Science.gov

Sample records for horizontal flow regime

  1. A mechanistic determination of horizontal flow regime bound using void wave celerity

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The two-phase flow regime boundaries in a horizontal channel has been investigated by using the behavior of the second order void wave celerities. The average two-fluid model has been constituted with closure relations for horizontally stratified and bubbly flows. A vapor phase turbulent stress model for a smooth interface geometry has been included. It is found that the second order waves (i.e., eigenvalues) propagate in opposite direction with almost the same speed when the liquid phase is stationary. Using the well-posedness limit of the two-phase system, the dispersed-stratified flow regime boundary has been modeled. Two-phase Froude number has been theoretically found to be a convenient parameter in quantifying the flow regime boundary as a function of the void fraction. It is found that interaction between void wave celerities become stronger as the two-phase Froude number is reduced. This result should be interpreted as that gravity and the relative velocity are key parameters in determining flow regime boundaries in a horizontal flow. The influence of the vapor phase turbulent stress found to stabilize the flow stratification. This study clearly shows that the average two-fluid model is very effective for a mechanistic determination of horizontal flow regimes if appropriate closure relations are developed.

  2. Prediction of refrigerant void fraction in horizontal tubes using probabilistic flow regime maps

    SciTech Connect

    Jassim, E.W.; Newell, T.A.; Chato, J.C.

    2008-04-15

    A state of the art review of two-phase void fraction models in smooth horizontal tubes is provided and a probabilistic two-phase flow regime map void fraction model is developed for refrigerants under condensation, adiabatic, and evaporation conditions in smooth, horizontal tubes. Time fraction information from a generalized probabilistic two-phase flow map is used to provide a physically based weighting of void fraction models for different flow regimes. The present model and void fraction models in the literature are compared to data from multiple sources including R11, R12, R134a, R22, R410A refrigerants, 4.26-9.58 mm diameter tubes, mass fluxes from 70 to 900 kg/m{sup 2} s, and a full quality range. The present model has a mean absolute deviation of 3.5% when compared to the collected database. (author)

  3. Experimental investigation of the two-phase flow regimes and pressure drop in horizontal mini-size rectangular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elazhary, Amr Mohamed; Soliman, Hassan M.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted in order to investigate two-phase flow regimes and fully developed pressure drop in a mini-size, horizontal rectangular channel. The test section was machined in the form of an impacting tee junction in an acrylic block (in order to facilitate visualization) with a rectangular cross-section of 1.87-mm height on 20-mm width on the inlet and outlet sides. Pressure drop measurement and flow regime identification were performed on all three sides of the junction. Air-water mixtures at 200 kPa (abs) and room temperature were used as the test fluids. Four flow regimes were identified visually: bubbly, plug, churn, and annular over the ranges of gas and liquid superficial velocities of 0.04 ≤ JG ≤ 10 m/s and 0.02 ≤ JL ≤ 0.7 m/s, respectively, and a flow regime map was developed. Accuracy of the pressure-measurement technique was validated with single-phase, laminar and turbulent, fully developed data. Two-phase experiments were conducted for eight different inlet conditions and various mass splits at the junction. Comparisons were conducted between the present data and former correlations for the fully developed two-phase pressure drop in rectangular channels with similar sizes. Wide deviations were found among these correlations, and the correlations that agreed best with the present data were identified.

  4. Condensation of refrigerants in horizontal, spirally grooved microfin tubes: Numerical analysis of heat transfer in the annular flow regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nozu, S.; Honda, H.

    2000-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the condensation heat transfer coefficient in a horizontal, spirally grooved microfin tube. Based on the flow observation study performed by the authors, a laminar film condensation model in the annular flow regime is proposed. The model assumes that all the condensate flow occurs through the grooves. The condensate film is segmented into thin and thick film regions. In the thin film region formed on the fin surface, the condensate is assumed to be drained by the combined surface tension and vapor shear forces. In the thick film region formed in the groove, on the other hand, the condensate is assumed to be driven by the vapor shear force. The present and previous local heat transfer data including four fluids (CFC11, HCFC22, HCFC123, and HFCl34a) and three microfin tubes are found to agree with the present predictions to a mean absolute deviation of 15.1%.

  5. Experimental study on the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flow in horizontal pipes.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M; Shaahid, S M; Tunde, Lukman O; Al-Sarkhi, A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20 °C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed. PMID:24523645

  6. Experimental Study on the Flow Regimes and Pressure Gradients of Air-Oil-Water Three-Phase Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M.; Shaahid, S. M.; Tunde, Lukman O.; Al-Sarkhi, A.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20°C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed. PMID:24523645

  7. Probabilistic determination of two-phase flow regimes in horizontal tubes utilizing an automated image recognition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassim, Emad W.; Newell, Ty A.; Chato, John C.

    2007-04-01

    Probabilistic two-phase flow map data is experimentally obtained for R134a at 25.0, 35.0, and 49.7°C, R410A at 25.0°C, mass fluxes from 100 to 600 kg/m2-s, qualities from 0 to1 in 8.00, 5.43, 3.90, and 1.74 mm I.D. single, smooth, adiabatic, horizontal tubes in order to extend probabilistic two-phase flow map modeling techniques to single tubes. A new web camera based flow visualization technique utilizing an illuminated diffuse striped background was used to enhance images, detect fine films, and aid in the automated image recognition process developed in the present study. This technique has an average time fraction classification error of less than 0.01.

  8. Non-invasive classification of gas–liquid two-phase horizontal flow regimes using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and a neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa Abbagoni, Baba; Yeung, Hoi

    2016-08-01

    The identification of flow pattern is a key issue in multiphase flow which is encountered in the petrochemical industry. It is difficult to identify the gas–liquid flow regimes objectively with the gas–liquid two-phase flow. This paper presents the feasibility of a clamp-on instrument for an objective flow regime classification of two-phase flow using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and an artificial neural network, which records and processes the ultrasonic signals reflected from the two-phase flow. Experimental data is obtained on a horizontal test rig with a total pipe length of 21 m and 5.08 cm internal diameter carrying air-water two-phase flow under slug, elongated bubble, stratified-wavy and, stratified flow regimes. Multilayer perceptron neural networks (MLPNNs) are used to develop the classification model. The classifier requires features as an input which is representative of the signals. Ultrasound signal features are extracted by applying both power spectral density (PSD) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) methods to the flow signals. A classification scheme of ‘1-of-C coding method for classification’ was adopted to classify features extracted into one of four flow regime categories. To improve the performance of the flow regime classifier network, a second level neural network was incorporated by using the output of a first level networks feature as an input feature. The addition of the two network models provided a combined neural network model which has achieved a higher accuracy than single neural network models. Classification accuracies are evaluated in the form of both the PSD and DWT features. The success rates of the two models are: (1) using PSD features, the classifier missed 3 datasets out of 24 test datasets of the classification and scored 87.5% accuracy; (2) with the DWT features, the network misclassified only one data point and it was able to classify the flow patterns up to 95.8% accuracy. This approach has demonstrated the

  9. Inlet Jet Interaction in Horizontal Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pranab; Smith, Chuck; Metcalfe, Ralph

    2012-11-01

    Laminar incompressible flow (Re < 1000) inside a horizontal channel with multiple cross-flow inlets was studied numerically. First, two cross-flow inlets were used to observe the flow interference phenomenon between the inlets. This concept was extended to axisymmetric pipe flow with five cross-flow inlets. Three basic flow regimes - trickle flow, partially blocked flow and fully blocked flow - were identified with respect to the blocking of upstream inlets by the downstream ones. The effects of inlet pressure and different inlet sizes on the flow regimes under steady state condition were studied. A hydrostatic model of fluid reservoirs draining into the channel was constructed using a linear function for pressure at the inlet boundaries to study the dynamic behavior of the inlets. Three different time scales related to the depletion of the reservoirs were identified. The dynamic behavior of two cross-flow inlets was observed with the initial conditions corresponding to the three flow regimes. Similar study was carried out for a five-inlet case and the dynamic behavior of individual reservoirs was observed. The change of flow regimes in the system over time with reservoir draining was evident and the different time-scales involved were identified. Supported in Part by Apache Corporation.

  10. Environment Flow Assessment with Flow Regime Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Ho, C. C.; Chang, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    To avoid worsen river and estuarine ecosystems cause by overusing water resources, environmental flows conservation is applied to reduce the impact of river environment. Environmental flows refer to water provided within a river, wetland or coastal zone to sustain ecosystems and benefits to human wellbeing. Environment flow assessment is now widely accepted that a naturally variable flow regime, rather than just a minimum low flow. In this study, we propose four methods, experience method, Tenant method, hydraulic method and habitat method to assess the environmental flow of base flow, flush flow and overbank flow with different discharge, frequency and occurrence period. Dahan River has been chosen as a case to demonstrate the assessment mechanism. The alternatives impact analysis of environment and human water used provides a reference for stakeholders when holding an environmental flow consultative meeting.

  11. Merging of Rhine flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boessenkool, Berry; Bronstert, Axel; Bürger, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    The Rhine flow regime is changing: (a) in the alpine nival regime, snow melt floods occur earlier in the year and (b) in the pluvial middle-Rhine regime, rainfall induced flood magnitudes rise. The seasonality of each is currently separated in time, but it is conceivable that this may shift due to climate change. If extremes of both flood types coincide, this would create a new type of hydrologic extreme with disastrous consequences. Quantifying the probability for a future overlap of pluvial and nival floods is therefore of high relevance to society and particularly to reinsurance companies. In order to investigate possible changes in magnitude and timing of flood types, we are developing a chain of physical models for spatio-temporal combination of flood probabilities. As input, we aim to use stochastically downscaled temperature and rainfall extremes from climate model weather projections. Preliminary research shows a six-week forward-shift of peak discharge at the nival gauge Maxau in the past century. The aim of presenting our early-stage work as a poster is to induce an exchange of ideas with fellow scientists in close research disciplines.

  12. Phase-locked measurements of gas-liquid horizontal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2014-11-01

    A flow of gas and liquid in a horizontal pipe can be described in terms of various flow regimes, e.g. wavy stratified, annular or slug flow. These flow regimes appear at characteristic gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and feature unique wave phenomena. Wavy stratified flow is populated by low amplitude waves whereas annular flow contains high amplitude and long lived waves, so called disturbance waves, that play a key role in a liquid entrainment into the gas phase (droplets). In a slug flow regime, liquid-continuous regions travel at high speeds through a pipe separated by regions of stratified flow. We use a refractive index matched dynamic shadowgraphy technique using a high-speed camera mounted on a moving robotic linear rail to track the formation and development of features characteristic for the aforementioned flow regimes. We show that the wave dynamics become progressively more complex with increasing liquid and gas Reynolds numbers. Based on the shadowgraphy measurements we present, over a range of conditions: (i) phenomenological observations of the formation, and (ii) statistical data on the downstream velocity distribution of different classes of waves. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  13. Flow interaction between multiple cross-flow inlets in a horizontal pipe or channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pranab N.; Smith, Chuck; Metcalfe, Ralph W.

    2013-11-01

    Incompressible flow in horizontal channels and pipes with multiple cross-flow inlets was studied numerically. Flow interference among the inlets was studied using an axisymmetric pipe flow model with five cross-flow inlets. Three basic flow regimes - trickle flow, partially blocked flow and fully blocked flow - were identified with respect to the blocking of upstream inlets by the downstream ones. The effects of inlet pressure and inlet size on the flow regimes under steady state conditions were studied. The presence of these regimes was supported by field data obtained from a horizontal natural gas well at two different times in the production cycle. Using a hydrostatic pressure model of reservoirs as the inlet boundary condition that drained fluid into the channel, the dynamic interaction of the inlets was studied. The transient behavior of the flow regimes was simulated and the key time-scales involved were identified. This is supported by field data where a similar behavior can be observed over time. Initially, the upstream inlets were in a blocked state, but opened up at a later time, leading to a trickle flow regime. Supported in Part by Apache Corporation.

  14. Capacitance densitometer for flow regime identification

    DOEpatents

    Shipp, Jr., Roy L.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a capacitance densitometer for determining the flow regime of a two-phase flow system. A two-element capacitance densitometer is used in conjunction with a conventional single-beam gamma densitometer to unambiguously identify the prevailing flow regime and the average density of a flowing fluid.

  15. Dual permeability flow behavior for modeling horizontal well production in fractured-vuggy carbonate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-Chun; Nie, Ren-Shi; Jia, Yong-Lu

    2012-09-01

    SummaryFractured-vuggy carbonate reservoirs are composed of by matrix, fracture, and vug systems. This paper is the first investigation into the dual permeability flow issue for horizontal well production in a fractured-vuggy carbonate reservoir. Considering dispersed vugs in carbonate reservoirs and treating media directly connected with horizontal wellbore as the matrix and fracture systems, a test analysis model of a horizontal well was created, and triple porosity and dual permeability flow behavior were modeled. Standard log-log type curves were drawn up by numerical simulation and flow behavior characteristics were thoroughly analyzed. Numerical simulations showed that type curves are dominated by external boundary conditions as well as the permeability ratio of the fracture system to the sum of fracture and matrix systems. The parameter κ is only relevant to the dual permeability model, and if κ is one, then the dual permeability model is equivalent to the single permeability model. There are seven main flow regimes with constant rate of horizontal well production and five flow regimes with constant wellbore pressure of horizontal well production; different flow regimes have different flow behavior characteristics. Early radial flow and linear flow regimes are typical characteristics of horizontal well production; duration of early radial flow regime is usually short because formation thickness is generally less than 100 m. Derivative curves are W-shaped, which is a reflection of inter-porosity flows between matrix, fracture, and vug systems. A distorted W-shape, which could be produced in certain situations, such as one involving an erroneously low time of inter-porosity flows, would handicap the recognition of a linear flow regime. A real case application was successfully implemented, and some useful reservoir parameters (e.g., permeability and inter-porosity flow factor) were obtained from well testing interpretation.

  16. Identifying natural flow regimes using fish communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fi-John; Tsai, Wen-Ping; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Chen, Hung-kwai; Herricks, Edwin E.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryModern water resources management has adopted natural flow regimes as reasonable targets for river restoration and conservation. The characterization of a natural flow regime begins with the development of hydrologic statistics from flow records. However, little guidance exists for defining the period of record needed for regime determination. In Taiwan, the Taiwan Eco-hydrological Indicator System (TEIS), a group of hydrologic statistics selected for fisheries relevance, is being used to evaluate ecological flows. The TEIS consists of a group of hydrologic statistics selected to characterize the relationships between flow and the life history of indigenous species. Using the TEIS and biosurvey data for Taiwan, this paper identifies the length of hydrologic record sufficient for natural flow regime characterization. To define the ecological hydrology of fish communities, this study connected hydrologic statistics to fish communities by using methods to define antecedent conditions that influence existing community composition. A moving average method was applied to TEIS statistics to reflect the effects of antecedent flow condition and a point-biserial correlation method was used to relate fisheries collections with TEIS statistics. The resulting fish species-TEIS (FISH-TEIS) hydrologic statistics matrix takes full advantage of historical flows and fisheries data. The analysis indicates that, in the watersheds analyzed, averaging TEIS statistics for the present year and 3 years prior to the sampling date, termed MA(4), is sufficient to develop a natural flow regime. This result suggests that flow regimes based on hydrologic statistics for the period of record can be replaced by regimes developed for sampled fish communities.

  17. Learning Flow Regimes from Snapshot Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemati, Maziar

    2015-11-01

    Fluid flow regimes are often categorized based on the qualitative patterns observed by visual inspection of the flow field. For example, bluff body wakes are traditionally classified based on the number and groupings of vortices shed per cycle (e.g., 2S, 2P, P+S), as seen in snapshots of the vorticity field. Subsequently, the existence and nature of these identified flow regimes can be explained through dynamical analyses of the fluid mechanics. Unfortunately, due to the need for manual inspection, the approach described above can be impractical for studies that seek to learn flow regimes from large volumes of numerical and/or experimental snapshot data. Here, we appeal to established techniques from machine learning and data-driven dynamical systems analysis to automate the task of learning flow regimes from snapshot data. Moreover, by appealing to the dynamical structure of the fluid flow, this approach also offers the potential to reveal flow regimes that may be overlooked by visual inspection alone. Here, we will introduce the methodology and demonstrate its capabilities and limitations in the context of several model flows.

  18. Gas flow through rough microchannels in the transition flow regime.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zilong; Chen, Yongping; Shao, Chenxi

    2016-01-01

    A multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model of Couette flow is developed to investigate the rarified gas flow through microchannels with roughness characterized by fractal geometry, especially to elucidate the coupled effects of roughness and rarefaction on microscale gas flow in the transition flow regime. The results indicate that the surface roughness effect on gas flow behavior becomes more significant in rarefied gas flow with the increase of Knudsen number. We find the gas flow behavior in the transition flow regime is more sensitive to roughness height than that in the slip flow regime. In particular, the influence of fractal dimension on rarefied gas flow behavior is less significant than roughness height. PMID:26871175

  19. Axisymmetric, Ventilated Supercavitation in Unsteady, Horizontal Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Ellison; Lee, Seung-Jae; Arndt, Roger

    2012-11-01

    Drag reduction and/or speed augmentation of marine vehicles by means of supercavitation is a topic of great interest. During the initial launch of a supercavitating vehicle, an artificial supercavity is required until the vehicle can reach conditions at which a natural supercavity can be sustained. Previous studies at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) focused on the behavior of ventilated supercavities in steady horizontal flows. In open waters, vehicles can encounter unsteady flows, especially when traveling under waves. A study has been carried out at SAFL to investigate the effects of unsteady flow on axisymmetric supercavities. An attempt is made to duplicate sea states seen in open waters. In an effort to track cavity dimensions throughout a wave cycle, an automated cavity tracking script has been developed. Using a high speed camera and the proper software, it is possible to synchronize cavity dimensions with pressure measurements taken inside the cavity. Results regarding supercavity shape, ventilation demand, cavitation parameters and closure methods are presented. It was found that flow unsteadiness caused a decrease in the overall length of the supercavity while having only a minimal effect on the maximum diameter. The supercavity volume varied with cavitation number and a possible relationship between the two is being explored. (Supported by ONR)

  20. Constructing an interdisciplinary flow regime recommendation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally agreed that river rehabilitation most often relies on restoring a more natural flow regime, but credibly defining the desired regime can be problematic. I combined four distinct methods to develop and refine month-by-month and event-based flow recommendations to protect and partially restore the ecological integrity of the Cache la Poudre River through Fort Collins, Colorado. A statistical hydrologic approach was used to summarize the river's natural flow regime and set provisional monthly flow targets at levels that were historically exceeded 75% of the time. These preliminary monthly targets were supplemented using results from three Poudre-specific disciplinary studies. A substrate maintenance flow model was used to better define the high flows needed to flush accumulated sediment from the river's channel and help sustain the riparian zone in this snowmelt-dominated river. A hydraulic/habitat model and a water temperature model were both used to better define the minimum flows necessary to maintain a thriving cool water fishery. The result is a range of recommended monthly flows and daily flow guidance illustrating the advantage of combining a wide range of available disciplinary information, supplemented by judgment based on ecological principles and a general understanding of river ecosystems, in a highly altered, working river. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  1. Forest damage and snow avalanche flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Margreth, S.; Diefenbach, L.; Bartelt, P.

    2015-01-01

    Snow avalanches break, uproot and overturn trees causing damage to forests. The extent of forest damage provides useful information on avalanche frequency and intensity. However, impact forces depend on avalanche flow regime. In this paper, we define avalanche loading cases representing four different avalanche flow regimes: powder, intermittent, dry and wet. In the powder regime, the blast of the cloud can produce large bending moments in the tree stem because of the impact area extending over the entire tree crown. We demonstrate that intermittent granular loadings are equivalent to low-density uniform dry snow loadings under the assumption of homogeneous particle distributions. In the wet snow case, avalanche pressure is calculated using a quasi-static model accounting for the motion of plug-like wet snow flows. Wet snow pressure depends both on avalanche volume and terrain features upstream of the tree. Using a numerical model that simulates both powder and wet snow avalanches, we study documented events with forest damage. We find (1) powder clouds with velocities over 20 m s-1 can break tree stems, (2) the intermittent regime seldom controls tree breakage and (3) quasi-static pressures of wet snow avalanches can be much higher than pressures calculated using dynamic pressure formulas.

  2. Regimes of flow past a vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velte, C. M.; Okulov, V. L.; Naumov, I. V.

    2012-04-01

    A complete parametric investigation of the development of multi-vortex regimes in a wake past simple vortex generator has been carried out. It is established that the vortex structure in the wake is much more complicated than a simple monopole tip vortex. The vortices were studied by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV). Based on the obtained SPIV data, a map of the regimes of flow past the vortex generator has been constructed. One region with a developed stable multivortex system on this map reaches the vicinity of the optimum angle of attack of the vortex generator.

  3. Forced flow of a vapor-liquid stream in a horizontal pipe with film boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, É. K.; Panevin, V. I.; Firsov, V. P.

    1986-05-01

    The stream structure and flow regime during film boiling of liquid nitrogen in a horizontal pipe are investigated. Data on heat transfer are obtained and a model is proposed for calculating the parameters of the two-phase stream along the channel length.

  4. Forest damage and snow avalanche flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Margreth, S.; Diefenbach, L.; Bartelt, P.

    2015-06-01

    Snow avalanches break, uproot and overturn trees causing damage to forests. The extent of forest damage provides useful information on avalanche frequency and intensity. However, impact forces depend on avalanche flow regime. In this paper, we define avalanche loading cases representing four different avalanche flow regimes: powder, intermittent, dry and wet. Using a numerical model that simulates both powder and wet snow avalanches, we study documented events with forest damage. First we show that in the powder regime, although the applied impact pressures can be small, large bending moments in the tree stem can be produced due to the torque action of the blast. The impact area of the blast extends over the entire tree crown. We find that, powder clouds with velocities over 20 m s-1 can break tree stems. Second we demonstrate that intermittent granular loadings are equivalent to low-density uniform dry snow loadings under the assumption of homogeneous particle distributions. The intermittent regime seldom controls tree breakage. Third we calculate quasi-static pressures of wet snow avalanches and show that they can be much higher than pressures calculated using dynamic pressure formulas. Wet snow pressure depends both on avalanche volume and terrain features upstream of the tree.

  5. Flow regimes in a trapped vortex cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasagna, D.; Iuso, G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents results of an experimental investigation on the flow in a trapped vortex cell, embedded into a flat plate, and interacting with a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. The objective of the work is to describe the flow features and elucidate some of the governing physical mechanisms, in the light of recent investigations on flow separation control using vortex cells. Hot-wire velocity measurements of the shear layer bounding the cell and of the boundary layers upstream and downstream are reported, together with spectral and correlation analyses of wall-pressure fluctuation measurements. Smoke flow visualisations provide qualitative insight into some relevant features of the internal flow, namely a large-scale flow unsteadiness and possible mechanisms driving the rotation of the vortex core. Results are presented for two very different regimes: a low-Reynolds-number case where the incoming boundary layer is laminar and its momentum thickness is small compared to the cell opening, and a moderately high-Reynolds-number case, where the incoming boundary layer is turbulent and the ratio between the momentum thickness and the opening length is significantly larger than in the first case. Implications of the present findings to flow control applications of trapped vortex cells are also discussed.

  6. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method developed for the classification of quasi-stationary events into a few planetary flow regimes and for the examination of transitions between these regimes is described. The method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and then to a 500-mbar data set for Northern Hemisphere (NH), for which cluster analysis was carried out in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters were found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, while transient clusters were found in the band-pass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band, three pairs of clusters determined EOFs 1, 2, and 3, respectively; they exhibited well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American pattern, and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data exhibited strong bimodality.

  7. The relationship between void waves and flow regime transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Drew, D.A.; Kalkach-Navarro, S.; Park, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    The results of an extensive experimental and analytical study on the relationship between void waves and flow regime transition are presented, in particular, the bubbly/slug flow regime transition. It is shown that void wave instability signals a flow regime transition.

  8. Formation damage effects on horizontal-well flow efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, G.; Dupuy, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Wellbore damage commonly is accounted for by an apparent skin factor. A better relative index for determining the efficiency with which a well has been drilled and completed is the flow efficiency, the ration of a well's actual PI to ideal PI. The flow efficiency of horizontal wells is derived assuming steady-state flow of an incompressible fluid in a homogeneous, anisotropic medium. A comparison between the flow efficiencies of vertical and horizontal wells indicates that permeability reduction around the wellbore is less detrimental to horizontal wells. This paper shows that the effect of damage around a horizontal wellbore is reduced slightly by increasing the well length. Conversely, if the vertical permeability is less than the horizontal permeability, the anisotropy ratio, {radical} k{sub H}/k{sub V}, magnifies the influence of formation damage near the horizontal wellbore. Examples of flow efficiency calculations assuming a formation damage or a formation collapse around a liner in poorly consolidated formations are provided for horizontal and vertical wells.

  9. Wavy regime of a viscoplastic film flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Symphony; Ruyer-Quil, Christian; Dandapat, Bhabani S.

    2010-11-01

    We consider a power-law fluid flowing down an inclined plane under the action of gravity. The divergence of the viscosity of a shear-thinning fluid at zero strain rate is taken care of by introducing a Newtonian plateau at small strain rate. Applying a weighted residual approach, a two-equations model is formulated in terms of two coupled evolution equations for the film thickness h and the local flow rate q within the framework of lubrication theory. The model accounts for the streamwise diffusion of momentum. Consistency of the model is achieved up to first order in the film parameter for inertia terms and up to second order for viscous terms. Comparison to Orr-Sommerfeld stability analysis and to DNS show convincing agreement in both linear and nonlinear regimes. In the case of shear-thinning fluids, lowering the power index has a non-trivial effect on the primary instability of the film: the threshold of the instability occurs at a smaller Reynolds number but the range of instable wavenumber is also reduced. In the nonlinear regime, we have evidenced a subcritical bifurcation of the traveling-wave solutions from marginal stability conditions.

  10. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  11. SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2010-08-01

    Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

  12. Constraints on flow regimes in wide-aperture fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2004-02-28

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the complex flow processes in individual fractures, aided by flow visualization experiments and conceptual modeling efforts. These advances have led to the recognition of several flow regimes in individual fractures subjected to different initial and boundary conditions. Of these, the most important regimes are film flow, rivulet flow, and sliding of droplets. The existence of such significantly dissimilar flow regimes has been a major hindrance in the development of self-consistent conceptual models of flow for single fractures that encompass all the flow regimes. The objective of this study is to delineate the existence of the different flow regimes in individual fractures. For steady-state flow conditions, we developed physical constraints on the different flow regimes that satisfy minimum energy configurations, which enabled us to segregate the wide range of fracture transmissivity (volumetric flow rate per fracture width) into several flow regimes. These are, in increasing order of flow rate, flow of adsorbed films, flow of sliding drops, rivulet flow, stable film flow, and unstable (turbulent) film flow. The scope of this study is limited to wide-aperture fractures with the flow on the opposing sides of fracture being independent.

  13. Online recognition of the multiphase flow regime and study of slug flow in pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liejin, Guo; Bofeng, Bai; Liang, Zhao; Xin, Wang; Hanyang, Gu

    2009-02-01

    Multiphase flow is the phenomenon existing widely in nature, daily life, as well as petroleum and chemical engineering industrial fields. The interface structure among multiphase and their movement are complicated, which distribute random and heterogeneously in the spatial and temporal scales and have multivalue of the flow structure and state[1]. Flow regime is defined as the macro feature about the multiphase interface structure and its distribution, which is an important feature to describe multiphase flow. The energy and mass transport mechanism differ much for each flow regimes. It is necessary to solve the flow regime recognition to get a clear understanding of the physical phenomena and their mechanism of multiphase flow. And the flow regime is one of the main factors affecting the online measurement accuracy of phase fraction, flow rate and other phase parameters. Therefore, it is of great scientific and technological importance to develop new principles and methods of multiphase flow regime online recognition, and of great industrial background. In this paper, the key reasons that the present method cannot be used to solve the industrial multiphase flow pattern recognition are clarified firstly. Then the prerequisite to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime is analyzed, and the recognition rules for partial flow pattern are obtained based on the massive experimental data. The standard templates for every flow regime feature are calculated with self-organization cluster algorithm. The multi-sensor data fusion method is proposed to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime with the pressure and differential pressure signals, which overcomes the severe influence of fluid flow velocity and the oil fraction on the recognition. The online recognition method is tested in the practice, which has less than 10 percent measurement error. The method takes advantages of high confidence, good fault tolerance and less requirement of

  14. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  15. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2×10^{3}regime diagram provided by Yanagisawa et al. [T. Yanagisawa et al., Phys. Rev. E 88, 063020 (2013)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.88.063020]. Three regimes were identified, of which the regime of regular flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra/Q=10, where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach. PMID:27176392

  16. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q . We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2 ×103regime diagram provided by Yanagisawa et al. [T. Yanagisawa et al., Phys. Rev. E 88, 063020 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.063020]. Three regimes were identified, of which the regime of regular flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra /Q =10 , where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  17. Flow regimes in a single dimple on the channel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, G. V.; Terekhov, V. I.; Khalatov, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The boundaries of the domains of existence of flow regimes past single dimples made as spherical segments on a flat plate are determined with the use of available experimental results. Regimes of a diffuser-confuser flow, a horseshoe vortex, and a tornado-like vortex in the dimple are considered. Neither a horseshoe vortex nor a tornado-like vortex is observed in dimples with the relative depth smaller than 0.1. Transformations from the diffuser-confuser flow regime to the horseshoe vortex regime and from the horseshoe vortex flow to the tornado-like vortex flow are found to depend not only on the Reynolds number, but also on the relative depth of the spherical segment. Dependences for determining the boundaries of the regime existence domains are proposed, and parameters at which the experimental results can be generalized are given.

  18. DETECTION OF SUPERSONIC HORIZONTAL FLOWS IN THE SOLAR GRANULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bellot Rubio, L. R.

    2009-07-20

    Hydrodynamic simulations of granular convection predict the existence of supersonic flows covering {approx}3%-4% of the solar surface at any time, but these flows have not been detected unambiguously as yet. Using data from the spectropolarimeter aboard the Hinode satellite, I present direct evidence of fast horizontal plasma motions in quiet-Sun granules. Their visibility increases toward the limb due to more favorable viewing conditions. At the resolution of Hinode, the horizontal flows give rise to asymmetric intensity profiles with very inclined blue wings and even line satellites located blueward of the main absorption feature. Doppler shifts of up to 9 km s{sup -1} are observed at the edges of bright granules, demonstrating that the flows reach supersonic speeds. The strongest velocities occur in patches of 0.''5 or less. They tend to be associated with enhanced continuum intensities, line widths, and equivalent widths, but large values of these parameters do not necessarily imply the existence of supersonic flows. Time series of spectropolarimetric measurements in regions away from the disk center show the transient nature of the strong horizontal motions, which last only for a fraction of the granule lifetime. Supersonic flows are expected to produce shocks at the boundaries between granules and intergranular lanes, and may also play a role in the emergence of small-scale magnetic fields in quiet-Sun internetwork regions.

  19. Void fraction correlations in two-phase horizontal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Papathanassiou, G.; Maeder, P.F.; DiPippo, R.; Dickinson, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This study examines some physical mechanisms which impose limits on the possible existence of two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe. With the aid of this analysis and the use of the Martinelli variable, X, a method is developed which determines the range of possible void fractions for a given two-phase flow. This method affords a means of direct comparison among void fraction correlations, as well as between correlation predictions and experimental results. In this respect, four well-known void fraction correlations are compared against each other and with experimental results obtained in the Brown University Two-Phase Flow Research Facility.

  20. Algebraic instability in shallow water flows with horizontally nonuniform density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. P.; Pavlov, V. I.

    2015-04-01

    The regimes and mechanisms of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability have been studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic shallow water model with horizontally nonuniform density. As analysis shows, the nonhydrostaticity has a crucial influence on the instability. It is for this reason that at the final stage a collapse tendency predicted on the base of the hydrostatic scenario slows down and turns into the regime of algebraic instability. The numerical testing has shown that in spite of its simplicity, the model is quite able to describe realistically a number of effects. For example, the model captures the shallowing effect, which manifests itself as profile concavities on either side of the jet coming out of the boundary layer.

  1. Estuarine versus transient flow regimes in Juan de Fuca Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Richard E.; MiháLy, Steven F.; Kulikov, Evgueni A.

    2007-09-01

    Residual currents in Juan de Fuca Strait are observed to switch between two fundamental states: estuarine and transient. The estuarine regime, which prevails roughly 90% of the time in summer and 55% of the time in winter, has a fortnightly modulated, three-layer structure characterized by strong (˜50 cm s-1) outflow above 60 ± 15 m depth, moderate (˜25 cm s-1) inflow between 60 and 125 m depth, and weak (˜10 cm s-1) inflow below 125 ± 10 m depth. Rotation increases the upper layer depth by 40 m on the northern side of the channel and upwelling-favorable coastal winds augment inflow in the bottom layer by as much as 5 cm s-1. Rotation, combined with modulation of the estuarine currents by tidal mixing in the eastern strait, leads to fortnightly variability in the along-channel velocity and cross-channel positioning of the core flow regions. Transient flows, which occur roughly 10% of the time in summer and 45% of the time in winter, are rapidly evolving, horizontally and vertically sheared "reversals" in the estuarine circulation generated during poleward wind events along the outer coast. Major events can persist for several weeks, force a net inward transport, and give rise to an O(10) km wide, surface-intensified, O(100) cm s-1 inflow along the southern (Olympic Peninsula) boundary of the strait. This "Olympic Peninsula Countercurrent" is typically accompanied by an abrupt decrease in salinity, indicating that it is a buoyancy flow originating with low-density water on the northern Washington shelf.

  2. Rheological equations in asymptotic regimes of granular flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper assesses the validity of the generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in light of the established constitutive relations in two asymptotic flow regimes, namely, the macroviscous and grain-inertia regimes. A comprehensive review of the literature on constitutive relations in both regimes reveals that except for some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution, the normalized shear stress in both regimes varies only with the grain concentration, C. It is found that Krieger-Dougherty's relative viscosity, ??*(C), is sufficiently coherent among the monotonically nondecreasing functions of C used in describing the variation of the shear stress with C in both regimes. It not only accurately represents the C-dependent relative viscosity of a suspension in the macroviscous regime, but also plays a role of the radial distribution function that describes the statistics of particle collisions in the grain-inertia regime. Use of ??*(C) alone, however, cannot link the two regimes. Another parameter, the shear-rate number, N, is needed in modelling the rheology of neutrally buoyant granular flows in transition between the two asymptotic regimes. The GVF model proves compatible with most established relations in both regimes.

  3. Horizontal flow and capillarity-driven redistribution in porous media.

    PubMed

    Doster, F; Hönig, O; Hilfer, R

    2012-07-01

    A recent macroscopic mixture theory for two-phase immiscible displacement in porous media has introduced percolating and nonpercolating phases. Quasi-analytic solutions are computed and compared to the traditional theory. The solutions illustrate physical insights and effects due to spatiotemporal changes of nonpercolating phases, and they highlight the differences from traditional theory. Two initial and boundary value problems are solved in one spatial dimension. In the first problem a fluid is displaced by another fluid in a horizontal homogeneous porous medium. The displacing fluid is injected with a flow rate that keeps the saturation constant at the injection point. In the second problem a horizontal homogeneous porous medium is considered which is divided into two subdomains with different but constant initial saturations. Capillary forces lead to a redistribution of the fluids. Errors in the literature are reported and corrected. PMID:23005535

  4. Predictive mapping of the natural flow regimes of France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelder, Ton H.; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Leathwick, John R.; Pella, Hervé; Sauquet, Eric; Shankar, Ude

    2009-06-01

    SummaryHydrologic variability is important in sustaining a variety of ecological processes in streams and rivers. Natural flow regime classifications group streams and rivers that are relatively homogeneous with respect to flow variability and have been promoted as a method of defining units for management of river flows. Although there has been considerable interest in classifying natural flow regimes, there has been less emphasis given to developing accurate methods of extrapolating these classifications to locations without flow data. We developed a method of mapping flow regime classes using boosted regression trees (BRT) that automatically fits non-linear functions and interactions between explanatory variables of flow regimes, both of which can be expected when comparing responses between complex systems such as watersheds. A natural flow regimes classification of continental France was developed from cluster analysis of 157 hydrological indices derived from 763 gauging stations representing unmodified flows. BRT models were used to predict the likelihood of gauging stations belonging to each class based on the watershed characteristics. These models were used to extrapolate the natural flow regime classification to all segments of a national river network. The performance of the BRT models were compared with other methods of assigning locations to flow regime classes, including the use of geographically contiguous regions, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and classification and regression trees (CART). The "fitted" misclassification rate (associated with model fits) for assignment based on the BRT models was 13% whereas the fitted misclassification rates for geographically contiguous regions, LDA and CART were 52%, 44% and 39% respectively. A "predictive" misclassification rate (calculated for new cases) was estimated for assignments based on the BRT, LDA and CART models using cross validation analysis. For assignment based on the BRT models, the mean

  5. Flow regime shifts in the Little Piney creek (US)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, G.

    2014-09-01

    Non-stationarity of climate drivers and soil-use strongly affects the hydrologic cycle, producing significant inter-annual and multi-decadal fluctuations of river flow regimes. Understanding the temporal trajectories of hydrologic regimes is a key issue for the management of freshwater ecosystems and the security of human water uses. Here, long-term changes in the seasonal flow regime of the Little Piney creek (US) are analyzed with the aid of a stochastic mechanistic approach that expresses analytically the streamflow distribution in terms of a few measurable hydroclimatic parameters, providing a basis for assessing the impact of climate and landscape modifications on water resources. Mean rainfall and streamflow rates exhibit a pronounced inter-annual variability across the last century, though in the absence of clear sustained drifts. Long-term modifications of streamflow regimes across different periods of 2 and 8 years are likewise significant. The stochastic model is able to reasonably reproduce the observed 2-years and 8-years regimes in the Little Piney creek, as well as the corresponding inter-annual variations of streamflow probability density. The study evidences that a flow regime shift occurred in the Little Piney creek during the last century, with erratic regimes typical of the 30s/40s that had been progressively replaced by persistent flow regimes featured by more dumped streamflow fluctuations. Causal drivers of regime shift are identified as the increase of the frequency of events (a byproduct of climate variability) and the decrease of recession rates (induced by a decrease of cultivated lands). The approach developed offers an objective basis for the analysis and prediction of the impact of climate/landscape change on water resources.

  6. Numerical study of boundary layer transition in flowing film evaporation on horizontal elliptical cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbik, M.; Ansari, O.; Zeghmati, B.

    2005-03-01

    A numerical study of the onset of longitudinal transition between turbulent and laminar regimes during the evaporation of a water film is presented. These water film streams along a horizontal elliptical tube under the simultaneous effects of gravity, pressure gradients, caused by the vapor flow and curvature, and viscous forces. At the interface of water vapor, the shear stress is supposed to be negligible. Outside the boundary layer, the vapor phase velocity is obtained from potential flow. In the analysis Von Karman’s turbulence model is used and the inertia and convection terms are retained. Transfers equations are discretised by using the implicit Keller method. The effects of an initial liquid flow rate per unit of length, Froude number, temperature difference between the wall and the liquid vapor interface and ellipticity on the transition position have been evaluated. The transition criterion has been given in term of the critical film Reynolds number (ReΓ)C.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial wave generation in turbulent gas-liquid flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bryce; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2014-11-01

    For gas-liquid flows through pipes and channels, a flow regime (referred to as slug flow) may occur when waves form at the interface of a stratified flow and grow until they bridge the pipe diameter trapping large elongated gas bubbles within the liquid. Slug formation is often accompanied by strong nonlinear wave-wave interactions, wave breaking, and gas entrainment. This work numerically investigates the fully nonlinear interfacial evolution of a two-phase density/viscosity stratified flow through a horizontal channel. A Navier-Stokes flow solver coupled with a conservative volume-of-fluid algorithm is use to carry out high resolution three-dimensional simulations of a turbulent gas flowing over laminar (or turbulent) liquid layers. The analysis of such flows over a range of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers permits the characterization of the interfacial stresses and turbulent flow statistics allowing for the development of physics-based models that approximate the coupled interfacial-turbulent interactions and supplement the heuristic models built into existing industrial slug simulators.

  8. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  9. Early regimes of water capillary flow in slit silica nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, Jens H; Mejía, Andrés; Zambrano, Harvey A

    2015-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the initial stages of spontaneous imbibition of water in slit silica nanochannels surrounded by air. An analysis is performed for the effects of nanoscopic confinement, initial conditions of liquid uptake and air pressurization on the dynamics of capillary filling. The results indicate that the nanoscale imbibition process is divided into three main flow regimes: an initial regime where the capillary force is balanced only by the inertial drag and characterized by a constant velocity and a plug flow profile. In this regime, the meniscus formation process plays a central role in the imbibition rate. Thereafter, a transitional regime takes place, in which, the force balance has significant contributions from both inertia and viscous friction. Subsequently, a regime wherein viscous forces dominate the capillary force balance is attained. Flow velocity profiles identify the passage from an inviscid flow to a developing Poiseuille flow. Gas density profiles ahead of the capillary front indicate a transient accumulation of air on the advancing meniscus. Furthermore, slower capillary filling rates computed for higher air pressures reveal a significant retarding effect of the gas displaced by the advancing meniscus. PMID:25976034

  10. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  11. Temporal evolution of flow regimes in urbanizing basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, A.; Rossel, F.; Gironas, J. A.; Jovanovic, T.

    2014-12-01

    We characterize the temporal evolution of the flow regime of urbanizing basins. By urbanizing basins, we mean basins that have experienced urban growth during their observation period. To represent the flow regime, we use flow duration curves (FDCs). We compute the FDCs using a stochastic model of daily streamflow for urban basins. In this case, the model aids in discerning the influence of key factors (e.g., climate, land use change, stormwater managenment conditions, and the slow and fast properties of the hydrologic response) on streamflow. To implement the model, we first divide the complete observation period of a given urban basin into intervals of equal duration, e.g. 5 years. Subsequently, we apply the model to each interval and this is how we capture the influence of land use changes and climatic fluctuations on the flow regime. We apply this modeling framework to 14 urbanizing basins in the Baltimore-Washington DC region. Results from this application indicate consistent changes in the temporal evolution of the altered flow regimes, which can largely be explained by the progressive redistribution with urban growth of water from slow subsurface runoff and evapotranspiration to fast urban runoff. We also use the modeling framework to determine indicators of ecohydrological alteration for urbanizing basins. The application of these indicators to our study area suggests that the flow regime is sensitive to alterations up to a certain level of urbanization after which sensitivity seems to level off. The flow regime also seems to be relatively more resistant to alterations for both the smaller and larger levels of urbanization considered. In the future, we would like to extend the application of the proposed modeling framework to other metropolitan areas.

  12. Steady particulate flows in a horizontal rotating cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S.A.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Results of discrete element method (DEM) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments are compared for monodisperse granular materials flowing in a half-filled horizontal rotating cylinder. Because opacity is not a problem for MRI, a long cylinder with an aspect ratio {approximately}7 was used and the flow in a thin transverse slice near the center was studied. The particles were mustard seeds and the ratio of cylinder diameter to particle diameter was approximately 50. The parameters compared were dynamic angle of repose, velocity field in a plane perpendicular to the cylinder axis, and velocity fluctuations at rotation rates up to 30 rpm. The agreement between DEM and MRI was good when the friction coefficient and nonsphericity were adjusted in the simulation for the best fit. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Steady particulate flows in a horizontal rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S. A.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    1998-06-01

    Results of discrete element method (DEM) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments are compared for monodisperse granular materials flowing in a half-filled horizontal rotating cylinder. Because opacity is not a problem for MRI, a long cylinder with an aspect ratio ˜7 was used and the flow in a thin transverse slice near the center was studied. The particles were mustard seeds and the ratio of cylinder diameter to particle diameter was approximately 50. The parameters compared were dynamic angle of repose, velocity field in a plane perpendicular to the cylinder axis, and velocity fluctuations at rotation rates up to 30 rpm. The agreement between DEM and MRI was good when the friction coefficient and nonsphericity were adjusted in the simulation for the best fit.

  14. Analysis of horizontal flows in the solar granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Suematsu, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Solar limb observations sometimes reveal the presence of a satellite lobe in the blue wing of the Stokes I profile from pixels belonging to granules. The presence of this satellite lobe has been associated in the past to strong line-of-sight gradients and, as the line-of-sight component is almost parallel to the solar surface, to horizontal granular flows. We aim to increase the knowledge about these horizontal flows studying a spectropolarimetric observation of the north solar pole. We will make use of two state of the art techniques, the spatial deconvolution procedure that increases the quality of the data removing the stray light contamination, and spectropolarimetric inversions that will provide the vertical stratification of the atmospheric physical parameters where the observed spectral lines form. We inverted the Stokes profiles using a two component configuration, obtaining that one component is strongly blueshifted and displays a temperature enhancement at upper photospheric layers while the second component has low redshifted velocities and it is cool at upper layers. In addition, we examined a large number of cases located at different heliocentric angles, finding smaller velocities as we move from the centre to the edge of the granule. Moreover, the height location of the enhancement on the temperature stratification of the blueshifted component also evolves with the spatial location on the granule being positioned on lower heights as we move to the periphery of the granular structure.

