Nadjoua; Subramanian, R Shankar

    2008-05-01

    The motion of drops of decane on horizontal poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated glass surfaces resulting from a temperature gradient on the surface is studied experimentally, and a theoretical description of the thermocapillary motion of spherical-cap drops on a horizontal solid surface obtained using the lubrication approximation also is presented. The drop size and the applied temperature gradient are varied in the experiments, and the measured velocities of the drops are compared with predictions from the model. The scalings of the velocity with drop size and with the applied temperature gradient are predicted correctly by the theoretical model, even though the actual velocities are smaller than those predicted. The influence of contact angle hysteresis, which leads to a critical drop size below which drops do not move, is found to be minimal. Unlike in previous studies (Chen, J. Z.; Troian, S. M.; Darhuber, A. A.; Wagner, S. J. Appl. Phys. 2005, 97, 014906; Brzoska, J. B.; Brochard-Wyart, F.; Rondelez, F. Langmuir 1993, 9, 2220), this small critical drop size appears to be independent of the applied temperature gradient. Results also are presented on the deformation of the contact lines of the moving drops in the form of an aspect ratio, and correlated with the temperature difference across the footprints of the drops and the capillary number. PMID:18399689

  12. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis ["Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface," Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A2), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A2) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A2) and thus particle dispersion on O(A4). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  13. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  14. Synoptic classification and horizontal homogeneity of the refractive index structure function parameter in the surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, P. J.; Davidson, K. L.

    1984-02-01

    This is a two part report. The first part describes an investigation of the feasibility of using the synoptic scale classification scheme described in the Refractive Effects Guidebook (REG) to predict the level of optical turbulence in the surface layer as measured by C sub n squared, the refractive index structure function parameter. Data were examined from nine experiments which took place in the north Pacific and north Atlantic. The measurement experiments spanned five years and included all four seasons. The REG appears to be useful in a limited way in predicting ranges of C sub n squared in the surface layer. Inclusion of local factors would increase predictability. The second part deals with horizontal homogeneity of the surface layer C sub n squared as measured during the JASIN experiment in the North Atlantic in 1978. Periods of homogeneity lasting between one and two days were encountered along 200 km sectors and for up to nine hours over the entire JASIN experimental area.

  15. Convective Heat Transfer from Castings of Ice Roughened Surfaces in Horizontal Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukhan, Nihad; Vanfossen, G. James, Jr.; Masiulaniec, K. Cyril; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1995-01-01

    A technique was developed to cast frozen ice shapes that had been grown on a metal surface. This technique was applied to a series of ice shapes that were grown in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel on flat plates. Eight different types of ice growths, characterizing different types of roughness, were obtained from these plates, from which aluminum castings were made. Test strips taken from these castings were outfitted with heat flux gages, such that when placed in a dry wind tunnel, they could be used to experimentally map out the convective heat transfer coefficient in the direction of flow from the roughened surfaces. The effects on the heat transfer coefficient for parallel flow, which simulates horizontal flight, were studied. The results of this investigation can be used to help size heaters for wings, helicopter rotor blades, jet engine intakes, etc., or de-icing for anti-icing applications where the flow is parallel to the iced surface.

  16. Sensitivity of snow cover to horizontal resolution in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, E.; Kotlarski, S.; Viterbo, P.; Balsamo, G.; Miranda, P. M. A.; Schär, C.

    2010-09-01

    Snow cover is a highly variable land surface condition that exerts a strong control on the heat and moisture budget of the overlying atmosphere. Modeling studies based on long integrations of global circulation models (GCM) are normally carried out at very low resolution (typically coarser than 100 km) due to their high computational demand. On local scales, snow cover plays an important socioeconomic role, ranging from water management applications to outdoor recreation. These latter applications vary in horizontal resolution from a few hundred meters to a few kilometers, where small scale topography, land cover and local circulation effects play a significant role. In this study our focus will be on horizontal scales ranging from typical GCM global climate modeling to high resolution global weather forecasts. In the land surface component of a GCM (land surface model - LSM), snow cover temporal and spatial variability is mainly determined by the overlying atmospheric conditions. However, once snowfall settles on the ground, the sub-grid scale variability associated with complex terrain and land cover variability (not resolved at the model resolution) is parameterized following simple physical and/or empirical relations. The present study intends to access the impact of horizontal resolution in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) land surface model (HTESSEL). HTESSEL is forced by the ECMWF operational weather forecasts since March 2006 to December 2009 (runs in offline/stand-alone mode). The control run is carried out at the horizontal resolution of the forecasts at TL799 (gaussian reduced grid N400 -about 25 km). Two lower horizontal resolutions are then tested: TL255 (gaussian reduced grid - about 80 km, same as the ERA-Interim reanalysis), and TL95 (gaussian reduced grid N48 - about 200 km). The length of the simulations is rather small (only 46 months), however global meteorological forcing at 25 km can only be accessed through the

  17. Review of literature on the finite-element solution of the equations of two-dimensional surface-water flow in the horizontal plane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.; Froehlich, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Published literature on the application of the finite-element method to solving the equations of two-dimensional surface-water flow in the horizontal plane is reviewed in this report. The finite-element method is ideally suited to modeling two-dimensional flow over complex topography with spatially variable resistance. A two-dimensional finite-element surface-water flow model with depth and vertically averaged velocity components as dependent variables allows the user great flexibility in defining geometric features such as the boundaries of a water body, channels, islands, dikes, and embankments. The following topics are reviewed in this report: alternative formulations of the equations of two-dimensional surface-water flow in the horizontal plane; basic concepts of the finite-element method; discretization of the flow domain and representation of the dependent flow variables; treatment of boundary conditions; discretization of the time domain; methods for modeling bottom, surface, and lateral stresses; approaches to solving systems of nonlinear equations; techniques for solving systems of linear equations; finite-element alternatives to Galerkin's method of weighted residuals; techniques of model validation; and preparation of model input data. References are listed in the final chapter.

  18. Free-surface flow in horizontally rotating cylinder: experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohacek, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.; Paar, A.; Brandner, M.; Elizondo, L.; Trickl, T.

    2016-07-01

    The horizontal centrifugal casting process targets on a liquid layer with a uniform thickness. To achieve this, the rotations of the mold have to be large enough so that the liquid can pick up the speed of the mold. In the present paper, an experiment was conducted using a laboratory plexi-glass mold with water as a working fluid. Starting with an initial volume fraction of liquid resting in the bottom of the mold, the mold rotations were gradually increased from 0 rpm to max rpm and a new position of the contact line was recorded. In addition, first critical rpm was recorded, at which the transition from the liquid pool to a uniform liquid layer occurred. While gradually going back from max rpm to 0 rpm, second critical rpm was recorded, at which the uniform liquid layer collapsed. The experiment was compared with the numerical simulation solving the modified shallow water equations using the Newton-Raphson method with the Wallington filter.

  19. On the development of boundary layer secondary circulations resulting from horizontally varying surface heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    During the last decade there has been a surge in efforts to understand the processes at work in the inhomogeneous atmospheric boundary layer. Much of the interest in the problem has been driven by increasingly urgent needs to develop accurate assessments of man`s Contribution to climate change. It has been argued that subgrid-scale secondary circulations in the boundary layer can cause significant errors in parameterized turbulent surface fluxes. Such circulations -- variously termed ``inland breezes``, ``lake breezes``, ``snow breezes``, or ``nonclassical mesoscale circulations`` are becoming widely discussed and modeled. Because surface fluxes are part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models, it is important to understand when these circulations occur and what their effects are on overall turbulent transfer. What are not yet clear are the combinations of the ambient wind and the horizontal scale and intensity of surface flux variability under which we may expect boundary layer secondary circulations to occur. Several authors have modeled the development of these circulations for ad hoc situations of alternating surface characteristics, and SA have developed one parameterization relating the scale of surface heat flux variability and the ambient wind to the evolution of NCMCs. In this paper we present observations, collected in a region of inhomogeneous surface fluxes, that suggest the development of a ``farm breeze``, and we develop an alternative scaling argument to that of SA that better represents our measurement conditions.

  20. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2015-12-15

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis [“Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface,” Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A{sup 2}), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A{sup 2}) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A{sup 2}) and thus particle dispersion on O(A{sup 4}). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  1. Multi-waveband solar irradiance on tree-shaded vertical and horizontal surfaces: cloud-free and partly cloudy skies.

    PubMed

    Grant, R H; Heisler, G M

    2001-01-01

    Irradiance measurements of short wave (SW), photosynthetically active (PAR), ultraviolet-A (UVA) and ultraviolet-B (UVB) solar radiations were made on horizontal and vertical surfaces in the shade of trees under cloud-free and partly cloudy skies. All measurements were referenced to the irradiance of a horizontal surface above the canopy. For horizontal shaded surfaces under cloud-free skies, the values of the ratio (Rh) of below- to above-canopy horizontal irradiance were similar for the UVA and UVB wavebands and for the SW and PAR wavebands. However, Rh for the UV wavebands differed from that for the PAR and SW wavebands. Overall, values of Rh in the shade typically varied as PAR < SW < UVA < UVB. The irradiance ratios for vertical surface in the shade typically varied as UVB > UVA = SW > PAR. In absolute terms, UVB irradiance (Ih) on tree-shaded horizontal surfaces increased relative to a cloud-free sky when a translucent cirroform cloud was in front of the sun, but decreased when the cloud was in a region of sky away from the sun. Translucent cirroform cloud cover also tended to decrease the UVB irradiance (Iv) for a shaded vertical surface (either facing the sun or south) relative to that under cloud-free skies, regardless of where the clouds were in the sky. In all other wavebands the shaded Ih and Iv increased under translucent cirroform cloud cover relative to cloud-free skies, regardless of where the clouds were in the sky. PMID:11202362

  2. Buoyancy effects on the vapor condensation rate on a horizontal liquid surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Lin, Chin-Shun

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of a numerical study of the effects of buoyancy on the direct condensation of saturated or nearly saturated vapor on a horizontal liquid surface in a cylindrical tank. The liquid motion beneath the liquid-vapor interface is induced by an axisymmetric laminar jet of subcooled liquid. Analysis and numerical results show that the dominant parameter which determines the influence of buoyancy on the condensation rate is the Richardson number. However, the effect of buoyancy on the condensation rate cannot be quantified in terms of the Richardson number alone. The critical value of the Richardson number below which the condensation rate is not significantly reduced depends on the Reynolds number as well as the Prandtl number.

  3. Buoyancy effects on the vapor condensation rate on a horizontal liquid surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Lin, Chin-Shun

    1989-01-01

    The results are presented of a numerical study of the effects of buoyancy on the direct condensation of saturated or nearly saturated vapor on a horizontal liquid surface in a cylindrical tank. The liquid motion beneath the liquid-vapor interface is induced by an axisymmetric laminar jet of subcooled liquid. Analysis and numerical results show that the dominant parameter which determines the influence of buoyancy on the condensation rate is the Richardson number. However, the effect of buoyancy on the condensation rate cannot be quantified in terms of the Richardson number alone. The critical value of the Richardson number below which the condensation rate is not significantly reduced depends on the Reynolds number as well as the Prandtl number.

  4. The Pressure Distribution over the Horizontal Tail Surfaces of an Airplane III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Brown, W G

    1923-01-01

    This report contains the results of an investigation of the distribution of pressure over the tail surfaces of a full-sized airplane during accelerated flight for the purpose of determining the magnitude of the tail and fuselage stresses in maneuvering. As the pressures in accelerated flight change in value with great rapidity, it was found that the liquid manometer used in the first part of this investigation would not be at all suitable under these conditions; so it was necessary to design and construct a new manometer containing a large number of recording diaphragm gauges for these measurements. Sixty openings on the tail surfaces were connected to this manometer and continuous records of pressures for each pair of holes were taken during various maneuvers. There were also recorded, simultaneously with the pressures, the normal acceleration at the center of gravity and the angular position of all the controls. The present investigation consisted in measuring on a standard rigged JN4H airplane the distribution of pressure over the whole of the horizontal tail surfaces while the airplane was being put through maneuvers as violently as it was thought safe, including spinning and pulling out of dives.

  5. Horizontally assembled green InGaN nanorod LEDs: scalable polarized surface emitting LEDs using electric-field assisted assembly

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoo Keun; Yoon, Seong Woong; Eo, Yun Jae; Chung, Won Woo; Yoo, Gang Yeol; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Keyong Nam; Kim, Woong; Do, Young Rag

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the concerted fabrication process, which is easy to transform the size of active emitting area and produce polarized surface light, using the electric-field-assisted assembly for horizontally assembled many tiny nanorod LEDs between two metal electrodes. We fabricate the millions of individually separated 1D nanorod LEDs from 2D nanorod arrays using nanosphere lithography, etching and cutting process of InGaN/GaN LED structure on a flat sapphire substrate. The horizontally assembled InGaN-based nanorods LED device shows bright (~2,130 cd/m2) and uniform polarized (polarization ratio, ρ = ~0.61) green emissions from large area (0.7 cm × 0.6 cm) planar surface. The realization of a horizontally assembled nanorod LED device can prove the concept of an innovative idea to fabricate formable and scalable polarized surface LED lighting. PMID:27324568

  6. Horizontally assembled green InGaN nanorod LEDs: scalable polarized surface emitting LEDs using electric-field assisted assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hoo Keun; Yoon, Seong Woong; Eo, Yun Jae; Chung, Won Woo; Yoo, Gang Yeol; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Keyong Nam; Kim, Woong; Do, Young Rag

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the concerted fabrication process, which is easy to transform the size of active emitting area and produce polarized surface light, using the electric-field-assisted assembly for horizontally assembled many tiny nanorod LEDs between two metal electrodes. We fabricate the millions of individually separated 1D nanorod LEDs from 2D nanorod arrays using nanosphere lithography, etching and cutting process of InGaN/GaN LED structure on a flat sapphire substrate. The horizontally assembled InGaN-based nanorods LED device shows bright (~2,130 cd/m2) and uniform polarized (polarization ratio, ρ = ~0.61) green emissions from large area (0.7 cm × 0.6 cm) planar surface. The realization of a horizontally assembled nanorod LED device can prove the concept of an innovative idea to fabricate formable and scalable polarized surface LED lighting.

  7. Horizontally assembled green InGaN nanorod LEDs: scalable polarized surface emitting LEDs using electric-field assisted assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Hoo Keun; Yoon, Seong Woong; Eo, Yun Jae; Chung, Won Woo; Yoo, Gang Yeol; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Keyong Nam; Kim, Woong; Do, Young Rag

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the concerted fabrication process, which is easy to transform the size of active emitting area and produce polarized surface light, using the electric-field-assisted assembly for horizontally assembled many tiny nanorod LEDs between two metal electrodes. We fabricate the millions of individually separated 1D nanorod LEDs from 2D nanorod arrays using nanosphere lithography, etching and cutting process of InGaN/GaN LED structure on a flat sapphire substrate. The horizontally assembled InGaN-based nanorods LED device shows bright (~2,130 cd/m(2)) and uniform polarized (polarization ratio, ρ = ~0.61) green emissions from large area (0.7 cm × 0.6 cm) planar surface. The realization of a horizontally assembled nanorod LED device can prove the concept of an innovative idea to fabricate formable and scalable polarized surface LED lighting. PMID:27324568

  8. Use of a commercial heat transfer code to predict horizontally oriented spent fuel rod surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, S.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1993-03-01

    Radioactive spent fuel assemblies are a source of hazardous waste that will have to be dealt with in the near future. It is anticipated that the spent fuel assemblies will be transported to disposal sites in spent fuel transportation casks. In order to design a reliable and safe transportation cask, the maximum cladding temperature of the spent fuel rod arrays must be calculated. A comparison between numerical calculations using commercial thermal analysis software packages and experimental data simulating a horizontally oriented spent fuel rod array was performed. Twelve cases were analyzed using air and helium for the fill gas, with three different heat dissipation levels. The numerically predicted temperatures are higher than the experimental data for all levels of heat dissipation with air as the fill gas. The temperature differences are 4{degree}C and 23{degree}C for the low heat dissipation and high heat dissipation, respectively. The temperature predictions using helium as a fill gas are lower for the low and medium heat dissipation levels, but higher at the high heat dissipation. The temperature differences are 1{degree}C and 6{degree}C for the low and medium heat dissipation, respectively. For the high heat dissipation level, the temperature predictions are 16{degree}C higher than the experimental data. Differences between the predicted and experimental temperatures can be attributed to several factors. These factors include experimental uncertainty in the temperature and heat dissipation measurements, actual convection effects not included in the model, and axial heat flow in the experimental data. This work demonstrates that horizontally oriented spent fuel rod surface temperature predictions can be made using existing commercial software packages. This work also shows that end effects will be increasingly important as the amount of dissipated heat increases.

  9. Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2013-03-01

    The reflection of a planar finite-amplitude internal gravity wave beam off a free-slip flat horizontal surface is investigated numerically in a uniformly stratified Boussinesq fluid. Nonlinear effects such as mean currents and harmonics are observed in the wave reflection zone. Mean currents form a stationary, vertically oscillatory, layered structure under the free-slip reflecting surface. The vertical wavelength of the mean-flow layers equals half of the vertical wavelength of the reflecting wave. An empirical predictive model for the steady-state mean flow strength, based on the degree of wave nonlinearity and hydrostaticity, is proposed and subsequently compared to the weakly nonlinear theory by Tabaei et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 526, 217-243 (2005), 10.1017/S0022112004002769]. Very strong agreement between simulation results and theory is observed for all waves considered, suggesting although weakly nonlinear in its formulation, the Tabaei et al. theory is valid for the full range of finite amplitudes for which a wave remains stable. Both propagating and evanescent superharmonics are observed, and for waves with steepnesses of O(5%), parametric subharmonic instabilities can occur in the later stages of the reflection process. When a subsurface mixed layer is incorporated into the simulations, the mean currents at the middle of the underlying pycnocline are similar in structure and magnitude to their uniformly-stratified counterparts.

  10. Surface waves in a square container due to its resonant horizontal elliptic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakoshi, Mitsuaki; Hiramitsu, Ai

    2015-11-01

    Surface waves in a square container due to its resonant horizontal elliptic or linear motion are investigated theoretically. The motion of the container is characterized by the ratio, expressed as tan ϕ , of the length of the minor axis to the length of the major axis of its elliptic orbit, and by the angle θ between the directions of the major axis and one of its sidewalls. Using the reductive perturbation method, nonlinear time evolution equations for the complex amplitudes of two degenerate modes excited by this motion are derived with the inclusion of linear damping. When tan ϕ is small, for any θ these equations have two kinds of stable stationary solutions corresponding to regular co-rotating waves whose direction of rotation is the same as that of the container, and regular counter-rotating waves of the opposite direction of rotation. As tan ϕ increases to one, the region of forcing frequency in which stable regular counter-rotating waves are observed shrinks and then disappears for any θ. Solutions with chaotic or periodic slow variations in amplitude and phase of excited surface waves are also obtained for forcing frequencies where no stable stationary solutions exist.

  11. Study on transient characteristics of mist-cooling heat transfer from a horizontal upward-facing surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Nishio, Shigefumi )

    1993-04-01

    The effects of cooling rate and thermal conductivity of a heat-transfer plate on mist-cooling heat transfer were investigated experimentally for the high-temperature region. Experiments were conducted for horizontal upward-facing surfaces made of silver, stainless steel, and fused quartz. The experimental conditions of mist flow were as follows: The air velocity V[sub a] = 20 m/s, the temperature of water droplet T[sub l] = 21 C, and the volumetric droplet-flow-rate D = 0.00043-0.00472[sup 3]/(m[sup 2]s). It was found that, in the case where the horizontal surfaces face upward, the thermal properties of surface material does not significantly affect the heat-transfer coefficient, but the cooling rate of the surface affects it if the heat capacity of the surface is less than a critical value.

  12. The Questions of the Dynamics of Drilling Bit on the Surface of Well Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burievich, Toshov Javohir

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dynamics of drilling bit on the well bottom as a function of their geometrical parameters. The frame of this method for this study includes former existed objective data on the unstable drilling devices as cantilever suspension. Research methods and calculation results are as follows: square coverage by tools blade working in different rotation regime; radius of the inscribed and circumscribed circle which leads to introduce and prospectively and solve problems on process optimization of mining rock at drilling the well bottom.

  13. Shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in a magneto-electro-elastic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, Shahin; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves (SHSAWs) within a functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic (FGMEE) half-space was previously presented (Shodja HM, Eskandari S, Eskandari M. J. Eng. Math. 2015, 1-18) In contrast, the current paper considers propagation of SHSAWs in a medium consisting of an FGMEE layer perfectly bonded to a homogeneous MEE substrate. When the FGMEE layer is described by some special inhomogeneity functions - all the MEE properties have the same variation in depth which may or may not be identical to that of the density - we obtain the exact closed-form solution for the MEE fields. Additionally, certain special inhomogeneity functions with monotonically decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth are considered, and the associated boundary value problem is solved using power series solution. This problem in the limit as the layer thickness goes to infinity collapses to an FGMEE half-space with decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth. It is shown that in such a medium SHSAW does not propagate. Using power series solution we can afford to consider some FGMEE layers of practical importance, where the composition of the MEE obeys a prescribed volume fraction variation. The dispersive behavior of SHSAWs in the presence of such layers is also examined.

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using gold-coated horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X. N.; Gao, Y.; Mahjouri-Samani, M.; Black, P. N.; Allen, J.; Mitchell, M.; Xiong, W.; Zhou, Y. S.; Jiang, L.; Lu, Y. F.

    2012-05-01

    Gold-coated horizontally aligned carbon nanotube (Au-HA-CNT) substrates were fabricated for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The Au-HA-CNT substrates, which are granular in nature, are easy-to-prepare with large SERS-active area. Enhancement factors (EFs) of ˜107 were achieved using the Au-HA-CNTs as substrates for rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules. Maximum enhancement was found when the polarization direction (E-field) of the incident laser beam was parallel to the aligned direction of the HA-CNTs. Simulations using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method were carried out for the granular Au-HA-CNT samples. Enhancement mechanisms and determination of EFs were analyzed. Biological samples, including 13C- and deuterium (D)-labeled fatty acids and Coccomyxa sp. c-169 microalgae cells, were also measured using this SERS substrate. The limits of detection (LODs) of D- and 13C-labeled fatty acids on the SERS substrate were measured to be around 10 nM and 20 nM, respectively. Significantly enhanced Raman signals from the microalgae cells were acquired using the SERS substrate.

  15. Rebound suppression of a droplet impacting on an oscillating horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, K. Ashoke; Jaiman, Rajeev K.; Sui, Yi; Lee, Thong-See; Low, Hong-Tong

    2016-08-01

    The behavior of a droplet impinging onto a solid substrate can be influenced significantly by the horizontal motion of the substrate. The coupled interactions between the moving wall and the impacting droplet may result in various outcomes, which may be different from the usual normal droplet impact on a stationary wall. In this paper, we present a method to suppress drop rebound on hydrophobic surfaces via transverse wall oscillations, normal to the impact direction. The numerical investigation shows that the suppression of droplet rebound has a direct relationship with the oscillation phase, amplitude, and frequency. For a particular range of oscillation frequencies and amplitudes, a lateral shifting of the droplet position is observed along the oscillating direction. While large oscillation amplitude favors the process of droplet deposition, a high frequency promotes droplet rebound from the oscillating wall. A linear trend in the transition region between deposition and rebound is observed from a scaled phase diagram of the oscillation amplitude versus frequency. We provide a systematic investigation of drop deposition and elucidate the mechanism of rebound suppression through the temporal evolution of the nonaxial kinetic energy and the velocity flow field.

  16. Occurrence and distribution of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in surface water and bottom water of the Shuangtaizi Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mihua; Ding, Guanghui; Zhang, Jing; Wei, Lie; Xue, Huanhuan; Zhang, Nannan; Li, Yang; Chen, Guanqun; Sun, Yeqing

    2016-09-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been recognized as emerging environmental pollutants. However, there is limited information on the contamination level and spatial distribution of PFASs in the Shuangtaizi Estuary, where the Shuangtaizi Hekou Nature Reserve is located. In the present study, the contamination level and spatial distribution of PFASs in surface water (approximately 0.5 m below the surface) and bottom water (about 0.5 m above the bottom) of the Shuangtaizi Estuary were investigated. The data indicated that the Shuangtaizi Estuary was commonly contaminated by PFASs. The total concentration of PFASs in surface and bottom water of the Shuangtaizi Estuary ranged from 66.2 to 185 ng L(-1) and from 44.8 to 209 ng L(-1), respectively. The predominant PFASs were perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluoropentanoic acid, perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorohexanoic acid and perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS). In general, PFAS concentrations in surface water samples were lower than those in bottom water samples. The spatial distribution of PFASs in the Shuangtaizi Estuary was mainly affected by particular landform, tide and residual currents in Liaodong Bay. The total mass flux of 15 PFASs from the Shuangtaizi River to Liaodong Bay was estimated to be 352 kg year(-1), which was lower than the total flux from the Daling River and the Daliao River. As short-chain PFASs, such as PFBS and PFBA, have been the prevalent compounds in some places and are continuously produced and used, long-term monitoring and effective pollution controls are suggested. PMID:27344086

  17. Research of micro-prism distribution on the bottom surface of the small-size integrated light guide plate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ping; Huang, Yanyan; Su, Zhijie; Zhang, Xulin; Luo, Tongzheng; Peng, Wenda

    2015-02-23

    The luminance uniformity of the backlight module (BLM) importantly depends on the microstructure distribution on the bottom surface of the light guide plate (LGP). Based on the small-size integrated LGP (ILGP) proposed, we put forward a distribution expression of micro-prisms on the bottom surface of the ILGP, and present the relational expressions between the coefficients of the analytical expression and the structural parameters of the ILGP, such as the light guide length L, width of the ILGP W, thickness of the ILGP H, and space between light emitting diodes (LEDs) d. Then, the research results above are applied to the design of the small-size ILGPs. Not only can the micro-structure distributions on the bottom surface of the ILGPs be directly given, but also the simulation results show that the luminance uniformities of the integrated BLMs are higher than 85%. The research indicates that the expressions proposed in this paper are correct and effective, and have important guiding significances and referential value. PMID:25836524

  18. Ground Boundary Conditions for Thermal Convection Over Horizontal Surfaces at High Rayleigh Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanjalić, K.; Hrebtov, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present "wall functions" for treating the ground boundary conditions in the computation of thermal convection over horizontal surfaces at high Rayleigh numbers using coarse numerical grids. The functions are formulated for an algebraic-flux model closed by transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy, its dissipation rate and scalar variance, but could also be applied to other turbulence models. The three-equation algebraic-flux model, solved in a T-RANS mode ("Transient" Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes, based on triple decomposition), was shown earlier to reproduce well a number of generic buoyancy-driven flows over heated surfaces, albeit by integrating equations up to the wall. Here we show that by using a set of wall functions satisfactory results are found for the ensemble-averaged properties even on a very coarse computational grid. This is illustrated by the computations of the time evolution of a penetrative mixed layer and Rayleigh-Bénard (open-ended, 4:4:1 domain) convection, using 10 × 10 × 100 and 10 × 10 × 20 grids, compared also with finer grids (e.g. 60 × 60 × 100), as well as with one-dimensional treatment using 1 × 1 × 100 and 1 × 1 × 20 nodes. The approach is deemed functional for simulations of a convective boundary layer and mesoscale atmospheric flows, and pollutant transport over realistic complex hilly terrain with heat islands, urban and natural canopies, for diurnal cycles, or subjected to other time and space variations in ground conditions and stratification.

  19. Surface waves in a square container due to its resonant horizontal elliptic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramitsu, Ai; Funakoshi, Mitsuaki

    2015-08-01

    Surface waves in a square container due to its resonant horizontal elliptic or linear motion are investigated theoretically. The motion of the container is characterized by the ratio, expressed as {tan}φ , of the length of the minor axis to the length of the major axis of its elliptic orbit, and by the angle θ between the directions of the major axis and one of its sidewalls. Using the reductive perturbation method, non-linear time evolution equations for the complex amplitudes of two degenerate modes excited by this motion are derived with the inclusion of linear damping. When {tan}φ is small, for any θ these equations have two kinds of stable stationary solutions corresponding to regular co-rotating waves whose direction of rotation is the same as that of the container and regular counter-rotating waves of the opposite direction of rotation. As {tan}φ increases to one, the region of forcing frequency in which stable regular counter-rotating waves are observed shrinks and then disappears for any θ. Solutions with chaotic or periodic slow variations in amplitude and phase of excited surface waves are also obtained for forcing frequencies where no stable stationary solutions exist. Non-stationary solutions are either unidirectionally or bidirectionally rotating waves. For θ =0^\\circ , chaotic waves and bidirectionally rotating waves are observed more frequently for smaller {tan}φ . For θ =φ =0^\\circ , for sufficiently small fluid depth, regular non-rotating waves are expected to occur for any forcing frequency. Moreover, stable stationary and non-stationary solutions obtained for φ =0^\\circ are found to agree fairly well with the experimental results in a preceding study.

  20. Ground Boundary Conditions for Thermal Convection Over Horizontal Surfaces at High Rayleigh Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanjalić, K.; Hrebtov, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present "wall functions" for treating the ground boundary conditions in the computation of thermal convection over horizontal surfaces at high Rayleigh numbers using coarse numerical grids. The functions are formulated for an algebraic-flux model closed by transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy, its dissipation rate and scalar variance, but could also be applied to other turbulence models. The three-equation algebraic-flux model, solved in a T-RANS mode ("Transient" Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes, based on triple decomposition), was shown earlier to reproduce well a number of generic buoyancy-driven flows over heated surfaces, albeit by integrating equations up to the wall. Here we show that by using a set of wall functions satisfactory results are found for the ensemble-averaged properties even on a very coarse computational grid. This is illustrated by the computations of the time evolution of a penetrative mixed layer and Rayleigh-Bénard (open-ended, 4:4:1 domain) convection, using 10 × 10 × 100 and 10 × 10 × 20 grids, compared also with finer grids (e.g. 60 × 60 × 100 ), as well as with one-dimensional treatment using 1 × 1 × 100 and 1 × 1 × 20 nodes. The approach is deemed functional for simulations of a convective boundary layer and mesoscale atmospheric flows, and pollutant transport over realistic complex hilly terrain with heat islands, urban and natural canopies, for diurnal cycles, or subjected to other time and space variations in ground conditions and stratification.

  1. Improvements of the experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids using horizontal capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinš, Václav; Hošek, Jan; Hykl, Jiří; Hrubý, Jan

    2016-03-01

    An experimental apparatus with a horizontal capillary tube for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids, i.e. liquids in a metastable state below the equilibrium freezing point, was designed and tested in the previous study [V. Vinš et al., EPJ Web Conf. 92, 02108 (2015)]. In this work, recent modifications of both the experimental setup and the measurement analysis are described. The main aim is to improve the accuracy and the reproducibility of measured surface tension and to achieve higher degrees of supercooling. Temperature probes measuring the temperature of cooling medium near the horizontal capillary tube were calibrated in the relevant temperature range from - 31 °C to + 45 °C. An additional pressure transducer was installed in the helium distribution setup at the position close to the capillary tube. The optical setup observing the liquid meniscus at the open end of the horizontal capillary tube together with the video analysis were thoroughly revised. The red laser illuminating the liquid meniscus, used at the original apparatus, was replaced by a fiber optic light source, which significantly improved the quality of the meniscus image. The modified apparatus was used for the measurement of surface tension of supercooled water at temperatures down to - 11 °C. The new data have a lower scatter compared to the previous horizontal measurements and show a good agreement with the other data obtained with a different measurement technique based on the modified capillary rise method.

  2. Observation of the surface horizontal thermohaline variability at meso- to submesoscales in the North-Eastern Subtropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Nicolas; Reverdin, Gilles; Boutin, Jacqueline; Hernandez, Olga

    2015-04-01

    The seasonal variability of the surface horizontal thermohaline structure is investigated in the North-Eastern Atlantic Surface Salinity Maximum (SSM) at length scales from five to hundreds of kilometers, i.e. at submeso- to meso-scales. The near-surface temperature and salinity data from merchant ship thermosalinograph (TSG) transects across the Atlantic are used to compute the horizontal temperature, salinity and density fluctuations, and the density ratio. During late winter in the north-eastern SSM, thermohaline compensation is observed for wavelengths from 5 km to more than 200 km; in spite of large and sharp surface thermohaline fronts a weak density surface horizontal gradient is observed. Temperature and salinity exhibit an energetic spectra in k-2 slope scale between 20-100 km scale and a steeper slope at shorter wavelengths, while density spectra exhibit lower energy level with a clear k-3 slope below 20 km, consistent with interior quasi-geostrophic turbulence. During summer in the north-eastern SSM, salinity and temperature gradients are no longer compensated due to strong atmospheric heating of the upper ocean. In comparison with winter, the surface density spectrum is enhanced with a flatter slope between k-2-k-3 between 5 and 20 km.

  3. Observation of the surface horizontal thermohaline variability at mesoscale to submesoscale in the north-eastern subtropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Nicolas; Reverdin, Gilles; Boutin, Jacqueline; Hernandez, Olga

    2015-04-01

    The seasonal variability of the surface horizontal thermohaline structure is investigated in the north-eastern Atlantic Surface Salinity Maximum (SSM) at length scales from five to hundreds of kilometers, i.e., at submesoscale to mesoscale. The near-surface temperature and salinity data from merchant ship thermosalinograph (TSG) transects across the Atlantic are used to compute the horizontal temperature, salinity and density fluctuations, and the density ratio. During late winter in the north-eastern SSM, thermohaline compensation is observed for wavelengths from 5 km to more than 200 km; in spite of large and sharp surface thermohaline fronts, a weak density surface horizontal gradient is observed. Temperature and salinity exhibit an energetic spectra in k-2 slope scale between 20-100 km scale and a steeper slope at shorter wavelengths, while density spectra exhibit lower energy level with a clear k-3 slope below 20 km, consistent with interior quasigeostrophic turbulence. During summer in the north-eastern SSM, salinity and temperature gradients are no longer compensated due to strong atmospheric heating of the upper ocean. In comparison with winter, the surface density spectrum is enhanced with a flatter slope between k-2 and k-1 between 5 and 20 km.

  4. Reflected solar radiation from horizontal, vertical and inclined surfaces: ultraviolet and visible spectral and broadband behaviour due to solar zenith angle, orientation and surface type.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Parisi, A V; Turnbull, D J

    2008-07-24

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation affects human life and UV exposure is a significant everyday factor that individuals must be aware of to ensure minimal damaging biological effects to themselves. UV exposure is affected by many complex factors. Albedo is one factor, involving reflection from flat surfaces. Albedo is defined as the ratio of reflected (upwelling) irradiance to incident (downwelling) irradiance and is generally accepted only for horizontal surfaces. Incident irradiance on a non horizontal surface from a variety of incident angles may cause the reflectivity to change. Assumptions about the reflectivity of a vertical surface are frequently made for a variety of purposes but are rarely quantified. As urban structures are dominated by vertical surfaces, using albedo to estimate influence on UV exposure is limiting when incident (downwelling) irradiance is not normal to the surface. Changes to the incident angle are affected by the solar zenith angle, surface position and orientation and surface type. A new characteristic describing reflection from a surface has been used in this research. The ratio of reflected irradiance (from any surface position of vertical, horizontal or inclined) to global (or downwelling) irradiance (RRG) has been calculated for a variety of metal building surfaces in winter time in the southern hemisphere for both the UV and visible radiation spectrum, with special attention to RRG in the UV spectrum. The results show that the RRG due to a vertical surface can exceed the RRG due to a horizontal surface, at smaller solar zenith angles as well as large solar zenith angles. The RRG shows variability in reflective capacities of surface according to the above mentioned factors and present a more realistic influence on UV exposure than albedo for future investigations. Errors in measuring the RRG at large solar zenith angles are explored, which equally highlights the errors in albedo measurement at large solar zenith angles. PMID:18490174

  5. Three-dimensional numerical modeling of bottom-diffracted surface-reflected arrivals in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, R. A.; Udovydchenkov, I. A.; Bolmer, T.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.; Casarotti, E.; Xie, Z.; Worcester, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    Bottom-diffracted surface-reflected (BDSR) arrivals were first identified in the 2004 Long-range Ocean Acoustic Propagation Experiment (Stephen et al, 2013, JASA, v.134, p.3307-3317). The BDSR mechanism provides a means for acoustic signals and noise from distant sources to appear with significant strength on the deep seafloor. At depths greater than the conjugate depth ambient noise and PE- predicted arrivals are sufficiently quiet that BDSR paths, scattered from small seamounts, can be the largest amplitude arrivals observed. The Ocean Bottom Seismometer Augmentation in the North Pacific (OBSANP) Experiment in June-July 2013 was designed to further define the characteristics of the BDSRs and to understand the conditions under which BDSRs are excited and propagate. An example of BDSR arrivals is shown on the record section in the figure. Other arrivals are the direct water wave and first and second multiples. The reciprocal of the BDSR mechanism also plays a role in T-phase excitation. To further understand the BDSR mechanism, the SPECFEM3D code was extended to handle high-frequency, deep water bottom scattering problems with actual bathymetry and a typical sound speed profile in the water column. The model size is 38km x 27km x 6.5km. The source is centered at 10Hz with a 5Hz bandwidth. Work supported by NSF and ONR.

  6. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a 1/5-Scale Semispan Model of the Republic XF-12 Horizontal Tail Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denaci, H. G.

    1945-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests of a 1/5-scale semispan model of the Republic XF-12 horizontal tail surface equipped with an internally balanced elevator were conducted in the 6- by 6-foot test section of the Langley stability tunnel. The tests included measurements of the aerodynamic characteristics of the horizontal tail with and without a beveled trailing edge and also included measurements of the tab characteristics. The variation of the aerodynamic characteristics with boundary-layer conditions and leakage in the internal-balance chambers, measurements of the boundary-layer displacement thickness near the elevator hinge axis, and pressure distributions at the mean geometric chord were also obtained. The results showed that the hinge-moment characteristics of the elevator were critical to boundary-layer conditions and internal-balance leakage. Increasing the boundary-layer displacement thickness by use of roughness strips reduced the rate of change of elevator hinge moments with tab deflection by about 20 percent. The present horizontal tail appears to be unsatisfactory for longitudinal stability with power on, however, an increase in horizontal-tail lift effectiveness should correct this difficulty. The maneuvering stick force per unit acceleration will be extremely critical to minor variations of the elevator hinge moments if the elevator is linked directly to the stick.

  7. Multilayered silicene: the bottom-up approach for a weakly relaxed Si(111) with Dirac surface states.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huixia; Chen, Lan; Chen, Jian; Qiu, Jinglan; Ding, Zijing; Zhang, Jin; Wu, Kehui; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng

    2015-10-14

    Combining first principles investigations and scanning tunneling microscopy, we identify that the presumable van der Waals packed multilayered silicene sheets spontaneously transform into a diamond-structure bulk Si film due to strong interlayer couplings. In contrast to drastic surface reconstruction on conventional Si(111), multilayered silicene prepared by bottom-up epitaxy on Ag(111) exhibits a nearly ideal flat surface with only weak buckling. Without invoking Ag surfactants, √3 ×√3 honeycomb patterns emerge thanks to dynamic fluctuation of mirror-symmetric rhombic phases, similar to monolayered silicene [Chen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2013, 110, 085504]. The weak relaxation enables novel surface states with a Dirac linear dispersion. PMID:26359537

  8. On the development of packets of surface gravity waves moving over an uneven bottom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djordjevic, V. D.; Redekopp, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    The object of study is the evolution of packets of gravity waves moving over variable depth, in particular, the transformation of packets moving into a shelf of increased or decreased depth. The variable-coefficient nonlinear Schroedinger equation with inhomogeneous term is derived for gravity waves moving over an uneven bottom. A solution for an envelope-hole soliton moving over variable depth is obtained when the amplitude-length ratio of the soliton is small. For the shelf problem, it is shown that the first soliton on the shelf will be the one with smallest depression, and the last will have greatest depression. This is in contrast to Korteweg-de Vries soliton fission.

  9. Lifting-surface-theory aspect-ratio corrections to the lift and hinge-moment parameters for full-span elevators on horizontal tail surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Robert S; Crandall, Stewart M

    1948-01-01

    A limited number of lifting-surface-theory solutions for wings with chordwise loadings resulting from angle of attack, parabolic-ac camber, and flap deflection are now available. These solutions were studied with the purpose of determining methods of extrapolating the results in such a way that they could be used to determine lifting-surface-theory values of the aspect-ratio corrections to the lift and hinge-moment parameters for both angle-of-attack and flap-deflection-type loading that could be used to predict the characteristics of horizontal tail surfaces from section data with sufficient accuracy for engineering purposes. Such a method was devised for horizontal tail surfaces with full-span elevators. In spite of the fact that the theory involved is rather complex, the method is simple to apply and may be applied without any knowledge of lifting-surface theory. A comparison of experimental finite-span and section value and of the estimated values of the lift and hinge-moment parameters for three horizontal tail surfaces was made to provide an experimental verification of the method suggested. (author)

  10. Atomic layer deposition-Sequential self-limiting surface reactions for advanced catalyst "bottom-up" synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Stair, Peter C.

    2016-06-01

    Catalyst synthesis with precise control over the structure of catalytic active sites at the atomic level is of essential importance for the scientific understanding of reaction mechanisms and for rational design of advanced catalysts with high performance. Such precise control is achievable using atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is similar to chemical vapor deposition (CVD), except that the deposition is split into a sequence of two self-limiting surface reactions between gaseous precursor molecules and a substrate. The unique self-limiting feature of ALD allows conformal deposition of catalytic materials on a high surface area catalyst support at the atomic level. The deposited catalytic materials can be precisely constructed on the support by varying the number and type of ALD cycles. As an alternative to the wet-chemistry based conventional methods, ALD provides a cycle-by-cycle "bottom-up" approach for nanostructuring supported catalysts with near atomic precision. In this review, we summarize recent attempts to synthesize supported catalysts with ALD. Nucleation and growth of metals by ALD on oxides and carbon materials for precise synthesis of supported monometallic catalyst are reviewed. The capability of achieving precise control over the particle size of monometallic nanoparticles by ALD is emphasized. The resulting metal catalysts with high dispersions and uniformity often show comparable or remarkably higher activity than those prepared by conventional methods. For supported bimetallic catalyst synthesis, we summarize the strategies for controlling the deposition of the secondary metal selectively on the primary metal nanoparticle but not on the support to exclude monometallic formation. As a review of the surface chemistry and growth behavior of metal ALD on metal surfaces, we demonstrate the ways to precisely tune size, composition and structure of bimetallic metal nanoparticles. The cycle-by-cycle "bottom up" construction of bimetallic (or multiple

  11. The shape and behaviour of a horizontal buoyant jet adjacent to a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, Henry; Hunt, Gary

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the incompressible turbulent buoyant jet formed when fluid is steadily ejected horizontally from a circular source into a quiescent environment of uniform density. As our primary focus, we introduce a horizontal boundary. For sufficiently large source-boundary separations, the buoyant jet is `free' to rise under the action of the buoyancy force. For smaller source-boundary separations, the jet attaches and `clings' to the boundary before, further downstream, pulling away from the boundary. Based on measurements of saline jets in freshwater we deduce the conditions required for a jet to cling. We present data for the variation in volume flux, flow envelope and centreline for both `clinging' and `free' jets. For source Froude numbers fr0 >= 12 the data collapses when scaled, identifying universal behaviours for both clinging jets and for free jets. The support and funding from Dyson Technology Ltd is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Horizontal Heat Impact of Urban Structures on the Surface Soil Layer and Its Diurnal Patterns under Different Micrometeorological Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongxuan; Hu, Dan; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Wu, Xiaogang; Ma, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of the surface soil layer around different orientation walls was investigated horizontally along several construction-soil micro-gradients in Beijing, China. On a diurnal scale, similar fluctuating trends in T0 and T50 (temperature of surface soil layer, 0 and 0.5 m from the building baseline) adjacent to the external walls of buildings with the same orientation usually appeared under similar micrometeorological conditions. The difference between T0 and T50 (ΔT0-50) can be considered an indicator of the intensity of the horizontal heat effects: higher ΔT0-50 values correspond to greater intensities. The values of ΔT0-50 for south-, north-, east- and west-facing sides of buildings were highest on sunny days in summer and exhibited values of 6.61 K, 1.64 K, 5.93 K and 2.76 K, respectively. The scope of horizontal heat impacts (Sh) changed on a diurnal scale between zero and the maximum, which fluctuated with the micrometeorological conditions. The maximum values of Sh were 0.30, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.20 m for south-, north-, east-, and west-facing walls. The ΔT0-50 was related to solar radiation, horizontal heat flux, relative humidity, wind speed, soil moisture differences and air temperature; the relative importance of these factors was 36.22%, 31.80%, 19.19%, 2.67%, 3.68% and 6.44%, respectively.

  13. Horizontal Heat Impact of Urban Structures on the Surface Soil Layer and Its Diurnal Patterns under Different Micrometeorological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongxuan; Hu, Dan; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Wu, Xiaogang; Ma, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of the surface soil layer around different orientation walls was investigated horizontally along several construction-soil micro-gradients in Beijing, China. On a diurnal scale, similar fluctuating trends in T0 and T50 (temperature of surface soil layer, 0 and 0.5 m from the building baseline) adjacent to the external walls of buildings with the same orientation usually appeared under similar micrometeorological conditions. The difference between T0 and T50 (ΔT 0-50) can be considered an indicator of the intensity of the horizontal heat effects: higher ΔT 0-50 values correspond to greater intensities. The values of ΔT 0-50 for south-, north-, east- and west-facing sides of buildings were highest on sunny days in summer and exhibited values of 6.61 K, 1.64 K, 5.93 K and 2.76 K, respectively. The scope of horizontal heat impacts (Sh) changed on a diurnal scale between zero and the maximum, which fluctuated with the micrometeorological conditions. The maximum values of Sh were 0.30, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.20 m for south-, north-, east-, and west-facing walls. The ΔT 0-50 was related to solar radiation, horizontal heat flux, relative humidity, wind speed, soil moisture differences and air temperature; the relative importance of these factors was 36.22%, 31.80%, 19.19%, 2.67%, 3.68% and 6.44%, respectively. PMID:26728627

  14. Horizontal Heat Impact of Urban Structures on the Surface Soil Layer and Its Diurnal Patterns under Different Micrometeorological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongxuan; Hu, Dan; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Wu, Xiaogang; Ma, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of the surface soil layer around different orientation walls was investigated horizontally along several construction-soil micro-gradients in Beijing, China. On a diurnal scale, similar fluctuating trends in T0 and T50 (temperature of surface soil layer, 0 and 0.5 m from the building baseline) adjacent to the external walls of buildings with the same orientation usually appeared under similar micrometeorological conditions. The difference between T0 and T50 (ΔT0–50) can be considered an indicator of the intensity of the horizontal heat effects: higher ΔT0–50 values correspond to greater intensities. The values of ΔT0–50 for south-, north-, east- and west-facing sides of buildings were highest on sunny days in summer and exhibited values of 6.61 K, 1.64 K, 5.93 K and 2.76 K, respectively. The scope of horizontal heat impacts (Sh) changed on a diurnal scale between zero and the maximum, which fluctuated with the micrometeorological conditions. The maximum values of Sh were 0.30, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.20 m for south-, north-, east-, and west-facing walls. The ΔT0–50 was related to solar radiation, horizontal heat flux, relative humidity, wind speed, soil moisture differences and air temperature; the relative importance of these factors was 36.22%, 31.80%, 19.19%, 2.67%, 3.68% and 6.44%, respectively. PMID:26728627

  15. The Effects of TI/PT Bottom Electrode on Crystallographic and Surface Characteristics of PZT Thick Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koochekzadeh, Ali; Keshavarz Alamdari, Eskandar; Barzegar, Abdolghafar

    The ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) films near the morphotropic phase boundary are successfully integrated into MEMS devices, especially for applications in microsensors and actuators. The ferro/piezo electric properties of PZT thick films are widely dependent on its surface quality and crystallographic orientation growth. This paper indicates the influences of platinum bottom electrode on the surface and crystallographic properties of PZT. Ti (10nm) and Pt (100nm) thin films have been deposited on silicon substrate by thermal evaporation and electron beam respectively without vacuum breaking. After annealing treatment, the Pt film exhibited (111) preferred orientation. Finally one micron thick PZT (54/46) film was deposited by a RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature in pure Argon followed by a conventional post annealing treatment on silicon substrate. The XRD measurements have shown the provskite structure of PZT films with (100) preferred orientation at annealing temperatures above 600°C and (111) preferred orientation above 650°c. The SEM results demonstrate that whatever the annealing temperature is increased, recrystallization grains and black holes on Pt surface occurs and cause morphological change of PZT surface. The AFM test shows the strong RMS roughness of platinum surface after annealing temperature at 650°C.

  16. Effect of Welding Atmosphere at Bottom Surface on Welding Phenomenan in Full Penetration Laser Welding of Thick Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakane, Goro; Tsukamoto, Susumu; Honda, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Fukushima, Takeshi

    The keyhole behaviour and bubble formation were investigated in the full penetration laser welding of 11 and 15 mm thick plate with various kinds of atmosphere at the bottom side. Prevention of some defects was also attempted. Back surface atmosphere was controlled using a shielding box fixed on the sample back surface to avoid contamination from the air and also the effect of gas flow on the keyhole behaviour. A lot of bubbles were formed during welding with the back surface atmosphere of nitrogen and air. This was deduced to be caused by supersaturation of nitrogen, which was dissolved from the backside molten pool. The critical nitrogen concentration in the weld metal to form the porosity was independent of the back surface atmosphere. Oxygen enhanced the porosity formation, since the nitrogen concentration increased in the presence of oxygen. The keyhole was significantly perturbed and hot cracking occurred in the inert gas back shielding. It was shown that the keyhole stability determined by solubility of the shielding gas in the molten steel. Aluminum coating on the sample back surface was effective in preventing the porosity due to denitrification of the molten pool and hot cracking.