  15. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A.; Vitoshkin, H.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-04-01

    Linear stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels to arbitrary wavenumber disturbances is studied. The problem is reduced to Orr-Sommerfeld equations for the stream function disturbances, defined in each sublayer and coupled via boundary conditions that account also for possible interface deformation and capillary forces. Applying the Chebyshev collocation method, the equations and interface boundary conditions are reduced to the generalized eigenvalue problems solved by standard means of numerical linear algebra for the entire spectrum of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors. Some additional conclusions concerning the instability nature are derived from the most unstable perturbation patterns. The results are summarized in the form of stability maps showing the operational conditions at which a stratified-smooth flow pattern is stable. It is found that for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems, the stratified flow with a smooth interface is stable only in confined zone of relatively low flow rates, which is in agreement with experiments, but is not predicted by long-wave analysis. Depending on the flow conditions, the critical perturbations can originate mainly at the interface (so-called "interfacial modes of instability") or in the bulk of one of the phases (i.e., "shear modes"). The present analysis revealed that there is no definite correlation between the type of instability and the perturbation wavelength.

  16. Low volume fraction rimming flow in a rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Ju; Tsai, Yu-Te; Liu, Ta-Jo; Wu, Ping-Yao

    2007-12-01

    An experimental study was carried out to examine how uniform rimming flow is established for a very small volume fraction of aqueous Newtonian solutions in a partially filled rotating horizontal cylinder. There exists a certain critical volume fraction (Vc) for each solution, where the rotational speed required to achieve uniform rimming flow takes a minimum value. Counterintuitively, it takes greater rotation speeds for both larger and smaller volume fractions than this. Axial instabilities are observed for liquid volume fractions above or below this critical value. For V >Vc the defects are mainly of shark-teeth and turbulent types, while for V Vc, but has very little effect for V flow found in the present study is 0.25%. The dimensionless minimum rotational speed Ω to achieve rimming flow is presented as a function of the dimensionless liquid volume fraction ϕ. The competing effects of fluid inertia and viscous force on rimming flow are demonstrated from a dimensionless plot of Ω versus ϕ.

  17. Microgravity Flow Regime Data: Buoyancy and Mixing Apparatus Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Adam; Best, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Zero-g two-phase flow data set qualification and flight experiment design have not been standardized and as a result, agreement among researchers has not been reached regarding what experimental conditions adequately approximate those of microgravity. The effects of buoyancy forces and mixing apparatus on the flow regime transitions are presented in this study. The gravity conditions onboard zero-g aircraft are at best 10-3 g which is used to approximate the 10-5 g conditions of microgravity, thus the buoyancy forces present on zero-g aircraft can become significantly large and unrepresentative of microgravity. When buoyancy forces approach those of surface tension forces, buoyancy induced coalescence occurs. When discussing flow regime transitions, these large buoyancy forces lead to flow regime transitions which otherwise would not occur. The buoyancy attributes of the two-phase flow data sets available in the literature are evaluated to determine which data sets exhibit buoyancy induced transitions. Upon comparison of the representative data sets, the affects of different mixing apparatus can be seen in the superficial velocity flow regime maps.

  18. Dynamic Modeling Strategy for Flow Regime Transition in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Wang; Xiaodong Sun; Benjamin Doup; Haihua Zhao

    2012-12-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regimes has been widely used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are flow regime dependent. Current nuclear reactor safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5, classify flow regimes using flow regime maps or transition criteria that were developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows. As twophase flows are dynamic in nature, it is important to model the flow regime transitions dynamically to more accurately predict the two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy to determine flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation of the interfacial area, fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation, and the destruction of the interfacial area, fluid particle coalescence and condensation. For flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shapes, namely group-1 and group-2 bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identify the flow regimes is discussed, in which discriminator s are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration. The flow regime predicted with this method shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  19. Proper horizontal photospheric flows in a filament channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Roudier, T.; Mein, N.; Mein, P.; Malherbe, J. M.; Chandra, R.

    2014-04-01

    Context. An extended filament in the central part of the active region NOAA 11106 crossed the central meridian on Sept. 17, 2010 in the southern hemisphere. It has been observed in Hα with the THEMIS telescope in the Canary Islands and in 304 Å with the EUV imager (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). Counterstreaming along the Hα threads and bright moving blobs (jets) along the 304 Å filament channel were observed during 10 h before the filament erupted at 17:03 UT. Aims: The aim of the paper is to understand the coupling between magnetic field and convection in filament channels and relate the horizontal photospheric motions to the activity of the filament. Methods: An analysis of the proper photospheric motions using SDO/HMI continuum images with the new version of the coherent structure tracking (CST) algorithm developed to track granules, as well as the large scale photospheric flows, was performed for three hours. Using corks, we derived the passive scalar points and produced a map of the cork distribution in the filament channel. Averaging the velocity vectors in the southern hemisphere in each latitude in steps of 3.5 arcsec, we defined a profile of the differential rotation. Results: Supergranules are clearly identified in the filament channel. Diverging flows inside the supergranules are similar in and out of the filament channel. Converging flows corresponding to the accumulation of corks are identified well around the Hα filament feet and at the edges of the EUV filament channel. At these convergence points, the horizontal photospheric velocity may reach 1 km s-1, but with a mean velocity of 0.35 km s-1. In some locations, horizontal flows crossing the channel are detected, indicating eventually large scale vorticity. Conclusions: The coupling between convection and magnetic field in the photosphere is relatively strong. The filament experienced the convection motions through its anchorage points with the photosphere, which are

  20. Study of the Transition Flow Regime using Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA Cooperative Agreement presents a study of the Transition Flow Regime Using Monte Carlo Methods. The topics included in this final report are: 1) New Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) procedures; 2) The DS3W and DS2A Programs; 3) Papers presented; 4) Miscellaneous Applications and Program Modifications; 5) Solution of Transitional Wake Flows at Mach 10; and 6) Turbulence Modeling of Shock-Dominated Fows with a k-Enstrophy Formulation.

  1. Analytic expression for poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.

    2013-01-15

    The poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime is calculated by improving the l = 1 approximation for the Fokker-Planck collision operator [M. Taguchi, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 1897 (1988)]. The obtained analytic expression for this flow, which can be used for general axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, agrees quite well with the recently calculated numerical results by Parker and Catto [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085011 (2012)] in the full range of aspect ratio.

  2. Nozzle Free Jet Flows Within the Strong Curved Shock Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tso-Shin

    1975-01-01

    A study based on inviscid analysis was conducted to examine the flow field produced from a convergent-divergent nozzle when a strong curved shock occurs. It was found that a certain constraint is imposed on the flow solution of the problem which is the unique feature of the flow within this flow regime, and provides the reason why the inverse method of calculation cannot be employed for these problems. An approximate method was developed to calculate the flow field, and results were obtained for two-dimensional flows. Analysis and calculations were performed for flows with axial symmetry. It is shown that under certain conditions, the vorticity generated at the jet boundary may become infinite and the viscous effect becomes important. Under other conditions, the asymptotic free jet height as well as the corresponding shock geometry were determined.

  3. Intermittency of rheological regimes in uniform liquid-granular flows.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Aronne; Larcher, Michele; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2009-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a free surface-saturated liquid-granular mixture flowing over a static loose bed of grains, where the coexistence of layers dominated by collisional and frictional interactions among particles was observed. Kinetic theory was applied to the flow described above and it proved suitable for describing a realistic behavior of the collisional layers, although it failed to interpret the regions of the flow domain dominated by the frictional contacts. The paper provides a conceptual scheme with which to overcome this problem by focusing on the mechanisms governing the transition from the frictional to the collisional regime. In particular we observed that in highly concentrated flows the transition layer exhibits a typical intermittency of the dominating rheological regime, switching alternately from the frictional to the collisional one. By filtering the velocity signal, we introduced an intermittency function that made it possible to extend the validity of the equations derived from dense gas analogy, typical of the collisional regimes, also in the intermittent phase of the flow. Owing to the small values of the Stokes number, in the application of the kinetic theory we accounted for the possible variation of the elastic restitution coefficient along the flow depth. PMID:19518448

  4. A Cahn-Hilliard framework for thin-film flows in the partial-wetting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavan, A. A.; Chen, M.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; McKinley, G. H.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Traditional mathematical descriptions of multiphase flow in porous media rely on a multiphase extension of Darcy's law, and lead to nonlinear second-order (advection-diffusion) partial differential equations for fluid saturations. Here, we study horizontal redistribution of immiscible fluids. The traditional Darcy-flow model predicts that the spreading of a finite amount of liquid in a horizontal porous medium never stops; a prediction that is not substantiated by observation. To help guide the development of new models of multiphase flow in porous media [1], we draw an analogy with the flow of thin films. The flow of thin films over flat surfaces has been the subject of much theoretical, experimental and computational research [2]. Under the lubrication approximation, the classical mathematical model for these flows takes the form of a nonlinear fourth-order PDE, where the fourth-order term models the effect of surface tension [3]. This classical model, however, effectively assumes that the film is perfectly wetting to the substrate and, therefore, does not capture the partial wetting regime. Partial wetting is responsible for stopping the spread of a liquid puddle. Here, we present experiments of (large-volume) liquid spreading over a flat horizontal substrate in the partial wetting regime, and characterize the spreading regimes that we observe. We extend our previous theoretical work of two-phase flow in a capillary tube [4], and develop a macroscopic phase-field model of thin-film flows with partial wetting. Our model naturally accounts for the dynamic contact angle at the contact line, and therefore permits modeling thin-film flows without invoking a precursor film, leading to compactly-supported solutions that reproduce the spreading dynamics and the static equilibrium configuration observed in the experiments. We anticipate that this modeling approach will provide a natural mathematical framework to describe spreading and redistribution of immiscible fluids

  5. Particle seeding flow system for horizontal shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Stephen; Garcia, Nicolas J.; Martinez, Adam A.; Orlicz, Gregory C.; Prestridge, Katherine P.

    2012-08-01

    The Extreme Fluids Team in P-23, Physics Division, studies fluid dynamics at high speeds using high resolution diagnostics. The unsteady forces on a particle driven by a shock wave are not well understood, and they are difficult to model. A horizontal shock tube (HST) is being modified to collect data about the behavior of particles accelerated by shocks. The HST has been used previously for studies of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) as well as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), diagnostics that measure density and velocity. The purpose of our project is to design a flow system that will introduce particles into the HST. The requirements for this particle flow system (PFS) are that it be non-intrusive, be able to introduce either solid or liquid particles, have an exhaust capability, not interfere with existing diagnostics, and couple with the existing HST components. In addition, the particles must flow through the tube in a uniform way. We met these design criteria by first drawing the existing shock tube and diagnostics and doing an initial design of the ducts for the PFS. We then estimated the losses through the particle flow system from friction and researched possible fans that could be used to drive the particles. Finally, the most challenging component of the design was the coupling to the HST. If we used large inlets, the shock would lose strength as it passed by the inlet, so we designed a novel coupling inlet and outlet that minimize the losses to the shock wave. Our design was reviewed by the Extreme Fluids Team, and it is now being manufactured and built based upon our technical drawings.

  6. Flow regime classification in air magnetic fluid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, T.; DeVuyst, F.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2008-05-01

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  7. Flow regime classification in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, T; De Vuyst, F; Yamaguchi, H

    2008-05-21

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors. PMID:21694270

  8. Classification of the stratified fluid flows regimes around a square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchin, V. A.; Matyushin, P. V.

    2015-10-01

    The 2D density stratified (in vertical direction) viscous fluid flows around a square cylinder with diameter d (moving in horizontal direction with the velocity U) have been simulated on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. For solving of the Navier-Stokes equations the Splitting on physical factors Method for Incompressible Fluid flows (SMIF) with hybrid explicit finite difference scheme (second-order accuracy in space, minimum scheme viscosity and dispersion, monotonous) has been used. The numerical method SMIF has been successfully applied for solving of the different problems: 2D and 3D separated homogeneous and stratified fluid flows around a sphere and a circular cylinder; the flows with free surface including regimes with broken surface wave; the air, heat and mass transfer in the clean rooms. At the present paper the original refined classification of 2D stratified viscous fluid flow regimes around a square cylinder at Re ≤ 200 has been obtained and the interesting fluid flows with two hanging vortices in the wake and with two wavy hanging sheets of density (connected with two hanging vortices) have been investigated in details at Fr = 0.1, Re = 50, where Re = U.d/ν is the Reynolds number, Fr = U/(N.d) is the internal Froude number, ν is the kinematical viscosity coefficient, N is the buoyancy frequency.

  9. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of three-phase slug flows in horizontal pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    One of the most common flow regimes in pipelines is that of slug flow: slug bodies corresponding to alternating blocks of aerated liquid which bridge the pipe, separated by elongated bubbles; the latter ride atop a liquid layer. The slugs travel at velocities that exceed the mixture superficial velocity; this can potentially cause structural damage, particularly at pipe bends and junctions. Two-phase slug flows have received considerable attention in the literature both experimentally and computationally but there has been very little work carried out on three-phase slugging. In the present work, the evolution of oil-water-air three-phase slug flow in a horizontal cylindrical pipe is investigated using two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations. The parameters characterising three-phase slug flow, e.g. slug length, propagation velocity, and slug formation frequency, are determined for various gas and liquid superficial velocities for a given pipe geometry. The results of this work are compared to available experimental data and numerical solutions based on approximate, one-dimensional models relying on the use of empirical correlations. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  10. compartment transfer rates in horizontal flow constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Uli; Oswald, Sascha; Thullner, Martin; Grathwohl, Peter

    2010-05-01

    A conceptual computer model has been constructed to simulate the compartment transfer rates in horizontal flow constructed wetlands. The model accounts for flow and transport in the variably saturated porous medium as well as biogeochemical change reactions. The most concentrated contaminants such as BTEX, MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons and dissolved as well as mineral phase electron acceptors are considered. Also of major interest are reduced species with high oxygen demand such as ammonium. The influence of marsh plants on microbial activity, gas transport, water balance and contaminant fate in general is matter of current investigation. The constructed wetlands consist of a coarse sand or fine gravel porous medium. Marsh plants were introduced after installation, however, a number of control basins are operated unplanted. Water levels and through flow rates are adjusted to optimize the remediation efficiency. The system is likely to be neither reaction nor mixing limited, thus both, values of dispersivity and degradation kinetics may be crucial for remediation efficiency. Biogeochemical modelling is able to delineate in detail (i) the zonation of processes, (ii) temporal variation (breakthrough curves) and (iii) mass balance information. The contributions of biodegradation and volatilisation and the influence of plants (compartment transfer) can generally best be evaluated by the component's mass balance. More efficient mixing is expected in the wetlands with open water body which leads to both, more biodegradation and volatilisation. An important task is to quantify the role of plants and root systems for contaminant attenuation in constructed wetlands. The long term goal of investigation is to allow for predictions for the design of large scale compartment transfer wetlands that may be applied to remediate the site as a whole.

  11. Regimes of flow induced vibration for tandem, tethered cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gary; Stremler, Mark

    2015-11-01

    In the wake of a bluff body, there are a number of dynamic response regimes that exist for a trailing bluff body depending on spacing, structural restoring forces, and the mass-damping parameter m* ζ . For tandem cylinders with low values of m* ζ , two such regimes of motion are Gap Flow Switching and Wake Induced Vibration. In this study, we consider the dynamics of a single degree-of-freedom rigid cylinder in the wake of another in these regimes for a variety of center-to-center cylinder spacings (3-5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4,000-11,000). The system consists of a trailing cylinder constrained to a circular arc around a fixed leading cylinder, which, for small angle displacements, bears a close resemblance to the transversely oscillating cylinders found more commonly in existing literature. From experiments on this system, we compare and contrast the dynamic response within these two regimes. Our results show sustained oscillations in the absence of a structural restoring force in all cases, providing experimental support for the wake stiffness assumption, which is based on the mean lift toward the center line of flow.

  12. Couette flow regimes with heat transfer in rarefied gas

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, A. A. Butkovskii, A. V.

    2013-06-15

    Based on numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation by direct statistic simulation, the Couette flow with heat transfer is studied in a broad range of ratios of plate temperatures and Mach numbers of a moving plate. Flow regime classification by the form of the dependences of the energy flux and friction stress on the Knudsen number Kn is proposed. These dependences can be simultaneously monotonic and nonmonotonic and have maxima. Situations are possible in which the dependence of the energy flux transferred to a plate on Kn has a minimum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic or even has a maximum. Also, regimes exist in which the dependence of the energy flux on Kn has a maximum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic, and vice versa.

  13. Characterization of river flow fluctuations via horizontal visibility graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, A. C.; Alves, L. G. A.; Costa, L. S.; Ribeiro, A. A.; de Jesus, M. M. A.; Tateishi, A. A.; Ribeiro, H. V.

    2016-02-01

    We report on a large-scale characterization of river discharges by employing the network framework of the horizontal visibility graph. By mapping daily time series from 141 different stations of 53 Brazilian rivers into complex networks, we present a useful approach for investigating the dynamics of river flows. We verified that the degree distributions of these networks were well described by exponential functions, where the characteristic exponents are almost always larger than the value obtained for random time series. The faster-than-random decay of the degree distributions is an another evidence that the fluctuation dynamics underlying the river discharges has a long-range correlated nature. We further investigated the evolution of the river discharges by tracking the values of the characteristic exponents (of the degree distribution) and the global clustering coefficients of the networks over the years. We show that the river discharges in several stations have evolved to become more or less correlated (and displaying more or less complex internal network structures) over the years, a behavior that could be related to changes in the climate system and other man-made phenomena.

  14. Modelling Air and Water Two-Phase Annular Flow in a Small Horizontal Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Yao, Yufeng; Arini, Antonino; McIiwain, Stuart; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been carried out to study air and water two-phase flow in a small horizontal pipe of an inner diameter of 8.8mm, in order to investigate unsteady flow pattern transition behaviours and underlying physical mechanisms. The surface liquid film thickness distributions, determined by either wavy or full annular flow regime, are shown in reasonable good agreement with available experimental data. It was demonstrated that CFD simulation was able to predict wavy flow structures accurately using two-phase flow sub-models embedded in ANSYS-Fluent solver of Eulerian-Eulerian framework, together with a user defined function subroutine ANWAVER-UDF. The flow transient behaviours from bubbly to annular flow patterns and the liquid film distributions revealed the presence of gas/liquid interferences between air and water film interface. An increase of upper wall liquid film thickness along the pipe was observed for both wavy annular and full annular scenarios. It was found that the liquid wavy front can be further broken down to form the water moisture with liquid droplets penetrating upwards. There are discrepancies between CFD predictions and experimental data on the liquid film thickness determined at the bottom and the upper wall surfaces, and the obtained modelling information can be used to assist further 3D user defined function subroutine development, especially when CFD simulation becomes much more expense to model full 3D two-phase flow transient performance from a wavy annular to a fully developed annular type.

  15. Predicting regime shifts in flow of the Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, S.; McCabe, G. J.; Brekke, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    The effects of continued global warming on water resources are a concern for water managers and stake holders. In the western United States, where the combined climatic demand and consumptive use of water is equal to or greater than the natural supply of water for some locations, there is growing concern regarding the sustainability of future water supplies. In addition to the adverse effects of warming on water supply, another issue for water managers is accounting for, and managing, the effects of natural climatic variability, particularly persistently dry and wet periods. Analyses of paleo-reconstructions of Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) flow demonstrate that severe sustained droughts, and persistent pluvial periods, are a recurring characteristic of hydroclimate in the Colorado River basin. Shifts between persistently dry and wet regimes (e.g. decadal to multi-decadal variability (D2M)) have important implications for water supply and water management. In this study paleo-reconstructions of UCRB flow are used to compute the risks of shifts between persistently wet and dry regimes given the length of time in a specific regime. Results indicate that low frequency variability of hydro-climatic conditions and the statistics that describe this low frequency variability can be useful to water managers by providing information about the risk of shifting from one hydrologic regime to another. Boxplot of risk outlooks in the Colorado River Basin from the nine flow reconstructions developed in Gangopadhyay et al. (2009). Gangopadhyay, S., B.L. Harding, B. Rajagopalan, J.J. Lukas, and T.J. Fulp, (2009) A non-parametric approach for paleohydrologic reconstruction of annual streamflow ensembles. Water Resour. Res., 45, W06417.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Granular Flows in a Silo Bed on Flow Regime Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xingtuan; Gui, Nan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jiang, Shengyao

    2015-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a gravity-driven dense granular flow in a granular bed with a contracted drainage orifice are studied by using discrete element method and quantitative analysis. Three values of discharging rates, ranging from fast to slow dense flows, are investigated. Time variations and derivatives of mean forces and velocities, as well as their respective correlations, are analyzed to quantitatively depict the characteristics of granular flow as well as flow regime categorization. The auto-correlation functions, as well as their Fourier spectrums, are utilized to characterize the differences between the mechanisms of slow and fast granular flows. Finally, it is suggested that the flow regimes of slow and fast flows can be characterized by the kinetic and kinematic flow properties of particles. PMID:25793996

  17. Numerical analysis of granular flows in a silo bed on flow regime characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingtuan; Gui, Nan; Tu, Jiyuan; Jiang, Shengyao

    2015-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a gravity-driven dense granular flow in a granular bed with a contracted drainage orifice are studied by using discrete element method and quantitative analysis. Three values of discharging rates, ranging from fast to slow dense flows, are investigated. Time variations and derivatives of mean forces and velocities, as well as their respective correlations, are analyzed to quantitatively depict the characteristics of granular flow as well as flow regime categorization. The auto-correlation functions, as well as their Fourier spectrums, are utilized to characterize the differences between the mechanisms of slow and fast granular flows. Finally, it is suggested that the flow regimes of slow and fast flows can be characterized by the kinetic and kinematic flow properties of particles. PMID:25793996

  18. Zero-G two phase flow regime modeling in adiabatic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Best, Frederick R.; Wheeler, Montgomery; Miller, Katheryn M.

    1993-01-01

    Two-phase flow, thermal management systems are currently being considered as an alternative to conventional, single phase systems for future space missions because of their potential to reduce overall system mass, size, and pumping power requirements. Knowledge of flow regime transitions, heat transfer characteristics, and pressure drop correlations is necessary to design and develop two-phase systems. This work is concerned with microgravity, two-phase flow regime analysis. The data come from a recent sets of experiments. The experiments were funded by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and conducted by NASA JSC with Texas A&M University. The experiment was on loan to NASA JSC from Foster-Miller, Inc., who constructed it with funding from the Air Force Phillips Laboratory. The experiment used R12 as the working fluid. A Foster-Miller two phase pump was used to circulate the two phase mixture and allow separate measurements of the vapor and liquid flow streams. The experimental package was flown 19 times for 577 parabolas aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which simulates zero-G conditions by its parabolic flight trajectory. Test conditions included bubbly, slug and annular flow regimes in 0-G. The superficial velocities of liquid and vapor have been obtained from the measured flow rates and are presented along with the observed flow regimes and several flow regime transition predictions. None of the predictions completely describe the transitions as indicated by the data.

  19. Observations on preferential flow and horizontal transport of nitrogen fertilizer in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkison, D.H.; Blevins, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    A study site underlain by a claypan soil was instrumented to examine the transport of fertilizer nitrogen (N) under corn (Zea mays L.) cultivation. The study was designed to examine N transport within the unsaturated zone and in interflow (the saturated flow of water on top of the claypan). A 15N- labeled fertilizer (labeled N), bromide (Br), and chloride (Cl) were used as field tracers. Rapid or prolonged infiltration events allowed water and dissolved solutes to perch on the claypan for brief periods. However, a well- developed network of preferential flow paths quickly diverted water and solutes through the claypan and into the underlying glacial till aquifer. Excess fertilizer N in the unsaturated zone supplied a continuous, but declining input of N to ground water for a period of 15 mo after a single fertilizer application. Calculated solute velocities through the claypan matrix (6.4 x 10-6 cm s-1) were similar to horizontal transport rates along the claypan (3.5 to 7.3 x 10-6 cm s-1) but much slower than infiltration rates determined for preferential flow paths (1.67 x 10-3 cm s-1). These flow paths accounted for 35% of the transport. A seasonally variable, dual mode of transport (matrix and preferential flow) prevented the claypan from being an effective barrier to vertical transport. Simulations of selected field observations, conducted using the variably saturated two- dimensional flow and transport model, VS2DT, confirmed the presence of a dual flow regime in the claypan.

  20. Predicting regime shifts in flow of the Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Subhrendu; McCabe, Gregory J.

    2010-10-01

    The effects of continued global warming on water resources are a concern for water managers and stake holders. In the western United States, where the combined climatic demand and consumptive use of water is equal to or greater than the natural supply of water for some locations, there is growing concern regarding the sustainability of future water supplies. In addition to the adverse effects of warming on water supply, another issue for water managers is accounting for, and managing, the effects of natural climatic variability, particularly persistently dry and wet periods. Analyses of paleo-reconstructions of Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) flow demonstrate that severe sustained droughts, and persistent pluvial periods, are a recurring characteristic of hydroclimate in the Colorado River basin. Shifts between persistently dry and wet regimes (e.g., decadal to multi-decadal variability (D2M)) have important implications for water supply and water management. In this study paleo-reconstructions of UCRB flow are used to compute the risks of shifts between persistently wet and dry regimes given the length of time in a specific regime. Results indicate that low frequency variability of hydro-climatic conditions and the statistics that describe this low frequency variability can be useful to water managers by providing information about the risk of shifting from one hydrologic regime to another. To manage water resources in the future water managers will have to understand the joint hydrologic effects of natural climate variability and global warming. These joint effects may produce future hydrologic conditions that are unprecedented in both the instrumental and paleoclimatic records.

  1. Space-charge-limited flow in quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Lay Kee

    2005-10-01

    Space-charge-limited (SCL) flow has been an area of active research in the development of non-neutral plasma physics, high current diodes, high power microwave sources, vacuum microelectronics and sheath physics. According to the classical Child-Langmuir (CL) law for the planar diodes, the current density scales as 3/2's power of gap voltage and to the inverse squared power of gap spacing. In the past decade, there have been renewed interests in extending the classical CL law to multi-dimensional models both numerically and analytically. The study of SCL flow in quantum regime has also attracted considerable interests in the past 3 years [1-3]. With the recent advances in nanotechnology, electron beam with very high current density may be transported in a nano-scale gap with a relatively low gap voltage. In this new operating regime, where the electron wavelength is comparable or larger than the gap spacing, the quantum effects become important. In this talk, the quantum theory of CL law will be introduced to reveal that the classical CL law is enhanced by a large factor due to electron tunneling and exchange-correlation effects, and there is a new quantum scaling for the current density, which is proportional to the 1/2's power of gap voltage, and to the inverse fourth-power of gap spacing [1-2]. Quasi-2D and 3D models with finite emission area will be shown [3]. We will also show that the classical properties of the SCL flow such as bipolar flow, beam-loaded capacitance, transit time and noise will require a complete revision in the quantum regime. The implications of the emission law of Fowler-Nordheim in the presence of intense space charge over the nanometer scale will be discussed.[1] L. K. Ang, T. J. T. Kwan, and Y. Y. Lau, ``New Scaling of Child-Langmuir Law in the Quantum Regime,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 208303 (2003). [2] L. K. Ang, Y. Y. Lau, and T. J. T. Kwan, ``Simple Derivation of Quantum Scaling in Child-Langmuir law,'' IEEE Trans Plasma Sci. 32, 410

  2. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-11-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ``isolated`` bubbles, ``coalesced`` bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined.

  3. Effect of horizontal heat and fluid flow on the vertical temperature distribution in a semiconfining layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ge, S.

    1996-01-01

    By including the constant flow of heat and fluid in the horizontal direction, we develop an analytical solution for the vertical temperature distribution within the semiconfining layer of a typical aquifer system. The solution is an extension of the previous one-dimensional theory by Bredehoeft and Papadopulos [1965]. It provides a quantitative tool for analyzing the uncertainty of the horizontal heat and fluid flow. The analytical results demonstrate that horizontal flow of heat and fluid, if at values much smaller than those of the vertical, has a negligible effect on the vertical temperature distribution but becomes significant when it is comparable to the vertical.

  4. Large-scale horizontal flows from SOUP observations of solar granulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    November, L. J.; Simon, G. W.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.; Ferguson, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Using high resolution time sequence photographs of solar granulation from the SOUP experiment on Spacelab 2, large scale horizontal flows were observed in the solar surface. The measurement method is based upon a local spatial cross correlation analysis. The horizontal motions have amplitudes in the range 300 to 1000 m/s. Radial outflow of granulation from a sunspot penumbra into surrounding photosphere is a striking new discovery. Both the supergranulation pattern and cellular structures having the scale of mesogranulation are seen. The vertical flows that are inferred by continuity of mass from these observed horizontal flows have larger upflow amplitudes in cell centers than downflow amplitudes at cell boundaries.

  5. Assessing temporal and spatial alterations of flow regimes in the regulated Huai River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Shao, Quanxi; Yan, Ziqi

    2015-10-01

    The assessment of flow regime alterations is fundamental in understanding the potential impact of reservoirs and other water infrastructures on aquatic ecosystems and biota. Previously used methods to classify flow regimes have not captured temporal changes between unregulated and regulated flow regimes at individual stations. In this study, a combination of hierarchical classification and trend analysis was used to assess spatial and temporal flow regime alterations in the Huai River Basin, China. Two categories of flow regime indices were selected to characterize the impacts of reservoir and sluice regulation, including the basic flow indices for mean variation, and the cumulative variation indices for long-term alteration. The overall impact of reservoirs and sluices on flow regime included the decrease of high flow magnitudes but the increase of low flow magnitudes through time. Moreover, on average, the flow variability, and the high and low flow frequencies were reduced, while their durations were increased. Reservoirs had a greater impact on flow regimes than sluices. The flow regimes at 18 of 30 stations were altered significantly from a pre-regulation condition and were divided into three main types of alteration corresponding to operational rules of reservoirs and sluices. From a management perspective, water projects in China should address the environmental flow requirements of the rivers, particularly in terms of the hydrologic indices affected mostly by reservoirs and sluices. This study will promote the application of flow regime classification and river restoration in highly regulated basins in China.

  6. Wind-Driven Ecological Flow Regimes Downstream from Hydropower Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, J.; Characklis, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    challenge, the following study was designed to investigate the potential for wind power integration to alter riparian flow regimes below hydroelectric dams. A hydrological model of a three-dam cascade in the Roanoke River basin (Virginia, USA) is interfaced with a simulated electricity market (i.e. a unit commitment problem) representing the Dominion Zone of PJM Interconnection. Incorporating forecasts of electricity demand, hydro capacity and wind availability, a mixed-integer optimization program minimizes the system cost of meeting hourly demand and reserve requirements by means of a diverse generation portfolio (e.g. nuclear, fossil, hydro, and biomass). A secondary 'balancing' energy market is executed if real-time wind generation is less than the day-ahead forecast, calling upon reserved generation resources to meet the supply shortfall. Hydropower release schedules are determined across a range of wind development scenarios (varying wind's fraction of total installed generating capacity, as well as its geographical source region). Flow regimes for each wind development scenario are compared against both historical and simulated flows under current operations (negligible wind power), as well as simulated natural flows (dam removal), in terms of ecologically relevant flow metrics. Results quantify the ability of wind power development to alter within-week stream flows downstream from hydropower dams.

  7. Turbulence- and buoyancy-driven secondary flow in a horizontal square duct heated from below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, A.; Kawahara, G.; Sekiyama, K.; Uhlmann, M.; Pinelli, A.

    2011-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of fully developed turbulent flows in a horizontal square duct heated from below are performed at bulk Reynolds numbers Reb = 3000 and 4400 (based on duct width H) and bulk Richardson numbers 0≤Ri≤1.03. The primary objective of the numerical simulations concerns the characterization of the mean secondary flow that develops in this class of flows. On one hand, it is known that turbulent isothermal flow in a square duct presents secondary mean motions of Prandtl's second kind that finds its origin in the behavior of turbulence structures. On the other hand, thermal convection drives a mean secondary motion of Prandtl's first kind directly induced by buoyancy. As far as the mean structure of the cross-stream motion is concerned, it is found that different types of secondary flow regimes take place when increasing the value of the Richardson number. The mean secondary flow in the range 0.025≲Ri≲0.25 is characterized by a single large-scale thermal convection roll and four turbulence-driven corner vortices of the opposite sense of rotation to the roll, as contrasted with the classical scenario of the eight-vortex secondary flow pattern typical of isothermal turbulent square-duct flow. This remarkable structural difference in the corner regions can be interpreted in terms of combined effects, on instantaneous streamwise vortices, of the large-scale circulation and of the geometrical constraint by the duct corner. When further increasing the Richardson number, i.e., Ri ≳ 0.25, the structure of the mean secondary flow is solely determined by the large-scale circulation induced by the buoyancy force. In this regime, the additional mean cross-stream motion is characterized by the presence of two distinct buoyancy-driven vortices of opposite sense of rotation to the circulation only in two of the four corner regions. With increasing Ri, the large-scale circulation is found to enhance the wall skin friction and heat transfer. In the

  8. A hydrometeorological forecasting approach for basins with complex flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkadoulas, Akis; Mantesi, Konstantina; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koussis, Antonis; Mazi, Aikaterini; Katsanos, Demetris; Koukouvinos, Antonis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    The combined use of weather forecasting models and hydrological models in flood risk estimations is an established technique, with several successful applications worldwide. However, most known hydrometeorological forecasting systems have been established in large rivers with perpetual flow. Experience from small- and medium-scale basins, which are often affected by flash floods, is very limited. In this work we investigate the perspectives of hydrometeorological forecasting, by emphasizing two issues: (a) which modelling approach can credibly represent the complex dynamics of basins with highly variable runoff (intermittent or ephemeral); and (b) which transformation of point-precipitation forecasts provides the most reliable estimations of spatially aggregated data, to be used as inputs to semi-distributed hydrological models. Using as case studies the Sarantapotamos river basin, in Eastern Greece (145 km2), and the Nedontas river basin, in SW Peloponnese (120 km2), we demonstrate the advantages of continuous simulation through the HYDROGEIOS model. This employs conjunctive modelling of surface and groundwater flows and their interactions (percolation, infiltration, underground losses), which are key processes in river basins characterized by significantly variability of runoff. The model was calibrated against hourly flow data at two and three hydrometric stations, respectively, for a 3-year period (2011-2014). Next we attempted to reproduce the most intense flood events of that period, by substituting observed rainfall by forecast scenarios. In this respect, we used consecutive point forecasts of a 6-hour lead time, provided by the numerical weather prediction model WRF (Advanced Research version), dynamically downscaled from the ~1° forecast of GSF-NCEP/NOAA successively first to ~18 km, then to ~6 km and ultimately at the horizontal grid resolution of 2x2 km2. We examined alternative spatial integration approaches, using as reference the rainfall stations

  9. Flow regime change in an Endorheic basin in Southern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worku, F. F.; Werner, M.; Wright, N.; van der Zaag, P.; Demissie, S.

    2014-01-01

    Endorheic basins, often found in semi-arid and arid climates, are particularly sensitive to changes in climatological fluxes such as precipitation, evaporation and runoff, resulting in variability of river flows as well as of water levels in end-point lakes that are often present. In this paper we apply the Indicators of Hydrological Alteration (IHA) to characterise change to the natural flow regime of the Omo-Ghibe basin in Southern Ethiopia. This endorheic basin is considered relatively pristine, with the basin being the main source of flow to Lake Turkana, the end-point lake in the East-African rift valley. The water level in Lake Turkana shows significant fluctuation, but an increasing trend can be observed over the past 20 yr. The reasons are currently not well understood. Of the five groups of metrics in the IHA, only those related to magnitude were found to show significant trends, with the main trend being the increase of flow during the dry season. This trend was not reflected in climatological drivers such as rainfall, evaporation, and temperature (which shows an increasing trend), but rather is attributed to the substantial changes in Land Use and Land Cover (LULC) in the basin. The impact on the basin hydrology is apparent mainly in the more humid part of the basin. The significant shift from forest and woodland to grassland and cropland results in a decrease of actual evaporation and subsequent increase in (dry season) runoff. The long term trend of the increasing levels in lake Turkana are related to these trends in dry season flows, while shorter term fluctuations of the lake levels are attributed primarily to anomalies in consecutive wet and dry season rainfall.

  10. Flow regime change in an endorheic basin in southern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worku, F. F.; Werner, M.; Wright, N.; van der Zaag, P.; Demissie, S. S.

    2014-09-01

    Endorheic basins, often found in semi-arid and arid climates, are particularly sensitive to variation in fluxes such as precipitation, evaporation and runoff, resulting in variability of river flows as well as of water levels in end-point lakes that are often present. In this paper we apply the indicators of hydrological alteration (IHA) to characterise change to the natural flow regime of the Omo-Ghibe Basin in southern Ethiopia. Little water resource infrastructure has been developed in the basin to date, and it is considered pristine. The basin is endorheic and is the main source of flow to Lake Turkana in the East African Rift Valley. The water level in Lake Turkana shows significant fluctuation, but increase of its level can be observed over the past 20 years. The reasons are currently not well understood. Of the five groups of hydrological characteristics in the IHA (magnitude, timing, duration, frequency and variability), only those related to magnitude were found to show significant trends, with the main trend being the increase of flow during the dry season. This trend was not reflected in climatological drivers such as rainfall, evaporation and temperature (which shows a positive trend), but rather is attributed to the substantial changes in land use and land cover in the basin. The change in the basin hydrology is apparent mainly in the more humid part of the basin. The significant shift from forest and woodland to grassland and cropland results in a decrease of actual evaporation and subsequent increase in (dry season) runoff. The long-term trend of the increasing levels in Lake Turkana are related to these trends in dry season flows, while shorter-term fluctuations of the lake levels are attributed primarily to anomalies in consecutive wet and dry season rainfall.

  11. Controls of Wellbore Flow Regimes on Pump Effluent Composition

    SciTech Connect

    James Martin-Hayden; plummer; Sanford Britt

    2014-01-01

    Where well water and formation water are compositionally different or heterogeneous, pump effluent composition will vary due to partial mixing and transport induced by pumping. Investigating influences of purging and sampling methodology on composition variability requires quantification of wellbore flow regimes and mixing. As a basis for this quantification, analytical models simulating Poiseuille flow were developed to calculate flow paths and travel times. Finite element modeling was used to incorporate influences of mixing. Parabolic velocity distributions within the screened interval accelerate with cumulative inflow approaching the pump intake while an annulus of inflowing formation water contracts uniformly to displace an axial cylinder of pre-pumping well water as pumping proceeds. Increased dispersive mixing forms a more diffuse formation water annulus and the contribution of formation water to pump effluent increases more rapidly. Models incorporating viscous flow and diffusion scale mixing show that initially pump effluent is predominantly pre-pumping well water and compositions vary most rapidly. After two screen volumes of pumping, 94% of pump effluent is inflowing formation water. Where the composition of formation water and pre-pumping well water are likely to be similar, pump effluent compositions will not vary significantly and may be collected during early purging or with passive sampling. However, where these compositions are expected to be considerably different or heterogeneous, compositions would be most variable during early pumping, that is, when samples are collected during low-flow sampling. Purging of two screen volumes would be required to stabilize the content and collect a sample consisting of 94% formation water.

  12. Flow Visualization Study of a 1/48-Scale AFTI/F111 Model to Investigate Horizontal Tail Flow Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    During flight testing of the AFTI/F111 aircraft, horizontal tail buffet was observed. Flutter analysis ruled out any aeroelastic instability, so a water-tunnel flow visualization study was conducted to investigate possible flow disturbances on the horizontal tail which might cause buffet. For this study, a 1/48-scale model was used. Four different wing cambers and one horizontal tail setting were tested between 0 and 20 deg angle of attack. These wing cambers corresponded to the following leading training edge deflections: 0/2, 10/10, 10/2, and 0/10. Flow visualization results in the form of still photographs are presented for each of the four wing cambers between 8 and 12 deg angle of attack. In general, the horizontal tail experiences flow disturbances which become more pronounced with angle of attack or wing trailing-edge deflection.

  13. The effect of the scale of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands on flow and transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Suliman, F; French, H; Haugen, L E; Kløve, B; Jenssen, P

    2005-01-01

    Horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands have proven their efficiency in treating wastewater and removing the pollutants of concern. Treatment efficiency depends on the wastewater residence time, which is a function of the hydraulic loading and the physical conditions of the constructed filter system, which can be described with effective parameters such as: hydraulic conductivity, porosity, dispersivity etc. Because spatial variability is often scale dependent, these effective parameters may be affected by the scale of the system being studied. In this paper the results of tracer experiments in constructed filters using saturated horizontal flow at three scales (small and medium lab scales and full-scale system) using the same filter media is reported. Light-weight aggregate (filter media termed Filtralite-P) was used at all scales. Increasing the scale was associated with increasing dispersivity, meanwhile hydraulic conductivity experienced dramatic reduction and variation by increasing the examined scale. Observed changes in the hydraulic parameters indicate that heterogeneity at different scales should be taken into account when the performance of LWA filters are evaluated from small-scale experiments. PMID:16042266

  14. Study of flow regimes in two-phase pipeline flow using computer-based digital-image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    A new unobtrusive method for liquid-liquid two-phase flow data collection was proven reliable in this research. Drop-size distributions and concentration profiles were determined for a dilute water-in-kerosene system under horizontal straight pipe flow using this technique. The drop-size distributions were found to follow a Rosin-Rammler function for a limited droplet-diameter range, and the average value of the exponent in the Rosin-Rammler equation was determined to be 2.0. The velocity where the flow-regime transitions from stratified to adequately dispersed was found to be between 6.6 and 7.3 ft/s. Concentration profiles predicted by the Segev model were in general agreement with the profiles determined in this work. Using the experimentally determined Rosin-Rammler exponent value of 2.0 and using the proper choice of the dimensionless lateral diffusivity, the Segev model predicts very well the profiles found in this work. The new experimental method developed in this work will be useful to future researchers in two-phase flow. The data generated is useful both for theoretical modeling efforts and for application to industry sampling problems.

  15. Flow regime study of a light material in an industrial scale cold flow circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Monazam, E.R.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-06-15

    A series of experiments was conducted in the 0.3 meter diameter circulating fluidized bed test facility at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the U. S. Department of Energy. The particle used in this study was a coarse, light material, cork, which has a particle density of 189 kg/m{sup 3} and a mean diameter of 812 {mu}m. Fluidizing this material in ambient air approximates the same gas-solids density ratio as coal and coal char in a pressurized gasifier. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, this study is to provide a better understanding on the fundamentals of flow regimes and their transitions. The second purpose of this study is to generate reliable data to validate the mathematical models, which are currently under development at NETL. This paper presents and discusses the data, which covered operating flow regime from dilute phase, fast fluidization, and to dense phase transport by varying the solid flux, G{sub s}. at a constant gas velocity, U{sub g}. Data are presented by mapping the flow regime for coarse cork particles in a {Delta}P/{Delta} L-G{sub s}-U{sub g} plot. A stable operation can be obtained at a fixed riser gas velocity higher than the transport velocity e.g., at U{sub g} = 3.2 m/s, even though the riser is operated within the fast fluidization flow regime. Depending upon the solids influx, the riser can also be operated at dilute phase or dense phase flow regimes. Experimental data were compared to empirical correlations in published literature for flow regime boundaries as well as solids, fractions in the upper dilute and the lower dense regions for fast fluidization flow regime. Comparisons of measured data with these empirical correlations show rather poor agreements. These discrepancies, however, are not surprising since the correlations for these transitions were derived from experimental data of comparative heavier materials such as sands, FCC, iron ore etc.

  16. Predicted Variations in Flow Patterns in a Horizontal CVD Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    1999-01-01

    Expressions in terms of common reactor operating parameters were derived for the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, Gr/Re, the ratio of the Grashof to the square of 2 the Reynolds number, Gr/Re(exp 2), and the Rayleigh number, Ra. Values for these numbers were computed for an example horizontal CVD reactor and compared to numerical simulations to gauge their effectiveness as predictors of the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in the reactor. Comparisons were made for both argon and hydrogen carrier gases over the pressure range 2- 101 kPa. Reasonable agreement was achieved in most cases when using Gr/Re to predict the presence of transverse rolls and Ra to predict the presence of longitudinal rolls. The ratio Gr/Re(exp 2) did not yield useful predictions regarding the presence of transverse rolls. This comparison showed that the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, as well as the Rayleigh number, can be used to predict the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in a horizontal CVD reactor for a given set of reactor conditions. These predictions are approximate, and care must be exercised when making predictions near transition regions.

  17. Flooding characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in a horizontal U bend pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, T.; Hosokawa, S.; Fujii, Y.

    1995-09-01

    For next-generation nuclear reactors, hybrid safety systems which consist of active and passive safety systems have been planned. Steam generators with horizontal U bend pipelines will be used as one of the passive safety systems. It is required to clarify flow characteristics, especially the onset of flooding, in the horizontal U bend pipelines in order to examine their safety. Flooding in vertical pipes has been studied extensively. However, there is little study on flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines. It is supposed that the onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines is different from that in vertical pipes. On the other hand, liquid is generated due to condensation of steam in pipes of the horizontal steam generators at the loss of coolant accident because the steam generators will be used as a condenser of a cooling system of steam from the reactor. It is necessary to simulate this situation by the supply of water at the middle of horizontal pipe. In the present paper, experiments were carried out using a horizontal U bend pipeline with a liquid supply section in the midway of pipeline. The onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipeline was measured. Effects of the length of horizontal pipe and the radius of U bend on the onset of flooding were discussed.

  18. Flow regime and deposition pattern of evaporating binary mixture droplet suspended with particles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2016-02-01

    The flow regimes and the deposition pattern have been investigated by changing the ethanol concentration in a water-based binary mixture droplet suspended with alumina nanoparticles. To visualize the flow patterns, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been applied in the binary liquid droplet containing the fluorescent microspheres. Three distinct flow regimes have been revealed in the evaporation. In Regime I, the vortices and chaotic flows are found to carry the particles to the liquid-vapor interface and to promote the formation of particle aggregation. The aggregates move inwards in Regime II as induced by the Marangoni flow along the droplet free surface. Regime III is dominated by the drying of the left water and the capillary flow driving particles radially outward is observed. The relative weightings of Regimes I and II, which are enhanced with an increasing load of ethanol, determine the motion of the nanoparticles and the formation of the final drying pattern. PMID:26920521

  19. Hot-wire calibration in subsonic/transonic flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Ash, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    A different approach for calibrating hot-wires, which simplifies the calibration procedure and reduces the tunnel run-time by an order of magnitude was sought. In general, it is accepted that the directly measurable quantities in any flow are velocity, density, and total temperature. Very few facilities have the capability of varying the total temperature over an adequate range. However, if the overheat temperature parameter, a(sub w), is used to calibrate the hot-wire then the directly measurable quantity, voltage, will be a function of the flow variables and the overheat parameter i.e., E = f(u,p,a(sub w), T(sub w)) where a(sub w) will contain the needed total temperature information. In this report, various methods of evaluating sensitivities with different dependent and independent variables to calibrate a 3-Wire hot-wire probe using a constant temperature anemometer (CTA) in subsonic/transonic flow regimes is presented. The advantage of using a(sub w) as the independent variable instead of total temperature, t(sub o), or overheat temperature parameter, tau, is that while running a calibration test it is not necessary to know the recovery factor, the coefficients in a wire resistance to temperature relationship for a given probe. It was deduced that the method employing the relationship E = f (u,p,a(sub w)) should result in the most accurate calibration of hot wire probes. Any other method would require additional measurements. Also this method will allow calibration and determination of accurate temperature fluctuation information even in atmospheric wind tunnels where there is no ability to obtain any temperature sensitivity information at present. This technique greatly simplifies the calibration process for hot-wires, provides the required calibration information needed in obtaining temperature fluctuations, and reduces both the tunnel run-time and the test matrix required to calibrate hotwires. Some of the results using the above techniques are presented

  20. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  1. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-12-31

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  2. Magneto-polar fluid flow through a porous medium of variable permeability in slip flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, P. K.; Jha, A. K.; Sharma, R.

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical study is carried out to obtain an analytical solution of free convective heat transfer for the flow of a polar fluid through a porous medium with variable permeability bounded by a semi-infinite vertical plate in a slip flow regime. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicular to the porous surface. The free stream velocity follows an exponentially decreasing small perturbation law. Using the approximate method the expressions for the velocity, microrotation, and temperature are obtained. Further, the results of the skin friction coefficient, the couple stress coefficient and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are presented with various values of fluid properties and flow conditions.

  3. Zonal flow regimes in rotating anelastic spherical shells (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.; Aurnou, J. M.; Heimpel, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    The surface zonal winds observed in the giant planets form a complex jet pattern with alternating prograde and retrograde direction. While the main equatorial band is prograde on the gas giants, both ice giants have a pronounced retrograde equatorial jet. The depth of these jets is however poorly known and highly debated. Theoretical scenarios range from "shallow models", that assume that these zonal flows are restricted to the outer stably stratified layer; to "deep models" that hypothesise that the surface winds are the signature of deep-seated convection. Most of the numerical models supporting the latter idea employed the Boussinesq approximation where compressibility effects are ignored. While this approximation is suitable for modelling the liquid iron core of terrestrial planets, this becomes questionable in the gas giants interiors, where density increases by several orders of magnitude. To tackle this problem, several numerical models using the "anelastic approximation" have been recently developed to study the compressibility effects while filtering out the fast acoustic waves. Here, we consider such anelastic models of rapidly-rotating spherical shells to explore the properties of the zonal winds in different regimes where either rotation or buoyancy dominates the force balance. We conduct several parameter studies to quantify the dependence of zonal flows on the background density stratification and the driving of convection. We find that the direction of the equatorial wind is controlled by the ratio of buoyancy and Coriolis force. The prograde equatorial band maintained by Reynolds stresses is found in the rotation-dominated regime. At low Ekman numbers, several alternating jets form at high latitude in a similar way to some previous Boussinesq calculations. In cases where buoyancy dominates Coriolis force, the angular momentum per unit mass is homogenised and the equatorial band is retrograde, reminiscent to those observed in the ice giants

  4. Well testing and interpretation for horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, F.J. )

    1995-01-01

    The use of transient well testing for determining reservoir parameters and productivity of horizontal wells has become common because of the upsurge in horizontal drilling. Initially, horizontal well tests were analyzed with the conventional techniques designed for vertical wells. During the last decade, analytic solutions have been presented for the pressure behavior of horizontal wells. New flow regimes have been identified, and simple equations and flow regime existence criteria have been presented for them. The flow regimes are now used frequently to estimate horizontal and vertical permeabilities of the reservoir, wellbore skin, and reservoir pressure. Although the existing tools and interpretation techniques may be sufficient for simple systems, innovation and improvement of the present technology are still essential for well testing of horizontal wells in many reservoirs with different geological environments and different well-completion requirements.

  5. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  6. Slug-plug flow analyses of stratified flows in a horizontal duct by means of MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunugi, T.; Ose, Y.; Banat, M.

    1999-07-01

    The objectives of this study are to perform the slug-plug flow analyses of stratified flows in a horizontal duct by means of the MARS (Multi-interfaces Advection and Reconstruction Solver) developed by the author which based on the piece-wise linear calculation as a volume tracking procedure and the continuum surface force model (CSF) for the surface tension, and to investigate the effect of the Bernoulli term for slug-plug flows, i.e., so-called the topological law, on the competition between inertial forces and gravitation forces. Some discussion on the primary jump condition at the interface in the MARS is described in the paper. The results of the direct numerical simulation (DNS) by the MARS are compared with the experimental one. The slugging positions obtained by the DNS are in good agreement with the experimental one. Since the mass conservation between before the plugging and after slugging can be shown by the DNS here, the authors may conclude that this physical/numerical model based on the MARS is reliable.

  7. Investigation of single-substance horizontal two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, D.A.; Maeder, P.F.

    1984-03-01

    Despite the abundance of work in the field of two-phase flow, it seems as though a consensus has not been reached on some of the fundamental points. Although exceptions exist, adequate physical interpretation of the flow seems to be hindered either by complexity of analysis or, in the opposite extreme, the trend toward limited-range analysis and correlations. The dissertation presents the derivation of basic conservation equations for the phases. The combined equations are used to examine the phenomenon of slip and its practical limitations, the Fanno line for single-substance flow and the effect of slip on choking. Equations for critical mass flux in the presence of slip are derived. The Mach, Reynolds and Froude numbers based on conditions at flashing are introduced as the characteristic parameters, and the importance of compressibility in single-substance two-phase flow is discussed. Experimental measurements of pressure change and void fraction for flow in the highly compressible range (.5 < Ma < 1) are presented. The working fluid is Refrigerant R-114, at room temperature, in a test section of diameter 5 cm and length 8 m. The effect of the Froude and Mach numbers is examined. The experimental facility is operated intermittently with running times of approximately two minutes and is instrumented for rapid measurements using a computer data acquisition and control system. A description of the facility and procedure is provided.

  8. Unbounded wall flow with free surface waves and horizontal shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary; McHugh, John

    2015-11-01

    Free surface waves in the presence of a non-uniform shear flow are treated. The shear flow of interest varies with both the transverse and vertical coordinates, U (y , z) . Initial results treat a mean flow varying only with the transverse, U (y) . The domain is bounded on one side by a flat rigid vertical wall and is unbounded on the other side. The mean flows considered here are nonzero near the vertical wall and approach zero far from the wall, e.g. U =e-γy . The flowfield is treated as inviscid but rotational. Linear solutions are obtained using a nonuniform coordinate transformation that converts the free surface boundary condition into a modified Bessel equation. Velocity components are expanded in modified Bessel functions of the first kind of purely imaginary order. The dispersion relation for steady waves are found with wavespeeds outside the range of U, matching previous results for a flow bounded on both sides. Corresponding eigenvectors show a sequence of wave profiles of increasing complexity near the wall. The wave amplitude approaches zero far from the wall.

  9. Development of an inflow controlled environmental flow regime for a Norwegian river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfredsen, Knut; Harby, Atle; Linnansaari, Tommi; Ugedal, Ola

    2010-05-01

    For most regulated rivers in Norway the common environmental flow regime is static and shows very little variation over the year. Recent research indicate that flow regimes that follow the natural inflow variation can meet the ecological and social demands for water in a better way. The implementation of a variable environmental flow regime provides many challenges both related to defining flow for various species and user groups in the river, but also due to practical implementation, legislation and control. A inflow controlled flow regime is developed for a Norwegian river regulated for hydro power as a pilot study. The regime should meet ecological demands from Atlantic salmon and brown trout, recreational use of water and visual impression of the river. This should be achieved preferably without altering the energy production in the hydro power system. The flow regime is developed for wet, dry and normal discharge conditions based on unregulated inflow to the catchment. The development of the seasonal flow requirements for various targets identified is done using a modification of the Building Block Method. Several options are tested regarding the integration of the flow regime into the operational strategy of the hydropower plant, both using real time prognosis of inflow and combinations with historical data. An important topic in selecting the release strategy is how it meets current Norwegian legislation and how well future documentation and environmental control can be carried out. An evaluation protocol is also proposed for the flow regime to test if the ecological targets are met.

  10. Natural flow regimes of the Ozark-Ouachita Interior Highlands region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leasure, D. R.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; Longing, S. D.

    2016-01-01

    Natural flow regimes represent the hydrologic conditions to which native aquatic organisms are best adapted. We completed a regional river classification and quantitative descriptions of each natural flow regime for the Ozark–Ouachita Interior Highlands region of Arkansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. On the basis of daily flow records from 64 reference streams, seven natural flow regimes were identified with mixture model cluster analysis: Groundwater Stable, Groundwater, Groundwater Flashy, Perennial Runoff, Runoff Flashy, Intermittent Runoff and Intermittent Flashy. Sets of flow metrics were selected that best quantified nine ecologically important components of these natural flow regimes. An uncertainty analysis was performed to avoid selecting metrics strongly affected by measurement uncertainty that can result from short periods of record. Measurement uncertainties (bias, precision and accuracy) were assessed for 170 commonly used flow metrics. The ranges of variability expected for select flow metrics under natural conditions were quantified for each flow regime to provide a reference for future assessments of hydrologic alteration. A random forest model was used to predict the natural flow regimes of all stream segments in the study area based on climate and catchment characteristics, and a map was produced. The geographic distribution of flow regimes suggested distinct ecohydrological regions that may be useful for conservation planning. This project provides a hydrologic foundation for future examination of flow–ecology relationships in the region. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. The Lakshmi Plateau structure as an indicator of asthenosphere horizontal flows on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pronin, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    The structure of Lakshmi Planum in the western part of Ishtar Terra in a fold-fault setting which conforms to the basic massif of the plateau with eruptive centers is constructed concentrically and is interpreted from the point of view of the subsurface flow of materials in the form of horizontally diverging asthenospheric flows and gravitational creep. The surrounding structures are formed by the deformation of the more rigid lithosphere as it breaks away from the asthenospheric flow.

  12. Counter-current flow in a vertical to horizontal tube with obstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Tye, P.; Matuszkiewicz, A.; Teyssedou, A.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents experimental results on counter-current flow and flooding in an elbow between a vertical and a horizontal run. The experimental technique used allowed not only the flooding limit to be determined, but also the entire partial delivery region to be studied as well. The influence that various size orifices placed in the horizontal run have on both the delivered liquid flow rates and on the flooding limits is also examined. It is observed that both the flooding limits and the delivered liquid flow rates decrease with decreasing orifice size. Further, it is also observed that the mechanisms that govern the partial delivery of the liquid are significantly different when an orifice is present in the horizontal leg as compared to the case when no orifice is present.

  13. Numerical simulation of flows from free molecular regime to continuum regime by a DVM with streaming and collision processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wu, J.; Wang, Y.

    2016-02-01

    A discrete velocity method (DVM) with streaming and collision processes is presented in this work for simulation of flows from free molecular regime to continuum regime. The present scheme can be considered as a semi-Lagrangian like scheme. At first, we follow the conventional DVM to discretize the phase velocity space by a number of discrete velocities. Then, for each discrete velocity, the kinetic equation with BGK-Shakhov model is integrated in space and time within one time step. As a result, a simple algebraic formulation can be obtained, and its solution can be marched in time by the streaming and collision processes. However, differently from the conventional semi-Lagrangian scheme, the present scheme uses the MUSCL approach with van Albada limiter in the process of reconstructing the distribution function at the surrounding points of the cell center, and the transport distance is controlled in order to avoid extrapolation. This makes the present scheme be capable of simulating the hypersonic rarefied flows. In addition, as compared to the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS), the present scheme is simpler and easier for implementation. Thus, the computational efficiency can be improved accordingly. To validate the proposed numerical scheme, test examples from free molecular regime to continuum regime are simulated. Numerical results showed that the present scheme can predict the flow properties accurately even for hypersonic rarefied flows.

  14. Computation of flow around a circular cylinder in a supercritical regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, K.; Kuwahara, K.; Kawamura, T.; Ogawa, S.; Chyu, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Compressible flows around a circular cylinder in a supercritical regime at Mach number 0.3 have been calculated by using the Beam-Warming-Steger scheme based on the full Navier-Stokes equations with improved accuracy. The flow patterns are visualized extensively to observe the characteristics in this regime. The computations show that the flow at certain Reynolds numbers in a supercritical regime becomes rather steady and irregular with small drag coefficients. This may correspond to the experimental observations that the Strouhal number can not be measured clearly at a certain Reynolds number range in the supercritical regime.

  15. Modality transition-based network from multivariate time series for characterizing horizontal oil-water flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mei-Shuang; Jin, Ning-De; Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2015-11-01

    The simultaneous flow of oil and water through a horizontal pipe is a common occurrence during petroleum industrial processes. Characterizing the flow behavior underlying horizontal oil-water flows is a challenging problem of significant importance. In order to solve this problem, we carry out experiment to measure multivariate signals from different flow patterns and then propose a novel modality transition-based network to analyze the multivariate signals. The results suggest that the local betweenness centrality and weighted shortest path of the constructed network can characterize the transitions of flow conditions and further allow quantitatively distinguishing and uncovering the dynamic flow behavior underlying different horizontal oil-water flow patterns.

  16. Horizontal Flows in the Photosphere and Subphotosphere of Two Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei; Schuck, P. W.

    2012-01-01

    We compare horizontal flow fields in the photosphere and in the subphotosphere (a layer 0.5 megameters below the photosphere) in two solar active regions: AR11084 and AR11158. AR11084 is a mature, simple active region without significant flaring activity, and AR11158 is a multipolar, complex active region with magnetic flux emerging during the period studied. Flows in the photosphere are derived by applying the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms (DAVE4VM) on HMI-observed vector magnetic fields, and the subphotospheric flows are inferred by time-distance helioseismology using HMI-observed Dopplergrams. Similar flow patterns are found for both layers for AR11084: inward flows in the sunspot umbra and outward flows surrounding the sunspot. The boundary between the inward and outward flows, which is slightly different in the photosphere and the subphotosphere, is within the sunspot penumbra. The area having inward flows in the subphotosphere is larger than that in the photosphere. For AR11158, flows in these two layers show great similarities in some areas and significant differences in other areas. Both layers exhibit consistent outward flows in the areas surrounding sunspots. On the other hand, most well-documented flux-emergence-related flow features seen in the photosphere do not have counterparts in the subphotosphere. This implies that the horizontal flows caused by flux emergence do not extend deeply into the subsurface.

  17. Multiple planetary flow regimes in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoden, Shigeo; Shiotani, Masato; Hirota, Isamu

    1987-01-01

    Low-frequency variations in the general circulation of the Southern Hemisphere during 1983 were studied using daily geopotential height and temperature analyses for 12 pressure levels from 1000 mb up to 50 mb, performed by the National Meteorological Center of Japan. Results disclosed the presence, in the Southern Hemisphere troposphere, of an irregular fluctuation of two zonal mean geostrophic wind patterns (named single-jet and double-jet regimes) during wintertime. The fluctuation is characterized by the persistence of one geostrophic wind regime, with characteristic duration of a month, followed by a rather rapid transition to another regime.

  18. Flow and habitat effects on juvenile fish abundance in natural and altered flow regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Mary C.; Bowen, Z.H.; Bovee, K.D.; Irwin, E.R.

    2001-01-01

    Conserving biological resources native to large river systems increasingly depends on how flow-regulated segments of these rivers are managed. Improving management will require a better understanding of linkages between river biota and temporal variability of flow and instream habitat. However, few studies have quantified responses of native fish populations to multiyear (>2 yr) patterns of hydrologic or habitat variability in flow-regulated systems. To provide these data, we quantified young-of-year (YOY) fish abundance during four years in relation to hydrologic and habitat variability in two segments of the Tallapoosa River in the southeastern United States. One segment had an unregulated flow regime, whereas the other was flow-regulated by a peak-load generating hydropower dam. We sampled fishes annually and explored how continuously recorded flow data and physical habitat simulation models (PHABSIM) for spring (April-June) and summer (July-August) preceding each sample explained fish abundances. Patterns of YOY abundance in relation to habitat availability (median area) and habitat persistence (longest period with habitat area continuously above the long-term median area) differed between unregulated and flow-regulated sites. At the unregulated site, YOY abundances were most frequently correlated with availability of shallow-slow habitat in summer (10 species) and persistence of shallow-slow and shallow-fast habitat in spring (nine species). Additionally, abundances were negatively correlated with 1-h maximum flow in summer (five species). At the flow-regulated site, YOY abundances were more frequently correlated with persistence of shallow-water habitats (four species in spring; six species in summer) than with habitat availability or magnitude of flow extremes. The associations of YOY with habitat persistence at the flow-regulated site corresponded to the effects of flow regulation on habitat patterns. Flow regulation reduced median flows during spring and

  19. Aerothermodynamics of compressible flow past a flat plate in the slip-flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Yang; Dai, Yi; Li, Genong; Hu, Yitao; Lai, Ming-Chia

    2015-11-01

    Compressible flow past a flat plate in the slip-flow regime features a very simple geometry and flow field, but it retains the most relevant and interesting physics in high-speed rarefied gas dynamics. In the slip-flow regime, the aerothermodynamic issues, especially the recovery factors and the convection heat transfer correlation, are the focus of this presentation. We first present the detailed similarity equations, especially the transformed Maxwell's slip and jump boundary conditions, and the equations for the Chapman-Rubesin parameter as well as how we incorporate the variable gas properties and the constitutive scaling model for the Knudsen layer in the similarity equations. The similarity solutions are compared with results published by E. R. van Driest [NACA Technical Note 2597, 1952]. We point out that van Driest's solutions were computed by using no-slip and no-jump boundary conditions. The recovery factor and Nusselt number of the plate are shown as functions of the Reynolds number and the Mach number. Finally, the similarity solutions are also compared with simulations of a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model solving the full Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations with slip and jump boundary conditions.

  20. LHe Flow Regime/Pressure Drop for D0 Solenoid at Steady State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-03-03

    This paper describes in a note taking format what was learned from several sources on two phase liquid helium flow regimes and pressure drops as applied to the D-Zero solenoid upgrade project. Calculations to estimate the steady state conditions for the D-Zero solenoid at 5, 10 and 15 g/s are also presented. For the lower flow rates a stratified type regime can be expected with a pressure drop less than 0.5 psi. For the higher flow rate a more homogeneous flow regime can be expected with a pressure drop between 0.4 to 1.5 psi.

  1. Aircraft wake flow effect and horizontal tail buffet. [pressure distribution and responses of fighter aircraft in transonic maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, C.; Pi, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    As part of a program to investigate the fluctuating pressure distribution and response behavior of a fighter aircraft in transonic maneuver, an F-5A scale model has previously been tested in an 11-ft transonic wind tunnel. The model, with a number of static and dynamic pressure transducers imbedded in the lifting surfaces was tested at various angles of attack up to 16 deg. In this paper, test results of particular interest to wake flow and horizontal tail buffet are described. It is shown that the dynamic pressure data on the tail surface at the specified flight conditions serve to determine the local dynamic loads. They also influence the control performance of the aircraft under maneuver conditions where buffet is encountered. The data presented demonstrate a number of contributing factors that affect the tail dynamic pressures in the transonic regime.

  2. Wave / wave interaction production horizontal mean flows in stably stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galmiche, M.; Thual, O.; Bonneton, P.

    2000-01-01

    We show that internal wave/wave interactions in stratified fluids are able to produce strong horizontal mean currents. A simple analytical model allows us to estimate the amplitude of the time-periodic horizontal mean flow induced by the interaction of two monochromatic waves. This model shows that in some cases, the mean flow velocity can overgo a threshold beyond which critical layers and intense energy transfers from the waves to the mean flow are expected. This prediction is confirmed by direct pseudo-spectral simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. Such interactions may help to further understand the presence of strong vertical shear observed in the final stage of stratified flows in oceans and atmospheres.

  3. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  4. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  5. Horizontal Flow of Semantic and Phonological Information in Chinese Spoken Sentence Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jin-Chen; Yang, Yu-Fang

    2008-01-01

    A variant of the picture--word interference paradigm was used in three experiments to investigate the horizontal information flow of semantic and phonological information between nouns in spoken Mandarin Chinese sentences. Experiment 1 demonstrated that there is a semantic interference effect when the word in the second phrase (N3) and the first…

  6. STRATIFICATION OF PARTICULATE AND VOC POLLUTANTS IN HORIZONTAL FLOW PAINT SPRAY BOOTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses stratification of particulate and volatile organic compound (VOC) pollutants in horizontal flow paint spray booths, as part of a joint U. S. Air Force/EPA research and development program on emissions from paint spray booths. The test program discussed in this...

  7. System-focused environmental flow regime prescription, monitoring and adaptive management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, David; Lexartza Artza, Irantzu

    2016-04-01

    The definition of appropriate environmental flow regimes through hydropower schemes and water storage reservoirs is key part of mitigation. Insufficient (magnitude and variability) environmental flows can result in much environmental harm with negative impacts being encountered by morphological, ecological and societal systems. Conventionally, environmental flow regimes have been determined by using generic protocols and guidance such as the Tennant method of environmental flow estimation. It is generally accepted that such approaches to minimum environmental flow definition, although being a useful starting point, are not universally applicable across catchment typologies and climatic regions. Such approaches will not always produce conditions that would be associated with 'Good Ecological Status' under the Water framework Directive (or equivalent). Other similar approaches to minimum environmental flow estimation are used that are specific to geographies, yet still the associated guidance rarely thoroughly covers appropriate definition for healthy holistic systems across the flow regime. This paper draws on experience of system-focused environmental flow regime determination in the UK and the Georgian Caucasus Mountains, which allowed for a critical analysis of more conventional methods to be undertaken. The paper describes a recommended approach for determining appropriate environmental flow regimes based on analysis of the impacted geomorphological, ecological and societal systems in a way which is sensitive to the local holistic environment and associated complexities and interactions. The paper suggests that a strong understanding of the local geomorphology in key in predicting how flows will manifest habitat differently across the flow regime, and be spatially dynamic. Additionally, an understanding of the geomorphological system allows the flow of course and fine sediment to be factored into the initial suggested environmental flow regime. It is suggested

  8. Homogenization of precipitation and flow regimes across China: Changing properties, causes and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Gu, Xihui; Singh, Vijay P.; Xu, Chong-Yu; Kong, Dongdong; Xiao, Mingzhong; Chen, Xiaohong

    2015-11-01

    Homogenization and similarities of precipitation and flow regimes across China are thoroughly investigated using Gini coefficient analysis method and the Analysis Of Similarity (ANOSIM) technique, respectively based on daily precipitation data from 554 meteorological stations and monthly streamflow data from 370 hydrological stations covering the period of 1960-2000. The results indicate that: (1) Homogenization of precipitation regimes is increasing from the northwest to the southeast China. However, different spatial patterns of homogenization of flow regions are identified. Spatially, lower homogenization of flow regimes is detected in the northeast China and higher homogenization of flow regimes in the central and southeast China. Temporally, flow regimes during 1961-2000 are characterized mainly by increasing homogenization, and it is particularly true after 1980; (2) precipitation regimes during 1961-2000 are characterized by decreasing dissimilarities. Larger areas of China are characterized by decreasing dissimilarities of precipitation regimes during 1980-2000 when compared to those during 1961-1980, which should be due to increasing precipitation concentration and intensifying precipitation regimes in recent years; (3) distinctly dissimilar precipitation and flow regimes can be identified between geographically separate river basins. Interregional similarities of flow regimes are enhancing after 1980 when compared to those before 1980 though interregional similarities of precipitation regimes are not changed much; and (4) spatial mismatch is evident in terms of spatial range and changing degree of flow and precipitation regimes. Roughly spatial match can be observed between changes of flow and precipitation indicates and it is particularly the case for precipitation and flow changes in dry season such as winter in China. However, influences of human activities and precipitation changes on streamflow are varying as for specific river basins, such as the

  9. Venus' nighttime horizontal plasma flow, 'magnetic congestion', and ionospheric hole production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Mayr, H. G.; Curtis, S. A.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A simple rectilinear, two-dimensional MHD model is used to investigate the effects of field-aligned plasma loss and cooling on a dense plasma convecting across a weak magnetic field, in order to illumine the Venus nighttime phenomena of horizontal plasma flow, magnetic congestion and ionospheric hole production. By parameterizing field-aligned variations and explicitly solving for cross magnetic field variations, it is shown that the abrupt horizontal enhancements of the vertical magnetic field, as well as sudden decreases of the plasma density to very low values (which are characteristic of ionospheric holes), can be produced in the presence of field-aligned losses.

  10. Two Phase Flow Modeling: Summary of Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop Correlations in Reduced and Partial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rame, E.; Kizito, J.; Kassemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art predictions for two-phase flows relevant to Advanced Life Support. We strive to pick out the most used and accepted models for pressure drop and flow regime predictions. The main focus is to identify gaps in predictive capabilities in partial gravity for Lunar and Martian applications. Following a summary of flow regimes and pressure drop correlations for terrestrial and zero gravity, we analyze the fully developed annular gas-liquid flow in a straight cylindrical tube. This flow is amenable to analytical closed form solutions for the flow field and heat transfer. These solutions, valid for partial gravity as well, may be used as baselines and guides to compare experimental measurements. The flow regimes likely to be encountered in the water recovery equipment currently under consideration for space applications are provided in an appendix.

  11. On the prediction of the phase distribution of bubbly flow in a horizontal pipe.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, G H; Cheung, Sherman C P; Tu, J Y

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal bubbly flow is widely encountered in various industrial systems because of its ability to provide large interfacial areas for heat and mass transfer. Nonetheless, this particular flow orientation has received less attention when compared to vertical bubbly flow. Owing to the strong influence due to buoyancy, the migration of dispersed bubbles towards the top wall of the horizontal pipe generally causes a highly asymmetrical internal phase distributions, which are not experienced in vertical bubbly flow. In this study, the internal phase distribution of air-water bubbly flow in a long horizontal pipe with an inner diameter of 50.3 mm has been predicted using the population balance model based on direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) and multiple-size group (MUSIG) model. The predicted local radial distributions of gas void fraction, liquid velocity and interfacial area concentration have been validated against the experimental data of Kocamustafaogullari and Huang (1994). In general, satisfactory agreements between predicted and measured results were achieved. The numerical results indicated that the gas void fraction and interfacial area concentration have a unique internal structure with a prevailing maximum peak near the top wall of the pipe due to buoyancy effect. PMID:24415823

  12. On the prediction of the phase distribution of bubbly flow in a horizontal pipe

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, G.H.; Cheung, Sherman C.P.; Tu, J.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal bubbly flow is widely encountered in various industrial systems because of its ability to provide large interfacial areas for heat and mass transfer. Nonetheless, this particular flow orientation has received less attention when compared to vertical bubbly flow. Owing to the strong influence due to buoyancy, the migration of dispersed bubbles towards the top wall of the horizontal pipe generally causes a highly asymmetrical internal phase distributions, which are not experienced in vertical bubbly flow. In this study, the internal phase distribution of air-water bubbly flow in a long horizontal pipe with an inner diameter of 50.3 mm has been predicted using the population balance model based on direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) and multiple-size group (MUSIG) model. The predicted local radial distributions of gas void fraction, liquid velocity and interfacial area concentration have been validated against the experimental data of Kocamustafaogullari and Huang (1994). In general, satisfactory agreements between predicted and measured results were achieved. The numerical results indicated that the gas void fraction and interfacial area concentration have a unique internal structure with a prevailing maximum peak near the top wall of the pipe due to buoyancy effect. PMID:24415823

  13. A model for fluid flow during saturated boiling on a horizontal cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kheyrandish, K.; Dalton, C.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    A model has been developed to represent the vapor removal pattern in the vicinity of a cylinder during nucleate flow boiling across a horizontal cylinder. The model is based on a potential flow representation of the liquid and vapor regions and an estimate of the losses that should occur in the flow. Correlation of the losses shows a weak dependence on the Weber number and a slightly stronger dependence on the saturated liquid-to-vapor density ratio. The vapor jet thickness, which is crucial to the prediction of the burnout heat flux, and the shape of the vapor film are predicted. Both are verified by qualitative experimental observations.

  14. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the solar magnetic flux emergence. Parametric study on the horizontal divergent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    2013-05-01

    Context. Solar active regions are formed through the emergence of magnetic flux from the deeper convection zone. Recent satellite observations have shown that a horizontal divergent flow (HDF) stretches out over the solar surface just before the magnetic flux appearance. Aims: The aims of this study are to investigate the driver of the HDF and to see the dependency of the HDF on the parameters of the magnetic flux in the convection zone. Methods: We conducted three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) numerical simulations of the magnetic flux emergence and varied the parameters in the initial conditions. An analytical approach was also taken to explain the dependency. Results: The horizontal gas pressure gradient is found to be the main driver of the HDF. The maximum HDF speed shows positive correlations with the field strength and twist intensity. The HDF duration has a weak relation with the twist, while it shows negative dependency on the field strength only in the case of the stronger field regime. Conclusions: Parametric dependencies analyzed in this study may allow us to probe the structure of the subsurface magnetic flux by observing properties of the HDF.

  15. Optimal Ranking Regime analysis of TreeFlow dendrohydrological reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauget, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The Optimal Ranking Regime (ORR) method was used to identify 6-100 year time windows containing significant ranking sequences in 55 western US streamflow reconstructions, and reconstructions of the level of the Great Salt Lake and San Francisco Bay salinity during 1500-2007. The method's ability to identify optimally significant and non-overlapping runs of low and high rankings allows it to re-express a reconstruction time series as a simplified sequence of regime segments marking intra- to multi-decadal (IMD) periods of low or high streamflow, lake level, or salinity. Those ORR sequences, referred to here as Z lines, can be plotted to identify consistent regime patterns in the analysis of numerous reconstructions. The Z lines for the 57 reconstructions evaluated here show a common pattern of IMD cycles of drought and pluvial periods during the late 16th and 17th centuries, a relatively dormant period during the 18th century, and the reappearance of alternating dry and wet IMD periods during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Although this pattern suggests the possibility of similarly active and inactive oceanic modes in the North Pacific and North Atlantic, such centennial-scale patterns are not evident in the ORR analyses of reconstructed Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation, and North Atlantic seas-surface temperature variation. But given the inconsistency in the analyses of four PDO reconstructions the possible role of centennial-scale oceanic mechanisms is uncertain. In future research the ORR method might be applied to climate reconstructions around the Pacific Basin to try to resolve this uncertainty. Given its ability to compare regime patterns in climate reconstructions derived using different methods and proxies, the method may also be used in future research to evaluate long-term regional temperature reconstructions.

  16. Optimal ranking regime analysis of TreeFlow dendrohydrological reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauget, S. A.

    2015-08-01

    The optimal ranking regime (ORR) method was used to identify 6-100-year time windows containing significant ranking sequences in 55 western US streamflow reconstructions, and reconstructions of the level of the Great Salt Lake and San Francisco Bay salinity during 1500-2007. The method's ability to identify optimally significant and non-overlapping runs of low- and high-rankings allows it to re-express a reconstruction time series as a simplified sequence of regime segments marking intra- to multi-decadal (IMD) periods of low or high streamflow, lake level, and salinity. Those ORR sequences, referred to here as Z-lines, can be plotted to identify consistent regime patterns in the analysis of numerous reconstructions. The Z-lines for the 57 reconstructions evaluated here show a common pattern of IMD cycles of drought and pluvial periods during the late 16th and 17th centuries, a relatively dormant period during the 18th century, and the reappearance of alternating dry and wet IMD periods during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Although this pattern suggests the possibility of similarly active and inactive oceanic modes in the North Pacific and North Atlantic, such centennial-scale patterns are not evident in the ORR analyses of reconstructed Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation, and North Atlantic sea-surface temperature variation. However, given the inconsistency in the analyses of four PDO reconstructions, the possible role of centennial-scale oceanic mechanisms is uncertain. In future research the ORR method might be applied to climate reconstructions around the Pacific Basin to try to resolve this uncertainty. Given its ability to compare regime patterns in climate reconstructions derived using different methods and proxies, the method may also be used in future research to evaluate long-term regional temperature reconstructions.

  17. Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Near-wake Flow Dynamics of a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Tari, P.; Siddiqui, K.; Refan, M.; Hangan, H.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments conducted in a large wind tunnel set-up investigate the 3D flow dynamics within the near-wake region of a horizontal axis wind turbine. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements quantify the mean and turbulent components of the flow field. Measurements are performed in multiple adjacent horizontal planes in order to cover the area behind the rotor in a large radial interval, at several locations downstream of the rotor. The measurements were phase-locked in order to facilitate the re-construction of the threedimensional flow field. The mean velocity and turbulence characteristics clearly correlate with the near-wake vortex dynamics and in particular with the helical structure of the flow, formed immediately behind the turbine rotor. Due to the tip and root vortices, the mean and turbulent characteristics of the flow are highly dependent on the azimuth angle in regions close to the rotor and close to the blade tip and root. Further from the rotor, the characteristics of the flow become phase independent. This can be attributed to the breakdown of the vortical structure of the flow, resulting from the turbulent diffusion. In general, the highest levels of turbulence are observed in shear layer around the tip of the blades, which decrease rapidly downstream. The shear zone grows in the radial direction as the wake moves axially, resulting in velocity recovery toward the centre of the rotor due to momentum transport.

  18. Comparison of the transport of the aggregates of nanoscale zerovalent iron under vertical and horizontal flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2016-02-01

    Direct injection of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles is being considered for remediation of contaminated sites. However, the transport characteristics of NZVI under horizontal flow conditions are not fully understood. In this study, NZVI particles were stabilized with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and injected in vertical and horizontal columns to compare the effects of the flow direction on the transport. Columns were packed with sand of mean grain diameters of 180, 340 or 1140 µm (referred to as fine, intermediate and coarse sand, respectively), and were injected with CMC-NZVI suspensions of 0.3, 1 or 3 g Fe L(-1). Experimental breakthrough curves showed that with the coarse and intermediate sands, the steady-state effluent concentration in the horizontal column were up to 84% lower than those in the vertical column regardless of the initial NZVI concentration. However, in the fine sand the differences were insignificant, except at the highest NZVI particle concentration. Additionally, in the horizontally-oriented columns containing the coarse or intermediated sand, NZVI aggregates particles were non-uniformly distributed in the cross-section of the columns and there higher deposition in the bottom-half of the cross-section due to gravity effects. These deposition patterns can be accounted for, in part, by the gravitational settling of the large aggregates of NZVI, especially at high NZVI concentrations. A particle trajectory analysis in three dimensions demonstrated that under horizontal flow, gravity forces resulted in lower deposition of NZVI on the bottom-half of a single collector, as particles approaching the bottom-half of the collector were deflected by gravity to collectors below. PMID:26498094

  19. Salix response to different flow regimes in controlled experiments: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, Lorenzo; Signarbieux, Constant; Buttler, Alexandre; Perona, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Dams and water management for hydropower production, agriculture and other human activities alter the natural flow regime of rivers. The new river hydrograph components depend on the type of impoundment and the policy of regulation but such a different flow regime will likely affect the riparian environment. The main challenge in order to define sustainable flow releases is to quantify hydrological effects in terms of geomorphology and ecosystem response. A considerable lack of knowledge still affects the link hydrology-ecology and inadequate flow rules (e.g., minimal or residual flows) are consequently still widespread: further research in this direction is urgently required. We present an experiment, which aims to investigate the effects of different water stage regimes on riparian vegetation (salix Viminalis cuttings) development in a temperate region (Switzerland). This work describes the installation setup, together with the first results concerning the first of the two scheduled seasons of campaign. Sixty Salix cuttings were planted in non-cohesive sandy-gravel sediment within 1 meter tall plastic pots installed outside in the EPFL campus. After grouping them in three batteries, the water level within them has been varying following three river regimes simulated by adjusting the water level within the pots by means of an automatic hydraulic system. The three water level regimes reproduce a natural flow regime, a minimum residual flow policy, which only conserves peaks during flooding conditions, and an artificial regime conserving only low frequencies (e.g., seasonality) of the natural dynamic. The natural flow regime of the first battery has been applied for two months to the entire system; the three regimes above said started in June 2012. This triggered a plant response transitory regime, which we monitored by measuring plant growth, soil and atmospheric variables. Particularly, measures concern with branches development leaves photosynthesis and

  20. Scaling laws and flow structures of double diffusive convection in the finger regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yantao; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations are conducted for double diffusive convection (DDC) bounded by two parallel plates, with fluid properties similar to the values of seawater. The DDC flow is driven by an unstable salinity difference and stabilized at the same time by a temperature difference. For these conditions the flow can be in the finger regime. We develop scaling laws for three key response parameters of the system: The non-dimensional salinity flux $Nu_S$ mainly depends on the salinity Rayleigh number $Ra_S$, which measures the strength of the salinity difference, and exhibits a very weak dependence on the density ratio $\\Lambda$, which is the ratio of the buoyancy forces induced by two scalar differences. The non-dimensional flow velocity $Re$ and the non-dimensional heat flux $Nu_T$ are dependent on both $Ra_S$ and $\\Lambda$. However, the rescaled Reynolds number $Re\\Lambda^{\\alpha^{\\rm eff}_u}$ and the rescaled convective heat flux $(Nu_T-1)\\Lambda^{\\alpha^{\\rm eff}_T}$ depend only on $Ra_S$. The two exponents are dependent on the fluid properties and are determined from the numerical results. Moreover, the behaviors of $Nu_S$ and $Re\\Lambda^{\\alpha^{\\rm eff}_u}$ agree with the predictions of the Grossmann-Lohse theory which was originally developed for the Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard flow. The non-dimensional salt-finger width and the thickness of the velocity boundary layers, after being rescaled by $\\Lambda^{\\alpha^{\\rm eff}_u/2}$, collapse and obey a similar power-law scaling relation with $Ra_S$. When $Ra_S$ is large enough, salt fingers do not extend from one plate to the other and horizontal zonal flows emerge in the bulk region. We then show that the current scaling strategy can be successfully applied to the experimental results of a heat-copper-ion system~(Hage and Tilgner, Phys. Fluids, 22, 076603, 2010).

  1. The impact of stormwater source-control strategies on the (low) flow regime of urban catchments.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Perrine; Fletcher, Tim D

    2014-01-01

    Stormwater management strategies increasingly recognise the need to emulate the pre-development flow regime, in addition to reducing pollutant concentrations and loads. However, it is unclear whether current design approaches for stormwater source-control techniques are effective in restoring the whole flow regime, and in particular low flows, towards their pre-development levels. We therefore modelled and compared a range of source-control stormwater management strategies, including some specifically tailored towards enhancing baseflow processes. The strategies were assessed based on the total streamflow volume and three low flow metrics. Strategies based on harvesting tanks showed much greater volume reduction than those based on raingardens. Strategies based on a low flow rate release, aimed at mimicking natural baseflow, failed to completely restore the baseflow regime. We also found that the sensitivity of the low flow metrics to the proportion of catchment treated varied amongst metrics, illustrating the importance of metrics selection in the assessment of stormwater strategies. In practice, our results suggest that realistic scenarios using low flow release from source-control techniques may not be able to fully restore the low flow regime, at least for perennial streams. However, a combination of feasibly-sized tanks and raingardens is likely to restore the baseflow regime to a great extent, while also benefitting water quality through the retention and filtration processes. PMID:24569271

  2. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; McFarland, E. R.; Chima, R. V.; Capece, V. R.; Hayden, J.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center linear cascade on the intermittent flow on the suction surface of an airfoil section from the tip region of a modern low aspect ratio fan blade. Experimental results revealed that, at a large incidence angle, a range of transonic inlet Mach numbers exist where the leading-edge shock-wave pattern was unstable. Flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers indicated large local jumps in the pressure in the leading edge area, which generates large intermittent loading on the blade leading edge. These measurements suggest that for an inlet Mach number between 0.9 and 1.0 the flow is bi-stable, randomly switching between subsonic and supersonic flows. Hence, it appears that the change in overall flow conditions in the transonic region is based on the frequency of switching between two stable flow states rather than on the continuous increase of the flow velocity. To date, this flow behavior has only been observed in a linear transonic cascade. Further research is necessary to confirm this phenomenon occurs in actual transonic fans and is not the byproduct of an endwall restricted linear cascade.

  3. Structures in the Oscillatory regime of RLDCC flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchapakesan, Nagangudy

    2015-11-01

    Rotating lid driven cubical cavity flow (RLDCC flow) is studied with a view to test structure eduction algorithms. OpenFoam software was used to simulate the RLDCC flow at Reynolds numbers higher than the critical Reynolds number for this geometry. Vortex bubble and other characteristic structures were observed in these simulations. The vector fields of the simulations were further analyzed with LCS and other methodologies to educe the structures. The structures were compared with level sets of different dynamical variables. The ability of these algorithms to present a coherent representation of the time evolution and unsteady dynamics of the bubble and other structures is evaluated. Funded by AR&DB India.

  4. Intermittent flow regimes near the convection threshold in ferromagnetic nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauzina, Marina T.; Bozhko, Alexandra A.; Putin, Gennady F.; Suslov, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    The onset and decay of convection in a spherical cavity filled with ferromagnetic nanofluid and heated from below are investigated experimentally. It is found that, unlike in a single-component Newtonian fluid where stationary convection sets in as a result of supercritical bifurcation and where convection intensity increases continuously with the degree of supercriticality, convection in a multicomponent ferromagnetic nanofluid starts abruptly and has an oscillatory nature. The hysteresis is observed in the transition between conduction and convection states. In moderately supercritical regimes, the arising fluid motion observed at a fixed temperature difference intermittently transitions from quasiharmonic to essentially irregular oscillations that are followed by periods of a quasistationary convection. The observed oscillations are shown to result from the precession of the axis of a convection vortex in the equatorial plane. When the vertical temperature difference exceeds the convection onset value by a factor of 2.5, the initially oscillatory convection settles to a steady-state regime with no intermittent behavior detected afterward. The performed wavelet and Fourier analyses of thermocouple readings indicate the presence of various oscillatory modes with characteristic periods ranging from one hour to several days.

  5. Intermittent flow regimes near the convection threshold in ferromagnetic nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Krauzina, Marina T; Bozhko, Alexandra A; Putin, Gennady F; Suslov, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    The onset and decay of convection in a spherical cavity filled with ferromagnetic nanofluid and heated from below are investigated experimentally. It is found that, unlike in a single-component Newtonian fluid where stationary convection sets in as a result of supercritical bifurcation and where convection intensity increases continuously with the degree of supercriticality, convection in a multicomponent ferromagnetic nanofluid starts abruptly and has an oscillatory nature. The hysteresis is observed in the transition between conduction and convection states. In moderately supercritical regimes, the arising fluid motion observed at a fixed temperature difference intermittently transitions from quasiharmonic to essentially irregular oscillations that are followed by periods of a quasistationary convection. The observed oscillations are shown to result from the precession of the axis of a convection vortex in the equatorial plane. When the vertical temperature difference exceeds the convection onset value by a factor of 2.5, the initially oscillatory convection settles to a steady-state regime with no intermittent behavior detected afterward. The performed wavelet and Fourier analyses of thermocouple readings indicate the presence of various oscillatory modes with characteristic periods ranging from one hour to several days. PMID:25679711

  6. Lava Fountaining Discharge Regime driven by Slug-to-Churn Flow Transition. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripepe, M.; Pioli, L.; Marchetti, E.; Ulivieri, G.

    2013-12-01

    Lava fountaining episodes at Etna volcano appear characterized by the transition between Strombolian and Hawaiian end-member eruptive styles. There is no evidence for this transition in the seismic (i.e. seismic tremor) signal. However, infrasonic records provide unprecedented evidence on this flow transition. Each eruptive episode is characterized by distinctive common trend in the amplitude, waveform and frequency content of the infrasonic wavefield, which evidences the shift from discrete, and transient, strombolian to sustained, and oscillatory, lava fountain dynamics. Large scale experiments on the dynamics of two-phase flow of basaltic magmas show how the transition between different regimes mainly depends on gas volume flow, which in turn controls pressure distribution within the conduit and also magma vesicularity. In particular, while regular large bubble bursting is associated with slug flow regime, large amplitude and low frequency column oscillations are associated with churn flow. In large pipes, transition from slug to churn flow regime is independent on conduit diameter and it is reached at high superficial gas velocity. Lava fountaining episodes at Etna can be thus interpreted as induced by the transition from the slug (discrete strombolian) to churn flow (sustained lava fountain) regimes that is reflecting an increase in the gas discharge rate. Based on laboratory experiments, we calculate that transition between these two end-member explosive regimes at Etna occurs when gas superficial velocity is 76 m/s for near-the-vent stagnant magma conditions.