  17. Versatile bottom-up construction of diverse macromolecules on a surface observed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Haq, Sam; Hanke, Felix; Sharp, John; Persson, Mats; Amabilino, David B; Raval, Rasmita

    2014-09-23

    The heterocoupling of organic building blocks to give complex multicomponent macromolecules directly at a surface holds the key to creating advanced molecular devices. While "on-surface" synthesis with prefunctionalized molecules has recently led to specific one- and two- component products, a central challenge is to discover universal connection strategies that are applicable to a wide range of molecules. Here, we show that direct activation of C-H bonds intrinsic to π-functional molecules is a highly generic route for connecting different building blocks on a copper surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) reveals that covalent π-functional macromolecular heterostructures, displaying diverse compositions, structures and topologies, are created with ease from seven distinct building blocks (including porphyrins, pentacene and perylene). By exploiting differences in C-H bond reactivity in the deposition and heating protocols we also demonstrate controlled synthesis of specific products, such as block copolymers. Further, the symmetry and geometry of the molecules and the surface also play a critical role in determining the outcome of the covalent bond forming reactions. Our "pick-mix-and-link" strategy opens up the capability to generate libraries of multivariate macromolecules directly at a surface, which in conjunction with nanoscale probing techniques could accelerate the discovery of functional interfaces. PMID:25191836

  18. Predictions of solar radiation distribution: Global, direct and diffuse light on horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabane, Foued; Moummi, Noureddine; Brima, Abdelhafid

    2016-04-01

    Solar radiation models for predicting the average daily and hourly global radiation, direct and diffuse radiation are discussed in this paper. The average daily global radiation in Ghardaia (32.38 N latitude, 3.82 E longitude) is predicted. Estimations of monthly average hourly global radiation are considered. We have developed this correlation using the sunlight and global radiation data from one year location around the weather station in Ghardaia. Two predictions of solar radiation distribution: direct and diffuse light on a horizontal area models, are reviewed to predict the hourly irradiation of Ghardaia utilizing the approach such as regression models. Comparisons between model predictions with measured data are made.

  19. Horizontal and Vertical Surface Displacements in the Upper Rhine Graben Derived from GNSS and Precise Levelling Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, T.; Knöpfler, A.; Masson, F.; Mayer, M.; Ulrich, P.; Westerhaus, M.; Zippelt, K.; Heck, B.

    2012-04-01

    At the Geodetic Institute, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) area is investigated using various geodetic techniques. The recent objective is to gain detailed insight in the horizontal and vertical velocity field of the URG from GNSS and levelling data. In addition, it is planned to integrate InSAR data and to rigorously merge the three geodetic measurement techniques into a combined 3D displacement solution. For the GNSS part, a transnational network called GURN (GNSS Upper Rhine Graben Network) was established in 2008 in close cooperation with the Institute de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg (France). GURN actually consist of more than 80 permanently operating GNSS sites of Germany, France and Switzerland. A continuous database is existing since 2002. The analysis strategy for the determination of horizontal and vertical displacement rates and first results from up to 10 years long GNSS time series will be presented. Besides GNSS, the analysis of precise levelling data enables an accurate determination of vertical displacement rates at levelling benchmarks, if repeated measurements at identical benchmarks are available. The levelling measurements in the URG area were carried out by the ordnance survey of Germany, France and Switzerland along levelling lines. These levelling lines were measured up to five times within the last 100 years. Therefore, at discrete benchmarks a detailed assessment of surface displacements could be carried out. The presentation will compare the results of the two geodetic measurement techniques applied within the research activities in the URG area. As levelling and GNSS are point-wise measurement techniques, the spatial resolution of estimated surface displacements is poor. Therefore, InSAR data is used to fill the gap in the future. A short outlook will point out possibilities and limitations on the combination of GNSS, levelling, and InSAR data for an accurate solution aiming for horizontal and vertical

  20. DNS of Horizontal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Scotti, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    We perform three-dimensional DNS of Horizontal Convection in a rectangular tank with idealized boundary conditions. The flow is driven by imposing the profile for the buoyancy b at the surface, where it ranges from b0 to b0 + Δb and the transition region is confined to a very small area. The Rayleigh based on the domain depth ranges from 105 to 1012. The scaling observed for the Nusselt number and the strength of the circulation is consistent with Rossby's scaling across the range of Rayleigh numbers considered, indicating that the dynamics in the boundary layer under the ``warming'' side throttles the flow. Energetically, we find that Available Potential Energy (APE) is generated along the surface, and converted to Kinetic Energy (KE). Along the descending plume energy goes from APE to KE up to Ra ~1011 . For higher Rayleigh numbers the plume becomes a net sink of APE. When the switch occurs, a stagnant layer develops near the bottom, and the overall circulation becomes characterized by a narrow plume which retroflects rapidly towards the surface, with a shallow recirculation to close the flow. This may indicate the beginning of a Sandström regime characterized by a stagnant abyssal region and a shallow circulation. Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  1. Nanotopographical Surfaces for Stem Cell Fate Control: Engineering Mechanobiology from the Bottom

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Shao, Yue; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Gang; Fu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Summary During embryogenesis and tissue maintenance and repair in an adult organism, a myriad of stem cells are regulated by their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) enriched with tissue/organ-specific nanoscale topographical cues to adopt different fates and functions. Attributed to their capability of self-renewal and differentiation into most types of somatic cells, stem cells also hold tremendous promise for regenerative medicine and drug screening. However, a major challenge remains as to achieve fate control of stem cells in vitro with high specificity and yield. Recent exciting advances in nanotechnology and materials science have enabled versatile, robust, and large-scale stem cell engineering in vitro through developments of synthetic nanotopographical surfaces mimicking topological features of stem cell niches. In addition to generating new insights for stem cell biology and embryonic development, this effort opens up unlimited opportunities for innovations in stem cell-based applications. This review is therefore to provide a summary of recent progress along this research direction, with perspectives focusing on emerging methods for generating nanotopographical surfaces and their applications in stem cell research. Furthermore, we provide a review of classical as well as emerging cellular mechano-sensing and -transduction mechanisms underlying stem cell nanotopography sensitivity and also give some hypotheses in regard to how a multitude of signaling events in cellular mechanotransduction may converge and be integrated into core pathways controlling stem cell fate in response to extracellular nanotopography. PMID:25883674

  2. SMOS salinity in the subtropical north Atlantic salinity maximum: Observation of the surface thermohaline horizontal structure and of its seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Nicolas; Hernandez, Olga; Boutin, Jacqueline; Reverdin, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The seasonal variability of the surface horizontal thermohaline structure is investigated in the subtropical and tropical north Atlantic Surface Salinity Maximum (SSM) at length scales from 5-10 km to more than 500 km. The near surface temperature and salinity data from merchant ship thermosalinograph (TSG) transects across the Atlantic, from ISAS product interpolated from Argo profiles, and a combination of SST from Tropical Microwave Imager (TMI) and SSS from the recently launched Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite, were used as complementary tools to compute the horizontal temperature, salinity and density gradients and the density ratio in the northern subtropical-tropical Atlantic. During late winter, in north-eastern SSM, the thermohaline compensation is observed for wavelengths from 5-10 km to more than 500 km. In spite of large and sharp surface thermohaline fronts a very weak density surface horizontal gradient is observed. In contrast, in the southern SSM, at large scale (>200 km) the density ratio is controlled by the salinity gradient and the horizontal density gradient is sharpened by a constructive contribution of opposite salinity and temperature gradients. During summer, the density ratio is dominated everywhere by the salinity gradient which enhances the horizontal surface density gradient in particular the south-western SSM, in the Amazon-Orinoco run off region. The first attempt in using SMOS SSS and TMI SST in order to retrieve the surface density ratio and horizontal density gradient is promising. We suggest that the surface density ratio and horizontal density gradient result from the straining and mixing of surface thermohaline properties that may play important roles in the deepening and re-stratification of the oceanic mixed layer.

  3. Holocene Millennial-scale Surface and Bottom Water Variability, Feni Drift, NE Atlantic Ocean: Foraminiferal Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, S. J.; Richter, T. O.; de Stigter, H. C.; van Weering, T. C. E.; de Haas, H.

    A high-resolution sediment core from Feni Drift (ENAM9606, 56N 14W, 2543 m wa- ter depth) was investigated for planktonic and benthic foraminiferal assemblages dur- ing the last 12,000 years. During the Preboreal, peak abundances of T.quinqueloba indicate the passage of the Arctic front over the core site. Holocene planktonic foraminiferal assemblages indicate a gradual warming trend of surface water masses punctuated by a major cooling (8,200ky event s.l.), and possibly a slight cooling dur- ing the last 3,000 years. The interval from 10 to 5kyrs shows higher and fluctuating abundances of T.quinqueloba and G.bulloides, which suggest proximity of the subarc- tic front and enhanced spring blooms compared to the upper Holocene. Abundance peaks of N.pachyderma(s) and/or T.quinqueloba indicate a series of millennial-scale cooling events during the entire Holocene, which can be correlated to similar episodes previously described from other locations in the North Atlantic and Norwegian- Greenland Sea. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages indicate a gradual transition from seasonal, spring-bloom related food supply in the Lower Holocene (dominance of the phytodetritus species E.exigua) to possibly lower, but more sustained food supply in the Upper Holocene (dominance of C.obtusa and C.laevigata).

  4. Unbalanced oil filled sphere as rolling pendulum on a flat surface to damp horizontal structural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bransch, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The passive damping of horizontal structural vibrations by means of an unbalanced oil filled sphere as a tuned mass damper (TMD) is examined. Due to the unbalance contained in the TMD, a pendulum-like motion is produced. The TMD lies unconstrained on the structure. As a result, forces are only transferred through the static friction between the TMD and the structure. The TMD is filled with oil to enable energy dissipation. This paper investigates the mechanical system of the proposed TMD and calculation methods for its tuning. Furthermore, experimental results of the TMD are presented. To determine the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed TMD, it will be compared to other passive tuned mass dampers. The advantages of the presented TMD are its robust design, simple mounting/demounting onto the main system and its adjustability after mounting. The oil filling makes the damper construction simple, as an additional container for the oil is no longer needed. Furthermore, the energy dissipating effect of breaking waves is used when the oil level inside the TMD is shallow. The disadvantages of the presented TMD when compared to a conventional tuned mass damper (linear spring-mass-damper-system) are its slightly lower performance and its complex tuning.

  5. Bacterial community dissimilarity between the surface and subsurface soils equals horizontal differences over several kilometers in the western Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chu, Haiyan; Sun, Huaibo; Tripathi, Binu M; Adams, Jonathan M; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Yangjian; Shi, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have investigated patterns in the near-surface soil microbial community over large spatial scales. However, less is known about variation in subsurface (15-30 cm of depth) microbial communities. Here we studied depth profiles of microbial communities in high-elevation soils from Tibet. The relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Alphaproteobacteria was higher in near-surface layers, while the relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Betaproteobacteria was higher in the subsurface samples. The microbial community structure was distinct between the surface and subsurface soil layers, strongly correlating with variation in total carbon (TC) and carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N). The differences in the microbial community between the layers were about the same as the horizontal differences between sites separated by many kilometers. Overall, we found that TC and C/N were the best predictors for both surface and subsurface microbial community distribution. Exploration of the relative contribution of distance and environmental variables to community composition suggests that the contemporary environment is the primary driver of microbial distribution in this region. Reflecting niche conservatism in evolution, the microbial communities in each soil site and layer tended to be more phylogenetically clustered than expected by chance, and surface soil layer samples were more likely to be clustered than subsurface samples. PMID:26914676

  6. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  7. Satellite Estimation of Spectral Surface UV Irradiance. 2; Effect of Horizontally Homogeneous Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothov, N.; Herman, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahmad, Z.a; Fioletov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The local variability of UV irradiance at the Earth's surface is mostly caused by clouds in addition to the seasonal variability. Parametric representations of radiative transfer RT calculations are presented for the convenient solution of the transmission T of ultraviolet radiation through plane parallel clouds over a surface with reflectivity R(sub s). The calculations are intended for use with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measured radiances to obtain the calculated Lambert equivalent scene reflectivity R for scenes with and without clouds. The purpose is to extend the theoretical analysis of the estimation of UV irradiance from satellite data for a cloudy atmosphere. Results are presented for a range of cloud optical depths and solar zenith angles for the cases of clouds over a low reflectivity surface R(sub s) less than 0.1, over a snow or ice surface R(sub s) greater than 0.3, and for transmission through a non-conservative scattering cloud with single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) = 0.999. The key finding for conservative scattering is that the cloud-transmission function C(sub T), the ratio of cloudy-to clear-sky transmission, is roughly C(sub T) = 1 - R(sub c) with an error of less than 20% for nearly overhead sun and snow-free surfaces. For TOMS estimates of UV irradiance in the presence of both snow and clouds, independent information about snow albedo is needed for conservative cloud scattering. For non-conservative scattering with R(sub s) greater than 0.5 (snow) the satellite measured scene reflectance cannot be used to estimate surface irradiance. The cloud transmission function has been applied to the calculation of UV irradiance at the Earth's surface and compared with ground-based measurements.

  8. Wind Stress Variation over the horizontally variable Roughness of Ocean Surface: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, Lev; Charnotskii, Mikhail; Ermakov, Stanislav

    2013-04-01

    We consider the effect of localized variations of the sea surface wave roughness on the near- surface turbulent wind. These variations can be caused by oil, surfactants, inhomogeneous currents, internal waves, etc. The corresponding transition effects in the turbulent wind over the sea is a very difficult problem, if only due to uncertainties in the turbulent closure models for the non-stationary and inhomogeneous flows. Here we suggest some practical schemes for calculating wind variation near the surface, the average short-wave roughness of which is varying in space and time. They include a generalized two-layer model, three-layer model, and a direct approach based on the solution of the Reynolds-type equations for the air flow velocity and turbulent kinetic energy. Laboratory experiments in a wind-wave tank are also described and compared with the theory.

  9. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  10. Shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave phononic device with high density filling material for ultra-low power sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.; Bhethanabotla, V. R.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.

    2014-06-23

    Finite element simulations of a phononic shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor based on ST 90°-X Quartz reveal a dramatic reduction in power consumption. The phononic sensor is realized by artificially structuring the delay path to form an acoustic meta-material comprised of a periodic microcavity array incorporating high-density materials such as tantalum or tungsten. Constructive interference of the scattered and secondary reflected waves at every microcavity interface leads to acoustic energy confinement in the high-density regions translating into reduced power loss. Tantalum filled cavities show the best performance while tungsten inclusions create a phononic bandgap. Based on our simulation results, SAW devices with tantalum filled microcavities were fabricated and shown to significantly decrease insertion loss. Our findings offer encouraging prospects for designing low power, highly sensitive portable biosensors.

  11. Processes controlling surface, bottom and lateral melt of Arctic sea ice in a state of the art sea ice model.

    PubMed

    Tsamados, Michel; Feltham, Daniel; Petty, Alek; Schroeder, David; Flocco, Daniela

    2015-10-13

    We present a modelling study of processes controlling the summer melt of the Arctic sea ice cover. We perform a sensitivity study and focus our interest on the thermodynamics at the ice-atmosphere and ice-ocean interfaces. We use the Los Alamos community sea ice model CICE, and additionally implement and test three new parametrization schemes: (i) a prognostic mixed layer; (ii) a three equation boundary condition for the salt and heat flux at the ice-ocean interface; and (iii) a new lateral melt parametrization. Recent additions to the CICE model are also tested, including explicit melt ponds, a form drag parametrization and a halodynamic brine drainage scheme. The various sea ice parametrizations tested in this sensitivity study introduce a wide spread in the simulated sea ice characteristics. For each simulation, the total melt is decomposed into its surface, bottom and lateral melt components to assess the processes driving melt and how this varies regionally and temporally. Because this study quantifies the relative importance of several processes in driving the summer melt of sea ice, this work can serve as a guide for future research priorities. PMID:26347538

  12. Radionuclide concentrations in game (surface feeders) and nongame (bottom feeders) fish upstream and downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Salazar, J.G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper summarizes radionuclide concentrations in game (surface feeders) and nongame (bottom feeders) fish collected from reservoirs upstream (Abiquiu, Heron and/or El Vado) and downstream (Cochiti) of Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1981 to 1992. Sr-90, Cs-137, Pu- 238, and Pu-239 were not significantly different in either game or nongame fish collected from Cochiti reservoir as compared to fish collected from reservoirs upstream of the Laboratory. Total uranium was the only radionuclide that was found to be significantly different in both game and nongame fish collected from Cochiti as compared to fish collected from Abiquiu, Heron and El Vado. Uranium concentrations in fish collected from Cochiti, however, significantly decrease from 1981 to 1992, and no evidence of depleted uranium was found. Based on the average concentration of radionuclides over the years, the effective (radiation) dose equivalent from consuming 21 kg of game fish and nongame fish from Cochiti reservoir was 0.005 and 0.009 mrem/yr, respectively. This is <0.01% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) permissible dose limit for protecting members of the public.

  13. Power scaling and beam divergence compression of bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Ning, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jianwei; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jinsheng; Jia, Peng; Li, Xiushan; Shi, Jingjing; Qin, Li; Liu, Yun; Tong, Cunzhu; Wang, Lijun

    2013-09-01

    Power scaling and beam divergence compression of 980 nm bottom-emitting vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are presented in this paper. First, the relationships among the reflectivity of the n-doped distributed Bragg reflector, threshold current, and output power were analyzed, and the n-DBR reflectivity was optimized to achieve higher slope efficiency in a relatively low threshold current. Second, the influence of the p-contact on the current density distribution inside the active region was analyzed using the three-dimensional finite-element method. Uniform current distribution was achieved by optimizing the diameter of the p-contact, and a consequent improvement in beam divergence was observed. A low divergence of 5.4° was obtained for a single device with continuous-wave (CW) of 1.46 W at room temperature. The 8×8 VCSEL array showed a divergence angle of 10.2° at 4A. This array afforded a CW output power of 1.95 W under an injected current of 4 A and a pulse output power of 115 W under a pulse drive current of 130 A, a pulse width of 100 ns, and a repetition frequency of 100 Hz. VCSEL array chips were packaged in series to form a "quasi-array" to further increase the output power. This series achieved a peak output power of 475 W under a pulse drive current of 120 A.

  14. Motion of a drop on a horizontal solid surface with a wettability gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moumen, Nadjoua

    The motion of drops of tetraethylene glycol in a wettability gradient present on a silicon surface is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The gradient was formed by exposing clean silicon surfaces to a source of dodecyltrichlorosilane vapor. The static contact angles were measured as a function of position and used to characterize the local wettability gradient. The Reynolds, capillary, and Bond numbers in the experiments were relatively small. The measured migration velocities of drops over a range of sizes demonstrated the complex nature of the variation of the velocity with position on the gradient surface in response to the changes in the driving force and the resistance to the motion. The results are organized and interpreted using a simple quasi-steady hydrodynamic model in which inertial effects and deformation due to gravity as well as motion are neglected so that the shape is approximated by a spherical cap. Two approaches are used to estimate the hydrodynamic resistance experienced by the drop. In the "wedge approximation" the drop is modeled as a collection of wedges; the drag on each wedge is calculated from a solution for Stokes flow. In the second approach, lubrication theory is employed while retaining the exact shape of the drop. A slip boundary condition is used in a region close to the contact line to relax the usual stress singularity. The results from the wedge approximation and lubrication theory are indistinguishable at contact angles ≤ 30°. The theoretical model based on the wedge approximation describes the qualitative features of the shape of the curve of velocity versus position along the gradient surface. A detailed investigation of the remaining discrepancy does not support the hypothesis of a missing resistance due to either contact line dissipation or an underestimation of the hydrodynamic drag. Instead, it is concluded that a reduction in the driving force due to contact angle hysteresis is the most likely reason. The

  15. Temporal offsets between surface temperature, ice-rafting and bottom flow speed proxies in the glacial (MIS 3) northern North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkers, Lukas; Prins, Maarten A.; Moros, Matthias; Weltje, Gert Jan; Troelstra, Simon R.; Brummer, Geert-Jan A.

    2012-08-01

    Rapid climatic switches during marine isotope stage 3 (29-59 ka BP) are often attributed to ocean circulation changes caused by freshwater input into the North Atlantic through the melting of large amounts of icebergs and sea ice. However, recent studies have questioned this direct coupling between factors influencing the ocean-climate system. By combining multiple proxies from two mid depth northern North Atlantic sediment cores we assess temporal offsets and links between freshwater input and response of the near bottom flow as well as between near bottom flow and sea surface temperatures changes. Grain size, mineralogical and magnetic proxies for ice rafting and near-bottom flow speed, interpreted as indicators of freshwater input and deep circulation strength, consistently indicate a delay in the recovery of the deep circulation after freshwater perturbations. Sea surface temperature variability is inferred from foraminiferal assemblages and Mg/Ca and δ18O of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma s. The records show rapid switches towards higher temperatures following the ice-rafting events. Interestingly, near sea surface temperatures increased and decreased again during periods of accelerating bottom flow speed, likely reflecting the sudden release of heat from deeper in the water column, rather than circulation changes. Our data thus confirm the impact of freshwater forcing on the Atlantic deep circulation, but suggest that temperature variability at the surface was not directly linked to these circulation changes.

  16. Millennial-scale Changes of Surface and Bottom Water Conditions in the Northwest Pacific during the Last Deglacial Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, B. K.; Kim, S.; Ikehara, K.; Itaki, T.; Shibahara, A.; Yamamoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    The last deglacial changes of the water column conditions in the Northwest Pacific were reconstructed using geochemical and isotope proxies (biogenic opal, CaCO3, total organic carbon (TOC), redox sensitive elements, bulk nitrogen isotopes (δ15N), and silicon isotopes (δ30Sidiatom) of diatom frustules) along with the published data (alkenone temperatures and benthic foraminiferal faunas) at core GH02-1030 recovered from the slope off Tokachi. Age model for core GH02-1030 was determined using both planktonic and benthic foraminiferal AMC 14C dates (Ikehara et al., 2006). Alkenone sea surface temperature (SST) shows that biogenic opal productivity was related to the degree of spring-summer mixed layer depth (MLD). Biogenic opal and TOC contents change almost in parallel. δ30Sidiatom values are high (~+1‰) during the Holocene and low (~-0.4‰) during the last glacial maximum. During the Bølling-Allerød (BA) and the Pre-Boreal (PB), silicic acid utilization represented by δ30Sidiatom increased when the biogenic opal productivity and export TOC productivity are high under shoaling of spring-summer MLD. The BA and the PB intervals contain laminated sediment layers, which are characterized by increases of CaCO3 contents, bulk δ15N values, and redox element concentrations (Mo/Al, Cd/Al, and U/Al). All these indicate low dissolved oxygen content of the bottom water during the BA and PB periods, which is supported by the good preservation of dysoxic benthic foraminifera. In addition, compared to the Holocene biogenic opal productivity and related silicic acid utilization, the high δ15N values during the BA and the PB seemed to be attributed more to denitrification through the water column rather than complete utilization of nitrate. Another distinct feature based on benthic foraminiferal assemblage, CaCO3 contents and redox element concentrations is that the dissolved oxygen content in bottom water was lower during the BA than the PB. Because biogenic opal

  17. The interplay between the surface and bottom water environment within the Benguela Upwelling System over the last 70 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. L.; Filipsson, H. L.; Romero, O. E.; Stuut, J.-B. W.; Björck, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Benguela Upwelling System (BUS), located between 30 and 20°S, is one of the fundamental high-productivity systems of the world ocean. The BUS has previously been studied in terms of primary productivity and ecology over glacial-interglacial timescales; however, the response and coupling with the benthic environment have received little attention. Here, for the first time, we present a high-resolution reconstruction of the BUS highlighting the link between surface and benthic productivity and their response to climatic and oceanographic changes over the last 70 ka. The study is based on benthic foraminiferal faunal analysis together with analyses of diatom assemblages, grain size of the terrigenous fraction, and stable O and C isotopic and bulk biogenic components of core GeoB3606-1. We reveal significant shifts in benthic foraminiferal assemblage composition. Tight coupling existed between the surface and bottom water environment especially throughout marine isotope stages 4 and 3 (MIS4 and MIS3). Due to the high export production, the site has essentially experienced continuous low oxygen conditions; however, there are time periods where the hypoxic conditions were even more notable. Two of these severe hypoxic periods were during parts of MIS4 and MIS3 where we find an inverse relationship between diatom and benthic foraminifera accumulation, meaning that during times of extremely high phytodetritus export we note strongly suppressed benthic productivity. We also stress the importance of food source for the benthos throughout the record. Shifts in export productivity are attributed not only to upwelling intensity and filament front position, but also, regional-global climatic and oceanographic changes had significant impact on the BUS dynamics.

  18. An apparatus with a horizontal capillary tube intended for measurement of the surface tension of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinš, Václav; Hošek, Jan; Hykl, Jiří; Hrubý, Jan

    2015-05-01

    New experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of liquids under the metastable supercooled state has been designed and assembled in the study. The measuring technique is similar to the method employed by P.T. Hacker [NACA TN 2510] in 1951. A short liquid thread of the liquid sample was sucked inside a horizontal capillary tube partly placed in a temperature-controlled glass chamber. One end of the capillary tube was connected to a setup with inert gas which allowed for precise tuning of the gas overpressure in order of hundreds of Pa. The open end of the capillary tube was precisely grinded and polished before the measurement in order to assure planarity and perpendicularity of the outer surface. The liquid meniscus at the open end was illuminated by a laser beam and observed by a digital camera. Application of an increasing overpressure of the inert gas at the inner meniscus of the liquid thread caused variation of the outer meniscus such that it gradually changed from concave to flat and subsequently convex shape. The surface tension at the temperature of the inner meniscus could be evaluated from the overpressure corresponding to exactly planar outer meniscus. Detailed description of the new setup together with results of the preliminary tests is provided in the study.

  19. Horizontal distributions of surface chlorophyll a and nitrogenous nutrients near Bering Strait and Unimak Pass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Isao; Furuya, Ken; Otobe, Hirotake; Nakai, Toshisuke; Memoto, Takahisa; Hattori, Akihiko

    1982-02-01

    Surface temperature, salinity, nitrate,aammonium, and chlorophyll a were continuously monitored along a north-south transect across the Bering Strait and Unimak Pass region of the southeastern Bering Sea in July 1978. A cold water mass, rich in nitrate and chlorophyll a, north of the Bering Strait, was examined over a distance of 40 km; it was probably associated with local upwelling. Near Unimak Pass, chlorophyll a was inversely correlated with nitrate, suggesting rapid growth of phytoplankton in nutrient-rich Alaskan Stream water during its travel into the Bering Sea. Phytoplankton species composition was consistent with this inference.

  20. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  1. Contribution of the Yellow Sea bottom cold water to the abnormal cooling of sea surface temperature in the summer of 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon-ho; Pang, Ig-Chan; Moon, Jae-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) measurements revealed an abnormal cooling anomaly over the Yellow Sea (YS) in the summer of 2011. Using in situ hydrographic profiles, meteorological fields, and an ocean circulation model with a passive tracer experiment, we identified the cold SST anomaly and its connection with the YS Bottom Cold Water (YSBCW), which occupies the central part of the YS below the thermocline in the summer. The summer SST anomalies in the YS showed three cold peaks in 1993, 2003, and 2011 over the past 20 years, but the reasons for the cooling events were different, as one was due to weakened surface heating and the other was attributed to mixing with the YSBCW. In 1993 and 2003, relatively weak surface heating made the surface water cooler compared with that during the other years, whereas in 2011, a strong vertical mixing of water was induced by a typhoon that passed through the central YS, causing the surface water to cool by ˜8°C and the bottom water to warm up by ˜4°C. A tracer experiment further confirmed that the vertical heat transfers between the warm surface and the cold bottom water masses when the typhoon passed through the YS interior.

  2. Experiments on the Motion of Drops on a Horizontal Solid Surface due to a Wettability Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moumen, Nadjoua; Subramanian, R, Shankar; MLaughlin, john B.

    2006-01-01

    Results from experiments performed on the motion of drops of tetraethylene glycol in a wettability gradient present on a silicon surface are reported and compared with predictions from a recently developed theoretical model. The gradient in wettability was formed by exposing strips cut from a silicon wafer to decyltrichlorosiland vapors. Video images of the drops captured during the experiments were subsequently analyzed for drop size and velocity as functions of position along the gradient. In separate experiments on the same strips, the static contact angle formed by small drops was measured and used to obtain the local wettability gradient to which a drop is subjected. The velocity of the drops was found to be a strong function of position along the gradient. A quasi-steady theoretical model that balances the local hydrodynamic resistance with the local driving force generally describes the observations; possible reasons for the remaining discrepancies are discussed. It is shown that a model in which the driving force is reduced to accomodate the hysteresis effect inferred from the data is able to remove most of the discrepancy between the observed and predicted velocities.

  3. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  4. The modelled surface mass balance of the Antarctic Peninsula at 5.5 km horizontal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wessem, J. M.; Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; Reijmer, C. H.; van de Berg, W. J.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Barrand, N. E.; Thomas, E. R.; Turner, J.; Wuite, J.; Scambos, T. A.; van Meijgaard, E.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a high-resolution (˜ 5.5 km) estimate of surface mass balance (SMB) over the period 1979-2014 for the Antarctic Peninsula (AP), generated by the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO2.3 and a firn densification model (FDM). RACMO2.3 is used to force the FDM, which calculates processes in the snowpack, such as meltwater percolation, refreezing and runoff. We evaluate model output with 132 in situ SMB observations and discharge rates from six glacier drainage basins, and find that the model realistically simulates the strong spatial variability in precipitation, but that significant biases remain as a result of the highly complex topography of the AP. It is also clear that the observations significantly underrepresent the high-accumulation regimes, complicating a full model evaluation. The SMB map reveals large accumulation gradients, with precipitation values above 3000 mm we yr-1 in the western AP (WAP) and below 500 mm we yr-1 in the eastern AP (EAP), not resolved by coarser data sets such as ERA-Interim. The average AP ice-sheet-integrated SMB, including ice shelves (an area of 4.1 × 105 km2), is estimated at 351 Gt yr-1 with an interannual variability of 58 Gt yr-1, which is dominated by precipitation (PR) (365 ± 57 Gt yr-1). The WAP (2.4 × 105 km2) SMB (276 ± 47 Gt yr-1), where PR is large (276 ± 47 Gt yr-1), dominates over the EAP (1.7 × 105 km2) SMB (75 ± 11 Gt yr-1) and PR (84 ± 11 Gt yr-1). Total sublimation is 11 ± 2 Gt yr-1 and meltwater runoff into the ocean is 4 ± 4 Gt yr-1. There are no significant trends in any of the modelled AP SMB components, except for snowmelt that shows a significant decrease over the last 36 years (-0.36 Gt yr-2).

  5. The modelled surface mass balance of the Antarctic Peninsula at 5.5 km horizontal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wessem, J. M.; Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; Reijmer, C. H.; van de Berg, W. J.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Barrand, N. E.; Thomas, E. R.; Turner, J.; Wuite, J.; Scambos, T. A.; van Meijgaard, E.

    2015-09-01

    This study presents a high-resolution (~ 5.5 km) estimate of Surface Mass Balance (SMB) over the period 1979-2014 for the Antarctic Peninsula (AP), generated by the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO2.3 and a Firn Densification Model (FDM). RACMO2.3 is used to force the FDM, which calculates processes in the snowpack, such as meltwater percolation, refreezing and runoff. We evaluate model output with 132 in-situ SMB observations and discharge rates from 6 glacier drainage basins, and find that the model realistically simulates the strong spatial variability in precipitation, but that significant biases remain as a result of the highly complex topography of the AP. It is also clear that the observations significantly underrepresent the high-accumulation regimes. The SMB map reveals large accumulation gradients, with precipitation values above 3000 mm we yr-1 over the western AP (WAP) and below 500 mm we yr-1 on the eastern AP (EAP), not resolved by coarser data-sets such as ERA-Interim. The other SMB components are one order of magnitude smaller, with drifting snow sublimation the largest ablation term removing up to 100 mm we yr-1 of mass. Snowmelt is widespread over the AP, reaching 500 mm we yr-1 towards the northern ice shelves, but the meltwater mostly refreezes. As a result runoff fluxes are low, but still considerable (200 mm we yr-1) over the Larsen (B/C), Wilkins and George VI ice shelves. The average AP ice sheet integrated SMB, including ice shelves (an area of 4.1 × 105 km2), is estimated at 351 Gt yr-1 with an interannual variability of 58 Gt yr-1, which is dominated by precipitation (PR) (365 ± 57 Gt yr-1). The WAP (2.4 × 105 km2) SMB (276 ± 47 Gt yr-1), where PR is large (276 ± 47 Gt yr-1), dominates over the EAP (1.7 × 105 km2) SMB (75 ± 11 Gt yr-1) and PR (84 ± 11 Gt yr-1). Total sublimation is 11 ± 2 Gt yr-1 and meltwater runoff into the ocean is 4 ± 4 Gt yr-1. There are no significant trends in any of the AP SMB components, except

  6. A Comparison of Sediment Transport Measurements and a Bottom Boundary Layer Model on a Hardbottom Surface Offshore of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cziraki, E.; Wren, P.

    2008-12-01

    Two instrumented bottom-mounted quadrapod frames have been deployed on the shoreface and inner- continental shelf of Long Bay, SC offshore of Myrtle Beach in an effort to measure and quantify the cross- and along-shore suspended sediment transport and examine sediment deposition dispersal on nearshore hardbottom habitats. The inshore instrument frame is located 850 meters offshore on an extensive hardbottom surface and the second instrumented frame is secured to a hardbottom surface at a distance of approximately 2.5 km offshore. The nearshore instrumentation includes a downward-looking RDI/Teledyne 1200 kHz Pulse-Coherent Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (PC-ADCP), an upward-looking Nortek Acoustic Wave and Current profiler (AWAC), and a multi-frequency Aquatec Acoustic Backscatter Sensor. The inner- shelf instrumentation includes a Sontek Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), a Sequoia LISST-100X, an upward looking RDI 1200 kHz ACDP with wave capabilities, and an Imaginex profiling sonar. Sediment samples have also been collected and analyzed for composition and grain size distribution. Continuous and simultaneous in-situ measurements of directional wave spectra, bottom wave and current velocities, suspended sediment concentration profiles, grain-size distributions, and seabed elevation changes have been collected since July 2008. Additionally, measured near-bottom wave orbital velocities, current velocities at 50 cmab, and sediment grain size data have been input into a bottom boundary layer model (Styles and Glenn, 2002). Model generated profiles of current speed, suspended sediment concentration, and sediment transport due to wave-current interactions have been compared to the measured current, suspended sediment concentration and transport profiles in order to calibrate and verify the bottom boundary layer model over the hardbottom surface. Measured sediment flux and direction over the hardbottom areas have been compared to the BBL model output during several

  7. Simultaneous Modification of Bottom-Contact Electrode and Dielectric Surfaces for Organic Thin-Film Transistors Through Single-Component Spin-Cast Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    O Acton; M Dubey; t Weidner; K OMalley; T Kim; G Ting; D Hutchins; J Baio; T Lovejoy; et al.

    2011-12-31

    An efficient process is developed by spin-coating a single-component, self-assembled monolayer (SAM) to simultaneously modify the bottom-contact electrode and dielectric surfaces of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs). This efficient interface modification is achieved using n-alkyl phosphonic acid based SAMs to prime silver bottom-contacts and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) dielectrics in low-voltage OTFTs. Surface characterization using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and spectroscopic ellipsometry suggest this process yields structurally well-defined phosphonate SAMs on both metal and oxide surfaces. Rational selection of the alkyl length of the SAM leads to greatly enhanced performance for both n-channel (C60) and p-channel (pentacene) based OTFTs. Specifically, SAMs of n-octylphos-phonic acid (OPA) provide both low-contact resistance at the bottom-contact electrodes and excellent interfacial properties for compact semiconductor grain growth with high carrier mobilities. OTFTs based on OPA modifi ed silver electrode/HfO{sub 2} dielectric bottom-contact structures can be operated using < 3V with low contact resistance (down to 700 Ohm-cm), low subthreshold swing (as low as 75 mV dec{sup -1}), high on/off current ratios of 107, and charge carrier mobilities as high as 4.6 and 0.8 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, for C60 and pentacene, respectively. These results demonstrate that this is a simple and efficient process for improving the performance of bottom-contact OTFTs.

  8. Vertical and horizontal distributions of coral-reef fish larvae in open water immediately prior to reef colonization.

    PubMed

    Lecchini, D; Waqalevu, V P; Holles, S; Lerohellec, M; Brie, C; Simpson, S D

    2013-06-01

    To explore the vertical and horizontal distributions of fish larvae near the end of their pelagic period, six light traps were set up over four lunar months at different depths (sub-surface, midwater and bottom) and different habitat types (reef slope: 50 m horizontal distance from the reef crest; frontier zone: 110 m horizontal distance; sandy zone: 200 m horizontal distance) on the outer reef slope of Moorea Island, French Polynesia. The highest captures were in sub-surface traps on the reef slope and the frontier zone, and in bottom traps on the sandy zone and the frontier zone. It is hypothesized that fish larvae move towards the surface near the reef slope to avoid reef-based planktivores and to get into a favourable position for surfing over the reef crest. PMID:23731158

  9. The influence of surface waves on performance characteristics and wake measurements of a horizontal axis marine current turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Karen; Lust, Ethan; Luznik, Luksa

    2015-11-01

    Performance characteristics and wake flow field results are presented for a 1/25 scale, 0.8 m diameter two bladed horizontal axis marine current turbine. The performance data and 2D PIV measurements were obtained in the 380 ft tow tank at the United States Naval Academy. The turbine was towed at a constant carriage speed of Utow = 1.68 m/s with turbine loading resulting in a nominal tip speed ratio of 7. Conditions with two regular waves were investigated. The first wave had a 2.3 second period and 0.18 m wave height, while the second wave had a 2.0 second period and a 0.20 m wave height. The waves were selected to have the same energy. Flow field measurements were obtained with an underwater PIV system comprised of two submersible housings. The forward looking submersible contained the laser sheet forming optics and the side looking submersible included a camera and remote focus/aperture electronics. Planar wake measurements were obtained 2 diameters downstream of the rotor plane. Flow field structures, as well as wave phase averaged mean velocities turbulence statistics will be presented and compared to the baseline case without surface waves. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  10. Thermodynamic understanding of Sn whisker growth on the Cu surface in Cu(top)-Sn(bottom) bilayer system upon room temperature aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lin; Jian, Wei; Lin, Bing; Wen, Yuren; Gu, Lin; Wang, Jiangyong

    2015-06-01

    Sn whiskers are observed by scanning electron microscope on the Cu surface in Cu(top)-Sn(bottom) bilayer system upon room temperature aging. Only Cu6Sn5 phase appears in the X-ray diffraction patterns and no Sn element is detected in the Cu sublayer by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Based on the interfacial thermodynamics, the intermetallic Cu6Sn5 compound phase may form directly at the Sn grain boundary. Driven by the stress gradient during the formation of Cu6Sn5 compound at Sn grain boundaries, Sn atoms segregate onto the Cu surface and accumulate to form Sn whisker.

  11. Modeling, design, packing and experimental analysis of liquid-phase shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Thomas B

    using uniform-electrode and shear-horizontal mode configurations on potassium-niobate, langasite, and quartz substrates. Optimum configurations are determined yielding maximum sensitivity. Results show mode propagation-loss and sensitivity to viscosity are correlated by a factor independent of substrate material. The analysis is useful for designing devices meeting sensitivity and signal level requirements. A novel, rapid and precise microfluidic chamber alignment/bonding method was developed for SAW platforms. The package is shown to have little effect on device performance and permits simple macrofluidic interfacing. Lastly, prototypes were designed, fabricated, and tested for viscosity and biosensor applications; results show ability to detect as low as 1% glycerol in water and surface-bound DNA crosslinking.

  12. Onset and demise of Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events: The coupling of surface and bottom oceanic processes in two pelagic basins of the western Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambacorta, G.; Bersezio, R.; Weissert, H.; Erba, E.

    2016-06-01

    The upper Albian-lower Turonian pelagic successions of the Tethys record processes acting during the onset, core, and recovery from perturbed conditions across oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 1d, OAE 2, and the mid-Cenomanian event I (MCE I) relative to intervening intervals. Five sections from Umbria-Marche and Belluno Basins (Italy) were analyzed at high resolution to assess processes in surface and deep waters. Recurrent facies stacking patterns (SP) and their associations record periods of bottom current activity coupled with surface changes in trophic level. Climate changes appear to have been influential on deep circulation dynamics. Under greenhouse conditions, vigorous bottom currents were arguably induced by warm and dense saline deep waters originated on tropical shelves in the Tethys and/or proto-Atlantic Ocean. Tractive facies postdating intermittent anoxia during OAE 1d and in the interval bracketed by MCE I and OAE 2 are indicative of feeble bottom currents, though capable of disrupting stratification and replenish deep water with oxygen. The major warming at the onset of OAE 2 might have enhanced the formation of warm salty waters, possibly producing local hiatuses at the base of the Bonarelli Level and winnowing at the seafloor. Hiatuses detected at the top of the Bonarelli Level possibly resulted from most effective bottom currents during the early Turonian thermal maximum. Times of minimal sediment displacement correlate with cooler climatic conditions and testify a different mechanism of deep water formation, as further suggested by a color change to reddish lithologies of the post-OAE 1d and post-OAE 2 intervals.

  13. Diurnal behavior of the carbon dioxide flux and change in the isotopic ratio δ13C in surface and near-bottom water in littoral of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Domysheva, Valentina M.; Padalko, Natalia L.; Chernikov, Eugenii V.; Prazdnichnykh, Maxim I.; Tumakov, Alexander G.; Pestunov, Dmitrii A.

    2014-11-01

    Lake Baikal is one of the unique natural environments in Siberia which, to a large extent, affects the state of the nature in this region. The processes of gas exchange in the "water-atmosphere" system have been studied in Lake Baikal since 2002. The main purpose of the integrated investigations of exchange of carbon-containing gases in the water-atmosphere system in Lake Baikal is to study the contribution of physical, chemical, and biological components of the process and their interrelation with the intensity and rhythms of the fluxes. In 2013, the integrated measurements in the littoral area of Baikal were complemented with studies of the diurnal dynamics of isotopic ratio δ 13C in the surface and near-bottom water, which were not yet performed in Baikal before. In this work, we analyze first results of the joint analysis of RO2 fluxes in the "atmosphere - water surface" system and δ 13C, obtained in August 2013 in the littoral area of South Baikal. It is shown that d13C markedly increases in the surface waters at daylight time. In nighttime period, there takes place a reverse process, when δ 13C of the surface water approaches δ 13C, which is recorded for near-bottom water.

  14. Bottom production

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, J.; Baranov, S.P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bouhova, E.; Cacciari, M.; Caner, A.; Coadou, Y.; Corti, G.; Damet, J.; Dell-Orso, R.; De Mello Neto, J.R.T.; Domenech, J.L.; Drollinger, V.; Eerola, P.; Ellis, N.; Epp, B.; Frixione, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gavrilenko, I.; Gennai, S.; George, S.; Ghete, V.M.; Guy, L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iengo, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jones, R.; Kharchilava, A.; Kneringer, E.; Koppenburg, P.; Korsmo, H.; Kramer, M.; Labanca, N.; Lehto, M.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; Mele, S.; Nairz, A.M.; Nakada, T.; Nikitin, N.; Nisati, A.; Norrbin, E.; Palla, F.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robins, S.; Rousseau, D.; Sanchis-Lozano, M.A.; Shapiro, M.; Sherwood, P.; Smirnova, L.; Smizanska, M.; Starodumov, A.; Stepanov, N.; Vogt, R.

    2000-03-15

    In the context of the LHC experiments, the physics of bottom flavoured hadrons enters in different contexts. It can be used for QCD tests, it affects the possibilities of B decays studies, and it is an important source of background for several processes of interest. The physics of b production at hadron colliders has a rather long story, dating back to its first observation in the UA1 experiment. Subsequently, b production has been studied at the Tevatron. Besides the transverse momentum spectrum of a single b, it has also become possible, in recent time, to study correlations in the production characteristics of the b and the b. At the LHC new opportunities will be offered by the high statistics and the high energy reach. One expects to be able to study the transverse momentum spectrum at higher transverse momenta, and also to exploit the large statistics to perform more accurate studies of correlations.

  15. Test Plan to Determine the Maximum Surface Temperatures for a Plutonium Storage Cubicle with Horizontal 3013 Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    HEARD, F.J.

    2000-10-12

    A simulated full-scale plutonium storage cubicle with 22 horizontally positioned and heated 3013 canisters is proposed to confirm the effectiveness of natural circulation. Temperature and airflow measurements will be made for different heat generation and cubicle door configurations. Comparisons will be made to computer based thermal Hydraulic models.

  16. BAERLIN2014 - the influence of land surface types on and the horizontal heterogeneity of air pollutant levels in Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, Boris; von Schneidemesser, Erika; Andrich, Dorota; Quedenau, Jörn; Gerwig, Holger; Lüdecke, Anja; Kura, Jürgen; Pietsch, Axel; Ehlers, Christian; Klemp, Dieter; Kofahl, Claudia; Nothard, Rainer; Kerschbaumer, Andreas; Junkermann, Wolfgang; Grote, Rüdiger; Pohl, Tobias; Weber, Konradin; Lode, Birgit; Schönberger, Philipp; Churkina, Galina; Butler, Tim M.; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2016-06-01

    organic compounds (VOCs) at representative sites for traffic- and vegetation-affected sites. The quantification displayed notable horizontal heterogeneity of the short-lived gases and particle number concentrations. For example, baseline concentrations of the traffic-related chemical species CO and NO varied on average by up to ±22.2 and ±63.5 %, respectively, on the scale of 100 m around any measurement location. Airborne observations revealed the dominant source of elevated urban particulate number and mass concentrations being local, i.e., not being caused by long-range transport. Surface-based observations related these two parameters predominantly to traffic sources. Vegetated areas lowered the pollutant concentrations substantially with ozone being reduced most by coniferous forests, which is most likely caused by their reactive biogenic VOC emissions. With respect to the overall potential to reduce air pollutant levels, forests were found to result in the largest decrease, followed by parks and facilities for sports and leisure. Surface temperature was generally 0.6-2.1 °C lower in vegetated regions, which in turn will have an impact on tropospheric chemical processes. Based on our findings, effective future mitigation activities to provide a more sustainable and healthier urban environment should focus predominantly on reducing fossil-fuel emissions from traffic as well as on increasing vegetated areas.

  17. Resurvey of quality of surface water and bottom material of the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.

    2003-01-01

    The quality of water and bottom material in the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana, was surveyed from March 1999 to May 2000. Organochlorine, chlorophenoxy acid, and organophosphorus pesticides; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB?s); and trace elements were analyzed in surface water and bottom material from three sites previously sampled in a 1981-82 survey. Surface water at six sites was sampled and analyzed for selected nutrients and major inorganic ions based on their importance to human health, the health of the marshes of the Barataria Preserve, or their usefulness in tracking the circulation of Mississippi River water in the Barataria Preserve. Southern Louisiana was in a moderate to severe drought during most of the sampling period, which elevated salinity in the Barataria Preserve for at least 8 months. Specific conductance values were less than 3,000 ?S/cm (microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius) in surface water throughout the Barataria Preserve from March through September 1999. Specific conductance values increased over the next 2 months and then remained between 5,000 and 6,000 ?S/cm. The herbicide 2,4-D was detected in water at the two sites sampled in August 1999 but not at any site during the two other sampling times. Iron, manganese, and the trace elements copper, nickel, and zinc were detected in dissolved and whole-water samples at all three sites. Nitrite+ nitrate, as nitrogen, concentrations ranged from less than 0.002 to 0.19 mg/L (milligrams per liter). Ammonia, as nitrogen, concentrations ranged from less than 0.01 to 0.16 mg/L. Orthophosphate, as phosphorus, concentrations ranged from less than 0.002 to 0.14 mg/L. Calcium, magnesium, potassium, sulfate, and chloride concentrations in surface water were elevated due to the marine influence on the composition of surface water in the Barataria Preserve during the sampling period. Sulfate and chloride concentrations reached 379 and 2

  18. Organic carbon and nitrogen in the surface sediments of world oceans and seas: distribution and relationship to bottom topography

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1980-06-01

    Information dealing with the distribution of organic carbon and nitrogen in the top sediments of world oceans and seas has been gathered and evaluated. Based on the available information a master chart has been constructed which shows world distribution of sedimentary organic matter in the oceans and seas. Since organic matter exerts an influence upon the settling properties of fine inorganic particles, e.g. clay minerals and further, the interaction between organic matter and clay minerals is maximal, a relationship between the overall bottom topography and the distribution of clay minerals and organic matter should be observable on a worldwide basis. Initial analysis of the available data indicates that such a relationship does exist and its significance is discussed.

  19. Combined tidal and wind driven flows and bedload transport over a flat bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmedal, Lars Erik; Myrhaug, Dag

    2013-08-01

    The combined tidal and wind driven flow and resulting sediment transport in the ocean over a flat bottom at intermediate water depth has been investigated, using a simple one dimensional two-equation turbulence closure model. This model has been verified against field measurements of a tidal flow in the Celtic Sea. The tidal velocity ellipses and the time series of the horizontal velocity components at given elevations above the bottom are well predicted through the water column although there are some deviations between the predicted and measured velocities near the bottom due to the uncertainty of the bottom roughness. For the combined tidal and wind driven flows the velocity profiles, turbulent kinetic energy profiles and surface particle trajectories are predicted for weak and strong winds. Furthermore, the bottom shear stress and the resulting bedload transport have been predicted; the parts of the particle trajectories in the close vicinity of the bottom where the bedload transport exists are displayed. Finally, the direction and magnitude of the surface drift, the depth-averaged mean velocity and the mean bedload transport are given, and the effect of the bottom roughness on the sea surface drift is investigated.

  20. Mathematical Analysis of Hall Effect on Transient Hartman Flow about a Rotating Horizontal Permeable Surface in a Porous Medium under Inclined Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, M.; Manglik, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the exact solution for unsteady flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past a impulsively started infinite horizontal surface which is rotating with an angular velocity embedded in a saturated porous medium under the influence of strong magnetic field with hall effect. Our study focuses on the change of direction of the external magnetic field on the flow system which leads to change in the flow behavior and skin frictional forces at the boundary. Systems of flow equations are solved using Laplace transform technique. The impacts of control parameters Hartman number, rotation of the system, hall effect, inclination of the magnetic field, and Darcy number on primary and secondary velocities are shown graphically, skin friction at horizontal boundary in tabular form. For validating our results, in the absence of permeability of the porous medium and inclination of the magnetic field the results are in good agreement with the published results.