  7. Rheology of simple shear flows of dense granular assemblies in different regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chialvo, Sebastian; Sun, Jin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2010-11-01

    Using the discrete element method, simulations of simple shear flow of dense assemblies of frictional particles have been carried out over a range of shear rates and volume fractions in order to characterize the transition from quasistatic or inertial flow to intermediate flow. In agreement with previous results for frictionless spheres [1], the pressure and shear stress in the intermediate regime are found to approach asymptotic power law relations with shear rate; curiously, these asymptotes appear to be common to all intermediate flows regardless of the value of the particle friction coefficient. The scaling relations for stress for the inertial and quasistatic regimes are consistent with a recent extension of kinetic theory to dense inertial flows [2] and a simple model for quasistatic flows [3], respectively. For the case of steady, simple shear flow, the different regimes can be bridged readily: a harmonic weighting function blends the inertial regime to the intermediate asymptote, while a simple additive rule combines the quasistatic and intermediate regimes. [4pt] [1] T. Hatano, et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 76, 023001 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. Jenkins, and D. Berzi, Granular Matter 12, 151 (2010). [0pt] [3] J. Sun, and S. Sundaresan, J. Fluid Mech. (under review).

  8. Impurity flows and plateau-regime poloidal density variation in a tokamak pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Landreman, M.; Fueloep, T.; Guszejnov, D.

    2011-09-15

    In the pedestal of a tokamak, the sharp radial gradients of density and temperature can give rise to poloidal variation in the density of impurities. At the same time, the flow of the impurity species is modified relative to the conventional neoclassical result. In this paper, these changes to the density and flow of a collisional impurity species are calculated for the case when the main ions are in the plateau regime. In this regime, it is found that the impurity density can be higher at either the inboard or outboard side. This finding differs from earlier results for banana- or Pfirsch-Schlueter-regime main ions, in which case the impurity density is always higher at the inboard side in the absence of rotation. Finally, the modifications to the impurity flow are also given for the other regimes of main-ion collisionality.

  9. Statistical Analysis of Nitrogen in the Soil of Constructed Wetland with Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaszek, Anita; Wojciech, Magdalena

    2014-06-01

    The removal of nitrogen compounds in constructed wetlands depends on various physical, chemical and biomechanical factors as well as on conditions of the environment. The paper presents the results of a statistical analysis of the depositing of nitrogen at HSSF (horizontal subsurface flow) construcred wetland. The results of the substrate showed that the highest contents of nitrogen existed in the surface soil layer up to 20 cm of the depth. Nitrogen accumulation decreased in the deposit with depth, and in the direction of the wastewater flow.

  10. Velocity and temperature profiles in near-critical nitrogen flowing past a horizontal flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Boundary layer velocity and temperature profiles were measured for nitrogen near its thermodynamic critical point flowing past a horizontal flat plate. The results were compared measurements made for vertically upward flow. The boundary layer temperatures ranged from below to above the thermodynamic critical temperature. For wall temperatures below the thermodynamic critical temperature there was little variation between the velocity and temperature profiles in three orientations. In all three orientations the point of crossing into the critical temperature region is marked by a significant flattening of the velocity and temperature profiles and also a decrease in heat transfer coefficient.

  11. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  12. Laminar, turbulent, and inertial shear-thickening regimes in channel flow of neutrally buoyant particle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lashgari, Iman; Picano, Francesco; Breugem, Wim-Paul; Brandt, Luca

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this Letter is to characterize the flow regimes of suspensions of finite-size rigid particles in a viscous fluid at finite inertia. We explore the system behavior as a function of the particle volume fraction and the Reynolds number (the ratio of flow and particle inertia to viscous forces). Unlike single-phase flows, where a clear distinction exists between the laminar and the turbulent states, three different regimes can be identified in the presence of a particulate phase, with smooth transitions between them. At low volume fractions, the flow becomes turbulent when increasing the Reynolds number, transitioning from the laminar regime dominated by viscous forces to the turbulent regime characterized by enhanced momentum transport by turbulent eddies. At larger volume fractions, we identify a new regime characterized by an even larger increase of the wall friction. The wall friction increases with the Reynolds number (inertial effects) while the turbulent transport is weakly affected, as in a state of intense inertial shear thickening. This state may prevent the transition to a fully turbulent regime at arbitrary high speed of the flow. PMID:25554885

  13. Multiple Regimes of Flow, Stratification, and Turbulence in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, A. H.; Rees, T.

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that the atmospheric Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) can display distinct regimes of flow. In the weakly stable boundary layer, turbulence is weak but continuous and the surface flow is coupled to that aloft. In the very stable boundary layer, turbulence collapses and the surface flow becomes decoupled from the flow above.This study demonstrates the clear presence of two distinct SBL regimes in a long record of observations from the 213m tower in Cabauw, Netherlands. These regimes are found in the joint distribution of near-surface stratification, shear, and vertically-averaged wind speed. Hidden Markov model (HMM) analysis is used to distinguish these regimes and objectively classify states as being in one regime or the other. This classification allows for a detailed diagnosis of the flow, stratification, and turbulence structures within each of the two regimes, as well as their relation to large-scale forcing through the geostrophic wind and cloud cover. Observational evidence is presented that the very stable boundary layer is produced by a previously-discussed positive feedback associated with a maximum sustainable turbulent heat flux.

  14. Using regional flow classes as references to analyse flow regime anomalies across a set of regulated Canadian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Fraser; Lapointe, Michel; Bourque, Guillaume; Boisclair, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that a river's natural flow regime is a key determinant of ecological integrity and that dam regulated-flow releases can be detrimental to biotic communities and even affect river ecosystem structure (e.g. Poff and Zimmerman, 2010). Regional flow classes, groups of rivers that share similar natural flow regimes (called ‘river types' by Poff and Zimmerman (2010)) and to which regional fish communities are ‘adapted', have been proposed as units of analysis to identify significant damming related flow alteration (e.g. Poff, 1996; Poff and Zimmerman, 2010; McManamay et al., 2012a). Specifically, the natural range of flow behaviour within regional classes can be used to identify clearly anomalous flow features in rivers regulated by dams. Through ordination analysis on 70 ecologically important flow indices, we isolated five distinctive regional groupings of natural flow regimes among the 96 unregulated rivers located in study regions of South Eastern and South Western Canada, selected based on watershed characteristics as possible references for the 13 hydro-regulated, NSERC-HydroNet study rivers in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. The distinguishing characteristics of natural flow regimes within each flow class are explored through visualization in principal component space. The 16 regulated HydroNet sites were assigned to appropriate regional flow classes through discriminant function analysis based on shared geographic location and watershed characteristics. Anomalous flow features in the regulated rivers are then characterized by type and strength, based on identification of flow indices that are significantly different from observed natural variability in the relevant regional class. The magnitude distributions and the main axes of variability in index anomalies are analysed, across regions and regulation types (storage, peaking and run-of-the-river (RoR)). We also discuss the potential biological

  15. A new Spool Piece for horizontal two-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monni, G.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    This works presents the characterization of a Spool Piece (SP), made up of a Classical Venturi and a Wire Mesh Sensor (WMS), that are installed in a horizontal test section, in which an air-water mixture flows. The test section consists of a horizontal Plexiglas pipe of internal diameter 19.5 mm and total length of about 7 m. The flow quality ranges from 0 to 0.73 and the superficial velocity ranges from 0.14 to 32 m/s for air and from 0.019 to 2.62 m/s for water; the pressure ranges from atmospheric pressure to 4 bar depending on the experimental conditions. The observed flow patterns are stratified-bubbly-slug/plug-annular. The instruments response is analyzed and discussed. From the signal analysis the mass flow rate of each phase is obtained. The developed model allows the evaluation of the mass flow rate with an accuracy higher than 20% in the 84% of the cases and with an accuracy higher than 10% in the 73.3% of the cases. Finally the introduction of the estimated parameters in the SP model is considered and discussed.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Cavitating Flow of Liquid Helium inHorizontal Converging-Diverging Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Kamijo, Kenjiro

    The basic characteristics of the two-dimensional cavitating flow of liquid helium through a horizontal converging-diverging channel near the lambda point are numerically investigated to realize the further development and high performance of new multiphase superfluid cooling systems. First, the governing equations of the cavitating flow of liquid helium based on the unsteady thermal nonequilibrium multifluid model with generalized curvilinear coordinates system are presented, and several flow characteristics are numerically calculated, taking into account the effect of superfluidity. Based on the numerical results, the two-dimensional structure of the cavitating flow of liquid helium though horizontal converging-diverging channel is shown in detail, and it is also found that the generation of superfluid counterflow against normal fluid flow based on the thermo mechanical effect is conspicuous in the large gas phase volume fraction region where the liquid- to gas-phase change actively occurs. Furthermore, it is clarified that the mechanism of the He I to He II phase transition caused by the temperature decrease is due to the deprivation of latent heat for vaporization from the liquid phase.

  17. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis ["Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface," Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A2), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A2) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A2) and thus particle dispersion on O(A4). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  18. Multi-metric calibration of hydrological model to capture overall flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Shao, Quanxi; Zhang, Shifeng; Zhai, Xiaoyan; She, Dunxian

    2016-08-01

    Flow regimes (e.g., magnitude, frequency, variation, duration, timing and rating of change) play a critical role in water supply and flood control, environmental processes, as well as biodiversity and life history patterns in the aquatic ecosystem. The traditional flow magnitude-oriented calibration of hydrological model was usually inadequate to well capture all the characteristics of observed flow regimes. In this study, we simulated multiple flow regime metrics simultaneously by coupling a distributed hydrological model with an equally weighted multi-objective optimization algorithm. Two headwater watersheds in the arid Hexi Corridor were selected for the case study. Sixteen metrics were selected as optimization objectives, which could represent the major characteristics of flow regimes. Model performance was compared with that of the single objective calibration. Results showed that most metrics were better simulated by the multi-objective approach than those of the single objective calibration, especially the low and high flow magnitudes, frequency and variation, duration, maximum flow timing and rating. However, the model performance of middle flow magnitude was not significantly improved because this metric was usually well captured by single objective calibration. The timing of minimum flow was poorly predicted by both the multi-metric and single calibrations due to the uncertainties in model structure and input data. The sensitive parameter values of the hydrological model changed remarkably and the simulated hydrological processes by the multi-metric calibration became more reliable, because more flow characteristics were considered. The study is expected to provide more detailed flow information by hydrological simulation for the integrated water resources management, and to improve the simulation performances of overall flow regimes.

  19. Assessment of flow regime alterations over a spectrum of temporal scales using wavelet-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fu-Chun; Chang, Ching-Fu; Shiau, Jenq-Tzong

    2015-05-01

    The full range of natural flow regime is essential for sustaining the riverine ecosystems and biodiversity, yet there are still limited tools available for assessment of flow regime alterations over a spectrum of temporal scales. Wavelet analysis has proven useful for detecting hydrologic alterations at multiple scales via the wavelet power spectrum (WPS) series. The existing approach based on the global WPS (GWPS) ratio tends to be dominated by the rare high-power flows so that alterations of the more frequent low-power flows are often underrepresented. We devise a new approach based on individual deviations between WPS (DWPS) that are root-mean-squared to yield the global DWPS (GDWPS). We test these two approaches on the three reaches of the Feitsui Reservoir system (Taiwan) that are subjected to different classes of anthropogenic interventions. The GDWPS reveal unique features that are not detected with the GWPS ratios. We also segregate the effects of individual subflow components on the overall flow regime alterations using the subflow GDWPS. The results show that the daily hydropeaking waves below the reservoir not only intensified the flow oscillations at daily scale but most significantly eliminated subweekly flow variability. Alterations of flow regime were most severe below the diversion weir, where the residual hydropeaking resulted in a maximum impact at daily scale while the postdiversion null flows led to large hydrologic alterations over submonthly scales. The smallest impacts below the confluence reveal that the hydrologic alterations at scales longer than 2 days were substantially mitigated with the joining of the unregulated tributary flows, whereas the daily-scale hydrologic alteration was retained because of the hydropeaking inherited from the reservoir releases. The proposed DWPS approach unravels for the first time the details of flow regime alterations at these intermediate scales that are overridden by the low-frequency high-power flows when

  20. The effect of evaporator operating parameters on the flow patterns inside horizontal pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Lige; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Li; Sun, Xinxing; Xie, Yunfei

    2011-08-01

    A general and simple model for simulating the steady state behaviors of air-to-refrigerant fin-and-tube evaporator is introduced with the focus on the detailed flow patterns inside the tubes. In order to simulate the heat transfer between air and the working fluid, the evaporator is divided into a number of control volumes. Empirical correlations from literature were also adopted to estimate the void fraction, the internal and external heat transfer coefficients, and the pressure drops. Simulations were performed to study the effects of varying inlet air temperature, refrigerant mass flow rate and evaporation pressure on the flow patterns inside the horizontal pipe of the evaporator. The simulation results indicate that the proposed model can be used to predict flow patterns well. The predicted results of the model agree well with experimental results, the difference is within ±3% for the cooling capacity, and is within ±0.2% for refrigerant evaporation temperature.

  1. Effects of inclination and vorticity on interfacial flow dynamics in horizontal and inclined pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiara, Areti; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming

    2015-11-01

    The transport of oil and gas in long horizontal pipelines can be significantly affected by the development of violent roll waves and slugs, but the mechanics causing such transitions have not been well understood. To enable the improvement of the prediction of flow transition criteria in long pipelines we perform theoretical analysis and direct numerical simulations of multiphase pipe flows to quantify the roles of inclination and vorticity in the flow dynamics. We find that backflow or flooding may occur even in the absence of disturbances due to inclination effects and obtain criteria on the maximum pipe length for steady flows. We identify and compare the effects of inclination and vorticity on the stability of interfacial wave disturbances. We discuss the mechanisms of non-linear energy transfer between stable and unstable wave disturbances and present results from direct numerical simulations for the predictions of spectrum evolutions for broad-banded interfacial disturbances in inclined pipes.

  2. Infrared imaging and tufts studies of boundary layer flow regimes on a NACA 0012 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartenberg, Ehud; Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.; Mcree, Griffith J.

    1989-01-01

    A study of boundary-layer flow regimes on a NACA 0012 airfoil from zero angle of attack up to separation is presented. The boundary-layer transition from the laminar to the turbulent regime and the onset of the separation were detected by surface thermography of the airfoil performed with an infrared imaging system. The findings were compared with observations of aluminum-foil tufts visible with the infrared imaging system. This arrangement allows the infrared imaging system to assume the dual role of flow regime detection through surface thermography and flow visualization through the observation of the aluminum-foil tufts. Ultimately the temperature history on an uncontaminated surface could provide an interpretation of the state of boundary-layer flow. Separation studies performed on the NACA 0012 airfoil showed that aluminum foil tufts can be observed with infrared imaging systems.

  3. Ontogenetic propulsive transitions from viscous to inertial flow regimes in the medusae Sarsia tubulosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katija, Kakani; Jiang, Houshuo; Colin, Sean; Costello, John

    2012-11-01

    Among marine organisms, the influences of flow regimes on swimming strategies are largely unknown. As an approach to examine this issue, we quantified how transitions from viscous to inertially dominated flow regimes, which commonly occur during the development of marine animals, relate to changes in swimming strategies. We used the hydromedusae Sarsia tubulosa as a model organism for this investigation because its morphology and propulsive actuation mechanism are radially symmetric. This feature allows for determination of three-dimensional fluid quantities from two-dimensional flow measurement techniques. Digital particle image velocimetry was used to quantify the flow fields created by free-swimming hydromedusae and calculate the impulse generated by their swimming pulses at different life stages. Swimming strategies were evaluated by quantifying the relationship between impulse production and hydrodynamic swimming efficiency. Utilizing these metrics enable us to generalize our findings to the swimming strategies of other aquatic animals that swim in similar fluid regimes.

  4. Reconstruction of a constructed wetland with horizontal subsurface flow after 18 years of operation.

    PubMed

    Hudcová, Tereza; Vymazal, Jan; Dunajský, Michal Kriška

    2013-01-01

    The constructed wetland (CW) for 326 PE with horizontal subsurface flow at Kotenčice, Central Bohemia, Czech Republic, was built in 1994. Despite the relatively high efficiency of the CW, the filtration beds suffered from clogging, and therefore it was decided in 2011 to rebuild the whole system. The new treatment system was built as an experimental system consisting of four different combinations of horizontal and vertical beds. The major aim of the design was to determine the best hybrid combination which then could be used in the future for refurbishment of older horizontal flow CWs or for the new systems. The mechanical pretreatment consists of mechanical bar screens, a new Imhoff tank, and the original settling tank which has been converted into the accumulation tank from where the wastewater is pumped into the wetlands. The filters are planted with Phragmites australis, Phalaris arundinacea, Iris pseudacorus, Iris sibirica, Glyceria maxima and Lythrum salicaria in order to evaluate and compare various plant species' effect on the treatment process. The new technology includes a tertiary treatment which consists of a greenhouse with a photo-reactor for the cultivation of algae and hydroponic systems (residual nutrients removal), sludge reed-beds and a composting field. PMID:24037174

  5. DETECTION OF THE HORIZONTAL DIVERGENT FLOW PRIOR TO THE SOLAR FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Hayashi, K.

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that solar active regions including sunspots are formed by the emerging magnetic flux from the deep convection zone. In previous numerical simulations, we found that the horizontal divergent flow (HDF) occurs before the flux emergence at the photospheric height. This paper reports the HDF detection prior to the flux emergence of NOAA AR 11081, which is located away from the disk center. We use SDO/HMI data to study the temporal changes of the Doppler and magnetic patterns from those of the reference quiet Sun. As a result, the HDF appearance is found to come before the flux emergence by about 100 minutes. Also, the horizontal speed of the HDF during this time gap is estimated to be 0.6-1.5 km s{sup -1}, up to 2.3 km s{sup -1}. The HDF is caused by the plasma escaping horizontally from the rising magnetic flux. And the interval between the HDF and the flux emergence may reflect the latency during which the magnetic flux beneath the solar surface is waiting for the instability onset to the further emergence. Moreover, SMART H{alpha} images show that the chromospheric plages appear about 14 minutes later, located cospatial with the photospheric pores. This indicates that the plages are caused by plasma flowing down along the magnetic fields that connect the pores at their footpoints. One important result of observing the HDF may be the possibility of predicting the sunspot appearances that occur in several hours.

  6. Determination of flow-regime boundaries for cohesive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, T. M.; Findlay, J. G.; Arastoopour, H.; Gidaspow, D.

    1992-10-01

    Cohesive particles (Geldart Group C powders) are fine particles generally less than 30 microns in size. Interparticle forces are large relative to inertial forces in these particles, and cause clumping, sticking, and channeling when attempts are made to fluidize them. These solids do not flow easily through pipes, and bridge extremely easily. The objectives of the work in this program were (1) to develop a hydrodynamic model which can be applied to cohesive solids, and (2) to obtain data in a large-scale (30-cm-diameter) riser to test the model. The work was divided into six tasks: Task 1. Preparation of a Project Work Plan; Task 2. Hydrodynamic Model Development; Task 3. Determination of Rheological Properties for Incorporation into the Model; Task 4. Small-Scale Flow Tests; Task 5. Large-Scale Flow Tests; and Task 6. Comparison of Model With Data. The work was conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) in collaboration with the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). This work combined the expertise of IIT in model development, with the large-scale experimental capabilities of IGT. IIT researchers developed the hydrodynamic model in the program, while the large-scale data were generated by IGT. Following the preparation of the Project Work Plan in Task 1, work was started on the development of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model to enable the behavior of cohesive solids in a dilute-phase riser to be simulated. In Task 2, two hydrodynamic models were developed based on the kinetic theory model of granular flow. The models were used to predict data presented in the literature, as well as data generated in Task 5 of this study. In Task 3, rheological data on cohesive oil shale with an average particle size of approximately 12 microns was obtained using a unique device called a cohetester.

  7. Modelling the effects of horizontal and vertical shear in stratified turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umlauf, Lars

    2005-05-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) and model results from a number of one-point turbulence models are compared for homogeneous, stably stratified flows. Because of their wide spread use in numerical ocean modelling, only explicit algebraic second-moment models are investigated. Considered are two types of shear flows with either purely vertical or purely horizontal shear. The dissipation rate is evaluated from the observation that the shear-number becomes independent of stratification for low to moderate Richardson numbers as soon as the flow approaches self-similarity. For the cases with vertical shear, it is found that all statistical models essentially reproduced the DNS results, though with different accuracy. In contrast, only the most recent model was able to predict the salient features of horizontally sheared flows, i.e. a steady-state Richardson number that is about an order of magnitude larger and a vertical mixing efficiency that is about twice as large compared to the case with vertical shear. This model also reproduced other key parameters like the turbulent Froude number and the turbulent Prandtl number with good accuracy, but it failed to predict quantitatively the reduction of the shear anisotropy with increasing stratification. For strong stratification, none of the models was able to describe the rapid decrease of the mixing efficiency associated with the collapse and fossilisation of turbulence.

  8. Effect of Drag Reducing Polymers on Stratified and Stratified/Annular Flow in a Horizontal Duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernica, Patricia; Fleck, Brian; Heidrick, Ted

    2006-11-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the effects of a drag reducing additive (DRA) on two phase flow in horizontal stratified and stratified/annular flow patterns. Experiments were conducted in an air-water flow in a transparent rectangular channel of cross-section 25.4 mm x 50.8 mm and 2.5 m in length. Pressure drop measurements, wave characteristics and observations of entrainment with and without DRA are presented. A non-contact measurement technique using laser induced fluorescence and high speed videography was used to measure span-wise liquid wave heights and to characterize the air-water interface. Pressure drop was measured at the centerline of the duct over a one meter distance. The onset of entrainment was observed visually. Effects of DRA were observed even at a low concentration of 5ppm. This concentration yielded pressure drop reductions of 10-15% which correlate with previous experiments done in horizontal pipelines. Observations also show dampening of roll waves and the suppression of atomization. Al-Sarkhi, A., Hanratty, T.J., Int J. Multiphase Flow, 27, 1151 (2001)

  9. Characterization of horizontal flows around solar pores from high-resolution time series of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Domínguez, S.; de Vicente, A.; Bonet, J. A.; Martínez Pillet, V.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Though there is increasing evidence linking the moat flow and the Evershed flow along the penumbral filaments, there is not a clear consensus regarding the existence of a moat flow around umbral cores and pores, and the debate is still open. Solar pores appear to be a suitable scenario to test the moat-penumbra relation as they correspond to a direct interaction between the umbra and the convective plasma in the surrounding photosphere without any intermediate structure in between. Aims: We study solar pores based on high-resolution ground-based and satellite observations. Methods: Local correlation tracking techniques were applied to different-duration time series to analyze the horizontal flows around several solar pores. Results: Our results establish that the flows calculated from different solar pore observations are coherent among each other and show the determining and overall influence of exploding events in the granulation around the pores. We do not find any sign of moat-like flows surrounding solar pores, but a clearly defined region of inflows surrounding them. Conclusions: The connection between moat flows and flows associated to penumbral filaments is hereby reinforced.

  10. Characterization of Horizontal Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow Using Markov Model-Based Complex Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Dan; Jin, Ning-De; Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2013-05-01

    Horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow widely exists in many physical systems and chemical engineering processes. Compared with vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow, investigations on dynamic behavior underlying horizontal gas-liquid flows are quite limited. Complex network provides a powerful framework for time series analysis of complex dynamical systems. We use a network generation method based on Markov transition probability to infer directed weighted complex networks from signals measured from horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow experiment and find that the networks corresponding to different flow patterns exhibit different network structure. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of horizontal gas-liquid flows, we construct a number of complex networks under different flow conditions, and explore the network indices for each constructed network. In addition, we investigate the sample entropy of different flow patterns. Our results suggest that the network statistic can well represent the complexity in the transition among different flow patterns and further allows characterizing the interface fluctuation behavior in horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow.

  11. Flow regimes of adiabatic gas-liquid two-phase under rolling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chaoxing; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Licheng; Xing, Dianchuan; Wang, Yang; Tian, Daogui

    2013-07-01

    Characteristics of adiabatic air/water two-phase flow regimes under vertical and rolling motion conditions were investigated experimentally. Test sections are two rectangular ducts with the gaps of 1.41 and 10 mm, respectively, and a circular tube with 25 mm diameter. Flow regimes were recorded by a high speed CCD-camera and were identified by examining the video images. The experimental results indicate that the characteristics of flow patterns in 10 mm wide rectangular duct under vertical condition are very similar to those in circular tube, but different from the 1.41 mm wide rectangular duct. Channel size has a significant influence on flow pattern transition, boundary of which in rectangular channels tends asymptotically towards that in the circular tube with increasing the width of narrow side. Flow patterns in rolling channels are similar to each other, nevertheless, the effect of rolling motion on flow pattern transition are significantly various. Due to the remarkable influences of the friction shear stress and surface tension in the narrow gap duct, detailed flow pattern maps of which under vertical and rolling conditions are indistinguishable. While for the circular tube with 25 mm diameter, the transition from bubbly to slug flow occurs at a higher superficial liquid velocity and the churn flow covers more area on the flow regime map as the rolling period decreases.

  12. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients under the influence of SDS surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Duangprasert, Tanabordee; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2008-01-15

    Two-phase gas/liquid flows in vertical pipes have been systematically investigated. Water and SDS surfactant solutions at various concentrations were used as the working fluids. In particular, we focus our work on the influence of surfactant addition on the flow regimes, the corresponding pressure gradients, and the bubble sizes and velocity. Adding the surfactant lowers the air critical Reynolds numbers for the bubble-slug flow and the slug flow transitions. The pressure gradients of SDS solutions are lower than those of pure water especially in the slug flow and the slug-churn flow regimes, implying turbulent drag reduction. At low Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the surfactant solution are lower than those of pure water due to the increase in viscosity. With increasing and at high Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the SDS solution become greater than those of pure water which is attributed to the effect of surface tension. (author)

  13. Hydrodynamic flow regimes, gas holdup, and liquid circulation in airlift reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Abashar, M.E.; Narsingh, U.; Rouillard, A.E.; Judd, R.

    1998-04-01

    This study reports an experimental investigation into the hydrodynamic behavior of an external-loop airlift reactor (ALR) for the air-water system. Three distinct flow regimes are identified--namely homogeneous, transition, and heterogeneous regimes. The transition between homogeneous and heterogeneous flow is observed to occur over a wide range rather than being merely a single point as has been previously reported in the literature. A gas holdup correlation is developed for each flow regime. The correlations fit the experimental gas holdup data with very good accuracy (within {+-}5%). It would appear, therefore, that a deterministic equation to describe each flow regime is likely to exist in ALRs. This equation is a function of the reactor geometry and the system`s physical properties. New data concerning the axial variation of gas holdup is reported in which a minimum value is observed. This phenomenon is discussed and an explanation offered. Discrimination between two sound theoretical models--namely model 1 (Chisti et al., 1988) and model 2 (Garcia Calvo, 1989)--shows that model 1 predicts satisfactorily the liquid circulation velocity with an error of less than {+-} 10%. The good predictive features of model 1 may be due to the fact that it allows for a significant energy dissipation by wakes behind bubbles. Model 1 is now further improved by the new gas holdup correlations which are derived for the three different flow regimes.

  14. Laboratory Validation of Passive Flow Focusing of Horizontal Wells for in Situ Groundwater Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMarco, A.; Crimi, M.; Holsen, T.; Bellona, C.; Kumarage, P.; Divine, C.; O'Fallon, T.

    2014-12-01

    A new concept for in situgroundwater remediation was recently developed where drilled horizontal wells filled with granular treatment media are installed in the direction of groundwater flow. Due to the differences in hydraulic conductivity (K) of the media in the well and the surrounding aquifer, groundwater is "focused" into the well and treated (Figure 1). Initial computer simulations demonstrate that the horizontal well will have a substantial capture zone making this a viable and appealing remediation strategy. In this work, a laboratory scale model was constructed to validate the computer simulations and determine the expected capture zone of a horizontal well under a range of hydraulic conductivity differentials. We have built a physical model to replicate a horizontal well in a confined aquifer. The model is constructed inside a 55-gallon drum packed with sand and water is pumped into the bottom of the drum and flows upward through the system. Within the aquifer, we installed a 1" screened well packed with lime-soda beads. To define the capture zone, we placed manometers in the aquifer. Finally, a constant head is applied to the system (Figure 2 and 3). Initial tests have shown that the 1" well with a hydraulic conductivity 65 times greater than the surrounding aquifer (kwell= 1.3 cm/sec vs. kaquifer= 0.02cm/sec) will capture a significant percentage (over 80% in some configurations) of the water applied to the system. A tracer test has shown that the water velocity in the well is substantially higher than the aquifer. Manometer readings confirm the flowfield effects of the well and these data are being used to calibrate numerical models. The presentation will focus on the observed behavior of the physical model under varying applied head and hydraulic conductivities and discuss the potential design implications for full-scale application.

  15. Economic interpretation of environmental flow regime downstream diverted river reaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, Lorenzo; Perona, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Water demand for hydropower production is increasing together with the consciousness of the importance of riparian ecosystems and biodiversity. Some Cantons in Switzerland and other alpine regions in Austria and in Sud Tirol (Italy) started replacing the inadequate concept of Minimum Flow Requirement (MFR) with a dynamic one, by releasing a fix percentage of the total inflow (e.g. 25 %) to the environment. In the same direction Perona et al. (in revision) mathematically formulated a method particularly suitable for small hydropower plants, handling the environment as a non-traditional water use, which competes with exploitators. This model uses the Principle of Equal Marginal Utility (PEMU) as optimal water allocation rule for generating like-natural flow releases while maximizing the aggregate economic benefit of all uses (Gorla and Perona, in revision). In this paper we show how redistribution policies can be interpreted in terms of PEMU, particularly we focus at traditional water repartition rules, such as the MFR, but also to dynamic ones like proportional redistribution. For the first case we show both ecological and economical arguments suggesting its inappropriateness; in the second case we highlight explicit points of strength and weakness, and suggest ways of improvement. For example the flow release allocation rule can be changed from inflow-independent ones (e.g., proportional redistribution), to inflow-dependent ones (e.g., non-proportional). The latters, having fewer constraints, can generally lead to better both ecological and economical performances. A class of simple functions, based on the PEMU, is then proposed as a suitable solution in run-of-river or small hydropower plants. Each water repartition policy underlies an ecosystem monetization. We explicit the value of the ecosystem health underlying each policy by means of the PEMU under a few assumptions, and discuss how the theoretic efficient redistribution law obtained by our approach is

  16. Assessment of land use and water management induced changes in flow regime of the Upper Narew

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, Renata J.; Osuch, Marzena

    Previous studies have shown that it is very difficult to distinguish human-induced changes from those caused by natural forcing. In this paper we try to quantify the influence of land use and water management on flows of the Upper Narew River in north-east Poland. Apart from climatic and land use changes, the Upper Narew catchment was changed by the construction of a storage reservoir at Siemianówka, near Bondary, on the upstream reach of the river. We apply four different approaches to analysing the changes in flow regime and catchment response for the periods before and after reservoir construction. First we estimate the cumulative distribution functions for low and high flow events. The second approach is a time series analysis of flow variation over the whole length of available data and the derivation of cumulative distribution functions for the flows and 0.25-0.75 quantiles followed by a statistical analysis of the number of events below and above the thresholds and their duration. The third approach consists of the application of the Wittenberg baseflow separation method and tests for changes in baseflow indices. In the fourth approach an analysis of changes in flow regime is performed by studying the changes in transfer function-based flow model parameters. Long-term changes in land use are assessed using previous studies of the catchment and the analysis of Corine land cover data and government yearbooks. The results show that different methods explain different aspects of changes in the catchment and flow regime due to climatic changes and changes in land use and water management practices. The analysis of cumulative distribution functions gave evidence of the influence of Siemianówka reservoir on low flows which was also confirmed by the low flow analysis using the Wittenberg approach. The STF analysis of flows indicates the existence of changes in flow regime that can be attributed to the roughness changes in the channel.

  17. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governing equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.

  18. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governingmore » equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.« less

  19. Obseration of flow regime transition in CFB riser using an LDV

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Paul C.; Mei, Joseph S.; Shadle, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    The solids flow in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser is often described to have a core-annular structure. For a given superficial gas velocity, at the initial introduction of solids into a riser a flow structure of dilute upflow regime exists. Continuing to increase the solids flow in the riser transitions the flow structure to the core-annular flow regime. However, with further increase of solids flow a condition is reached, depending on the superficial gas velocity, where all the solids across the riser cross section flow upwards, even those at the wall. When the solids flux, solids fraction and gas velocity are relatively high, such a condition is described as the dense phase suspense upflow (DSU) regime. In this paper we report our observations of these flow regime transitions by using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) to monitor the upward and downward particle flow velocities at and near the riser wall of the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s 30.4 centimeters diameter CFB cold flow model. The particles were high density polyethylene (PPE) spheres with a Sauter mean diameter of 861 micron and a density of 800 kg/m3. Three superficial gas velocities of 6.55 m/s, 10.67 m/s and 13.72 m/s were used in this study. For the case of superficial gas velocity 6.55 m/s, the experimental data show that the transition from dilute upflow to core-annular flow occurred when the solids flux was about 7 kg/m{sup 2}-s and the transition from core-annular flow to dense suspension upflow was about 147 kg/m{sup 2}-s. As the superficial gas velocity was increased to 10.67 m/s the corresponding flow regime transitions were at 34 kg/m{sup 2}-s and 205 kg/m{sup 2}-s, respectively. For the case of superficial gas velocity of 13.72 m/s the data showed no distinct transition of flow regimes. The particles were all upflow for the range of solids fluxes from 10 kg/m{sup 2}-s to 286 kg/m{sup 2}-s.

  20. Simulation of Flow Regimes to Reduce Habitat for T. tubifex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Whirling disease has had a significant impact on trout fisheries of the American west by reducing the numbers and quality of rainbow trout in infected streams. A critical factor in the life cycle of the whirling disease parasite is the fine sediment that provides the optimum habitat for Tubifex tubifex, an oligochaete worm that acts as an intermediate host for the disease. This report presents a model for the simulation of flushing flows required to remove undesirable fines and sand from a pool. Undesirable fines may also need to be flushed from runs, the surface layer, and backwater areas. Well-defined links of specific particle sizes to oligochaete worm abundance is needed to justify the use of flushing flows to move sediment. An analytical method for estimating the streamflows needed to remove the fine sediment is demonstrated herein. The overall steps to follow in removing fines from a stream are: Step 1. Determine size of the sediment that is the habitat for oligochaete worms. Step 2. Determine location of the sediment that is the habitat for oligochaete worms. Step 3. Determine streamflows needed to flush (remove) the sediment that is the habitat for oligochaete worms. The case study approach is used to present the method and to demonstrate its application. The case is derived from the sediment and oligochaete worm habitat of Willow Creek, a tributary of the Upper Colorado River located in Grand County, Colo. Willow Creek Reservoir (an element of the Colorado-Big Thompson Project) controls the streamflows of the creek and is just above the study site.

  1. A nonlinear flow-transition criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal channels and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bryce K.; Liu, Yuming

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the interfacial instability and transition of a two-fluid flow from a stratified state to large amplitude waves or slugs is considered. By combining an asymptotic approximation of the linear Orr-Sommerfeld analysis with nonlinear resonant wave interaction theory, a novel nonlinear slug-transition criterion is derived. This criterion corresponds to a bounding condition on the upper fluid's velocity in order to limit the amount of energy (provided by the linear instability) which is transferred to long waves through resonant wave interactions. It is proposed that such a condition can predict the formation of large-amplitude long waves and/or slugs. Quantitative comparisons of the onset of slugging are made between the prediction by the nonlinear transition criterion and the experimental measurements carried out in a horizontal square channel. Good agreement is observed. An additional heuristic model is developed which generalizes the transition criterion to flow through horizontal pipes. Comparisons are made for flows through different pipe diameters and over a wide range of fluid properties. Good agreement between the present theoretical predictions and the experimental measurements is also observed.

  2. Flow Regimes of Air-Water Counterflow Through Cross Corrugated Parallel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, V.F.

    2000-06-07

    Heretofore unknown flow regimes of air-water counterflow through a pair of transparent vertical parallel cross corrugated plates were observed via high-speed video. Air flows upward driven by pressure gradient and water, downward driven by gravity. The crimp geometry of the corrugations was drawn from typical corrugated sheets used as filling material in modern structured packed towers. Four regimes were featured, namely, rivulet, bicontinuous, flooding fronts, and flooding waves. It is conceivable that the regimes observed might constitute the basis for understanding how gas and liquid phases contend for available space in the interstices of structured packings in packed towers. Flow regime transitions were expressed in terms of liquid load (liquid superficial velocity) and gas flow factor parameters commonly used in pressure drop and capacity curves. We have carefully examined the range of parameters equivalent to the ill-understood high-liquid-flow operation in packed towers. More importantly, our findings should prove valuable in validating improved first-principles modeling of gas-liquid flows in these industrially important devices.

  3. Flow regime patterns and their controlling factors in the Ebro basin (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano, M. Dolores; Marchamalo, Miguel; García de Jalón, Diego; González del Tánago, Marta

    2010-05-01

    SummaryNatural intra-annual flow fluctuations vary between rivers, being a determining factor for aquatic insects, fish and riparian communities which are adapted to the habitat conditions and different flows throughout the seasons. Moreover, restoration of seasonal flow patterns plays an important role in achieving good ecological status of rivers, through the preservation and/or recovery of components and processes of natural river ecosystems. In this work we: (a) classify fluvial segments in the Ebro basin (North-Eastern Spain) according to the intra-annual variability of flows under natural conditions using statistical cluster analysis of monthly mean flow data; (b) characterise the resulting flow typologies according to several ecologically important hydrological variables; (c) analyse the relationships between flow regimes of fluvial segments and physical variables from their catchments; and finally (d) predict the most probable natural flow regime using logistic models based on the most determinant physical characteristics. Fifteen natural flow typologies were described in the Ebro basin, which were characterised in terms of flow fluctuation through the year as well as timing, flow ratio and duration of the maximum and minimum flows. Precipitation, biogeography and geology of catchments showed the highest correlations with flow regimes. Basin size, mean elevation and slope were also correlated. The logistic model we developed had a prediction success of 72% in the Ebro basin. The definition of the natural hydrological conditions (to which the biological communities are tailored), even when flow data are not available, is an important support in the management of river ecosystems. It is especially suitable for setting goals in aquatic ecosystem conservation or restoration projects.

  4. Flow regime analysis for fluid injection into a confined aquifer: implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Zheng, Z.; Celia, M. A.; Stone, H.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide injection into a confined saline aquifer may be modeled as an axisymmetric two-phase flow problem. Assuming the two fluids segregate in the vertical direction due to strong buoyancy, and neglecting capillary pressure and miscibility, the lubrication approximation leads to a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors in the system are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of the displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ , the gravity number, which represents the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. Four different analytical solutions can be derived as the asymptotic approximations, representing specific values of the parameter pairs. The four solutions correspond to: (1) Γ << 1, M <1; (2) Γ << 1, M =1; (3) Γ << 1, M >1; and (4) Γ >> 1, any M values. The first two of these solutions are new, while the third corresponds to the solution of Nordbotten and Celia (2006) for confined injections and the fourth corresponds to the solution of (Lyle et al., 2005) for gravity currents in an unconfined aquifer. Overall, the various axisymmetric flows can be summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime (Fig. 1). Data from a number of CO2 injection sites around the world can be used to compute the two dimensionless groups Γ and M associated with each injection. When plotted on the regime diagram, these values show the flow behavior for each injection and how the values vary from site to site. For all the CO2 injections, M is always larger than 1, while Γ can range from 0.01 up to 100. The pairs of (Γ, M) with lower Γ values correspond to solution (3), while the ones with higher Γ values can move up to the intermediate regime and the flow regime for solution (4). The higher values of Γ correspond to pilot-scale injections with low

  5. Melting of ice stuck on cylinders placed horizontally in a water flowing duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Beer, H.

    2016-04-01

    Melting of ice stuck on seven in-lined cooling cylinders placed horizontally in a water flowing duct is investigated by means of a numerical analysis on the PHOENICS Code. The numerical results are validated compared with the experiment of an ice sphere melting. Parameters for calculations are inlet temperature, inlet velocity and clearance between the cylinders. The most concern of the melting is a finding of a curious behavior that is the melting in small inlet velocity on the long clearance between the cylinders.

  6. Flow of a binary mixture of linearly incompressible viscous fluids between two horizontal parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we use the classical Mixture Theory and present exact solutions to the equations of motion for the steady flow of two linearly viscous fluids between two horizontal plates. We show that for a saturated mixture and under very special conditions, namely when the body forces are assumed negligible, the only interaction force is due to relative velocity (drag force), and if the two velocities are assumed to be related to each other in a linear fashion, then it is possible to integrate the coupled ordinary differential equations and obtain analytical expressions for the velocities and the volume fraction.

  7. Flow of a binary mixture of linearly incompressible viscous fluids between two horizontal parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we use the classical Mixture Theory and present exact solutions to the equations of motion for the steady flow of two linearly viscous fluids between two horizontal plates. We show that for a saturated mixture and under very special conditions, namely when the body forces are assumed negligible, the only interaction force is due to relative velocity (drag force), and if the two velocities are assumed to be related to each other in a linear fashion, then it is possible to integrate the coupled ordinary differential equations and obtain analytical expressions for the velocities and the volume fraction.

  8. Stokes flow between eccentric rotating spheres with slip regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltas, M. S.; Saad, E. I.

    2012-10-01

    The steady axisymmetric flow problem of a viscous fluid contained between two eccentric spheres that rotate about an axis joining their centers with different angular velocities is considered. A linear slip of Basset-type boundary condition at both surfaces of the spherical particle and the container is used. Under the Stokesian assumption, a general solution is constructed from the superposition of basic solutions in the spherical coordinate systems based on the inner solid particle and the spherical container. The boundary conditions on the particle's surface and spherical container are satisfied by a collocation technique. Numerical results for the coupling coefficient acting on the particle are obtained with good convergence for various values of the ratio of particle-to-container radii, the relative distance between the centers of the particle and container, the slip coefficients and the relative angular velocity. In the limiting cases, the numerical values of the coupling coefficient for the solid sphere in concentric position with the container and when the particle is near the inner surface of the container are obtained, and the results are in good agreement with the available values in the literature. The variation of the coupling coefficient with respect the parameters considered are tabulated and displayed graphically.

  9. Modeling flow into horizontal wells in a Dupuit-Forchheimer model.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, Henk; Kuzin, Sergey; Kelson, Vic; Abrams, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Horizontal wells or radial collector wells are used in shallow aquifers to enhance water withdrawal rates. Groundwater flow patterns near these wells are three-dimensional (3D), but difficult to represent in a 3D numerical model because of the high degree of grid refinement needed. However, for the purpose of designing water withdrawal systems, it is sufficient to obtain the correct production rate of these wells for a given drawdown. We developed a Cauchy boundary condition along a horizontal well in a Dupuit-Forchheimer model. Such a steady-state 2D model is not only useful for predicting groundwater withdrawal rates but also for capture zone delineation in the context of source water protection. A comparison of our Dupuit-Forchheimer model for a radial collector well with a 3D model yields a nearly exact production rate. Particular attention is given to horizontal wells that extend underneath a river. A comparison of our approach with a 3D solution for this case yields satisfactory results, at least for moderate-to-large river bottom resistances. PMID:20331744

  10. EFFECT OF HORIZONTALLY INHOMOGENEOUS HEATING ON FLOW AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE CHROMOSPHERE OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P.; Vasyliūnas, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar chromosphere is heated by damped Alfvén waves propagating upward from the photosphere at a rate that depends on magnetic field strength, producing enhanced heating at low altitudes in the extended weak-field regions (where the additional heating accounts for the radiative losses) between the boundaries of the chromospheric network as well as enhanced heating per particle at higher altitudes in strong magnetic field regions of the network. The resulting inhomogeneous radiation and temperature distribution produces bulk flows, which in turn affect the configuration of the magnetic field. The basic flow pattern is circulation on the spatial scale of a supergranule, with upward flow in the strong-field region; this is a mirror image in the upper chromosphere of photospheric/subphotospheric convection widely associated with the formation of the strong network field. There are significant differences between the neutral and the ionized components of the weakly ionized medium: neutral flow streamlines can form closed cells, whereas plasma is largely constrained to flow along the magnetic field. Stresses associated with this differential flow may explain why the canopy/funnel structures of the network magnetic field have a greater horizontal extent and are relatively more homogeneous at high altitudes than is expected from simple current-free models.

  11. Effect of Horizontally Inhomogeneous Heating on Flow and Magnetic Field in the Chromosphere of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Vasyliūnas, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar chromosphere is heated by damped Alfvén waves propagating upward from the photosphere at a rate that depends on magnetic field strength, producing enhanced heating at low altitudes in the extended weak-field regions (where the additional heating accounts for the radiative losses) between the boundaries of the chromospheric network as well as enhanced heating per particle at higher altitudes in strong magnetic field regions of the network. The resulting inhomogeneous radiation and temperature distribution produces bulk flows, which in turn affect the configuration of the magnetic field. The basic flow pattern is circulation on the spatial scale of a supergranule, with upward flow in the strong-field region; this is a mirror image in the upper chromosphere of photospheric/subphotospheric convection widely associated with the formation of the strong network field. There are significant differences between the neutral and the ionized components of the weakly ionized medium: neutral flow streamlines can form closed cells, whereas plasma is largely constrained to flow along the magnetic field. Stresses associated with this differential flow may explain why the canopy/funnel structures of the network magnetic field have a greater horizontal extent and are relatively more homogeneous at high altitudes than is expected from simple current-free models.

  12. Prediction of gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jinho; Platt, Jonathan A.

    1993-01-01

    An attempt is made to predict gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in a pipe in a microgravity environment through scaling analysis based on dominant physical mechanisms. Simple inlet geometry is adopted in the analysis to see the effect of inlet configuration on flow regime transitions. Comparison of the prediction with the existing experimental data shows good agreement, though more work is required to better define some physical parameters. The analysis clarifies much of the physics involved in this problem and can be applied to other configurations.

  13. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation for pressure driven microscale gas flows in transition regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiang-Ji; Wu, Ze-Huan; Ba, Yao-Shuai; Lu, Yan-Jun; Zhu, Zhi-Peng; Ba, De-Chun

    2015-09-01

    This paper carries out numerical simulation for pressure driven microscale gas flows in transition flow regime. The relaxation time of LBM model was modified with the application of near wall effective mean free path combined with a combination of Bounce-back and Specular Reflection (BSR) boundary condition. The results in this paper are more close to those of DSCM and IP-DSCM compared with the results obtained by other LBM models. The calculation results show that in transition regime, with the increase of Knudsen number, the dimensionless slip velocity at the wall significantly increases, but the maximum linear deviation of nonlinear pressure distribution gradually decreases.

  14. Altered stream-flow regimes and invasive plant species: The Tamarix case

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromberg, J.C.; Lite, S.J.; Marler, R.; Paradzick, C.; Shafroth, P.B.; Shorrock, D.; White, J.M.; White, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that anthropogenic alteration of stream-flow regimes is a key driver of compositional shifts from native to introduced riparian plant species. Location: The arid south-western United States; 24 river reaches in the Gila and Lower Colorado drainage basins of Arizona. Methods: We compared the abundance of three dominant woody riparian taxa (native Populus fremontii and Salix gooddingii, and introduced Tamarix) between river reaches that varied in stream-flow permanence (perennial vs. intermittent), presence or absence of an upstream flow-regulating dam, and presence or absence of municipal effluent as a stream water source. Results: Populus and Salix were the dominant pioneer trees along the reaches with perennial flow and a natural flood regime. In contrast, Tamarix had high abundance (patch area and basal area) along reaches with intermittent stream flows (caused by natural and cultural factors), as well as those with dam-regulated flows. Main conclusions: Stream-flow regimes are strong determinants of riparian vegetation structure, and hydrological alterations can drive dominance shifts to introduced species that have an adaptive suite of traits. Deep alluvial groundwater on intermittent rivers favours the deep-rooted, stress-adapted Tamarix over the shallower-rooted and more competitive Populus and Salix. On flow-regulated rivers, shifts in flood timing favour the reproductively opportunistic Tamarix over Populus and Salix, both of which have narrow germination windows. The prevailing hydrological conditions thus favour a new dominant pioneer species in the riparian corridors of the American Southwest. These results reaffirm the importance of reinstating stream-flow regimes (inclusive of groundwater flows) for re-establishing the native pioneer trees as the dominant forest type. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Analysis of basic flow regimes in a human airway model by stereo-scanning PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soodt, Thomas; Pott, Desirée; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    The detailed understanding of the human lung flow is of high relevance for the optimization of mechanical ventilation. Therefore, the spatial and temporal development of the flow field in a realistic human lung model is investigated for several oscillatory flow regimes using stereo-scanning particle-image velocimetry (PIV). The flow in the right primary bronchus is always measured for a complete sinusoidal ventilation cycle. Three Reynolds and Womersley number sets describing viscous ( Re = 10; α = 1.5), unsteady ( Re = 40; α = 5), and convective ( Re = 150; α = 1.5) regimes are defined to cover various dominating fluid mechanical effects. In addition, multi-plane PIV measurements are performed to analyze steady laminar ( Re = 150) and turbulent ( Re = 2,650) flow at inspiration and expiration. The steady results show that the maximum velocity is shifted to the outer wall at inspiration and toward the inner wall of the bronchial bend at expiration. At inhalation, a U-shaped high-speed velocity profile develops only inside the left primary bronchus, whereas both primary bronchi contain one vortex pair. During expiration, the vortex pairs from each main bronchus merge into a two-vortex-pair system inside the trachea. From the oscillatory findings, it is evident that an undersupply for the right upper lobe is noticed at low ventilatory frequencies, whereas high-frequency flow leads to a more homogeneous ventilation. The analysis of the temporal development of the absolute velocity in the center plane shows a variable phase lag. Unlike the flow in the unsteady regime, the flow of the viscous flow domain ( α = 1.5) is in phase with the applied pressure gradient. Additionally, a premature outflow of the upper right lung lobe can be observed in the unsteady flow regime.

  16. Lagrangian flows within reflecting internal waves at a horizontal free-slip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qi; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2015-12-15

    In this paper sequel to Zhou and Diamessis [“Reflection of an internal gravity wave beam off a horizontal free-slip surface,” Phys. Fluids 25, 036601 (2013)], we consider Lagrangian flows within nonlinear internal waves (IWs) reflecting off a horizontal free-slip rigid lid, the latter being a model of the ocean surface. The problem is approached both analytically using small-amplitude approximations and numerically by tracking Lagrangian fluid particles in direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets of the Eulerian flow. Inviscid small-amplitude analyses for both plane IWs and IW beams (IWBs) show that Eulerian mean flow due to wave-wave interaction and wave-induced Stokes drift cancels each other out completely at the second order in wave steepness A, i.e., O(A{sup 2}), implying zero Lagrangian mean flow up to that order. However, high-accuracy particle tracking in finite-Reynolds-number fully nonlinear DNS datasets from the work of Zhou and Diamessis suggests that the Euler-Stokes cancelation on O(A{sup 2}) is not complete. This partial cancelation significantly weakens the mean Lagrangian flows but does not entirely eliminate them. As a result, reflecting nonlinear IWBs produce mean Lagrangian drifts on O(A{sup 2}) and thus particle dispersion on O(A{sup 4}). The above findings can be relevant to predicting IW-driven mass transport in the oceanic surface and subsurface region which bears important observational and environmental implications, under circumstances where the effect of Earth rotation can be ignored.

  17. Accuracy of flowmeters measuring horizontal groundwater flow in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E.R.; Mandell, Wayne A.; Ursic, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Borehole flowmeters that measure horizontal flow velocity and direction of groundwater flow are being increasingly applied to a wide variety of environmental problems. This study was carried out to evaluate the measurement accuracy of several types of flowmeters in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator. Flowmeter response to hydraulic gradient, aquifer properties, and well-screen construction was measured during 2003 and 2005 at the U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The flowmeters tested included a commercially available heat-pulse flowmeter, an acoustic Doppler flowmeter, a scanning colloidal borescope flowmeter, and a fluid-conductivity logging system. Results of the study indicated that at least one flowmeter was capable of measuring borehole flow velocity and direction in most simulated conditions. The mean error in direction measurements ranged from 15.1 degrees to 23.5 degrees and the directional accuracy of all tested flowmeters improved with increasing hydraulic gradient. The range of Darcy velocities examined in this study ranged 4.3 to 155 ft/d. For many plots comparing the simulated and measured Darcy velocity, the squared correlation coefficient (r2) exceeded 0.92. The accuracy of velocity measurements varied with well construction and velocity magnitude. The use of horizontal flowmeters in environmental studies appears promising but applications may require more than one type of flowmeter to span the range of conditions encountered in the field. Interpreting flowmeter data from field settings may be complicated by geologic heterogeneity, preferential flow, vertical flow, constricted screen openings, and nonoptimal screen orientation.

  18. An investigation of flow regimes affecting the Mexico City region

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    The Mexico City region is well-known to the meteorological community for its overwhelming air pollution problem. Several factors contribute to this predicament, namely, the 20 million people and vast amount of industry within the city. The unique geographical setting of the basin encompassing Mexico City also plays an important role. This basin covers approximately 5000 km{sup 2} of the Mexican Plateau at an average elevation of 2250 m above sea level (asl) and is surrounded on three sides by mountains averaging over 3500 m asl, with peaks over 5000 m asl. Only to the north is their a significant opening in the mountainous terrain. Mexico City sprawls over 1000 km{sup 2} in the southwestern portion of the basin. In recent years, several major research programs have been undertaken to investigate the air quality problem within Mexico City. One of these, the Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative (MARI), conducted in 1990--1993, was a cooperative study between researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mexican Petroleum Institute. As part of this study, a field campaign was initiated in February 1991 during which numerous surface, upper air, aircraft, and LIDAR measurements were taken. Much of the work to date has focused upon defining and simulating the local meteorological conditions that are important for understanding the complex photochemistry occurring within the confines of the city. It seems reasonable to postulate, however, that flow systems originating outside of the Mexico City basin will influence conditions within the city much of the time.

  19. Experimental observations of pressure oscillations and flow regimes in an analogue volcanic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, S.J.; Chouet, B.A.; Phillips, J.C.; Dawson, P.; Ryan, G.A.; Hurst, E.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-liquid flows, designed to be analogous to those in volcanic conduits, are generated in the laboratory using organic gas-gum rosin mixtures expanding in a vertically mounted tube. The expanding fluid shows a range of both flow and pressure oscillation behaviors. Weakly supersaturated source liquids produce a low Reynolds number flow with foam expanding from the top surface of a liquid that exhibits zero fluid velocity at the tube wall; i.e., the conventional "no-slip" boundary condition. Pressure oscillations, often with strong long-period characteristics and consistent with longitudinal and radial resonant oscillation modes, are detected in these fluids. Strongly supersaturated source liquids generate more energetic flows that display a number of flow regimes. These regimes include a static liquid source, viscous flow, detached flow (comprising gas-pockets-at-wall and foam-in-gas annular flow, therefore demonstrating strong radial heterogeneity), and a fully turbulent transonic fragmented or mist flow. Each of these flow regimes displays characteristic pressure oscillations that can be related to resonance of flow features or wall impact phenomena. The pressure oscillations are produced by the degassing processes without the need of elastic coupling to the confining medium or flow restrictors and valvelike features. The oscillatory behavior of the experimental flows is compared to seismoacoustic data from a range of volcanoes where resonant oscillation of the fluid within the conduit is also often invoked as controlling the observed oscillation frequencies. On the basis of the experimental data we postulate on the nature of seismic signals that may be measured during large-scale explosive activity. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Influence of flow velocity on the removal of faecal coliforms in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Lohay, W S; Lyimo, T J; Njau, K N

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of flow velocity on the removal of faecal coliforms (FC) in constructed wetlands (CWs), removal rate constants of FC (k(FC)) were studied at various flow velocities (u). Membrane filtration technique was used during analysis. Values of k(FC) were determined using Reed's equation of pathogen removal; the results were compared with the plug flow equation. According to Reed's equation, k(FC) values ranged from 1.6 day⁻¹ at a velocity of 4 m/day to 34.5 day⁻¹ at a velocity of 42.9 m/day. The removal rates correlated positively with flow velocity (r = 0.84, p < 0.05). On assuming a plug flow equation, removal rates constants ranged from 0.77 to 11.69 day⁻¹; a more positive correlation (r = 0.93, p < 0.05) was observed. Optimum removal rate constants were observed for the velocity ranging 36 to 43 m/day. Generally, the increase of flow velocity improved FC removal rate constants: implying that pathogen removals are influenced by diffusion of the microorganisms into the biofilms on CW media. The velocity dependent approach together with the plug flow equation is therefore proposed for incorporation in the design of CW in a tropical climate where temperature variations are minor. PMID:23109602

  1. Weathering of plagioclase across variable flow and solute transport regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Fernando A. L.; Van der Weijden, Cornelis H.

    2012-02-01

    SummaryThe study area is situated in a fault zone with fractured granites and metasediments. In a conceptual model, infiltrating water first passes the bedrock cover of soil and saprolite and then partly enters the fractures. Weathering reactions of minerals occur in small pores and fissures in the bedrock cover zone to continue in the larger fractures. Pumping tests were carried out in a number of boreholes to measure the drawdown as a function of pumping time. From the results, values of transmissivity ( T) could be derived. In combination with the storage coefficient ( S) for similar fault zones, the hydraulic diffusivity ( D = T/ S) could be computed. Water samples, collected from the boreholes, represent fluid packets with a history of weathering reactions in the bedrock cover and in the larger fractures. The major element composition of these samples was used by means of the SiB mass balance algorithm ( Pacheco and Van der Weijden, 1996) to calculate the moles L -1 of dissolved plagioclase (oligoclase with An ≈ 0.20) and the moles L -1 of secondary phases (gibbsite, halloysite, smectite) precipitated along the flow paths of the samples. These results were then used to calculate the net dissolved silica concentrations ( [HSiO40]) related to dissolution of plagioclase followed by precipitation of each of the secondary phases. An interpretation of a plot of each of these [HSiO40] 's versusD is that at D < 0.7 m 2 s -1, dissolution of plagioclase is followed by precipitation of halloysite in the large fractures of the fault zone (open system), whereas at D ⩾ 0.7 m 2 s -1 precipitation of both halloysite and smectite occurs in the rock matrix with small fissures and pores (semi-open system). Before being pumped, the percolating fluids travelled 0.01-13.7 years. During these periods, plagioclase weathered at rates ( W Pl) of 10 -(12.9±1.1) moles m -2 s -1, which are approximately 2.2 orders of magnitude higher than solid-state weathering rates reported in

  2. Operation of the ISL transonic shock tube in a high subsonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, F.; Havermann, M.; Boller, F.; Mangold, P.; Takayama, K.

    The transonic flow regime plays an important role in experimental aerodynamic research. Modern civil aircraft fly up to a Mach number of M ≈ 0.9 in the high subsonic speed regime, as, for example, the Boeing or Airbus passenger aircraft. Nearly sonic Mach numbers are foreseen for innovative airplane concepts like the sonic cruiser by Boeing. In the military domain, guided missiles like the cruise missile also fly in the high subsonic flow regime. For testing purposes, transonic wind tunnels are mainly used for sub- as well as supersonic design applications. These wind tunnels have normally very large dimensions, which makes their operation quite expensive. If only small scale tests are required, a cheap working facility turns out to be more beneficial. For this purpose, a conventional shock tube operated at transonic flow conditions has been put into operation at the ISL. In the transonic flow regime, however, the reduction of the tube cross section by the model can produce severe distortions followed by a choking of the shock tube flow in the test section. Extensive experimental investigations were performed to determine the subsonic choking Mach number as a function of the model size. These results are compared with theoretical estimations and, more in detail, with CFD calculations.

  3. General slip regime permeability model for gas flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Jiang, Peixue; Xu, Ruina; Ouyang, Xiaolong

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical effective gas permeability model was developed for rarefied gas flow in porous media, which holds over the entire slip regime with the permeability derived as a function of the Knudsen number. This general slip regime model (GSR model) is derived from the pore-scale Navier-Stokes equations subject to the first-order wall slip boundary condition using the volume-averaging method. The local closure problem for the volume-averaged equations is studied analytically and numerically using a periodic sphere array geometry. The GSR model includes a rational fraction function of the Knudsen number which leads to a limit effective permeability as the Knudsen number increases. The mechanism for this behavior is the viscous fluid inner friction caused by converging-diverging flow channels in porous media. A linearization of the GSR model leads to the Klinkenberg equation for slightly rarefied gas flows. Finite element simulations show that the Klinkenberg model overestimates the effective permeability by as much as 33% when a flow approaches the transition regime. The GSR model reduces to the unified permeability model [F. Civan, "Effective correlation of apparent gas permeability in tight porous media," Transp. Porous Media 82, 375 (2010)] for the flow in the slip regime and clarifies the physical significance of the empirical parameter b in the unified model.

  4. Revisiting Maxwell’s accommodation coefficient: A study of nitrogen flow in a silica microtube across all flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Wenwen McKenzie, David R.

    2014-12-15

    Gas flows have been studied quantitatively for more than a hundred years and have relevance in modern fields such as the control of gas inputs to processes, the measurement of leak rates and the separation of gaseous species. Cha and McCoy have derived a convenient formula for the flow of an ideal gas applicable across a wide range of Knudsen numbers (Kn) that approaches the Navier–Stokes equations at small Kn and the Smoluchowski extension of the Knudsen flow equation at large Kn. Smoluchowski’s result relies on the Maxwell definition of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient α, recently challenged by Arya et al. We measure the flow rate of nitrogen gas in a smooth walled silica tube across a wide range of Knudsen numbers from 0.0048 to 12.4583. We find that the nitrogen flow obeys the Cha and McCoy equation with a large value of α, unlike carbon nanotubes which show flows consistent with a small value of α. Silica capillaries are therefore not atomically smooth. The flow at small Kn has α=0.91 and at large Kn has α close to one, consistent with the redefinition of accommodation coefficient by Arya et al., which also resolves a problem in the literature where there are many observations of α of less than one at small Kn and many equal to one at large Kn. Silica capillaries are an excellent choice for an accurate flow control system. - Highlights: • First experimental study on flow rate across all flow regimes in a well-defined microtube. • Extend Cha and McCoy theory for molecular flow regime. • Demonstrate the Maxwell accommodation coefficient is different in the slip and molecular flow regimes.

  5. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients: Effect of viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Da Hlaing, Nan; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of liquid viscosity on the flow regimes and the corresponding pressure gradients along the vertical two-phase flow was investigated. Experiment was carried out in a vertical transparent tube of 0.019 m in diameter and 3 m in length and the pressure gradients were measured by a U-tube manometer. Water and a 50 vol.% glycerol solution were used as the working fluids whose kinematic viscosities were 0.85 x 10{sup -6} and 4.0 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In our air-liquid annular two-phase flow, the liquid film of various thicknesses flowed adjacent to the wall and the gas phase flowed at the center of the tube. The superficial air velocity, j{sub air}, was varied between 0.0021 and 58.7 m/s and the superficial liquid velocity, j{sub liquid}, was varied between 0 and 0.1053 m/s. In the bubble, the slug and the slug-churn flow regimes, the pressure gradients decreased with increasing Reynolds number. But in the annular and the mist flow regimes, pressure gradients increased with increasing Reynolds number. Finally, the experimentally measured pressure gradient values were compared and are in good agreement with the theoretical values. (author)

  6. Functional architecture of an optic flow-responsive area that drives horizontal eye movements in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Fumi; Hablitzel, Bastian; Dal Maschio, Marco; Driever, Wolfgang; Baier, Herwig; Arrenberg, Aristides B

    2014-03-19

    Animals respond to whole-field visual motion with compensatory eye and body movements in order to stabilize both their gaze and position with respect to their surroundings. In zebrafish, rotational stimuli need to be distinguished from translational stimuli to drive the optokinetic and the optomotor responses, respectively. Here, we systematically characterize the neural circuits responsible for these operations using a combination of optogenetic manipulation and in vivo calcium imaging during optic flow stimulation. By recording the activity of thousands of neurons within the area pretectalis (APT), we find four bilateral pairs of clusters that process horizontal whole-field motion and functionally classify eleven prominent neuron types with highly selective response profiles. APT neurons are prevalently direction selective, either monocularly or binocularly driven, and hierarchically organized to distinguish between rotational and translational optic flow. Our data predict a wiring diagram of a neural circuit tailored to drive behavior that compensates for self-motion. PMID:24656253

  7. Theoretical and pragmatic modeling of governing equations for two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M.; Ajuha, S.; Sengpiel, W.

    1994-12-31

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy derived for a two-phase flow by volume-averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration; bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities makes the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modeling of these terms is discussed.

  8. Theoretical and pragmatic modelling of governing equations for a two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M.; Sengpiel, W.

    1992-12-01

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy, derived for a two-phase flow by volume averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration, bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities make the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modelling of these terms is discussed. 3 figs., 15 refs.

  9. Theoretical and pragmatic modelling of governing equations for a two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M. . Materials and Components Technology Div.); Sengpiel, W. . Inst. fuer Reaktorsicherheit)

    1992-01-01

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy, derived for a two-phase flow by volume averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration, bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities make the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modelling of these terms is discussed. 3 figs., 15 refs.

  10. Removing heavy metals from Isfahan composting leachate by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Bakhshoodeh, Reza; Alavi, Nadali; Soltani Mohammadi, Amir; Ghanavati, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Composting facility leachate usually contains high concentrations of pollutants including heavy metals that are seriously harmful to the environment and public health. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate heavy metals removal from Isfahan composting facility (ICF) leachate by a horizontal flow constructed wetland (HFCWs) system. Two horizontal systems were constructed, one planted with vetiver and the other without plant as a control. They both operated at a flow rate of 24 L/day with a 5-day hydraulic retention time (HRT). The average removal efficiencies for Cr (53 %), Cd (40 %), Ni (35 %), Pb (30 %), Zn (35 %), and Cu (40 %) in vetiver constructed wetland were significantly higher than those of the control (P < 0.05). Accumulations of heavy metals in roots were higher than shoots. Cd and Zn showed the highest and the lowest bioconcentration factor (BCF), respectively. Vetiver tolerates the extreme condition in leachate including high total dissolved solids. PMID:26983810

  11. Anaerobic treatment of cassava starch extraction wastewater using a horizontal flow filter with bamboo as support.

    PubMed

    Colin, X; Farinet, J-L; Rojas, O; Alazard, D

    2007-05-01

    Small-scale sour starch agroindustry in Colombia suffer from absence of water treatment. Although starch processing plants produce diluted wastewater, it is a source of pollution and cause environmental problems to the nearby rural population. A laboratory scale anaerobic horizontal flow filter packed with bamboo pieces was evaluated for the treatment of cassava starch extraction wastewater. The wastewater used in the experimentation was the draining water of the starch sedimentation basin. The reactor was operated for 6 months. It was inoculated with a semi-granular sludge from an anaerobic UASB reactor of a slaughterhouse. Maximum organic loading rate (OLR) applied was 11.8g COD/L d without dilution of the wastewater. At steady state and maximum OLR applied, 87% of the COD was removed and a gas productivity of 3.7L/L d was achieved. The average biogas yield was 0.36L/g COD removed. Methane content in the biogas was in the range of 69-81%. The total suspended solids (TSS) removed were 67%. The relative high lactic acid content did not negatively influence the performance of the reactor. No perturbation due to cyanide (3-5mg/L) was observed during the reactor operation. The results obtained indicated that the anaerobic horizontal flow filter could be used efficiently for the treatment of wastewater from Colombian starch processing small-scale agroindustry. PMID:16973355

  12. Experimental investigation of fluid flow in horizontal pipes system of various cross-section geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsirotou, E.; Kasiteropoulou, D.; Stamatopoulou, D.

    2014-03-01

    The current research work presents experiments of an essentially incompressible fluid flow in pipes. The experimental equipment consists of a horizontal pipe including a gate valve, a Venturi meter, a wide angle diffuser, an orifice plate, a 90-degree elbow and pressure tappings. An elbow connects the pipe to arotameter with further pressure tappings. All pressure tappings connected to manometers held on a vertical panel behind the pipe work and show pressure at various points. The effect of the pipe geometry in the flow pattern is presented. Furthermore head losses are estimated, at specific stream-wise cross-sections, for mass flow rate numbered from 0.056 to 0.411 l/s. The manometers measure and clearly show pressure distribution against a calibrated scale. The diagrams of mass flow rate and head losses are presented in specific crosssections, where geometry changes. All measurements were calibrated and validated in a maximum standard deviation difference of 5%. The head losses decrease as the mass flow rate decreases, for all pipe geometries. In the future the experimental results can be used to verify numerical simulation results.

  13. The path to COVIS: A review of acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, Karen G.; Silver, Deborah; Xu, Guangyu; Light, Russ; Jackson, Darrell; Jones, Christopher; Ozer, Sedat; Liu, Li

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic imaging of hydrothermal flow regimes started with the incidental recognition of a plume on a routine sonar scan for obstacles in the path of the human-occupied submersible ALVIN. Developments in sonar engineering, acoustic data processing and scientific visualization have been combined to develop technology which can effectively capture the behavior of focused and diffuse hydrothermal discharge. This paper traces the development of these acoustic imaging techniques for hydrothermal flow regimes from their conception through to the development of the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). COVIS has monitored such flow eight times a day for several years. Successful acoustic techniques for estimating plume entrainment, bending, vertical rise, volume flux, and heat flux are presented as is the state-of-the-art in diffuse flow detection.

  14. A Regional Hydrologic Classification of Unregulated Rivers: Towards the Development of Natural Flow Regime Characterization and Environmental Flows in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, B.; Sandoval Solis, S.

    2014-12-01

    Alterations to flow regimes from regulation and climate change affect the biophysical functioning of rivers. Re-operating reservoirs to provide environmental flows - the quantity, quality, and timing of water to sustain natural river functions and species - is now widely applied in multi-objective water resources management. However, the absence of a quantitative, transferable framework for evaluating the relationships between hydrologic inputs, geomorphic functions, and ecological responses, remains a major limitation to setting environmental flows standards. This research addresses this gap by developing a hydrologic classification framework for the State of California that balances operational practicality with scientific defensibility. The framework organizes river reaches into: (1) natural flow classes based on (a) a classification model that clusters hydrologic indices calculated directly from unimpaired streamflow data, and (b) a regression model using a set of climatic, landscape, and local geomorphic controls over the flow regime, and (2) functional zones constrained by temporal (seasonal) ranges and hydrologic (average flow percentile-based) thresholds (e.g. summer low flows). The framework is then used to (1) identify major climatic, landscape, and local geomorphic controls over prototypical flow regime signatures, and (2) characterize key natural functions and processes expected of reaches of each flow class and functional zone during wet, dry, and normal water year types. Organizing hydrologic data in this manner provides a means of comparison and transferability of ecologically-significant hydrologic and geomorphic information across reaches of all major flow classes seen in California, both regulated and unregulated. Through this framework, transferable relationships between hydrologic and physiographic conditions, flow alteration, and ecological metrics can be developed and tested on the basis of data obtained from a limited set of study sites.

  15. Validating alternative methodologies to estimate the regime of temporary rivers when flow data are unavailable.

    PubMed

    Gallart, F; Llorens, P; Latron, J; Cid, N; Rieradevall, M; Prat, N

    2016-09-15

    Hydrological data for assessing the regime of temporary rivers are often non-existent or scarce. The scarcity of flow data makes impossible to characterize the hydrological regime of temporary streams and, in consequence, to select the correct periods and methods to determine their ecological status. This is why the TREHS software is being developed, in the framework of the LIFE Trivers project. It will help managers to implement adequately the European Water Framework Directive in this kind of water body. TREHS, using the methodology described in Gallart et al. (2012), defines six transient 'aquatic states', based on hydrological conditions representing different mesohabitats, for a given reach at a particular moment. Because of its qualitative nature, this approach allows using alternative methodologies to assess the regime of temporary rivers when there are no observed flow data. These methods, based on interviews and high-resolution aerial photographs, were tested for estimating the aquatic regime of temporary rivers. All the gauging stations (13) belonging to the Catalan Internal Catchments (NE Spain) with recurrent zero-flow periods were selected to validate this methodology. On the one hand, non-structured interviews were conducted with inhabitants of villages near the gauging stations. On the other hand, the historical series of available orthophotographs were examined. Flow records measured at the gauging stations were used to validate the alternative methods. Flow permanence in the reaches was estimated reasonably by the interviews and adequately by aerial photographs, when compared with the values estimated using daily flows. The degree of seasonality was assessed only roughly by the interviews. The recurrence of disconnected pools was not detected by flow records but was estimated with some divergences by the two methods. The combination of the two alternative methods allows substituting or complementing flow records, to be updated in the future through

  16. Influence of electrolyte concentration on holdup, flow regime transition and local flow properties in a large scale bubble column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besagni, Giorgio; Inzoli, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the influence of the electrolyte concentration on holdup, flow regime transition and local flow properties in a large scale bubble column, with air and water as working fluids. The column is 0.24 m inner diameter, 5.3 m height and the air is introduced by a spider sparger up to a superficial gas velocity of 0.2 m/s. The influence of five NaCl concentrations are investigated by using gas holdup and optical probe measurements. The gas holdup measurements are used for analysing the flow regime transition between the homogeneous and the transition regime and the optical probe is used for studying the local flow characteristics at different radial positions. The presence of NaCl - up to a critical concentration - increases the gas holdup. The increase in the gas holdup is due to the inhibition of the coalescence between the bubbles and, thus, the extension of the homogeneous regime. The results are in agreement with the previous literature on smaller bubble columns.

  17. Analysis of regimes of magnetogasdynamic interaction between a current layer and an argon flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, E. N.; Nesterov, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    A nonstationary three-dimensional magnetogasdynamics (MGD) model is used to study the dynamics of a current layer interacting with a transverse magnetic field in a supersonic argon flow through a channel of constant cross section. The MGD interaction regimes and the features of the current layer formation for various external resistances and channel widths are analyzed as based on numerical results.

  18. Flow regimes in a T-mixer operating with a binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarri, Simone; Siconolfi, Lorenzo; Galletti, Chiara; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria

    2015-11-01

    Efficient mixing in small volumes is a key target in many processes. Among the most common micro-devices, passive T-shaped micro-mixers are widely used. For this reason, T-mixers have been studied in the literature and its working flow regimes have been identified. However, in most of the available theoretical studies it is assumed that only one working fluid is used, i.e. that the same fluid at the same thermodynamic conditions is entering the two inlet conduits of the mixer. Conversely, the practical use of micro-devices often involves the mixing of two different fluids or of the same fluid at different thermodynamic conditions. In this case flow regimes significantly different than those observed for a single working fluid may occur. The present work aims at investigating the flow regimes in a T-mixers when water at two different temperatures, i.e. having different viscosity and density, is entering the mixer. The effect of the temperature difference on the flow regimes in a 3D T-mixer is investigated by DNS and stability analysis and the results are compared to the case in which a single working fluid is employed.

  19. FLOW REGIME, JUVENILE ABUNDANCE, AND THE ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE OF STREAM FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The assemblage of fishes in a second-order stream in east-central Illinois was compared through seine sampling for two years with distinctly different flow regimes. In both years adult (age 0) fish were most abundant in late spring and early summer while juvenile (age 0) abundanc...

  20. Design configurations affecting flow pattern and solids accumulation in horizontal free water and subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, A; Sidrach-Cardona, R; Sánchez, J C; Carretero, J; Garfi, M; Bécares, E

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different horizontal constructed wetland (CW) design parameters on solids distribution, loss of hydraulic conductivity over time and hydraulic behaviour, in order to assess clogging processes in wetlands. For this purpose, an experimental plant with eight CWs was built at mesocosm scale. Each CW presented a different design characteristic, and the most common CW configurations were all represented: free water surface flow (FWS) with different effluent pipe locations, FWS with floating macrophytes and subsurface flow (SSF), and the presence of plants and specific species (Typha angustifolia and Phragmites australis) was also considered. The loss of the hydraulic conductivity of gravel was greatly influenced by the presence of plants and organic load (representing a loss of 20% and c.a. 10% in planted wetlands and an overloaded system, respectively). Cattail seems to have a greater effect on the development of clogging since its below-ground biomass weighed twice as much as that of common reed. Hydraulic behaviour was greatly influenced by the presence of a gravel matrix and the outlet pipe position. In strict SSF CW, the water was forced to cross the gravel and tended to flow diagonally from the top inlet to the bottom outlet (where the inlet and outlet pipes were located). However, when FWS was considered, water preferentially flowed above the gravel, thus losing half the effective volume of the system. Only the presence of plants seemed to help the water flow partially within the gravel matrix. PMID:23286990

  1. Flow regime alterations under changing climate in two river basins: Implications for freshwater ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibson, C.A.; Meyer, J.L.; Poff, N.L.; Hay, L.E.; Georgakakos, A.

    2005-01-01

    We examined impacts of future climate scenarios on flow regimes and how predicted changes might affect river ecosystems. We examined two case studies: Cle Elum River, Washington, and Chattahoochee-Apalachicola River Basin, Georgia and Florida. These rivers had available downscaled global circulation model (GCM) data and allowed us to analyse the effects of future climate scenarios on rivers with (1) different hydrographs, (2) high future water demands, and (3) a river-floodplain system. We compared observed flow regimes to those predicted under future climate scenarios to describe the extent and type of changes predicted to occur. Daily stream flow under future climate scenarios was created by either statistically downscaling GCMs (Cle Elum) or creating a regression model between climatological parameters predicted from GCMs and stream flow (Chattahoochee-Apalachicola). Flow regimes were examined for changes from current conditions with respect to ecologically relevant features including the magnitude and timing of minimum and maximum flows. The Cle Elum's hydrograph under future climate scenarios showed a dramatic shift in the timing of peak flows and lower low flow of a longer duration. These changes could mean higher summer water temperatures, lower summer dissolved oxygen, and reduced survival of larval fishes. The Chattahoochee-Apalachicola basin is heavily impacted by dams and water withdrawals for human consumption; therefore, we made comparisons between pre-large dam conditions, current conditions, current conditions with future demand, and future climate scenarios with future demand to separate climate change effects and other anthropogenic impacts. Dam construction, future climate, and future demand decreased the flow variability of the river. In addition, minimum flows were lower under future climate scenarios. These changes could decrease the connectivity of the channel and the floodplain, decrease habitat availability, and potentially lower the ability

  2. Flow in horizontally anisotropic multilayered aquifer systems with leaky wells and aquitards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Abdullah; Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Kraemer, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Flow problems in an anisotropic domain can be transformed into ones in an equivalent isotropic domain by coordinate transformations. Once analytical solutions are obtained for the equivalent isotropic domain, they can be back transformed to the original anisotropic domain. The existing solutions presented by Cihan et al. (2011) for isotropic multilayered aquifer systems with alternating aquitards and multiple injection/pumping wells and leaky wells were modified to account for horizontal anisotropy in aquifers. The modified solutions for pressure buildup distribution and leakage rates through leaky wells can be used when the anisotropy direction and ratio (Kx/Ky) are assumed to be identical for all aquifers alternating with aquitards. However, for multilayered aquifers alternating with aquicludes, both the principal direction of the anisotropic horizontal conductivity and the anisotropy ratio can be different in each aquifer. With coordinate transformation, a circular well with finite radius becomes an ellipse, and thus in the transformed domain the head contours in the immediate vicinity of the well have elliptical shapes. Through a radial flow approximation around the finite radius wells, the elliptical well boundaries in the transformed domain are approximated by an effective well radius expression. The analytical solutions with the effective radius approximations were compared with exact solutions as well as a numerical solution for elliptic flow. The effective well radius approximation is sufficiently accurate to predict the head buildup at the well bore of the injection/pumping wells for moderately anisotropic systems (Kx/Ky≤25). The effective radius approximation gives satisfactory results for predicting head buildup at observation points and leakage through leaky wells away from the injection/pumping wells even for highly anisotropic aquifer systems >(Kx/Ky≤1000>).

  3. European river flow regimes: assessing space-time dynamics and links to large-scale climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, D. M.; Kingston, D. G.; Laize, C.; Lavers, D. A.; Wilson, D.

    2011-12-01

    Given heightened concerns about climate change/ variability and human impacts on hydrology, there is a pressing need for research to quantify temporal variability and spatial structure in river flow regimes, and to establish hydroclimatological (climate-flow) associations as a basis for predicting future water stress. This paper draws together findings from studies undertaken at the UK and pan-European scale (using datasets of >100 stations with time series >25 years) and aims: (1) to demonstrate the utility of classification schemes for identifying space-time patterns in river flow regimes and (2) to explore the hydroclimatological relationships between large-scale atmospheric circulation and river flow response. Often, classification is undertaken prior to detailed analysis of large-scale patterns in river flow. In this paper, a suite of novel cluster analysis based methods are presented that identify hydrological regions as well as inter-annual river flow regime variation within regions. Statistical characteristics of the emergent classifications are analysed including geographical expression, teleconnections and presence of time-series trends. Results show that classification provides a useful general organising framework for large-scale hydrological research and facilitates systematic testing of hypotheses about drivers of hydrological variation across wide spatial domains. To investigate climate controls on space-time river flow variation, three methods for characterising atmospheric influences are considered: air-mass types, large-scale climate indices and gridded re-analyses (ECMWF ERA-40). A new air-mass classification for Europe (Spatial Synoptic Classification 2) is presented that classifies daily air-masses. Data are pooled by long-term flow regime regions to assess air-mass - flow regime (shape and magnitude) class associations across Europe; and multiple discriminant function analysis (MDFA) is used to model links between the categorical data. The

  4. Prediction of the multicellular flow regime of natural convection in fenestration glazing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Goss, W.P.; Curcija, D.

    1997-12-31

    In this work, gas-filled tall rectangular cavities, typically found in insulating glazing units (IGUs) of fenestration systems, with constant temperatures at the side walls and zero heat flux at the top and bottom, were investigated. Critical Rayleigh numbers, Ra{sub c}, at which multicellular flow begins to form were determined for aspect ratios from 10.7 to 80. Using a general-purpose fluid flow and heat transfer finite-element analysis computer program (FDI 1993), numerical calculations were performed over the range of aspect ratios, A, from 10 to 80 with Rayleigh numbers, Ra, varying within the laminar flow regime. The calculations revealed that for aspect ratios between 10.7 and 30, the multicellular flow pattern dies out before the flow enters the turbulent flow regime. In addition, the lowest aspect ratio at which multicellular flow patterns existed was 10.7, which is lower than the lowest limit (A = 12) published by other researchers. The resulting critical Rayleigh numbers are plotted on a graph as a function of the aspect ratio and the Rayleigh numbers. The overall heat transfer results in terms of the average, or integrated, Nusselt numbers, Nu, are compared with available numerical and experimental data on multicellular flow in rectangular cavities, and good agreement was found. Also, streamline contour plots and temperature profiles are plotted for selected cases.

  5. Evaluating the Effects of Horizontal Spatial Discretization on Interflow in the Soil Zone Using the Richards and Groundwater Flow Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, W.; Niswonger, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    In many mountainous regions, a large proportion of streamflow originates as shallow subsurface storm flow (interflow) within the shallow soils of hillslopes. Infiltration can accumulate to form perched groundwater within the upper few meters of the soil horizon that drains to streams through both macropores and soil-matrix. Richards Equation has become a commonly used governing equation for simulating interflow in regional-scale models. Recent research has shown that optimal vertical discretization for Richards Equation near land surface and the water table is much smaller than the discretization typically used in basin-scale hydrologic models, yet little is known about optimal horizontal discretization or potential effects of horizontal discretization on interflow solutions. Most of the work related to the effects of discretization on the solution of Richards Equation has focused on the vertical infiltration problem. This study evaluates horizontal spatial discretization effects on interflow predictions using 1) a modified version of GSFLOW and 2) VS2DT. The modified GSFLOW couples Smith-Parlange 1-D infiltration equations with 3-D unconfined groundwater flow equation, whereas VS2DT uses Richards Equation to represent infiltration and variably saturated flow. Interflow solutions and breakthrough at the stream were compared using a model domain similar to Vauclin and others (1979) with horizontal grid resolutions ranging from 0.05-5m and vertical resolutions ranging between 0.05-1m, with horizontal flow path lengths of 25m to the stream. Variable horizontal spatial resolutions affected VS2DT interflow solutions (RMSE up to 0.12) and interflow breakthrough at the stream, whereas GSFLOW solutions were well correlated (RMSE <0.052). Interflow breakthrough was delayed by up to 10 days with increasing resolution in VS2DT, whereas GSFLOW breakthrough was consistently the same day. Results indicate that the solution of Richards Equation for soil-zone interflow is much

  6. Effect of intermolecular potential on compressible Couette flow in slip and transitional regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Andrew B.; Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of intermolecular potentials on compressible, planar flow in slip and transitional regimes is investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Two intermolecular interaction models, the variable hard sphere (VHS) and the Lennard-Jones (LJ) models, are first compared for subsonic and supersonic Couette flows of argon at temperatures of 40, 273, and 1,000 K, and then for Couette flows in the transitional regime ranging from Knudsen numbers (Kn) of 0.0051 to 1. The binary scattering model for elastic scattering using the Lennard-Jones (LJ) intermolecular potential proposed recently [A. Venkattraman and A. Alexeenko, "Binary scattering model for Lennard-Jones potential: Transport coefficients and collision integrals for non-equilibrium gas flow simulations," Phys. Fluids 24, 027101 (2012)] is shown to accurately reproduce both the theoretical collision frequency in an equilibrium gas as well as the theoretical viscosity variation with temperature. The use of a repulsive-attractive instead of a purely repulsive potential is found to be most important in the continuum and slip regimes as well as in flows with large temperature variations. Differences in shear stress of up to 28% between the VHS and LJ models is observed at Kn=0.0051 and is attributed to differences in collision frequencies, ultimately affecting velocity gradients at the wall. For Kn=1 where the Knudsen layer expands the entire domain, the effect of the larger collision frequency in the LJ model relative to VHS diminishes, and a 7% difference in shear stress is observed.

  7. Zero-G experiments in two-phase fluids flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; King, C. D.; Littles, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The two-phase flows studied were liquid and gas mixtures in a straight flow channel of circular cross-section. Boundaries between flow regimes have been defined for normogravity on coordinates of gas quality and total mass velocity; and, when combined with boundary expressions having a Froude number term, an analytical model was derived predicting boundary shifts with changes in gravity level. Experiments with air and water were performed, first in the normogravity environment of a ground laboratory and then in 'zero gravity' aboard a KC-135 aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. Data reduction confirmed regime boundary shifts in the direction predicted, although the magnitude was a little less than predicted. Pressure drop measurements showed significant increases for the low gravity condition.

  8. Effects of flow regime on stream turbidity and suspended solids after wildfire, Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Writer, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Wildfires occur frequently in the Colorado Front Range and can alter the hydrological response of watersheds, yet little information exists on the impact of flow regime and storm events on post-wildfire water quality. The flow regime in the region is characterized by base-flow conditions during much of the year and increased runoff during spring snowmelt and summer convective storms. The impact of snowmelt and storm events on stream discharge and water quality was evaluated for about a year after a wildfire near Boulder, Colorado, USA. During spring snowmelt and low-intensity storms, differences in discharge and turbidity at sites upstream and downstream from the burned areas were minimal. However, high-intensity convective storms resulted in dramatic increases in discharge and turbidity at sites downstream from the burned area. This study highlights the importance of using high-frequency sampling to assess accurately wildfire impacts on water quality downstream.

  9. Granular flow regimes in rotating drums from depth-integrated theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C.-Y.; Stark, C. P.; Capart, H.

    2016-03-01

    Granular flows in rotating drums transition between two regimes characterized by straight and curved free surfaces. Here we predict this behavior using a depth-integrated theory applicable to general eroding flows. Closure is achieved by a local μ (I ) rheology and an equation for kinetic energy. Spanning the transition, the theory yields relations for all flow properties in terms of a single dimensionless rotation rate. In accord with experiments, distinct scaling laws are obtained for slow and fast rates, dominated respectively by local energy dissipation and longitudinal energy transfer.

  10. Characterising temporary streams' regimes using qualitative "aquatic states" instead of quantitative flow measures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, F.; Prat, N.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of the biological communities found in stream reaches is currently used for the assessment of the quality of stream waters. Nevertheless, in temporary streams, these communities are largely varying in time, strongly depending on the occurrence of the sets of aquatic mesohabitats determined by the hydrological conditions (hereafter called Aquatic States). Particularly, the interruption of the flow in a stream, or even its total desiccation, plays a determinant role in their ecological communities so much so that temporary streams should be considered a distinct class of ecosystems instead of simply hydrologically challenged permanent streams. Within the EU MIRAGE project (grant FP7 n° 211732), two complementary tools have been developed to analyse and characterise the regime of temporary streams: the Aquatic States Frequency Graph (ASFG) that shows the monthly frequency of occurrence of the diverse Aquatic States throughout the year, and the Temporary Stream Regime Plot (TSRP) that maps the value of two metrics that describe respectively the relative number of months with flow per year (Mf) and the seasonal predictability of the zero-flow periods (Sd6). The ASFG allows a rapid appraisal of the stream regime relevant for the development of the aquatic life and is useful for anticipating the sampling calendars but is somewhat dependent of the subjective criteria of the observer. On the contrary, the TSRP manages much less information but allows the comparison and classification of the regimes and is based on the more objective criterion of the presence-absence of flow. In the case of lack of observations, rainfall-runoff models may be used to develop these analyses, although a threshold value for zero flow must be assessed as models usually do not simulate the absence of flow.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Studies of the Natural Convection Flow Within a Horizontal Cylinder Subjected to a Uniformly Cold Wall Boundary Condition. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Poly. Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Numberical solutions are obtained for the quasi-compressible Navier-Stokes equations governing the time dependent natural convection flow within a horizontal cylinder. The early time flow development and wall heat transfer is obtained after imposing a uniformly cold wall boundary condition on the cylinder. Solutions are also obtained for the case of a time varying cold wall boundary condition. Windware explicit differ-encing is used for the numerical solutions. The viscous truncation error associated with this scheme is controlled so that first order accuracy is maintained in time and space. The results encompass a range of Grashof numbers from 8.34 times 10,000 to 7 times 10 to the 7th power which is within the laminar flow regime for gravitationally driven fluid flows. Experiments within a small scale instrumented horizontal cylinder revealed the time development of the temperature distribution across the boundary layer and also the decay of wall heat transfer with time.