  1. Thermodynamic understanding of Sn whisker growth on the Cu surface in Cu(top)-Sn(bottom) bilayer system upon room temperature aging

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lin; Jian, Wei; Lin, Bing; Wang, Jiangyong; Wen, Yuren; Gu, Lin

    2015-06-07

    Sn whiskers are observed by scanning electron microscope on the Cu surface in Cu(top)-Sn(bottom) bilayer system upon room temperature aging. Only Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} phase appears in the X-ray diffraction patterns and no Sn element is detected in the Cu sublayer by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Based on the interfacial thermodynamics, the intermetallic Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} compound phase may form directly at the Sn grain boundary. Driven by the stress gradient during the formation of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} compound at Sn grain boundaries, Sn atoms segregate onto the Cu surface and accumulate to form Sn whisker.

  2. Improvement of the free-surface tension model in shallow water basin by using in-situ bottom-friction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Roux, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wind stress on the free surface is the main driving force behind the circulation of the upper part of the ocean, which in hydrodynamic models are usually defined in terms of the coefficient of surface tension (Zhang et al., 2009, Davies et al., 2003). Moreover, wave motion impacts local currents and changes sea level, impacts the transport and the stratification of the entire water column. Influence of surface waves at the bottom currents is particularly pronounced in the shallow coastal systems. However, existing methods of parameterization of the surface tension have significant limits, especially in strong wind waves (Young et al., 2001, Jones et al., 2004) due to the difficulties of measuring the characteristics of surface waves in stormy conditions. Thus, the formula for calculating the coefficient of surface tension in our day is the actual problem in modeling fluid dynamics, particularly in the context of strong surface waves. In the hydrodynamic models usually a coefficient of surface tension is calculated once at the beginning of computation as a constant that depends on the averaged wind waves characteristic. Usually cases of strongly nonlinear wind waves are not taken into account, what significantly reduces the accuracy of the calculation of the flow structures and further calculation of the other processes in water basins, such as the spread of suspended matter and pollutants. Thus, wave motion influencing the pressure on the free surface and at the bottom must be considered in hydrodynamic models particularly in shallow coastal systems. A method of reconstruction of a free-surface drag coefficient based on the measured in-situ bottom pressure fluctuations is developed and applied in a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model MARS3D, developed by the French laboratory of IFREMER (IFREMER - French Research Institute for Marine Dynamics). MARS3D solves the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid in the Boussinesq approximation and with the

  3. Improvement of the free-surface tension model in shallow water basin by using in-situ bottom-friction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Roux, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wind stress on the free surface is the main driving force behind the circulation of the upper part of the ocean, which in hydrodynamic models are usually defined in terms of the coefficient of surface tension (Zhang et al., 2009, Davies et al., 2003). Moreover, wave motion impacts local currents and changes sea level, impacts the transport and the stratification of the entire water column. Influence of surface waves at the bottom currents is particularly pronounced in the shallow coastal systems. However, existing methods of parameterization of the surface tension have significant limits, especially in strong wind waves (Young et al., 2001, Jones et al., 2004) due to the difficulties of measuring the characteristics of surface waves in stormy conditions. Thus, the formula for calculating the coefficient of surface tension in our day is the actual problem in modeling fluid dynamics, particularly in the context of strong surface waves. In the hydrodynamic models usually a coefficient of surface tension is calculated once at the beginning of computation as a constant that depends on the averaged wind waves characteristic. Usually cases of strongly nonlinear wind waves are not taken into account, what significantly reduces the accuracy of the calculation of the flow structures and further calculation of the other processes in water basins, such as the spread of suspended matter and pollutants. Thus, wave motion influencing the pressure on the free surface and at the bottom must be considered in hydrodynamic models particularly in shallow coastal systems. A method of reconstruction of a free-surface drag coefficient based on the measured in-situ bottom pressure fluctuations is developed and applied in a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model MARS3D, developed by the French laboratory of IFREMER (IFREMER - French Research Institute for Marine Dynamics). MARS3D solves the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid in the Boussinesq approximation and with the

  4. Variability of the horizontal gradients of the air and the water surface temperatures in the vernal frontal zone period of Lake Ladoga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, M. A.; Guzivaty, V. V.; Karetnikov, S. G.

    2012-11-01

    Every year, the during springtime heating conditions, the seasonal thermal frontal zone appears in Lake Ladoga. It features high horizontal water temperature gradients. The coastal waters, stably stratified in density, interact with the waters of the open lake that are unstably stratified because of the free convection developing in the temperature range between 0°C and the maximum density of the water at 4°C. In Lake Ladoga, the advance of the vernal frontal zone lasts about 7-8 weeks from mid-May to the beginning of July. Both the water temperature and air temperature distributions over the water's surface show that large spatial temperature ranges exist in the vernal front reaching more than 11°C. We investigated the spatial horizontal gradients of the water's surface and the air temperature using a spatial grid with a resolution of 5 km. The surface water temperature and the air temperature gradients were compared with each other as well as with the temperatures in the region of varying depths. During the spring peak of the frontal activity in Lake Ladoga, most of the fronts feature mean temperatures greater than 4°C. This indicates that the thermal bar marks the offshore edge of the most extensive frontal zone.

  5. Mapping bedrock surface contours using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method near the middle quarter srea, Woodbury, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Craig J.; Voytek, Emily B.; Lane, Jr., John W.; Stone, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    The bedrock surface contours in Woodbury, Connecticut, were determined downgradient of a commercial zone known as the Middle Quarter area (MQA) using the novel, noninvasive horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratio (HVSR) passive seismic geophysical method. Boreholes and monitoring wells had been drilled in this area to characterize the shallow subsurface to within 20 feet (ft) of the land surface, but little was known about the deep subsurface, including sediment thicknesses and depths to bedrock (Starn and Brown, 2007; Brown and others, 2009). Improved information on the altitude of the bedrock surface and its spatial variation was needed for assessment and remediation of chlorinated solvents that have contaminated the overlying glacial aquifer that supplies water to wells in the area.

  6. Similarity solutions for buoyancy-induced flow of a power-law fluid over a horizontal surface immersed in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Chamkha, A.J.

    1997-10-01

    There has been considerable interest in studying natural or buoyancy-induced flows in fluid-saturated porous media adjacent to surfaces in recent years. This interest stems from numerous possible industrial and technological applications. Examples of some applications include geothermal reservoirs, drying of porous solids, heat exchanger design, petroleum production, filtration, chemical catalytic reactor, nuclear waste repositories, and geophysical flows. Here, continuum equations governing steady, laminar, buoyancy-induced flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid over a horizontal surface immersed in a uniform porosity and permeability porous medium are developed. These partial differential equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations by using a general similarity transformation for variable surface temperature and constant heat flux cases. The resulting equations are solved numerically by an implicit finite-difference method. Numerical results for typical velocity and temperature profiles are presented and discussed.

  7. Mechanisms for surface contamination of soils and bottom sediments in the Shagan River zone within former Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site.

    PubMed

    Aidarkhanov, A O; Lukashenko, S N; Lyakhova, O N; Subbotin, S B; Yakovenko, Yu Yu; Genova, S V; Aidarkhanova, A K

    2013-10-01

    The Shagan River is the only surface watercourse within the former Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS). Research in the valley of the Shagan River was carried out to study the possible migration of artificial radionuclides with surface waters over considerable distances, with the possibility these radionuclides may have entered the Irtysh River. The investigations revealed that radioactive contamination of soil was primarily caused by the first underground nuclear test with soil outburst conducted at the "Balapan" site in Borehole 1004. The surface nuclear tests carried out at the "Experimental Field" site and global fallout made insignificant contributions to contamination. The most polluted is the area in the immediate vicinity of the "Atomic" Lake crater. Contamination at the site is spatial. The total area of contamination is limited to 10-12 km from the crater piles. The ratio of plutonium isotopes was useful to determine the source of soil contamination. There was virtual absence of artificial radionuclide migration with surface waters, and possible cross-border transfer of radionuclides with the waters of Shagan and Irtysh rivers was not confirmed. PMID:23811126

  8. Quantum Hall effect on top and bottom surface states of topological insulator (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3 films.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, R; Tsukazaki, A; Kozuka, Y; Falson, J; Takahashi, K S; Checkelsky, J G; Nagaosa, N; Kawasaki, M; Tokura, Y

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional topological insulator is a novel state of matter characterized by two-dimensional metallic Dirac states on its surface. To verify the topological nature of the surface states, Bi-based chalcogenides such as Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3 and their combined/mixed compounds have been intensively studied. Here, we report the realization of the quantum Hall effect on the surface Dirac states in (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3 films. With electrostatic gate-tuning of the Fermi level in the bulk band gap under magnetic fields, the quantum Hall states with filling factor ±1 are resolved. Furthermore, the appearance of a quantum Hall plateau at filling factor zero reflects a pseudo-spin Hall insulator state when the Fermi level is tuned in between the energy levels of the non-degenerate top and bottom surface Dirac points. The observation of the quantum Hall effect in three-dimensional topological insulator films may pave a way toward topological insulator-based electronics. PMID:25868494

  9. Scattering of the Fundamental Shear Horizontal Mode by Part-Thickness Surface-Breaking Cracks in AN Isotropic Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2008-02-01

    The interaction of the fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) mode with cracks in isotropic plates in the context of array imaging using ultrasonic guided waves is a subject of continued interest to the authors. Previous work [1-3] in this regard has illuminated different aspects of the scattering of circular crested SH0 waves from through-cracks. In this paper, the relationship between the scattering from part- and through-thickness cracks is explored. First a framework for such a relationship is proposed, in which the scattering from part- and through-thickness cracks are related by a suitable correction factor. The limits of the model are then tested using results from FE simulations of the problem for different configurations.

  10. Removal of trace elements in three horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Kröpfelová, Lenka; Vymazal, Jan; Svehla, Jaroslav; Stíchová, Jana

    2009-04-01

    Between March 2006 and June 2008 removal of 34 trace elements was measured on a monthly basis at three horizontal-flow constructed wetlands in the Czech Republic designed to treat municipal wastewater. In general, the results indicated a very wide range of removal efficiencies among studied elements. The highest degree of removal (average of 90%) was found for aluminum. High average removal was also recorded for zinc (78%). Elements removed in the range of 50-75% were uranium, antimony, copper, lead, molybdenum, chromium, barium, iron and gallium. Removal of cadmium, tin, mercury, silver, selenium and nickel varied between 25 and 50%. Low retention (0-25%) was observed for vanadium, lithium, boron, cobalt and strontium. There were two elements (manganese and arsenic) for which average outflow concentrations were higher compared to inflow concentrations. Reduced manganese compounds are very soluble and therefore they are washed out under anaerobic conditions. PMID:19124182

  11. Resonant vibration of a droplet located on a superhydrophobic surface under the vertical and horizontal ac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiyama, Y.; Ohuchi, T.; Sugimoto, T.

    2015-10-01

    A water droplet under an ac electric field with resonant frequency changes drastically its shape repeating extension and shrinkage, alternatively. To develop an electrostatic mixing method of small amount of liquid, resonant vibrating motion of a water droplet was investigated. Both horizontal and vertical fields were applied to the droplet placed on a super-hydrophobic plate with a contact angle of 150 degrees. From the video images of the droplet, the degree of deformation of the droplet shape was evaluated by deformation rate. Under the two-directional electric field, the deformation ratio at shrinkage was increased significantly. The height of the droplet varies from 1.2 to 1.8 times larger than that of the original droplet during vibrating motion. Furthermore, the deformation rate at shrinkage varies with time periodically due to rotating motion of the droplet. The vertical electric field might be effective to cause the turbulent flow inside of the droplet.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of false bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizovtseva, Irina; Alexandrov, Dmitri; Ryashko, Lev

    2014-05-01

    Nansen from his observations in the Beaufort Sea published in 1897 noted that heat transfer from the fresh water to the arctic salt water is the only source of ice accretion during the polar summer. This transfer mechanism, unusual at first sight, is responsible for the initiation and evolution of a false bottom ice, changing ice properties to a great extent and affecting various processes while interacting with the ocean and the atmosphere. A false bottom represents a thin layer of ice which forms in summer underneath the floe where fresh water lies between the salt water and the ice. Details of how this process occurs in nature are now emerging from different laboratory and field experiments. The false bottoms appearing at the interface between the fresh and salt water as a result of double-diffusive convection normally lie below surface and under-ice melt ponds. Such false bottoms represent the only significant source of ice growth in the Arctic during the spring-summer period. Their evolution influences the mass balance of the Arctic sea-ice cover recognized as an indicator of climate change. However, the quantity, aerial extent and other properties of false bottoms are difficult to measure because coring under the surface melt ponds leads to direct mixing of surface and under-ice water. This explains why their aerial extent and overall volume is still not known despite the fact that the upper limit of the ice coverage by the false bottom is approximately half of the ice surface. The growth of false bottoms also leads to other important consequences for different physical, chemical and biological processes associated with their dynamics. This study addressed to a broad community of readers is concerned with non-linear behavior of false bottoms including their stochastic dynamics due to possible fluctuations of the main process parameters in the ocean and the atmosphere.

  13. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Glenn J.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  14. Calculation of zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi-Ping, Liu

    1990-01-01

    Impulse responses including near-field terms have been obtained in closed form for the zero-offset vertical seismic profiles generated by a horizontal point force acting on the surface of an elastic half-space. The method is based on the correspondence principle. Through transformation of variables, the Fourier transform of the elastic impulse response is put in a form such that the Fourier transform of the corresponding anelastic impulse response can be expressed as elementary functions and their definite integrals involving distance angular frequency, phase velocities, and attenuation factors. These results are used for accurate calculation of shear-wave arrival rise times of synthetic seismograms needed for data interpretation of anelastic-attenuation measurements in near-surface sediment. -Author

  15. Dissolver vessel bottom assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kilian, Douglas C.

    1976-01-01

    An improved bottom assembly is provided for a nuclear reactor fuel reprocessing dissolver vessel wherein fuel elements are dissolved as the initial step in recovering fissile material from spent fuel rods. A shock-absorbing crash plate with a convex upper surface is disposed at the bottom of the dissolver vessel so as to provide an annular space between the crash plate and the dissolver vessel wall. A sparging ring is disposed within the annular space to enable a fluid discharged from the sparging ring to agitate the solids which deposit on the bottom of the dissolver vessel and accumulate in the annular space. An inlet tangential to the annular space permits a fluid pumped into the annular space through the inlet to flush these solids from the dissolver vessel through tangential outlets oppositely facing the inlet. The sparging ring is protected against damage from the impact of fuel elements being charged to the dissolver vessel by making the crash plate of such a diameter that the width of the annular space between the crash plate and the vessel wall is less than the diameter of the fuel elements.

  16. Bottom pressure torque and the vorticity balance from observations in Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firing, Yvonne L.; Chereskin, Teresa K.; Watts, D. Randolph; Mazloff, Matthew R.

    2016-06-01

    The vorticity balance of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in Drake Passage is examined using 4 years of observations from current- and pressure-recording inverted echo sounders. The time-varying vorticity, planetary and relative vorticity advection, and bottom pressure torque are calculated in a two-dimensional array in the eddy-rich Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ). Bottom pressure torque is also estimated at sites across Drake Passage. Mean and eddy nonlinear relative vorticity advection terms dominate over linear advection in the local (50-km scale) vorticity budget in the PFZ, and are balanced to first order by the divergence of horizontal velocity. Most of this divergence comes from the ageostrophic gradient flow, which also provides a second-order adjustment to the geostrophic relative vorticity advection. Bottom pressure torque is approximately one-third the size of the local depth-integrated divergence. Although the cDrake velocity fields exhibit significant turning with depth throughout Drake Passage even in the mean, surface vorticity advection provides a reasonable representation of the depth-integrated vorticity balance. Observed near-bottom currents are strongly topographically steered, and bottom pressure torques grow large where strong near-bottom flows cross steep topography at small angles. Upslope flow over the northern continental slope dominates the bottom pressure torque in cDrake, and the mean across this Drake Passage transect, 3 to 4×10-9 m s-2, exceeds the mean wind stress curl by a factor of 15-20.

  17. Effect of adiabatic wall on the natural convection heat transfer from a wavy surface created by attached horizontal cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Harsini, I.; Ashjaee, M.

    2010-09-15

    The effect of a vertical adiabatic wall on the natural convection heat transfer from vertical array of attached cylinders, which can be considered as wavy surface, was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments were carried out using Mach-Zehnder interferometer and the commercial FLUENT code was used for numerical study. This paper focuses on the effect of wall-wavy surface spacing and Rayleigh number variation on the local and average free convection heat transfer coefficients from the each cylinder and the wavy surface. Rayleigh number ranges from 2400 to 10,000 and from 300,000 to 1,250,000 based on cylinder diameter and wavy surface height respectively. The local and average Nusselt numbers were determined for the different Rayleigh numbers, and the ratio of wall- wavy surface spacing to cylinder diameter 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, and {infinity}. Results are indicated with a single correlation which gives the average Nusselt number as a function of the ratio of the wall-wavy surface spacing to cylinder diameter and the Rayleigh numbers. There is an optimum distance between the wall and wavy surface in which the Nusselt number attain its maximum value. This optimum distance depends on the Rayleigh number. (author)

  18. Top-down and bottom-up identification of proteins by liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry of healthy and diseased human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Sarsby, Joscelyn; Martin, Nicholas J; Lalor, Patricia F; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J

    2014-11-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA MS) has the potential to become a useful tool in the spatially-resolved profiling of proteins in substrates. Here, the approach has been applied to the analysis of thin tissue sections from human liver. The aim was to determine whether LESA MS was a suitable approach for the detection of protein biomarkers of nonalcoholic liver disease (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), with a view to the eventual development of LESA MS for imaging NASH pathology. Two approaches were considered. In the first, endogenous proteins were extracted from liver tissue sections by LESA, subjected to automated trypsin digestion, and the resulting peptide mixture was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (bottom-up approach). In the second (top-down approach), endogenous proteins were extracted by LESA, and analyzed intact. Selected protein ions were subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) and/or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry. The bottom-up approach resulted in the identification of over 500 proteins; however identification of key protein biomarkers, liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1), and its variant (Thr→Ala, position 94), was unreliable and irreproducible. Top-down LESA MS analysis of healthy and diseased liver tissue revealed peaks corresponding to multiple (~15-25) proteins. MS/MS of four of these proteins identified them as FABP1, its variant, α-hemoglobin, and 10 kDa heat shock protein. The reliable identification of FABP1 and its variant by top-down LESA MS suggests that the approach may be suitable for imaging NASH pathology in sections from liver biopsies. PMID:25183224

  19. Top-Down and Bottom-Up Identification of Proteins by Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry of Healthy and Diseased Human Liver Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsby, Joscelyn; Martin, Nicholas J.; Lalor, Patricia F.; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2014-09-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA MS) has the potential to become a useful tool in the spatially-resolved profiling of proteins in substrates. Here, the approach has been applied to the analysis of thin tissue sections from human liver. The aim was to determine whether LESA MS was a suitable approach for the detection of protein biomarkers of nonalcoholic liver disease (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), with a view to the eventual development of LESA MS for imaging NASH pathology. Two approaches were considered. In the first, endogenous proteins were extracted from liver tissue sections by LESA, subjected to automated trypsin digestion, and the resulting peptide mixture was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (bottom-up approach). In the second (top-down approach), endogenous proteins were extracted by LESA, and analyzed intact. Selected protein ions were subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) and/or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry. The bottom-up approach resulted in the identification of over 500 proteins; however identification of key protein biomarkers, liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1), and its variant (Thr→Ala, position 94), was unreliable and irreproducible. Top-down LESA MS analysis of healthy and diseased liver tissue revealed peaks corresponding to multiple (~15-25) proteins. MS/MS of four of these proteins identified them as FABP1, its variant, α-hemoglobin, and 10 kDa heat shock protein. The reliable identification of FABP1 and its variant by top-down LESA MS suggests that the approach may be suitable for imaging NASH pathology in sections from liver biopsies.

  20. The Pressure Distribution over the Horizontal and Vertical Tail Surfaces of the F6C-4 Pursuit Airplane in Violent Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, R V

    1929-01-01

    This investigation of the pressure distribution on the tail surfaces of a pursuit airplane in violent maneuvers was conducted for the purpose of determining the maximum loads likely to be encountered on these surfaces in flight. The information is a part of that needed for a revision of existing loading specifications to bring these into closer agreement with the actual flight conditions. A standard F6C-4 airplane was used and the pressure distribution over the right horizontal and complete vertical tail surfaces was recorded throughout violent maneuvers. The results show that the existing loading specifications do not conform satisfactorily to the loadings existent in critical conditions, and in some cases were exceeded by the loads obtained. An acceleration of 10.5 G. Was recorded in one maneuver in which the pilot suffered severely; it is therefore indicated that the limits of the physical resistance of the pilot to violent maneuvers are being approached. Navy specifications for the structural design of tail surfaces are included as an appendix. (author)

  1. Effect of heat generation on free convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder with constant surface heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Kasim, Abdul Rahman; Mohammad, Nurul Farahain; Shafie, Sharidan

    2012-05-01

    Effect of heat generation on free convection boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic fluid past a horizontal circular cylinder with constant surface heat flux has been investigated. The boundary layer equations are an order higher than those for the Newtonian (viscous) fluid and the adherence boundary conditions are insufficient to determine the solution of these equations completely. The governing equations are transformed into dimensionless non-similar equations by using a set of suitable transformations and solved numerically by the finite difference method along with Newton's linearization approximation. Computations are performed numerically by using Keller-box method by augmenting an extra boundary condition at infinity. We have focused our attention on the evaluation of velocity profiles, temperature profiles, shear stress in terms of local skin friction and the rate of heat transfer in terms of local Nusselt number for different values of heat generation parameter, viscoelastic parameter and the Prandlt number and the numerical results have been shown graphically.

  2. Analysis of the horizontal two-dimensional near-surface structure of a winter tornadic vortex using high-resolution in situ wind and pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ryohei; Kusunoki, Kenichi; Sato, Eiichi; Mashiko, Wataru; Inoue, Hanako Y.; Fujiwara, Chusei; Arai, Ken-ichiro; Nishihashi, Masahide; Saito, Sadao; Hayashi, Syugo; Suzuki, Hiroto

    2015-06-01

    The horizontal two-dimensional near-surface structure of a tornadic vortex within a winter storm was analyzed. The tornadic vortex was observed on 10 December 2012 by the high-resolution in situ observational linear array of wind and pressure sensors (LAWPS) system in conjunction with a high-resolution Doppler radar. The 0.1 s maximum wind speed and pressure deficit near the ground were recorded as 35.3 m s-1 and -3.8 hPa, respectively. The horizontal two-dimensional distributions of the tornadic vortex wind and pressure were retrieved by the LAWPS data, which provided unprecedented observational detail on the following important features of the near-surface structure of the tornadic vortex. Asymmetric convergent inflow toward the vortex center existed. Total wind speed was strong to the right and rear side of the translational direction of the vortex and weak in the forward part of the vortex possibly because of the strong convergent inflow in that region. The tangential wind speed profile of the vortex was better approximated using a modified Rankine vortex rather than the Rankine vortex both at 5 m above ground level (agl) and 100 m agl, and other vortex models (Burgers-Rott vortex and Wood-White vortex) were also compared. The cyclostrophic wind balance was violated in the core radius R0 and outside the core radius in the forward sector; however, it was held with a relatively high accuracy of approximately 14% outside the core of the vortex in the rearward sector (from 2 R0 to 5 R0) near the ground.

  3. Experiments on the Flow of a Thin Liquid Film Over a Horizontal Stationary and Rotating Disk Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozar, B.; Cetegen, B. M.; Faghri, A.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments on characterization of thin liquid films flowing over stationary and rotating disk surfaces are described. The thin liquid film was created by introducing deionized water from a flow collar at the center of an aluminum disk with a known initial film thickness and uniform radial velocity. Radial film thickness distribution was measured using a non-intrusive laser light interface reflection technique that enabled the measurement of the instantaneous film thickness over a finite segment of the disk. Experiments were performed for a range of flow rates between 3.01pm and 15.01pm, corresponding to Reynolds numbers based on the liquid inlet gap height and velocity between 238 and 1,188. The angular speed of the disk was varied from 0 rpm to 300 rpm. When the disk was stationary, a circular hydraulic jump was present in the liquid film. The liquid-film thickness in the subcritical region (down-stream of the hydraulic jump) was an order of magnitude greater than that in the supercritical region (upstream of the hydraulic jump) which was of the order of 0.3 mm. As the Reynolds number increased, the hydraulic jump migrated toward the edge of the disk. In the case of rotation, the liquid-film thickness exhibited a maximum on the disk surface. The liquid-film inertia and friction influenced the inner region where the film thickness progressively increased. The outer region where the film thickness decreased was primarily affected by the centrifugal forces. A flow visualization study of the thin film was also performed to determine the characteristics of the waves on the free surface. At high rotational speeds, spiral waves were observed on the liquid film. It was also determined that the angle of the waves which form on the liquid surface was a function of the ratio of local radial to tangential velocity.

  4. Numerical Calculation of Anelastic Seismic Pulse Propagation in a Hysteretic Elastic Material Along a Horizontal Surface Boundary of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosik, Dan

    2009-11-01

    The stress-strain relation for materials such as soil and sand exhibit hysteretic elastic behavior and are modeled using the Preisach-Mayergoyz method for a numerical calculation of a propagating seismic pulse. The source pulse is taken to be the result of pressure applied to the inner surface of a cylindrical cavity in order to simulate a two dimensional dynamite source. The anelastic differential equation of motion that is solved does not include traditional nonlinear elasticity terms appropriate to materials with atomic elasticity, but contains the dominant anelastic terms appropriate to consolidated materials that exhibit hysteretic elastic behavior. For parameters characteristic of sand at the Earth's surface, a comparison of anelastic to linear seismic pulse propagation gives an anelastic pulse with much slower propagation speed than a corresponding linear pulse with evidence of dispersion in the pulse. The simulated ground roll that results shows dramatic differences between the anelastic and linear cases. These results have important implications for the detailed behavior of strong seismic waves moving in soft sediments. Their dominant frequencies, amplitudes, and methods by which they may be attenuated will depend on getting the detailed pulse structure and its propagation correct.

  5. Horizontal drilling improves recovery in Abu Dhabi

    SciTech Connect

    Muhairy, A.A. ); Farid, E.A. )

    1993-09-13

    Both onshore and offshore Abu Dhabi, horizontal wells have increased productivity three to four times more than that from vertical and deviated wells in the same reservoirs. Horizontal drilling technology was first applied in Abu Dhabi in February 1988, and through March 1993, 48 wells have been horizontally drilled. During the 5 years of horizontal drilling, the experience gained by both operating company and service company personnel has contributed to a substantial improvement in drilling rate, and hence, a reduction in drilling costs. The improvements in drilling and completions resulted from the following: The horizontal drilling and completion operations were analyzed daily, and these follow-up analyses helped optimize the planning of subsequent wells. The bits and bottom hole assemblies were continuously analyzed for optimum selections. Steerable drilling assemblies were found very effective in the upper sections of the wells. The paper describes drilling activities onshore and offshore, completion design, and the outlook for future well drilling.

  6. Fermi-Surface Topological Phase Transition and Horizontal Order-Parameter Nodes in CaFe2As2 Under Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, R. S.; Daghero, D.; Tortello, M.; Ummarino, G. A.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Reuvekamp, P. G.; Kremer, R. K.; Profeta, G.; Suzuki, K.; Kuroki, K.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-based compounds (IBS) display a surprising variety of superconducting properties that seems to arise from the strong sensitivity of these systems to tiny details of the lattice structure. In this respect, systems that become superconducting under pressure, like CaFe2As2, are of particular interest. Here we report on the first directional point-contact Andreev-reflection spectroscopy (PCARS) measurements on CaFe2As2 crystals under quasi-hydrostatic pressure, and on the interpretation of the results using a 3D model for Andreev reflection combined with ab-initio calculations of the Fermi surface (within the density functional theory) and of the order parameter symmetry (within a random-phase-approximation approach in a ten-orbital model). The almost perfect agreement between PCARS results at different pressures and theoretical predictions highlights the intimate connection between the changes in the lattice structure, a topological transition in the holelike Fermi surface sheet, and the emergence on the same sheet of an order parameter with a horizontal node line. PMID:27216477

  7. Fermi-Surface Topological Phase Transition and Horizontal Order-Parameter Nodes in CaFe2As2 Under Pressure.

    PubMed

    Gonnelli, R S; Daghero, D; Tortello, M; Ummarino, G A; Bukowski, Z; Karpinski, J; Reuvekamp, P G; Kremer, R K; Profeta, G; Suzuki, K; Kuroki, K

    2016-01-01

    Iron-based compounds (IBS) display a surprising variety of superconducting properties that seems to arise from the strong sensitivity of these systems to tiny details of the lattice structure. In this respect, systems that become superconducting under pressure, like CaFe2As2, are of particular interest. Here we report on the first directional point-contact Andreev-reflection spectroscopy (PCARS) measurements on CaFe2As2 crystals under quasi-hydrostatic pressure, and on the interpretation of the results using a 3D model for Andreev reflection combined with ab-initio calculations of the Fermi surface (within the density functional theory) and of the order parameter symmetry (within a random-phase-approximation approach in a ten-orbital model). The almost perfect agreement between PCARS results at different pressures and theoretical predictions highlights the intimate connection between the changes in the lattice structure, a topological transition in the holelike Fermi surface sheet, and the emergence on the same sheet of an order parameter with a horizontal node line. PMID:27216477

  8. Fermi-Surface Topological Phase Transition and Horizontal Order-Parameter Nodes in CaFe2As2 Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnelli, R. S.; Daghero, D.; Tortello, M.; Ummarino, G. A.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Reuvekamp, P. G.; Kremer, R. K.; Profeta, G.; Suzuki, K.; Kuroki, K.

    2016-05-01

    Iron-based compounds (IBS) display a surprising variety of superconducting properties that seems to arise from the strong sensitivity of these systems to tiny details of the lattice structure. In this respect, systems that become superconducting under pressure, like CaFe2As2, are of particular interest. Here we report on the first directional point-contact Andreev-reflection spectroscopy (PCARS) measurements on CaFe2As2 crystals under quasi-hydrostatic pressure, and on the interpretation of the results using a 3D model for Andreev reflection combined with ab-initio calculations of the Fermi surface (within the density functional theory) and of the order parameter symmetry (within a random-phase-approximation approach in a ten-orbital model). The almost perfect agreement between PCARS results at different pressures and theoretical predictions highlights the intimate connection between the changes in the lattice structure, a topological transition in the holelike Fermi surface sheet, and the emergence on the same sheet of an order parameter with a horizontal node line.

  9. Roles of land surface albedo and horizontal resolution on the Indian summer monsoon biases in a coupled ocean-atmosphere tropical-channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, Guillaume; Masson, Sébastien; Durand, Fabien; Terray, Pascal; Berthet, Sarah; Jullien, Swen

    2016-05-01

    The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) simulated over the 1989-2009 period with a new 0.75° ocean-atmosphere coupled tropical-channel model extending from 45°S to 45°N is presented. The model biases are comparable to those commonly found in coupled global climate models (CGCMs): the Findlater jet is too weak, precipitations are underestimated over India while they are overestimated over the southwestern Indian Ocean, South-East Asia and the Maritime Continent. The ISM onset is delayed by several weeks, an error which is also very common in current CGCMs. We show that land surface temperature errors are a major source of the ISM low-level circulation and rainfall biases in our model: a cold bias over the Middle-East (ME) region weakens the Findlater jet while a warm bias over India strengthens the monsoon circulation over the southern Bay of Bengal. A surface radiative heat budget analysis reveals that the cold bias is due to an overestimated albedo in this desertic ME region. Two new simulations using a satellite-observed land albedo show a significant and robust improvement in terms of ISM circulation and precipitation. Furthermore, the ISM onset is shifted back by 1 month and becomes in phase with observations. Finally, a supplementary set of simulations at 0.25°-resolution confirms the robustness of our results and shows an additional reduction of the warm and dry bias over India. These findings highlight the strong sensitivity of the simulated ISM rainfall and its onset timing to the surface land heating pattern and amplitude, especially in the ME region. It also illustrates the key-role of land surface processes and horizontal resolution for improving the ISM representation, and more generally the monsoons, in current CGCMs.

  10. Bottom profiling by correlating beam-steered noise sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Chris H; Siderius, Martin

    2008-03-01

    It has already been established that by cross-correlating ambient noise time series received on the upward and downward steered beams of a drifting vertical array one can obtain a subbottom layer profile. Strictly, the time differential of the cross correlation is the impulse response of the seabed. Here it is shown theoretically and by simulation that completely uncorrelated surface noise results in a layer profile with predictable amplitudes proportional to those of an equivalent echo sounder at the same depth as the array. The phenomenon is simulated by representing the sound sources as multiple random time sequences emitted from random locations in a horizontal plane above a vertical array and then accounting for the travel times of the direct and bottom reflected paths. A well-defined correlation spike is seen at the depth corresponding to the bottom reflection despite the fact that the sound sources contain no structure whatsoever. The effects of using simultaneously steered upward and downward conical beams with a tilted or faceted seabed and multiple layers are also investigated by simulation. Experimental profiles are obtained using two different vertical arrays in smooth and rough bottom sites in the Mediterranean. Correlation peak amplitudes follow the theory and simulations closely. PMID:18345817

  11. Trends in Arctic Ocean bottom pressure, sea surface height and freshwater content using GRACE and the ice-ocean model PIOMAS from 2008-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Morison, James; Zhang, Jinlun; Bonin, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    The variability of ocean bottom pressure (OBP) in the Arctic is dominated by the variations in sea surface height (SSH) from daily to monthly timescales. Conversely, OBP variability is dominated by the changes in the steric pressure (StP) at inter-annual timescales, particularly off the continental shelves. The combination of GRACE-derived ocean bottom pressure and ICESat altimetry-derived sea surface height variations in the Arctic Ocean have provided new means of identifying inter-annual trends in StP (StP = OBP-SSH) and associated freshwater content (FWC) of the Arctic region (Morison et al., 2012). Morison et al. (2012) showed that from 2004 to 2008, the FWC increased in the Beaufort Gyre and decreased in the Siberian and Central Arctic, resulting in a relatively small net basin-averaged FWC change. In this work, we investigate the inter-annual trends from 2008 to 2012 in OBP from GRACE, SSH from the state-of-the-art pan-Arctic ocean model PIOMAS -validated with tide and pressure gauges in the Arctic-, and compute the trends in StP and FWC from 2008-2012. We compare these results with the previous trends from 2005-2008 described in Morison et al. (2012). Our initial findings suggest increased salinity in the entire Arctic basin (relative to the climatological seasonal variation) from 2008-2012, compared to the preceding four years (2005-2008). We also find that the trends in OBP, SSH and StP from 2008-2012 present a different behavior during the spring-summer and fall-winter, unlike 2005-2008, in which the trends were generally consistent through all months of the year. It seems since 2009, when the Beaufort Gyre relaxed and the export of freshwater from the Canada Basin into the Canadian Archipelago and Fram Strait, via the Lincoln Sea, was anomalously large (de Steur et al., 2013), the Arctic Ocean has entered a new circulation regime. The causes of such changes in the inter-annual trends of OBP, SSH and StP -hence FWC-, associated with the changes in the

  12. Special linear design improves dual lateral horizontal well

    SciTech Connect

    Talk, G. ); Wooten, S. ); Lewis, D. ); Talbot, T. )

    1992-08-31

    This paper reports that the use of multiple horizontal sections from a single vertical well bore has increased well potential and improved the economics of producing the Austin chalk. The vertically fractured Austin chalk formation in central Texas is difficult to drill from both technical and economic perspectives. Torch Energy Advisers Inc. recently completed a unique northwest-southeast dual opposing lateral horizontal well, the Basden No. 1-H, in the Austin chalk in Fayette County, Tex. The Basden No. 1-H well plan had to overcome some of the drilling challenges inherent in the vertically fractured Austin chalk in the Fayette County area of the Giddings field, including the following: High bottom hole pressures; Strong kicks that could deliver large volumes of oil and gas to the surface; Harsh drilling fluids (CaCl{sub 2}); High temperatures (270-280{degrees} bottom hole circulating temperature); Major faults with large geological throws; and Minimal distance between the base of the ash and top of the Eagleford shale.

  13. Effect of Tail Dihedral on Lateral Control Effectiveness at High Subsonic Speeds of Differentially Deflected Horizontal-Tail Surfaces on a Configuration having a Thin Highly Tapered Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Paul G.

    1959-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the effect of tail dihedral on lateral control effectiveness of a complete-model configuration having differentially deflected horizontal-tail surfaces. Limited tests were made to determine the lateral characteristics as well as the longitudinal characteristics in sideslip. The wing had an aspect ratio of 3, a taper ratio of 0.14, 28.80 deg sweep of the quarter-chord line with zero sweep at the 80-percent-chord line, and NACA 65A004 airfoil sections. The test Mach number range extended from 0.60 to 0.92. There are only small variations in the roll effectiveness parameter C(sub iota delta) with negative tail dihedral angle. The tail size used on the test model, however, is perhaps inadequate for providing the roll rates specified by current military requirements at subsonic speeds. The lateral aerodynamic characteristics were essentially constant throughout the range of sideslip angle from 12 deg to -12 deg. A general increase in yawing moment was noted with increased negative dihedral throughout the Mach number range.

  14. Application of divided convective-dispersive transport model to simulate conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    We have created a divided convective-dispersive transport (D-CDT) model that can be used to provide an accurate simulation of conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C). This model makes a fitted response curve from the sum of two independent CDT curves, which show the contributions of the main and side streams. The analytical solutions of both CDT curves are inverse Gaussian distribution functions. We used Fréchet distribution to provide a fast optimization mathematical procedure. As a result of our detailed analysis, we concluded that the most important role in the fast upward part of the tracer response curve is played by the main stream, with high porous velocity and dispersion. This gives the first inverse Gaussian distribution function. The side stream shows slower transport processes in the micro-porous system, and this shows the impact of back-mixing and dead zones, too. The significance of this new model is that it can simulate transport processes in this kind of systems more accurately than the conventionally used convective-dispersive transport (CDT) model. The calculated velocity and dispersion coefficients with the D-CDT model gave differences of 24-54% (of velocity) and 22-308% (of dispersion coeff.) from the conventional CDT model, and were closer to actual hydraulic behaviour. PMID:26178828

  15. Examining marginal sequence similarities between bacterial type III secretion system components and Trypanosoma cruzi surface proteins: horizontal gene transfer or convergent evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Danielle C. F.; Silva, Richard C.; Ferreira, Renata C.; Briones, Marcelo R. S.

    2013-01-01

    The cell invasion mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi has similarities with some intracellular bacterial taxa especially regarding calcium mobilization. This mechanism is not observed in other trypanosomatids, suggesting that the molecules involved in this type of cell invasion were a product of (1) acquisition by horizontal gene transfer (HGT); (2) secondary loss in the other trypanosomatid lineages of the mechanism inherited since the bifurcation Bacteria-Neomura (1.9 billion to 900 million years ago); or (3) de novo evolution from non-homologous proteins via convergent evolution. Similar to T. cruzi, several bacterial genera require increased host cell cytosolic calcium for intracellular invasion. Among intracellular bacteria, the mechanism of host cell invasion of genus Salmonella is the most similar to T. cruzi. The invasion of Salmonella occurs by contact with the host's cell surface and is mediated by the type III secretion system (T3SS) that promotes the contact-dependent translocation of effector proteins directly into host's cell cytoplasm. Here we provide evidence of distant sequence similarities and structurally conserved domains between T. cruzi and Salmonella spp T3SS proteins. Exhaustive database searches were directed to a wide range of intracellular bacteria and trypanosomatids, exploring sequence patterns for comparison of structural similarities and Bayesian phylogenies. Based on our data we hypothesize that T. cruzi acquired genes for calcium mobilization mediated invasion by ancient HGT from ancestral Salmonella lineages. PMID:23967008

  16. AERO2S - SUBSONIC AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WINGS WITH LEADING- AND TRAILING-EDGE FLAPS IN COMBINATION WITH CANARD OR HORIZONTAL TAIL SURFACES (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1994-01-01

    This code was developed to aid design engineers in the selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing-canard and wing-horizontal-tail configurations that may employ simple hinged-flap systems. Rapid estimates of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting surface arrangements are provided. The method is particularly well suited to configurations which, because of high speed flight requirements, must employ thin wings with highly swept leading edges. The code is applicable to wings with either sharp or rounded leading edges. The code provides theoretical pressure distributions over the wing, the canard or horizontal tail, and the deflected flap surfaces as well as estimates of the wing lift, drag, and pitching moments which account for attainable leading edge thrust and leading edge separation vortex forces. The wing planform information is specified by a series of leading edge and trailing edge breakpoints for a right hand wing panel. Up to 21 pairs of coordinates may be used to describe both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The code has been written to accommodate 2000 right hand panel elements, but can easily be modified to accommodate a larger or smaller number of elements depending on the capacity of the target computer platform. The code provides solutions for wing surfaces composed of all possible combinations of leading edge and trailing edge flap settings provided by the original deflection multipliers and by the flap deflection multipliers. Up to 25 pairs of leading edge and trailing edge flap deflection schedules may thus be treated simultaneously. The code also provides for an improved accounting of hinge-line singularities in determination of wing forces and moments. To determine lifting surface perturbation velocity distributions, the code provides for a maximum of 70 iterations. The program is constructed so that successive runs may be made with a given code entry. To make additional runs, it is

  17. AERO2S - SUBSONIC AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WINGS WITH LEADING- AND TRAILING-EDGE FLAPS IN COMBINATION WITH CANARD OR HORIZONTAL TAIL SURFACES (CDC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    This code was developed to aid design engineers in the selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing-canard and wing-horizontal-tail configurations that may employ simple hinged-flap systems. Rapid estimates of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting surface arrangements are provided. The method is particularly well suited to configurations which, because of high speed flight requirements, must employ thin wings with highly swept leading edges. The code is applicable to wings with either sharp or rounded leading edges. The code provides theoretical pressure distributions over the wing, the canard or horizontal tail, and the deflected flap surfaces as well as estimates of the wing lift, drag, and pitching moments which account for attainable leading edge thrust and leading edge separation vortex forces. The wing planform information is specified by a series of leading edge and trailing edge breakpoints for a right hand wing panel. Up to 21 pairs of coordinates may be used to describe both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The code has been written to accommodate 2000 right hand panel elements, but can easily be modified to accommodate a larger or smaller number of elements depending on the capacity of the target computer platform. The code provides solutions for wing surfaces composed of all possible combinations of leading edge and trailing edge flap settings provided by the original deflection multipliers and by the flap deflection multipliers. Up to 25 pairs of leading edge and trailing edge flap deflection schedules may thus be treated simultaneously. The code also provides for an improved accounting of hinge-line singularities in determination of wing forces and moments. To determine lifting surface perturbation velocity distributions, the code provides for a maximum of 70 iterations. The program is constructed so that successive runs may be made with a given code entry. To make additional runs, it is

  18. Muscle spindle responses to horizontal support surface perturbation in the anesthetized cat: insights into the role of autogenic feedback in whole body postural control.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Nardelli, Paul; Cope, Timothy C; Nichols, T Richard

    2012-09-01

    Intact cats and humans respond to support surface perturbations with broadly tuned, directionally sensitive muscle activation. These muscle responses are further sensitive to initial stance widths (distance between feet) and perturbation velocity. The sensory origins driving these responses are not known, and conflicting hypotheses are prevalent in the literature. We hypothesize that the direction-, stance-width-, and velocity-sensitive muscle response during support surface perturbations is driven largely by rapid autogenic proprioceptive pathways. The primary objective of this study was to obtain direct evidence for our hypothesis by establishing that muscle spindle receptors in the intact limb can provide appropriate information to drive the muscle response to whole body postural perturbations. Our second objective was to determine if spindle recordings from the intact limb generate the heightened sensitivity to small perturbations that has been reported in isolated muscle experiments. Maintenance of this heightened sensitivity would indicate that muscle spindles are highly proficient at detecting even small disturbances, suggesting they can provide efficient feedback about changing postural conditions. We performed intraaxonal recordings from muscle spindles in anesthetized cats during horizontal, hindlimb perturbations. We indeed found that muscle spindle afferents in the intact limb generate broadly tuned but directionally sensitive activation patterns. These afferents were also sensitive to initial stance widths and perturbation velocities. Finally, we found that afferents in the intact limb have heightened sensitivity to small perturbations. We conclude that muscle spindle afferents provide an array of important information about biomechanics and perturbation characteristics highlighting their potential importance in generating appropriate muscular response during a postural disturbance. PMID:22673334

  19. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  20. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome is described. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending therethrough. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending therethrough, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending therethrough, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore therethrough, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening.

  1. Infragravity waves and horizontal seafloor compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Adrian K.; Laske, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    We report the first consistent observation of horizontal seafloor compliance induced by infragravity (IG) waves. Long-period IG ocean waves manifest themselves as broad, dominant features in ocean bottom pressure and vertical deformation spectra, but signals are rarely (if ever) identified on the horizontal components of traditional ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) due to low signal level and high current-induced tilt noise at long periods. We examine two OBS stations with shallow-buried seismometers: the Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband site offshore California and the Ocean Seismic Network (OSN) pilot site OSN1B near Hawaii. We use nearby weather buoys to investigate the relationship between the presence of infragravity waves and environmental conditions. We find strong evidence that infragravity wave generation is primarily confined to the near-coastal environment. Additional IG source information is found by examining the directionality of passing IG waves as a function of frequency, which we analyze using the coherence between pressure and the two horizontal components. Finally, we evaluate the implications for a joint vertical and horizontal compliance inversion.

  2. Experimental Determination of the Effect of Horizontal-Tail Size, Tail Length, and Vertical Location on Low-Speed Static Longitudinal Stability and Damping Pitch of a Model Having 45 Degree Sweptback Wing and Tail Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, Jacob H

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted in the Langley stability tunnel to determine the effects of horizontal tails of various sizes and at various tail lengths (when loaded on the fuselage center line) and also the effects of vertical location of the horizontal tail relative to the wing on the low-speed static longitudinal stability and on the steady-state rotary damping in pitch for a complete-model configuration. The wing and tail surfaces had the quarter-chord lines swept back 45 degrees and had aspect ratios of 4. The results of the investigation showed that, in agreement with analytical considerations, the contribution of the horizontal tail to static longitudinal stability was related directly to the tail size and length; whereas, its contribution to damping in pitch was related directly to tail size and the square of tail length.

  3. 50 kHz bottom backscattering measurements from two types of artificially roughened sandy bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Su-Uk; Cho, Sungho; Choi, Jee Woong

    2016-07-01

    Laboratory measurements of 50 kHz bottom backscattering strengths as a function of grazing angle were performed on the sandy bottom of a water tank; two types of bottom roughnesses, a relatively smooth interface and a rough interface, were created on the bottom surface. The roughness profiles of the two interface types were measured directly using an ultrasound arrival time difference of 5 MHz and then were Fourier transformed to obtain the roughness power spectra. The measured backscattering strengths increased from ‑29 to 0 dB with increasing grazing angle from 35 to 86°, which were compared to theoretical backscattering model predictions. The comparison results implied that bottom roughness is a key factor in accurately predicting bottom scattering for a sandy bottom.

  4. Horizontal drilling technology advances

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-04

    Horizontal drilling technology is making further advances in the Texas Austin chalk play as such drilling continues to spread in many U.S. land areas. One company has completed a Cretaceous Austin chalk oil well with the longest horizontal well bore in Texas and what at 1 1/6 miles is believed to be the world's longest medium radius horizontal displacement.

  5. A rapid method to derive horizontal distributions of trace gases and aerosols near the surface using multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Li, A.; Xie, P. H.; Wagner, T.; Chen, H.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, J. G.

    2014-06-01

    We apply a novel experimental procedure for the rapid measurement of the average volume mixing ratios (VMRs) and horizontal distributions of trace gases such as NO2, SO2, and HCHO in the boundary layer, which was recently suggested by Sinreich et al. (2013). The method is based on two-dimensional scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). It makes use of two facts (Sinreich et al., 2013): first, the light path for observations at 1° elevation angle traverses mainly air masses located close to the ground (typically < 200 m); second, the light path length can be calculated using the simultaneous measured absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. Thus, the average value of the trace gas VMR in the atmospheric layer between the surface and the particular altitude, for which this observation was sensitive, can be calculated. Compared to the originally proposed method, we introduce several important modifications and improvements: We apply the method only to measurements at 1° elevation angle (besides zenith view), for which the uncertainties of the retrieved values of the VMRs and surface extinctions are especially small. Using only 1° elevation angle for off-axis observation also allows an increased temporal resolution. We determine (and apply) correction factors (and their uncertainties) directly as function of the measured O4 absorption. Finally, the method is extended to trace gases analysed at other wavelengths and also to the retrieval of aerosol extinction. Depending on atmospheric visibility, the typical uncertainty of the results ranges from about 20% to 30%. We apply the rapid method to observations of a newly-developed ground-based multifunctional passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (GM-DOAS) instrument in the north-west outskirts near Hefei in China. We report NO2, SO2, and HCHO VMRs and aerosol extinction for four azimuth angles and compare these results with those from simultaneous long-path DOAS observations

  6. Characteristics of the near-bottom suspended sediment field over the continental shelf off northern California based on optical attenuation measurements during STRESS and SMILE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trowbridge, J.H.; Butman, B.; Limeburner, R.

    1994-01-01

    Time-series measurements of current velocity, optical attenuation and surface wave intensity obtained during the Sediment Transport Events on Shelves and Slopes (STRESS) experiments, combined with shipboard measurements of conductivity, temperature and optical attenuation obtained during the Shelf Mixed Layer Experiment (SMILE), provide a description of the sediment concentration field over the central and outer shelf off northern California. The questions addressed are: (1) existence and characteristics of bottom nepheloid layers and their relationship to bottom mixed layers; (2) characteristics of temporal fluctuations in sediment concentration and their relationship to waves and currents; (3) spatial scales over which suspended sediment concentrations vary horizontally; and (4) vertical distribution of suspended sediment. ?? 1994.

  7. Horizontal drilling developments

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.

    1997-05-01

    The advantages of horizontal drilling are discussed. Use of horizontal drilling has climbed in the past half decade as technology and familiarity offset higher costs with higher production rates and greater recoveries from new and existing wells. In essence, all types of horizontal wells expose a larger section of the reservoir to the wellbore with a resulting increase in flow rates. (A horizontal well may also be drilled to provide coning control or to intersect vertical fractures.) Thus, drilling horizontally, both onshore and offshore, reduces the number of wells necessary to develop a field.

  8. Performance study on primary gas coolers with horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, E.L.; Lekhter, V.I.; Gostev, Yu.A.

    1992-12-31

    No. 1-bis coke-oven battery system at the Mariupol C&CW was equipped with primary gas coolers of horizontal-tube type. They consisted of three sections, with working surface areas in m{sup 2} of: I (bottom) 800 (middle) 800 and III (top) 600 respectively. The nominal water flow rate through each cooler was 600-720 m. The coolers were constantly irrigated with tar/water emulsions to remove scale deposits in the inter-tube space. The circulating water from the primary gas coolers is cooled in a e-section cooling tower (type 2VG) equipped with spray nozzles designed by the Dnepropetrovsk Chemical Technology Institute (nominal water throughput 3000 m{sup 3}/h). 1 tab.

  9. Brine network structural metamorphosis and sea ice bottom layer permeability change induced by sea water penetration under a surface pressure field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Sea ice presents two roughness scales: one in the millimetre range and the other up to several meters due to ridging. The larger roughness elements are the result of compression and sheer, causing ice blocks to pile up and down at the line of contact between converging ice floes. In terms of boundary limit dynamic, they create obstacles that induce, in their wake, a pressure gradient at the ice water interface. Sea ice is a porous medium and as such, is permeable when subject to pressure gradients. Models have shown that, at spring, when ice permeability increases, sea water can be forced through the ice water interface into the bottom ice layer while brine is pumped out of it under obstacle induced pressure gradients. These results suggest that ice ocean heat budgets have to include a porous flow component and its associated latent heat import/export caused by through volume melting/thawing inside the bottom ice layer subject to sea water infiltration. With the initiation of a melt/thaw dynamic within the porous bottom ice layer, the porous network restructures. Our research show an enlargement of the larger brine channels while smaller ones close due ice growth. Similarly, ice volume of smaller cross size tend to disappear while larger ones evolve slowly. As heat fluxes due to latent heat exchanges become several orders of magnitude larger than any other exterior forcing, such as radiation, heat budgets within ice individual volumes balance fluxes in and out caused by melting/thaw on channel walls. Our simulations were run from an early spring C shape temperature profile to an isothermal state showing that structural change becomes significant only after the temperature profile becomes positive upward.

  10. Influence of anthropogenic inputs and a high-magnitude flood event on metal contamination pattern in surface bottom sediments from the Deba River urban catchment.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Santos, Miren; Probst, Anne; García-García, Jon; Ruiz-Romera, Estilita

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of anthropogenic factors (infrastructure construction and industrial and wastewater inputs) and hydrological factors (high-magnitude flood events) on metal and organic contamination and on the source variability of sediments taken from the Deba River and its tributaries. The pollution status was evaluated using a sequential extraction procedure (BCR 701), enrichment factor, individual and global contamination factors and a number of statistical analysis methods. Zn, Cu and Cr were found to have significant input from anthropogenic sources, with moderately severe enrichment, together with an extremely high potential risk of contamination. The principal scavenger of Cu and Cr was organic matter, whereas Zn was uniformly distributed among all non-residual fractions. For Fe, the anthropogenic contribution was more obviously detected in bulk sediments (<2 mm) than in fine fractions (<63 μm). Finally, the recent construction of a rail tunnel traversing Wealden Facies evaporites, together with intense rainfalls, was the main reason for the change in the source variability of bottom sediments and metal distribution in headwaters. The occurrence of a high-magnitude flood event resulted in a washout of the river bed and led to a general decrease in fine-grained sediment and metal concentrations in labile fractions of channel-bottom sediments, and a consequent downstream transfer of the pollution. PMID:25647464

  11. Ground-water, surface-water, and bottom-sediment contamination in the O-field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and the possible effects of selected remedial actions on ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Oliveros, James P.

    1995-01-01

    Disposal of munitions and chemical-warfare substances has introduced inorganic and organic contaminants to the ground water, surface water, and bottom sediment at O-Field, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contaminants include chloride, arsenic, transition metals, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, and organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds. The hydrologic effects of several remedial actions were estimated by use of a ground-water-flow model. The remedial actions examined were an impermeable covering, encapsulation, subsurface barriers, a ground-water drain, pumping of wells to manage water levels or to remove contaminated ground water for treatment, and no action.

  12. Some Considerations on Horizontal Displacement and Horizontal Displacement Coefficient B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajduś, Krzysztof; Tajduś, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Mining-induced deformations of the ground surface and within the rock mass may pose danger not only for surface constructions but also for underground objects (e.g., tunnels, underground storages, garages), diverse types of pipelines, electric cables, etc. For a proper evaluation of hazard for surface and underground objects, such parameters as horizontal displacement and horizontal deformations, especially their maximum values, are of crucial importance. The paper is an attempt at a critical review of hitherto accomplished studies and state of the art of predicting horizontal displacement u, in particular the coefficient B, whose value allows determination of the value of maximum displacement if the value of maximum slope is known, or the value of maximum deformation if the value of maximum trough slope is recognized. Since the geodesic observations of fully developed subsidence troughs suggest that the value of the coefficient depends on the depth H, radius of main influences range r and properties of overburden rock, in particular the occurrence of sub-eras Paleogene and Neogene layers (old name: Quaternary and Tertiary) with low strength parameters, therefore a formula is provided in the present paper allowing for the estimation of the influence of those factors on the value of coefficient B.

  13. Investigation of the tritium content in surface water, bottom sediments (zoobenthos), macrophytes, and fish in the mid-stream region of the Yenisei River (Siberia, Russia).

    PubMed

    Bondareva, Lydia; Schultz, Michael K

    2015-11-01

    The potential sources of tritium input to the Yenisei River ecosystem are derived from local operations of nuclear facilities of the Mining and Chemical Combine operated by the state-owned Rosatom corporation and from sources derived from global weapons testing fallout and nuclear power. The background tritium concentrations in zoobenthos, bottom sediments, relevant commercial fish species, and widespread endogenous aquatic plants have been obtained for the first time in this region. Our results demonstrate that the major input term of tritium to this region of the Yenisei is derived from nearby mining operations of Rosatom, with tritium concentrations in aquatic plants marginally exceeding the observed background values obtained from upstream control sample collection sites. PMID:26178837

  14. Experimental study of evaporation of horizontal films of water-salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elistratov, S. L.; Morozov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    The present studies were carried out for the horizontal films (thin layers) of water and water solutions of NaCl, CaCl2, LiCl, and LiBr with different solubility characteristics, as well as with specific features of formation and decay of water hydrates. Required volume of solution Vo of given weight concentration ξo, preliminary heated to the working surface temperature, was put in one step on the horizontal bottom of the bowl, heated to working temperature tCT, by means of volume batchers Thermo Scientific. After evaporation completion, the final mass of solution and form of their residue were registered. At the final stage of evaporation formation of NaCl crystals and water hydrates of CaCl2 · 2H2O, LiCl · H2O, and LiBr · 2H2O occurred.

  15. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  16. GROUTING TECHNIQUES IN BOTTOM SEALING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bottom sealing of hazardous waste sites involves the injection or insertion of an inert impermeable and continuous horizontal barrier in soil below the source of contamination. This type of containment strategy could be used in conjunction with other technology such as slurry wal...

  17. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  18. Horizontal well planning

    SciTech Connect

    Schuh, F.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Interest in horizontal drilling has exploded at a rate well above even the most optimistic projections. Certainly, this technique will not end with the Bakken and Austin Chalk plays. However, future reservoirs will undoubtedly require much more complicated well designs and multi-disciplined technical interaction than has been used so far. The horizontal drilling costs are too high to permit resolving of all the technical issues by trial and error. A multi-disciplinary team approach will be required in order for horizontal drilling to achieve its economic potential.

  19. Horizontal Velocity Structure in Waterspouts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiesow, R. L.

    1981-04-01

    We have measured the spatial variation of a single horizontal component of the velocity in a number of waterspouts using an airborne infrared Doppler lidar. In 21 data sets, maximum velocities range from 4.2 to 33.6 m s1 and visible funnel diameters from 6.6 to 90 m. Data were taken at altitudes between 675 m, near cloud base, and 95 m above the surface. The sequences show time development of the velocity as a function of radius at a fixed altitude and the velocity structure at different altitudes and sequential times with a horizontal resolution of 0.75 m between data points. The variation in velocity structure between waterspouts is large, with some showing marked azimuthal asymmetry and mixing with the ambient flow, and others showing multiple concentric vortex shells.

  20. Natural convection in horizontal porous layers with localized heating from below

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V. ); Kulacki, F.A. )

    1987-08-01

    Convective flow of fluid through saturated porous media heated from below is of considerable interest, and has been extensively studied. Most of these studies are concerned with either infinite horizontal porous layers or rectangular (or cylindrical) porous cavities with adiabatic vertical walls. A related problem of practical importance occurs when only a portion of the bottom surface is heated and the rest of it is either adiabatic or isothermally cooled. This situation is encountered in several geothermal areas which consists of troughs of volcanic debris contained by walls of nonfragmented ignimbrite. Thus, the model region considered is a locally heated long trough of isotropic porous medium confined by impermeable and insulating surroundings. Also, the recent motivation to study this problem has come from the efforts to identify a geologic repository for nuclear waste disposal. The purpose of the present work is to consider the effects of aspect ratio and Rayleigh number on free convection heat transfer from an isothermal heat source centrally located on the bottom surface of a horizontal porous cavity.

  1. Vacuum hand pump apparatus for collecting water samples from a horizontal intragravel pipe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a lightweight, portable vacuum hand pump apparatus for use in collecting water samples from horizontal intragravel pipe samplers buried in the stream bottom. The apparatus is easily fabricated from relatively inexpensive materials available at many laboratory supply houses.

  2. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary Brown, William Detmold, Stefan Meinel, Konstantinos Orginos

    2012-09-01

    The arena of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. This has led to a great deal of theoretical effort being put forth in the calculation of mass spectra in this sector. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of experiments for some time, it is interesting to compare results between lattice QCD computations and continuum theoretical models. Several recent lattice QCD calculations exist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. In this work we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of the mass spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. The wide range of quark masses in these systems require that the various flavors of quarks be treated with different lattice actions. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. The calculation of the ground state spectrum is presented and compared to recent models.

  3. 48. Bottom of shock absorber, bottom of launch tube, soda ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Bottom of shock absorber, bottom of launch tube, soda bottle liter at right - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  4. Direct seal papers for horizontal form-fill-seal machine.

    PubMed

    Merritt, John

    2002-01-01

    Direct-seal papers are designed for minimal fibre lift, where the sealing layer is incorporated into the bottom web. There are applications where they are the most appropriate economical alternative to traditional coated papers for horizontal form-fill-seal packaging. This article explores their benefits and limitations. PMID:11921779

  5. 48. View of typical 90 degree elbow located at horizontal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. View of typical 90 degree elbow located at horizontal corner with output (to scanner radar system control switch) waveguide on top and return wave on bottom of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1993-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct was experimentally and analytically investigated. To prevent the dripping of condensate on the film, the experiment was conducted inside a horizontal rectangular duct with vapor condensing only on the bottom cooled plate of the duct. R-113 and FC-72 (Fluorinert Electronic Fluid developed by the 3M Company) were used as the condensing fluids. The experimental program included measurements of film thickness, local and average heat transfer coefficients, wave length, wave speed, and a study of wave initiation. The measured film thickness was used to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient. The wave initiation was studied both with condensation and with an adiabatic air-liquid flow. The test sections used in both experiments were identical.

  7. Estimation of seismic wave velocity at seafloor surface and sound source localization based on transmitted wave observation with an ocean bottom seismometer offshore of Kamaishi, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Ryoichi

    2016-07-01

    An in situ method of estimating the seismic wave velocity at the seafloor surface by observing the particle motion of a wave transmitted into the sediment is presented; this method uses a sound source whose location is known. Conversely, a sound source localization method using the obtained seismic velocities and involving particle motion observation is also presented. Although this method is applicable only when the sound source exists within the critical incidence angle range, it is expected to contribute to the tracing of vocalizing baleen whales, which are unknown around Japanese waters.

  8. Large-scale submicron horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotube surface arrays on various substrates produced by a fluidic assembly method.

    PubMed

    Yan, Y H; Li, S; Chen, L Q; Chan-Park, M B; Zhang, Qing

    2006-11-28

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have been assembled on various substrates over mm-scale surface areas by combining fluidic alignment with soft lithography (micropatterning in capillaries) techniques. The feature size of the nanotube patterns reaches down to submicrometre scale. To this end, tailored substrate surface modification and pre-alignment of chopped CNTs in suspension are highly critical. PMID:21727344

  9. Horizontal drilling spurs optimism

    SciTech Connect

    Crouse, P.C. )

    1991-02-01

    1990 proved to be an exciting year for horizontal wells. This budding procedure appears to be heading for the mainstream oil and gas market, because it can more efficiently recover hydrocarbons from many reservoirs throughout the world. This paper reports on an estimated 1,000 wells that were drilled horizontally (all laterals) in 1990, with the Austin Chalk formation of Texas accounting for about 65% of all world activity. The Bakken Shale play in Montana and North Dakota proved to be the second most active area, with an estimated 90 wells drilled. Many operators in this play have indicated the bloom may be off the Bakken because of poor results outside the nose of the formation, further complicated by some of the harshest rock, reservoir and completion problems posed to horizontal technology.

  10. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  11. Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-22

    An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

  12. TLP tendon bottom connector

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, H.S.

    1986-09-16

    This patent describes a bottom connector for connecting a tendon segment of a tension leg platform to a subsea template which includes a receptacle for the connector comprising: a first body member adapted to be received within an anchor receptacle, a second body member connected to the first body member through a flexible joint for universally pivotal movement and adapted to be connected to the tendon segment, a latch carrier movable with respect to the first body member and having latch segments pivotally connected to the latch carrier, the latch segments being such that in one position of the latch carrier, the latch segments engage both a recess in the receptacle and the first body member when the connector is inserted into the receptacle a sufficient distance so that the latch segments and carrier will react to the recess and such that when the latch carrier is in another position, the latch segments are clear of the recess to enable the connector to move further into the receptacle or to allow the bottom connector to be removed from the receptacle, and release means operative to maintain the carrier in the other position if a decision is made to remove the connector from the receptacle.

  13. WAVE ACTION AND BOTTOM SHEAR STRESSES IN LAKE ERIE

    EPA Science Inventory

    For Lake Erie, the amplitudes and periods of wind-driven, surface gravity waves were calculated by means of the SMB hindcasting method. Bottom orbital velocities and bottom shear stresses were then calculated using linear wave theory and Kajiura's (1968) turbulent oscillating bou...

  14. Design and performance of a horizontal mooring for upper-ocean research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grosenbaugh, Mark; Anderson, Steven; Trask, Richard; Gobat, Jason; Paul, Walter; Butman, Bradford; Weller, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a two-dimensional moored array for sampling horizontal variability in the upper ocean. The mooring was deployed in Massachusetts Bay in a water depth of 84 m for the purpose of measuring the horizontal structure of internal waves. The mooring was instrumented with three acoustic current meters (ACMs) spaced along a 170-m horizontal cable that was stretched between two subsurface buoys 20 m below the sea surface. Five 25-m-long vertical instrument strings were suspended from the horizontal cable. A bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was deployed nearby to measure the current velocity throughout the water column. Pressure sensors mounted on the subsurface buoys and the vertical instrument strings were used to measure the vertical displacements of the array in response to the currents. Measurements from the ACMs and the ADCP were used to construct time-dependent, two-dimensional current fields. The current fields were used as input to a numerical model that calculated the deformation of the array with respect to the nominal zero-current configuration. Comparison of the calculated vertical offsets of the downstream subsurface buoy and downstream vertical instrument string with the pressure measurements were used to verify the numerical code. These results were then used to estimate total deformation of the array due to the passage of the internal waves. Based on the analysis of the three internal wave events with the highest measured vertical offsets, it is concluded that the geometry of the main structure (horizontal cable and anchor legs) was kept to within ±2.0 m, and the geometry of the vertical instrument strings was kept to within ±4.0 m except for one instance when the current velocity reached 0.88 m s−1.

  15. The Effectiveness of Organic Pollutants Removal in Constructed Wetland with Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow / Efektywność Usuwania Zanieczyszczeń Organicznych W Oczyszczalni Hydrofitowej

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaszek, Anita; Sadecka, Zofia

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the research work related to the removal efficiency from wastewater organic pollutants and suspended solids at HSSF (horizontal subsurface flow) constructed wetland. The average effectiveness defined as loss of value COD in wastewater has reached 77%, for BOD5 - 80% and TOC - 82%. The effect of seasonal temperature changes and the period of plant vegetation and rest on the effectiveness of wastewater treatment were also analyzed. The results of the presented research showed a decrease in the efficiency of removing organic pollutants from wastewater and suspended solids in the autumn and winter. During the vegetation the object in Małyszyn has been characterized by the effectiveness of wastewater treatment at the level of 78% for COD, 82% for BOD5, and in the non-vegetation period the effectiveness has decreased up to 75% for COD and 74% for BOD5. During the plants growth the total suspension was removed in 88%, whereas during the plants rest efficiency of removing lowered to 69%. W pracy przedstawiono wyniki badań dotyczące efektywności usuwania ze ścieków zanieczyszczeń organicznych w oczyszczalni hydrofitowej. Średnia skuteczność oczyszczania wyrażona jako obniżenie wartości ChZT w ściekach była na poziomie 77%, dla BZT5 80%, a dla OWO 82%. Analizowano również wpływ sezonowych zmian temperatury oraz okresu wegetacji i spoczynku roślin na skuteczność oczyszczania ścieków. Wyniki badań wykazały obniżenie efektywności usuwania zanieczyszczeń organicznych ze ścieków wyrażonych przez ChZT i BZT5 oraz zawiesiny ogólnej w okresie jesienno-zimowym. W okresie wegetacyjnym obiekt w Małyszynie charakteryzował się efektywnością oczyszczania ścieków na poziomie: 78% dla ChZT, 82% dla BZT5, a w sezonie pozawegetacyjnym skuteczność uległa obniżeniu do 75% w przypadku ChZT oraz 74% dla BZT5. Zawiesina ogólna w okresie wegetacji trzciny usuwana była w 88%, a w okresie powegetacyjnym w 69%.

  16. Retrieve Ocean Bottom and Downhole Seismic sensors orientation using integrated low cost gyroscope and direct rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    To reduce the background noise level, seismic sensors are often installed in downhole. During the installation, it is not possible to determine exactly what the sensors has rotated in the horizontal plane before reaching the bottom. To monitoring the seismic activity occurred in offshore areas, Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) are often deployed in the area to be studied. During the OBS descent phase along the seawater column the sensor can undergo to significant rotations in the horizontal plane. Therefore, both for seismic sensors installed in downhole or on ocean bottom, the absolute orientation of the horizontal components are unknown. Clearly, this serious problem can be limits data analysis and interpretation. The absolute orientation of horizontal components are critical for many modern seismic analysis techniques such as receiver functions, body- and surface-wave polarization analysis, studies of anisotropy, and surface wave dispersion curves estimations. The techniques proposed to retrieve the correct sensor horizontal components orientations use different approaches (polarization analysis, cross-correlation measurements, synthetic seismograms fitting), different data set (shots, earthquakes, seismic noise) and different portion of the seismic wave-field (P or S wave arrival times, Rayleigh waves, full waveforms), but are all based on the post-processing of the acquired data. All these methods are not error-free and not always applicable. Method based on active source are not applicable in passive OBS monitoring campaigns. The method based on synthetic waveforms are strong dependent on accuracy of the source parameters estimation and are generally computationally intensive. The method based on polarization analysis are clearly strong dependent on the quality of the data in term of number of seismic events recorded, azimuthal coverage and signal to noise ratio. The methods base on events or noise cross-correlation can be applicable only if an array of sensor

  17. Corrosion in three-phase oil/water/gas slug flow in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Jepson, W.P.

    1994-12-31

    A study of corrosion in the mixing zone at the front of slugs has been carried out in a 10 cm internal diameter, horizontal, three-phase flow system using a light condensate oil and saltwater as liquids and carbon dioxide as the gas phase. Visual observations show that stratified water layers are apparent at the bottom of the pipe at oil compositions up to 60%. Pulses of gas bubbles are formed at high Froude numbers which impinge on the lower surfaces of the pipe. The corrosion rate increased with an increase in Froude number. This is due to the increases in wall shear stress, turbulence, and gas present at the bottom of the pipe as the Froude number increases. The presence of gas at the bottom of the pipe has a significant effect on the corrosion rate. It provides an erosion component to the corrosion processes. The corrosion rate can be related to pressure drop across the slug but average wall shear stress does not seem to be appropriate.

  18. Horizontal gradients of bromine monoxide (BrO) across the lead and young sea ice features, from surface based instruments near Barrow, AK during the BRomine, Ozone, Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX), Spring 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, S. J.; Simpson, W. R.; Peterson, P. K.; Gleason, E.; Shepson, P.; Pratt, K. A.; Halfacre, J. W.; Oltmans, S. J.; Rigor, I.; Nghiem, S. V.; Perovich, D. K.; Sturm, M.; Zielcke, J.; Friess, U.; Platt, U.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive halogens in the lower atmosphere alter the oxidation pathways in polar regions during springtime. Bromine radicals play a key role in ozone depletion episodes (ODEs) and the oxidation of many gaseous constituents. Inorganic saline surfaces are believed to be the sources of the reactive bromine. However, the specific mechanisms that activate and sustain the production of these radicals remains uncertain. One of the main goals of BROMEX is to better understand the coupling of ice and snow surfaces to the chemistry occurring at or near these surfaces. Three ground based instrument sites observed bromine monoxide (BrO) via Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS), in-situ ozone, and basic meteorology. One site was stationary at Barrow and the other two aboard autonomous buoys (IceLander1,2) at different remote sea-ice locations. IceLander1 (IL1) was deployed to the landfast ice northeast of Barrow for the duration of March. IceLander2 (IL2) was deployed to the sea ice west of Barrow. During March, the three instruments conducted simultaneous measurements spanning a spatial area of approximately 10x50 km. Upon the lead opening at Barrow, observations from a now drifting IL2, were made from the downwind side of the open lead. Young sea ice features between Barrow and IL2 were probed (by comparable measurements at both locations) over a spatial fetch greater than 100km. During periods of horizontal advection between the sites, typical parcel transit times were on the order of less than one hour to upwards of a day. We report limited evidence that there is an appreciable difference in the BrO abundance measured when air parcels traverse over the active ice zone, between the IL2 and Barrow sites. A BrO boundary layer vertical column density diurnal pattern with a minimum at local solar noon is similarly observed at all sites for the entire experiment. Minimal horizontal BrO gradients, similar rates of ozone change, and recurring Br

  19. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  20. Horizontal geophone transducer assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hefer, F.W.

    1985-06-25

    The geophone transducer comprises in combination: a geophone capable of detecting horizontal seismic waves, and a rigid casing having a gimbal chamber. A gimbal is provided inside the chamber on which the geophone is mounted for limited free angular movement in one direction only. The gimbal includes in one preferred embodiment a viscous liquid in which the geophone is only partially submerged while it is supported by a U-shaped bracket which is mounted for rotation about a fixed axis.

  1. Horizontal Gene Transfer Contributed to the Evolution of Extracellular Surface Structures: The Freshwater Polyp Hydra Is Covered by a Complex Fibrous Cuticle Containing Glycosaminoglycans and Proteins of the PPOD and SWT (Sweet Tooth) Families

    PubMed Central

    Böttger, Angelika; Doxey, Andrew C.; Hess, Michael W.; Pfaller, Kristian; Salvenmoser, Willi; Deutzmann, Rainer; Geissner, Andreas; Pauly, Barbara; Altstätter, Johannes; Münder, Sandra; Heim, Astrid; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; McConkey, Brendan J.; David, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    The single-cell layered ectoderm of the fresh water polyp Hydra fulfills the function of an epidermis by protecting the animals from the surrounding medium. Its outer surface is covered by a fibrous structure termed the cuticle layer, with similarity to the extracellular surface coats of mammalian epithelia. In this paper we have identified molecular components of the cuticle. We show that its outermost layer contains glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans and we have identified chondroitin and chondroitin-6-sulfate chains. In a search for proteins that could be involved in organising this structure we found PPOD proteins and several members of a protein family containing only SWT (sweet tooth) domains. Structural analyses indicate that PPODs consist of two tandem β-trefoil domains with similarity to carbohydrate-binding sites found in lectins. Experimental evidence confirmed that PPODs can bind sulfated glycans and are secreted into the cuticle layer from granules localized under the apical surface of the ectodermal epithelial cells. PPODs are taxon-specific proteins which appear to have entered the Hydra genome by horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. Their acquisition at the time Hydra evolved from a marine ancestor may have been critical for the transition to the freshwater environment. PMID:23300632

  2. High angle-of-attack characteristics of three-surface fighter aircraft. [canard-wing-horizontal tail configuration for greater stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, M. A.; Grafton, S. B.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program aimed at providing information on the high angle-of-attack characteristics of three-surface fighter concepts incorporating a close-coupled canard, an investigation is being conducted on two specific configurations based on the F-18 and F-15 designs. The study configurations are being subjected to a wide range of tests including wind-tunnel tests, dynamic model tests, and piloted simulation. This paper summarizes the results obtained to date in this study. High-alpha results in the areas of static stability, damping, and control characteristics are reviewed and some of the more significant aerodynamic phenomena are identified.

  3. Statistic study on developing condition of horizontal columnar joints in Jeongja and Eupchon beach areas, SE Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, K.; Kim, Y.; Geologic Structure; Geohazard Research Group

    2010-12-01

    Unusual patterns of columnar joints are developed in Tertiary volcanic rocks along the Jeongja and Eupchon beach areas, SE Korea. The columnar joints represent various features in shape and orientation, including horizontal and inclined column distribution. The shape and orientation of columnar joints were statistically analyzed to understand the causes of the unusual column patterns. For this purpose, the shape of the column face perpendicular to the column direction and the trend and plunge of the column are analyzed. Most columnar joints in the study areas have five or six column faces, and the column diameter perpendicular to the column direction is in a range of between 30 to 50 cm. Columnar joints generally develop vertically due to cooling from both top and bottom surfaces. However, unusual horizontal and inclined columnar joints are observed in the study areas. Therefore, the horizontal and inclined columnar joints developed in the study areas may suggest abnormal cooling condition. The volcanic rocks in the study areas intruded or extruded in late Miocene (22-16 Ma), which coincides with a period of high sea level in the Miocene. The sea level is almost the same as the present sea level. This may suggest that the unusual columnar joint patterns that have developed in the study areas may have been affected by sea water. Therefore, if the characteristics of these columnar joints are more intensively studied on a morphological, petrological, geochemical, and chronological level, we can better understand the developing mechanism of horizontal columnar joints.

  4. Effects of interspecific competition on the growth of macrophytes and nutrient removal in constructed wetlands: A comparative assessment of free water surface and horizontal subsurface flow systems.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yucong; Wang, Xiaochang; Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Zhao, Yaqian; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Ge, Yuan; Xiong, Jiaqing

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of competition between adjoining interspecific colonies of Phragmites and Typha in two large field pilot-scale free water surface (FWS) and subsurface flow (SSF) CWs is evaluated. According to findings, the effect of interspecific competition was notable for Phragmites australis, whereby it showed the highest growth performance in both FWS and SSF wetland. In a mixed-culture, P. australis demonstrates superiority in terms of competitive interactions for space between plants. Furthermore, the interspecific competition among planted species seemed to cause different ecological responses of plant species in the two CWs. For example, while relatively high density and shoot height determined the high aboveground dry weight of P. australis in the FWS wetland, this association was not evident in the SSF. Additionally, while plants nutrients uptake accounts for a higher proportion of the nitrogen removal in FWS, that in the SSF accounts for a higher proportion of the phosphorous removal. PMID:26874442

  5. Horizontal drilling in shallow reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.F. Jr.; Schrider, L.A.; Haynes, C.D.; Mazza, R.L.

    1992-06-01

    The objectives of this joint horizontal drilling effort by the US DOE and Belden & Blake in the complex, low permeability Clinton Sandstone will focus on the following objectives: (1) apply horizontal drilling technology in hard, abrasive, and tight Clinton Sandstone; (2) evaluate effects of multiple hydraulic fracturing in a low permeability horizontal wellbore; (3) assess economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Clinton and similar tight gas sands.

  6. Horizontal drilling in shallow reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.F. Jr.; Schrider, L.A.; Haynes, C.D.; Mazza, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this joint horizontal drilling effort by the US DOE and Belden Blake in the complex, low permeability Clinton Sandstone will focus on the following objectives: (1) apply horizontal drilling technology in hard, abrasive, and tight Clinton Sandstone; (2) evaluate effects of multiple hydraulic fracturing in a low permeability horizontal wellbore; (3) assess economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Clinton and similar tight gas sands.

  7. Growth of false bottoms under sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Naomi; Feltham, Daniel; Flocco, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    In the summer months, melt water from the surface of Arctic sea ice can percolate through the relatively porous ice and collect at the ice-ocean interface, filling hollows in the base of the ice. These pools are called under-ice melt ponds. Freezing can occur at the interface between the fresh water and the oceanic mixed layer, forming a sheet of ice called a false bottom. These have been observed to thicken and migrate upwards over time. False bottoms insulate the true base of the sea ice from the ocean and their formation is a significant mechanism of Arctic sea ice summer growth. Current parameterisations of basal ablation of sea ice in climate models do not account for these processes, the inclusion of which could improve the accuracy of predictions of Arctic sea ice. In this poster, a one-dimensional thermodynamic model of the evolution of under-ice melt ponds and false bottoms is presented. Our aim is to develop a parameterisation of the impact of under ice melt ponds and false bottoms on basal ablation of Arctic sea ice appropriate for use in gridded climate models.

  8. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  9. Three-dimensional finite-element modelling of horizontal surface velocity and strain patterns near thrust and normal faults during the earthquake cycle: implications for interpreting geological and geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Andrea; Hetzel, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, more and more geological and space-geodetic data on the surface deformation associated with earthquakes on intra-continental normal and thrust faults have become available. Here we use three-dimensional finite-element models that account for gravity, far-field ("regional") extension/shortening and postseismic relaxation in a viscoelastic lower crust to quantify the surface deformation caused by an Mw ~7 earthquake on a dip-slip fault. The coseismic deformation is characterized by horizontal shortening in the footwall of the normal fault and extension in the hanging wall of the thrust fault - consistent with elastic dislocation models, geological field observations and GPS data from earthquakes in Italy and Taiwan. During the postseismic phase, domains of extensional and contractional strain exist next to each other near both fault types. The spatiotemporal evolution of these domains as well as the postseismic velocities and strain rates strongly depend on the viscosity of the lower crust. For viscosities of 1e18-1e20 Pa s, the signal from postseismic relaxation is detectible for 20-50 years after the earthquake. If GPS data containing a postseismic relaxation signal are used to derive regional rates, the stations may show rates that are too high or too low or even an apparently wrong tectonic regime. By quantifying the postseismic deformation through space and time, our models help to interpret GPS data and to identify the most suitable locations for GPS stations.

  10. Horizontal baffle for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rylatt, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A horizontal baffle disposed in the annulus defined between the core barrel and the thermal liner of a nuclear reactor thereby physically separating the outlet region of the core from the annular area below the horizontal baffle. The horizontal baffle prevents hot coolant that has passed through the reactor core from thermally damaging apparatus located in the annulus below the horizontal baffle by utilizing the thermally induced bowing of the horizontal baffle to enhance sealing while accommodating lateral motion of the baffle base plate.

  11. The Surface Mass Balance of the Antarctic Peninsula at 5.5 km horizontal resolution, as simulated by a regional atmospheric climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wessem, M.; Reijmer, C.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Ligtenberg, S.; Scambos, T. A.; Barrand, N. E.; Van De Berg, W. J.; Thomas, E. R.; Wuite, J.; van Meijgaard, E.; Turner, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula (AP) is one of the most rapidly changing regions on earth, but limited detailed information is available about AP climate due to a lack of observational data. Here, we present a high-resolution (5.5 km) estimate of the surface mass balance (SMB) for the AP, from 1979 to 2014, calculated by the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO2.3, that is specifically adapted for use over the polar regions. Next to this, a firn densification model is used to calculate the processes in the snowpack, such as firn compaction and meltwater percolation, refreezing, and runoff. A comparison with the few available in-situ observations shows that the AP SMB is well modeled, but that discrepancies remain that are mainly related to the highly variable AP topography compared to the model resolution. Integrated over an ice sheet area of 4.1 105 km2, the climatological (1979-2014) SMB of the AP amounts to 351 Gt y-1 (with interannual variability = 58 Gt y-1), which mostly consists of snowfall (363 ± 56 Gt y-1). The other SMB components, sublimation, drifting snow erosion and meltwater runoff, are small (11, 0.5 and 4 Gt y-1, respectively). The AP mountains act as an important climate barrier, leading to distinct differences between the climate of the western AP (WAP) and the eastern AP (EAP). For instance, 77% of all AP snowfall falls over the WAP, where strong orographic forcing leads to snowfall rates >4 m w.e. y-1 on the northwestern slopes, while snowfall rates are <400 mm w.e. y-1 over the EAP ice shelves. These results, and further investigations of this sharp west-to-east climate distinction, clearly highlight the different forcing mechanisms of the SMB over the WAP and the EAP: over the WAP most snowfall is orographically induced, while over the EAP it is generated by depressions over the Weddell Sea. Furthermore, no significant trends are found in any of the SMB components, except for a slight decrease in snowmelt.

  12. Technology vital for horizontal well success

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, D.N.

    1995-12-11

    Union Pacific Resources Co. (UPRC) has drilled more than 1,100 horizontal wells since 1987 and continues to operate about 15--20 rigs drilling horizontal wells. Technology has advanced the drilling, completion, formation evaluation, stimulation, and production of horizontal wells. Drilling break-throughs include dual-powerhead mud motors, retrievable whipstocks, and routine multiple lateral wells. Cost improvements have enabled UPRC to extend activity into deeper zones, which are hotter and more hostile. State-of-the-art drilling includes as many as four, 4,000+ ft horizontal laterals, horizontal wells at TVDs greater than 16,000 ft, and mud weights in excess of 15 ppg. In the Austin chalk, UPRC operates properties producing more than 480 MMcfd, 40,000 bo/d, and over 100,000 bw/d. The paper uses the wells of the Austin chalk to describe the technology used for formation evaluation, geological steering, muds, top drives, bit selection, mud motors, multiple laterals, retrievable whipstocks, water fracs, vapor-recovery units, artificial lift, automation, and surface facilities. Organizations, alliances, and corrosion problems are also discussed.

  13. Development of differential coastal cooling above sloping bottom: laboratory and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Natilya

    2013-04-01

    The process of formation of differential coastal cooling above sloping bottom, often observed in autumn in coastal regions of seas and large lakes, is investigated by means of laboratory experiments and numerical modelling. During this period, an integral heat flux is directed from water to atmosphere. When water temperature is above that of maximum density (what is typically the case in autumn), it results in a negative buoyancy flux through the surface and the appearance of vertical convection. Water temperature decreases, and in shallow parts the process goes faster than in deeper ones, so that significant horizontal temperature gradients above sloping bottom are formed along with vertical thermal homogeneity of every particular water column. The corresponding density and pressure gradients cause large-scale exchange flows between shallow and deep parts of a basin. The goal of this work is an investigation of the process of establishment of the surface water temperature profile from the coast to the deep part and comparison of the characteristics of this profile with the observed flow rate of the horizontal exchange flows. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted in a rectangular plexiglas laboratory channel with internal dimensions 33 cm × 33 cm × 750 cm; a 5m-long part of the bottom had a slope of A~0.03; walls and bottom were thermally insulated. Heat exchange through the surface with cooler air in laboratory provided natural cooling; initial water temperature varied between 25 and 31 ° C, air temperature - from 19 to 25 ° C. Maximum water layer depth (10, 12, 13, 16, 20, 22.5, 24, 24.5, 27 cm) and the initial air-water temperature difference (Δ~4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11 °C) were changing parameters in the experiments. Registration of water temperature time series in 8 points (1 cm below the water surface in the sloping region with time step 30 s) and vertical profilings in these locations were carried out by electronic thermistors. Flow-rate of

  14. Fluid flow over arbitrary bottom topography in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Srikumar

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional free surface potential flow over an arbitrary bottom in a channel is considered to analyze the behavior of the free surface profile using linear theory. It is assumed that the fluid is inviscid, incompressible and flow is irrotational. Perturbation analysis in conjunction with Fourier transform technique is employed to determine the first order corrections of some important physical quantities such as free surface profile, velocity potential, etc. From the practical point of view, one arbitrary bottom topography is considered to determine the free surface profile since the free surface profile depends on the bottom topography. It is found that the free surface profile is oscillatory in nature, representing a wave propagating downstream and no wave upstream.

  15. Self-Assembly and Horizontal Orientation Growth of VO2 Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chun; Guo, Hua; Amini, Abbas; Liu, Kai; Fu, Deyi; Zou, Jian; Song, Haisheng

    2014-01-01

    Single-crystalline vanadium dioxide (VO2) nanostructures have attracted an intense research interest recently because of their unique single-domain metal-insulator phase transition property. Synthesis of these nanostructures in the past was limited in density, alignment, or single-crystallinity. The assembly of VO2 nanowires (NWs) is desirable for a “bottom-up” approach to the engineering of intricate structures using nanoscale building blocks. Here, we report the successful synthesis of horizontally aligned VO2 NWs with a dense growth mode in the [1-100]quartz direction of a polished x-cut quartz surface using a simple vapor transport method. Our strategy of controlled growth of VO2 NWs promisingly paves the way for designing novel metal-insulator transition devices based on VO2 NWs. PMID:24965899

  16. Heat transfer in porous duct: Effect of horizontal outer wall heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleed, H. M. T.; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Athani, Abdulgaphur

    2016-06-01

    Heat transfer in porous medium is one of the important areas of research for last few decades. The current work is considered to investigate the effect of top and bottom wall heating of a square duct that contains porous medium between its inner and outer boundaries. The other six surfaces of duct are cooled to isothermal temperature Tc. The resulting momentum and energy equations that govern the heat and fluid flow behavior in porous medium are solved with the help of finite element method. It is observed that the heat transfer and fluid flow behavior of horizontal wall heating is quite different from other cases being reported in literature. It is found that the fluid flows in multiple circulation cells around corners of the duct giving a unique flow pattern. The isotherms tend to concentrate on lower and upper section of duct with huge middle area of cavity having least thermal energy.

  17. Accumulations of total metal in dominant shrimp species (Palaemon adspersus, Palaemon serratus, Parapenaeus longirostris) and bottom surface sediments obtained from the Northern Inner Shelf of the Sea of Marmara.

    PubMed

    Kurun, A; Balkis, H; Balkis, N

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the total metal (aluminum, copper, manganese, nickel, lead, zinc, cadmium, iron, mercury) contents of dominant shrimp species and sediments present at 1-50 m depths of the Northern Inner Shelf of the Sea of Marmara. Shrimp and sediment samples were collected from four regions (Büyükçekmece, Silivri, Tekirdağ, Sarköy) and from different depths (1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 m) at each region in September and November of 2003. Three shrimp species [Palaemon adspersus (Rathke, 1937), Palaemon serratus (Pennant, 1777), Parapenaeus longirostris (H. Lucas, 1846)] were identified to be dominant as a result of the examination on the obtained samples. Heavy metal contents of these three species were determined and the results were compared with the acceptable treshold values of the Seafood Standards and also with available literatures. The Cu contents were found to be higher than the treshold limits in all samples except P. longirostris from Silivri, also the Cd contents in all samples except P. adspersus from Büyükçekmece, the Zn contents only in P. adspersus and P. longirostris from Tekirdağ, and the Pb contents in all species from all regions. These high values are the indicator of industrial pollution. There is not any data in the Seafood Standards about Mn, Ni, Fe and Al contents in shrimp species. The values of these metal contents were given in the present study. The examination of total metal distributions in bottom surface sediment samples in the Northern Inner Shelf of the Sea of Marmara showed that the determined values were higher than the shale average at some depths of examined stations. PMID:17406997

  18. Temperature measurements from a horizontal heater test in G-Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wunan; Ramirez, A.L.; Watwood, D.

    1991-10-01

    A horizontal heater test was conducted in G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, to study the hydrothermal response of the rock mass due to a thermal loading. The results of the temperature measurements are reported here. The measured temperatures agree well with a scoping calculation that was performed using a model which investigates the transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in fractured porous media. Our results indicate that the temperature field might be affected by the initial moisture content of the rock, the fractures in the rock, the distance from the free surface of the alcove wall, and the temperature distribution on the heater surface. Higher initial moisture content, higher fracture density, and cooling from the alcove wall tend to decrease the measured temperature. The temperature on top of the horizontal heater can was about 30{degrees}C greater than at the bottom throughout most of the heating phase, causing the rock temperatures above the heater to be greater than those below. Along a radius from the center of the heater, the heating created a dry zone, followed by a boiling zone and condensation zone. Gravity drainage of the condensed water in the condensation zone had a strong effect on the boiling process in the test region. The temperatures below and to the side of the heater indicated a region receiving liquid drainage from an overlying region of condensation. We verified that a thermocouple in a thin-wall tubing measures the same temperature as one grouted in a borehole.

  19. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  20. Horizontally shaken impact pendulums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T. J.; Xu, Y.; Sidhu, H.

    2016-03-01

    We consider two pendulum masses attached to the same pivot point and which interact with each other through Hertzian impacts. We show that this splitting of the mass leads to an instability in the conservative case, in which initially synchronized large amplitude motion may evolve into out-of-phase (impacting) motion. We then study in detail the response of the impacting masses in the presence of damping and driving through horizontal shaking of the pivot point. We find that synchronized modes are usually accompanied by small amplitude quasi-periodic, or even chaotic, impacts and a number of multi-period solutions may appear in the bifurcation diagram. We reveal the existence and stability of a number of impact modes and scan the frequency response of the system to a series of initial conditions to identify which modes may be more easily generated in experiment.

  1. Horizontal drilling used in gas storage programs

    SciTech Connect

    Young, F.S.Jr.; McDonald, W.J. ); Shikari, Y.A. )

    1993-04-05

    Horizontal wells may restore deliverability in old reservoirs and help efficiently develop new, porous-media, natural gas storage reservoirs. In many types of gas storage reservoirs, horizontal wells can have 5-10 times the productivity of vertical wells yet cost only about twice as much. The advantages of using horizontal wells in gas storage include the ability to develop less-favorable parts of the reservoir, fewer surface sites, less pipe and surface equipment, improved late season deliverability at low pressure, and reduced base gas requirements. Since 1990, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) has sponsored a project to increase the deliverability of the nation's 14,00 gas storage wells. The primary objective of the study is to conduct a comprehensive review of deliverability enhancement techniques, well completion methods, and procedures used by operators of underground natural gas storage fields in North America. Another objective is to design and construct a computer data base and compile reports and analyses in aggregated format. The first task of the project involved an assessment of the state of technology. The paper describes results from the gas storage survey; horizontal drilling technology; special considerations; and test results.

  2. Estimators of bottom reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, L.; Holloway, J.

    1992-01-01

    Estimators of in situ bottom spectral reflectance are calculated from multi-station optical field data gathered with standard instrumentation from different sites. These spectra are then compared to reflectance spectra measured in the laboratory of the bottom sediments collected in the field for the stations at these different sites. The relative fit of the estimated spectral curves to those measured in the laboratory was measured. The most accurate absolute estimation was provided by the single scattering irradiance model.

  3. Horizontal well drilled into deep, hot Austin chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, D.; Johnson, M.; Godfrey, B.

    1995-04-03

    Bent-housing steerable downhole motors helped maintain course for a deep, hot, horizontal well in the Austin chalk. The Navasota Unit No. 1 was planned as a B zone, single downdip lateral, Austin chalk horizontal well with a maximum departure from vertical of 3,767 ft and a planned total depth (TD) of 17,342 ft measured depth (MD)/14,172 ft TVD. The Austin chalk was found significantly deeper in this well than planned, which resulted in an actual TD of 17,899 ft MD/14,993 ft TVD, the deepest (TVD) horizontal well in the Austin chalk to date. The well was spudded on August 6, 1994, and took 52 days to reach TD. The static bottom hole temperature was almost 350 F. The paper describes the well plan, drilling results, and the lateral section.

  4. Use of mode subspace projections for depth discrimination with a horizontal line array: theory and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Premus, Vincent E; Helfrick, Mark N

    2013-06-01

    A solution to the problem of acoustic source depth discrimination in a downward refracting, shallow-water ocean waveguide is presented for the case of a horizontal line array at endfire. The approach exploits the phenomenon of mode trapping, wherein a shallow acoustic source cannot excite the lowest order waveguide modes due to its evanescent amplitude dependence near the surface. The important implication of this "trapping" behavior is that, given sufficient spatial aperture, it provides a mechanism for differentiating a shallow acoustic noise source from one at depth. The method does not require array cant, or physical vertical aperture of any kind, but instead relies only on the sensitivity of a line array at endfire to differences in horizontal wave number to resolve low and high order mode subspace excitations. The only inputs to the algorithm are an approximate sound speed profile, water depth, and bottom type. The theoretical basis for the test statistic is first reviewed, followed by discussion of key requirements, and illustration of the concept using results from a RAM PE simulation for a downward refracting environment. Finally, the algorithm is experimentally demonstrated using data from a bottom-mounted HLA deployed in the moderately cluttered continental shelf environment of the Florida Straits. PMID:23742355

  5. Horizontal drilling in shallow reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.F. Jr.; Schrider, L.A.; McCallister, J.V.; Mazza, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Belden & Blake and the US DOE will cofund a horizontal well to be drilled in the Clinton Sandstone as part of the DOE`s multi well program titled ``Horizontal Drilling in Shallow Geologic Complex Reservoirs.`` This well will be located in Mahoning County, Ohio in an area which has demonstrated above average Clinton gas production. To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first horizontal well drilled to the Clinton Sand formation in Ohio. Since many of the remaining Clinton Sand drilling sites are of poorer reservoir quality, they may not be developed unless technology such as horizontal drilling can be successfully demonstrated.

  6. Horizontal surface velocity and strain patterns near thrust and normal faults during the earthquake cycle: The importance of viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust and implications for interpreting geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Andrea; Hetzel, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, more and more space-geodetic data on the surface deformation associated with earthquakes on intracontinental normal and thrust faults have become available. However, numerical models investigating the coseismic and postseismic deformation near such faults in a general way, i.e., not focused on a particular earthquake, are still sparse. Here we use three-dimensional finite element models that account for gravity, far-field ("regional") extension/shortening and postseismic relaxation in a viscoelastic lower crust to quantify the surface deformation caused by an Mw ~7 earthquake on a dip-slip fault. The coseismic deformation is characterized by horizontal shortening in the footwall of the normal fault and extension in the hanging wall of the thrust fault—consistent with elastic dislocation models, geological field observations, and GPS data from earthquakes in Italy and Taiwan. During the postseismic phase, domains of extensional and contractional strain exist next to each other near both fault types. The spatiotemporal evolution of these domains as well as the postseismic velocities and strain rates strongly depend on the viscosity of the lower crust. For viscosities of 1018-1020 Pa s, the signal from postseismic relaxation is detectible for 20-50 years after the earthquake. If GPS data containing a postseismic relaxation signal are used to derive regional rates, the stations may show rates that are too high or too low or even an apparently wrong tectonic regime. By quantifying the postseismic deformation through space and time, our models help to interpret GPS data and to identify the most suitable locations for GPS stations.

  7. Bottom Pressure Variability in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limeburner, R.; Abualnaja, Y.; Beardsley, R.

    2012-04-01

    We deployed an array of three bottom pressure/temperature/conductivity (PTC) instruments at Jeddah, Thuwal and Rabigh along the Saudi Arabian coast of the eastern Red Sea for a period of 3 years. This PTC array accurately measured the regional tidal variability of the bottom pressure field and characterized the low frequency along-shore pressure, temperature and salinity gradients and their variability. Surface sea level/height was calculated from the bottom pressure measurements using the hydrostatic equation. On time scales of order 1 day the most energetic component of sea level variability was the semidiurnal and diurnal tides dominated by the M2, N2, K1 and O1 tidal constituents. On time scales of order 10 days the sea level variability was wind driven with setup and set down up to 40 cm due to the local wind stress. On yearly time scales the sea level varied approximately 50 cm and was highest in winter (January-February) and lowest in summer (July-August). Barometric pressure also had an annual cycle of approximately 10 mb and was highest in January thus attenuating the amplitude of the annual sea level variability. Higher sea level in winter months may be due to a convergence in the large-scale Red Sea wind stress. The amplitude of the principal tidal and subtidal sea level variability was coherent at the three sites, but the direction of phase propagation could not be resolved with confidence.

  8. Electroluminescence from completely horizontally oriented dye molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komino, Takeshi; Sagara, Yuta; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Oki, Yuji; Nakamura, Nozomi; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-06-01

    A complete horizontal molecular orientation of a linear-shaped thermally activated delayed fluorescent guest emitter 2,6-bis(4-(10Hphenoxazin-10-yl)phenyl)benzo[1,2-d:5,4-d'] bis(oxazole) (cis-BOX2) was obtained in a glassy host matrix by vapor deposition. The orientational order of cis-BOX2 depended on the combination of deposition temperature and the type of host matrix. Complete horizontal orientation was obtained when a thin film with cis-BOX2 doped in a 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (CBP) host matrix was fabricated at 200 K. The ultimate orientation of guest molecules originates from not only the kinetic relaxation but also the kinetic stability of the deposited guest molecules on the film surface during film growth. Utilizing the ultimate orientation, a highly efficient organic light-emitting diode with the external quantum efficiency of 33.4 ± 2.0% was realized. The thermal stability of the horizontal orientation of cis-BOX2 was governed by the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the CBP host matrix; the horizontal orientation was stable unless the film was annealed above Tg.

  9. Understanding Horizontal Governance. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal governance is an umbrella term that covers a range of approaches to policy development, service delivery issues, and management practices. A horizontal initiative may take place across levels of government, across boundaries between units of a single department or agency or among multiple departments or agencies, or across public,…

  10. Calibration of a Horizontal Sundial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovsek, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes how a horizontal sundial can be calibrated in a classroom without using the nontrivial equations of projective geometry. If one understands how a simple equatorial sundial works, one will also understand the procedure of calibrating a horizontal (or "garden," as it is also called) sundial.