  12. Zonal flow regimes in rotating anelastic spherical shells: An application to giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The surface zonal winds observed in the giant planets form a complex jet pattern with alternating prograde and retrograde direction. While the main equatorial band is prograde on the gas giants, both ice giants have a pronounced retrograde equatorial jet. We use three-dimensional numerical models of compressible convection in rotating spherical shells to explore the properties of zonal flows in different regimes where either rotation or buoyancy dominates the force balance. We conduct a systematic parameter study to quantify the dependence of zonal flows on the background density stratification and the driving of convection. In our numerical models, we find that the direction of the equatorial zonal wind is controlled by the ratio of the global-scale buoyancy force and the Coriolis force. The prograde equatorial band maintained by Reynolds stresses is found in the rotation-dominated regime. In cases where buoyancy dominates Coriolis force, the angular momentum per unit mass is homogenized and the equatorial band is retrograde, reminiscent to those observed in the ice giants. In this regime, the amplitude of the zonal jets depends on the background density contrast with strongly stratified models producing stronger jets than comparable weakly stratified cases. Furthermore, our results can help to explain the transition between solar-like (i.e. prograde at the equator) and the "anti-solar" differential rotations (i.e. retrograde at the equator) found in anelastic models of stellar convection zones. In the strongly stratified cases, we find that the leading order force balance can significantly vary with depth. While the flow in the deep interior is dominated by rotation, buoyancy can indeed become larger than Coriolis force in a thin region close to the surface. This so-called "transitional regime" has a visible signature in the main equatorial jet which shows a pronounced dimple where flow amplitudes notably decay towards the equator. A similar dimple is observed on

  13. Horizontal annular flow modelling using a compositional based interface capturing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhizhua; Percival, James; Gomes, Jefferson; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Progress on a consistent approach for interface-capturing in which each component represents a different phase/fluid is described. The aim is to develop a general multi-phase modelling approach based on fully-unstructured meshes that can exploit the latest mesh adaptivity methods, and in which each fluid phase may have a number of components. The method is compared against experimental results for a collapsing water column test case and a convergence study is performed. A number of numerical test cases are undertaken to demonstrate the method's ability to model arbitrary numbers of phases with arbitrary equations of state. The method is then used to simulate horizontal annular flows. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  14. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with constant heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Tariq; Ahmad, Hussain; Ghaffari, Abuzar

    2015-12-01

    Mixed convection boundary layer flow of a viscous fluid over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with a constant heat flux is investigated numerically. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to non-dimensional form and then are solved by an efficient implicit finite different scheme known as Keller-box method. The solutions are expressed in the form of skin friction and Nusselt number, which are plotted against the eccentric angle. The effect of pertinent parameters such as mixed convection parameter, aspect ratio (ratio of lengths of minor axis to major axis), and Prandtl number on skin friction and Nusselt number are illustrated through graphs for both blunt and slender orientations. The increase in the value of mixed convection parameter results in increase in skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for blunt as well as slender orientations.

  15. Design and monitoring of horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands for treating nursery leachates.

    PubMed

    Narváez, Lola; Cunill, Conrad; Cáceres, Rafaela; Marfà, Oriol

    2011-06-01

    Nursery leachates usually contain high concentrations of nitrates, phosphorus and potassium, so discharging them into the environment often causes pollution. Single-stage or two-stage horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSCW) filled with different substrates were designed to evaluate the effect and evolution over time of the removal of nitrogen and other nutrients contained in nursery leachates. The addition of sodium acetate to achieve a C:NO(3)(-)-N ratio of 3:1 was sufficient to reach complete denitrification in all HSSCW. The removal rate of nitrate was high throughout the operation period (over 98%). Nevertheless, the removal rate of ammonium decreased about halfway through the operation. Removal of the COD was enhanced by the use of two-stage HSSCW. In general, the substrates and the number of stages of the wetlands did not affect the removal of nitrogen, total phosphorus and potassium. PMID:21489781

  16. Implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme for steady state solutions in all flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yajun; Zhong, Chengwen; Xu, Kun

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS) for non-equilibrium steady state flow computation. The UGKS is a direct modeling method for flow simulation in all regimes with the updates of both macroscopic flow variables and microscopic gas distribution function. By solving the macroscopic equations implicitly, a predicted equilibrium state can be obtained first through iterations. With the newly predicted equilibrium state, the evolution equation of the gas distribution function and the corresponding collision term can be discretized in a fully implicit way for fast convergence through iterations as well. The lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) factorization method is implemented to solve both macroscopic and microscopic equations, which improves the efficiency of the scheme. Since the UGKS is a direct modeling method and its physical solution depends on the mesh resolution and the local time step, a physical time step needs to be fixed before using an implicit iterative technique with a pseudo-time marching step. Therefore, the physical time step in the current implicit scheme is determined by the same way as that in the explicit UGKS for capturing the physical solution in all flow regimes, but the convergence to a steady state speeds up through the adoption of a numerical time step with large CFL number. Many numerical test cases in different flow regimes from low speed to hypersonic ones, such as the Couette flow, cavity flow, and the flow passing over a cylinder, are computed to validate the current implicit method. The overall efficiency of the implicit UGKS can be improved by one or two orders of magnitude in comparison with the explicit one.

  17. Using Historic Models of Cn2 to predict r0 and regimes affected by atmospheric turbulence for horizontal, slant and topological paths

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J K; Carrano, C J

    2006-06-20

    Image data collected near the ground, in the boundary layer, or from low altitude planes must contend with the detrimental effects of atmospheric turbulence on the image quality. So it is useful to predict operating regimes (wavelength, height of target, height of detector, total path distance, day vs. night viewing, etc.) where atmospheric turbulence is expected to play a significant role in image degradation. In these regimes, image enhancement techniques such as speckle processing, deconvolution and Wiener filtering methods can be utilized to recover near instrument-limited resolution in degraded images. We conducted a literature survey of various boundary layer and lower troposphere models for the structure coefficient of the index of refraction (C{sub n}{sup 2}). Using these models, we constructed a spreadsheet tool to estimate the Fried parameter (r{sub 0}) for different scenarios, including slant and horizontal path trajectories. We also created a tool for scenarios where the height along the path crudely accounted for the topology of the path. This would be of particular interest in mountain-based viewing platforms surveying ground targets. The tools that we developed utilized Visual Basic{reg_sign} programming in an Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheet environment for accessibility and ease of use. In this paper, we will discuss the C{sub n}{sup 2} profile models used, describe the tools developed and compare the results obtained for the Fried parameter with those estimated from experimental data.

  18. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images. II. Flow fields in the final stages of sunspot decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Deng, N.; Liu, C.; Shimizu, T.; Wang, H.; Denker, C.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Generation and dissipation of magnetic fields is a fundamental physical process on the Sun. In comparison to flux emergence and the initial stages of sunspot formation, the demise of sunspots still lacks a comprehensive description. Aims: The evolution of sunspots is most commonly discussed in terms of their intensity and magnetic field. Here, we present additional information about the three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of sunspots towards the end of their existence. Methods: We present a subset of multi-wavelengths observations obtained with the Japanese Hinode mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain during the time period 2010 November 18-23. Horizontal proper motions were derived from G-band and Ca ii H images, whereas line-of-sight velocities were extracted from VTT echelle Hα λ656.28 nm spectra and Fe i λ630.25 nm spectral data of the Hinode/Spectro-Polarimeter, which also provided three-dimensional magnetic field information. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO provided continuum images and line-of-sight magnetograms, in addition to the high-resolution observations for the entire disk passage of the active region. Results: We perform a quantitative study of photospheric and chromospheric flow fields in and around decaying sunspots. In one of the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 11126, we observe moat flow and moving magnetic features (MMFs), even after its penumbra had decayed. We also detect a superpenumbral structure around this pore. We find that MMFs follow well-defined, radial paths from the spot all the way to the border of a supergranular cell surrounding the spot. In contrast, flux emergence near the other sunspot prevents the establishment of similar well ordered flow patterns, which could be discerned around a tiny pore of merely 2 Mm diameter. After the disappearance of the sunspots/pores, a coherent patch of abnormal

  19. Orbiter Aerodynamic Acceleration Flight Measurements in the Rarefied-Flow Transition Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    Acceleration data taken from the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) during reentry on STS-62 have been analyzed using calibration factors taken on orbit. This is the first Orbiter mission which collected OARE data during the Orbiter reentry phase. The data examined include the flight regime from orbital altitudes down to about 90 km which covers the free-molecule-flow regime and the upper altitude fringes of the rarefied-flow transition into the hypersonic continuum. Ancillary flight data on Orbiter position, orientation, velocity, and rotation rates have been used in models to transform the measured accelerations to the Orbiter center-of-gravity, from which aerodynamic accelerations along the Orbiter body axes have been calculated. Residual offsets introduced in the measurements by unmodeled Orbiter forces are identified and discussed. Direct comparisons are made between the OARE flight data and an independent micro-gravity accelerometer experiment, the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), which also obtained flight data on reentry during the mission down to about 95 km. The resulting OARE aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's body axis, aid the normal to axial acceleration ratio in the free-molecule-flow and transition-flow regimes are presented and compared with numerical simulations from three direct simulation Monte Carlo codes.

  20. Impacts of water resources development on flow regimes in the Brazos River.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Adrian L; Lopes, Vicente L

    2009-10-01

    The Brazos River, the second largest basin in Texas, represents one of the most highly developed river systems in the state. Thirty-nine reservoirs with capacities greater than 5,000 acre-feet are currently in operation in the basin. Impacts on stream ecosystems are evidenced by changes in flow regimes and resulting changes in fish assemblages over the past 50 years. These changes have been widely attributed to human impacts, through the construction of dams, diversion of water supplies for agricultural and municipal uses, and land use change. However, streamflow regimes result from a complex mix of drivers that include climate, topography, land cover, land use practices, reservoir management practices, dam releases, and water consumption patterns, making determination of anthropogenic impacts problematic. This study quantifies changes in flow regime and probable historical drivers including precipitation, dam construction, population growth, and changing water demand in the Brazos River basin over the past 100 years. Results indicate that the climate of the basin has been relatively stable over the study period, while large-scale changes in human population densities and intense water resources development are correlated with impacts on flow regimes, decreasing the frequency and magnitude of high flow events and stabilizing low flows. These changes have resulted in an increase of habitat generalist fish species, a decrease of native obligate riverine fishes, and an overall homogenization of species assemblages. The results of this study indicate the importance of combining ecological data with an assessment of social drivers for a greater understanding of the dynamics of river basin systems. PMID:18819012

  1. Thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Schubert, Gerald; Eichelberger, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes, due to temperature-dependent viscosity and dissipation, was investigated using finite element calculations of magma flow in dikelike channels with length-to-width ratios of 1000:1 or more. Solutions of the steady state equations governing magma flow are obtained for a variety of conditions ranging from idealized plane-parallel models to cases involving nonparallel geometry and two-phase flows. The implications of the numerical simulations for the dynamics of flow in a dike-reservoir system and the consequences of dike entrance conditions on magmatic storage are discussed. Consideration is also given to an unmixing/self-lubrication mechanism which may be important for the lubrication of silicic magmas rising to the earth's surface in mixed magma ascent scenarios, which naturally segregates magma mixtures of two components with differing viscosities to minimize the driving pressure gradient.

  2. Thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C. .; Schubert, G.; Eichelberger, J.C. California Univ., Los Angeles Alaska Univ., Fairbanks )

    1992-11-01

    The coupling between thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes, due to temperature-dependent viscosity and dissipation, was investigated using finite element calculations of magma flow in dikelike channels with length-to-width ratios of 1000:1 or more. Solutions of the steady state equations governing magma flow are obtained for a variety of conditions ranging from idealized plane-parallel models to cases involving nonparallel geometry and two-phase flows. The implications of the numerical simulations for the dynamics of flow in a dike-reservoir system and the consequences of dike entrance conditions on magmatic storage are discussed. Consideration is also given to an unmixing/self-lubrication mechanism which may be important for the lubrication of silicic magmas rising to the earth's surface in mixed magma ascent scenarios, which naturally segregates magma mixtures of two components with differing viscosities to minimize the driving pressure gradient. 56 refs.

  3. Horizontal plasma flow velocities in the ionosphere of Mars - A test case for the solar wind interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    On the apparently nonmagnetic planets Mars and Venus, ionospheric plasma can be driven from the day to the nightside by two different mechanisms: (1) the pressure gradient force across the terminator, and (2) a solar wind-induced force via a viscous boundary layer interaction. Calculations of the horizontal flow velocities in the ionosphere of Mars using the two mechanisms produce results differing by an order of magnitude. It is pointed out that the detailed observations of the horizontal flow velocity in the ionosphere of Mars may provide a test case for the resolution of some problems relating to the interaction of the solar wind with the planets Mars and Venus.

  4. Flow Regime Based Climatologies of Lightning Probabilities for Spaceports and Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Sharp, David; Spratt, Scott; Lafosse, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to provide forecasters with a tool to indicate the warm season climatological probability of one or more lightning strikes within a circle at a site within a specified time interval. This paper described the AMU work conducted in developing flow regime based climatologies of lightning probabilities for the SLF and seven airports in the NWS MLB CWA in east-central Florida. The paper also described the GUI developed by the AMU that is used to display the data for the operational forecasters. There were challenges working with gridded lightning data as well as the code that accompanied the gridded data. The AMU modified the provided code to be able to produce the climatologies of lightning probabilities based on eight flow regimes for 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-n mi circles centered on eight sites in 1-, 3-, and 6-hour increments.

  5. The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weihang; Kong, Lingfu; Li, Lei; Liu, Xingbin; Xie, Ronghua; Li, Jun; Tang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow is widespread in petroleum industry processes. The study of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes and the liquid holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow are of great importance for the optimization of the oil production process. This paper presents a novel sensor, i.e., a mini-conductance probe (MCP) for measuring pure-water phase conductivity of oil-water segregated flow in horizontal pipes. The MCP solves the difficult problem of obtaining the pure-water correction for water holdup measurements by using a ring-shaped conductivity water-cut meter (RSCWCM). Firstly, using the finite element method (FEM), the spatial sensitivity field of the MCP is investigated and the optimized MCP geometry structure is determined in terms of the characteristic parameters. Then, the responses of the MCP for the oil-water segregated flow are calculated, and it is found that the MCP has better stability and sensitivity to the variation of water-layer thickness in the condition of high water holdup and low flow velocity. Finally, the static experiments for the oil-water segregated flow were carried out and a novel calibration method for pure-water phase conductivity measurements was presented. The validity of the pure-water phase conductivity measurement with segregated flow in horizontal pipes was verified by experimental results. PMID:27563907

  6. Nitrogen transforming community in a horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Coban, Oksana; Kuschk, Peter; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Spott, Oliver; Martienssen, Marion; Jetten, Mike S M; Knoeller, Kay

    2015-05-01

    Constructed wetlands are important ecosystems with respect to nitrogen cycling. Here we studied the activity and abundance of nitrogen transforming bacteria as well as the spatial distribution of nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and denitrification processes in a horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland. The functional genes of the nitrogen cycle were evenly distributed in a linear way along the flow path with prevalence at the superficial points. The same trend was observed for the nitrification and denitrification turnover rates using isotope labeling techniques. It was also shown that only short-term incubations should be used to measure denitrification turnover rates. Significant nitrate consumption under aerobic conditions diminishes nitrification rates and should therefore be taken into account when estimating nitrification turnover rates. This nitrate consumption was due to aerobic denitrification, the rate of which was comparable to that for anaerobic denitrification. Consequently, denitrification should not be considered as an exclusively anaerobic process. Phylogenetic analysis of hydrazine synthase (hzsA) gene clones indicated the presence of Brocadia and Kuenenia anammox species in the constructed wetland. Although anammox bacteria were detected by molecular methods, anammox activity could not be measured and hence this process appears to be of low importance in nitrogen transformations in these freshwater ecosystems. PMID:25744184

  7. Numerical simulation of droplets deposition in a horizontal turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwaish, Ibraheem K.

    1999-11-01

    In this dissertation, a two-phase, air-droplets, dilute, turbulent, and steady state flow in a horizontal rectangular channel, is modeled and numerically simulated using a modified KIVA-3V code. The deposition of different sizes of droplets on the walls of the channel is also studied. In this model, the interaction effects between the phases (two-way coupling) are considered by source terms in the momentum and energy equations for the continuous phase and by the instantaneous local velocity of the air in the droplet equation of motion, which includes the aerodynamic and gravitational forces. The turbulence is modeled by a k-ɛ model. The interaction effects between the turbulence and the dispersed droplets are also taken into account. The effects of the turbulence on the droplets are modeled by a fluctuating component added to the local air velocity in the droplet equation of motion. The effects of the droplets on the turbulence are modeled by two extra terms in the equation of motion for k and for ɛ. A stochastic model, which includes the spray equation, the droplet equation of motion, and a computational particle technique, is utilized. The flow variables in this simulation are consistent with theory and with experimental correlations. The large droplet behaviors are consistent with theory and experiments. The small droplet behavior agrees with some studies and contradicts others.

  8. Treatment of municipal wastewater using horizontal flow constructed wetlands in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elela, Sohair I; Golinelli, G; Saad El-Tabl, Abdou; Hellal, Mohammed S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of two pilot horizontal flow constructed wetlands (HFCWs) with and without vegetation. Three types of plants namely Canna, Phragmites australis and Cyprus papyrus were used. The surface area of each plant was 654 m(2). The flow rate was 20 m(3) d(-1) and the organic loading rate range was 1.7-3.4 kg BOD d(-1) with a detention time of 11 days. The results obtained showed that planted HFCW produced high quality effluent in terms of reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD; 88%), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD; 91%) and total suspended solids (TSS; 92%) as well as nutrient removal. In addition, 4 logs of total coliform were removed from the planted unit compared with only 3 logs in the unplanted one. The phosphate uptake by the plants reached 29, 30.91 and 38.9 g P m(-2) for Canna, Phragmites and Cyprus, respectively, with 60% removal rate in the treated effluent. The nitrogen uptake by the same plants reached 63.1, 49.46 and 82.33 g N m(-2). Although, the unplanted unit proved to be efficient in the removal of COD, BOD and TSS, it lacks efficiency in pathogen and nutrient removal. The reclaimed wastewater, after disinfection, could be reused for non-restricted irrigation purposes. PMID:24434966

  9. Phase splitting of wet steam in annular flow through a horizontal impacting tee

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, S.F.; Rubel, M.T. )

    1992-11-01

    Phase splitting occurs during gas/liquid two-phase flow through pipe junctions and causes a gas/liquid mass ratio in the outlet legs of the junction that is different form that at the inlet. In steamflood distribution networks, this results in different steam qualities at the outlets of a junction than at the inlet. This, in turn, results in a heat distribution not in accordance with the mass distribution in the outlets of the tee. Because heat management of a steamflood project is important for both economic incentives and ultimate recovery, phase splitting must be understood and controlled. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation conducted on phase splitting of wet steam during annular flow through a horizontal 2-in. impacting tee. The experimental operating range included inlet pressures of 400 and 600 psig, inlet mass fluxes form 1,180 to 10,150 lbm/(in[sup 2]-hr), inlet steam qualities form 0.2 to 0.8, and outlet vapor extraction ratios for one outlet leg from 0.2 to 0.5.

  10. Sensitivity of atmospheric flow regimes to anthropogenic forcing: Insights from an intermediate atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwala, S.

    2003-04-01

    Changes in the frequency of extreme events are of great societal importance. Recent work suggests that these changes can be surprisingly large for variables with ``fat-tailed'' probability density functions (PDFs) even for small mean changes in climate. Fat-tailed, and in particular exponential, PDFs imply a greater likelihood of occurrence of large fluctuations (``extreme events''). The exponentially distributed persistence time of anomalous atmospheric flow patterns known as weather regimes is a climatically important example. The notion of atmospheric weather regimes as persistent, quasi-stationary flow patterns controlled by intermittently attracting fixed points in the atmosphere's phase space led Palmer (1999) to explore the behavior of low-dimensional chaotic systems. Based on insight from these simpler systems, Palmer hypothesized that the response of climate to a small imposed forcing (such as the anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases) would manifest itself primarily in terms of the PDFs associated with regimes, while the spatial patterns of these regimes would be relatively unchanged. Palmer focused on changes in the average frequency of occurrence of regimes. However, recent experiments (Khatiwala et al, 2001) with simple dynamical and stochastic systems suggest that a potentially more damaging way in which the atmosphere can respond to small perturbations is through changes in the frequency of occurrence of extremely persistent events. In common with the atmosphere, these systems too are characterized by both regime behavior and exponential PDFs of persistence time. Consequently, small perturbations in external parameters can change the probability of occurrence of persistent events by many orders of magnitude. This extreme sensitivity is directly related to the stability properties of the system. An immediate question then is whether more complex geophysical systems with multiple regimes such as the atmosphere, are similarly sensitive to small

  11. Experimental response of Salix cuttings to different flow regimes due to human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, Lorenzo; Signarbieux, Constant; Turberg, Pascal; Buttler, Alexandre; Perona, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Hydropower production and other human activities change the natural flow regime of rivers, in turn impacting the riparian environment. The main challenge in order to define eco-sustainable flows is to quantify the effects in terms of geomorphology and ecosystem adaptation. We present 2-years controlled experiments to investigate riparian vegetation (Salix Viminalis) response to forced water table changing dynamics, from one water regime to another, in a temperate region (Switzerland). Three synthetic flow regimes have been simulated and applied to three batteries of Salix cuttings growing outdoor within plastic pots, each about 1 meter tall. In 2012 one treatment simulated a minimal flow policy for small run-of-river hydropower plants, which drastically impacts the low and the medium-low components of the hydrograph, but not the extremes. In 2013 we confirmed and completed some of 2012 results, by reproducing typical hydropeaking effects due to dam management and focusing on daily water table variations and offsets. For both the seasons, after an initial period where all pots undergone the same oscillations in order to uniform the plants initial conditions, the experiment started, and the water dynamic was changed. Cuttings transitory response dynamics has been quantified by continuous sap flow and water potential measurements, and by regularly collecting growth parameters, as well as leaves photosynthesis, fluorescence, and pictures of each plant. At the end of the experiment, all cuttings were carefully removed and the both above and below ground biomass analyzed in detail. Particularly, the 3D root structure was obtained by High Resolution Computer Tomography. Our analyses revealed a clear dependence between roots distribution and water regime reflecting the need for adaptation, in agreement with field observations of Pasquale et al. (2012). In particular, an initial strong difference in terms of stress and growth performances was then followed by a later

  12. Validating alternative methodologies to estimate the hydrological regime of temporary streams when flow data are unavailable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Pilar; Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Cid, Núria; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic life in temporary streams is strongly conditioned by the temporal variability of the hydrological conditions that control the occurrence and connectivity of diverse mesohabitats. In this context, the software TREHS (Temporary Rivers' Ecological and Hydrological Status) has been developed, in the framework of the LIFE Trivers project, to help managers for adequately implement the Water Framework Directive in this type of water bodies. TREHS, using the methodology described in Gallart et al (2012), defines six temporal 'aquatic states', based on the hydrological conditions representing different mesohabitats, for a given reach at a particular moment. Nevertheless, hydrological data for assessing the regime of temporary streams are often non-existent or scarce. The scarcity of flow data makes frequently impossible the characterization of temporary streams hydrological regimes and, as a consequence, the selection of the correct periods and methods to determine their ecological status. Because of its qualitative nature, the TREHS approach allows the use of alternative methodologies to assess the regime of temporary streams in the lack of observed flow data. However, to adapt the TREHS to this qualitative data both the temporal scheme (from monthly to seasonal) as well as the number of aquatic states (from 6 to 3) have been modified. Two alternatives complementary methodologies were tested within the TREHS framework to assess the regime of temporary streams: interviews and aerial photographs. All the gauging stations (13) belonging to the Catalan Internal Catchments (NE, Spain) with recurrent zero flows periods were selected to validate both methodologies. On one hand, non-structured interviews were carried out to inhabitants of villages and small towns near the gauging stations. Flow permanence metrics for input into TREHS were drawn from the notes taken during the interviews. On the other hand, the historical series of available aerial photographs (typically 10

  13. Modeling of cavitation phenomena in homogeneous flow in transitory regimes in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessal, Mohand

    1987-12-01

    Cavitation in transitory regime of a homogeneous gas-liquid mixture in an elastic pipe was studied. For the case where the two components have the same velocity, it is shown that it is possible to model the flow while conserving the relations and the continuous character of the medium. The flow equations were solved using the standard MacCormack finite difference scheme and the method of characteristics. Measurements confirm model validity. A characteristic formulation for the case where the two components have different velocities was derived.

  14. Emulsification in turbulent flow 1. Mean and maximum drop diameters in inertial and viscous regimes.

    PubMed

    Vankova, Nina; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai D; Ivanov, Ivan B; Vulchev, Vassil D; Danner, Thomas

    2007-08-15

    Systematic experimental study of the effects of several factors on the mean and maximum drop sizes during emulsification in turbulent flow is performed. These factors include: (1) rate of energy dissipation, epsilon; (2) interfacial tension, sigma; (3) viscosity of the oil phase, eta(D); (4) viscosity of the aqueous phase, eta(C); and (5) oil volume fraction, Phi. The emulsions are prepared by using the so-called "narrow-gap homogenizer" working in turbulent regime of emulsification. The experiments are performed at high surfactant concentration to avoid the effect of drop-drop coalescence. For emulsions prepared in the inertial turbulent regime, the mean and the maximum drop sizes increase with the increase of eta(D) and sigma, and with the decrease of epsilon. In contrast, Phi and eta(C) affect only slightly the mean and the maximum drop sizes in this regime of emulsification. These results are described very well by a theoretical expression proposed by Davies [Chem. Eng. Sci. 40 (1985) 839], which accounts for the effects of the drop capillary pressure and the viscous dissipation inside the breaking drops. The polydispersity of the emulsions prepared in the inertial regime of emulsification does not depend significantly on sigma and epsilon. However, the emulsion polydispersity increases significantly with the increase of oil viscosity, eta(D). The experiments showed also that the inertial turbulent regime is inappropriate for emulsification of oils with viscosity above ca. 500 mPa s, if drops of micrometer size are to be obtained. The transition from inertial to viscous turbulent regime of emulsification was accomplished by a moderate increase of the viscosity of the aqueous phase (above 5 mPa s in the studied systems) and/or by increase of the oil volume fraction, Phi>0.6. Remarkably, emulsions with drops of micrometer size are easily formed in the viscous turbulent regime of emulsification, even for oils with viscosity as high as 10,000 mPa s. In this regime

  15. On the nonlinear characteristics of the axisymmetric flow regime: Cylindrical and spherical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. W.; Dutton, J. A.; Shirer, H. N.

    1985-01-01

    The physical relationship between steady axisymmetric flows that might be observed in the atmosphere and in laboratory vessels is investigated theoretically. This is accomplished by comparing both the nonlinear structure and the thermal forcing mechanisms in two truncated spectral models of flow in the atmosphere and the rotating laboratory cylinder, respectively. Under statically stable conditions, the response of the internally forced spherical model (which is developed here from a set of new orthonormal basis functions) exhibits steady behavior different from that in the externally forced cylindrical model. Two regions of multiple steady solutions occur in the cylindrical model, under stable conditions, that are not found in the spherical one. The possible physical relevance of these multiple solutions is investigated by determining their location in parameter space with respect to the classical Hadley-Rossby transition curve. The results suggest that the wave flow regime, in an annulus, might develop catastrophically when an upper symmetric flow ceases to exist.

  16. Numerical investigation of flow motion and performance of a horizontal axis tidal turbine subjected to a steady current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-juan; Zheng, Jin-hai; Peng, Yu-xuan; Zhang, Ji-sheng; Wu, Xiu-guang

    2015-04-01

    Horizontal axis tidal turbines have attracted more and more attentions nowadays, because of their convenience and low expense in construction and high efficiency in extracting tidal energy. The present study numerically investigates the flow motion and performance of a horizontal axis tidal turbine with a supporting vertical cylinder under steady current. In the numerical model, the continuous equation and incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved, and the volume of fluid method is employed to track free surface motion. The RNG k- ɛ model is adopted to calculate turbulence transport while the fractional area/volume obstacle representation method is used to describe turbine characteristics and movement. The effects of installation elevation of tidal turbine and inlet velocity on the water elevation, and current velocity, rotating speed and resultant force on turbine are discussed. Based on the comparison of the numerical results, a better understanding of flow structure around horizontal axis tidal turbine and turbine performance is achieved.

  17. Onset of entrainment and degree of dispersion in dual continuous horizontal oil-water flows

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Wahaibi, Talal; Angeli, Panagiota

    2009-04-15

    The transition from stratified to dual continuous oil-water flow (where each phase retains its continuity but there is dispersion of one phase into the other) as well as the dispersed phase fractions in the layers of the dual continuous pattern, were studied experimentally. Transition to this pattern from stratified flow occurs when drops of one phase appear into the other (onset of entrainment). The studies were carried out in a 38 mm ID horizontal stainless steel test section using two different inlet geometries, a T- and a Y-junction. The patterns were visualized through a transparent acrylic section located at 7 m from the inlet using a high speed video camera. Phase distribution measurements in a pipe cross section were obtained just before the acrylic section with a local impedance probe and the results were used to calculate the volume fraction of each phase entrained into the other. The onset of entrainment was found to occur at lower superficial water velocities as the oil superficial velocities increased. However, the inlet geometry did not affect significantly the transition line. During dual continuous flow, the dispersion of one phase into the opposite was found to extend further away from the interface with increasing water superficial velocity for a certain oil superficial velocity. An increase in the superficial water velocity increased the entrained fraction of water in oil (E{sub w/o}) but there was no trend with the oil velocity. Similarly, an increase in the superficial oil velocity increased the fraction of oil drops in water (E{sub o/w}) but the water velocity had no clear effect. The entrainment fractions were affected by the inlet geometry, with the T-inlet resulting in higher entrainment than the Y-inlet, perhaps because of the increased mixing induced by the T-inlet. The difference between the two inlets increased as the oil and water velocities increased. (author)

  18. Nitrogen transformation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands I: Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, A. W.; Bigambo, T.

    In this paper a mathematical model for prediction of nitrogen transformation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands was developed. Two horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands were designed to receive organic loading rate below 50 kg/ha/d and hydraulic loading rate of 480 m 3/ha/d from a primary facultative pond. Two rectangular shaped units each 11.0 m long, 3.7 m wide and 1.0 m deep and bottom slope of 1% were constructed and filled with 6-25 mm diameter gravel pack to a depth of 0.75 m. Each unit was planted with Phragmites mauritianus with an initial plant density of 29,000 plants/ha. The plants were allowed to grow for about four months before sampling for water quality parameters commenced. Samples were collected daily for about three months. Dissolved oxygen, pH and temperature were measured in situ and ammonia, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrates, nitrite and Chemical Oxygen Demand were measured in the laboratory in accordance with Standard Methods. The mathematical model took into account activities of biomass suspended in the water body and biofilm on aggregates and plant roots. The state variables modelled include organic, ammonia, and nitrate-nitrogen, which were sectored in water, plant and aggregates. The major nitrogen transformation processes considered in this study were mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, plant uptake, plant decaying, and sedimentation. The forcing functions, which were considered in the model, are temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen. Stella II software was used to simulate the nitrogen processes influencing the removal of nitrogen in the constructed wetland. One of the two-wetland units was used for model calibration and the second unit for model validation. The model results indicated that 0.872 gN/m 2 d was settled at the bottom of the wetland and on gravel bed and roots of the plants. However, 0.752 gN/m 2 d (86.2%) of the settled nitrogen was regenerated back to the water body, which means that

  19. Flow Regime Study in a High Density Circulating Fluidized Bed Riser with an Abrupt Exit

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Shadle, L.J.; Yue, P.C.; Monazam, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    Flow regime study was conducted in a 0.3 m diameter, 15.5 m height circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser with an abrupt exit at the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. Local particle velocities were measured at various radial positions and riser heights using an optical fiber probe. On-line measurement of solid circulating rate was continuously recorded by the Spiral. Glass beads of mean diameter 61 μm and particle density of 2,500 kg/m3 were used as bed material. The CFB riser was operated at various superficial gas velocities ranging from 3 to 7.6 m/s and solid mass flux from 20 to 550 kg/m2-s. At a constant riser gas velocity, transition from fast fluidization to dense suspension upflow (DSU) regime started at the bottom of the riser with increasing solid flux. Except at comparatively low riser gas velocity and solid flux, the apparent solid holdup at the top exit region was higher than the middle section of the riser. The solid fraction at this top region could be much higher than 7% under high riser gas velocity and solid mass flux. The local particle velocity showed downward flow near the wall at the top of the riser due to its abrupt exit. This abrupt geometry reflected the solids and, therefore, caused solid particles traveling downward along the wall. However, at location below, but near, the top of the riser the local particle velocities were observed flowing upward at the wall. Therefore, DSU was identified in the upper region of the riser with an abrupt exit while the fully developed region, lower in the riser, was still exhibiting core-annular flow structure. Our data were compared with the flow regime boundaries proposed by Kim et al. [1] for distinguishing the dilute pneumatic transport, fast fluidization, and DSU.

  20. Quantifying downstream impacts of impoundment on flow regime and channel planform, lower Trinity River, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Slattery, Michael C.; Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2005-07-01

    As human population worldwide has grown, so has interest in harnessing and manipulating the flow of water for the benefit of humans. The Trinity River of eastern Texas is one such watershed greatly impacted by engineering and urbanization. Draining the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, just under 30 reservoirs are in operation in the basin, regulating flow while containing public supplies, supporting recreation, and providing flood control. Lake Livingston is the lowest, as well as largest, reservoir in the basin, a mere 95 km above the Trinity's outlet near Galveston Bay. This study seeks to describe and quantify channel activity and flow regime, identifying effects of the 1968 closure of Livingston dam. Using historic daily and peak discharge data from USGS gauging stations, flow duration curves are constructed, identifying pre- and post-dam flow conditions. A digital historic photo archive was also constructed using six sets of aerial photographs spanning from 1938 to 1995, and three measures of channel activity applied using a GIS. Results show no changes in high flow conditions following impoundment, while low flows are elevated. However, the entire post-dam period is characterized by significantly higher rainfall, which may be obscuring the full impact of flow regulation. Channel activity rates do not indicate a more stabilized planform following dam closure; rather they suggest that the Trinity River is adjusting itself to the stress of Livingston dam in a slow, gradual process that may not be apparent in a modern time scale.

  1. Vertical Subsurface Flow Mixing and Horizontal Anisotropy in Coarse Fluvial Aquifers: Structural Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggenberger, P.; Huber, E.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed descriptions of the subsurface heterogeneities in coarse fluvial aquifer gravel often lack in concepts to distinguish between the essence and the noise of a permeability structure and the ability to extrapolate site specific hydraulic information at the tens to several hundred meters scale. At this scale the heterogeneity strongly influences the anisotropies of the flow field and the mixing processes in groundwater. However, in many hydrogeological models the complexity of natural systems is oversimplified. Understanding the link between the dynamics of the surface processes of braided-river systems and the resulting subsurface sedimentary structures is the key to characterizing the complexity of horizontal and vertical mixing processes in groundwater. From the different depositional elements of coarse braided-river systems, the largest permeability contrasts can be observed in the scour-fills. Other elements (e.g. different types of gravel sheets) show much smaller variabilities and could be considered as a kind of matrix. Field experiments on the river Tagliamento (Northeast Italy) based on morphological observation and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys, as well as outcrop analyses of gravel pit exposures (Switzerland) allowed us to define the shape, sizes, spatial distribution and preservation potential of scour-fills. In vertical sections (e.g. 2D GPR data, vertical outcrop), the spatial density of remnant erosional bounding surfaces of scours is an indicator for the dynamics of the braided-river system (lateral mobility of the active floodplain, rate of sediment net deposition and spatial distribution of the confluence scours). In case of combined low aggradation rate and low lateral mobility the deposits may be dominated by a complex overprinting of scour-fills. The delineation of the erosional bounding surfaces, that are coherent over the survey area, is based on the identification of angular discontinuities of the reflectors. Fence diagrams

  2. Nitrogen transformation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands II: Effect of biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigambo, T.; Mayo, A. W.

    In this paper the significance of the biofilm biomass present in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland in removal of nitrogen was demonstrated. The model was developed and optimised using data obtained in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland planted with Phragmites mauritianus and filled with 6-25 mm diameter gravel pack. The effects of biofilm biomass activities were studied by removing the effects of plant and gravel bed biofilm in an already calibrated model and re-run the same. Research results indicate that total nitrogen removal was largely influenced by growth of biofilm on plants than on aggregates. When plant biofilm and suspended biomasses were considered total nitrogen removal of 38.1% was observed compared with 25.1% when aggregate-biofilm and suspended biomasses were considered because plants have more surface areas, which are active sites for the effective biofilm activities than aggregates. However, in a natural wetland where the soil grain size is smaller, the effect of biofilm on plants may be smaller than biofilm on soil particles. There was no significant difference in organic-nitrogen effluent concentrations when biofilm biomass was considered or rejected. The averages in organic-nitrogen effluent concentrations were 0.39, 0.41 and 0.53 gN/m 2 for suspended alone, aggregate-biofilm and suspended; and suspended and plant-biofilm, respectively. This indicates that the removal of organic-nitrogen in wastewater is not significantly influenced by biofilm activities. Sedimentation and mineralization processes are the major factors influencing the concentration of organic-nitrogen in the effluent. On the other hand, biofilm activities had significant influence on ammonia-nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen transformation. The developed model output indicates that the effluent ammonia concentration was 2 gN/m 2, but in absence of biofilm the effluent ammonia concentration increases to 3.5 gN/m 2. Statistical analysis indicates that the

  3. Flow regimes, bed morphology, and flow resistance in self-formed step-pool channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comiti, F.; Cadol, D.; Wohl, E.

    2009-04-01

    We used a mobile bed flume with scaled grain size distribution, channel geometry, and flow to examine morphology and hydraulics of stepped channels. We hypothesized that (1) step geometry and flow resistance differs significantly as a function of the range of grain sizes present, (2) a transition from nappe to skimming flow occurs in stepped channels with mobile beds for conditions similar to stepped spillways, and (3) the partitioning of flow resistance changes significantly when flow passes from nappe to skimming conditions. Results support each of these hypotheses and help to illuminate the complexity of V-Q relationships in stepped channels, in which a dramatic decrease in flow resistance and increase in velocity accompany the transition from nappe to skimming flow near step-forming events. Therefore, a single flow resistance equation applicable to both ordinary and large floods may not be ideal in stepped channels. Nonetheless, models based on dimensionless velocity and unit discharge appear more robust compared to those based on the Darcy-Weisbach friction factor.

  4. Granular-flow rheology: Role of shear-rate number in transition regime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.-L.; Ling, C.-H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the rationale behind the semiempirical formulation of a generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model in the light of the Reiner-Rivlin constitutive theory and the viscoplastic theory, thereby identifying the parameters that control the rheology of granular flow. The shear-rate number (N) proves to be among the most significant parameters identified from the GVF model. As N ??? 0 and N ??? ???, the GVF model can reduce asymptotically to the theoretical stress versus shear-rate relations in the macroviscous and graininertia regimes, respectively, where the grain concentration (C) also plays a major role in the rheology of granular flow. Using available data obtained from the rotating-cylinder experiments of neutrally buoyant solid spheres dispersing in an interstitial fluid, the shear stress for granular flow in transition between the two regimes proves dependent on N and C in addition to some material constants, such as the coefficient of restitution. The insufficiency of data on rotating-cylinder experiments cannot presently allow the GVF model to predict how a granular flow may behave in the entire range of N; however, the analyzed data provide an insight on the interrelation among the relevant dimensionless parameters.

  5. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhihui; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Junlin; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-12-09

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body.

  6. The effect of solid particles on flow regime and implications for slug flow in high-crystallinity magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belien, I. L.; Cashman, K. V.; Rempel, A. W.; Rust, A.; Phillips, J.

    2009-12-01

    Strombolian explosions are a common form of activity in small mafic systems. Strombolian eruptions are commonly attributed to a conduit-filling gas bubble rising and bursting at the magma free surface, and expelling magma as it bursts. This flow regime, called slug flow, has been identified for two-phase systems in which gas flows through a liquid. At many volcanoes exhibiting the Strombolian eruption style however, the crystallinity of the magma can be quite high (up to 50% at Stromboli). It is generally assumed that the primary effect of particles is to increase the bulk viscosity of the fluid; unknown is the effect of adding particles on two-phase flow regimes. To explore the role of particles on the slug flow regime, we have performed a set of analogue experiments in which air rises at different flow rates through a cylindrical tube filled with a mixture of corn syrup (magma) and varying proportions of solid particles (crystals). In previous studies, we have shown that bubbles a few times larger than the particles tend to split into smaller bubbles through interaction with particles in dense suspensions. Under these conditions it is unlikely that large conduit-filling bubbles will be able to form or maintain themselves. In this study we investigate the influence of particles on bubbles that are several orders of magnitude larger than the particles and approach the width of the conduit. Initial observations show that periodic bubbles are formed when a pressure gradient exists across the particle-liquid suspension. Bubbles tend to be conduit-filling when the particle concentration is low. When the concentration approaches 50%, smaller bubbles are formed. This shift in bubble size suggests that it may be difficult, or even impossible, for large (conduit-filling) bubbles to ascend through highly crystalline mafic magmas. Changing the flow rate of air changes the frequency with which bubbles form. Our results start to constrain the conditions of gas flux and magma

  7. Integrating Acoustic Imaging of Flow Regimes With Bathymetry: A Case Study, Main Endeavor Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Jackson, D. R.; Jones, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    A unified view of the seafloor and the hydrothermal flow regimes (plumes and diffuse flow) is constructed for three major vent clusters in the Main Endeavour Field (e.g., Grotto, S&M, and Salut) of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. The Main Endeavour Field is one of RIDGE 2000's Integrated Study Sites. A variety of visualization techniques are used to reconstruct the plumes (3D) and the diffuse flow field (2D) based on our acoustic imaging data set (July 2000 cruise). Plumes are identified as volumes of high backscatter intensity (indicating high particulate content or sharp density contrasts due to temperature variations) that remained high intensity when successive acoustic pings were subtracted (indicating that the acoustic targets producing the backscatter were in motion). Areas of diffuse flow are detected using our acoustic scintillation technique (AST). For the Grotto vent region (where a new Doppler technique was used to estimate vertical velocities in the plume), we estimate the areal partitioning between black smoker and diffuse flow in terms of volume fluxes. The volumetric and areal regions, where plume and diffuse flow were imaged, are registered over the bathymetry and compared to geologic maps of each region. The resulting images provide a unified view of the seafloor by integrating hydrothermal flow with geology.

  8. A study of transient channel flow in a transitionally rough regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddighi, Mehdi; He, Shuisheng; O'Donoghue, Tom; Pokrajac, Dubravka; Vardy, Alan

    2014-11-01

    DNS has been used to investigate the transient behaviour of turbulence following a rapid flow acceleration from an initially turbulent flow in a channel with a smooth top wall and a roughened bottom wall made of close-packed pyramids. Simulations have been performed at various flow conditions in the transitionally rough regime with equivalent roughness heights (ks+) ranging from 12 to 42. It is shown that the transient responses of the flow over the smooth and rough walls are practically independent of each other. Also, the nature of the process over the rough wall varies strongly as the influence of the roughness increases during the early stages of the acceleration. Whereas the transient flow over the smooth-wall undergoes a process strikingly similar to laminar-turbulent bypass transition, the corresponding behaviour over the rough wall depends on the wall condition. When the equivalent roughness height of the final flow condition is below ~30, bypass-like transition dominates, although the roughness induces early transition. When ks+ > 30 , however, the rough-wall flow undergoes a highly transient process resembling roughness induced transition.

  9. Effects of intermittent loading on nitrogen removal in horizontal subsurface flow wetlands.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Margaret G; Yelderman, Joe C; Potterton, Tina; Doyle, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    Removal of CBOD(5) and nitrogen from septic tank effluent was evaluated in four horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) wetlands. An intermittently loaded cell was compared to a continuously loaded control cell, with both treatments receiving the same weekly volume. The intermittent cell was rapidly drained and "rested" for 24-hr, then refilled in steps, twice weekly. Two media with different particle sizes but similar porosities were also compared. The two media, light weight expanded shale and gravel, were both continuously loaded. As hypothesized, the wetland cell that was intermittently loaded had higher dissolved oxygen, greater ammonia removal, and greater nitrate production than the continuously loaded cells. Areal NH(3)-N removal for the intermittently loaded cell was 0.90 g m(-2) d(-1) compared to 0.47 g m(-2) d(-1) for the control. Ammonia removal was also higher in continuously loaded gravel cells than in cells with expanded shale. Ammonia-N removal was an order of magnitude lower in a similar SSF wetland that had been in operation for 3 years. However, CBOD(5), total suspended solids, and total nitrogen did not vary substantially among the treatments. PMID:20962402

  10. Sub-grid drag models for horizontal cylinder arrays immersed in gas-particle multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2013-09-08

    Immersed cylindrical tube arrays often are used as heat exchangers in gas-particle fluidized beds. In multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of large fluidized beds, explicit resolution of small cylinders is computationally infeasible. Instead, the cylinder array may be viewed as an effective porous medium in coarse-grid simulations. The cylinders' influence on the suspension as a whole, manifested as an effective drag force, and on the relative motion between gas and particles, manifested as a correction to the gas-particle drag, must be modeled via suitable sub-grid constitutive relationships. In this work, highly resolved unit-cell simulations of flow around an array of horizontal cylinders, arranged in a staggered configuration, are filtered to construct sub-grid, or `filtered', drag models, which can be implemented in coarse-grid simulations. The force on the suspension exerted by the cylinders is comprised of, as expected, a buoyancy contribution, and a kinetic component analogous to fluid drag on a single cylinder. Furthermore, the introduction of tubes also is found to enhance segregation at the scale of the cylinder size, which, in turn, leads to a reduction in the filtered gas-particle drag.

  11. Corrosion in three-phase oil/water/gas slug flow in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Jepson, W.P.

    1994-12-31

    A study of corrosion in the mixing zone at the front of slugs has been carried out in a 10 cm internal diameter, horizontal, three-phase flow system using a light condensate oil and saltwater as liquids and carbon dioxide as the gas phase. Visual observations show that stratified water layers are apparent at the bottom of the pipe at oil compositions up to 60%. Pulses of gas bubbles are formed at high Froude numbers which impinge on the lower surfaces of the pipe. The corrosion rate increased with an increase in Froude number. This is due to the increases in wall shear stress, turbulence, and gas present at the bottom of the pipe as the Froude number increases. The presence of gas at the bottom of the pipe has a significant effect on the corrosion rate. It provides an erosion component to the corrosion processes. The corrosion rate can be related to pressure drop across the slug but average wall shear stress does not seem to be appropriate.