  11. Automated area segmentation for ocean bottom surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, John C.; Smith, Cheryl M.

    2015-05-01

    In practice, environmental information about an ocean bottom area to be searched using SONAR is often known a priori to some coarse level of resolution. The SONAR search sensor then typically has a different performance characterization function for each environmental classification. Large ocean bottom surveys using search SONAR can pose some difficulties when the environmental conditions vary significantly over the search area because search planning tools cannot adequately segment the area into sub-regions of homogeneous search sensor performance. Such segmentation is critically important to unmanned search vehicles; homogenous bottom segmentation will result in more accurate predictions of search performance and area coverage rate. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) has developed an automated area segmentation algorithm that subdivides the mission area under the constraint that the variation of the search sensor's performance within each sub-mission area cannot exceed a specified threshold, thereby creating sub-regions of homogeneous sensor performance. The algorithm also calculates a new, composite sensor performance function for each sub-mission area. The technique accounts for practical constraints such as enforcing a minimum sub-mission area size and requiring sub-mission areas to be rectangular. Segmentation occurs both across the rows and down the columns of the mission area. Ideally, mission planning should consider both segmentation directions and choose the one with the more favorable result. The Automated Area Segmentation Algorithm was tested using two a priori bottom segmentations: rectangular and triangular; and two search sensor configurations: a set of three bi-modal curves and a set of three uni-modal curves. For each of these four scenarios, the Automated Area Segmentation Algorithm automatically partitioned the mission area across rows and down columns to create regions with homogeneous sensor performance. The

  12. Extreme horizontal branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    A review is presented on the properties, origin and evolutionary links of hot subluminous stars which are generally believed to be extreme Horizontal Branch stars or closely related objects. They exist both in the disk and halo populations (globular clusters) of the Galaxy. Amongst the field stars a large fraction of sdBs are found to reside in close binaries. The companions are predominantly white dwarfs, but also low mass main sequence stars are quite common. Systems with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions may qualify as Supernova Ia progenitors. Recently evidence has been found that the masses of some unseen companions might exceed the Chandrasekhar mass, hence they must be neutron stars or black holes. Even a planet has recently been detected orbiting the pulsating sdB star V391 Peg. Quite to the opposite,in globular clusters, only very few sdB binaries amongst are found indicating that the dominant sdB formation processes is different in a dense environment. Binary population synthesis models identify three formation channels, (i) stable Roche lobe overflow, (ii) one or two common envelope ejection phases and (iii) the merger of two helium white dwarfs. The latter channel may explain the properties of the He-enriched subluminous O stars, the hotter sisters of the sdB stars, because their binary fraction is lower than that of the sdBs by a factor of ten or more. The rivaling ''late hot flasher'' scenario is also discussed. Pulsating subluminous B (sdB) stars play an important role for asteroseismology as this technique has already led to mass determinations for a handful of stars. A unique hyper-velocity sdO star moving so fast that it is unbound to the Galaxy has probably been ejected by the super-massive black hole in the Galactic centre.

  13. Matched Bearing Processing for Airborne Source Localization by an Underwater Horizontal Line Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhao-Hui; Li, Zheng-Lin; Wang, Guang-Xu

    2010-11-01

    Location of an airborne source is estimated from signals measured by a horizontal line array (HLA), based on the fact that a signal transmitted by an airborne source will reach a underwater hydrophone in different ways: via a direct refracted path, via one or more bottom and surface reflections, via the so-called lateral wave. As a result, when an HLA near the airborne source is used for beamforming, several peaks at different bearing angles will appear. By matching the experimental beamforming outputs with the predicted outputs for all source locations, the most likely location is the one which gives minimum difference. An experiment is conducted for airborne source localization in the Yellow Sea in October 2008. An HLA was laid on the sea bottom at the depth of 30m. A high-power loudspeaker was hung on a research ship floating near the HLA and sent out LFM pulses. The estimated location of the loudspeaker is in agreement well with the GPS measurements.

  14. Progressive micrographia shown in horizontal, but not vertical, writing in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-Ing; Hwang, Wen-Juh; Chang, Shao-Hsia; Wang, Tsui-Ying

    2013-01-01

    All published studies on micrographia, a diminution of letter size, examine handwriting in the horizontal direction. Writing horizontally typically requires increased wrist extension as handwriting progresses from left to right. Chinese characters, however, can be written not only horizontally from left to right, but also vertically from top to bottom. We examined the effect of handwriting direction on character size and stroke length. Fifteen participants with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 15 age-matched controls wrote the same Chinese characters both horizontally and vertically. Handwriting performance was recorded with a digitizing tablet, and a custom-written computer program was used to provide objective data about character size and stroke length. The PD group had a linear decrease in overall character size and horizontal strokes along the writing sequence in the horizontal direction, but not in the vertical direction. The controls had shorter horizontal strokes in the horizontal than the vertical direction, but there was no progressive shortening of stroke length along the writing sequence. The results suggest that traditionally reported progressive micrographia in horizontal writing may not be generalizable to vertical writing. The observed decrease of handwriting size in the horizontal direction suggests that micrographia in PD may be associated with wrist extension. For clinical implications, patients may mitigate their micrographia by changing handwriting direction. PMID:23242350

  15. Culture from the Bottom Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight; Sohn, Jija

    2013-01-01

    The culture concept has been severely criticized for its top-down nature in TESOL, leading arguably to its falling out of favor in the field. But what of the fact that people do "live culturally" (Ingold, 1994)? This article describes a case study of culture from the bottom up--culture as understood and enacted by its individual users.…

  16. "Bottom-up" transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Morag, Ahiud; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-11-15

    Transparent electrodes (TEs) have attracted significant scientific, technological, and commercial interest in recent years due to the broad and growing use of such devices in electro-optics, consumer products (touch-screens for example), solar cells, and others. Currently, almost all commercial TEs are fabricated through "top-down" approaches (primarily lithography-based techniques), with indium tin oxide (ITO) as the most common material employed. Several problems are encountered, however, in this field, including the cost and complexity of TE production using top-down technologies, the limited structural flexibility, high-cost of indium, and brittle nature and low transparency in the far-IR spectral region of ITO. Alternative routes based upon bottom-up processes, have recently emerged as viable alternatives for production of TEs. Bottom up technologies are based upon self-assembly of building blocks - atoms, molecules, or nanoparticles - generating thin patterned films that exhibit both electrical conductivity and optical transparency. In this Feature Article we discuss the recent progress in this active and exciting field, including bottom-up TE systems produced from carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene-oxide), silver, gold, and other metals. The current hurdles encountered for broader use of bottom-up strategies along with their significant potential are analyzed. PMID:27545510

  17. Phase-modulated solitary waves controlled by a boundary condition at the bottom.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Abhik; Janaki, M S

    2014-06-01

    A forced Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived to describe weakly nonlinear, shallow-water surface wave propagation over nontrivial bottom boundary condition. We show that different functional forms of bottom boundary conditions self-consistently produce different forced KdV equations as the evolution equations for the free surface. Solitary wave solutions have been analytically obtained where phase gets modulated controlled by bottom boundary condition, whereas amplitude remains constant. PMID:25019847

  18. Interannual variability in bottom-up processes in the upstream range of the California Current system: An isotopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabaawi, Rana W.; Trudel, Marc; Mackas, David L.; Dower, John F.; Mazumder, Asit

    2012-11-01

    The abundance and composition of zooplankton, fish and seabirds show dramatic interannual variability in temperate coastal regions. Understanding links between this variability and bottom-up processes is an important goal for biological oceanographers. Because zooplankton stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) are potentially influenced by variability in phytoplankton nutrient utilization, primary production, and zooplankton trophic structure, they have the potential to elucidate links between bottom-up processes, food web structure, and abundance or species composition of higher trophic levels. Here we measure correlations between zooplankton stable isotopes and oceanographic variables in two time series from the west coast of Vancouver Island, upstream of the California Current upwelling system. We then relate interannual variability in zooplankton stable isotopes to interannual variability in zooplankton species composition. Zooplankton stable isotopes show striking patterns of seasonal, regional and interannual variability. A strong positive correlation between annual averages of zooplankton δ15N and sea-surface temperature is evident in both time series. Zooplankton δ15N is also negatively correlated with interannual anomalies of subarctic copepod biomass in both time series. We propose two different mechanisms to explain these correlations: variability in the strength and direction of horizontal advection, or local fluctuations nutrient availability. We conclude that they are most likely caused by local, temperature-driven fluctuations in nitrate concentrations and primary production. We show that the positive correlation between zooplankton δ15N and temperature is widespread, extending to regions outside of the California Current system. Our findings suggest that interannual variability in zooplankton composition is linked with bottom-up variability in nitrate availability and primary production in the upstream portion of the California Current system. Our

  19. Sliding and rotary PDM drilling keep horizontal well on target. [Positive Displacement Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.L. )

    1993-07-12

    Improved drilling efficiency and the use of steerable positive displacement motors (PDMs) helped keep an Austin chalk horizontal well on target and below cost. Field development in the Austin chalk began more than 60 years ago; however, many wells have had low-to-average oil recovery. Recent thorough studies of the natural fracture matrix in the Austin chalk revealed that the fractures were not interconnected. The ability of a horizontal well to intersect numerous fracture systems made the Austin chalk an excellent candidate for horizontal drilling. This paper describes the well plan, its trajectory, bottom hole assemblies, and drilling results.

  20. Organic biomarkers in deep-sea regions affected by bottom trawling: pigments, fatty acids, amino acids and carbohydrates in surface sediments from the La Fonera (Palamós) Canyon, NW Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañé, E.; Martín, J.; Puig, P.; Palanques, A.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems are in general adapted to a limited variability of physical conditions, resulting in high vulnerability and slow recovery rates from anthropogenic perturbations such as bottom trawling. Commercial trawling is the most recurrent and pervasive of human impacts on the deep-sea floor, but studies on its consequences on the biogeochemistry of deep-sea sediments are still scarce. Pigments, fatty acids, amino acids and carbohydrates were analyzed in sediments from the flanks of the La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon (NW Mediterranean Sea), where a commercial bottom trawling fishery has been active for more than 70 yr. More specifically, we investigated how trawling-induced sediment reworking affects the quality of sedimentary organic matter which reaches the seafloor and accumulates in the sediment column, which is fundamental for the development of benthic communities. Sediment samples were collected during two oceanographic cruises in spring and autumn 2011. The sampled sites included trawl fishing grounds as well as pristine (control) areas. We report that bottom trawling in the flanks of the La Fonera Canyon has caused an alteration of the quality of the organic matter accumulated in the upper 5 cm of the seafloor. The use of a wide pool of biochemical tracers characterized by different reactivity to degradation allowed us to discriminate the long-term effects of trawled-induced sediment reworking from the natural variability caused by the seasonal cycle of production and sinking of biogenic particles. Differences between untrawled and trawled areas were evidenced by labile amino acids, while differences between spring and autumn samples were detected only by the more labile indicators chlorophyll a and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. These results suggest that changes in the biochemical composition of the sedimentary organic matter caused by bottom trawling can be more relevant than those associated with natural seasonality and pose serious

  1. Organic biomarkers in deep-sea regions affected by bottom trawling: pigments, fatty acids, amino acids and carbohydrates in surface sediments from the La Fonera (Palamós) Canyon, NW Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañé, E.; Martín, J.; Puig, P.; Palanques, A.

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems are in general adapted to a limited variability of physical conditions, resulting in high vulnerability and slow recovery rates from anthropogenic perturbations such as bottom trawling. Commercial trawling is the most recurrent and pervasive of human impacts on the deep-sea floor, but studies on its consequences on the biogeochemistry of deep-sea sediments are still scarce. Pigments, fatty acids, amino acids and carbohydrates were analysed in sediments from the flanks of the La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon (NW Mediterranean Sea), where a commercial bottom trawling fishery has been active for more than 70 yr. More specifically, we investigated how trawling-induced sediment reworking affects the quality of sedimentary organic matter which reaches the seafloor and accumulates in the sediment column, which is fundamental for the development of benthic communities. Sediment samples were collected during two oceanographic cruises in spring and autumn 2011. The sampled sites included trawl fishing grounds as well as pristine (control) areas. We report that bottom trawling in the flanks of the La Fonera Canyon has caused an alteration of the quality of the organic matter accumulated in the upper 5 cm of the seafloor. The use of a wide pool of biochemical tracers characterized by different reactivity to degradation allowed for us to discriminate the long-term effects of trawl-induced sediment reworking from the natural variability caused by the seasonal cycle of production and sinking of biogenic particles. Differences between untrawled and trawled areas were evidenced by labile amino acids, while differences between spring and autumn samples were detected only by the more labile indicators chlorophyll a and monounsaturated fatty acids. These results suggest that changes in the biochemical composition of the sedimentary organic matter caused by bottom trawling can be more relevant than those associated with natural seasonality and pose serious

  2. Horizontal and Vertical Line Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Pat

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students learn about the artist Piet Mondrian and create their own abstract artworks. Focuses on geometric shapes using horizontal and vertical lines. Includes background information about the artist. (CMK)

  3. Rotary Steerable Horizontal Directional Drilling: Red River Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukupally, A.; Bergevin, M.; Jones, J.

    2011-12-01

    Sperry-Sun Drilling, a Halliburton company provides engineering solutions and sets new records for Horizontal and Vertical Displacement Drilling (HVDD). Halliburton Sperry Drilling, Casper, WY, allowed one student to participate in 12-week experiential learning program this summer as HVDD engineer. HVDD is the science of drilling non-vertical wells and can be differentiated into three main groups; Oilfield Directional Drilling (ODD), Utility Installation Directional Drilling (UIDD) and in-seam directional Drilling. Sperry-Sun prior experience with rotary drilling established a number of principles for the configuration of Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) that would be prone to drilling crooked hole [1]. Combining Measurement While Drilling survey tools (MWD tools) and BHA designs made HVDD possible. Geologists use the MWD survey data to determine the well placement in the stratigraphic sequence. Through the analysis of this data, an apparent dip of the formation can be calculated, and the bit is directed to stay in the target zone of production. Geological modeling assists in directing the well by creating a map of the target zone surface, an Isopach map. The Isopach map provides contour intervals and changes in formation dip. When the inclination of the formation changes the geologist informs the directional drillers to adjust the drill bits. HVDD provides Halliburton the opportunity to reach more production intervals in a given formation sequence [1]. The Down hole motors powered by fluid flow through the drill string create horsepower and rotation of the bit which enables the use of a bend element in the BHA to create the tilt necessary to deviate the wellbore from vertical displacement drilling path. The rotation of Down hole motors is influenced by temperature and aromatics found in water, oil and diesel based mud. The development of HVDD Rotary Steerable tools hold promise to have almost a complete automated process for drilling highly deviated production well

  4. SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2010-08-01

    Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

  5. Consider FRP linings instead of replacing storage tank bottoms

    SciTech Connect

    LeBleu, J.B. ); Hummel, B. )

    1995-03-01

    If a storage tank bottom is corroding quickly, it must either be replaced, or a thick-filmed, fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) lining must be applied to the existing tank bottom. Replacing a tank bottom can be a costly and time-consuming process. Proper selection and application of an FRP lining system with a 60 to 65-mil thickness can save time, money and prevent internal corrosion of the steel tank bottom for 10 to 20 years. Average corrosion rate of carbon steel storage tanks in crude oil service at ambient temperatures is more than 1 mil per year. Corrosion occurs even more quickly when a layer of water containing corrosive compounds such as salt and sediment settles to the bottom of a crude oil tank. Installing a thick fiber glass-reinforced lining system involves applying a primer, putty, catalyzed resin with a glass mat and a sealcoat. After the tank has been pumped dry and the surface properly prepared, the entire process takes substantially less than the downtime and costs associated with replacing the entire tank bottom. The paper describes the application of a FRP lining system, testing and metal repairs, and the use of catalyzed resin and glass mats.

  6. Texaco sets horizontal well marks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-06

    This paper reports that Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. has completed the first dual lateral horizontal well in East Texas and claimed a horizontal oil well record in the Gulf of Mexico. The East Texas well, 1 Texaco Fee Brookeland, is the company's first dual lateral well. Site is in Newton County. The Brookeland well was drilled vertically to the top of Cretaceous Austin chalk at 9,138 ft. Texaco set casing, then drilled horizontally 3,242 ft to the southeast and 3,000 ft to the northwest for a total horizontal displacement of 6,242 ft. Texaco set an industry record offshore with its B19-ST well on its Teal prospect in Eugene Island Block 338, its first horizontal oil well in the gulf, by drilling a horizontal section of 1,414 ft. Measured depth (MD) is 7,500 ft and true vertical depth (TVD) 4,662 ft. Site is in 268 ft of water. Drilling horizontally through the Pleistocene prograding sand complex allowed Texaco to penetrate 50% more of the reservoir than would have been possible with a conventional well, Wallace the. In another industry first, Texaco isolated the Teal reservoir gas cap by setting intermediate casing 50 ft below the oil-gas contact with the 90{degrees} angle already established because of concern that the reservoir had an expanded gas cap. The dual lateral Brookeland well cost $500,000-700,000 less than two vertical wells capable of comparable production rates and recovery. Texaco expects the full cost of the well, production facilities, and gathering system to pay out in about 4 months. Texaco estimates the B19-ST well cost about 10% more than a Teal vertical well. A cross discipline team of Texaco geologists, geophysicists, engineers, and field technicians contributed to the success of both projects.

  7. Uniform head in horizontal and vertical wells.

    PubMed

    Steward, David R; Jin, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The steady-state head within a fully penetrating well may be estimated by evaluating the Thiem equation at the radius of the well. A method is presented here to extend results from the Thiem equation to horizontal wells and to partially penetrating wells. The particular model used in this investigation is based upon the analytic element method; it accurately reproduces a boundary condition of uniform head along the cylindrical surface at the perforated face of the well. This model is exercised over a representative range of parameters including the well's length, radius, and pumping rate, and the aquifer's hydraulic conductivity and thickness. Results are presented in a set of figures and tables that compare the well's drawdown to the drawdown that would have been obtained using the Thiem solution with the same pumping rate and radius. A methodology is presented to estimate the head within a horizontal or partially penetrating well by adding a correction term to results that can be readily obtained from computer models of vertical fully penetrating wells. This approach may also be used to contrast the differences in head between horizontal and vertical wells of various lengths, radii, and placement elevations. PMID:16405471

  8. Well logging and completion technology for horizontal wellbores

    SciTech Connect

    Fertl, W.H. )

    1990-09-01

    In highly deviated and, particularly, horizontal wellbores, special hardware systems guide, push, and/or pump the logging instrument assembly toward the bottom, i.e., the end of the wellbore, and to log the interval of interest. The present paper discusses basic pipe-conveyed logging (PCL) systems and the coiled-tubing-conveyed (CTC) system for completion and perforating applications in horizontal well bores, which already have proven successful in Europe, the US, and Canada. Open- and cased-hole field applications, with special emphasis on the Cretaceous Austin Chalk in Texas and the Bakken Shale in Wyoming, will illustrate today's technology and review advantages and possible constraints of these well logging and completion techniques.

  9. Modeling Horizontal GPS Seasonal Signals Caused by Ocean Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, N. M.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2014-12-01

    GPS monuments around the world exhibit seasonal signals in both the horizontal and vertical components with amplitudes on the order of centimeters. For analysis of tectonic signals, researchers typically fit and remove a sine wave with an annual period, and sometimes an additional sine wave with a semiannual period. As interest grows in analyzing smaller, slower signals it becomes more important to correct for these seasonal signals accurately. It is well established that the vertical component of seasonal GPS signals is largely due to continental water storage cycles (e.g. van Dam et al., GRL, 2001). Horizontal seasonal signals however are not well explained by continental water storage. We examine horizontal seasonal signals across western North America and find that the horizontal component is coherent at very large spatial scales and is in general oriented perpendicular to the nearest coastline, indicating an oceanic origin. Additionally, horizontal and vertical annual signals are out of phase by approximately 2 months indicating different physical origins. Studies of GRACE and ocean bottom pressure data indicate an annual variation of non-steric, non-tidal ocean height with an average amplitude of 1 cm globally (e.g. Ponte et al., GRL, 2007). We use Some Programs for Ocean Tide Loading (SPOTL; Agnew, SIO Technical Report, 2012) to model predicted displacements due to these (non-tidal) ocean loads and find general agreement with observed horizontal GPS seasonal signals. In the future, this may lead to a more accurate way to predict and remove the seasonal component of GPS displacement time-series, leading to better discrimination of the true tectonic signal. Modeling this long wavelength signal also provides a potential opportunity to probe the structure of the Earth.

  10. 13. CLOSEUP OF AFT BULKHEAD IN THE MAIN HOLD. HORIZONTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. CLOSE-UP OF AFT BULKHEAD IN THE MAIN HOLD. HORIZONTAL ALUMINUM SCALE RESTING ON STEP IS FOUR FEET LONG. THE BOTTOM OF THE HOLD IS MADE OF POURED CONCRETE AND HAS A CENTER DRAIN TO COLLECT WATER FROM MELTING ICE AND OTHER FLUIDS. THE DRAIN LED TO A SUMP CLEARED BY A BILGE PUMP WHICH PUMPED OVERBOARD. THE RECTANGULAR OPENING IN THE BULKHEAD WAS CUT TO ENABLE EASIER REMOVAL OF THE ENGINE AFTER THE EVELINA M. GOULART WAS ABANDONED. - Auxiliary Fishing Schooner "Evelina M. Goulart", Essex Shipbuilding Museum, 66 Main Street, Essex, Essex County, MA

  11. Pressure analysis for horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Davlau, F.; Mouronval, G.; Bourdarot, G.; Curutchet, P.

    1988-12-01

    This paper presents horizontal-well test design and interpretation methods. Analytical solutions are developed that can be handled easily by a desktop computer to carry out design as well as interpretation with semilog and log-log analysis. These analytical solutions point out the distinctive behavior of horizontal wells: (1) at early time, there is a circular radial flow in a vertical plane perpendicular to the well, and (2) at late time, there is a horizontal pseudoradial flow. Each type of flow is associated with a semilog straight line to which semilog analysis has to be adapted. The horizontal pseudoradial flow takes into account a pseudoskin depending on system geometry, which is a priori defined and estimated. Practical time criteria are proposed to determine the beginning and the end of each type of flow and to provide a guide to semilog analysis and well test design. The authors study the behavior of uniform-flux or infinite-conductivity horizontal wells, with wellbore storage and skin. The homogeneous reservoir is infinite or limited by impermeable or constant-pressure boundaries. A method is also outlined to transform all our solutions for homogeneous reservoirs into corresponding solutions for double-porosity reservoirs.

  12. Pressure behavior of horizontal wells in multilayer reservoirs with crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, F.J.; Habashy, T.

    1996-03-01

    New analytic solutions for horizontal wells with wellbore storage and skin in layered reservoirs with cross flow are presented. These layered systems can be bounded by two horizontal impermeable boundary planes at the top and the bottom, or either one of the boundary planes can have a constant pressure (the system either has a gas cap or an active aquifer), while the other is maintained as a no-flow boundary. The new solutions are derived by utilizing the reflection and transmission concept of electromagnetics to solve fluid flow problems in three dimensional layered reservoirs, where nonhomogeneity is in only one direction. The solution technique is sufficiently general that it may be applied to a wide variety of fluid flow and well testing problems involving single-phase flow. The solutions are applied to a number of layered-reservoir examples. It is shown that a gas cap or aquifer should automatically not be treated as a constant-pressure boundary. It is also shown that estimation of layer parameters from conventional well tests is difficult. A field example is presented for the use of the new solutions for the interpretation of a buildup test from a horizontal well in a multilayer reservoir, where the layers are separated sporadically by low permeability zones. The Horner method is also used to interpret the field test; however, Horner does not work well for layered systems with horizontal wells.

  13. Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clauson, T.L.

    1999-08-31

    The Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment No.1 is a series of tests intended to further the understanding of rotational dynamics. A simple experimental assembly is rotated using the Horizontal Air Bearing and allowed to spin freely as the internal rotational damping is measured. The low friction of the bearing effectively isolates the test assembly, allowing the internal damping of the test object to be evaluated. The experimental assembly is composed of an aluminum ball within a spherical cavity. A flanged pipe section and an auxiliary adapter plate secure the assembly to the Air Bearing interface plate. Three aluminum balls are interchanged to vary test parameters. The aluminum balls are free to move independently as the entire assembly rotates. The aluminum balls vary in diameter and/or surface finish. While the diameter and surface finish is varied, the space between the ball and socket is dry. To examine the effect of viscosity, the space is filled with a lubricant while the ball diameter and surface finish is held constant.

  14. Horizontal displacement profiles in N Reactor horizontal control rod channels

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1988-12-01

    One of the potential results from N Reactor graphite moderator distortion is horizontal curvature of the horizontal control rod (HCR) channels. Mockup testing has identified two possible problem scenarios resulting from such curvature: slow scram times and rod abrasion due to rubbing of the rod on the side of the channel and subsequent displacement of T-blocks that form the sides of the channels. As a result of these potential events, surveillance tools (instrumentation) to measure HCR channel horizontal displacement was recently developed. Surveillance of HCR channel 65, performed on December 11, 1987, indicated a six inch rearward displacement near the center of the channel. This approximated the displacement which mockup testing has identified as a concern with regard to T-block movement. Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) observations indicate that T-block movement has not occurred in HCR channel 65, but that there has been some rubbing of the rod on the channel sides. Review of most recent rod hot scram times indicates normal performance for HCR 65. To further evaluate this concern, horizontal deflection and CCTV surveillance was scheduled in six HCR channels surrounding HCR channel 65. Inspection of the HCR rod tip was also performed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  15. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  16. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  17. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  18. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  19. 46 CFR 171.105 - Double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Double bottoms. 171.105 Section 171.105 Shipping COAST... VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.105 Double bottoms. (a) This section... over 165 feet (50 meters) and under 200 feet (61 meters) in LBP must have a double bottom that...

  20. Magneto-convective instabilities in horizontal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistrangelo, Chiara; Bühler, Leo

    2016-02-01

    A linear stability analysis is performed to investigate the onset of convective motions in a flat cavity filled with liquid metal. A volumetric heat source is uniformly distributed in the fluid and a horizontal magnetic field is imposed. Walls perpendicular to the magnetic field are thermally insulating, and the top wall is isothermal and the bottom adiabatic. When a magnetic field is applied, electromagnetic forces tend to transform 3D convective flow structures into quasi-2D rolls aligned to the magnetic field. By integrating 3D equations along magnetic field lines, a quasi-2D mathematical model has been derived. A dissipation term in the 2D equations accounts for 3D viscous effects in boundary layers at Hartmann walls perpendicular to the magnetic field. The influence of various parameters on flow stability is investigated. The flow is stabilized by increasing the magnetic field intensity or the electric conductance of Hartmann walls and by reducing the aspect ratio of the cavity. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the analytical results and to describe the main convective flow patterns in the non-linear regime.

  1. Speckle imaging over horizontal paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Carmen J.

    2002-09-01

    Atmospheric aberrations reduce the resolution and contrast in surveillance images recorded over horizontal or slant paths. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant-path imaging experiments of extended scenes as well as the results obtained using speckle imaging. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed on either a rooftop or hillside and cover ranges of interest from 0.5 km up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures. The improvement in image quality using speckle imaging is dramatic in many cases, and depends significantly upon the atmospheric conditions. We quantify resolution improvement through modulation transfer function measurement comparisons.

  2. Speckle Imaging Over Horizontal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J

    2002-05-21

    Atmospheric aberrations reduce the resolution and contrast in surveillance images recorded over horizontal or slant paths. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant path imaging experiments of extended scenes as well as the results obtained using speckle imaging. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed on either a rooftop or hillside and cover ranges of interest from 0.5 km up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures. The improvement in image quality using speckle imaging is dramatic in many cases, and depends significantly upon the atmospheric conditions. We quantify resolution improvement through modulation transfer function measurement comparisons.

  3. Success in horizontal barrier developments

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, P.J.; Ridenour, D.E.; Jalovec, J.

    1996-06-01

    A successful proof of concept demonstration has been conducted of operational methods and tooling for the in situ construction of underground horizontal barriers for the control and containment of groundwater and contamination. The method involves jet grouting with specially adapted tools guided between twin, parallel wells for the placement of a grout beneath a waste site. The objective of the work is to develop reliable methods of constructing extensive, competent horizontal barriers underneath waste sites without excavating or penetrating the waste during the process.

  4. Horizontal completions challenge for industry

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Spatz, E.

    1988-05-02

    As the technology to drill horizontal wells continues to evolve, the problem of efficiently and cost-effectively completing such wells grows. The economics of applying horizontal technology in high-productivity reservoirs demands both increased production and lower development costs. Such high productivity reservoirs are typical of the Gulf of Mexico, North Sea, South China basin, and other areas. Lowering development costs is achieved by drilling fewer wells and in the offshore environment by reducing the number of platforms and other well structures. Specifically addressed in this article are the problems of achieving high efficiency, long lasting completions while controlling costs in unconsolidated and poorly consolidated sandstone reservoirs.

  5. Polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere delimited by a heterogeneous diffusely reflecting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strelkov, S. A.; Sushkevich, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Spatial frequency characteristics (SFC) and the scattering functions were studied in the two cases of a uniform horizontal layer with absolutely black bottom, and an isolated layer. The mathematical model for these examples describes the horizontal heterogeneities in a light field with regard to radiation polarization in a three dimensional planar atmosphere, delimited by a heterogeneous surface with diffuse reflection. The perturbation method was used to obtain vector transfer equations which correspond to the linear and nonlinear systems of polarization radiation transfer. The boundary value tasks for the vector transfer equation that is a parametric set and one dimensional are satisfied by the SFC of the nonlinear system, and are expressed through the SFC of linear approximation. As a consequence of the developed theory, formulas were obtained for analytical calculation of albedo in solving the task of dissemination of polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere with uniform Lambert bottom.

  6. Flow structure of natural dehumidification over a horizontal finned-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirbodi, Kamran; Yaghoubi, Mahmood

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, structure of water drops formation, growth, coalescence and departure over a horizontal finned-tube during natural dehumidification is investigated experimentally. Starting time of repelling the drops as well as heat transfer rate and the rate of dripping condensates in quasi-steady-state conditions are presented. Furthermore, cold airflow pattern around the horizontal finned-tube is visualized by using smoke generation scheme during natural dehumidification process. The finned-tube has a length of 300 mm, and inner and outer fin diameters, fin thickness and fin spacing are 25.4, 56, 0.4 and 2 mm, respectively. The tests are conducted in an insulated control room with dimensions of 5.8 m × 3 m × 4 m. Ambient air temperature, relative humidity and fin base temperature are selected from 25 to 35 °C, from 40 to 70 % and from 4 to 8 °C, respectively. Observations show that natural condensation from humid air over the test case is completely dropwise. Droplets only form on the edge of the fin and lateral fin surfaces remain almost dry. Dehumidification process over the tested finned-tube is divided into four stages; nucleation, formation, growth and departure of drops. It is also observed that the condensate inundation leaves the tube bottom in the form of droplets. Smoke visualization depicts that humid airflows downward around the cold finned-tube surface without noticeable turbulence and separation in the initial stages of dehumidification process. But the airflow has some disturbances in the intermediate stage and especially during drop departure on the edge of the fins.

  7. Flow structure of natural dehumidification over a horizontal finned-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirbodi, Kamran; Yaghoubi, Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, structure of water drops formation, growth, coalescence and departure over a horizontal finned-tube during natural dehumidification is investigated experimentally. Starting time of repelling the drops as well as heat transfer rate and the rate of dripping condensates in quasi-steady-state conditions are presented. Furthermore, cold airflow pattern around the horizontal finned-tube is visualized by using smoke generation scheme during natural dehumidification process. The finned-tube has a length of 300 mm, and inner and outer fin diameters, fin thickness and fin spacing are 25.4, 56, 0.4 and 2 mm, respectively. The tests are conducted in an insulated control room with dimensions of 5.8 m × 3 m × 4 m. Ambient air temperature, relative humidity and fin base temperature are selected from 25 to 35 °C, from 40 to 70 % and from 4 to 8 °C, respectively. Observations show that natural condensation from humid air over the test case is completely dropwise. Droplets only form on the edge of the fin and lateral fin surfaces remain almost dry. Dehumidification process over the tested finned-tube is divided into four stages; nucleation, formation, growth and departure of drops. It is also observed that the condensate inundation leaves the tube bottom in the form of droplets. Smoke visualization depicts that humid airflows downward around the cold finned-tube surface without noticeable turbulence and separation in the initial stages of dehumidification process. But the airflow has some disturbances in the intermediate stage and especially during drop departure on the edge of the fins.

  8. Horizontal tapping furnace and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wunsche, E.R.

    1987-07-14

    A metallurgical furnace is described including: a furnace floor and a furnace wall means extending generally upwardly about the floor, the furnace having a vertical axis and a horizontal axis, means mounting the furnace for pivotal tilting movement about the horizontal axis between a non-tilted, normal upright position, and a tilted discharge position with the furnace tilted less than 15/sup 0/ to the vertical axis; a hearth zone defined between the floor and wall means adapted to house a bath of liquid metal of predetermined volume, the hearth zone having an upper end defining a predetermined upper level for the bath and for a layer of liquid slag floating on the upper level, when the furnace is in a non-tilted, normal upright position; the hearth zone having a lower end adjacent the floor, a tapping passage extending through the wall means from a liquid metal discharge outlet at an outer end into the lower end of the hearth zone, at an inner end, the discharge outlet being defined by an outwardly facing passage wall and the passage at the outer end; the tapping passage disposed generally parallel to the horizontal axis and vertically below the predetermined upper level, when the furnace is in the non-tilted, normal, upright position; a discharge outlet closure having a closure surface and pivotally mounted externally of the passage for pivotal to and for movement towards and away from the furnace wall means between a first position. The closure surface engages the passage wall at the outer end to fully close the discharge outlet, and a second position spaced apart from the passage wall.

  9. Process and performance optimization of bottom antireflective coatings: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shuji; Sagan, John P.; Shan, Jianhui; Gonzalez, Eleazar; Dixit, Sunit S.; Liu, Ying; Khanna, Dinesh N.

    1999-06-01

    The newly developed AZ BARLi II coating material is a photoresist solvent-based bottom antireflective coating (BARC) for i-line lithographic application. The coating material has good compatibility with common edge bead removal solvents such as ethyl lactate, PGME, or PGMEA mixed with ethyl lactate or PGME. To evaluate the BARC material, its chemical compatibility with common EBR solvents has been tested by several analytical techniques including liquid particle counts and surface defect studies. Both top and bottom EBR dispense processes have been investigated and optimized. Improvements on edge roughness, visual cleanliness, and the BARC coating buildup at the edge will be discussed in this paper.

  10. Horizontal electric fields from lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, E. M.; Medelius, P. J.; Rubinstein, M.; Uman, M. A.; Johnson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment to measure simultaneously the wideband horizontal and vertical electric fields from lightning return strokes is described. Typical wave shapes of the measured horizontal and vertical fields are presented, and the horizontal fields are characterized. The measured horizontal fields are compared with calculated horizontal fields obtained by applying the wavetilt formula to the vertical fields. The limitations and sources of error in the measurement technique are discussed.

  11. STANDBY TOP AND BOTTOM ROTARY MILLING CUTTERS FOR TORIN LINE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STANDBY TOP AND BOTTOM ROTARY MILLING CUTTERS FOR TORIN LINE. SOME PRODUCT FROM THE #43 HOT ROLL IS PROCESSED ON THE TORIN LINE TO REMOVE OXIDIZED SURFACE MATERIAL. IN PRACTICE 15-20/1000 IS CUT FROM THE UPPER AND LOWER SURFACES OF THE STRIP AND RECYCLED TO THE CASTING SHOP. TORIN LINE ADDED AS PART OF 1981 EXPANSION PROGRAM. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  12. Theoretical horizontal-branch evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the theoretical evolution of canonical horizontal-branch (HB) stars are briefly reviewed with specific emphasis on the track morphology in the HR diagram and the determination of the globular cluster helium abundance. The observational evidence for the occurrence of semiconvection is discussed together with some remaining theoretical uncertainty.

  13. Horizontal drilling installs dutch waterline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    A 32-in. potable water line system, installed by Van Eijk Leidingen B.V. in Holland, was laid through an intensively cultivated vegetable gardening area, and designed to furnish additional irrigation water. Using a horizontally drilled 42-in. hole under the Maasdijk, though a difficult job, reduced the length by more than 3 miles.

  14. Dragging a floating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2010-11-01

    A cylinder immersed in a fluid stream experiences a drag, and it is well known that the drag coefficient is a function of the Reynolds number only. Here we study the force exerted on a long horizontal cylinder that is dragged perpendicular to its axis while floating on an air-water interface with a high Reynolds number. In addition to the flow-induced drag, the floating body is subjected to capillary forces along the contact line where the three phases of liquid/solid/gas meet. We first theoretically predict the meniscus profile around the horizontally moving cylinder assuming the potential flow, and show that the profile is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. Then we compare our theoretical predictions and experimental measurement results for the drag coefficient of a floating horizontal cylinder that is given by a function of the Weber number and the Bond number. This study can help us to understand the horizontal motion of partially submerged objects at air-liquid interface, such as semi-aquatic insects and marine plants.

  15. Lifetime measurements for bottom hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, G.

    1984-09-01

    The review of lifetime measurements of bottom hadrons begins with a first measurement by JADE, followed by similar measurements by MAC and MKII groups. New MAC data are reviewed based on a total of 75,000 multihadron events taken at a c.m. energy of 29 GeV. According to Monte Carlo calculations, 18% of the lepton candidates stem from charm decay and roughly 30% were misidentified hadrons. DELCO studied electrons obtained from 42,000 multihadron events at 29 GeV. The electrons were identified by means of Cerenkov counters. JADE analayzed 22,000 multihadron events at 35 GeV. Data were analyzed using two methods - one using a sample of b-enriched events, and the other using weighted distributions. The TASSO results were obtained with two different configurations of the detector - one of which used a drift chamber and the other a vertex detector. (LEW)

  16. Changes in bottom-surface elevations in three reservoirs on the lower Susquehanna River, Pennsylvania and Maryland, following the January 1996 flood; implications for nutrient and sediment loads to Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langland, Michael J.; Hainly, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    The Susquehanna River drains about 27,510 square miles in New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland, contributes nearly 50 percent of the freshwater discharge to the Chesapeake Bay, and contributes nearly 66 percent of the annual nitrogen load, 40 percent of the phosphorus load, and 25 percent of the suspended-sediment load from non-tidal parts of the Bay during a year of average streamflow. A reservoir system formed by three hydroelectric dams on the lower Susquehanna River is currently trapping a major part of the phosphorus and suspended-sediment loads from the basin and, to a lesser extent, the nitrogen loads. In the summer of 1996, the U. S. Geological Survey collected bathymetric data along 64 cross sections and 40 bottom-sediment samples along 14 selected cross sections in the lower Susquehanna River reservoir system to determine the remaining sediment-storage capacity, refine the current estimate of when the system may reach sediment-storage capacity, document changes in the reservoir system after the January 1996 flood, and determine the remaining nutrient mass in Conowingo Reservoir. Results from the 1996 survey indicate an estimated total of 14,800,000 tons of sediment were scoured from the reservoir system from 1993 (date of previous bathymetric survey) through 1996. This includes the net sediment change of 4,700,000 tons based on volume change in the reservoir system computed from the 1993 and 1996 surveys, the 6,900,000 tons of sediment deposited from 1993 through 1996, and the 3,200,000 tons of sediment transported into the reservoir system during the January 1996 flood. The January 1996 flood, which exceeded a 100-year recurrence interval, scoured about the same amount of sediment that normally would be deposited in the reservoir system during a 4- to 6-year period. Concentrations of total nitrogen in bottom sediments in the Conowingo Reservoir ranged from 1,500 to 6,900 mg/kg (milligrams per kilogram); 75 percent of the concentrations were between 3

  17. Seabed sub-bottom sediment classification using parametric sub-bottom profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Mohamed; Rabah, Mostafa

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have been published concerning classification techniques of seabed surfaces using single beam, multibeam, and side scan sonars, while few paid attentions to classify sub-bottom layers using a non-linear Sub-Bottom Profiler (SBP). Non-linear SBP is known for its high resolution images due to the very short pulse length and aperture angle for high and low frequencies. This research is devoted to develop an energy based model that automatically characterizes the layered sediment types as a contribution step toward "what lies where in 3D?". Since the grain size is a function of the reflection coefficient, the main task is to compute the reflection coefficients where high impedance contrast is observed. The developed model extends the energy based surface model (Van Walree et al., 2006) to account for returns reflection of sub-layers where the reflection coefficients are computed sequentially after estimating the geo-acoustic parameters of the previous layer. The validation of the results depended on the model stability. However, physical core samples are still in favor to confirm the results. The model showed consistent stable results that agreed with the core samples knowledge of the studied area. The research concluded that the extended model approximates the reflection coefficient values and will be very promising if volume scatters and multiple reflections are included.

  18. Numerical Modelling of the Mining Induced Horizontal Displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajduś, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents results of numerical calculations and modeling of mining-induced surface deformation based on Finite Element Method (FEM). Applying the numerical method discussed to calculations allows us to assume a larger number of factors, such as rock mass structure, fracture network, rock properties, etc., which essentially affect the results obtained. On the basis of an elastic transversely isotropic model, an analysis of horizontal displacement distribution and surface subsidence was carried out for two sample regions of mines. The results of numerical calculations were later compared with the measured values. Such an analysis proved that the applied numerical model properly described distribution and values of subsidence and slope of subsidence trough, though there were serious differences in the values of calculated horizontal displacement, especially in areas of far influence range. In order to improve the matching, the influence of boundary conditions of the model on the value of calculated horizontal displacement was analyzed. The results are presented in graphs.

  19. Chalk play tops Gulf Coast horizontal scene

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-18

    This paper reports on horizontal drilling in the Cretaceous Austin chalk of Texas which dominates news of U.S. Gulf Coast horizontal action. In spite of a significant decline in horizontal drilling in Texas-the Texas Railroad Commission reported a 15 unit decline in the number of permits to drill horizontal wells during the third quarter-operators in East and South Texas continue to expand plays and develop new ones. The Cretaceous Bruda may be gaining some respect as a horizontal target in Texas. Elsewhere on the Gulf Coast, Mississippi soon will see more action on the horizontal drilling front.

  20. Horizontal gene transfer in plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Caihua; Ren, Xiaodong; Mason, Annaliese S; Liu, Honglei; Xiao, Meili; Li, Jiana; Fu, Donghui

    2014-03-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) describes the transmission of genetic material across species boundaries. HGT often occurs in microbic and eukaryotic genomes. However, the pathways by which HGTs occur in multicellular eukaryotes, especially in plants, are not well understood. We systematically summarized more than ten possible pathways for HGT. The intimate contact which frequently occurs in parasitism, symbiosis, pathogen, epiphyte, entophyte, and grafting interactions could promote HGTs between two species. Besides these direct transfer methods, genes can be exchanged with a vector as a bridge: possible vectors include pollen, fungi, bacteria, viruses, viroids, plasmids, transposons, and insects. HGT, especially when involving horizontal transfer of transposable elements, is recognized as a significant force propelling genomic variation and biological innovation, playing an important functional and evolutionary role in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes. We proposed possible mechanisms by which HGTs can occur, which is useful in understanding the genetic information exchange among distant species or distant cellular components. PMID:24132513

  1. Horizontal-branch stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of canonical theory for the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars are examined. Particular attention is given to how an HB star maintains the appropriate composition distribution within the semiconvective zone and how this composition is affected by the finite time-dependence with which convective boundaries actually move. Newly developed models based on time-dependent overshooting are presented for both the core-helium-exhaustion and main HB phases.

  2. Horizontal drilling opportunities in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Horizontal drilling has become commonplace in certain parts of Texas. The Austin Chalk is the favorite target, especially where fracture systems are present. The activity has become so intense that leases are now costly or nearly impossible to find. This type of activity was prevalent during the late oil boom, but with vertical wells. So, the same areas that were drilled then are being redone with horizontal drilling. In the past few months, carbonates with little or no evidence of fracture systems are being drilled with some success. Because of the difficulty in lease acquisition, operators are turning their attention elsewhere. Even though horizontal drilling has been conducted limitedly in the Devonian black shales, the Appalachian basin is an area that calls for attention. In Ohio, there have been instances of discoveries of one-well fields in both the Trenton and Trempealeau formations. The initial production from these wells ranges from a few to hundreds of barrels of oil per day. The lack of success in offset wells has been attributed to the interpretation that the producing wells were serendipitously drilled into a limited fractured reservoir. In most cases, the producer is surrounded by clusters of dry holes. These Ohio wells and wells in one other area are studied using well data, spectral and sonic logs, aerial photographs, side-looking radar surveys, and other data. The results are presented on structure contour and lineament maps, and quantitative log interpretations. The maps show the interpretations of those areas of fracture systems that might be viable targets for horizontal drilling.

  3. A New Approach to Reconstruct Ancient Bottom Water Oxygen Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathburn, A. E.; Willingham, J.; Corliss, B. H.; Burkett, A. M.; Ziebis, W.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen availability controls many biological and geochemical processes, and serves as an important indicator of paleoceanographic characteristics. Recent work has demonstrated a direct relationship between oxygen acquisition and pores on benthic foraminiferal tests. Epifaunal foraminifera (living near or above the sediment-water interface) are directly exposed to bottom water, and can occur in abundance in a wide range of seafloor environments. In this study, a novel approach using ArcGIS and image analysis techniques was used to determine the percentage of test chamber surface area covered by pores in living and recently living (Rose Bengal stained) epifaunal taxa (Cibicides, Cibicidoides and Planulina). Analyses of Scanning Electron Microscope images of 97 specimens collected from 20 deep-sea locations having different bottom water oxygen concentrations (0.04 to 6.20 ml/L) revealed a robust (R2= 0.729; p < 0.001), negative relationship between pore surface area on test chambers and ambient bottom water oxygen concentration. The resulting calibration curve serves as new, quantitative proxy to assess bottom water oxygen of ancient oceans.

  4. Influence of pavement condition on horizontal curve safety.

    PubMed

    Buddhavarapu, Prasad; Banerjee, Ambarish; Prozzi, Jorge A

    2013-03-01

    Crash statistics suggest that horizontal curves are the most vulnerable sites for crash occurrence. These crashes are often severe and many involve at least some level of injury due to the nature of the collisions. Ensuring the desired pavement surface condition is one potentially effective strategy to reduce the occurrence of severe accidents on horizontal curves. This study sought to develop crash injury severity models by integrating crash and pavement surface condition databases. It focuses on developing a causal relationship between pavement condition indices and severity level of crashes occurring on two-lane horizontal curves in Texas. In addition, it examines the suitability of the existing Skid Index for safety maintenance of two-lane curves. Significant correlation is evident between pavement condition and crash injury severity on two-lane undivided horizontal curves in Texas. Probability of a crash becoming fatal is appreciably sensitive to certain pavement indices. Data suggested that road facilities providing a smoother and more comfortable ride are vulnerable to severe crashes on horizontal curves. In addition, the study found that longitudinal skid measurement barely correlates with injury severity of crashes occurring on curved portions. The study recommends exploring the option of incorporating lateral friction measurement into Pavement Management System (PMS) databases specifically at curved road segments. PMID:23298704

  5. 5. VIEW, LOOKING WEST BENEATH BRIDGE, SHOWING GIRDER FRAMEWORK, HORIZONTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW, LOOKING WEST BENEATH BRIDGE, SHOWING GIRDER FRAMEWORK, HORIZONTAL LATERAL DIAGONAL TENSION EYEBARS, PAIRS OF EYEBARS RUNNING THE LENGTH OF THE BRIDGE, AND RUNNING SURFACE RAILROAD TIES - Heber Creeper Railroad Line, Olmstead Bridge, Spanning Provo River, Provo, Utah County, UT

  6. Coal liquefaction with subsequent bottoms pyrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Walchuk, George P.

    1978-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein heavy bottoms produced in a liquefaction zone are upgraded by coking or a similar pyrolysis step, pyrolysis liquids boiling in excess of about 1000.degree. F. are further reacted with molecular hydrogen in a reaction zone external of the liquefaction zone, the resulting effluent is fractionated to produce one or more distillate fractions and a bottoms fraction, a portion of this bottoms fraction is recycled to the reaction zone, and the remaining portion of the bottoms fraction is recycled to the pyrolysis step.

  7. Simulation of the effects of bottom topography on net primary production induced by riverine input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshiba, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Riverine input often leads to high biological productivity in coastal areas. In coastal areas termed as region of freshwater influence (ROFI), horizontal anticyclonic gyres and vertical circulation form by density differences between buoyant river water and sea water. Previous physical oceanography studies have shown that the horizontal pattern of anticyclonic gyres and the strength of vertical circulation are dependent on the bottom topography of ROFI. However, the dependencies of biogeochemical cycles such as the net primary production (NPP) on the bottom topography have not been verified. In order to clarify how the bottom topography affects the NPP in phytoplankton blooms caused by riverine input through the physical processes in ROFI, we used an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) including a simple ecosystem model and conducted several case studies varying the bottom slope angle in the ideal settings. We estimated NPP categorized into three nutrients supplied from the river, the sea-subsurface layer and via regeneration: RI-NPP, S-NPP and RE-NPP. S-NPP and RE-NPP are larger and smaller with a steeper slope, respectively, while RI-NPP is not affected by the slope angle. As a result, total NPP is weakly dependent on the slope angle, i.e., because S- and RE-NPPs cancel each other out through two physical processes, (1) S-NPP is controlled by the strength of the vertical circulation and (2) RE-NPP is controlled by the shape of the horizontal gyre, which both vary with the bottom slope angle. We also conducted realistic simulations for Ishikari Bay, Japan and confirmed a similar dependency to that in the above ideal settings. That is, the simulation results are consistent with the regime of ideal settings and show that RI- and RE-NPPs are important variables for Ishikari Bay which has a gentle slope.

  8. Up or down? Reading direction influences vertical counting direction in the horizontal plane – a cross-cultural comparison

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Silke M.

    2015-01-01

    Most adults and children in cultures where reading text progresses from left to right also count objects from the left to the right side of space. The reverse is found in cultures with a right-to-left reading direction. The current set of experiments investigated whether vertical counting in the horizontal plane is also influenced by reading direction. Participants were either from a left-to-right reading culture (UK) or from a mixed (left-to-right and top-to-bottom) reading culture (Hong Kong). In Experiment 1, native English-speaking children and adults and native Cantonese-speaking children and adults performed three object counting tasks. Objects were presented flat on a table in a horizontal, vertical, and square display. Independent of culture, the horizontal array was mostly counted from left to right. While the majority of English-speaking children counted the vertical display from bottom to top, the majority of the Cantonese-speaking children as well as both Cantonese- and English-speaking adults counted the vertical display from top to bottom. This pattern was replicated in the counting pattern for squares: all groups except the English-speaking children started counting with the top left coin. In Experiment 2, Cantonese-speaking adults counted a square array of objects after they read a text presented to them either in left-to-right or in top-to-bottom reading direction. Most Cantonese-speaking adults started counting the array by moving horizontally from left to right. However, significantly more Cantonese-speaking adults started counting with a top-to-bottom movement after reading the text presented in a top-to-bottom reading direction than in a left-to-right reading direction. Our results show clearly that vertical counting in the horizontal plane is influenced by longstanding as well as more recent experience of reading direction. PMID:25852583

  9. Up or down? Reading direction influences vertical counting direction in the horizontal plane - a cross-cultural comparison.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Silke M

    2015-01-01

    Most adults and children in cultures where reading text progresses from left to right also count objects from the left to the right side of space. The reverse is found in cultures with a right-to-left reading direction. The current set of experiments investigated whether vertical counting in the horizontal plane is also influenced by reading direction. Participants were either from a left-to-right reading culture (UK) or from a mixed (left-to-right and top-to-bottom) reading culture (Hong Kong). In Experiment 1, native English-speaking children and adults and native Cantonese-speaking children and adults performed three object counting tasks. Objects were presented flat on a table in a horizontal, vertical, and square display. Independent of culture, the horizontal array was mostly counted from left to right. While the majority of English-speaking children counted the vertical display from bottom to top, the majority of the Cantonese-speaking children as well as both Cantonese- and English-speaking adults counted the vertical display from top to bottom. This pattern was replicated in the counting pattern for squares: all groups except the English-speaking children started counting with the top left coin. In Experiment 2, Cantonese-speaking adults counted a square array of objects after they read a text presented to them either in left-to-right or in top-to-bottom reading direction. Most Cantonese-speaking adults started counting the array by moving horizontally from left to right. However, significantly more Cantonese-speaking adults started counting with a top-to-bottom movement after reading the text presented in a top-to-bottom reading direction than in a left-to-right reading direction. Our results show clearly that vertical counting in the horizontal plane is influenced by longstanding as well as more recent experience of reading direction. PMID:25852583

  10. U. S. horizontal drilling continues to spread

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1990-12-10

    This paper reports that horizontal drilling is still spreading in onshore U.S. oil fields. One company completed a shallow well producing oil by gravity drainage through three horizontal legs about 120{sup {degrees}} apart on the La Barge platform in Wyoming. The author reports successful Austin chalk horizontal drilling in Sabine County, East Texas. Another horizontal completion of Cretaceous Niobrara was reported and several other wells were drilling or staked in Silo field, Laramie County, Wyoming.

  11. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  12. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  13. Use of a Foam Spatula for Sampling Surfaces after Bioaerosol Deposition ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Rafał; Kozłowska, Krystyna; Szpakowska, Małgorzata; Stępińska, Małgorzata; Trafny, Elżbieta A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study had three goals: (i) to evaluate the relative quantities of aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus spores deposited on the vertical, horizontal top, and horizontal bottom surfaces in a chamber; (ii) to assess the relative recoveries of the aerosolized spores from glass and stainless steel surfaces with a polyester swab and a macrofoam sponge wipe; and (iii) to estimate the relative recovery efficiencies of aerosolized B. atrophaeus spores and Pantoea agglomerans using a foam spatula at several different bacterial loads by aerosol distribution on glass surfaces. The majority of spores were collected from the bottom horizontal surface regardless of which swab type and extraction protocol were used. Swabbing with a macrofoam sponge wipe was more efficient in recovering spores from surfaces contaminated with high bioaerosol concentrations than swabbing with a polyester swab. B. atrophaeus spores and P. agglomerans culturable cells were detected on glass surfaces using foam spatulas when the theoretical surface bacterial loads were 2.88 × 104 CFU and 8.09 × 106 CFU per 100-cm2 area, respectively. The median recovery efficiency from the surfaces using foam spatulas was equal to 9.9% for B. atrophaeus spores when the recovery was calculated relative to the theoretical surface spore load. Using a foam spatula permits reliable sampling of spores on the bioaerosol-exposed surfaces in a wide measuring range. The culturable P. agglomerans cells were recovered with a median efficiency of 0.001%, but staining the swab extracts with fluorescent dyes allowed us to observe that the viable cell numbers were higher by 1.83 log units than culturable organisms. However, additional work is needed to improve the analysis of the foam extracts in order to decrease the limit of detection of Bacillus spores and Gram-negative bacteria on contaminated surfaces. PMID:20023101

  14. Horizontal film balance having wide range and high sensitivity

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, B.M.; Miyano, K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1981-03-05

    A thin-film, horizontal balance instrument is provided for measuring surface tension (surface energy) of thin films suspended on a liquid substrate. The balance includes a support bearing and an optical feedback arrangement for wide-range, high sensitivity measurements. The force on the instrument is balanced by an electromagnet, the current through the magnet providing a measure of the force applied to the instrument. A novel float construction is also disclosed.

  15. Horizontal film balance having wide range and high sensitivity

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Bernard M.; Miyano, Kenjiro; Ketterson, John B.

    1983-01-01

    A thin-film, horizontal balance instrument is provided for measuring surface tension (surface energy) of thin films suspended on a liquid substrate. The balance includes a support bearing and an optical feedback arrangement for wide-range, high sensitivity measurements. The force on the instrument is balanced by an electromagnet, the current through the magnet providing a measure of the force applied to the instrument. A novel float construction is also disclosed.

  16. Horizontal film balance having wide range and high sensitivity

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, B.M.; Miyano, K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-11-08

    A thin-film, horizontal balance instrument is provided for measuring surface tension (surface energy) of thin films suspended on a liquid substrate. The balance includes a support bearing and an optical feedback arrangement for wide-range, high sensitivity measurements. The force on the instrument is balanced by an electromagnet, the current through the magnet providing a measure of the force applied to the instrument. A novel float construction is also disclosed. 5 figs.

  17. WAVECALC: an Excel-VBA spreadsheet to model the characteristics of fully developed waves and their influence on bottom sediments in different water depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Jacobus P.; Demirbilek, Zeki; Brodalka, Marysia; Flemming, Burghard W.

    2010-10-01

    The generation and growth of waves in deep water is controlled by winds blowing over the sea surface. In fully developed sea states, where winds and waves are in equilibrium, wave parameters may be calculated directly from the wind velocity. We provide an Excel spreadsheet to compute the wave period, length, height and celerity, as well as horizontal and vertical particle velocities for any water depth, bottom slope, and distance below the reference water level. The wave profile and propagation can also be visualized for any water depth, modeling the sea surface change from sinusoidal to trochoidal and finally cnoidal profiles into shallow water. Bedload entrainment is estimated under both the wave crest and the trough, using the horizontal water particle velocity at the top of the boundary layer. The calculations are programmed in an Excel file called WAVECALC, which is available online to authorized users. Although many of the recently published formulas are based on theoretical arguments, the values agree well with several existing theories and limited field and laboratory observations. WAVECALC is a user-friendly program intended for sedimentologists, coastal engineers and oceanographers, as well as marine ecologists and biologists. It provides a rapid means to calculate many wave characteristics required in coastal and shallow marine studies, and can also serve as an educational tool.

  18. Closeup view of the bottom area of Space Shuttle Main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the bottom area of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) 2052 engine assembly mounted in a SSME Engine Handler in the Horizontal Processing area of the SSME Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The most prominent features in this view are the Low-Pressure Oxidizer Discharge Duct toward the bottom of the assembly, the SSME Engine Controller and the Main Fuel Valve Hydraulic Actuator are in the approximate center of the assembly in this view, the Low-Pressure Fuel Turbopump (LPFTP), the LPFTP Discharge Duct are to the left on the assembly in this view and the High-Pressure Fuel Turbopump is located toward the top of the engine assembly in this view. The ring of tabs in the right side of the image, at the approximate location of the Nozzle and the Coolant Outlet Manifold interface is the Heat Shield Support Ring. - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. Horizontal density compensation in ocean general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andrey O.; Helber, Robert W.; Richman, James G.; Barron, Charlie N.

    2013-04-01

    Density compensation is the condition where temperature (T) and salinity (S) gradients counteract in their effect on density. Open ocean observations with SeaSoar tows and recent glider observations in the Gulf of Mexico reported in the scientific literature suggest that horizontal gradients in the surface mixed layer tend to be strongly density compensated over a range of spatial scales while in seasonal thermocline and deeper layers T,S-fronts are only partially compensated or uncompensated. We assess the capability of ocean general circulation models (OGCM) to develop horizontal density compensation as observed in the upper ocean. The physics required to evolve the initial density compensated mixed layer toward the partially compensated conditions of the thermocline is tested. Idealistic scenarios with horizontal, partially compensated density fronts in the mixed layer are examined in submesoscale-resolved run-down simulations on Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Simulations with no atmospheric forcing show that initial Density compensation does not change substantially experiencing only minor decrease with time simultaneously with the restratification of the mixed layer by submesoscale eddies. Submesoscale fronts tend to be more compensated than mesoscale fronts. A sensitivity analysis shows that the density compensation of submesoscale fronts is particularly sensitive to the horizontal diffusion rate. Simulations with wind forcing exhibit destruction of initial density compensation due to ageostrophic frontogenesis which is confirmed by recent glider observations in the Gulf of Mexico. The lack of the model skill to develop and maintain compensated thermohaline variability is attributed to the T, S horizontal diffusion parameterization used in HYCOM and generally in modern OGCMs: it is decoupled from vertical diffusion and T and S diffusion is horizontally identical. Our findings suggest that OGCM's skill to develop compensated thermohaline variability

  20. Prediction of Heat Transfer Coefficient for Refrigerant With Oil Contained in Horizontal Evaporator Tuvbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi; Yoshida, Suguru

    A method which is generally applicable to predict the axially local (circumferentially averaged) heat transfer coefficient for refrigerant with oil contained flowing in horizontal evaporator tubes was developed by modifying a prediction method for pure refrigerants. The dimensionless correlation for an annular flow regime takes account of the influence of oil on an improvement or a reduction in the heat transfer, in addition to the change of the properties due to the addition of oil. For a separated flow regime, the correlations of the average heat transfer coefficients in the top part and the bottom part and their boundary angle were developed by modifying each correlation for pure refrigerants. The circumferentially averaged heat transfer coefficient for the separated flow regime can be obtained by using the solution of the steady heat conduction equation in the tube wall, to which the values calculated from the above correlations are applied as the boundary conditions at the inside surface of the tube. Which flow regime, annular or separated, prevails can be determined by the correlation of the boundary angle. The present prediction method was confirmed to be applicable to various kinds of refrigerant-oil mixture.

  1. Macrosegregation in horizontal direct chill casting of ternary Al alloys: Investigation of solid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vušanović, I.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Macrosegregation in direct chill casting processes is controlled by fluid flow due to the thermosolutal natural and forced convection, shrinkage, and transport of unattached solid grains. Because grain refinement is usually used in aluminum direct chill casting, some effort must be made to model free-floating solid grains, and their attachment to a rigid mushy zone. Criteria for attachment vary, but many are based on using a critical solid packing fraction, which is treated as uniform and constant throughout the domain. In the case of horizontal casting (HDC), gravity acts perpendicularly to the casting direction, and the assumption of a uniform packing fraction cannot be applied because the solid particles attach to some surfaces by settling and others by being swept into the rigid solid from below. In this simulation of HDC casting of an Al-Cu-Mg alloy, the rigid and unattached solid is tracked separately, and a rule set is developed to determine the attachment of free-floating solid. Comparison between cases with and without unattached solid movement shows qualitatively different results, particularly in bottom part of slab. Non-uniform packing fractions cause very different segregation patterns in the lower half of the ingot compared to the cases with no solid movement, less segregation near centerline compared to uniform packing fraction cases, and positive segregation near the place where inlet jet impinges on the mushy zone.

  2. Cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss model for horizontal narrow annular flow with rotating drillpipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofei, T. N.; Irawan, S.; Pao, W.

    2015-04-01

    During oil and gas drilling operations, frictional pressure loss is experienced as the drilling fluid transports the drilled cuttings from the bottom-hole, through the annulus, to the surface. Estimation of these pressure losses is critical when designing the drilling hydraulic program. Two-phase frictional pressure loss in the annulus is very difficult to predict, and even more complex when there is drillpipe rotation. Accurate prediction will ensure that the correct equivalent circulating density (ECD) is applied in the wellbore to prevent formation fracture, especially in formations with narrow window between the pore pressure and fracture gradient. Few researchers have attempted to propose cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models, nevertheless, these models fail when they are applied to narrow wellbores such as in casing- while-drilling and slimhole applications. This study proposes improved cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models for narrow horizontal annuli with drillpipe rotation using Dimensional Analysis. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids were considered. The proposed model constants were fitted by generated data from a full-scale simulation study using ANSYS-CFX. The models showed improvement over existing cuttings-liquid pressure loss correlations in literature.

  3. Hyperspectral imaging based procedures applied to bottom ash characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2007-09-01

    Bottom ash from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators (MSWIs) is mainly land filled or used as material for the foundation of road in European countries. Bottom ash is usually first crushed to below 40 mm and separated magnetically to recover the steel scrap. The remaining material contains predominantly sand, sinters and pieces of stone, glass and ceramics, which could be used as building material if strict technical and environmental requirements are respected. The main problem is the presence of residual organic matter in the ash and the large surface area presented by the fine fraction that creates leaching values, for elements such as copper, that are above the accepted levels for standard building materials. Main aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility offered by hyperspectral imaging to identify organic matter inside the residues in order to develop control/selection strategies to be implemented inside the bottom ash recycling plant. Reflectance spectra of selected bottom ash samples have been acquired in the VIS-NIR field (400- 1000 nm). Results showed as the organic content of the different samples influences the spectral signatures, in particular an inverse correlation between reflectance level and organic matter content was found.

  4. Linear waves in two-layer fluids over periodic bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Maas, Leo

    2015-11-01

    A new, exact Floquet theory is presented for linear waves in two-layer fluids over a periodic bottom of arbitrary shape and amplitude. A method of conformal transformation is adapted. The solutions are given, in essentially analytical form, for the dispersion relation between wave frequency and generalized wavenumber (Floquet exponent), and for the waveforms of free wave modes. The dispersion relation is the analogue of the classical Lamb's equation for a two-layer fluid over a flat bottom. For internal modes the interfacial wave shows rapid modulation at the scale of its own wavelength that is comparable to bottom wavelength, whereas for surface modes it becomes a long wave carrier for modulating short waves of bottom wavelength. The approximation using a rigid-lid is given. Sample calculations are shown, including the frequencies that are Bragg resonant. Supports to JY by US National Science Foundation (Grant CBET-0845957) and a visitor's grant of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) during the period of this work, are gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Horizontal drilling comes full circle

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, M.

    1991-06-01

    This paper discusses the new discoveries of oil and gas in Utah's Paradox Fold and Fault Belt resulting from horizontal drilling techniques. The Kane Spring Federal {number sign}27-1 is the first successful horizontal wildcat drilled in Utah. The discovery well recorded an initial potential test rate of 914 barrels of oil and 290 thousand cubic feet of gas per day through a 10/64-inch choke, with a flowing tubing pressure of 3,460 psi. A one-hour test on a 14/64-inch choke produced a rate of 2,302 barrels of oil and 627 thousand cubic feet of gas per day. The paper describes the engineering aspects of the well construct which was needed to direct the drill stem in salt beds and relatively incompetent beds. The pay zone is located in the Cane Creek Shale of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. The oil and gas are located in geologic fractures and sealed by two layers of salt. The future of the prospect area is described.

  6. Orphan penumbrae: Submerging horizontal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčák, J.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; Sobotka, M.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the properties of orphan penumbrae, which are photospheric filamentary structures observed in active regions near polarity inversion lines that resemble the penumbra of regular sunspots but are not connected to any umbra. Methods: We use Hinode data from the Solar Optical Telescope to determine the properties of orphan penumbrae. Spectropolarimetric data are employed to obtain the vector magnetic field and line-of-sight velocities in the photosphere. Magnetograms are used to study the overall evolution of these structures, and G-band and Ca ii H filtergrams are to investigate their brightness and apparent horizontal motions. Results: Orphan penumbrae form between regions of opposite polarity in places with horizontal magnetic fields. Their magnetic configuration is that of Ω-shaped flux ropes. In the two cases studied here, the opposite-polarity regions approach each other with time and the whole structure submerges as the penumbral filaments disappear. Orphan penumbrae are very similar to regular penumbrae, including the existence of strong gas flows. Therefore, they could have a similar origin. The main difference between them is the absence of a "background" magnetic field in orphan penumbrae. This could explain most of the observed differences. Conclusions: The fast flows we detect in orphan penumbrae may be caused by the siphon flow mechanism. Based on the similarities between orphan and regular penumbrae, we propose that the Evershed flow is also a manifestation of siphon flows. A movie attached to Fig. 11 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Comparison of the transport of the aggregates of nanoscale zerovalent iron under vertical and horizontal flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2016-02-01

    Direct injection of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles is being considered for remediation of contaminated sites. However, the transport characteristics of NZVI under horizontal flow conditions are not fully understood. In this study, NZVI particles were stabilized with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and injected in vertical and horizontal columns to compare the effects of the flow direction on the transport. Columns were packed with sand of mean grain diameters of 180, 340 or 1140 µm (referred to as fine, intermediate and coarse sand, respectively), and were injected with CMC-NZVI suspensions of 0.3, 1 or 3 g Fe L(-1). Experimental breakthrough curves showed that with the coarse and intermediate sands, the steady-state effluent concentration in the horizontal column were up to 84% lower than those in the vertical column regardless of the initial NZVI concentration. However, in the fine sand the differences were insignificant, except at the highest NZVI particle concentration. Additionally, in the horizontally-oriented columns containing the coarse or intermediated sand, NZVI aggregates particles were non-uniformly distributed in the cross-section of the columns and there higher deposition in the bottom-half of the cross-section due to gravity effects. These deposition patterns can be accounted for, in part, by the gravitational settling of the large aggregates of NZVI, especially at high NZVI concentrations. A particle trajectory analysis in three dimensions demonstrated that under horizontal flow, gravity forces resulted in lower deposition of NZVI on the bottom-half of a single collector, as particles approaching the bottom-half of the collector were deflected by gravity to collectors below. PMID:26498094

  8. Pipeline bottoming cycle study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of applying bottoming cycles to the prime movers that drive the compressors of natural gas pipelines was studied. These bottoming cycles convert some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas of the prime movers into shaft power and conserve gas. Three typical compressor station sites were selected, each on a different pipeline. Although the prime movers were different, they were similar enough in exhaust gas flow rate and temperature that a single bottoming cycle system could be designed, with some modifications, for all three sites. Preliminary design included selection of the bottoming cycle working fluid, optimization of the cycle, and design of the components, such as turbine, vapor generator and condensers. Installation drawings were made and hardware and installation costs were estimated. The results of the economic assessment of retrofitting bottoming cycle systems on the three selected sites indicated that profitability was strongly dependent upon the site-specific installation costs, how the energy was used and the yearly utilization of the apparatus. The study indicated that the bottoming cycles are a competitive investment alternative for certain applications for the pipeline industry. Bottoming cycles are technically feasible. It was concluded that proper design and operating practices would reduce the environmental and safety hazards to acceptable levels. The amount of gas that could be saved through the year 2000 by the adoption of bottoming cycles for two different supply projections was estimated as from 0.296 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a low supply projection to 0.734 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a high supply projection. The potential market for bottoming cycle equipment for the two supply projections varied from 170 to 500 units of varying size. Finally, a demonstration program plan was developed.

  9. Bottom temperature and salinity distribution and its variability around Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochumsen, Kerstin; Schnurr, Sarah M.; Quadfasel, Detlef

    2016-05-01

    The barrier formed by the Greenland-Scotland-Ridge (GSR) shapes the oceanic conditions in the region around Iceland. Deep water cannot be exchanged across the ridge, and only limited water mass exchange in intermediate layers is possible through deep channels, where the flow is directed southwestward (the Nordic Overflows). As a result, the near-bottom water masses in the deep basins of the northern North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas hold major temperature differences. Here, we use near-bottom measurements of about 88,000 CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) and bottle profiles, collected in the period 1900-2008, to investigate the distribution of near-bottom properties. Data are gridded into regular boxes of about 11 km size and interpolated following isobaths. We derive average spatial temperature and salinity distributions in the region around Iceland, showing the influence of the GSR on the near-bottom hydrography. The spatial distribution of standard deviation is used to identify local variability, which is enhanced near water mass fronts. Finally, property changes within the period 1975-2008 are presented using time series analysis techniques for a collection of grid boxes with sufficient data resolution. Seasonal variability, as well as long term trends are discussed for different bottom depth classes, representing varying water masses. The seasonal cycle is most pronounced in temperature and decreases with depth (mean amplitudes of 2.2 °C in the near surface layers vs. 0.2 °C at depths > 500 m), while linear trends are evident in both temperature and salinity (maxima in shallow waters of +0.33 °C/decade for temperature and +0.03/decade for salinity).

  10. Explorando nuevos horizontes en NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G. L.

    A pesar de la incesante expansión del Universo iniciada con el Big Bang 14 mil millones de años atrás, nuestro Universo se siente cada día más cercano. La inquebrantable vocación de la humanidad por descubrir nuevos horizontes ha permitido el acercamiento de civilizaciones en nuestro planeta y nos ha permitido conocer nuestro lugar en el Universo como nunca antes. En este artículo presento una breve sinopsis de nuestro trabajo que se relaciona con diversas investigaciones con implicaciones astrobiológicas, desde el origen de los ingredientes de la "sopa de la vida", hasta la evolución y composición de la atmósfera de Marte.

  11. An analysis of segregation during horizontal ribbon growth of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daggolu, Parthiv; Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2014-03-01

    A finite-element, thermal-capillary model is applied to study solute segregation in the horizontal ribbon growth of silicon. Results show a complicated redistribution of solute into the growing ribbon, with nearly constant composition in the upper portion of the crystal and high levels of solute incorporation in the lower portion. The redistribution pattern is explained by convective flow patterns and interfacial geometry in the system. Lower values of equilibrium partition coefficient and solute melt diffusivity contribute to more inhomogeneous crystal composition. Faster pull rates lead to more pronounced redistribution of solute in the crystal. Paradoxically, the inhomogeneous concentration levels in HRG ribbon may be beneficial; impurities accumulate towards a narrow bottom portion of the crystal, leaving a majority of the crystal relatively pure.

  12. New solutions for the confined horizontal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, Evangelos; Gravanis, Elias

    2016-04-01

    The Boussinesq equation is a dynamical equation for the free surface of saturated subsurface flows over an impervious bed. Boussinesq equation is non-linear. The non-linearity comes from the reduction of the dimensionality of the problem: The flow is assumed to be vertically homogeneous, therefore the flow rate through a cross section of the flow is proportional to the free surface height times the hydraulic gradient, which is assumed to be equal to the slope of the free surface. In the present work we consider the case of the subsurface flow with horizontal bed. This is a case with an infinite Henderson and Wooding parameter, that is, it is the limiting case where the non-linear term is present in the Boussinesq equation while the linear spatial derivative term vanishes. Nonetheless, no analogue of the kinematic wave exists in this case as there is no exact solution for the build-up phase. Neither is there an exact recession-phase solution that holds in early times, as the Boussinesq separable solution is actually an asymptotic solution for large times. We construct approximate solutions for the horizontal aquifer which utilize directly the dynamical content of the non-linear Boussinesq equation. The approximate character of the solution lies in the fact that we start with a pre-supposed form for the solution, an educated guess, based on the nature of the initial condition as well as empirical observations from the numerical solution of the problem. The forms we shall use are power series of the location variable x along the bed with time-dependent coefficients. The series are not necessarily analytic. The boundary conditions are incorporated in the structure of the series from the beginning. The time-dependent coefficients are then determined by applying the Boussinesq equation and its spatial derivatives at the end-points of the aquifer. The forms are chosen also on the basis of their solubility; we would like to be able to construct explicitly the approximate

  13. Well testing and interpretation for horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, F.J. )

    1995-01-01

    The use of transient well testing for determining reservoir parameters and productivity of horizontal wells has become common because of the upsurge in horizontal drilling. Initially, horizontal well tests were analyzed with the conventional techniques designed for vertical wells. During the last decade, analytic solutions have been presented for the pressure behavior of horizontal wells. New flow regimes have been identified, and simple equations and flow regime existence criteria have been presented for them. The flow regimes are now used frequently to estimate horizontal and vertical permeabilities of the reservoir, wellbore skin, and reservoir pressure. Although the existing tools and interpretation techniques may be sufficient for simple systems, innovation and improvement of the present technology are still essential for well testing of horizontal wells in many reservoirs with different geological environments and different well-completion requirements.

  14. International trends for future horizontal drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S.D.; Lacy, S.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Since 1985, there has been tremendous growth in horizontal well drilling around the world. This paper summarizes the present trends and results. In addition, it describes the generalized reservoir and geological conditions where horizontal wells have been both economically successful and unsuccessful. Based upon these criteria, the paper estimates possible future activity. In the United States, horizontal wells have been economically successful in fractured reservoirs such as Bakken Shale and Austin Chalk. Internationally, on the other hand, a majority of the applications are for minimizing gas and water coning problems. In general, horizontal wells have been economically successful in minimizing water coning in sandstone and fractured carbonate reservoirs when oil column thicknesses are greater than 20 ft. Many of these applications are in sandstone formations; a few are in fractured carbonate formations. Horizontal wells have been more successful in reducing water coning than gas coning. Internationally, the use of horizontal wells to minimize water and gas coning will continue to grow.

  15. Horizontal Shear Wave Imaging of Large Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J

    2007-09-05

    When complete the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser and will be capable of achieving for the first time fusion ignition in the laboratory. Detecting optics features within the laser beamlines and sizing them at diameters of 0.1 mm to 10 mm allows timely decisions concerning refurbishment and will help with the routine operation of the system. Horizontally polarized shear waves at 10 MHz were shown to accurately detect, locate, and size features created by laser operations from 0.5 mm to 8 mm by placing sensors at the edge of the optic. The shear wave technique utilizes highly directed beams. The outer edge of an optic can be covered with shear wave transducers on four sides. Each transducer sends a pulse into the optic and any damage reflects the pulse back to the transmitter. The transducers are multiplexed, and the collected time waveforms are enveloped and replicated across the width of the element. Multiplying the data sets from four directions produces a map of reflected amplitude to the fourth power, which images the surface of the optic. Surface area can be measured directly from the image, and maximum depth was shown to be correlated to maximum amplitude of the reflected waveform.

  16. Bottom water warming in the North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Masao; Freeland, Howard; Perkin, Ron; Watanabe, Tomowo; Uchida, Hiroshi; Nishina, Ayako

    2004-02-26

    Observations of changes in the properties of ocean waters have been restricted to surface or intermediate-depth waters, because the detection of change in bottom water is extremely difficult owing to the small magnitude of the expected signals. Nevertheless, temporal changes in the properties of such deep waters across an ocean basin are of particular interest, as they can be used to constrain the transport of water at the bottom of the ocean and to detect changes in the global thermohaline circulation. Here we present a comparison of a trans-Pacific survey completed in 1985 (refs 4, 5) and its repetition in 1999 (ref. 6). We find that the deepest waters of the North Pacific Ocean have warmed significantly across the entire width of the ocean basin. Our observations imply that changes in water properties are now detectable in water masses that have long been insulated from heat exchange with the atmosphere. PMID:14985757

  17. On the detection of underwater bottom topography by imaging radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpers, W.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model which explains basic properties of radar imaging of underwater bottom topography in tidal channels is presented. The surface roughness modulation is described by weak hydrodynamic interaction theory in the relaxation time approximation. In contrast to previous theories on short wave modulation by long ocean waves, a different approximation is used to describe short wave modulation by tidal flow over underwater bottom topography. The modulation depth is proportional to the relaxation time of the Bragg waves. The large modulation of radar reflectivity observed in SEASAT-SAR imagery of sand banks in the Southern Bight of the North Sea are explained by assuming that the relaxation time of 34 cm Bragg waves is of the order of 30-40 seconds.

  18. Bottom production asymmetries at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Norrbin, E.; Vogt, R.

    1999-01-01

    We present results on bottom hadron production asymmetries at the LHC within both the Lund string fragmentation model and the intrinsic bottom model. The main aspects of the models are summarized and specific predictions for pp collisions at 14 TeV are given. Asymmetries are found to be very small at central rapidities increasing to a few percent at forward rapidities. At very large rapidities intrinsic production could dominate but this region is probably out of reach of any experiment.

  19. Vertical structure of surface gravity waves propagating over a sloping seabed: Theory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Qingping; Hay, Alex E.; Bowen, Anthony J.

    2003-08-01

    Theoretical predictions of the vertical structure of wave motion over a sloping seabed are compared with field observations close to the bed in the nearshore zone. Of particular interest is the effect of the local slope on the magnitude and phase of the vertical velocity. Field measurements of near-bed velocity profiles on a 2° bed slope were obtained using a coherent Doppler profiler. The surface elevation was measured by a colocated, upward looking, acoustic sounder. Results are presented from two intervals of different wave energy levels during a storm event: for wave height/water depth ratios smaller than 0.3 and for Ursell numbers smaller than 0.6. The local comparisons of magnitude and phase between the vertical velocity and surface elevation measurements are in good agreement with linear theory for a sloping bed, but differ greatly from that for a horizontal bottom, especially in the lower water column. The sloping bottom, however, has little effect on the horizontal velocity. Linear theory appears to adequately describe the transfer function between the surface elevation and the near-bed velocities, not only at the peak frequencies but also at their harmonics. However, in relatively shallow water the local transformations of free and forced waves at the harmonic frequencies are indistinguishable in the lower water column. Therefore, given surface elevation measurements at a particular location (which reflect the integrated effects of nonlinearities associated with wave shoaling), the vertical structure of the third moments of velocity fields estimated from linear theory is in reasonable agreement with the observations. Both theory and observations show that the skewness and asymmetry of the vertical velocity are subject to significant bottom slope effects, whereas those of horizontal velocity are not.

  20. System for Estimating Horizontal Velocity During Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew; Cheng, Yang; Wilson, Reg; Goguen, Jay; Martin, Alejandro San; Leger, Chris; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    The descent image motion estimation system (DIMES) is a system of hardware and software, designed for original use in estimating the horizontal velocity of a spacecraft descending toward a landing on Mars. The estimated horizontal velocity is used in generating rocket-firing commands to reduce the horizontal velocity as part of an overall control scheme to minimize the landing impact. DIMES can also be used for estimating the horizontal velocity of a remotely controlled or autonomous aircraft for purposes of navigation and control.

  1. Opportunities for horizontal drilling in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.J.; Laubach, S.E.; Tyler, N.; Holtz, M.H. )

    1991-03-01

    To date, horizontal drilling in Texas has been effective in achieving production increases where natural fracturing is significant, as in the Pearsall field of the Austin Chalk trend of south Texas. Projected average ultimate recoveries of 500,000 bbl of oil and 500 mmcf of gas per horizontal well compare with 75,000 bbl and 82 mmcf for vertical wells in that field. In addition to increasing production from naturally fractured reservoirs, horizontal drilling applications can enhance production where coning problems exist, where the reservoir zone is thin, where a gravity drainage mechanism exists, or where macroscale heterogeneity can be overcome to produce from complex, compartmentalized reservoirs. Major Texas reservoirs have been classified into 47 oil plays and 73 gas plays that are useful in evaluating the application of horizontal drilling. Geological character amenable to horizontal drilling is evident in at least 10 oil plays containing 144 reservoirs, more than two Bbl of proved reserves, and eight Bbbl of uncovered mobile oil. At least seven gas plays containing more than 124 reservoirs with cumulative production of more than 19.7 tcf are amenable to horizontal drilling. Tight gas reservoirs may benefit from multiple hydraulic fracture treatments from horizontal well sections drilled parallel to the minimum horizontal stress direction. Although play analysis defines general suitability, applications of horizontal drilling depend upon geologic, engineering, and, most importantly, economic assessments of specific prospects. Increased understanding of fractured reservoirs and of scales of reservoir heterogeneity will enhance future applications.

  2. Mathematical simulation of the heating of a viscous liquid droplet spreading over a horizontally oriented cylindrical pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyamina, O. N.; Semenov, V. P.; Kadchenko, S. I.

    2013-09-01

    Liquid film generated during steam condensation in a bundle of horizontal tubes flows down under the effect of surface forces in the form of separate droplets and streams. A mathematical model for nonisothermal spreading of a viscous liquid droplet over a horizontal surface is developed, using which it is possible to determine the temperature field and shape of such liquid droplet.

  3. Quasi-horizontal circulation cells in 3D seawater intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca, Elena; Carrera, Jesús; Sánchez-Vila, Xavier; Voss, Clifford I.

    2007-06-01

    SummaryThe seawater intrusion process is characterized by the difference in freshwater and seawater density that causes freshwater to float on seawater. Many confined aquifers have a large horizontal extension with respect to thickness. In these cases, while buoyancy acts in the vertical direction, flow is confined between the upper and bottom boundaries and the effect of gravity is controlled by variations of aquifer elevation. Therefore, the effective gravity is controlled by the slope and the shape of the aquifer boundaries. Variability in the topography of the aquifer boundaries is one case where 3D analysis is necessary. In this work, density-dependent flow processes caused by 3D aquifer geometry are studied numerically and specifically, considering a lateral slope of the aquifer boundaries. Sub-horizontal circulation cells are formed in the saltwater entering the aquifer. The penetration of the saltwater can be quantified by a dimensionless buoyancy number that measures the lateral slope of the aquifer relative to freshwater flux. The penetration of the seawater intrusion wedge is controlled more by this slope than by the aquifer thickness and dispersivity. Thus, the slope must be taken into account in order to accurately evaluate seawater intrusion.

  4. Quasi-horizontal circulation cells in 3D seawater intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abarca, E.; Carrera, J.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Voss, C.I.

    2007-01-01

    The seawater intrusion process is characterized by the difference in freshwater and seawater density that causes freshwater to float on seawater. Many confined aquifers have a large horizontal extension with respect to thickness. In these cases, while buoyancy acts in the vertical direction, flow is confined between the upper and bottom boundaries and the effect of gravity is controlled by variations of aquifer elevation. Therefore, the effective gravity is controlled by the slope and the shape of the aquifer boundaries. Variability in the topography of the aquifer boundaries is one case where 3D analysis is necessary. In this work, density-dependent flow processes caused by 3D aquifer geometry are studied numerically and specifically, considering a lateral slope of the aquifer boundaries. Sub-horizontal circulation cells are formed in the saltwater entering the aquifer. The penetration of the saltwater can be quantified by a dimensionless buoyancy number that measures the lateral slope of the aquifer relative to freshwater flux. The penetration of the seawater intrusion wedge is controlled more by this slope than by the aquifer thickness and dispersivity. Thus, the slope must be taken into account in order to accurately evaluate seawater intrusion. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interpolation of bottom bathymetry and potential erosion in a large Tennessee reservoir system using GRASS

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrove, W.W.; Hoffman, F.M.; Levine, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    A regularized spline with tension was used to interpolate a bathymetric bottom surface for the Watts Bar reservoir just south of Oak Ridge, TN as part of an effort to predict the spatial distribution of radionuclide contaminants. Cesium 137 was released as a by-product of the production of fissionable materials during the mid-1950s. Cesium is strongly adsorbed onto clay and silt particles in the water column, and tends to settle to the bottom. An understanding of the shape and contours of the bottom is important for understanding and prediction of the location and extent of contaminated sediments. The results of the investigations are available on the World Wide Web (WWW) at URL: http://www.esd.ornl.gov/programs/CRERP/INDEX.HTM. The Waterways Experiment Station (WES) of the US Army Corps of Engineers conducted a hydro-acoustic study of the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir to determine the distribution, thickness, and type of bottom sediments that had accumulated since completion of Watts Bar Dam in 1942. WES has developed a rapid geophysical technique to determine material characteristics of bottom and subbottom sediments. Acoustic impedance values determined from seismic reflection data are directly related to the density and material type of the subbottom sediments. The objective was to quantify with depth the density and type of bottom and subbottom sediments up to depths of 15 ft below the bottom surface along the Clinch River and Poplar Creek, TN.

  6. Advanced high performance horizontal piezoelectric hybrid synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high performance, horizontal, zero-net mass-flux, synthetic jet actuator for active control of viscous, separated flow on subsonic and supersonic vehicles. The present invention is a horizontal piezoelectric hybrid zero-net mass-flux actuator, in which all the walls of the chamber are electrically controlled synergistically to reduce or enlarge the volume of the synthetic jet actuator chamber in three dimensions simultaneously and to reduce or enlarge the diameter of orifice of the synthetic jet actuator simultaneously with the reduction or enlargement of the volume of the chamber. The present invention is capable of installation in the wing surface as well as embedding in the wetted surfaces of a supersonic inlet. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the SJA-H will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  7. Bottom-feeding for blockbuster businesses.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, David; Tomlinson, Doug; Scott, Larry

    2003-03-01

    Marketing experts tell companies to analyze their customer portfolios and weed out buyer segments that don't generate attractive returns. Loyalty experts stress the need to aim retention programs at "good" customers--profitable ones- and encourage the "bad" ones to buy from competitors. And customer-relationship-management software provides ever more sophisticated ways to identify and eliminate poorly performing customers. On the surface, the movement to banish unprofitable customers seems reasonable. But writing off a customer relationship simply because it is currently unprofitable is at best rash and at worst counterproductive. Executives shouldn't be asking themselves, How can we shun unprofitable customers? They need to ask, How can we make money off the customers that everyone else is shunning? When you look at apparently unattractive segments through this lens, you often see opportunities to serve those segments in ways that fundamentally change customer economics. Consider Paychex, a payroll-processing company that built a nearly billion-dollar business by serving small companies. Established players had ignored these customers on the assumption that small companies couldn't afford the service. When founder Tom Golisano couldn't convince his bosses at Electronic Accounting Systems that they were missing a major opportunity, he started a company that now serves 390,000 U.S. customers, each employing around 14 people. In this article, the authors look closely at bottom-feeders--companies that assessed the needs of supposedly unattractive customers and redesigned their business models to turn a profit by fulfilling those needs. And they offer lessons other executives can use to do the same. PMID:12632804

  8. Robotized system for removal of slime from the bottom of steam generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, O. V.; Shvarov, V. A.

    2014-02-01

    Reliability of steam generators depends not only on the main technical characteristics and correctness of the operational mode but also on the cleanliness of the heat-exchange surface and the presence of slime precipitated on the bottom. To provide the cleanliness, chemical methods of cleaning the heatexchange surfaces are used. In this article, we consider the process of removal of sediments that are formed precisely on the bottom of the steam generator from its volume. Possible mechanical methods for removal of sediments are presented. The consideration of variants of cleaning approved for acting steam generators showed the efficiency and applicability of the developed installation for the slime removal from steam generators. The main principles of construction of the system for slime removal from the steam generator bottom and constructive features of the installation, which make it possible to implement the stated tasks on the slime removal from the steam generator bottom, are given.

  9. Widespread horizontal transfer of retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Ali Morton; Kortschak, R Daniel; Gardner, Michael G; Bertozzi, Terry; Adelson, David L

    2013-01-15

    In higher organisms such as vertebrates, it is generally believed that lateral transfer of genetic information does not readily occur, with the exception of retroviral infection. However, horizontal transfer (HT) of protein coding repetitive elements is the simplest way to explain the patchy distribution of BovB, a long interspersed element (LINE) about 3.2 kb long, that has been found in ruminants, marsupials, squamates, monotremes, and African mammals. BovB sequences are a major component of some of these genomes. Here we show that HT of BovB is significantly more widespread than believed, and we demonstrate the existence of two plausible arthropod vectors, specifically reptile ticks. A phylogenetic tree built from BovB sequences from species in all of these groups does not conform to expected evolutionary relationships of the species, and our analysis indicates that at least nine HT events are required to explain the observed topology. Our results provide compelling evidence for HT of genetic material that has transformed vertebrate genomes. PMID:23277587

  10. Horizontally opposed internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Honkanen, E.G.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes a internal combustion engine. It comprises a base plate coincident with a horizontal plane and generally symmetrical with respect to a central longitudinal axis coincident with a vertical plane extending between fore and aft ends of the base plate, a main power crankshaft suspended below the base plate and extending parallel with the central longitudinal axis, a plurality of open-ended piston cylinders disposed below the base plate arranged in axially aligned pairs, a pair of auxiliary crankshafts detachably journaled below the base plate on opposite sides of the vertical plane; a connecting rod assembly pivotally interconnecting the pair of auxiliary crankshafts with the main power crankshaft; a piston assembly in each of the cylinders operatively connected with the associated auxiliary crankshaft and including a piston having a head, a wrist-pin and a connecting rod connecting the wrist-pin of each piston with the associated auxiliary crankshaft; a fuel induction assembly for admitting a combustible fuel mixture into the cylinders between the opposed heads of the pistons in a controlled sequence correlated to the receding movement of the pistons in the cylinders in a fuel intake stroke; means for igniting the fuel mixture compressed between the juxtaposed heads of the pistons; means for exhausting from the cylinders the products of combustion of the fuel mixture in correlation to the movement of the pistons in an exhaust stroke; and means including an oil pan enclosing the auxiliary crankshafts.

  11. Vertical and horizontal access configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1987-01-01

    A number of configuration features and maintenance operations are influenced by the choice of whether a design is based on vertical or horizontal access for replacing reactor components. The features which are impacted most include the first wall/blanket segmentation, the poloidal field coil locations, the toroidal field coil number and size, access port size for in-vessel components, and facilities. Since either configuration can be made to work, the choice between the two is not clear cut because both have certain advantages. It is apparent that there are large cost benefits in the poloidal field coil system for ideal coil locations for high elongation plasmas and marginal savings for the INTOR case. If we assume that a new tokamak design will require a higher plasma elongation, the recommendation is to arrange the poloidal field coils in a cost-effective manner while providing reasonable midplane access for heating interfaces and test modules. If a new design study is not based on a high elongation plasma, it still appears prudent to consider this approach so that in-vessel maintenance can be accomplished without moving very massive structures such as the bulk shield. 10 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. 24 CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method of emplacing the array in a long, horizontal borehole. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  13. Construction of an embankment with a fly and bottom ash mixture: field performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.; Balunaini, U.; Yildirim, I.Z.; Prezzi, M.; Siddiki, N.Z.

    2009-06-15

    Fly ash and bottom ash are coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) that are generated in large quantities throughout the world. It is often economical to dispose ash as mixtures rather than separately; that notwithstanding, only a few studies have been performed to investigate the behavior of fly and bottom ash mixtures, particularly those with high contents of fly ash. Also, there is very limited data available in the literature on the field performance of structures constructed using ash mixtures. This paper describes the construction and the instrumentation of a demonstration embankment built with an ash mixture (60:40 by weight of fly ash:bottom ash) on State Road 641, Terre Haute, Ind. Monitoring of the demonstration embankment was conducted for a period of 1 year from the start of construction of the embankment. The settlement of the embankment stabilized approximately 5 months after the end of its construction. According to horizontal inclinometer readings, the differential settlement at the top of the embankment is about 5 mm. Results from field quality control tests performed during construction of the demonstration embankment and monitoring data from vertical and horizontal inclinometers and settlement plates indicate that the ash mixture investigated can be considered an acceptable embankment construction material.

  14. Modelling Air and Water Two-Phase Annular Flow in a Small Horizontal Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Yao, Yufeng; Arini, Antonino; McIiwain, Stuart; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been carried out to study air and water two-phase flow in a small horizontal pipe of an inner diameter of 8.8mm, in order to investigate unsteady flow pattern transition behaviours and underlying physical mechanisms. The surface liquid film thickness distributions, determined by either wavy or full annular flow regime, are shown in reasonable good agreement with available experimental data. It was demonstrated that CFD simulation was able to predict wavy flow structures accurately using two-phase flow sub-models embedded in ANSYS-Fluent solver of Eulerian-Eulerian framework, together with a user defined function subroutine ANWAVER-UDF. The flow transient behaviours from bubbly to annular flow patterns and the liquid film distributions revealed the presence of gas/liquid interferences between air and water film interface. An increase of upper wall liquid film thickness along the pipe was observed for both wavy annular and full annular scenarios. It was found that the liquid wavy front can be further broken down to form the water moisture with liquid droplets penetrating upwards. There are discrepancies between CFD predictions and experimental data on the liquid film thickness determined at the bottom and the upper wall surfaces, and the obtained modelling information can be used to assist further 3D user defined function subroutine development, especially when CFD simulation becomes much more expense to model full 3D two-phase flow transient performance from a wavy annular to a fully developed annular type.

  15. Gravel packing feasible in horizontal well completions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, T.E. Jr.; Ashton, J.P. )

    1990-06-11

    Successful completion of horizontal wells in unconsolidated formations depends on proper equipment selection and installation method balanced with reservoir objectives, formation parameters, and costs. The guidelines for designing these completions are based on generalized field experience, including horizontal cases where applicable.

  16. 33 CFR 84.17 - Horizontal sectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Horizontal sectors. 84.17 Section 84.17 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.17 Horizontal sectors. (a)(1) In the forward direction, sidelights...

  17. Worldwide experience shows horizontal well success

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, H.; Bitto, R.

    1989-03-01

    The convergence of technology and experience has made horizontal drilling an important tool in increasing production and solving a variety of completion problems. Since the early 1980s, horizontal drilling has been used to improve production on more than 700 oil and gas wells throughout the world. Approximately 200 horizontal wells were drilled in 1988 alone. Interest in horizontal drilling has been accelerating rapidly as service companies have developed and offered new technology for drilling and producing horizontal wells. Simultaneously, oil companies have developed better methods for evaluating reservoirs for potential horizontal applications, while their production departments have gained experience at completing and producing them. To date, most horizontal wells have been drilled in the United States. A major application is to complete naturally fractured formations, such as the Austin chalk in Texas, the Bakken shale in the Williston basin, the Spraberry in West Texas and the Devonian shale in the Eastern states. In addition, many horizontal wells have been drilled to produce the Niagaran reefs and the irregular Antrim shale reservoirs in Michigan.

  18. U. S. operators expand horizontal programs

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1990-10-22

    Operators are fanning out across the U.S. with horizontal drilling programs completions in many fields and reservoirs. Most oil and gas producing states now have multiple horizontal wells. Although the South Texas Cretaceous Austin chalk play is not likely to be matched soon by any other horizontal play in number of wells and production. Figures show 847 horizontal drilling permits were issued in the U.S. during January-September 1990, up from 257 in all of 1989. Horizontal well permits numbered 97 in September, down from 119 in August and 123, the highest monthly total, in May 1990. Nearly all operators decline to provide production information. But in some areas that's available with some lag time from state agencies.

  19. Survey shows successes, failures of horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Reid, T.B.

    1995-06-19

    Industry`s experience now shows that horizontal well technology must be applied thoughtfully and be site-specific to attain technical and economic success. This article, based on a comprehensive study done by Maurer Engineering for the US Department of Energy (DOE), addresses the success of horizontal wells in less-publicized formations, that is, other than the Austin chalk. Early excitement within the industry about the new technology reached a fever pitch at times, leaving some with the impression that horizontal drilling is a panacea for all drilling environments. This work gauges the overall success of horizontal technology in US and Canadian oil and gas fields, defines the applications where horizontal technology is most appropriate, and assesses its impact on oil recovery and reserves.

  20. Late Quaternary Pollen Record from Cheyenne Bottoms, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredlund, Glen G.

    1995-01-01

    A sediment and pollen record from Cheyenne Bottoms, a large (166 km 2) enclosed basin in central Kansas, provides evidence for local and regional vegetation and climate change during the late Quaternary (ca. 30,000 yr.). Although radiocarbon dating of the carbonate-rich lacustrine sediments remains problematic, a basic chronological framework for the section is established. Two major litho- and biostratigraphic units, a Farmdalian zone (ca. 30,000 to 24,000 yr B.P.) and a Holocene zone (ca. 11,000 yr B.P. to present), are separated by a major unconformity spanning the Woodfordian (ca. 24,000 to 11,000 yr B.P.). Pollen and sedimentary data indicate a period of basin-wide drying preceding this unconformity. The sustained absence of sediment accumulation within this playa-like basin suggests that early Woodfordian conditions were increasingly arid with strengthened surface winds. Before this, persistent shallow water marshland dominated the local basin-bottom vegetation. Regional upland vegetation was an open grassland-sage steppe throughout the Farmdalian with limited populations of spruce, juniper, aspen, birch, and boxelder in riparian settings and escarpments. Throughout the Holocene, water levels within the basin fluctuated. Changes in wetland vegetation resulting from water level fluctuation have increased during the last 3,000 yr indicating that periodic episodes of wetland loss and rebound are not unique to postsettlement conditions but are an ongoing phenomenon at Cheyenne Bottoms.

  1. The behavior of acoustic waves in the lakes bottom sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Pavel; Nourgaliev, Danis; Yasonov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Seismic studies are used for various tasks, such as the study of the bottom sediments properties, finding sunken objects, reconstruction the reservoir history, etc. Multiple acoustic waves are an enormous obstacle in obtaining full seismic record. Multiples from the bottom of a body of water (the surface of the base of water and the rock or sediment beneath it) and the air-water surface are common in lake seismic data. Multiple reflections on the seismic cross-sections are usually located on the double distance from the air/water surface. However, sometime multiple reflections from liquid deposits cannot be generated or they reflected from the deeper horizons. It is observed the phenomenon of changes in reflectance of the water/weakly consolidated sediments acoustic boundary under the influence of the acoustic wave. This phenomenon lies in the fact that after the first acoustic impact and reflection of acoustic wave for some time the reflectance of this boundary remains close to 0. This event on a cross-section can explain by the short-term changes in the properties of bottom sediments under the influence of shock? acoustic wave, with a further reduction of these properties to the next wave generation (generation period of 2 seconds). Perhaps in these deposits occurs thixotropic process. The paper presents the seismic acoustic cross-sections of Lake Balkhash (Kazakhstan), Turgoyak (Russia). The work was carried out according to the Russia Government's Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University, supported by the grant provided to the Kazan State University for performing the state program in the field of scientific research, and partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic research (grants № 14-05-00785, 16-35-00452).