  12. Generalized linear stability of non-inertial rimming flow in a rotating horizontal cylinder.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Tiwari, Naveen

    2015-10-01

    The stability of a thin film of viscous liquid inside a horizontally rotating cylinder is studied using modal and non-modal analysis. The equation governing the film thickness is derived within lubrication approximation and up to first order in aspect ratio (average film thickness to radius of the cylinder). Effect of gravity, viscous stress and capillary pressure are considered in the model. Steady base profiles are computed in the parameter space of interest that are uniform in the axial direction. A linear stability analysis is performed on these base profiles to study their stability to axial perturbations. The destabilizing behavior of aspect ratio and surface tension is demonstrated which is attributed to capillary instability. The transient growth that gives maximum amplification of any initial disturbance and the pseudospectra of the stability operator are computed. These computations reveal weak effect of non-normality of the operator and the results of eigenvalue analysis are recovered after a brief transient period. Results from nonlinear simulations are also presented which also confirm the validity of the modal analysis for the flow considered in this study. PMID:26496740

  13. Influence of chlorothalonil on the removal of organic matter in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Casas-Zapata, Juan C; Ríos, Karina; Florville-Alejandre, Tomás R; Morató, Jordi; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of chlorothalonil (CLT) on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCW) planted with Phragmites australis. Physicochemical parameters of influent and effluent water samples, microbial population counting methods and statistical analysis were used to evaluate the influence of CLT on organic matter removal efficiency. The experiments were conducted on four planted replicate wetlands (HSSFCW-Pa) and one unplanted control wetland (HSSFCW-NPa). The wetlands exhibited high average organic matter removal efficiencies (HSSFCW-Pa: 80.6% DOC, 98.0% COD; HSSFCW-NPa: 93.2% DOC, 98.4% COD). The addition of CLT did not influence organic removal parameters. In all cases CLT concentrations in the effluent occurred in concentrations lower than the detection limit of the analytical method. Microbial population counts from HSSFCW-Pa showed significant correlations among different microbial groups and with different physicochemical variables. The apparent independence of organic matter removal and CLT inputs, along with the CLT depletion observed in effluent samples demonstrated that HSSFCW are a viable technology for the treatment of agricultural effluents contaminated with organo-chloride pesticides like CLT. PMID:23305280

  14. Alternative filter media for phosphorous removal in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Vohla, Christina; Põldvere, Elar; Noorvee, Alar; Kuusemets, Valdo; Mander, Ulo

    2005-01-01

    During the study period from 1997 to 2002 the purification efficiency of phosphorus in the horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) constructed wetland (CW) in Kodijärve, has been quite high (63-95%). However, slowly increasing trend in outlet P concentrations and decreasing annual P removal rate are obviously the indicators that show possible saturation processes in filter media. To search for potential filter media with high phosphorus sorption capacity, sorption characteristics and particle size distribution of several local sands, gravels, glauconite-sandstone, LWA, and calcareous waste products from oil-shale industry were investigated. The average P sorption capacity for best materials (crashed ash block, oil, shale fly ash and the sediment from oil shale ash plateau) was higher than 96% and estimated design capacity was around 4-5 g P kg(-1). According to results, sediment from oil shale ash plateau was considered as perspective filter media for P retention. In Summer 2002 experimental sedimentation filter, filled with the sediment from oil shale ash plateau, was installed in the outlet from the Kodijärve HSSF CW. According to preliminary results the average P removal in the sedimentation filter was 52%. PMID:15921280

  15. Application of horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor for bioremediation of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R P; Vich, D V; Garcia, M L; Varesche, M B A; Zaiat, M

    2016-06-01

    The production of low-pH effluent with sulfate and metals is one of the biggest environmental concerns in the mining industry. The biological process for sulfate reduction has the potential to become a low-cost solution that enables the recovery of interesting compounds. The present study analyzed such a process in a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB) reactor, employing ethanol as the carbon and energy source. Results showed that a maximal efficiency in the removal of sulfate and ethanol could only be obtained by reducing the applied sulfate load (225.1 ± 38 g m(-3) d(-1)). This strategy led to over 75% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sulfate removal. Among the COD/SO4(2-) studied ratios, 0.67 showed the most promising performance. The effluent's pH has naturally remained between 6.8 and 7.0 and the complete oxidation of the organic matter has been observed. Corrections of the influent pH or effluent recirculation did not show any significant effect on the COD and sulfate removal efficiency. Species closely related to strains of Clostridium sp. and species of Acidaminobacter hydrogenomorfans and Fusibacter paucivorans that can be related to the process of sulfate reduction were found in the HAIB reactors when the initial pH was 5 and the COD/SO4(2-) ratio increased to 1.0. PMID:27280606

  16. Experimental investigation on liquid film asymmetry in air-water horizontal annular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Andriyanto; Deendarlianto, Indarto, Neo, Fredrick

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetry of circumferential liquid film thickness distribution in an air-water horizontal annular flow has been experimentally investigated using superficial gas and liquid velocity of 10 - 40 m/s and 0.025 to 0.4 m/s, respectively. In general, the film at the bottom of the pipe will be thicker than that of the side and the top. The asymmetry parameter could be expressed in the ratio of average film thickness to the bottom film thickness or the ratio of the top-to-bottom film thickness. Measurement using compact multiple probe instrument shows that the circumferential film thickness distribution is strongly affected by superficial gas velocity. The higher gas velocity results in the more uniform liquid film circumferential distribution. In comparison to the existing correlations, the asymmetry parameter resulted from the experiment shows a good agreement. It is also shown from the experiment that a less symmetry of film thickness distribution is resulted when the gravity force is dominant. A more symmetry distribution is resulted when the inertial force takes control.

  17. Sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin removal using a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor.

    PubMed

    Chatila, Sami; Amparo, Maura R; Carvalho, Lucas S; Penteado, Eduardo D; Tomita, Inês N; Santos-Neto, Álvaro J; Lima Gomes, Paulo C F; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotics sulfamethoxazole (SMTX) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) are commonly used in human and veterinary medicine, which explains their occurrence in wastewater. Anaerobic reactors are low-cost, simple and suitable technology to wastewater treatment, but there is a lack of studies related to the removal efficiency of antibiotics. To overcome this knowledge gap, the objective of this study was to evaluate the removal kinetics of SMTX and CIP using a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor. Two different concentrations were evaluated, for SMTX 20 and 40 μg L(-1); for CIP 2.0 and 5.0 μg L(-1). The affluent and effluent analysis was carried out in liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with the sample preparation procedure using an off-line solid-phase extraction. This method was developed, validated and successfully applied for monitoring the affluent and effluent samples. The removal efficiency found for both antibiotics at the two concentrations studied was 97%. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) exhibited kinetic constants that were different from that observed for the antibiotics, indicating the absence of co-metabolism. Also, though the antibiotic concentration was increased, there was no inhibitory effect in the removal of COD and antibiotics. PMID:26465824

  18. An experimental investigation of flow patterns and liquid entrainment in a horizontal-tube evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, John Steven

    An experimental study of two-phase flow patterns and droplet entrainment in a horizontal-tube evaporator was conducted. Measurements were made with serpentine aluminum and glass evaporators with geometries typical of those used for domestic refrigeration. The refrigerant in the majority of tests was R134a, which will replace R12 for refrigeration and automotive air-conditioning in 1995. The phenomenon of primary interest was the nonequilibrium transport of droplets within superheated vapor at the evaporator exit. Of particular concern were substantial variations in the liquid rate with time, and corresponding fluctuations in exit temperature. These variations are due to the formation of slugs which rapidly transport a surplus of liquid toward the exit. A flow loop was constructed to circulate oil-free refrigerant through the evaporator under widely varying conditions. Liquid carry over (expressed as a dimensionless entrained mass fraction, EMF) was measured as a function of inlet quality, heat flux, mass flux, and exit superheat. A laser-based phase/Doppler particle analyzer was used to measure droplet diameters and velocities at the evaporator exit. Tests with three refrigerants over wide ranges of operating conditions revealed time-averaged EMF's of no more than 0.1 percent. Analysis of variance showed exit superheat to have the strongest effect, followed by mass flux, inlet quality, and heat flux. Time-averaged EMF's varied with operating conditions by several orders of magnitude, decreasing with increasing superheat level (due to lower entrainment rates near the exit and more rapid droplet vaporization) and mass flux and inlet quality (due to reduced slug formation). The incidence of slug flow and its effect on evaporator exit conditions were documented in time-resolved experiments, using techniques such as auto- and cross-correlation and Fourier transform. Time-resolved EMF's as high as one percent were observed, as well as sharp reductions in exit superheat

  19. Statistical analysis of the horizontal divergent flow in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, Shin; Hayashi, Keiji; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-10-10

    Solar active regions (ARs) are thought to be formed by magnetic fields from the convection zone. Our flux emergence simulations revealed that a strong horizontal divergent flow (HDF) of unmagnetized plasma appears at the photosphere before the flux begins to emerge. In our earlier study, we analyzed HMI data for a single AR and confirmed presence of this precursor plasma flow in the actual Sun. In this paper, as an extension of our earlier study, we conducted a statistical analysis of the HDFs to further investigate their characteristics and better determine the properties. From SDO/HMI data, we picked up 23 flux emergence events over a period of 14 months, the total flux of which ranges from 10{sup 20} to 10{sup 22} Mx. Out of 23 selected events, 6 clear HDFs were detected by the method we developed in our earlier study, and 7 HDFs detected by visual inspection were added to this statistic analysis. We found that the duration of the HDF is on average 61 minutes and the maximum HDF speed is on average 3.1 km s{sup –1}. We also estimated the rising speed of the subsurface magnetic flux to be 0.6-1.4 km s{sup –1}. These values are highly consistent with our previous one-event analysis as well as our simulation results. The observation results lead us to the conclusion that the HDF is a rather common feature in the earliest phase of AR emergence. Moreover, our HDF analysis has the capability of determining the subsurface properties of emerging fields that cannot be directly measured.

  20. Reactive transport simulation in a tropical horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mburu, N; Rousseau, D P L; van Bruggen, J J A; Thumbi, G; Llorens, E; García, J; Lens, P N L

    2013-04-01

    A promising approach to the simulation of flow and conversions in the complex environment of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSF-CWs) is the use of reactive transport models, in which the transport equation is solved together with microbial growth and mass-balance equations for substrate transformation and degradation. In this study, a tropical pilot scale HSSF-CW is simulated in the recently developed CWM1-RETRASO mechanistic model. The model predicts organic matter, nitrogen and sulfur effluent concentrations and their reaction rates within the HSSF-CW. Simulations demonstrated that these reactions took place simultaneously in the same (fermentation, methanogenesis and sulfate reduction) or at different (aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic) locations. Anaerobic reactions occurred over large areas of the simulated HSSF-CW and contributed (on average) to the majority (68%) of the COD removal, compared to aerobic (38%) and anoxic (1%) reactions. To understand the effort and compare computing resources needed for the application of a mechanistic model, the CWM1-RETRASO simulation is compared to a process-based, semi-mechanistic model, run with the same data. CWM1-RETRASO demonstrated the interaction of components within the wetland in a better way, i.e. concentrations of microbial functional groups, their competition for substrates and the formation of intermediary products within the wetland. The CWM1-RETRASO model is thus suitable for simulations aimed at a better understanding of the CW system transformation and degradation processes. However, the model does not support biofilm-based modeling, and it is expensive in computing and time resources required to perform the simulations. PMID:23434579

  1. Statistical Analysis of the Horizontal Divergent Flow in Emerging Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Shin; Hayashi, Keiji; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-10-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are thought to be formed by magnetic fields from the convection zone. Our flux emergence simulations revealed that a strong horizontal divergent flow (HDF) of unmagnetized plasma appears at the photosphere before the flux begins to emerge. In our earlier study, we analyzed HMI data for a single AR and confirmed presence of this precursor plasma flow in the actual Sun. In this paper, as an extension of our earlier study, we conducted a statistical analysis of the HDFs to further investigate their characteristics and better determine the properties. From SDO/HMI data, we picked up 23 flux emergence events over a period of 14 months, the total flux of which ranges from 1020 to 1022 Mx. Out of 23 selected events, 6 clear HDFs were detected by the method we developed in our earlier study, and 7 HDFs detected by visual inspection were added to this statistic analysis. We found that the duration of the HDF is on average 61 minutes and the maximum HDF speed is on average 3.1 km s-1. We also estimated the rising speed of the subsurface magnetic flux to be 0.6-1.4 km s-1. These values are highly consistent with our previous one-event analysis as well as our simulation results. The observation results lead us to the conclusion that the HDF is a rather common feature in the earliest phase of AR emergence. Moreover, our HDF analysis has the capability of determining the subsurface properties of emerging fields that cannot be directly measured.

  2. Modeling Food Delivery Dynamics For Juvenile Salmonids Under Variable Flow Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L.; Utz, R.; Anderson, K.; Nisbet, R.

    2010-12-01

    Traditional approaches for assessing instream flow needs for salmonids have typically focused on the importance of physical habitat in determining fish habitat selection. This somewhat simplistic approach does not account for differences in food delivery rates to salmonids that arise due to spatial variability in river morphology, hydraulics and temporal variations in the flow regime. Explicitly linking how changes in the flow regime influences food delivery dynamics is an important step in advancing process-based bioenergetic models that seek to predict growth rates of salmonids across various life-stages. Here we investigate how food delivery rates for juvenile salmonids vary both spatially and with flow magnitude in a meandering reach of the Merced River, CA. We utilize a two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic model and discrete particle tracking algorithm to simulate invertebrate drift transport rates at baseflow and a near-bankfull discharge. Modeling results indicate that at baseflow, the maximum drift density occurs in the channel thalweg, while drift densities decrease towards the channel margins due to the process of organisms settling out of the drift. During high-flow events, typical of spring dam-releases, the invertebrate drift transport pathway follows a similar trajectory along the high velocity core and the drift concentrations are greatest in the channel centerline, though the zone of invertebrate transport occupies a greater fraction of the channel width. Based on invertebrate supply rates alone, feeding juvenile salmonids would be expected to be distributed down the channel centerline where the maximum predicted food delivery rates are located in this reach. However, flow velocities in these channel sections are beyond maximum sustainable swimming speeds for most juvenile salmonids. Our preliminary findings suggest that a lack of low velocity refuge may prevent juvenile salmonids from deriving energy from the areas with maximum drift density in this

  3. Variability of Sub-Canopy Flow, Temperature, and Horizontal Advection in Moderately Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christoph K.

    2011-04-01

    We examine the space-time structure of the wind and temperature fields, as well as that of the resulting spatial temperature gradients and horizontal advection of sensible heat, in the sub-canopy of a forest with a dense overstorey in moderately complex terrain. Data were collected from a sensor network consisting of ten stations and subject to orthogonal decomposition using the multiresolution basis set and stochastic analyses including two-point correlations, dimensional structure functions, and various other bulk measures for space and time variability. Despite some similarities, fundamental differences were found in the space-time structure of the motions dominating the variability of the sub-canopy wind and temperature fields. The dominating motions occupy similar spatial, but different temporal, scales. A conceptual space-time diagram was constructed based on the stochastic analysis that includes the important end members of the spatial and temporal scales of the observed motions of both variables. Short-lived and small-scale motions govern the variability of the wind, while the diurnal temperature oscillation driven by the surface radiative transfer is the main determinant of the variability in the temperature signal, which occupies much larger time scales. This scale mismatch renders Taylor's hypothesis for sub-canopy flow invalid and aggravates the computation of meaningful estimates of horizontal advective fluxes without dense spatial information. It may further explain the ambiguous and inconclusive results reported in numerous energy and mass balance and advection studies evaluating the hypothesis that accounting for budget components other than the change in storage term and the vertical turbulent flux improves the budget closure when turbulent diffusion is suppressed in plant canopies. Estimates of spatial temperature gradients and advective fluxes were sensitive to the network geometry and the spatial interpolation method. The assumption of linear

  4. Characterizing Sub-Daily Flow Regimes: Implications of Hydrologic Resolution on Ecohydrology Studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; McManamay, Ryan A.; O'Connor, B.

    2014-05-26

    Natural variability in flow is a primary factor controlling geomorphic and ecological processes in riverine ecosystems. Within the hydropower industry, there is growing pressure from environmental groups and natural resource managers to change reservoir releases from daily peaking to run-of-river operations on the basis of the assumption that downstream biological communities will improve under a more natural flow regime. In this paper, we discuss the importance of assessing sub-daily flows for understanding the physical and ecological dynamics within river systems. We present a variety of metrics for characterizing sub-daily flow variation and use these metrics to evaluate general trends amongmore » streams affected by peaking hydroelectric projects, run-of-river projects and streams that are largely unaffected by flow altering activities. Univariate and multivariate techniques were used to assess similarity among different stream types on the basis of these sub-daily metrics. For comparison, similar analyses were performed using analogous metrics calculated with mean daily flow values. Our results confirm that sub-daily flow metrics reveal variation among and within streams that are not captured by daily flow statistics. Using sub-daily flow statistics, we were able to quantify the degree of difference between unaltered and peaking streams and the amount of similarity between unaltered and run-of-river streams. The sub-daily statistics were largely uncorrelated with daily statistics of similar scope. Furthermore, on short temporal scales, sub-daily statistics reveal the relatively constant nature of unaltered streamreaches and the highly variable nature of hydropower-affected streams, whereas daily statistics show just the opposite over longer temporal scales.« less

  5. Characterizing Sub-Daily Flow Regimes: Implications of Hydrologic Resolution on Ecohydrology Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; McManamay, Ryan A.; O'Connor, B.

    2014-05-26

    Natural variability in flow is a primary factor controlling geomorphic and ecological processes in riverine ecosystems. Within the hydropower industry, there is growing pressure from environmental groups and natural resource managers to change reservoir releases from daily peaking to run-of-river operations on the basis of the assumption that downstream biological communities will improve under a more natural flow regime. In this paper, we discuss the importance of assessing sub-daily flows for understanding the physical and ecological dynamics within river systems. We present a variety of metrics for characterizing sub-daily flow variation and use these metrics to evaluate general trends among streams affected by peaking hydroelectric projects, run-of-river projects and streams that are largely unaffected by flow altering activities. Univariate and multivariate techniques were used to assess similarity among different stream types on the basis of these sub-daily metrics. For comparison, similar analyses were performed using analogous metrics calculated with mean daily flow values. Our results confirm that sub-daily flow metrics reveal variation among and within streams that are not captured by daily flow statistics. Using sub-daily flow statistics, we were able to quantify the degree of difference between unaltered and peaking streams and the amount of similarity between unaltered and run-of-river streams. The sub-daily statistics were largely uncorrelated with daily statistics of similar scope. Furthermore, on short temporal scales, sub-daily statistics reveal the relatively constant nature of unaltered streamreaches and the highly variable nature of hydropower-affected streams, whereas daily statistics show just the opposite over longer temporal scales.

  6. Optical vortex tracking studies of a horizontal axis wind turbine in yaw using laser-sheet, flow visualisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, I.; Parkin, P.; Wang, X.

    Experimental studies have been conducted on a 0.9 m diameter, horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) placed in the open jet of a closed return wind tunnel. The turbine was tested in a three blade and a two blade configuration. The power coefficient of the turbine was measured and wake flow studies conducted for a range of yawed flows by tilting the rotor plane at various angles up to 30° to the incident wind direction. The motion of the shed vorticity was followed using laser-sheet flow visualisation with the overall wake deflection being measured. The results were compared with theoretical predictions and with studies conducted elsewhere.

  7. Flow Regime Based Climatologies of Lightning Probabilities for Spaceports and Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Volmer, Matthew; Sharp, David; Spratt, Scott; Lafosse, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: provide forecasters with a "first guess" climatological lightning probability tool (1) Focus on Space Shuttle landings and NWS T AFs (2) Four circles around sites: 5-, 10-, 20- and 30 n mi (4) Three time intervals: hourly, every 3 hr and every 6 hr It is based on: (1) NLDN gridded data (2) Flow regime (3) Warm season months of May-Sep for years 1989-2004 Gridded data and available code yields squares, not circles Over 850 spread sheets converted into manageable user-friendly web-based GUI

  8. Ibuprofen removal in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: treatment performance and fungal community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongqing; Luo, Jinxue; Lee, Zarraz May Ping; Gersberg, Richard M; Liu, Yu; Tan, Soon Keat; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-06-01

    The treatment performance of ibuprofen (IBP)-enriched wastewater by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands planted with cattail (Typha angustifolia) and unplanted control mesocosms was investigated. Removal efficiencies of IBP were significantly (p < .05) enhanced in the planted mesocosms (78.5%) compared to those in the unplanted beds (57.9%). An 18S rRNA gene high-throughput pyrosequencing approach was used to investigate the effects of IBP on the structure of the fungal community in these wetland systems. The overall diversity of the fungal community was reduced under the IBP exposure. Taxonomic analysis revealed that 62.2% of the fungal sequences were affiliated with Basidiomycota, followed by Ascomycota (37.4%) at the phylum level. Uncultured fungus (48.2%), Chaetomium sp. (14.2%), Aspergillus sp. (12.4%), Trichoderma sp. (5.7%), Cladosporium sp. (5.4%), and Emericellopsis sp. (5.2%) were identified as dominant genera. At the genus level, a distinct profile of the fungal community in the IBP-enriched mesocosms was observed as compared to the control beds, and as well specific fungal genera were enhanced in the planted beds, regardless of IBP enrichment. However, despite these differences, the composition of the fungal community (as measured by Bray-Curtis similarity) was mostly unaffected by the significant IBP enrichment. On the other hand, a consistent similarity pattern of fungal community structure in the planted mesocosms suggests that the presence of higher macrophytes in the wetland systems may well help shape the fungal community structure. PMID:26581707

  9. Biological mechanisms associated with triazophos (TAP) removal by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSFCW).

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Feng, Yuqin; Dai, Yanran; Cui, Naxin; Anderson, Bruce; Cheng, Shuiping

    2016-05-15

    Triazophos (TAP) is a widely used pesticide that is easily accumulated in the environment due to its relatively high stability: this accumulation from agricultural runoff results in potential hazards to aquatic ecosystems. Constructed wetlands are generally considered to be an effective technology for treating TAP polluted surface water. However, knowledge about the biological mechanisms of TAP removal is still lacking. This study investigates the responses of a wetland plant (Canna indica), substrate enzymes and microbial communities in bench-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (HSCWs) loaded with different TAP concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5 and 5 mg · L(-1)). The results indicate that TAP stimulated the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) in the roots of C. indica. The highest TAP concentrations significantly inhibited photosynthetic activities, as shown by a reduced effective quantum yield of PS II (ΦPS II) and lower electron transport rates (ETR). However, interestingly, the lower TAP loadings exhibited some favorable effects on these two variables, suggesting that C. indica is a suitable species for use in wetlands designed for treatment of low TAP concentrations. Urease and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in the wetland substrate were activated by TAP. Two-way ANOVA demonstrated that urease activity was influenced by both the TAP concentrations and season, while acidphosphatase (ACP) only responded to seasonal variations. Analysis of high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed seasonal variations in the microbial community structure of the wetland substrate at the phylum and family levels. In addition, urease activity had a greater correlation with the relative abundance of some functional microbial groups, such as the Bacillaceae family, and the ALP and ACP may be influenced by the plant more than substrate microbial communities. PMID:26897579

  10. Palladium Catalysis in Horizontal-Flow Treatment Wells: Field-Scale Design and Laboratory Study

    SciTech Connect

    Munakata, N; Cunningham, J A; Reinhard, M; Ruiz, R; Lebron, C

    2002-03-01

    This paper discusses the field-scale design and associated laboratory experiments for a new groundwater remediation system that combines palladium-catalyzed hydrodehalogenation with the use of dual horizontal-flow treatment wells (HFTWs). Palladium (Pd) catalysts can treat a wide range of halogenated compounds, often completely and rapidly dehalogenating them. The HFTW system recirculates water within the treatment zone and provides the opportunity for multiple treatment passes, thereby enhancing contaminant removal. The combined Pd/HFTW system is scheduled to go on line in mid-2002 at Edwards Air Force Base in southeastern California, with groundwater contaminated with 0.5 to 1.5 mg/L of trichloroethylene (TCE). Laboratory work, performed in conjunction with the field-scale design, provided reaction rates for field-scale design and information on long-term catalyst behavior. The apparent first-order reaction rate constant for TCE was 0.43/min, corresponding to a half-life of 1.6 min. Over the long term (1 to 2 months), the reaction rate decreased, indicating catalyst deactivation. The data show three distinct deactivation rates: a slow rate of 0.03/day over approximately the first month, followed by faster deactivation at 0.16 to 0.19/day. The final, fastest deactivation (0.55/day) was attributed to an artifact of the laboratory setup, which caused unnaturally high sulfide concentrations through bacterial reduction of sulfate to sulfide, a known catalyst poison. Sodium hypochlorite recovered the catalyst activity, and is expected to maintain activity in the field with periodic pulses to regenerate the catalyst and control growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  11. BTEX removal in a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor under denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rogers; de Nardi, Ivana Ribeiro; Fernandes, Bruna Soares; Foresti, Eugenio; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2013-04-01

    Because benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and ethanol are important contaminants present in Brazilian gasoline, it is essential to develop technology that can be used in the bioremediation of gasoline-contaminated aquifers. This paper evaluates the performance of a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB) reactor fed with water containing gasoline constituents under denitrifying conditions. Two HAIB reactors filled with polyurethane foam matrices (5 mm cubes, 23 kg/m(3) density and 95 % porosity) for biomass attachment were assayed. The reactor fed with synthetic substrate containing protein, carbohydrates, sodium bicarbonate and BTEX solution in ethanol, at an Hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 13.5 h, presented hydrocarbon removal efficiencies of 99 % at the following initial concentrations: benzene 6.7 mg/L, toluene 4.9 mg/L, m-xylene and p-xylene 7.2 mg/L, ethylbenzene 3.7 mg/L, and nitrate 60 mg N/L. The HAIB reactor fed with gasoline-contaminated water at an HRT of 20 h showed hydrocarbon removal efficiencies of 96 % at the following initial concentrations: benzene, 4.9 mg/L; toluene, 7.2 mg/L; m-xylene, 3.7 mg/L; and nitrate 400 mg N/L. Microbiological observations along the length of the HAIB reactor fed with gasoline-contaminated water confirmed that in the first segment of the reactor, denitrifying metabolism predominated, whereas from the first sampling port on, the metabolism observed was predominantly methanogenic. PMID:22910812

  12. Assessment of future variability in extreme precipitation and the potential effects on the wadi flow regime.

    PubMed

    Gunawardhana, Luminda Niroshana; Al-Rawas, Ghazi A; Kazama, So; Al-Najar, Khalid A

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate how the magnitude and occurrence of extreme precipitation events are affected by climate change and to predict the subsequent impacts on the wadi flow regime in the Al-Khod catchment area, Muscat, Oman. The tank model, a lumped-parameter rainfall-runoff model, was used to simulate the wadi flow. Precipitation extremes and their potential future changes were predicted using six-member ensembles of general circulation models (GCMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Yearly maxima of the daily precipitation and wadi flow for varying return periods were compared for observed and projected data by fitting the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution function. Flow duration curves (FDC) were developed and compared for the observed and projected wadi flows. The results indicate that extreme precipitation events consistently increase by the middle of the twenty-first century for all return periods (49-52%), but changes may become more profound by the end of the twenty-first century (81-101%). Consequently, the relative change in extreme wadi flow is greater than twofolds for all of the return periods in the late twenty-first century compared to the relative changes that occur in the mid-century period. Precipitation analysis further suggests that greater than 50% of the precipitation may be associated with extreme events in the future. The FDC analysis reveals that changes in low-to-moderate flows (Q60-Q90) may not be statistically significant, whereas increases in high flows (Q5) are statistically robust (20 and 25% for the mid- and late-century periods, respectively). PMID:26370197

  13. Flow regime effects on mature Populus fremontii (Fremont cottonwood) productivity on two contrasting dryland river floodplains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    I compared riparian cottonwood (Populus fremontii) productivity-discharge relationships in a relictual stand along the highly regulated Green River and in a naturally functioning stand along the unregulated Yampa River in semiarid northwest Colorado. I used multiple regression to model flow effects on annual basal area increment (BAI) from 1982 to 2011, after removing any autocorrelation present. Each BAI series was developed from 20 trees whose mean size (67 cm diameter at breast height [DBH]) was equivalent in the two stands. BAI was larger in the Yampa River stand except in 2 y when defoliating leaf beetles were present there. I found no evidence for a Yampa flood-magnitude threshold above which BAI declined. Flow variables explained ∼45% of residual BAI variability, with most explained by current-year maximum 90-d discharge (QM90) in the Yampa River stand and by a measure of the year-to-year change in QM90 in the Green River stand. The latter reflects a management-imposed ceiling on flood magnitude—Flaming Gorge Dam power plant capacity—infrequently exceeded during the study period. BAI in the relictual stand began to trend upward in 1992 when flows started to mimic a natural flow regime. Mature Fremont cottonwoods appear to be ecologically resilient. Their productivity along regulated rivers might be optimized using multiyear environmental flow designs.

  14. Three-dimensional flow and vorticity transport in idealized airway model from laminar to turbulent regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalal, Sahar; van de Moortele, Tristan; Nemes, Andras; Eslam Panah, Azar; Coletti, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    The presence and intensity of secondary flows formed by the inhaled air during respiration has important consequences for gas exchange and particle transport in the lungs. Here we focus on the formation and persistence of such secondary flows by experimentally studying the steady inspiration in an idealized airway model. The geometry consists of a symmetric planar double bifurcation that respects the geometrical proportions of the human bronchial tree. Physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers from 100 to 5000 are investigated, ranging from laminar to turbulent regimes. The time-averaged, three-dimensional velocity fields are obtained from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), providing detailed distributions of vorticity, circulation, and secondary flow strength. Information on the velocity fluctuations are obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The measurements highlight the effect of the Reynolds number on the momentum transport, flow partitioning at the bifurcations, strength and sense of rotation of the longitudinal vortices. A marked change in topology is found at a specific Reynolds number, above which the influence of the upstream flow prevails over the effect of the local geometry. Finally, turbulence and its role in the mean vorticity transport are also discussed.

  15. Integrated model for the natural flow regime in the Cerro Prieto hydrothermal system, B. C. , Mexico, based upon petrological and isotope geochemical criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; Hoagland, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of cuttings and core at Cerro Prieto have now been extended to more than 50 boreholes. The aims of this petrological and isotopic work are to determine the shape of the reservoir, its physical properties, and its temperature distribution and flow regime before the steam field was produced. A map showing the first occurrence of hydrothermal epidote shows a dome-shaped top to the steam-producing zone. The hottest of the mapped mineral zones - the biotite vermiculite zone - shows a dome displaced to the northeast relative to the epidote zone. Patterns of mineral zones observed in wells are consistent with patterns of oxygen isotopic ratios in calcite and quartz. Using both criteria all of the boreholes so far studied were classified as belonging to one of four different regimes. These are: (a) the thermal plume of upward flowing water close to boiling, marked by a regular sequence of prograde mineral zones and large isotopic shifts; (b) the discharge system where fluid leaks to the surface, as indicated by the occurrence of only a few low temperature mineral zones, which extend over large depth intervals with little isotope exchange; (c) the horizontal flow zone, in which boreholes penetrate reversals of both mineral zones and isotope shifts with increasing depth; and (d) the recharge zone where cold water is descending. Plotting these four types of boreholes on a map reveals a simple, consistent, pattern. This is interpreted to have been produced by a thermal plume dipping at 45/sup 0/ to the northeast.

  16. Shifting chemical equilibria in flow--efficient decarbonylation driven by annular flow regimes.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Bernhard; Elsner, Petteri; Glasnov, Toma; Roberge, Dominique M; Kappe, C Oliver

    2014-10-20

    To efficiently drive chemical reactions, it is often necessary to influence an equilibrium by removing one or more components from the reaction space. Such manipulation is straightforward in open systems, for example, by distillation of a volatile product from the reaction mixture. Herein we describe a unique high-temperature/high-pressure gas/liquid continuous-flow process for the rhodium-catalyzed decarbonylation of aldehydes. The carbon monoxide released during the reaction is carried with a stream of an inert gas through the center of the tubing, whereas the liquid feed travels as an annular film along the wall of the channel. As a consequence, carbon monoxide is effectively vaporized from the liquid phase into the gas phase and stripped from the reaction mixture, thus driving the equilibrium to the product and preventing poisoning of the catalyst. This approach enables the catalytic decarbonylation of a variety of aldehydes with unprecedented efficiency with a standard coil-based flow device. PMID:25196172

  17. Unsteady Flow of Radiating and Chemically Reacting MHD Micropolar Fluid in Slip-Flow Regime with Heat Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Dahab, S. M.; Mohamed, R. A.

    2013-11-01

    An analytical study of the problem of unsteady free convection with thermal radiation and heat generation on MHD micropolar fluid flow through a porous medium bounded by a semi-infinite vertical plate in a slip-flow regime has been presented. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to describe the radiation heat flux in the energy equation. The homogeneous chemical reaction of first order is accounted for in the mass diffusion equation. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicular on the porous surface absorbing micropolar fluid with a suction velocity varying with time. A perturbation technique is applied to obtain the expressions for the velocity, microrotation, temperature, and concentration distributions. Expressions for the skin-friction, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are also obtained. The results are discussed graphically for different values of the parameters entered into the equations of the problem.

  18. Increasing power generation in horizontal axis wind turbines using optimized flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, John A., Jr.

    In order to effectively realize future goals for wind energy, the efficiency of wind turbines must increase beyond existing technology. One direct method for achieving increased efficiency is by improving the individual power generation characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines. The potential for additional improvement by traditional approaches is diminishing rapidly however. As a result, a research program was undertaken to assess the potential of using distributed flow control to increase power generation. The overall objective was the development of validated aerodynamic simulations and flow control approaches to improve wind turbine power generation characteristics. BEM analysis was conducted for a general set of wind turbine models encompassing last, current, and next generation designs. This analysis indicated that rotor lift control applied in Region II of the turbine power curve would produce a notable increase in annual power generated. This was achieved by optimizing induction factors along the rotor blade for maximum power generation. In order to demonstrate this approach and other advanced concepts, the University of Notre Dame established the Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design (eWiND). This initiative includes a fully instrumented meteorological tower and two pitch-controlled wind turbines. The wind turbines are representative in their design and operation to larger multi-megawatt turbines, but of a scale that allows rotors to be easily instrumented and replaced to explore new design concepts. Baseline data detailing typical site conditions and turbine operation is presented. To realize optimized performance, lift control systems were designed and evaluated in CFD simulations coupled with shape optimization tools. These were integrated into a systematic design methodology involving BEM simulations, CFD simulations and shape optimization, and selected experimental validation. To refine and illustrate the proposed design methodology, a

  19. A numerical investigation of the interaction between a horizontal density gradient and an oscillating turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptein, Steven; Duran-Matute, Matias; Armenio, Vincenzo; Roman, Federico; Clercx, Herman

    2015-11-01

    In coastal areas, river outflow provides a large buoyancy input that leads to strong horizontal density gradients. These density gradients are associated to complex hydrodynamics such as, penetration of fresh water currents in the ocean, coastal currents or strain-induced periodic stratification. One key governing mechanism is the interaction between stirring by the tides and horizontal density gradients which influences mixing . In order to investigate this mechanism and gain new insight into the mixing process, wall-resolving large eddy simulation (LES) are performed. The tide is simulated using a horizontal oscillating pressure gradient that acts perpendicular to a horizontal (unstable) linear density gradient. A decomposition of the density allows to apply periodic boundary conditions in the streamwise and spanwise directions, for both the velocity and the density. As the Reynolds number is limited by the computational time required for LES, simulations are performed for different values of the Richardson number.

  20. Flow regimes in a vertical Taylor-Couette system with a radial thermal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillerm, R.; Kang, C.; Savaro, C.; Lepiller, V.; Prigent, A.; Yang, K.-S.; Mutabazi, I.

    2015-09-01

    A rich variety of flow regimes in a Newtonian fluid inside a vertical large-aspect ratio and a wide-gap Taylor-Couette system with a radial temperature gradient has been determined in experiments and in direct numerical simulations (DNSs). Compared to previous experiments and numerical studies, a wider range of temperature differences (i.e., of the Grashof number Gr) and of the rotation rate (the Taylor number Ta) has been covered. The combined effect of rotation and of the radial temperature gradient is the occurrence of helicoidal vortices or modulated waves at the onset. Stationary axisymmetric vortices are found for very weak temperature differences. A good agreement was found for critical states between results from experiments, linear stability analysis, and DNS. Higher instability modes have been determined for a wide range of parameters and a state diagram of observable flow regimes has been established in the plane spanned by Gr and Ta. Some higher states observed in experiments were retrieved in DNS.

  1. Effective discharge for sediment transport: the sorting role of river flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Stefano; Sprocati, Riccardo; Frascati, Alessandro; Marani, Marco; Schirmer, Mario; Botter, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    The effective discharge is a key concept in geomorphology, river engineering and restoration. It is used to design the most stable channel configuration, to estimate sedimentation rate and lifespan of reservoirs and to characterize the hydrologic forcing in models studying long-term evolution of rivers. Previous empirical, theoretical and numerical studies found the effective discharge to be affected by climate, landscape and river morphology, type of transport (dissolved, suspended or bedload), and by streamflow variability. However, the heterogeneity of values observed for the effective discharge challenges a clear understanding of its pivotal drivers, and a consistent framework which explains observations carried out in different catchments and geographic areas is still lacking. This work relates the observed diversity of effective discharge values to the underlying heterogeneity of river flow regimes. The effective ratio (i.e. the ratio between effective discharge and mean streamflow) is derived as a function of the empirical exponent of the sediment rating curve and the streamflow variability, resulting from climatic and landscape drivers. The proposed analytic expression helps to disentangle hydrologic and landscape controls on the effective discharge, and highlights distinct effective ratios of persistent and erratic hydrologic regimes (respectively characterized by low and high flow variability), attributable to intrinsically different streamflow dynamics. The framework captures observed values of effective discharge for suspended sediment transport in a set of catchments of the continental United States, and may allow for first-order estimates of effective discharge in rivers belonging to different climatic regions.

  2. Effects of hydrologic infrastructure on flow regimes of California's Central Valley rivers: Implications for fish populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Larry R.; Bauer, Marissa L.

    2010-01-01

    Alteration of natural flow regimes is generally acknowledged to have negative effects on native biota; however, methods for defining ecologically appropriate flow regimes in managed river systems are only beginning to be developed. Understanding how past and present water management has affected rivers is an important part of developing such tools. In this paper, we evaluate how existing hydrologic infrastructure and management affect streamflow characteristics of rivers in the Central Valley, California and discuss those characteristics in the context of habitat requirements of native and alien fishes. We evaluated the effects of water management by comparing observed discharges with estimated discharges assuming no water management ("full natural runoff"). Rivers in the Sacramento River drainage were characterized by reduced winter–spring discharges and augmented discharges in other months. Rivers in the San Joaquin River drainage were characterized by reduced discharges in all months but particularly in winter and spring. Two largely unaltered streams had hydrographs similar to those based on full natural runoff of the regulated rivers. The reduced discharges in the San Joaquin River drainage streams are favourable for spawning of many alien species, which is consistent with observed patterns of fish distribution and abundance in the Central Valley. However, other factors, such as water temperature, are also important to the relative success of native and alien resident fishes. As water management changes in response to climate change and societal demands, interdisciplinary programs of research and monitoring will be essential for anticipating effects on fishes and to avoid unanticipated ecological outcomes.

  3. Stagnation point flow and heat transfer behavior of Cu-water nanofluid towards horizontal and exponentially stretching/shrinking cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, C.; Sandeep, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we analyzed the stagnation point flow and heat transfer behavior of Cu-water nanofluid towards horizontal and exponentially permeable stretching/shrinking cylinders in presence of suction/injection, heat source and shape of nanoparticles. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed to nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation which are then solved numerically using bvp4c Matlab package. The influence of non-dimensional governing parameters on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics are discussed and presented through graphs and tables. The study indicates that the solutions for the horizontal and exponential cylinders are non-unique and shape of nanoparticles also influences the rate of heat transfer. Comparisons of the present results with existed studies are presented. Present study has an excellent agreement with the existed studies under some special conditions.

  4. Understanding multiple ecological responses to anthropogenic disturbance: rivers and potential flow regime change.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Catherine; Stewart-Koster, Ben; Sheldon, Fran; Burford, Michele A

    2012-01-01

    Human-induced alteration of the natural flow regime is a major threat to freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity. The effects of hydrological alteration on the structural and functional attributes of riverine communities are expected to be multiple and complex, and they may not be described easily by a single model. Based on existing knowledge of key hydrological and ecological attributes, we explored potential effects of a flow-regulation scenario on macroinvertebrate assemblage composition and diversity in two river systems in Australia's relatively undeveloped wet-dry tropics. We used a single Bayesian belief network (BBN) to model potential changes in multiple assemblage attributes within each river type during dry and wet seasons given two flow scenarios: the current, near-natural flow condition, and flow regulation. We then used multidimensional scaling (MDS) ordination to visually summarize and compare the most probable attributes of assemblages and their environment under the different scenarios. The flow-regulation scenario provided less certainty in the ecological responses of one river type during the dry season, which reduced the ability to make predictions from the BBN outputs directly. However, visualizing the BBN results in an ordination highlighted similarities and differences between the scenarios that may have been otherwise difficult to ascertain. In particular, the MDS showed that flow regulation would reduce the seasonal differentiation in hydrology and assemblage characteristics that is expected under the current low level of development. Our approach may have wider application in understanding ecosystem responses to different river management practices and should be transferred easily to other ecosystems or biotic assemblages to provide researchers, managers, and decision makers an enhanced understanding of ecological responses to potential anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:22471088

  5. Observation of flow regimes and transitions during a columnar solidification experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-Kharicha, M.; Kharicha, A.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2014-08-01

    Experimental data for the validation of numerical models coupling solidification and hydrodynamics are very rare. Many experiments made in the field of solidifications are performed with pure metals or alloys (Al-Cu, Pb-Sn, etc) which are opaque and do not allow direct observation of the hydrodynamic. Only the results related to solidification such as grain size and orientation, or macro-segregation are usually used for the validation. The present paper is dedicated to the description of well-controlled experiments where both solidification and fluid dynamic can be simultaneously observed. The important point is the almost purely columnar nature of the solidified mushy region. To our knowledge this is the very first reported macro-scale experiment with almost purely columnar solidification where the flow was measured with a PIV technique. The experiments consist in studying the hydrodynamics during the columnar solidification of a H2O-NH4Cl hypereutectic alloy in a die cast cell. Particle image velocimetry was employed to measure the flow velocity in the liquid bulk. Different flow regimes generated by complex thermo-solutal double diffusive convection were observed. In the beginning of the solidification the solutal buoyancy generates a turbulent flow, which is progressively replaced by the development of stratification from the top of the cell. Later, the stratification leads to the development of a long lasting meandering flow, which filled almost all the liquid region. The kinetic energy of the flow was calculated and it was found out that it decreased with time. The solidification front was smooth and no freckles appeared in the mushy zone. The evolution of the thickness of the mushy zone was measured. As this experiment showed a good reproducibility it represents an excellent benchmark for validation of the numerical models that target the simultaneous prediction of flow dynamics and solidification.

  6. Invasive riparian vegetation response to flow regimes and flood pulses in a braided river floodplain.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Brian S; Pithie, Callum; Edmondson, Laura

    2013-08-15

    This study evaluated flow regimes and flood pulse characteristics, and their influences on invasive riparian vegetation, in a free-flowing braided river in the Southern Alps, South Island, New Zealand. A 46-year gauged flow record was used to evaluate 67 flow metrics for the Ahuriri River, and five sets of colour aerial photographs over 20 years (1991-2011) were analysed to quantify temporal and spatial changes in vegetation (crack willow, Russell lupin, and grassland). The correlation between flow metrics and vegetation class cover for each aerial photo interval was analysed, and multiple regression models were developed. Significant changes in different invasive vegetation classes were found, including cover, number and sizes of patches, and distances from patches to primary channels. In addition to infrequent large floods, specific characteristics of small floods, high flows, low/baseflows, and extreme low flows had influences on different vegetation classes. Key metrics that appear to drive changes in cover and provide a useful multiple regression model include the largest flood peak, frequency of floods, and the time since the last flood for each air photo interval. Up to 25% of invasive vegetation cover was removed and bare substrate increased after the largest flood on record (approximately 50-year flood), and the amount of vegetation cover is highly variable over time and space. Within approximately six years, however, the proportion of vegetation recovered to pre-flood levels. The study reach appears to demonstrate the "shifting-mosaic steady state" conceptual model of riverine floodplains, where the total proportion of substrate, vegetation and water remain relatively constant over long time periods. PMID:23660536

  7. Detailled AMS analysis of recent dykes. Inferences about the flow regime and progression magnetic trends.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Ó.; Gil Imaz, A.; Lago Sanjosé, M.; França, Z.; Forjaz, V. H.