  2. Processing NPP Bottoms by Ferrocyanide Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Savkin, A. E.; Slastennikov Y. T.; Sinyakin O. G.

    2002-02-25

    The purpose of work is a laboratory test of a technological scheme for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides by use of ozonization, ferrocyanide precipitation, filtration and selective sorption. At carrying out the ferrocyanide precipitation after ozonization, the specific activity of bottoms by Cs{sup 137} is reduced in 100-500 times. It has been demonstrated that the efficiency of ferrocyanide precipitation depends on the quality of consequent filtration. Pore sizes of a filter has been determined to be less than 0.2 {micro}m for complete separation of ferrocyanide residue. The comparison of two technological schemes for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides, characterized by presence of the ferrocyanide precipitation stage has been performed. Application of the proposed schemes allows reducing volumes of radioactive waste in many times.

  3. 30 CFR 77.1904 - Communications between slope and shaft bottoms and hoist operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Communications between slope and shaft bottoms and hoist operators. 77.1904 Section 77.1904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL...

  4. Coupling of ocean bottom seismometers to sediment: results of tests with the U.S. Geological Survey ocean bottom seismometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, Anne M.

    1985-01-01

    The response of an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) to a transient pull that excites the natural OBS-sediment coupling resonance can be modeled as a mass-spring-dashpot system in which the resonant frequency and damping are functions of instrument mass and bearing radius and of the physical properties of the sediment (primarily the shear modulus). For the very soft sediments sometimes found on the sea floor, this resonance may be within the main frequency band of interest (2 to 15 Hz) for many common instrument configurations. To test the model and to find an anchor that would shift the coupling resonance to a higher frequency and decrease its amplitude, we conducted a series of tests which measured the response of the vertical and horizontal components of the U.S. Geological Survey OBS to transient pulls as a function of anchor configuration and sediment properties. The tested anchors included a concrete “flowerpot,” a tripod, a plate, and a perforated plate. Sites were on soft, organic-rich ooze and on firm sand. Several small shots were also fired at the ooze site in order to compare the response of the plate and “flowerpot” anchors to seismic signals. For a given anchor at a given site, the observed response was very repeatable. We found that the model predicts the vertical coupling response quite well and that good vertical coupling can be achieved with the plate or perforated-plate anchors. The response to the horizontal pulls, however, was similar and resonant for all anchors.

  5. Zero Horizontal Reaction Force Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P. (Inventor); Nick, Andrew J. (Inventor); Schuler, Jason M. (Inventor); Smith, Jonathan D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An excavator includes a mobile chassis with a first bucket drum and a second bucket drum coupled thereto. The first bucket drum and second bucket drum are coupled to the chassis for positioning thereof on the surface at opposing ends of the chassis. Each first scoop on the first bucket drum is a mirror image of one second scoop on the second bucket drum when (i) the first bucket drum and second bucket drum are on the surface adjacent opposing ends of the chassis, and (ii) the first bucket drum is rotated in one direction and the second bucket drum is simultaneously rotated in an opposing direction.

  6. Underwater MASW to evaluate stiffness of water-bottom sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.; Sonnichsen, G.V.; Hunter, J.A.; Good, R.L.; Burns, R.A.; Christian, H.

    2005-01-01

    The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) is initially intended as a land survey method to investigate the near-surface materials for their elastic properties. The acquired data are first analyzed for dispersion characteristics and, from these the shear-wave velocity is estimated using an inversion technique. Land applications show the potential of the MASW method to map 2D bedrock surface, zones of low strength, Poisson's ratio, voids, as well as to generate shear-wave profiles for various othe geotechnical problems. An overview is given of several underwater applications of the MASW method to characterize stiffness distribution of water-bottom sediments. The first application details the survey under shallow-water (1-6 m) in the Fraser River (Canada). The second application is an innovative experimental marine seismic survey in the North Atlantic Ocean near oil fields in Grand Bank offshore Newfoundland.

  7. LONG-TERM OBSERVATIONS OF BOTTOM CONDITIONS AND SEDIMENT MOVEMENT ON THE ATLANTIC CONTINENTAL SHELF: TIME-LAPSE PHOTOGRAPHY FROM INSTRUMENTED TRIPODS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Bryden, Cynthia G.; Pfirman, Stephanie L.; Strahle, William J.; Noble, Marlene A.

    1984-01-01

    An instrument system that measures bottom current, temperature, light transmission, and pressure, and that photographs the bottom at 2- to 6-hour intervals has been developed to study sediment transport on the Atlantic Continental Shelf. Instruments have been deployed extensively along the United States East Coast Continental Shelf for periods of from 2 to 6 months to study the frequency, direction, and rate of bottom sediment movement, and the processes causing movement. The time-lapse photographs are used to (1) characterize the bottom benthic community and surface microtopography; (2) monitor changes in the bottom topography and near-bottom water column caused by currents and storms (for example, ripple generation and migration, sediment resuspension); and (3) monitor seasonal changes in the bottom benthic community and qualitative effects of this community on the bottom sediments.

  8. Rapid prediction of structural responses of double-bottom structures in shoal grounding scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Ge; Yao, Qi; Yu, Zhaolong

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a simplified analytical model for predicting the structural responses of double-bottom ships in a shoal grounding scenario. This solution is based on a series of analytical models developed from elastic-plastic mechanism theories for different structural components, including bottom girders, floors, bottom plating, and attached stiffeners. We verify this simplified analytical model by numerical simulation, and establish finite element models for a typical tanker hold and a rigid indenter representing seabed obstacles. Employing the LS-DYNA finite element solver, we conduct numerical simulations for shoal-grounding cases with a wide range of slope angles and indentation depths. In comparison with numerical simulations, we verify the proposed simplified analytical model with respect to the total energy dissipation and the horizontal grounding resistance. We also investigate the interaction effect of deformation patterns between bottom structure components. Our results show that the total energy dissipation and resistances predicted by the analytical model agree well with those from numerical simulations.

  9. An effect of the near-bottom pycnocline on the loads of the bottom hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilieva, V.; Shishkina, O.

    2012-04-01

    The results of the present theoretical solutions and experimental data revealed the nature of the considerable growth of the wave-drag component, which is caused by the perturbation of a thin pycnoclyne placed at the depth h of the hill's height T = h. All of the earlier studies gave considerably lower wave-drag effect of about Cw ~ 0.02 at the same values of the Froude number. The latter case, i.e. the presence of the near-bottom pycnocline, appeared to be the main condition for the sufficient increase of the wave-drag coefficient Cw ~ 0.15 at the values of the Froude number Fr ~ 0.5. This effect could exist in the natural conditions when the sharp pycnocline is deep enough to avoid the manifestation of internal perturbations at the free surface excluding any of its disturbance. Acknowledgement: this work is supported through the RFBR projects 09-05-00204-a and 10-01-00435-1072;.

  10. Horizontal fields generated by return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooray, Vernon

    1991-01-01

    Horizontal fields generated by return strokes play an important role in the interaction of lightning generated electric fields with power lines. In many of the recent investigations on the interaction of lightning electromagnetic fields with power lines, the horizontal field was calculated by employing the expression for the tilt of the electric field of a plane wave propagating over finitely conducting earth. The method is suitable for calculating horizontal fields generated by return strokes at distances as close as 200m. At these close ranges, the use of the wavetilt expression can cause large errors.

  11. Bakken shale typifies horizontal drilling success

    SciTech Connect

    Leibman, P.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Given the favorable production response that has been obtained from horizontal drilling in vertical- fractured reservoirs such as the Bakken shale and, more recently, the Austin chalk, industry interest in this technology has mushroomed in the U.S. Indeed, it is difficult to find a good-sized oil company these days that is not involved in a horizontal drilling project or is giving it serious consideration. In response to growing evidence of successful field applications, the realization is dawning on the investment community that horizontal drilling represents a significant technological development with positive implications for both the exploration and production business, and the oilfield services industry.

  12. 46 CFR 171.108 - Manholes in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manholes in double bottoms. 171.108 Section 171.108... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.108 Manholes in double bottoms. (a) The number of manholes in the inner bottom of a double bottom required by § 171.105 must...

  13. 46 CFR 171.108 - Manholes in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manholes in double bottoms. 171.108 Section 171.108... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.108 Manholes in double bottoms. (a) The number of manholes in the inner bottom of a double bottom required by § 171.105 must...

  14. 46 CFR 171.108 - Manholes in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manholes in double bottoms. 171.108 Section 171.108... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.108 Manholes in double bottoms. (a) The number of manholes in the inner bottom of a double bottom required by § 171.105 must...

  15. 46 CFR 171.109 - Watertight floors in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Watertight floors in double bottoms. 171.109 Section 171... Watertight floors in double bottoms. If a vessel is required to have a double bottom, a watertight transverse division must be located in the double bottom under each main transverse watertight bulkhead or as near...

  16. 46 CFR 171.108 - Manholes in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manholes in double bottoms. 171.108 Section 171.108... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.108 Manholes in double bottoms. (a) The number of manholes in the inner bottom of a double bottom required by § 171.105 must...

  17. 46 CFR 171.109 - Watertight floors in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Watertight floors in double bottoms. 171.109 Section 171... Watertight floors in double bottoms. If a vessel is required to have a double bottom, a watertight transverse division must be located in the double bottom under each main transverse watertight bulkhead or as near...

  18. 46 CFR 171.109 - Watertight floors in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Watertight floors in double bottoms. 171.109 Section 171... Watertight floors in double bottoms. If a vessel is required to have a double bottom, a watertight transverse division must be located in the double bottom under each main transverse watertight bulkhead or as near...

  19. 46 CFR 171.109 - Watertight floors in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Watertight floors in double bottoms. 171.109 Section 171... Watertight floors in double bottoms. If a vessel is required to have a double bottom, a watertight transverse division must be located in the double bottom under each main transverse watertight bulkhead or as near...

  20. 46 CFR 171.109 - Watertight floors in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Watertight floors in double bottoms. 171.109 Section 171... Watertight floors in double bottoms. If a vessel is required to have a double bottom, a watertight transverse division must be located in the double bottom under each main transverse watertight bulkhead or as near...

  1. 46 CFR 171.108 - Manholes in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manholes in double bottoms. 171.108 Section 171.108... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.108 Manholes in double bottoms. (a) The number of manholes in the inner bottom of a double bottom required by § 171.105 must...

  2. Three-dimensional mapping of red stingray ( Dasyatis akajei) movement with reference to bottom topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otaki, Takayoshi; Hamana, Masahiro; Tanoe, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki; Shibuno, Takuro; Komatsu, Teruhisa

    2015-06-01

    Most demersal fishes maintain strong relations with bottom substrates and bottom depths and/or topography during their lives. It is important to know these relations to for understand their lives. In Tokyo Bay, red stingray, Dasyatis akajei, classified as near-threatened species by IUCN, has increased since the 1980s. It is a top predator and engages in ecosystem engineer by mixing the sand bed surface through burring behavior, and greatly influences a coastal ecosystem. It is reported that this species invades in plage and tidal flats and has sometimes injured beachgoers and people gathering clams in Tokyo bay. Thus, it is necessary to know its behavior and habitat use to avoid accidents and to better conserve the biodiversity of ecosystems. However, previous studies have not examined its relationship with the bottom environment. This study aims to describe its behavior in relation to the bottom environment. We sounded three dimensional bottom topography of their habitat off Kaneda Cove in Tokyo Bay with interferometric sidescan sonar system and traced the movement of red stingrays by attaching a data logger system to survey their migration. The results revealed that red stingray repeated vertical movement between the surface and bottom, and used not only sand beds but also rocky beds.

  3. Bounding the error on bottom estimation for multi-angle swath bathymetry sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Geoff K.; Bird, John S.

    2005-04-01

    With the recent introduction of multi-angle swath bathymetry (MASB) sonar to the commercial marketplace (e.g., Benthos Inc., C3D sonar, 2004), additions must be made to the current sonar lexicon. The correct interpretation of measurements made with MASB sonar, which uses filled transducer arrays to compute angle-of-arrival information (AOA) from backscattered signal, is essential not only for mapping, but for applications such as statistical bottom classification. In this paper it is shown that aside from uncorrelated channel to channel noise, there exists a tradeoff between effects that govern the error bounds on bottom estimation for surfaces having shallow grazing angle and surfaces distributed along a radial arc centered at the transducer. In the first case, as the bottom aligns with the radial direction to the receiver, footprint shift and shallow grazing angle effects dominate the uncertainty in physical bottom position (surface aligns along a single AOA). Alternatively, if signal from a radial arc arrives, a single AOA is usually estimated (not necessarily at the average location of the surface). Through theoretical treatment, simulation, and field measurements, the aforementioned factors affecting MASB bottom mapping are examined. [Work supported by NSERC.

  4. Correcting the vertical component of ocean bottom seismometers for the effects of tilt and compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, S. W.; Forsyth, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Typically there are very high noise levels at long periods on the horizontal components of ocean bottom seismographs due to the turbulent interaction of bottom currents with the seismometer package on the seafloor. When there is a slight tilt of the instrument, some of the horizontal displacement caused by bottom currents leaks onto the vertical component record, which can severely increase the apparent vertical noise. Another major type of noise, compliance noise, is created when pressure variations associated with water (gravity) waves deform the seabed. Compliance noise increases with decreasing water depth, and at water depths of less than a few hundred meters, compliance noise typically obscures most earthquake signals. Following Crawford and Webb (2000), we have developed a methodology for reducing these noise sources by 1-2 orders of magnitude, revealing many events that could not be distinguished before noise reduction. Our methodology relies on transfer functions between different channels. We calculate the compliance noise in the vertical displacement record by applying a transfer function to the differential pressure gauge record. Similarly, we calculate the tilt-induced bottom current noise in the vertical displacement record by applying a transfer function to the horizontal displacement records. Using data from the Cascadia experiment and other experiments, we calculate these transfer functions at a range of stations with varying tilts and water depths. The compliance noise transfer function depends strongly on water depth, and we provide a theoretical and empirical description of this dependence. Tilt noise appears to be very highly correlated with instrument design, with negligible tilt noise observed for the 'abalone' instruments from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and significant tilt observed for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution instruments in the first year deployment of the Cascadia experiment. Tilt orientation appears relatively

  5. College Graduation "Is" the Bottom Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Bottom Line was founded in 1997 to help disadvantaged Boston students get into college, graduate from college and go far in life. In its first year, it supported 25 students through the college admissions process. This year, it is helping more than 350 Boston high school seniors from the class of 2006 to get into college and providing support to…

  6. Bottom Up Succession Planning Works Better.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Paul

    The majority of current succession planning practices reflect the viewpoint of only a linear career direction for ambitious people. They are based on the premise that competent people have and want only one career direction--an upwardly mobile one. In today's work force, however, a "bottom-up" process works better in succession planning. This…

  7. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  8. A resting bottom sodium cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, D.

    2012-07-01

    This follows ICAPP 2011 paper 11059 'Fast Reactor with a Cold Bottom Vessel', on sodium cooled reactor vessels in thermal gradient, resting on soil. Sodium is frozen on vessel bottom plate, temperature increasing to the top. The vault cover rests on the safety vessel, the core diagrid welded to a toric collector forms a slab, supported by skirts resting on the bottom plate. Intermediate exchangers and pumps, fixed on the cover, plunge on the collector. At the vessel top, a skirt hanging from the cover plunges into sodium, leaving a thin circular slit partially filled by sodium covered by argon, providing leak-tightness and allowing vessel dilatation, as well as a radial relative holding due to sodium inertia. No 'air conditioning' at 400 deg. C is needed as for hanging vessels, and this allows a large economy. The sodium volume below the slab contains isolating refractory elements, stopping a hypothetical corium flow. The small gas volume around the vessel limits any LOCA. The liner cooling system of the concrete safety vessel may contribute to reactor cooling. The cold resting bottom vessel, proposed by the author for many years, could avoid the complete visual inspection required for hanging vessels. However, a double vessel, containing support skirts, would allow introduction of inspecting devices. Stress limiting thermal gradient is obtained by filling secondary sodium in the intermediate space. (authors)

  9. MANAGEMENT OF BOTTOM SEDIMENTS CONTAINING TOXIC SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States-Japan Ministerial Agreement of May 1974 provided for the exchange of environmental information in several areas of mutual concern. This report is the compilation of papers presented at the Second U.S.-Japan Experts' Meeting on the Management of Bottom Sediments ...

  10. Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water

    DOEpatents

    Gadgil, Ashok

    2009-06-09

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  11. Sedimentation studies relevant to low level radioactive effluent dispersal in the Irish Sea. Part 2. Sea bed morphology, sediments and shallow sub-bottom stratigraphy of the eastern Irish Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.J.; Kirby, R.; Smith, T.J.; Parker, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed survey of the Eastern Irish Sea between the Isle of Man and the Cumbrian coast was carried out during 1979-80 using sidescan sonar, pinger and echo sounder seismic equipment supplemented by box cores, gravity cores and grab samples. The objective of the study was to provide a firm sedimentological basis for any further work concerning the horizontal and vertical distributions of radionuclides discharged from the Windscale nuclear fuel reprocessing plant within the sea bed sediments. The sidescan data were used to map the distribution of surface sediments and infer net sand transport paths, whilst the continous seismic profile records were used to study the sub-bottom stratigraphy and geological structures. The sediment samples were analyzed for faunal content and evidence of animal-sediment interaction.

  12. Large-scale horizontal flows from SOUP observations of solar granulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    November, L. J.; Simon, G. W.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Ferguson, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Using high resolution time sequence photographs of solar granulation from the SOUP experiment on Spacelab 2, large scale horizontal flows were observed in the solar surface. The measurement method is based upon a local spatial cross correlation analysis. The horizontal motions have amplitudes in the range 300 to 1000 m/s. Radial outflow of granulation from a sunspot penumbra into surrounding photosphere is a striking new discovery. Both the supergranulation pattern and cellular structures having the scale of mesogranulation are seen. The vertical flows that are inferred by continuity of mass from these observed horizontal flows have larger upflow amplitudes in cell centers than downflow amplitudes at cell boundaries.

  13. Seismic transducer measures small horizontal displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, T. L.

    1965-01-01

    Pendular seismic transducer mounted on base plate measures small horizontal displacements of structures subjected to vibration where no fixed reference point is available. Enclosure of transducer in transparent plastic case prevents air currents from disturbing the pendulum balance.

  14. Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Khalid

    2000-03-06

    One of the key issues addressed was pressure drop in long horizontal wells and its influence on well performance. Very little information is available in the literature on flow in pipes with influx through pipe walls. Virtually all of this work has been in small diameter pipes and with single-phase flow. In order to address this problem new experimental data on flow in horizontal and near horizontal wells have been obtained. Experiments were conducted at an industrial facility on typical 6 1/8 ID, 100 feet long horizontal well model. The new data along with available information in the literature have been used to develop new correlations and mechanistic models. Thus it is now possible to predict, within reasonable accuracy, the effect of influx through the well on pressure drop in the well.

  15. Horizontal steam generators: Problems and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunov, N. B.; Ryzhov, S. B.; Davidenko, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    Main results of the 40-year experience gained from operation of horizontal steam generators in VVER-type reactor installations used in Russia and many foreign countries are described. Existing unresolved problems are pointed out.

  16. Melt Stirring by Horizontal Crucible Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M. F.; Elwell, D.; Feigelson, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Horizontal vibration suggested as technique for more effective stirring of melts in crystal-growth apparatus. Vibrational technique may replace accelerated crucible rotation. Potential superiority of vibrational technique shown by preliminary experiments in which ink stirred into water.

  17. Observations of the Faroe Bank Channel overflow using bottom-following RAFOS floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Mark D.; Rossby, Tom

    2005-02-01

    Overflows do not easily lend themselves to study by Lagrangian floats that remain on a constant isobaric (pressure) or isopycnal (density) surface, since the mixing, entrainment, and descent of an overflow plume result in an increase of the pressure and typically a decrease in the density of the overflow waters. A simple technique to maintain the float's altitude above the bottom was developed, and 12 "bottom-following" RAFOS floats were deployed at or downstream of the sill in the Faroe Bank Channel in the summer of 2000 from the R.S.S. Discovery. A technical problem resulted in the majority of the floats becoming stuck to the bottom; nevertheless several floats were able to traverse the Iceland Basin and surface near the southeastern slope of Iceland. These floats made a descent from the mouth of the Faroe Bank Channel, only to shoal along the southern slope of the Iceland-Faroe Ridge before descending again when passing through the northwest corner of the Iceland Basin. Typical current speeds through the Basin were 0.20- 0.30ms-1, with peaks of 0.40- 0.50ms-1. Although the floats that were stuck on the bottom provided no trajectory information, they were able to provide a time-series of bottom or near-bottom temperature. In addition, a crude estimate of the flow regime could be made by interpreting the pressure signals from these stuck floats as a response to strong or weak currents. Floats that were bottom stuck near the mouth of the Channel experienced large fluctuations in temperature ( 0- 5C) and height of the bottom (and thus presumably speed) on scales from 1 to 4 days. Another float stuck 100 km downstream of the sill underwent temperature and speed excursions on similar time scales, albeit over a smaller range. The behavior of the floats is assumed to be the result of the mesoscale variability of the overflow plume downstream of the Faroe Bank Channel.

  18. Report of the Horizontal Launch Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhite, Alan W.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    A study of horizontal launch concepts has been conducted. This study, jointly sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was tasked to estimate the economic and technical viability of horizontal launch approaches. The study team identified the key parameters and critical technologies which determine mission viability and reported on the state of the art of critical technologies, along with objectives for technology development.

  19. Horizontal sidetrack taps reservoir sweet spots''

    SciTech Connect

    Wible, J.R. )

    1994-02-21

    Cutting a window at 85[degree] deviation allowed a sidetrack to pass through the high-resistivity sections in a Gulf of Mexico reservoir. Results from logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools indicated the original horizontal bore dropped too low in the reservoir, possibly leading to a low productivity well. The subsequent sidetrack successfully delivered the desired well bore, and the increased productivity justified the efforts in cutting a window in the horizontal section.

  20. Do infants have the horizontal bias?

    PubMed

    Van Renswoude, D R; Johnson, S P; Raijmakers, M E J; Visser, I

    2016-08-01

    A robust set of studies show that adults make more horizontal than vertical and oblique saccades, while scanning real-world scenes. In this paper we study the horizontal bias in infants. The directions of eye movements were calculated for 41 infants (M=8.40 months, SD=3.74, range=3.48-15.47) and 47 adults (M=21.74 years, SD=4.54, range=17.89-39.84) while viewing 28 real-world scenes. Saccade directions were binned to study the proportion of saccades in the horizontal, vertical and oblique directions. In addition, saccade directions were also modeled using a mixture of Von Mises distributions, to account for the relatively large amount of variance in infants data. Horizontal bias was replicated in adults and also found in infants, using both the binning and Von Mises approach. Moreover, a developmental pattern was observed in which older infants are more precise in targeting their saccades than younger infants. That infants have a horizontal bias is important in understanding infants' eye movements. Future studies should account for the horizontal bias in their designs and analyses. PMID:27281348

  1. In situ air stripping using horizontal wells. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In-situ air stripping employs horizontal wells to inject or sparge air into the ground water and vacuum extract VOC`S from vadose zone soils. The horizontal wells provide better access to the subsurface contamination, and the air sparging eliminates the need for surface ground water treatment systems and treats the subsurface in-situ. A full-scale demonstration was conducted at the Savannah River Plant in an area polluted with trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. Results are described.

  2. Field Demonstration of Horizontal Infill Drilling Using Cost-effective Integrated Reservoir Modeling--Mississippian Carbonates, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Saibal Bhattacharya

    2005-08-31

    Mississippian carbonate reservoirs have produced in excess of 1 billion barrels of oil in Kansas accounting for over 16% of the state's production. With declining production from other age reservoirs, the contribution of Mississippian reservoirs to Kansas's oil production has risen to 43% as of 2004. However, solution-enhanced features such as vertical shale intervals extending from the karst erosional surface at the top introduce complexities/compartmentalizations in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs. Coupled with this, strong water drives charge many of these reservoirs resulting in limited drainage from vertical wells due to high water cuts after an initial period of low water production. Moreover, most of these fields are operated by small independent operators without access to the knowledge bank of modern research in field characterization and exploitation/development practices. Thus, despite increasing importance of Mississippian fields to Kansas production, these fields are beset with low recovery factors and high abandonment rates leaving significant resources in the ground. Worldwide, horizontal infill wells have been successful in draining compartmentalized reservoirs with limited pressure depletion. The intent of this project was to demonstrate the application of horizontal wells to successfully exploit the remaining potential in mature Mississippian fields of the mid-continent. However, it is of critical importance that for horizontal wells to be economically successful, they must be selectively targeted. This project demonstrated the application of initial and secondary screening methods, based on publicly available data, to quickly shortlist fields in a target area for detailed studies to evaluate their potential to infill horizontal well applications. Advanced decline curve analyses were used to estimate missing well-level production data and to verify if the well produced under unchanging bottom-hole conditions--two commonly occurring data

  3. Are consumers aware of top-bottom but not of left-right inferences? Implications for shelf space positions.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Ana; Raghubir, Priya

    2015-09-01

    We propose that the horizontal and vertical position of an item on a display is a source of information that individuals use to make judgments. Six experiments using 1 × 5 or 5 × 5 displays show that consumers judge that products placed at the bottom (vs. top) and on the left-hand (vs. middle and right-hand) side of a display are less expensive and of lower quality (Study 1a using a bar display, Study 1b using wine, and Study 1c using Swatch watches). Results support the claim that verticality effects (top-bottom) are attenuated when participants are less involved with the decision task (Study 2 using Swatch watches and chocolates) and when they are exposed to information that questions the diagnosticity of using vertical position as a cue (Study 3 using wine). However, the horizontality (left-right) effect is robust to both of these manipulations. Horizontality effects are exacerbated for participants primed with a number line (Study 4 also using wine), suggesting that exposure to the number line (where higher numbers are on the right) is a possible antecedent of the horizontality effect. The verticality effects may, on the other hand, reflect people's retail experience of seeing higher priced products on higher shelves, which leads to their forming a similar expectation. The paper concludes with a discussion of theoretical implications for visual information processing as well as practical implications for retail management. PMID:26372081

  4. Retrieval of Ocean Bottom and Downhole Seismic sensors orientation using integrated MEMS gyroscope and direct rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, A.; D'Anna, G.

    2014-12-01

    The absolute orientation of the horizontal components of ocean bottom or downhole seismic sensors are generally unknown. Almost all the methods proposed to overcome this issue are based on the post-processing of the acquired signals and so the results are strongly dependent on the nature, quantity and quality of the acquired data. We have carried out several test to evaluate the ability of retrieve sensor orientation using integrated low cost MEMS gyroscope. Our tests have shown that the tested MEMS gyroscope (the model 1044_0-3/3/3 Phidget Spatial Precision High Resolution) can be used to measure angular displacement and therefore to retrieve the absolute orientation of the horizontal components of a sensor that has been subjected to rotation in the horizontal plane. A correct processing of the acquired signals permit to retrieve, for rotation at angular rate between 0 and 180° s-1, angular displacement with error less 2°.

  5. Design configurations affecting flow pattern and solids accumulation in horizontal free water and subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, A; Sidrach-Cardona, R; Sánchez, J C; Carretero, J; Garfi, M; Bécares, E

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different horizontal constructed wetland (CW) design parameters on solids distribution, loss of hydraulic conductivity over time and hydraulic behaviour, in order to assess clogging processes in wetlands. For this purpose, an experimental plant with eight CWs was built at mesocosm scale. Each CW presented a different design characteristic, and the most common CW configurations were all represented: free water surface flow (FWS) with different effluent pipe locations, FWS with floating macrophytes and subsurface flow (SSF), and the presence of plants and specific species (Typha angustifolia and Phragmites australis) was also considered. The loss of the hydraulic conductivity of gravel was greatly influenced by the presence of plants and organic load (representing a loss of 20% and c.a. 10% in planted wetlands and an overloaded system, respectively). Cattail seems to have a greater effect on the development of clogging since its below-ground biomass weighed twice as much as that of common reed. Hydraulic behaviour was greatly influenced by the presence of a gravel matrix and the outlet pipe position. In strict SSF CW, the water was forced to cross the gravel and tended to flow diagonally from the top inlet to the bottom outlet (where the inlet and outlet pipes were located). However, when FWS was considered, water preferentially flowed above the gravel, thus losing half the effective volume of the system. Only the presence of plants seemed to help the water flow partially within the gravel matrix. PMID:23286990

  6. Direct numerical simulation of horizontal open channel flow with finite-size, heavy particles at low solid volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidanemariam, Aman G.; Chan-Braun, Clemens; Doychev, Todor; Uhlmann, Markus

    2013-02-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulation of turbulent open channel flow over a smooth horizontal wall in the presence of finite-size, heavy particles. The spherical particles have a diameter of approximately 7 wall units, a density of 1.7 times the fluid density and a solid volume fraction of 5 × 10-4. The value of the Galileo number is set to 16.5, while the Shields parameter measures approximately 0.2. Under these conditions, the particles are predominantly located in the vicinity of the bottom wall, where they exhibit strong preferential concentration which we quantify by means of Voronoi analysis and by computing the particle-conditioned concentration field. As observed in previous studies with similar parameter values, the mean streamwise particle velocity is smaller than that of the fluid. We propose a new definition of the fluid velocity ‘seen’ by finite-size particles based on an average over a spherical surface segment, from which we deduce in the present case that the particles are instantaneously lagging the fluid only by a small amount. The particle-conditioned fluid velocity field shows that the particles preferentially reside in the low-speed streaks, leading to the observed apparent lag. Finally, a vortex eduction study reveals that spanwise particle motion is significantly correlated with the presence of vortices with the corresponding sense of rotation which are located in the immediate vicinity of the near-wall particles.

  7. Effect of marine litter on the benthic megafauna of coastal soft bottoms: a manipulative field experiment.

    PubMed

    Katsanevakis, Stelios; Verriopoulos, George; Nicolaidou, Artemis; Thessalou-Legaki, Maria

    2007-06-01

    The effect of litter on the abundance and community structure of soft-bottom epibenthic megafauna was investigated in three coves of the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea). At each site, two surfaces were defined on the sea-bottom. One of the surfaces was uniformly littered with debris (16 items per 100 m(2)), while the other remained 'clean' and acted as control. Benthic megafauna was censused with SCUBA diving, once before the littering episode and then monthly for one year. Both total abundance and the number of species showed an increasing trend in the impacted surfaces, either because the litter provided refuge or reproduction sites for mobile species or because hard-substratum sessile species had the opportunity to settle on provided surfaces. A marked gradual deviation in the community structure of the impacted surface from the control and a clear successional pattern of change in the community composition of the impacted surfaces were demonstrated. PMID:17303184

  8. Simulation on Decarburization and Inclusion Removal Process in the Ruhrstahl-Heraeus (RH) Process with Ladle Bottom Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Dian-Qiao; Zheng, Jin-Xing; Wang, Kai; Wang, Ping; Liang, Ru-Quan; Liu, Hai-Tao; Lei, Hong; He, Ji-Cheng

    2015-03-01

    To enhance the refining efficiency of the Ruhrstahl-Heraeus (RH) process, the ladle bottom blowing was employed in RH degasser and a numerical method was employed to investigate the decarburization and inclusion removal in RH with ladle bottom blowing. The results showed that the decarburization rate in RH with ladle bottom blowing is greater than that in traditional RH. The larger mass fraction of carbon at the recirculation zone under up snorkel disappears because of the gas bubbles from ladle bottom blowing in an RH degasser. For RH with ladle bottom blowing, the decarburization at argon bubble surface accounts for the majority of the removed carbon, and it is approximately two times greater than that in the inner site of the vacuum chamber. Besides, the inclusion removal rate in RH with ladle bottom blowing is greater than that in traditional RH, and the maximum inclusion characteristic radius is much less in RH with ladle bottom blowing than that in traditional RH. Besides, the accumulation of inclusions in ladle between sidewall and up snorkel and the recirculation zone under up snorkel, which can be found in traditional RH, disappears in RH with ladle bottom blowing. For RH with ladle bottom blowing, the average number density of inclusions decreases more drastically than that in traditional RH and the average terminal number density of inclusions is much smaller than that in traditional RH.

  9. Performance of weather research and forecasting model with variable horizontal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Ojha, Satya P.; Singh, Randhir; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is employed with three different horizontal grid spacings (45, 15 and 5 km) to assess the impact of horizontal resolution on short-range weather forecast. Simulations are carried out daily at 0000 UTC over the Indian region during the entire month of July 2011. A rigorous validation is performed against surface observations, radiosonde measurements and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42 merged rainfall product. Results show that horizontal resolution has a substantial impact on the WRF model forecast, particularly on the near surface temperature, moisture, winds and rainfall forecasts. Relative to 45-km horizontal grid spacing, 24-h forecasts of near surface temperature, moisture and winds are improved by ˜15, 9 and 4 %, respectively, when horizontal grid spacing is reduced to 5 km. Noteworthy improvement is also seen in the 24-h rainfall forecasts of the WRF model as the horizontal grid spacing decreased from 45 to 5 km. Larger improvements are observed over the Western Ghats and northeastern part of India compared to central India, which demonstrate the importance of finer resolution over the mountainous terrain compared to plains.

  10. Bottom-up synthesis of chemically precise graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Narita, Akimitsu; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we describe our chemical approach, developed over the course of a decade, towards the bottom-up synthesis of structurally well-defined graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). GNR synthesis can be achieved through two different methods, one being a solution-phase process based on conventional organic chemistry and the other invoking surface-assisted fabrication, employing modern physics methodologies. In both methods, rationally designed monomers are polymerized to form non-planar polyphenylene precursors, which are "graphitized" and "planarized" by solution-mediated or surface-assisted cyclodehydrogenation. Through these methods, a variety of GNRs have been synthesized with different widths, lengths, edge structures, and degrees of heteroatom doping, featuring varying (opto)electronic properties. The ability to chemically tailor GNRs with tuned properties in a well-defined manner will contribute to the elucidation of the fundamental physics of GNRs, as well as pave the way for the development of GNR-based nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. PMID:25414146

  11. Bottom Water Circulation and the Development of OAE2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. E.; MacLeod, K. G.; Blair, S. W.

    2006-12-01

    The role of deep ocean circulation in the development of Ocean Anoxic Events (OAEs) has long been debated; one of the primary discussions focuses on whether high levels of organic carbon burial are related to high rates of surface productivity or enhanced preservation. New Nd and oxygen isotopic data from Demerara Rise provide an opportunity to evaluate circulation and water column stratification across OAE2. During much of the Cenomanian to Santonian δ18O data from planktic foraminifera, benthic bivalves, fish debris and coprolites indicate that bottom waters on Demerara Rise were ~5°C warmer than thermocline waters. This bottom water mass also had a uniquely nonradiogenic ɛNd signature of ~-15, which contrasts to contemporaneous values > -11.5 from the Pacific, North Atlantic, and Tethys. We believe this nonradiogenic signature was acquired from relatively proximal weathering sources and introduced into the deep ocean without appreciable mixing, indicativing a low latitude source of relatively warm bottom water. The most striking feature of the Nd isotopic record at Site 1258 is a dramatic positive excursion of 8 ɛNd units across OAE2, with a similar, but smaller shift of at least 4.5 ɛNd units across the Mid Cenomanian Event (MCE). The initiation of the OAE2 excursion appears to be very rapid and closely correlated with the δ13C excursion. Lower resolution sampling across the MCE shows a similar pattern. These excursions occur within a continuous lithofacies of finely laminated black shales. In contrast, there is no change in ɛNd across a major lithologic transition from organic-rich shale to chalk and marl, arguing against a diagenetic control on observed patterns. Eruption of the Caribbean LIP is a potential source of radiogenic Nd observed during OAE2; however, anoxic conditions are probably required to prevent the quantitative removal of Nd by oxides. This scenario predicts that the δ13C shift should precede the shift in ɛNd, which is counter to our

  12. Measurement of bottom-reflected sound in bottom-limited propagation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Jooyoung; Park, Joungsoo

    2016-07-01

    To study the bottom reflection of underwater acoustic sound in a bottom-limited propagation environment, an experiment was conducted using four transmitting sounds in the form of a continuous wave from 1 to 6 kHz. The site of the experiment was a continental shelf region off the east coast of Korea where the bottom was composed of sandy mud. The mean water depth was 1100 m in the experiment area. Oceanographic data and acoustic data were collected simultaneously during the experiment. It was found that the sound pressure level decreased by 90 dB to 3.4 km and there is little frequency dependence because a strong direct path contributes more than a bottom-reflected path in sound pressure level. At a range between 6 and 7 km, there is a strong bottom-reflected ray path and frequency dependence exists because the bottom reflection loss varies with frequency at a given grazing angle. Sound pressure levels increase as the range increases between 6 and 7 km by 5.4, 1.9, 1.7, and 1.5 dB at frequencies of 1000, 2490, 3990, and 5490 Hz, respectively.

  13. BWR reactor vessel bottom head failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) incorporate many unique structural features that make their expected response under severe accident conditions very different from that predicted in the case of pressurized water reactor accident sequences. The effect of the BWR procedural and structural differences upon the progression of a severe accident sequence during the period preceding movement of core debris into the reactor vessel lower plenum has been discussed previously. It is the purpose of this paper to briefly address the events occurring after debris relocation past the core plate and to describe the subsequent expected modes of bottom head pressure boundary failure. As an example, the calculated timing of events for the unmitigated short-term station blackout severe accident sequence at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station is also presented. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Constructing bottom barriers with met grouting

    SciTech Connect

    Shibazaki, M.; Yoshida, H.

    1997-12-31

    Installing a bottom barrier using conventional high pressure jetting technology and ensuring barrier continuity is challenging. This paper describes technology that has been developed and demonstrated for the emplacement of bottom barriers using pressures and flow rates above the conventional high pressure jetting parameters. The innovation capable of creating an improved body exceeding 5 meters in diameter has resulted in the satisfying connection and adherence between the treated columns. Besides, the interfaces among the improved bodies obtain the same strength and permeability lower than 1 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec as body itself. A wide variety of the thickness and the diameter of the improved mass optimizes the application, and the method is nearing completion. The paper explains an aspect and briefs case histories.

  15. Kondo effect in charm and bottom nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Shigehiro

    2016-06-01

    The Kondo effect for isospin-exchange interaction between a D ¯, B meson and a valence nucleon in charm and bottom atomic nuclei including the discrete energy levels for valence nucleons is discussed. To investigate the binding energy by the Kondo effect, I introduce the mean-field approach for the bound state of the D ¯, B meson in charm and bottom nuclei. Assuming a simple model, I examine the validity of the mean-field approximation by comparing the results with the exact solutions. The effect of the quantum fluctuation is estimated beyond the mean-field approximation. The competition between the Kondo effect and the other correlations in valence nucleons, the isospin symmetry breaking and the nucleon pairings, are discussed.

  16. [Congenital rocker-bottom foot (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schulitz, K P; Schumacher, G; Parsch, K

    1977-02-01

    A report was made of 19 patients with rocker-bottom foot operated on during the last 10 years in the Orthopedic Hospital and Out-Patient Clinic of the University of Heidelberg. No additional bone anomalies were present in 6 cases. The remaining malformations occurred together with multiple contractures and in the context of spina bifida cystica. The various malformations of the foot were divided into three groups. This study is particularly concerned with therapy for rocker-bottom foot. Conservative measures are not suitable for types I and Ia while conservative therapy should be attempted in type II. The surgical procedure involves 4 steps: development of the calcancal part of the foot, repositioning of the navicular bone, new adjustment of the ankle and various stabilization measures including the Grice operation and transposition of various tendons. The surgical procedure and the results were discussed. PMID:320773

  17. DETECTION OF SUPERSONIC HORIZONTAL FLOWS IN THE SOLAR GRANULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bellot Rubio, L. R.

    2009-07-20

    Hydrodynamic simulations of granular convection predict the existence of supersonic flows covering {approx}3%-4% of the solar surface at any time, but these flows have not been detected unambiguously as yet. Using data from the spectropolarimeter aboard the Hinode satellite, I present direct evidence of fast horizontal plasma motions in quiet-Sun granules. Their visibility increases toward the limb due to more favorable viewing conditions. At the resolution of Hinode, the horizontal flows give rise to asymmetric intensity profiles with very inclined blue wings and even line satellites located blueward of the main absorption feature. Doppler shifts of up to 9 km s{sup -1} are observed at the edges of bright granules, demonstrating that the flows reach supersonic speeds. The strongest velocities occur in patches of 0.''5 or less. They tend to be associated with enhanced continuum intensities, line widths, and equivalent widths, but large values of these parameters do not necessarily imply the existence of supersonic flows. Time series of spectropolarimetric measurements in regions away from the disk center show the transient nature of the strong horizontal motions, which last only for a fraction of the granule lifetime. Supersonic flows are expected to produce shocks at the boundaries between granules and intergranular lanes, and may also play a role in the emergence of small-scale magnetic fields in quiet-Sun internetwork regions.

  18. Natural convection in binary gases driven by combined horizontal thermal and vertical solutal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.A.; Viskanta, R. )

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of natural convection is presented to examine the influence of a horizontal temperature gradient and a concentration gradient occurring from the bottom to the cold wall in a cavity. As the solutal buoyancy force changes from augmenting to opposing the thermal buoyancy force, the fluid motion switches from unicellular to multicellular flow (fluid motion is up the cold wall and down the hot wall for the bottom counterrotating flow cell). Qualitatively, the agreement between predicted streamlines and smoke flow patterns is generally good. In contrast, agreement between measured and predicted temperature and concentration distributions ranges from fair to poor. Part of the discrepancy can be attributed to experimental error. However, there remains considerable discrepancy between data and predictions due to the idealizations of the mathematical model, which examines only first-order physical effects. An unsteady flow, variable thermophysical properties, conjugate effects, species interdiffusion, and radiation were not accounted for in the model. 31 refs.

  19. Sound speed profile inversion using a horizontal line array in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, ZhengLin; He, Li; Zhang, RenHe; Li, FengHua; Yu, YanXin; Lin, Peng

    2015-01-01

    It is better to use a simple configuration to enhance the applicability of ocean environment inversion in shallow water. A matched-field inversion method based on a horizontal line array (HLA) is used to retrieve the variation of sound speed profile. The performance of the inversion method is verified in the South China Sea in June, 2010. An HLA laid at bottom was used to receive signals from a bottom-mounted transducer. Inverted mean sound speed profiles from 9-hour long acoustic signals are in good agreement with measurements from two temperature chains at the sites of the source and receiver. The results show that an HLA can be used to monitor the variability of shallow-water sound speed profile.

  20. Investigating bottom-up auditory attention

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Emine Merve; Elhilali, Mounya

    2014-01-01

    Bottom-up attention is a sensory-driven selection mechanism that directs perception toward a subset of the stimulus that is considered salient, or attention-grabbing. Most studies of bottom-up auditory attention have adapted frameworks similar to visual attention models whereby local or global “contrast” is a central concept in defining salient elements in a scene. In the current study, we take a more fundamental approach to modeling auditory attention; providing the first examination of the space of auditory saliency spanning pitch, intensity and timbre; and shedding light on complex interactions among these features. Informed by psychoacoustic results, we develop a computational model of auditory saliency implementing a novel attentional framework, guided by processes hypothesized to take place in the auditory pathway. In particular, the model tests the hypothesis that perception tracks the evolution of sound events in a multidimensional feature space, and flags any deviation from background statistics as salient. Predictions from the model corroborate the relationship between bottom-up auditory attention and statistical inference, and argues for a potential role of predictive coding as mechanism for saliency detection in acoustic scenes. PMID:24904367

  1. The Source of CO2 Ice on Enceladus’ Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, A. G.; Johnson, T. V.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-10-01

    Traces of CO2 ice have been found on Enceladus’ surface (Brown et al., 2006 p. 1427 [1]). We suggest that the CO2 came from subsurface pockets of gas. Such pockets are a natural consequence of the hydrothermal circulation of Enceladus’ gas-rich ocean water [2]. Ocean water rises through fissures in the icy crust and brings heat and chemicals to the surface. Near the surface the water flows horizontally below the relatively thin cap ice before returning to the ocean. The horizontal flow allows some of the CO2 bubbles in the seawater to raise and collect as gas pockets in irregularities along the bottom of the cap ice. Subsequent fissuring (e.g., as suggested by Hurford et al. [3]) at irregular intervals allows the gas to escape to the surface where it can condense as CO2 ice and is seen by Cassini VIMS. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. 2006. [2] Matson D. L. et al., Icarus 221, 53-62, 2012. (also see Matson et al. LPS 44 Abstract 1371, 2013). [3] Hurford T. A. et al., Nature 447, 292-294, 2007.

  2. How to drill horizontal sections faster

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffin, M. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that fewer trips, reduced slide time and lower drag during sliding have resulted from the application of downhole-adjustable stabilizers to horizontal drilling. Faster drilling times mean lower measurement while drilling (MWD) cost, and less wear on downhole equipment, motors and bits. These advantages combined with reduced drilling shocks have increased drilling rates and efficiency. Applying existing technology in new situations is an important way of reducing the cost of finding, exploring for and developing reserves. Engineers are responsible for using current technology to its fullest and developing new technology to reduce drilling expenses. Horizontal drilling was used in its early stages to develop the Austin chalk formation in Pearsall oil field more effectively. As procedures were generated to drill horizontal wells, Oryx drilling engineers began to develop new technology and investigate ways for existing technology to be used or altered to fit horizontal drilling programs. The new technology of downhole-adjustable stabilizers has been used successfully to further improve horizontal drilling efficiency.

  3. Statistical relations predict horizontal well production

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, W.T. )

    1993-04-01

    Some fields and formations are more or less suited for horizontal drilling. Most horizontal candidates include complex reservoirs with heterogeneous geometries. In these, characteristics necessary for commercial production are difficult to define. As a result, many horizontal wells drilled to date have proven, or will prove, to be uneconomic. How to characterize a reservoir's suitability for horizontal drilling is a difficult question. A comparative method for fractured carbonate reservoirs with examples from the Austin Chalk/Buda trend of Texas is proposed in this paper. A statistical approach was used to characterize fracture styles. The relationships are intuitive and reveal that fracture density, interconnectedness and size are reflected respectively in the statistical measures of medium (mean), coefficient of variation (standard deviation), and range of reservoir production. Using only a statistical approach, four of five study group fields were accurately rank ordered. When risk of drainage and water production were considered, the match was perfect. Since most drilling has occurred in existing fields, these measures are readily available from production records. The analysis performed requires comparison with other similar fields for most of its usefulness. Horizontal drilling opportunities in other fields and formations might be defined using a similar statistical approach.

  4. Opportunities for horizontal drilling in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.J.; Laubach, S.E.; Tyler, N.; Holtz, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    Highly productive wells drilled in the Pearsall field (Austin Chalk) of South Texas have shown that horizontal drilling is an extremely effective technique for developing unrecovered oil and natural gas, particularly in mature hydrocarbon provinces that contain natural fractures. Production can also be enhanced where the reservoir-quality zone or the oil column is thin or where gravity-drainage production occurs. Although they are not current targets of horizontal drilling activity, many other kinds of reservoirs contain depositional heterogeneities that interfere with recovery by vertical wells. Use of horizontal drilling to tap multiple reservoir compartments in these reservoirs has significant potential but has yet to be fully tested. The resource target of unrecovered mobile oil in the nine Texas plays and subplays discussed in this report, amounting to more than 8 billion barrels of oil, warrants further testing of horizontal drilling in areas of depositional heterogeneities and multiple reservoir compartments. The authors summarize geological and engineering characteristics of selected formations in Texas that have been or are potential targets for horizontal drilling.

  5. Sand-control alternatives for horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, T.E. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports that it has been well documented that horizontal completions increase production rates, as much as two to five times those of conventional techniques, because more of the producing formation is exposed to the wellbore. Although productivity improvements are highly sensitive to reservoir parameters, it is becoming generally accepted that optimum horizontal lengths will be 2,000 to 4,000 ft. The length of these completions generally causes the velocity of the fluid at the sandface to be an order of magnitude less than that observed in conventional completions. Because drag forces contributed to sand production, horizontal wells can produce at higher sand-free flow rates than conventional completions in the same reservoir. While it is frequently argued that horizontal wells do not need sand control, the potential for sand production increases significantly as reserves deplete and rock stresses increase. This is becoming more evident today in several major North Sea oil fields with conventional completions. Also, many unconsolidated formations produce sand for the first time with the onset of water production, a typical problem in such areas as the Gulf of Mexico. Operators must decide whether to implement sand control in the original horizontal-completion program because of an immediate concern or because the potential exists for a problem to arise as the well matures.

  6. Ocean bottom gravimetry near the coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Kanazawa, T.; Oshida, A.

    2008-12-01

    Inland earthquakes have recently caused damages in the Japanese Islands. Although more than 2,000 active faults have been recognized in and around Japan, the earthquakes had their sources in unexpected faults in the upper crust. Detecting such hidden active faults has become an important subject in the field of earth sciences. Precise gravimetry, a basic geodetic measurement, is now recognized as one of important means for detecting active faults hidden under the ground. Precise and dense gravimetry has covered the Japanese Islands, but not in the offshore area. The most critical point is that there are no gravity data in the offshore area near the coast; the area has not been included in land nor marine gravity mapping. An ocean bottom gravimeter (OBG) was developed in Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, for gravimetry on the deep seafloor (Fujimoto et al., 1998). Free gimbal suspensions with an oil damper keep a sensor package of Scintrex CG-3M/SB gravimeter roughly vertical, typically in a few tens arc-seconds, and the effect of the remaining tilt is numerically corrected by the gravimeter. The gimbals and the sensor are in a pressure-tight spherical housing made of titanium alloy, and the logging unit in a glass sphere. Two trial measurements on the shallow seafloor in Suruga Bay showed that precision of seafloor gravimtery with the OBG is much the same that with field gravimeters on land (Fujimoto et al., 1998). The importance of gravity mapping over the shallow ocean bottom near the coast was recognized and there were requests to use our OBG for such observations. Then we modify the OBG system into a single housing for easy maintenance and measurement. Ocean bottom gravity measurements with the OBG have been carried out around Awaji Island near Kobe, off the northern end of Tohoku, off Niigata, and in the Seto Inland Sea. The OBG was lowered from a boat to each gravity point on the bottom with a rope. Judging from the observed data, precision

  7. Airfoil design for variable RPM horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoerck, Anders

    1990-01-01

    The design criteria for new airfoils for a variable speed horizontal axis wind turbine are described. The two series of airfoils developed are characterized by high design lift coefficients in order to achieve small blade chords, high lift drag ratios for the airfoil sections designed for the outer part of the blade, performance insensitivity to surface roughness, and a gentle stall at an angle of attack in order to reduce excessive loads. Each series consists of airfoils with varying thickness to chord ratios for different radial stations. Interpolation between the two series is possible.

  8. Active Circulation Control for Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Dumitrescu, Horia; Preotu, Octavian

    2011-09-01

    A based method for modeling the aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine has been developed. Circulation control is implemented by tangentially blowing a small high-velocity jet over a highly curved surface, such as a rounded trailing edge. This causes the boundary layer and the jet sheet to remain attached along the curved surface due to the Coanda effect and causing the jet to turn without separation. This analysis has been validated for the experimental data of a rotor tested at NASA Ames Research Center. Comparisons have been done against measurements for surface pressure distribution, force coefficients normal and tangential to the chord line, torque and root bending moments. This approach for enhancing the circulation around the airfoil sections (and hence L/D and power production) has been examined and found to produce useful increases in power at low wind speeds.

  9. 3-D laser patterning process utilizing horizontal and vertical patterning

    DOEpatents

    Malba, Vincent; Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    A process which vastly improves the 3-D patterning capability of laser pantography (computer controlled laser direct-write patterning). The process uses commercially available electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) to pattern 3-D surfaces. The EDPR covers the surface of a metal layer conformally, coating the vertical as well as horizontal surfaces. A laser pantograph then patterns the EDPR, which is subsequently developed in a standard, commercially available developer, leaving patterned trench areas in the EDPR. The metal layer thereunder is now exposed in the trench areas and masked in others, and thereafter can be etched to form the desired pattern (subtractive process), or can be plated with metal (additive process), followed by a resist stripping, and removal of the remaining field metal (additive process). This improved laser pantograph process is simpler, faster, move manufacturable, and requires no micro-machining.

  10. Horizontal drilling techniques at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkirson, J.P.; Smith, J.H.; Stagg, T.O.; Walters, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Three extended departure horizontal wells have been drilled and completed at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska by Standard Alaska Production Company. Horizontal slotted liner completions of 1575 feet (480 m), 1637 feet (499 m), and 1163 feet (354 m) were accomplished at an average vertical depth of 9000 feet (2743 m). Improvements in technology and operating procedures have resulted in a cost per foot reduction of 40% over the three well program. When compared to conventional completions, initial production data indicates rate benefits of 300% and a major increase in ultimate recovery. This paper discusses the development of the techniques used to drill horizontal wells at Prudhoe Bay and reviews the drilling operations for each well.

  11. ESP's placed in horizontal lateral increase production

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, A.; Wilson, B.L. ); Marshall, R. )

    1990-06-18

    By design, the electric submersible pump (ESP) is an effective method of lifting fluids from horizontal wells. But this ESP application does have unique installation and operating parameters that need to be considered. ESP's have been used for many years in directional wells. This application provides an experience base for understanding deflection limits on the unit. To avoid damaging the ESP, special equipment may be required in some horizontal installations. This paper discusses how several ESP's have been designed specifically for medium-radius wells. In these applications, the deeper pump setting provides for a significant increase in production rate. In general, to realize the full benefit of a horizontal installation, the ESP should be considered when planning, drilling, and completing the well.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer, genome innovation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Gogarten, J Peter; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2005-09-01

    To what extent is the tree of life the best representation of the evolutionary history of microorganisms? Recent work has shown that, among sets of prokaryotic genomes in which most homologous genes show extremely low sequence divergence, gene content can vary enormously, implying that those genes that are variably present or absent are frequently horizontally transferred. Traditionally, successful horizontal gene transfer was assumed to provide a selective advantage to either the host or the gene itself, but could horizontally transferred genes be neutral or nearly neutral? We suggest that for many prokaryotes, the boundaries between species are fuzzy, and therefore the principles of population genetics must be broadened so that they can be applied to higher taxonomic categories. PMID:16138096

  13. Internal wave-turbulence pressure above sloping sea bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haren, Hans

    2011-12-01

    An accurate bottom pressure sensor has been moored at different sites varying from a shallow sea strait via open ocean guyots to a 1900 m deep Gulf of Mexico. All sites show more or less sloping bottom topography. Focusing on frequencies (σ) higher than tidal, the pressure records are remarkably similar, to within the 95% statistical significance bounds, in the internal gravity wave continuum (IWC) band up to buoyancy frequency N. The IWC has a relatively uniform spectral slope: log(P(σ)) = -αlog(σ), α = 2 ± 1/3. The spectral collapse is confirmed from independent internal hydrostatic pressure estimate, which suggests a saturated IWC. For σ > N, all pressure-spectra transit to a bulge that differs in magnitude. This bulge is commonly attributed to long surface waves. For the present data it is suggested to be due to stratified turbulence-internal wave coupling, which is typically large over sloping topography. The bulge drops off at a more or less common frequency of 2-3 × 10-2 Hz, which is probably related with typical turbulent overturning scales.

  14. Sludge mobilization with submerged nozzles in horizontal cylindrical tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, T.D.; Cummins, R.L.; Youngblood, E.L.; Perona, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    The Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) and the evaporator service tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are used for the collection and storage of liquid low-level waste (LLLW). Wastes collected in these tanks are typically acidic when generated and are neutralized with sodium hydroxide to protect the tanks from corrosion; however, the high pH of the solution causes the formation of insoluble compounds that precipitate. These precipitates formed a sludge layer approximately 0.6 to 1.2 m (2 to 4 ft) deep in the bottom of the tanks. The sludge in the MVSTs and the evaporator service tanks will eventually need to be removed from the tanks and treated for final disposal or transferred to another storage facility. The primary options for removing the sludge include single-point sluicing, use of a floating pump, robotic sluicing, and submerged-nozzle sluicing. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of submerged-nozzle sluicing in horizontal cylindrical tanks and (2) obtain experimental data to validate the TEMPEST (time-dependent, energy, momentun, pressure, equation solution in three dimensions) computer code.

  15. Application of Inclinometer Measurements for Relative Horizontal Displacement Investigations on Landslide Grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malarski, Ryszar; Nagórski, Kamil; Woźniak, Marek

    2013-10-01

    One of the basic criterion for safety evaluation of structures erected on embankment or sliding slopes is relative horizontal displacement at different elevations. Relative horizontal displacements beneath ground surfaces are performed with inclinometer measurements. This report presents results on horizontal relative ground displacements with the probe SISGEO S242SV30. Investigations were performed with two inclinometer columns 14m height embedded in Warsaw Bank Slope. Mean square error of single observation was determined and mean relative errors of relative displacements in relation to column height. On the basis measurement results several relevant recommendations and practical hints were formulated allowing to avoid survey blunders and discrepancies in measuring procedures often encountered. Detailed inclinometer horizontal displacement measurements results at Warsaw hillside St Ana's Church grounds were listed and presented.

  16. Causes and characteristics of horizontal positional nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Corinna; Taylor, Rachael L; Todd, Chris; Macdougall, Hamish; Yavor, Robbie; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2014-05-01

    Direction changing horizontal positional nystagmus can be observed in a variety of central and peripheral vestibular disorders. We tested sixty subjects with horizontal positional nystagmus and vertigo on the Epley Omniax(®) rotator. Monocular video recordings were performed with the right or left ear down, in the supine and prone positions. Nystagmus slow-phase velocity (SPV) was plotted as a function of time. Thirty-one subjects diagnosed with horizontal canalolithiasis had paroxysmal horizontal geotropic nystagmus with the affected ear down (onset 0.8 ± 1 s, range 0-4.9 s, duration 11.7-47.9 s, peak SPV 79 ± 67°/s). The SPV peaked at 5-20 s and declined to 0 by 60 s; at 40 s from onset, the average SPV was 1.8 % of the peak. Nine subjects diagnosed with cupulolithiasis had persistent apogeotropic horizontal nystagmus (onset 0.7 ± 1.4 s, range 0-4.3 s). Peak SPV was 54.2 ± 31.8°/s and 26.6 ± 12.2°/s with unaffected and affected ears down, respectively. At 40 s, the average SPV had decayed to only 81 % (unaffected ear down) and 65 % (affected ear down) of the peak. Twenty subjects were diagnosed with disorders other than benign positional vertigo (BPV) [vestibular migraine (VM), Ménière's Disease, vestibular schwannoma, unilateral or bilateral peripheral vestibular loss]. Subjects with VM (n = 13) had persistent geotropic or apogeotropic horizontal nystagmus. On average, at 40 s from nystagmus onset, the SPV was 61 % of the peak. Two patients with Ménière's Disease had persistent apogeotropic horizontal nystagmus; the peak SPV at 40 s ranged between 28.6 and 49.5 % of the peak. Symptomatic horizontal positional nystagmus can be observed in canalolithiasis, cupulolithiasis and diverse central and peripheral vestibulopathies; its temporal and intensity profile could be helpful in the separation of these entities. PMID:24676938

  17. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF BOTTOM CHORD CONNECTION AT THIRD PANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF BOTTOM CHORD CONNECTION AT THIRD PANAL POINT IN FROM ABUTMENT. NOTE THAT THE BOTTOM CHORD IS CONTINUOUS ACROSS THE CONNECTION - Poffenberger Road Bridge, Spanning Catoctin Creek, Middletown, Frederick County, MD

  18. 49 CFR 178.255-5 - Bottom discharge outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... outlets prohibited, except on tanks used for shipments of sludge acid and alkaline corrosive liquids. (b) If installed, bottom outlets or bottom washout chambers shall be of metal not subject to...

  19. 24. PIN CONNECTION AT VERTICAL AND BOTTOM CHORD ON CAMELBACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. PIN CONNECTION AT VERTICAL AND BOTTOM CHORD ON CAMELBACK THROUGH TRUSS. VERTICAL AND BOTTOM CHORD MADE OF HAND-FORGED EYE BARS - New River Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 623, Pembroke, Giles County, VA

  20. Formation of Deposits on the Cathode Surface of Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, François; Soucy, Gervais; Rivoaland, Loig

    2014-12-01

    The efficiency of electrolysis cells for aluminum production is reduced when deposits are formed on the cathode block surface. Overfeeding of alumina or excessive heat loss in industrial cells leads to the formation of highly resistive deposits. In this study, the chemical composition of sludge, ledge toe, and thin deposits was investigated at the bottom of both industrial and experimental electrolysis cells. The formation of deposits in laboratory experiments was demonstrated in acidic, neutral, and basic electrolytic bath. A gradient of chiolite (Na5Al3F14) and α-Al2O3 was observed in the deposits. The bath at the bottom of the experimental electrolysis cell had a higher cryolite ratio implying a higher liquidus temperature. The sludge formed at the bottom of the cell can lift the aluminum metal resulting in an important reduction of the contact surface between the aluminum and the cathode block. Moreover, the deposits disturb the current path and generate horizontal current components in the metal which enhance the motion and lower the current efficiency. A thin film of bath supersaturated in alumina was observed under the metal. This work provides clarification on the formation mechanisms of the various deposits responsible for the deterioration of the cathode surface.

  1. The CFB boiler in Gardanne -- An experimental investigation of its bottom zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesendorf, V.; Hartge, E.U.; Werther, J.; Johnsson, F.; Sterneus, J.; Leckner, B.; Montat, D.; Briand, P.

    1999-07-01

    Different measurement techniques have been used to analyze the fluid dynamics in the bottom zone of the 250 MW{sub e} Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler in Gardanne, France. In particular, horizontal profiles of the local solids volume concentration have been measured with a capacitance probe and the vertical pressure profile has been measured by a probe with densely spaced pressure taps. Local velocities were measured by cross-correlating the signals of a two-channel capacitance probe. In order to get some information on the influence of the flow structure on local combustion conditions a probe has been used which combines both capacitance and zirconia-cell sensors. This probe measured simultaneously local solids volume concentrations, local velocities and the local presence of oxygen. The results show the existence of a dense bed with a bed height of about 2% of the total riser height. This bottom bed has a flow structure which is different from the core-annulus structure observed in the upper dilute zone of the CFB combustor by several researchers. The lateral solids mixing does not seem to be enough to provide an even distribution of char over the whole cross-section of the bottom bed. Nevertheless, an even temperature distribution has been found indicating that mixing is sufficient to equalize the uneven heat generation.

  2. 3. Aerial view southeast, State Route 92 bottom left, Adams ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Aerial view southeast, State Route 92 bottom left, Adams Dam Road center, Brandywine Creek State Park and J. Chandler Farm in center left, duck pond bottom right and reservoir bottom left. - Winterthur Farms, Intersection State Routes 92 & 100, Intersection State Routes 92 & 100, Winterthur, New Castle County, DE

  3. 4. Aerial view southwest, Adams Dam Road bottom left, State ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Aerial view southwest, Adams Dam Road bottom left, State Route 100 center, back gates to Winterthur and Wilmington Country Club upper center, duck pond and reservoir bottom right and center, and State Route 92 center bottom. - Winterthur Farms, Intersection State Routes 92 & 100, Intersection State Routes 92 & 100, Winterthur, New Castle County, DE

  4. 46 CFR 174.050 - Stability on bottom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stability on bottom. 174.050 Section 174.050 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.050 Stability on bottom. Each bottom bearing unit...

  5. 46 CFR 171.106 - Wells in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wells in double bottoms. 171.106 Section 171.106... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.106 Wells in double bottoms. (a) This section applies to each vessel that has a well installed in a double bottom required...

  6. 46 CFR 171.106 - Wells in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wells in double bottoms. 171.106 Section 171.106... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.106 Wells in double bottoms. (a) This section applies to each vessel that has a well installed in a double bottom required...

  7. 46 CFR 173.058 - Double bottom requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Double bottom requirements. 173.058 Section 173.058... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.058 Double bottom requirements. Each new sailing school vessel... service must comply with the double bottom requirements in §§ 171.105 through 171.109, inclusive, of...

  8. 46 CFR 171.106 - Wells in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wells in double bottoms. 171.106 Section 171.106... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.106 Wells in double bottoms. (a) This section applies to each vessel that has a well installed in a double bottom required...

  9. 46 CFR 171.106 - Wells in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wells in double bottoms. 171.106 Section 171.106... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.106 Wells in double bottoms. (a) This section applies to each vessel that has a well installed in a double bottom required...

  10. 46 CFR 173.058 - Double bottom requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Double bottom requirements. 173.058 Section 173.058... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.058 Double bottom requirements. Each new sailing school vessel... service must comply with the double bottom requirements in §§ 171.105 through 171.109, inclusive, of...

  11. 46 CFR 173.058 - Double bottom requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Double bottom requirements. 173.058 Section 173.058... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.058 Double bottom requirements. Each new sailing school vessel... service must comply with the double bottom requirements in §§ 171.105 through 171.109, inclusive, of...

  12. 46 CFR 173.058 - Double bottom requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Double bottom requirements. 173.058 Section 173.058... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.058 Double bottom requirements. Each new sailing school vessel... service must comply with the double bottom requirements in §§ 171.105 through 171.109, inclusive, of...

  13. 46 CFR 171.106 - Wells in double bottoms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wells in double bottoms. 171.106 Section 171.106... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.106 Wells in double bottoms. (a) This section applies to each vessel that has a well installed in a double bottom required...

  14. 46 CFR 173.058 - Double bottom requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Double bottom requirements. 173.058 Section 173.058... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.058 Double bottom requirements. Each new sailing school vessel... service must comply with the double bottom requirements in §§ 171.105 through 171.109, inclusive, of...

  15. Bottom quark mass from {Upsilon} mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    The bottom quark pole mass M{sub b} is determined using a sum rule which relates the masses and the electronic decay widths of the {Upsilon} mesons to large {ital n} moments of the vacuum polarization function calculated from nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics. The complete set of next-to-next-to-leading order [i.e., O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2},{alpha}{sub s}v,v{sup 2}) where v is the bottom quark c.m. velocity] corrections is calculated and leads to a considerable reduction of theoretical uncertainties compared to a pure next-to-leading order analysis. However, the theoretical uncertainties remain much larger than the experimental ones. For a two parameter fit for M{sub b}, and the strong M{bar S} coupling {alpha}{sub s}, and using the scanning method to estimate theoretical uncertainties, the next-to-next-to-leading order analysis yields 4.74 GeV {le}M{sub b}{le}4.87 GeV and 0.096{le}{alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}){le}0.124 if experimental uncertainties are included at the 95{percent} confidence level and if two-loop running for {alpha}{sub s} is employed. M{sub b} and {alpha}{sub s} have a sizable positive correlation. For the running M{bar S} bottom quark mass this leads to 4.09 GeV {le}m{sub b}(M{sub {Upsilon}(1S)}/2){le}4.32 GeV. If {alpha}{sub s} is taken as an input, the result for the bottom quark pole mass reads 4.78 GeV {le}M{sub b}{le}4.98 GeVthinsp[4.08 GeV {le}m{sub b}(M{sub {Upsilon}(1S)}/2){le}4.28 GeV] for 0.114{le}{alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}){le}0.122. The discrepancies between the results of three previous analyses on the same subject by Voloshin, Jamin, and Pich and K{umlt u}hn {ital et al.} are clarified. A comprehensive review on the calculation of the heavy-quark{endash}antiquark pair production cross section through a vector current at next-to-next-to leading order in the nonrelativistic expansion is presented. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Peach bottom recirculation piping replacement ALARA program

    SciTech Connect

    Englesson, G.A.; Hilsmeier, A.E.; Mann, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    In late 1983, Philadelphia Electric Company (PECo) began detailed planning to replace the recirculation, residual heat removal, and part of the reactor water cleanup piping of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 reactor. Included in this work was an estimate of the collective exposure expected during piping replacement. That initial estimate, 1945 man-rem, is compared with the actual collective dose incurred during the piping replacement program. Also included are the exposures incurred during two additional tasks (safe end replacement and recirculation pump disassembly and decontamination) not considered in the initial estimate.

  17. Rankine bottoming cycle safety analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, G.A.

    1980-02-01

    Vector Engineering Inc. conducted a safety and hazards analysis of three Rankine Bottoming Cycle Systems in public utility applications: a Thermo Electron system using Fluorinal-85 (a mixture of 85 mole % trifluoroethanol and 15 mole % water) as the working fluid; a Sundstrand system using toluene as the working fluid; and a Mechanical Technology system using steam and Freon-II as the working fluids. The properties of the working fluids considered are flammability, toxicity, and degradation, and the risks to both plant workers and the community at large are analyzed.

  18. Search for top and bottom squarks

    SciTech Connect

    C. Rott

    2003-10-15

    Searches for the lightest scalar top quark {bar t}{sub 1} and scalar bottom quark {bar b}{sub 1} performed at LEP2 with a center-of-mass energy of up to {radical}s = 209 GeV and at Tevatron using data collected at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV during Run I and at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during Run II, are discussed. Different possible decay modes were considered and no evidence for any such signal was observed. Exclusion limits were extracted.

  19. The Effects of Bottom Blowing Gas Flow Rate Distribution During the Steelmaking Converter Process on Mixing Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Hsing-Hao; Lai, Po-Han; Wu, Hsuan-Chung; Liu, Yung-Chang; Lin, Chi-Cheng; Lu, Muh-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Featuring the advantages of top-blown and bottom-blown oxygen converters, top and bottom combined blown converters are mainstream devices used in steelmaking converter. This study adopted the FLUENT software to develop a numerical model that simulates 3D multiphase flows of gas (air and argon), liquid steel, and slag. Ten numerical experiments were conducted to analyze the effects that the bottom blowing gas flow rate distribution patterns (uniform, linear fixed total flow rate, linear fixed maximal flow rate, and V-type) and bottom blowing gas flow distribution gradients of combined blown converters exert on slag surface stirring heights, flow field patterns, simulation system dynamic pressures, mixing time, and liquid steel-slag interface velocity. The simulation results indicated that the mixing efficiency was highest for the linear fixed total flow rate, followed by the linear fixed maximal flow rate, V-type, and uniform patterns. The bottom blowing gas flow rate distribution exhibited linear patterns and large gradients, and high bottom blowing total flow rates increased the mixing efficiency substantially. In addition, the results suggested that even when bottom blowing total flow rate was reduced, adopting effective bottom blowing gas flow rate distribution patterns and gradients could improve the mixing efficiency.

  20. A note on the effect of bottom currents on an ocean bottom seismometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, Anne M.

    1985-01-01

    Two three-component ocean bottom seismometers and a current meter were deployed a few hundred meters apart on the southern Blake Plateau off the United States eastern coast to study the effect of near-bottom currents on the background noise level of seismometers. Although analysis of the data is limited somewhat by instrumental problems, the increase in current speed, which ranged from 2 to 25 cm/sec, is correlated with a broadband increase in the noise level at frequencies below 10 Hz. Intermittent periods of narrow-band 8-Hz noise, which were also observed, are not correlative with bottom currents and were tentatively attributed to passing ships. Details of the mechanism of generation of the background noise cannot be determined from the present data set.

  1. Velocity distribution in horizontal slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kvernvold, O.; Saasen, A.; Selmor-Olsen, S.; Sontvedt, T.; Vindoy, V.

    1984-08-01

    An experimental device for measurement of the velocity distribution in a two-phase slug is developed. Velocity profiles both in the film and the liquid slug besides velocity variation along the pipe bottom (at a distance of 1 mm) through the slug front are presented.

  2. [From vertical to horizontal. Writing in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Catheline-Antipoff, N

    1995-04-01

    Writing at adolescence has a non negligible part in identity's construction. Vertical writing as tags, graphs and graffiti refer to a narcissism deficiency and express a pulsional necessity, whereas, horizontal writing as private diaries, letters and novels express object's search and are made in dreaming attitude. PMID:7618823

  3. Uniform head in horizontal and vertical wells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The steady-state head within a fully penetrating well may be estimated by evaluating the Thiem equation at the radius of the well. A method is presented here to extend results from the Thiem equation to horizontal wells and to partially penetrating wells. The particular model used in this investigat...

  4. Horizontally separated 1-in-1 crossing insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    Previous to this workshop, realistic lattices have been developed for vertically separated l-in-l (e.g., D.E. Johnson, A.A. Garren) and 2-in-1 (e.g., S. Heifets) magnets as well as for horizontally separated 2-in-l magnets (e.g., SSC RDS). Bringing together the widely separated ({approximately}60-70 cm) beams in a reasonable length of tunnel and keeping the dispersion zero at the interaction point has been difficult in the vertical l-in-l case. Most designs have required spacial 2-in-1 quadrupoles near the interaction point where the beams are separated by 15 cm or less. It is not clear that such magnets, as dictated by some of these lattice designs, can easily be built. The purpose of this exercise is to provide a crossing insertion for a realistic lattice which involves horizontally separated l-in-l magnets. The following horizontal crossing insertions, which incorporate the dispersion suppressors and phase trombones into the major arcs, need no special 2-in-1 magnets near the interaction point. The dispersion at the IP created by the horizontal crossing can be cancelled by the dispersion suppressor and one set of triplets.

  5. Horizontal Axis Levitron--A Physics Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, Max M.

    2014-01-01

    After a brief history of the Levitron, the first horizontal axis Levitron is reported. Because it is easy to operate, it lends itself to educational physics experiments and analogies. Precession and nutation are visualized by reflecting the beam from a laser pointer off the "spignet". Precession is fundamental to nuclear magnetic…

  6. Cutting Down the Tall Poppies: Horizontal Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Carole

    Many women in educational leadership positions experience negative treatment from female teachers and female superintendents. This phenomenon is known as horizontal violence, "the curious behavior of members of oppressed groups who often lash out at their peers in response to oppression instead of attacking their oppressors." This paper explores…

  7. Teaching Activities on Horizontal Nuclear Proliferation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1990-01-01

    Provides learning activities concerning the horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons. Includes step-by-step directions for four activities: (1) the life cycle of nuclear weapons; (2) nuclear nonproliferation: pros and cons; (3) the nuclear power/nuclear weapons connection; and (4) managing nuclear proliferation. (NL)

  8. Orthodontic extrusion of horizontally impacted mandibular molars

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhigui; Yang, Chi; Zhang, Shanyong; Xie, Qianyang; Shen, Yuqing; Shen, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and evaluate a novel approach in treating horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars. Materials and methods: An orthodontic technique was applied for treatment of horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars, which included a push-type spring for rotation first, and then a cantilever for extrusion. There were 8 mandibular third molars (M3s) and 2 second molars (M2s) in this study. Tooth mobility, extraction time, the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth, alveolar bone height of the adjacent tooth, and the relationship of impacted M3 and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) were evaluated. Results: Two horizontally impacted M2s could be upright in the arch and good occlusal relationships were obtained after treatment. All impacted M3s were successfully separated from the IAN, without any neurologic consequences. The average extraction time was 5 minutes. There was a significant change in the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth after treatment. A new bone apposition with the average height of 3.2 mm was noted distal to the adjacent tooth. Conclusions: This two-step orthodontic technique as presented here may be a safe and feasible alternative in management of severely horizontally impacted mandibular molars, which achieves a successful separation of M3s from the IAN and an excellent position for M2s. PMID:25419364

  9. Utah's Cane Creek horizontal play expanding

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.

    1991-08-12

    This paper reports on one of the U.S. horizontal plays that continues to gather steam in southern Utah. And because it is expanding in an environmentally sensitive area, development is being watched closely by the Bureau of Land Management and environmental groups. One operator planning a wildcat in the vicinity has been forced to postpone drilling for environmental reasons.

  10. Bottom-sediment chemistry in Devil's Lake, northeast North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    High magnesium calcite 8 mole percent MgCO3 is the most abundant carbonate at the sediment surface. With increasing depth abundances of high magnesium carbonate decrease and abundances of low magnesium calcite aragonite and dolomite increase. Carbon isotope compositions of bulk carbonates range from δ13C = -0.7 to +0.5%. These values are close to equilibrium with dissolved inorganic carbon in lake water (δ13C = -2%) but far from equilibrium with dissolved inorganic carbon in pore water (δ13C = -16.3- -10/0%). Disequilibrium between pore water and carbonates suggests that the carbonates did not recrystallize substantially in the presence of pore water. Therefore the change of carbonate mineral proportions with depth in the sediments is due mainly to temporal changes in the proportions of endogenic, detrital, and biologic carbonates that were deposited on the lake bottom rather than postdepositional carbonate diagenesis.

  11. Effects of Horizontal Magnetic Fields on Acoustic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rekha

    2007-02-01

    Local helioseismology techniques seek to probe the subsurface magnetic fields and flows by observing waves that emerge at the solar surface after passing through these inhomogeneities. Active regions on the surface of the Sun are distinguished by their strong magnetic fields, and techniques such as time-distance helioseismology can provide a useful diagnostic for probing these structures. Above the active regions, the fields fan out to create a horizontal magnetic canopy. We investigate the effect of a uniform horizontal magnetic field on the travel time of acoustic waves by considering vertical velocity in a simple plane-parallel adiabatically stratified polytrope. It is shown that such fields can lower the upper turning point of p-modes and hence influence their travel time. It is found that acoustic waves reflected from magnetically active regions have travel times up to a minute less than for waves similarly reflected in quiet regions. It is also found that sound speeds are increased below the active regions. These findings are consistent with time-distance measurements.

  12. Effect of Horizontal-Tail Span and Vertical Location on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Unswept Tail Assembly in Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Donald R

    1954-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley stability tunnel on a vertical-tail model with a stub fuselage in combination with various horizontal tails to determine the effect of horizontal-tail span and vertical location of the horizontal tail relative to the vertical tail on the aerodynamic characteristics of an unswept tail assembly in sideslip. The results of the investigation indicated that the induced loading carried by the horizontal tail produced a rolling moment about the point of attachment to the vertical tail which was strongly influenced by horizontal-tail span and vertical locations. The greatest effect of horizontal-tail span on the rolling-moment derivative of the complete tail assembly was obtained for horizontal-tail locations near the top of the vertical tail. Span loadings which were reduced to the static-stability derivatives were calculated for each configuration tested by applying the well-known finite-step method used for wings to the intersecting surfaces of the vertical and horizontal tails. The finite-step method provides a simple and effective means of investigating the span loadings of intersecting surfaces.

  13. A self-decoupling piezoresistive sensor for measuring microforce in horizontal and vertical directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Rong, Weibin; Wang, Lefeng; Gao, Peng; Sun, Lining

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and calibration of a novel two-dimension microforce sensor with nano-Newton resolution. The sensor, mainly composed of a clamped–clamped beam (horizontal detecting beam), an overhanging beam (vertical detecting beam) and a half-folded beam, is highly sensitive to microforces in the horizontal (parallel to the probe of the designed sensor) and vertical (perpendicular to the wafer surface) directions. The four vertical sidewall surface piezoresistors (horizontal piezoresistors) and two surface piezoresistors (vertical piezoresistors) were fabricated to achieve the requirements of two-dimension microforce measurements. Combining the sensor structure with Wheatstone bridge configurations, the microforce decoupling among the x, y, and z direction can be realized. Accordingly, the sensor is capable of detecting microforces in the horizontal and vertical directions independently. The calibration results verified that the sensor sensitivities at room temperature are 210.58 V N‑1and 159.2 V N‑1 in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. Additionally, the sensor’s corresponding force resolutions are estimated at 2 nN and 3 nN in theory, respectively. The sensor can be used to measure the contact force between manipulating tools and micro-objects, in fields such as microassembly and biological assays.

  14. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  15. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  16. Provenance Of CO2 Ice On Enceladus’ Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, A. G.; Johnson, T. V.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Lunine, J. I.

    2012-10-01

    Brown et al. (2006) identified CO2 ice within Enceladus’ South Polar Terrain using Cassini VIMS data and suggested that it resulted from an active replenishment process. Until now this process has been a mystery. Although there is a relatively small amount of CO2 in the water vapor erupted by the plumes, the spectra of the resulting deposits are expected to be dominated by water frost. We point out that CO2 frost deposits are a possible product of the water circulation model proposed by Matson et al. (2012). In this model, buoyant CO2-bubble-rich water rises up from the ocean and into fissures in the icy crust. When a neutral buoyancy level is reached, the water flows horizontally along the fissures under a relatively thin ice cap. Heat lost from the water beneath the ice supplies heat for the thermal anomalies identified on the surface. Even as the water is flowing horizontally, it continues to lose CO2 because bubbles continue to rise. Recesses and other irregularities on the bottom of the surface ice allow the bubble-gas to collect in pockets. When these are fissured by recurring tidal stresses, the CO2 gas can escape and condense nearby on surfaces that are cold enough. References: Brown et al. (2006) Science, 311, 5766; Matson et al. (2012) Icarus, in press, doi 10.1016/j.icarus.2012.05.031. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA.

  17. [Structure-functional studies of the White sea water and bottom sediments].

    PubMed

    Korneeva, G A; Stepanova, E A

    2001-01-01

    Statistical analysis of dynamic indices of biopolymers enzymatic destruction in unstratified and stratified. White Sea water has revealed specific properties of protease and amylase activities. We analyzed the component composition and hydrolytic enzymatic activities in the surface layer of the bottom sediments (0-2 cm). The relationship between protease and amylase enzymatic activities in the surface sediments with different content of pelite fraction is discussed. PMID:11236571

  18. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  19. Borehole survey method and apparatus for drilling substantially horizontal boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Trowsdale, L.S.

    1982-11-30

    A borehole survey method and apparatus are claimed for use in drilling substantially horizontal boreholes through a mineral deposit wherein a dip accelerometer, a roll accelerometer assembly and a fluxgate are disposed near the drill bit, which is mounted on a bent sub, and connected to a surface computation and display unit by a cable which extends through the drill string. The dip angle of the borehole near the drill bit, the azimuth of the borehole near the drill bit and the roll angle or orientation of the bent sub are measured and selectively displayed at the surface while the drill string is in the borehole for utilization in guiding the drill bit through the mineral deposit along a predetermined path.

  20. Efficacy of horizontal jumping tasks as a method for talent identification of female rugby players.

    PubMed

    Agar-Newman, Dana J; Klimstra, Marc D

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between horizontal jumping tasks (standing long jump [SLJ] and standing triple jump [STJ]) and sprint speed (initial sprint speed [ISS] and maximum sprint speed [MSS]) in elite female rugby athletes. Data were collected from provincial, under 20 international fifteens players, in addition to senior sevens international level female rugby athletes (n = 114). Body weight, SLJ, STJ, 10-m sprint speed (ISS), 30- to 40-m sprint speed (MSS), initial sprint momentum, and maximal sprint momentum were analyzed. When categorized by horizontal jumping ability, there was a significant difference in sprint speeds (p < 0.001) between the top 50% and bottom 50% groups. Examining the relationship between horizontal jumping tasks and sprinting speed revealed a stronger correlation in the slowest 50% of athletes compared with the fastest 50%. A linear regression developed from STJ and body weight adequately predicted ISS (r = 0.645, p < 0.001) and MSS (r = 0.761, p < 0.001). In conclusion, horizontal jumping tasks can be used as a valuable performance test to identify differences of sprinting ability in elite female rugby players. However, the relationship between horizontal jumping tasks and sprinting speed seems to decrease in faster athletes. Further, STJ and body weight can be used to predict both ISS and MSS. Based on these data, it is suggested that only STJ be collected when identifying potential sprinting talent in female rugby athletes and caution be used when generalizing results across varying levels of athletes. PMID:25226331

  1. Detection of bottom ferromagnetic electrode oxidation in magnetic tunnel junctions by magnetometry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Nam, Dao N. H.; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart A.

    2010-12-01

    Surface oxidation of the bottom ferromagnetic (FM) electrode, one of the major detrimental factors to the performance of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), is difficult to avoid during the fabrication process of the MTJ's tunnel barrier. Since Co rich alloys are commonly used for the FM electrodes in MTJs, overoxidation of the tunnel barrier results in the formation of a CoO antiferromagnetic (AF) interface layer which couples with the bottom FM electrode to form a typical AF/FM exchange bias (EB) system. In this work, surface oxidation of the CoFe and CoFeB bottom electrodes was detected via magnetometry measurements of EB characterizations including the EB field, training effect, uncompensated spin density, and enhanced coercivity. Variations in these parameters were found to be related to the surface oxidation of the bottom electrode, among them the change in coercivity is most sensitive. Annealed samples show evidence for an oxygen migration back to the MgO tunnel barrier by annealing.

  2. Free-surface potential flow of an ideal fluid due to a singular sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestnikova, A. A.; Starovoitov, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    A two-dimensional problem of a potential free-surface flow of an ideal incompressible fluid caused by a singular sink is considered. The sink is placed at the horizontal bottom of the channel. By employing a conformal map, the problem is equivalently rewritten in the unit circle. After that, it is investigated by the Levi — Civita technique with the extraction of the singular part of the flow that corresponds to the sink. We derive a Nekrasov type equation that describes exactly the form of the free boundary. This equation is studied at first numerically and then by an exact mathematical technique. It is shown that for the Froude number greater than some particular value, there exists a unique solution of the problem such that the free surface decreases monotonically when moving from the infinity to the sink. At the point over the sink, the free surface has a cusp.

  3. Detection of seismic anisotropy using ocean bottom seismometers: a case study from the northern headwall of the Storegga Slide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exley, R. J. K.; Westbrook, G. K.; Haacke, R. R.; Peacock, S.

    2010-10-01

    Azimuthal seismic anisotropy has been identified from the analysis of S-waves generated by P to S mode conversion in the Pleistocene sediments that form the northern headwall of the Storegga Slide, which were investigated with a seismic experiment employing a seabed array of ocean-bottom seismometers and a grid of airgun shots. The principal technique used to detect the anisotropy was azimuthal stacking of the radial and transverse horizontal geophone components, after the application of moveout, to show the variations in amplitude, phase and cumulative traveltime effects of S-waves, ultimately providing information that identified the `fast' and `slow' S-wave polarization orientations. Particle-motion analysis was used to corroborate the results and provide further information on the magnitudes of cumulative S-wave splitting. A 2-D ray-traced inversion of the traveltimes of pre-critical P and PS arrivals provided a velocity model from which the variation with depth of Vp, Vs and anisotropy could be compared with lithological and stratigraphic data from a borehole at the centre of the OBS array. Increased anisotropic response was observed to be coincident with high velocity units, which have high mica but low water content and are interpreted to be of glacial origin. The analysis of azimuthal seismic anisotropy shows clear evidence for horizontal transverse isotropy or an orthorhombic symmetry. The distribution in orientations of the fast plane of symmetry is broadly bimodal (E-W and NE-SW) across the OBS array. The E-W group showed correlation with the headwalls of old, buried slides and other faults visible within coherency attributes calculated from an accompanying 3-D seismic data set and with the strike of some of the headwalls of slides shown in multibeam bathymetry. However, the pattern of headwall fractures shown in the bathymetry is complicated and reticulate, and the NE-SW orientation is also well represented. We infer that the cause of the anisotropy is

  4. Electron-shading effect on the horizontal aligned growth of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Yang; Xiao Zhiyong; Chan, Philip C. H.

    2009-01-26

    Based on the well-accepted electron-shading theory during plasma processing, we designed microstructures to control the local built-in electric-field on the substrate surface. The distortion magnitude of the electric-field is largest near the sidewalls of the microstructures, creating a horizontal electric-field in this region. We showed that the horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown by making use of this built-in electric-field during the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process, with a tactical choice of geometries and materials of the microstructures on the substrate. This technique opens up a way to selectively and controllably grow horizontally aligned CNTs on the substrate surface.

  5. Articulating Support for Horizontal Resistive Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundo, Daniel; Schaffner, Grant; Bentley, Jason; Loehr, James A.

    2005-01-01

    A versatile mechanical device provides support for a user engaged in any of a variety of resistive exercises in a substantially horizontal orientation. The unique features and versatility of the device promise to be useful in bedrest studies, rehabilitation, and specialized strength training. The device affords a capability for selectively loading and unloading of portions of the user s body through its support mechanisms, so that specific parts of the body can be trained with little or no effect on other parts that may be disabled or in the process of recovery from injury. Thus, the device is ideal for rehabilitation exercise programs prescribed by physicians and physical therapists. The capability for selective loading and support also offers potential benefits to strength and conditioning trainers and athletes who wish to selectively strengthen selected parts. The principal innovative aspect of the device is that it supports the subject s weight while enabling the subject, lying substantially horizontally, to perform an exercise that closely approximates a full standing squat. The device includes mechanisms that support the subject in such a way that the hips are free to translate both horizontally and vertically and are free to rotate about the line connecting the hips. At the same time, the shoulders are free to translate horizontally while the upper back is free to rotate about the line connecting the shoulders. Among the mechanisms for hip motion and support is a counterbalance that offsets the weight of the subject as the subject s pelvis translates horizontally and vertically and rotates the pelvis about the line connecting the hips. The counterbalance is connected to a pelvic support system that allows these pelvic movements. The subject is also supported at the shoulder by a mechanism that can tilt to provide continuous support of the upper back while allowing the rotation required for arching the back as the pelvis is displaced. The shoulder support

  6. Effect of wave-enhanced bottom friction on storm-driven circulation in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, R.P.; List, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Massachusetts Bay is a shallow (35 m average depth) semienclosed embayment, roughly 100 ?? 50 km, which opens into the Gulf of Maine at its eastern boundary. Surface waves associated with winter storm winds from the northeast cause large sediment resuspension events, and wave and circulation fields during these events have a quasi-steady response to the wind stress. Coupled wave, circulation, and boundary layer models indicate that wave-enhanced bottom friction has a significant damping effect on storm-driven circulation in Massachusetts Bay. The simulated response exhibits significant three-dimensional structure, but still can be fundamentally understood using idealized models. The depth-integrated momentum balance is dominated by along-bay stress, pressure gradient, and bottom stress. The effective bottom drag coefficient during typical storm conditions is increased by a factor of 2-5 when wave effects are included, but the mean bottom stress is relatively unaffected by wave effects due to a reduction in bottom currents by 30-50%. The vertical mixing is also relatively unaffected by the waves, and the result is that the increased drag causes a nearly depth-independent offset of the vertical current profiles. The alongshore transport in the bay is reduced 10-50%, depending on wind direction. ?? ASCE.

  7. Quality of the bottom sediment prior to dredging in the Golden Horn of Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Kinaci, C; Inanc, B; Aydin, A F; Yuksel, E; Sevimli, M F; Arikan, O; Topacik, D

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Horn has experienced severe pollution due to uncontrolled domestic and industrial wastewater discharges until recent years. A restoration project has been developed by our universities, upon a request from Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality. Two principal alternatives for the dredging and disposal of the bottom sediments were considered: disposing on the land and disposing in the sea. Both of these alternatives include several sub-alternatives. Characterization of the sediment quality is crucially important for selecting the best alternative considering the cost, environmental impact and public acceptance. However, only a few and rather old studies were present with which it was not possible to get a comprehensive information on the critical sediment characteristics. Therefore, the aim of this study was determination of spatial distribution of sediment characteristics. The project area, at which the sediment quality determined, covers the part of the Golden Horn remaining at the upstream of Valide Sultan Bridge. The number of sampling stations were thirteen and the sediment samples were collected from 0.0m, 5.0m and 10.0m from the bottom surface. The following parameters were measured on each sample: Total solids, organic matter, total phosphorus, TKN, oil and grease, total sulphur, and sediment oxygen demand (SOD). Sediment oxygen demand parameter was further divided into three fractions, namely, biological (SOD-B) and chemical (SOD-C). Average organic content of the bottom sediment was around 10% while ammonia and sulfur exhibit very high levels. It is found that the bottom sediment is well stabilized with very low organic content below 5.0m from the bottom surface. It can be said that, removing the upper 5m of the bottom sediment will be enough for creating a relatively stable bottom surface which will cause oxygen depletion in the overlaying water at acceptable levels. High SOD values of the bottom sediment makes the alternatives considering disposal

  8. Pool boiling thermal transport through micro-patterned metal superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Matthew; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Pool boiling thermal transport through horizontal superhydrophobic surfaces decorated with rib and post micro-patterns was explored experimentally. The pool consisted of a water reservoir heated from below by electric heaters embedded in an aluminum block. A test surface was located at the bottom of the pool and fixed to the block. Instrumentation allowed simultaneous measurement of heat flux through the test surface, test surface temperature, and pool water temperature. From these measurements, heat flux as a function of excess temperature (the difference between the test surface temperature and the water saturation temperature) was determined for each surface. Surface geometry was characterized by the cavity fraction (the ratio of projected cavity area to surface area on the test surface), distance between features, and microscale pattern geometry. The transition from nucleate to pool boiling was observed to occur at much lower excess temperatures for superhydrophobic surfaces than for hydrophobic surfaces, with greater deviation for larger cavity fraction. Heat flux versus excess temperature relationships are presented while exploring the influence of superhydrophobic surface microstructure on the thermal transport. NSF CBET-1235881.

  9. Peach Bottom test element program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Saurwein, J.J.; Holzgraf, J.F.; MIller, C.M.; Myers, B.F.; Wallroth, C.F.

    1982-11-01

    Thirty-three test elements were irradiated in the Peach Bottom high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of the testing program for advanced HTGRs. Extensive postirradiation examinations and evaluations of 21 of these irradiation experiments were performed. The test element irradiations were simulated using HTGR design codes and data. Calculated fuel burnups, power profiles, fast neutron fluences, and temperatures were verified via destructive burnup measurements, gamma scanning, and in-pile thermocouple readings corrected for decalibration effects. Analytical techniques were developed to improve the quality of temperature predictions through feedback of nuclear measurements into thermal calculations. Dimensional measurements, pressure burst tests, diametral compression tests, ring-cutting tests, strip-cutting tests, and four-point bend tests were performed to measure residual stress, strain, and strength distributions in H-327 graphite structures irradiated in the test elements.

  10. Station blackout calculations for Peach Bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    A calculational procedure for the Station Blackout Severe Accident Sequence at Browns Ferry Unit One has been repeated with plant-specific application to one of the Peach Bottom Units. The only changes required in code input are with regard to the primary continment concrete, the existence of sprays in the secondary containment, and the size of the refueling bay. Combustible gas mole fractions in the secondary containment of each plant during the accident sequence are determined. It is demonstrated why the current state-of-the-art corium/concrete interaction code is inadequate for application to the study of Severe Accident Sequences in plants with the BWR MK I or MK II containment design.

  11. Use of incinerator bottom ash in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Pera, J.; Coutaz, L.; Ambroise, J.; Chababbet, M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to show if municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could be an alternative aggregate for the production of building concrete presenting a characteristic 28-day compressive strength of 25 MPa. The aggregates passing the 20-mm sieve and retained on the 4-mm sieve were considered for investigation. They showed lower density, higher water absorption, and lower strength than natural gravel. They could be considered as average quality aggregates for use in concrete. When directly introduced in concrete, they led to swelling and cracking of specimens, due to the reaction between cement and metallic aluminium. Therefore, a treatment by sodium hydroxide was proposed to avoid such degradation, which made possible the partial replacement (up to 50%) of gravel in concrete without affecting the durability.

  12. Conductivity Probe after Trench-Bottom Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Needles of the thermal and conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander were positioned into the bottom of a trench called 'Upper Cupboard' during Sol 86 (Aug. 21, 2008), or 86th Martian day after landing. This image of the conductivity probe after it was raised back out of the trench was taken by Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera. The conductivity probe is at the wrist of the robotic arm's scoop.

    The probe measures how fast heat and electricity move from one needle to an adjacent one through the soil or air between the needles. Conductivity readings can be indicators about water vapor, water ice and liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Discovering bottom squark coannihilation at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Alexander; Lastovicka, Tomas; Nomerotski, Andrei; Lastovicka-Medin, Gordana

    2010-02-01

    We study the potential of the international linear collider (ILC) at {radical}(s)=500 GeV to probe new dark matter motivated scenario where the bottom squark (sbottom) is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle. For this scenario, which is virtually impossible for the LHC to test, the ILC has a potential to cover a large fraction of the parameter space. The challenge is due to a very low energy of jets, below 20-30 GeV, which pushes the jet clustering and flavor tagging algorithms to their limits. The process of sbottom pair production was studied within the SiD detector concept. We demonstrate that ILC offers a unique opportunity to test the supersymmetry parameter space motivated by the sbottom-neutralino coannihilation scenario in cases when the sbottom production is kinematically accessible. The study was done with the full SiD simulation and reconstruction chain including all standard model and beam backgrounds.

  14. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; McInnes, Ian D.; Massey, John V.

    1988-01-01

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  15. Stability of vertical and horizontal axis Levitrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Taylor, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    The stability of the new horizontal axis Levitron3 is compared with that of the vertical axis device. The rotation frequency ranges are similar because they are determined by the same precessional micro-trap, for which some theory is given. But the macro-trap of the horizontal axis system gives it far greater mechanical stability. Field-line studies allow this to be more easily visualized. The greater stability allows for educational experiments which could only be contemplated with the old Levitron: driven precession and nutation and motion along the field lines. These experiments illustrate some very fundamental space dynamics and several other topics. The enhanced stability may also lead to electro-mechanical applications.

  16. Horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and animals.

    PubMed

    Dunning Hotopp, Julie C

    2011-04-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is increasingly described between bacteria and animals. Such transfers that are vertically inherited have the potential to influence the evolution of animals. One classic example is the transfer of DNA from mitochondria and chloroplasts to the nucleus after the acquisition of these organelles by eukaryotes. Even today, many of the described instances of bacteria-to-animal transfer occur as part of intimate relationships such as those of endosymbionts and their invertebrate hosts, particularly insects and nematodes, while numerous transfers are also found in asexual animals. Both of these observations are consistent with modern evolutionary theory, in particular the serial endosymbiotic theory and Muller's ratchet. Although it is tempting to suggest that these particular lifestyles promote horizontal gene transfer, it is difficult to ascertain given the nonrandom sampling of animal genome sequencing projects and the lack of a systematic analysis of animal genomes for such transfers. PMID:21334091

  17. Elf cites 5 advantages of horizontal drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    ELF Aquitaine used horizontal drilling during a pilot test program to bring commercial production from its Rospo Mare oil discovery in the Adriatic, which would have been a costly disappointment if drilled by a conventional vertical well bore. Rospo Mare is a large reservoir containing a top column of highly viscous crude underlain by a water column. The company felt that a well bore that penetrated the reservoir vertically would bring early flooding of the oil column and yield only water. By penetrating the reservoir with a horizontal well drilled high in the oil column, the well successfully produced on numerous tests from Oct. 1982 until the end of the test program in 1983. Production was termed excellent, with productivity during tests reportedly reaching ca 15 times the rate produced from nearby vertical wells. However, ELF said the results usually average ca 5 times the usual rate of vertical wells.

  18. Horizontal Niobrara play proceeding with caution

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-11-11

    This paper reports that caution and careful planning are the watchwords for operators in their approach to horizontal drilling for oil in Puper Cretaceous Niobrara chalk in Colorado and Wyoming. Despite its geologic age equivalence with the Austin chalk of southeastern Texas, the formation has not attracted the same degree of attention or yielded as stunning results as the Austin chalk. Little is yet known about the precise reasons for its sporadic productivity; the exact nature of the fracture system(s) within it; the source and migration history of its oil(s); or the deeper structures and structural trends with which productivity appears associated. Niobrara underlies an area larger than that underlain by the Austin chalk, but Niobrara horizontal drilling so far has proceeded at a guarded pace.

  19. Search for horizontal bosons at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, C.H.; Deshpande, N.G.; Gunion, J.F.; Haber, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    The production process anti p p ..-->.. l/sup -/l'/sup +/ + X, where the leptons belong to two different generations and X refers to spectator jets, provides a clear signature for horizontal (generation-changing) bosons when the leptons are emitted nearly back-to-back and p/sub T//sup miss/ = 0. Cross sections and p/sub T/ distributions for each lepton are presented, and discovery limits on M/sub H/ are extracted for several different channels.

  20. Spin stabilized magnetic levitation of horizontal rotors.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis Anthony

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of a new configuration for achieving spin stabilized magnetic levitation. In the classical configuration, the rotor spins about a vertical axis; and the spin stabilizes the lateral instability of the top in the magnetic field. In this new configuration the rotor spins about a horizontal axis; and the spin stabilizes the axial instability of the top in the magnetic field.