    2009-04-01

    Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) has been applied to characterize the flow and emplacement conditions in tabular intrusions. The results in dykes have shown different models of relationship between the AMS ellipsoids and rock-fabric. These models include: a) imbrications during the flow observed in the margins of the intrusion (in the proximity of the dyke walls), b) magnetic lineation parallel to the flow, c) magnetic lineation normal to the flow (rolling of particles) or d) not evident relations between the flow and the magnetic axis. This complexity makes that, even when no mineralogical complexities exist, a contrast with outcrop evidences, shear indicators, orientation of grain, bubbles or vacuoles are needed. This complexity can be increased when this methodology is applied to old dykes, where not only the flow has influenced the AMS. In cases where the emplacement is syn-tectonic, or where deformational processes after the emplacement exist, the relation between flow regime and AMS can be more complex. To understand the changes and the model of emplacement in dykes, 12 recent dykes in sub-vertical position have been chosen to analyze the changes in orientation and the magnetic parameters along profiles border-center-border. The usual methodology recommends the sampling preferentially in the margin of the dykes. In this sense, the sampling has been focused in the margins but sampling also the whole extension. The average of cores for dyke is 54 (98 samples). The emplacement conditions of these dykes are related with a fracturation net parallel to the MAR in a passive manner. The dykes come from the Corvo and Flores islands, situated over North American Plate in the Western Azores (Portugal). Ten of the sampled dykes show clusters of axes and not significant variations in orientation of the magnetic ellipsoid between the sampling along the cross-sections border-center-border and the samples from both sides. Only two of the sampled dykes show

  8. Computational modelling of flow around a circular cylinder in sub-critical flow regime with various turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutar, M.; Holdø, A. E.

    2001-04-01

    The numerical simulation of transitional flow around a two-dimensional stationary circular cylinder is presented using two groups of turbulence models in a sub-critical flow regime. In the first group, enhanced two-equation turbulence models based on the eddy viscosity concept are used. They include the non-linear k- model with extended models, such as renormalization group (RNG) and the anisotropic model. In the second group, flow simulation is carried out using the large eddy simulation (LES) method, which is based on a standard sub-grid scale (SGS) model with a near-wall approach. This near-wall model, without using the law of wall, is achieved in a finite element code. The numerical results extracted from these simulations are compared with each other and with the experimental data in order to determine the relative performance of these turbulence models and to find the best model for the flow of interest. Although most of the LES simulations have been previously carried out using finite volume methods, results from using the present model show that the finite element method (FEM) can also be used with confidence. Copyright

  9. Monitoring strategies of stream phosphorus under contrasting climate-driven flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyenola, G.; Meerhoff, M.; Teixeira-de Mello, F.; González-Bergonzoni, I.; Graeber, D.; Fosalba, C.; Vidal, N.; Mazzeo, N.; Ovesen, N. B.; Jeppesen, E.; Kronvang, B.

    2015-10-01

    Climate and hydrology are relevant control factors determining the timing and amount of nutrient losses from land to downstream aquatic systems, in particular of phosphorus (P) from agricultural lands. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the differences in P export patterns and the performance of alternative monitoring strategies in streams under contrasting climate-driven flow regimes. We compared a set of paired streams draining lowland micro-catchments under temperate climate and stable discharge conditions (Denmark) and under sub-tropical climate and flashy conditions (Uruguay). We applied two alternative nutrient sampling programs (high-frequency composite sampling and low-frequency instantaneous-grab sampling) and estimated the contribution derived from point and diffuse sources fitting a source apportionment model. We expected to detect a pattern of higher total and particulate phosphorus export from diffuse sources in streams in Uruguay streams, mostly as a consequence of higher variability in flow regime (higher flashiness). Contrarily, we found a higher contribution of dissolved P in flashy streams. We did not find a notably poorer performance of the low-frequency sampling program to estimate P exports in flashy streams compared to the less variable streams. We also found signs of interaction between climate/hydrology and land use intensity, in particular in the presence of point sources of P, leading to a bias towards underestimation of P in hydrologically stable streams and overestimation of P in flashy streams. Based on our findings, we suggest that the evaluation and use of more accurate monitoring methods, such as automatized flow-proportional water samplers and automatized bankside analyzers, should be prioritized whenever logistically possible. However, it seems particularly relevant in currently flashy systems and also in systems where climate change predictions suggest an increase in stream flashiness.

  10. Effectiveness of a regional model calibrated to different parts of a flow regime in regionalisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. S.

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to reduce the parameter uncertainty which has an effect on the identification of the relationship between the catchment characteristics and the catchment response dynamics in ungauged catchments. A water balance model calibrated to represent the rainfall runoff characteristics over long time scales had a potential limitation in the modelling capacity to accurately predict the hydrological effects of non-stationary catchment response dynamics under different climate conditions (distinct wet and dry periods). The accuracy and precision of hydrological modelling predictions was assessed to yield a better understanding for the potential improvement of the model's predictability. In the assessment of model structure suitability to represent the non-stationary catchment response characteristics, there was a flow-dependent bias in the runoff simulations. In particular, over-prediction of the streamflow was dominant for the dry period. The poor model performance during the dry period was associated with the largely different impulse response estimates for the entire period and the dry period. The refined calibration approach was established based on assessment of model deficiencies. The rainfall-runoff models were separately calibrated to different parts of the flow regime, and the calibrated models for the separated time series were used to establish the regional models of relevant parts of the flow regime (i.e. wet and dry periods). The effectiveness of the parameter values for the refined approach in regionalisation was evaluated through investigating the accuracy of predictions of the regional models. The predictability was demonstrated using only the dry period to highlight the improvement in model performance easily veiled by the performance of the model for the whole period. The regional models from the refined calibration approach clearly enhanced the hydrological behaviour by improving the identification of the relationships between

  11. Flow regime, temperature, and biotic interactions drive differential declines of trout species under climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wenger, S.J.; Isaak, D.J.; Luce, C.H.; Neville, H.M.; Fausch, K.D.; Dunham, J.B.; Dauwalter, D.C.; Young, M.K.; Elsner, M.M.; Rieman, B.E.; Hamlet, A.F.; Williams, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Broad-scale studies of climate change effects on freshwater species have focused mainly on temperature, ignoring critical drivers such as flow regime and biotic interactions. We use downscaled outputs from general circulation models coupled with a hydrologic model to forecast the effects of altered flows and increased temperatures on four interacting species of trout across the interior western United States (1.01 million km2), based on empirical statistical models built from fish surveys at 9,890 sites. Projections under the 2080s A1B emissions scenario forecast a mean 47% decline in total suitable habitat for all trout, a group of fishes of major socioeconomic and ecological significance. We project that native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii, already excluded from much of its potential range by nonnative species, will lose a further 58% of habitat due to an increase in temperatures beyond the species' physiological optima and continued negative biotic interactions. Habitat for nonnative brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta is predicted to decline by 77% and 48%, respectively, driven by increases in temperature and winter flood frequency caused by warmer, rainier winters. Habitat for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is projected to decline the least (35%) because negative temperature effects are partly offset by flow regime shifts that benefit the species. These results illustrate how drivers other than temperature influence species response to climate change. Despite some uncertainty, large declines in trout habitat are likely, but our findings point to opportunities for strategic targeting of mitigation efforts to appropriate stressors and locations.

  12. Flow regime, temperature, and biotic interactions drive differential declines of trout species under climate change

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Seth J.; Isaak, Daniel J.; Luce, Charles H.; Neville, Helen M.; Fausch, Kurt D.; Dunham, Jason B.; Dauwalter, Daniel C.; Young, Michael K.; Elsner, Marketa M.; Rieman, Bruce E.; Hamlet, Alan F.; Williams, Jack E.

    2011-01-01

    Broad-scale studies of climate change effects on freshwater species have focused mainly on temperature, ignoring critical drivers such as flow regime and biotic interactions. We use downscaled outputs from general circulation models coupled with a hydrologic model to forecast the effects of altered flows and increased temperatures on four interacting species of trout across the interior western United States (1.01 million km2), based on empirical statistical models built from fish surveys at 9,890 sites. Projections under the 2080s A1B emissions scenario forecast a mean 47% decline in total suitable habitat for all trout, a group of fishes of major socioeconomic and ecological significance. We project that native cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii, already excluded from much of its potential range by nonnative species, will lose a further 58% of habitat due to an increase in temperatures beyond the species’ physiological optima and continued negative biotic interactions. Habitat for nonnative brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta is predicted to decline by 77% and 48%, respectively, driven by increases in temperature and winter flood frequency caused by warmer, rainier winters. Habitat for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, is projected to decline the least (35%) because negative temperature effects are partly offset by flow regime shifts that benefit the species. These results illustrate how drivers other than temperature influence species response to climate change. Despite some uncertainty, large declines in trout habitat are likely, but our findings point to opportunities for strategic targeting of mitigation efforts to appropriate stressors and locations. PMID:21844354

  13. Modeling the Evolution of Riparian Woodlands Facing Climate Change in Three European Rivers with Contrasting Flow Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Rivaes, Rui P.; Rodríguez-González, Patricia M.; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Pinheiro, António N.; Politti, Emilio; Egger, Gregory; García-Arias, Alicia; Francés, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Global circulation models forecasts indicate a future temperature and rainfall pattern modification worldwide. Such phenomena will become particularly evident in Europe where climate modifications could be more severe than the average change at the global level. As such, river flow regimes are expected to change, with resultant impacts on aquatic and riparian ecosystems. Riparian woodlands are among the most endangered ecosystems on earth and provide vital services to interconnected ecosystems and human societies. However, they have not been the object of many studies designed to spatially and temporally quantify how these ecosystems will react to climate change-induced flow regimes. Our goal was to assess the effects of climate-changed flow regimes on the existing riparian vegetation of three different European flow regimes. Cases studies were selected in the light of the most common watershed alimentation modes occurring across European regions, with the objective of appraising expected alterations in the riparian elements of fluvial systems due to climate change. Riparian vegetation modeling was performed using the CASiMiR-vegetation model, which bases its computation on the fluvial disturbance of the riparian patch mosaic. Modeling results show that riparian woodlands may undergo not only at least moderate changes for all flow regimes, but also some dramatic adjustments in specific areas of particular vegetation development stages. There are circumstances in which complete annihilation is feasible. Pluvial flow regimes, like the ones in southern European rivers, are those likely to experience more pronounced changes. Furthermore, regardless of the flow regime, younger and more water-dependent individuals are expected to be the most affected by climate change. PMID:25330151

  14. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V, Oliver C

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities. PMID:26207997

  15. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model

    PubMed Central

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V., Oliver C.

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities. PMID:26207997

  16. Evapotranspiration from subsurface horizontal flow wetlands planted with Phragmites australis in sub-tropical Australia.

    PubMed

    Headley, T R; Davison, L; Huett, D O; Müller, R

    2012-02-01

    The balance between evapotranspiration (ET) loss and rainfall ingress in treatment wetlands (TWs) can affect their suitability for certain applications. The aim of this paper was to investigate the water balance and seasonal dynamics in ET of subsurface horizontal flow (HF) TWs in a sub-tropical climate. Monthly water balances were compiled for four pilot-scale HF TWs receiving horticultural runoff over a two year period (Sep. 1999-Aug. 2001) on the sub-tropical east-coast of Australia. The mean annual wetland ET rate increased from 7.0 mm/day in the first year to 10.6 mm/day in the second, in response to the development of the reed (Phragmites australis) population. Consequently, the annual crop coefficients (ratio of wetland ET to pan evaporation) increased from 1.9 in the first year to 2.6 in the second. The mean monthly ET rates were generally greater and more variable than the Class-A pan evaporation rates, indicating that transpiration is an important contributor to ET in HF TWs. Evapotranspiration rates were generally highest in the summer and autumn months, and corresponded with the times of peak standing biomass of P. australis. It is likely that ET from the relatively small 1 m wide by 4 m long HF TWs was enhanced by advection through so-called "clothesline" and "oasis" effects, which contributed to the high crop coefficients. For the second year, when the reed population was well established, the annual net loss to the atmosphere (taking into account rainfall inputs) accounted for 6.1-9.6 % of the influent hydraulic load, which is considered negligible. However, the net loss is likely to be higher in arid regions with lower rainfall. The Water Use Efficiency (WUE) of the wetlands in the second year of operation was 1.3 g of above-ground biomass produced per kilogram of water consumed, which is low compared to agricultural crops. It is proposed that system level WUE provides a useful metric for selecting wetland plant species and TW design alternatives to

  17. Experimental investigation on the interfacial characteristics of stratified air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudaya, Akhmad Zidni; Kuntoro, Hadiyan Yusuf; Dinaryanto, Okto; Deendarlianto, Indarto

    2016-06-01

    The interfacial wave characteristics of stratified air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe were experimentally investigated by using the flush-mounted constant electric current method (CECM) sensors. The experiments were conducted in a horizontal two-phase flow loop 9.5 m long (L) consisting of transparent acrylic pipe of 26 mm i.d. (D). To obtain the stratified flow pattern, the superficial gas and liquid velocities were set to 1.02 - 3.77 m/s and 0.016 - 0.92 m/s, respectively. Several interfacial wave patterns as described by several investigators were identified. The common parameters such as liquid hold-up, probability distribution function, wave velocity and wave frequency were investigated as the function of the liquid and gas flow rates. The interfacial curvature was calculated on the basis of the liquid hold-up data from the CECM sensors and the liquid film thickness data from the image processing technique in the previous work. As a result, it was found that the mean liquid hold-up decreases with the increase of the superficial gas velocity. In the same sub flow pattern, the wave velocity increases as the superficial gas velocity increases. On the other hand, in the two-dimensional wave region, the dominant frequency decreases with the increase of the superficial liquid velocity.

  18. Experimental study of sheet flow regime of sediment transport in a laboratory flume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil-Baudard, Thibaud; Chauchat, Julien; Hurther, David; Barthélémy, Eric; Michallet, Hervé; Snabre, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The sheet flow regime of sediment transport occurs when the shear stress exerted by the fluid flow on the sediment bed is high enough to set in motion a thick layer of particles. This phenomenon is very important for river and coastal morphodynamical evolution. However, the key mechanisms controlling this regime such as intergranular interactions or turbulent processes in dense fluid-sediment mixture are not well understood yet. For this purpose, an original laboratory experiment has been set up at LEGI in a tilted flume (10 meters long, 35 centimeters wide). 3mm plastic (PMMA) particles are stored in a 3m long tank located close to the channel outlet. The channel is tilted at 0.5 per cent slope and the fluid flow rate is 35 l/s. The instrumentation is composed of an acoustic profiler, ACVP, a high speed camera and a water level sensor. The acoustic profiler allows to get streamwise and vertical velocities profiles from the clear water flow down to the fixed bed with great spatial and temporal resolution (3mm and 0,013s respectively) permitting a good characterization of turbulence. The high speed camera together with a videotrajectography method allow to get sediment velocity profiles and qualitative concentration profiles close to the wall. To compensate the lack of sediment recirculation and the short duration of the experiment, it is repeated to carry out ensemble averaging. The statistical protocol for the treatment of the turbulent signal is presented. This initial treatment allows the estimation of the mean velocity, the turbulent shear and the normal stresses profiles. From these profiles, reproducibility and steadiness of the flow are verified and the main mechanisms of momentum transfer acting from the fixed bed to the dilute suspension are analyzed. The mean velocity profile close to the bed shows three different regions, from bottom to top, an exponential tail, a linear layer and a logarithmic layer. The exponential tail is characteristic of a Coulomb

  19. Porous anodes with helical flow pathways in bioelectrochemical systems: The effects of fluid dynamics and operating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Rae; Boghani, Hitesh C.; Amini, Negar; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-François; Michie, Iain; Dinsdale, Richard M.; Guwy, Alan J.; Guo, Zheng Xiao; Premier, Giuliano C.

    2012-09-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) and/or microbial fuel cell (MFC) mass transport and associated over-potential limitations are affected by flow regimes, which may simultaneously increase the power and pollution treatment capacities. Two electrodes with helical flow channels were compared in the same tubular MFC reactor. 1). A machined monolithic microporous conductive carbon (MMCC). 2). A layered carbon veil with spoked ABS former (LVSF); both presented helical flow channel. Anode performances were compared when subject to temperature, substrate concentration and flow rate variations. The MMCC maximum power increased from 2.9 ± 0.3 to 7.6 ± 0.7 mW with influent acetate concentration, from 1 to 10 mM (with 2 mL min-1), but decreased power to 5.5 ± 0.5 mW at 40 mM, implicated localized pH/buffering. Flow rate (0.1 to 7.5 mL min-1) effects were relatively small but an increase was evident from batch to continuous operation at 0.1 mL min-1. The LVSF configuration showed improved performance in power as the flow rate increased, indicating that flow pattern affects BES performance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling showed less uniform flow with the LVSF. Thus flow regime driven mass transfer improves the power output in continuously fed system operation. These results indicate that electrode configuration, flow regime and operating condition need consideration to optimize the bioelectrochemical reaction.

  20. Self-similar turbulent boundary layer with imposed pressure gradient. Four flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigdorovich, I. I.

    2014-11-01

    Self-similar flows of an incompressible fluid in a turbulent boundary layer, when the free-stream velocity is a power function (with the exponent m) of the longitudinal coordinate, have been studied. It has been shown that there are four different self-similar flow regimes corresponding to four individual similarity parameters one of which is the known Clauser parameter and the three other parameters have been established for the first time. At adverse pressure gradient, when the exponent m lies in a certain range depending on Reynolds number, the problem has two solutions with different values of the boundary-layer thickness and skin friction; consequently, hysteresis in a pre-separation flow is possible. Separation occurs not at the minimal value of m that corresponds to the strongest adverse pressure gradient, but at m = -0.216 -0.4 Re{/p -1/3} + O(Re{/p -2/3}), where Re p is the Reynolds number based on longitudinal pressure gradient. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Climate change impact assessment on flow regime by incorporating spatial correlation and scenario uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallam, P.; Qin, X. S.

    2016-04-01

    Flooding risk is increasing in many parts of the world and may worsen under climate change conditions. The accuracy of predicting flooding risk relies on reasonable projection of meteorological data (especially rainfall) at the local scale. The current statistical downscaling approaches face the difficulty of projecting multi-site climate information for future conditions while conserving spatial information. This study presents a combined Long Ashton Research Station Weather Generator (LARS-WG) stochastic weather generator and multi-site rainfall simulator RainSim (CLWRS) approach to investigate flow regimes under future conditions in the Kootenay Watershed, Canada. To understand the uncertainty effect stemming from different scenarios, the climate output is fed into a hydrologic model. The results showed different variation trends of annual peak flows (in 2080-2099) based on different climate change scenarios and demonstrated that the hydrological impact would be driven by the interaction between snowmelt and peak flows. The proposed CLWRS approach is useful where there is a need for projection of potential climate change scenarios.

  2. Self-similar turbulent boundary layer with imposed pressure gradient. Four flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Vigdorovich, I. I.

    2014-11-15

    Self-similar flows of an incompressible fluid in a turbulent boundary layer, when the free-stream velocity is a power function (with the exponent m) of the longitudinal coordinate, have been studied. It has been shown that there are four different self-similar flow regimes corresponding to four individual similarity parameters one of which is the known Clauser parameter and the three other parameters have been established for the first time. At adverse pressure gradient, when the exponent m lies in a certain range depending on Reynolds number, the problem has two solutions with different values of the boundary-layer thickness and skin friction; consequently, hysteresis in a pre-separation flow is possible. Separation occurs not at the minimal value of m that corresponds to the strongest adverse pressure gradient, but at m = −0.216 −0.4 Re{sub p}{sup −1/3} + O(Re{sub p}{sup −2/3}), where Re{sub p} is the Reynolds number based on longitudinal pressure gradient. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Flow regimes of micrometric ripples in a capillary channel in micro gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlen, Alain; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam; Thomas, Peter

    Since the advent of nanotechnology microfluidic devices have become common in science and engineering. Examples are equipment for drug delivery, systems for the analysis of chemical substances or devices for the manipulation, transport or separation of suspended droplets, microparticles, cells, or macro-molecules in fluids. In these contexts observations of new patternformation phenomena in microfluidic two-phase flows is always of great interest. Here the oscillatory motion of a fluid carrying micron-sized particles inside a capillary tube is investigated experimentally in standard gravity condition. It is found that initially uniformly distributed particles can segregate and accumulate to form regularly spaced micron-sized particle clusters. The wavelength of the micro clusters is compared to data for macro-scale sand-ripple patterns and found to obey the same universal scaling as these. A physical and dimensional analysis is performed that confirms the universality of the experimentally observed scaling. From these theory, the effect of a low gravity can therefore be discussed on the basis of this universal scaling. The basis of the theory is the dominant importance of the interfacial velocity between the liquid and the grains layer. Of course this is only possible if the global flow variations in space are slow compared with the wave lengths observed. This allows a discussion about the flow regimes that can be present in space can therefore be forecasted and a few applications for bioscience or material sciences can be considered.

  4. Can water sensitive urban design systems help to preserve natural channel-forming flow regimes in an urbanised catchment?

    PubMed

    Wella-Hewage, Chathurika Subhashini; Alankarage Hewa, Guna; Pezzaniti, David

    2016-01-01

    Increased stormwater runoff and pollutant loads due to catchment urbanisation bring inevitable impacts on the physical and ecological conditions of environmentally sensitive urban streams. Water sensitive urban design (WSUD) has been recognised as a possible means to minimise these negative impacts. This paper reports on a study that investigated the ability of infiltration-based WSUD systems to replicate the predevelopment channel-forming flow (CFF) regime in urban catchments. Catchment models were developed for the 'pre-urban', 'urban' and 'managed' conditions of a case study catchment and the hydrological effect on CFF regime was investigated using a number of flow indices. The results clearly show that changes to flow regime are apparent under urban catchment conditions and are even more severe under highly urbanised conditions. The use of WSUD systems was found to result in the replication of predevelopment flow regimes, particularly at low levels of urbanisation. Under highly urbanised conditions (of managed catchments) overcontrol of the CFF indices was observed as indicated by flow statistics below their pre-urban values. The overall results suggest that WSUD systems are highly effective in replicating the predevelopment CFF regime in urban streams and could be used as a means to protect environmentally sensitive urban streams. PMID:26744937

  5. Permafrost, heat flow, and the geothermal regime at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.; Marshall, B.V.; Moses, T.H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Temperature measurements through permafrost in the oil field at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, combined with laboratory measurements of the thermal conductivity of drill cutting permit an evaluation of in situ thermal properties and an understanding of the general factors that control the geothermal regime. A sharp contrast in temperatire gradient at c600m represents a contrast in thermal conductivity caused by the downward change from interstitial ice to interstitial water at the base of permafrost under near steady state conditions. These results yield a heat flow of c1.3HFU, which is similar to other values on the Alaskan Arctic Coast: the anomalously deep permafrost is a result of the anomalously high conductivity of the siliceous ice-rich sediments. With confirmation of the permafrost configuration by offshore drilling, heat conduction models can yield reliable new information on the chronology of arctic shoreline. -from Authors

  6. Suspended particulate composition: evolution along a river linear and influence of regime flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Meur, Mathieu; Montargès-Pelletier, Emmanuelle; Bauer, Allan; Gley, Renaud; Migot, Sylvie; Mansuy-Huault, Laurence; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Villièras, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Suspended Particulate Matters are recognized to play a crucial role in the transport and fate of chemicals like trace metal elements. The affinity of trace metals with natural SPM is influenced by (i) the nature of metal (ii) physical-chemical conditions of the water column (iii) SPM physical characteristics (grain size, surface area) (iiii) SPM chemical characteristics (elemental composition, mineralogy, organic composition). Some authors observed that the SPM composition was the predominant factor controlling the affinity of trace metals with natural SPM. One purpose of this work is to follow the physical and chemical characteristics of SPM along the river linear in order to better understand the affinity between SPM and heavy metals. One other purpose is to study the influence of regime flow on SPM physical and chemical composition in order to detect any variation of SPM composition with regime flow. SPM were sampled along Moselle river (North East of France) following an urbanization gradient. Two tributaries were also sampled, the Madon river which drains an agricultural catchment and the Fensch stream which flows through an ancient steel-making basin. SPM were sampled several times during high flow and low flow. Particulate matter was extracted on field using continuous flow field centrifuge. Frozen-dried samples were then characterized in terms of size distribution, elemental composition (ICP - AES, ICP - MS), mineralogy (XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM), surface properties (gas adsorption techniques) and organic composition (Py-GC-MS and GC-MS). Grain size distribution evidenced the presence of coarser particles during high flow but no difference in the grain size distribution could be evidenced between the different stations. The grain size distribution of collected SPM appeared globally identical, although the increase of conductivity due to the junction of Meurthe river . In terms of composition, major element contents in SPM are characterized by the predominance of

  7. Modeling the Relations Between Flow Regime Components, Species Traits, and Spawning Success of Fishes in Warmwater Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Scott W.; Peterson, James T.; Freeman, Mary C.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Irwin, Elise

    2010-08-01

    Modifications to stream hydrologic regimes can have a profound influence on the dynamics of their fish populations. Using hierarchical linear models, we examined the relations between flow regime and young-of-year fish density using fish sampling and discharge data from three different warmwater streams in Illinois, Alabama, and Georgia. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the relative support for models describing hypothesized influences of five flow regime components representing: short-term high and low flows; short-term flow stability; and long-term mean flows and flow stability on fish reproductive success during fish spawning and rearing periods. We also evaluated the influence of ten fish species traits on fish reproductive success. Species traits included spawning duration, reproductive strategy, egg incubation rate, swimming locomotion morphology, general habitat preference, and food habits. Model selection results indicated that young-of-year fish density was positively related to short-term high flows during the spawning period and negatively related to flow variability during the rearing period. However, the effect of the flow regime components varied substantially among species, but was related to species traits. The effect of short-term high flows on the reproductive success was lower for species that broadcast their eggs during spawning. Species with cruiser swimming locomotion morphologies (e.g., Micropterus) also were more vulnerable to variable flows during the rearing period. Our models provide insight into the conditions and timing of flows that influence the reproductive success of warmwater stream fishes and may guide decisions related to stream regulation and management.

  8. Production of microbubbles from axisymmetric flow focusing in the jetting regime for moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, E. J.; Acero, A. J.; Montanero, J. M.; Herrada, M. A.; Gañán-Calvo, A. M.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze both experimentally and numerically the formation of microbubbles in the jetting regime reached when a moderately viscous liquid stream focuses a gaseous meniscus inside a converging micronozzle. If the total (stagnation) pressure of the injected gas current is fixed upstream, then there are certain conditions on which a quasisteady gas meniscus forms. The meniscus tip is sharpened by the liquid stream down to the gas molecular scale. On the other side, monodisperse collections of microbubbles can be steadily produced in the jetting regime if the feeding capillary is appropriately located inside the nozzle. In this case, the microbubble size depends on the feeding capillary position. The numerical simulations for an imposed gas flow rate show that a recirculation cell appears in the gaseous meniscus for low enough values of that parameter. The experiments allow one to conclude that the bubble pinch-off comprises two phases: (i) a stretching motion of the precursor jet where the neck radius versus the time before the pinch essentially follows a potential law, and (ii) a final stage where a very thin and slender gaseous thread forms and eventually breaks apart into a number of micron-sized bubbles. Because of the difference between the free surface and core velocities, the gaseous jet breakage differs substantially from that of liquid capillary jets and gives rise to bubbles with diameters much larger than those expected from the Rayleigh-type capillary instability. The dependency of the bubble diameter upon the flow-rate ratio agrees with the scaling law derived by A. M. Gañán-Calvo [Phys. Rev. E 69, 027301 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevE.69.027301], although a slight influence of the Reynolds number can be observed in our experiments.

  9. Production of microbubbles from axisymmetric flow focusing in the jetting regime for moderate Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Vega, E J; Acero, A J; Montanero, J M; Herrada, M A; Gañán-Calvo, A M

    2014-06-01

    We analyze both experimentally and numerically the formation of microbubbles in the jetting regime reached when a moderately viscous liquid stream focuses a gaseous meniscus inside a converging micronozzle. If the total (stagnation) pressure of the injected gas current is fixed upstream, then there are certain conditions on which a quasisteady gas meniscus forms. The meniscus tip is sharpened by the liquid stream down to the gas molecular scale. On the other side, monodisperse collections of microbubbles can be steadily produced in the jetting regime if the feeding capillary is appropriately located inside the nozzle. In this case, the microbubble size depends on the feeding capillary position. The numerical simulations for an imposed gas flow rate show that a recirculation cell appears in the gaseous meniscus for low enough values of that parameter. The experiments allow one to conclude that the bubble pinch-off comprises two phases: (i) a stretching motion of the precursor jet where the neck radius versus the time before the pinch essentially follows a potential law, and (ii) a final stage where a very thin and slender gaseous thread forms and eventually breaks apart into a number of micron-sized bubbles. Because of the difference between the free surface and core velocities, the gaseous jet breakage differs substantially from that of liquid capillary jets and gives rise to bubbles with diameters much larger than those expected from the Rayleigh-type capillary instability. The dependency of the bubble diameter upon the flow-rate ratio agrees with the scaling law derived by A. M. Gañán-Calvo [Phys. Rev. E 69, 027301 (2004)], although a slight influence of the Reynolds number can be observed in our experiments. PMID:25019884

  10. Depletion of horizontal pair diffusion in strongly stratified turbulence: comparison with plane two-dimensional flows.

    PubMed

    Nicolleau, F; Sung, K-S; Vassilicos, J C

    2008-10-01

    In this paper different arguments are put forward to explain why two-particle diffusion is depleted in the direction of stratification of a stably stratified turbulence. Kinematic simulations (KSs) which reproduce that depletion are used to shed light on the responsible mechanisms. The local horizontal divergence is studied and comparisons are made with two-dimensional kinematic simulation. The probability density function of the horizontal divergence of the velocity field is not a Dirac distribution in the presence of stratification but a Gaussian and this Gaussian does not depend on the Froude number. The number of stagnation points in the KS of three-dimensional strongly stratified turbulence is found virtually identical to what it is in KS of three-dimensional isotropic turbulence. However, the root mean square horizontal and vertical stagnation point velocities of the stratified turbulence are both larger than their counterparts in isotropic turbulence that latter getting progressively smaller as the Reynolds number increases. Therefore, the strong stratification destroys the persistence of the stagnation points. The main reason for the depletion, however, seems to have to be sought in the effect of stratification on the strain rate tensor. The stratification does lead to a depletion of the average square strain rate tensor, as well as of all average square strain rate eigenvalues. We conclude that it is these effects of stratification on the strain rate tensor that explain the depletion of the horizontal turbulent pair diffusion. PMID:18999525

  11. Fabrication of cm scale buckypapers of horizontally aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes highly filled with Fe3C: the key roles of Cl and Ar-flow rates.

    PubMed

    Boi, Filippo S; Guo, Jian; Wang, Shanling; He, Yi; Xiang, Gang; Zhang, Xi; Baxendale, Mark

    2016-03-18

    A key challenge in the fabrication of ferromagnetically filled carbon-nanotube buckypapers in the presence of Cl-radicals is the achievement of a preferential horizontal nanotube-alignment. We show that a horizontal-alignment can be achieved by tuning two main CVD parameters for a fixed dichlorobenzene concentration: the precursor-evaporation temperature and the flow rate. PMID:26905009

  12. Investigations on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher geometry in the hypersonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saile, D.; Gülhan, A.; Henckels, A.; Glatzer, C.; Statnikov, V.; Meinke, M.

    2013-06-01

    The turbulent wake flow of generic rocket configurations is investigated experimentally and numerically at a freestream Mach number of 6.0 and a unit Reynolds number of 10·106 m-1. The flow condition is based on the trajectory of Ariane V-like launcher at an altitude of 50 km, which is used as the baseline to address the overarching tasks of wake flows in the hypersonic regime like fluid-structural coupling, reverse hot jets and base heating. Experimental results using pressure transducers and the high-speed Schlieren measurement technique are shown to gain insight into the local pressure fluctuations on the base and the oscillations of the recompression shock. This experimental configuration features a wedgeprofiled strut orthogonally mounted to the main body. Additionally, the influence of cylindrical dummy nozzles attached to the base of the rocket is investigated, which is the link to the numerical investigations. Here, the axisymmetric model possesses a cylindrical sting support of the same diameter as the dummy nozzles. The sting support allows investigations for an undisturbed wake flow. A time-accurate zonal Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach is applied to identify shocks, expansion waves, and the highly unsteady recompression region numerically. Subsequently, experimental and numerical results in the strut-averted region are compared with regard to the wall pressure and recompression shock frequency spectra. For the compared configurations, experimental pressure spectra exhibit dominant Strouhal numbers at about SrD = 0.03 and 0.27, and the recompression shock oscillates at 0.2. In general, the pressure and recompression shock fluctuations numerically calculated agree reasonably with the experimental results. The experiments with a blunt base reveal base-pressure spectra with dominant Strouhal numbers at 0.08 at the center position and 0.145, 0.21-0.22, and 0.31-0.33 at the outskirts of the base.

  13. The Impact of Surface Friction on Boundary Layer Separation for Different Mountain Flow Regimes: An Analysis Based on Large-Eddy-Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachsperger, Johannes; Serafin, Stefano; Grubišić, Vanda

    2014-05-01

    expected; rather we find those in moderately non-linear flows. A possible explanation for that is that for flows in the strongest non-linear regime, the BLS is associated with low-level mountain-wave breaking which leads to the formation of a lee wave train underneath a self-induced critical level and an attendant train of smaller rotors underneath the lee wave crests. It appears also that the trapped flow over this train of rotors excites an upward propagating gravity wave (similar to a terrain generated internal gravity wave) which partially passes through the critical level and changes the structure of the larger-scale flow above. The sensitivity tests for the strength of surface friction show that with increasing surface drag the rotor interior structure changes from a single coherent horizontal vortex to a more complex interior filled with sub-vortices that impact the overall shape of the rotor.

  14. New regimes of plastic flow at very high pressures and strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Recent progress in understanding solid-state plastic flow at very high pressures and strain rates for high energy density (HED) science will be described. These results are relevant to hypervelocity impacts, space hardware durability, planetary formation dynamics, advanced designs for inertial confinement fusion, and basic HED science. We use high power lasers to study the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov hydrodynamic instability evolution in the solid state plastic flow regime on the Janus, Omega, and NIF lasers, spanning peak pressures from 10 - 500 GPa (0.1 - 5 Mbar). We are pursuing time resolved diffraction experiments to understand the lattice level dynamics resulting from high rate compression of samples. EXAFS experiments probe the atomic level structure and phase, and provide a volume-averaged temperature. We use the very bright, high time resolution x-ray probe at LCLS to examine the detailed lattice response and time evolution right behind the shock front. And finally, shock driven samples are recovered so that the residual microstructure caused by the shock can be examined by SEM, TEM, and other characterization techniques. An overview of these recent results, with comparisons to theory and simulations, will be given. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Hydrothermal flow regime and magmatic heat source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.; Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Williams, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    This detailed three-dimensional model of the natural flow regime of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, before steam production began, is based on patterns of hydrothermal mineral zones and light stable isotopic ratios observed in rock samples from more than 50 deep wells, together with temperature gradients, wireline logs and other data. At the level so far penetrated by drilling, this hydrothermal system was heated by a thermal plume of water close to boiling, inclined at 45/sup 0/, rising from the northeast and discharging to the west. To the east a zone of cold water recharge overlies the inclined thermal plume. Fission track annealing studies show the reservoir reached 170/sup 0/C only 10/sup 4/ years ago. Oxygen isotope exchange data indicate that a 12 km/sup 3/ volume of rock subsequently reacted with three times its volume of water hotter than 200/sup 0/C. Averaged over the duration of the heating event this would require a flow velocity through a typical cross-section of the reservoir of about 6 m/year. The heat in storage in that part of the reservoir hotter than 200/sup 0/C and shallower than 3 km depth is equivalent to that which would be released by the cooling of about 1 or 2 km/sup 3/ of basalt or gabbro magma.

  16. How kelp produce blade shapes suited to different flow regimes: A new wrinkle.

    PubMed

    Koehl, M A R; Silk, W K; Liang, H; Mahadevan, L

    2008-12-01

    Many species of macroalgae have flat, strap-like blades in habitats exposed to rapidly flowing water, but have wide, ruffled "undulate" blades at protected sites. We used the giant bull kelp, Nereocystis luetkeana, to investigate how these ecomorphological differences are produced. The undulate blades of N. luetkeana from sites with low flow remain spread out and flutter erratically in moving water, thereby not only enhancing interception of light, but also increasing drag. In contrast, strap-like blades of kelp from habitats with rapid flow collapse into streamlined bundles and flutter at low amplitude in flowing water, thus reducing both drag and interception of light. Transplant experiments in the field revealed that shape of the blade in N. luetkeana is a plastic trait. Laboratory experiments in which growing blades from different sites were subjected to tensile forces that mimicked the hydrodynamic drag experienced by blades in different flow regimes showed that change in shape is induced by mechanical stress. During growth experiments in the field and laboratory, we mapped the spatial distribution of growth in both undulate and strap-like blades to determine how these different morphologies were produced. The highest growth rates occur near the proximal ends of N. luetkeana blades of both morphologies, but the rates of transverse growth of narrow, strap-like blades are lower than those of wide, undulate blades. If rates of longitudinal growth at the edges of a blade exceed the rate of longitudinal growth along the midline of the blade, ruffles along the edges of the blade are produced by elastic buckling. In contrast, flat blades are produced when rates of longitudinal growth are similar across the width of a blade. Because ruffles are the result of elastic buckling, a compliant undulate N. luetkeana blade can easily be pushed into different configurations (e.g., the wavelengths of the ruffles along the edges of the blade can change, and the whole blade can

  17. Creep and Flow Regimes of Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt Films with Perpendicular Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J. P.; Mougin, A.; Cormier, M.; Ferré, J.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.; Dieny, B.; Stamps, R. L.

    2007-11-01

    We report on magnetic domain-wall velocity measurements in ultrathin Pt/Co(0.5 0.8nm)/Pt films with perpendicular anisotropy over a large range of applied magnetic fields. The complete velocity-field characteristics are obtained, enabling an examination of the transition between thermally activated creep and viscous flow: motion regimes predicted from general theories for driven elastic interfaces in weakly disordered media. The dissipation limited flow regime is found to be consistent with precessional domain-wall motion, analysis of which yields values for the damping parameter, α.

  18. Effect of placements (horizontal with vertical) on gas-solid flow and particle impact erosion in gate valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhe; Zhu, Linhang; Cui, Baoling; Li, Yi; Ruan, Xiaodong

    2014-12-01

    Gate valve has various placements in the practical usages. Due to the effect of gravity, particle trajectories and erosions are distinct between placements. Thus in this study, gas-solid flow properties and erosion in gate valve for horizontal placement and vertical placement are discussed and compared by using Euler-Lagrange simulation method. The structure of a gate valve and a simplified structure are investigated. The simulation procedure is validated in our published paper by comparing with the experiment data of a pipe and an elbow. The results show that for all investigated open degrees and Stokes numbers (St), there are little difference of gas flow properties and flow coefficients between two placements. It is also found that the trajectories of particles for two placements are mostly identical when St « 1, making the erosion independent of placement. With the increase of St, the distinction of trajectories between placements becomes more obvious, leading to an increasing difference of the erosion distributions. Besides, the total erosion ratio of surface T for horizontal placement is two orders of magnitudes larger than that for vertical placement when the particle diameter is 250μm.

  19. Expansion of bubbles under a pulsatile flow regime in decompressed ovine blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Ran; Marmur, Abraham

    2016-02-01

    After decompression of ovine large blood vessels, bubbles nucleate and expand at active hydrophobic spots on their luminal aspect. These bubbles will be in the path of the blood flow within the vessel, which might replenish the supply of gas-supersaturated plasma in their vicinity and thus, in contrast with our previous estimations, enhance their growth. We used the data from our previous study on the effect of pulsatile flow in ovine blood vessels stretched on microscope slides and photographed after decompression from hyperbaric exposure. We measured the diameter of 46 bubbles in 4 samples taken from 3 blood vessels (pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, and aorta) in which both a "multi-bubble active spot" (MBAS)--which produces several bubbles at a time, and at least one "single-bubble active spot" (SBAS)--which produces a single bubble at a time, were seen together. The linear expansion rate for diameter in SBAS ranged from 0.077 to 0.498 mm/min and in MBAS from 0.001 to 0.332 mm/min. There was a trend toward a reduced expansion rate for bubbles in MBAS compared with SBAS. The expansion rate for bubbles in an MBAS when it was surrounded by others was very low. Bubble growth is related to gas tension, and under a flow regime, bubbles expand from a diameter of 0.1 to 1mm in 2-24 min at a gas supersaturation of 620 kPa and lower. There are two phases of bubble development. The slow and disperse initiation of active spots (from nanobubbles to gas micronuclei) continues for more than 1h, whereas the fast increase in size (2-24 min) is governed by diffusion. Bubble-based decompression models should not artificially reduce diffusion constants, but rather take both phases of bubble development into consideration. PMID:26592146

  20. Investigating the flow and stress regime at the front of a tidewater outlet glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercenier, Rémy; Luethi, Martin; Vieli, Andreas; Rohner, Christoph; Small, David

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic changes in ocean-terminating glaciers are responsible for approximately half of the current high rate of mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet. The related calving process, which occurs when the stresses at the calving front exceed the fracture toughness of ice, is still not well understood and poorly represented in current generation ice-sheet models, but is a crucial requisite to understand and model dynamics and future mass loss of the ice sheet. Here, we use a two-dimensional finite-element model to compute the stress and flow fields near the front of a tidewater outlet glacier. First, we perform a sensitivity analysis for an idealized glacier exploring the effects of variable calving front slope, water depth and basal sliding. We then apply the model to two flowlines of Eqip Sermia, an ocean terminating outlet glacier in West Greenland. Detailed velocity and geometry measurements obtained from terrestrial radar interferometry serve as constraints to the model. These flowline geometries and velocities strongly differ. One flowline ends with a ˜ 50 meter vertical cliff, close to floatation, while the other has a 150-200 meter high grounded front with a ˜ 45° slope and for which extrusion flow is observed. These different geometry settings lead to substantial difference in stress and flow regimes. This stress analysis improves our understanding of how and where the ice is susceptible to failure and crevasse formation for different idealized as well as real conditions. In further work, we aim to use this information as a constraint to investigate the short-term and long-term processes related to outlet glacier calving.

  1. Basal ice flow regime influenced by glacial lake formation in Rhonegletscher, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, D.; Tsutaki, S.; Sugiyama, S.

    2010-12-01

    After the retreat of glacier terminus over a bedrock bump, a glacial lake has formed in front of Rhonegletscher, Switzerland. It is suspected that ice flow regime is now significantly influenced by the lake water. To investigate the impact of lake formation on glacier dynamics, we carried out surface and borehole observations in the terminus region of Rhonegletscher. In 2008 and 2009 summer seasons, we drilled more than 20 boreholes to measure borehole deformation by repeated inclinometry. Ice surface speed was measured by surveying stakes installed nearby the boreholes. We used a borehole televiewer to measure basal sliding speed by tracking stones and markers at the bottom of the boreholes. We also measured basal sediment layer thickness by hammering a penetrometer at the bottom of the boreholes. Our measurements showed clear decrease in the ice deformation rate near the lake (Fig. 1). Ice deformation accounted for 60-80% in the upper part of our study site (e.g. boreholes 1 and 5), whereas it is less than 10% near the lake (e.g. boreholes 7, 10 and 11). This result suggests that the basal ice flow near the lake is enhanced by the lake water. According to the basal sliding speed measurement in borehole 2, sliding accounted for less than 10% of basal flow speed from 2 to 31 August 2009. Deformation of a subglacial sediment layer is thus important in this region. The penetrometer measurement confirmed that the study site is underlain by a subglacial sediment layer whose thickness was in a range of 0-70 m. Fig.1 Terminus of Rhonegletscher and proglacial lakes indicated by the shaded areas. The columns show ice surface and deformation speeds measured at each borehole site from 9 July to 5 September in 2009. Ice deformation speed was negligibly small at boreholes 7, 10, and 11. Surface contour spacing is 20 m.

  2. The mantle wedge's transient 3-D flow regime and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D. R.; Le Voci, G.; Goes, S.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Arc volcanism, volatile cycling, mineralization, and continental crust formation are likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure. Wedge flow is often assumed to follow a regular corner-flow pattern. However, studies that incorporate a hydrated rheology and thermal buoyancy predict internal small-scale-convection (SSC). Here, we systematically explore mantle-wedge dynamics in 3-D simulations. We find that longitudinal "Richter-rolls" of SSC (with trench-perpendicular axes) commonly occur if wedge hydration reduces viscosities to Pa s, although transient transverse rolls (with trench-parallel axes) can dominate at viscosities of Pa s. Rolls below the arc and back arc differ. Subarc rolls have similar trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular dimensions of 100-150 km and evolve on a 1-5 Myr time-scale. Subback-arc instabilities, on the other hand, coalesce into elongated sheets, usually with a preferential trench-perpendicular alignment, display a wavelength of 150-400 km and vary on a 5-10 Myr time scale. The modulating influence of subback-arc ridges on the subarc system increases with stronger wedge hydration, higher subduction velocity, and thicker upper plates. We find that trench-parallel averages of wedge velocities and temperature are consistent with those predicted in 2-D models. However, lithospheric thinning through SSC is somewhat enhanced in 3-D, thus expanding hydrous melting regions and shifting dehydration boundaries. Subarc Richter-rolls generate time-dependent trench-parallel temperature variations of up to K, which exceed the transient 50-100 K variations predicted in 2-D and may contribute to arc-volcano spacing and the variable seismic velocity structures imaged beneath some arcs.

  3. Modeling the transition between upper plane bed regime and sheet flow without an active layer formulation. Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, E.; Hernandez Moreira, R. R.; Blom, A.

    2015-12-01

    A perusal of the literature on bedload transport revealed that, notwithstanding the large number of studies on bedform morphology performed in the past decades, the upper plane bed regime has not been thoroughly investigated and the distinction between the upper plane bed and sheet flow transport regimes is still poorly defined. Previous experimental work demonstrated that the upper plane bed regime is characterized by long wavelength and small amplitude bedforms that migrate downstream. These bedforms, however, were not observed in experiments on sheet flow transport suggesting that the upper plane bed and the sheet flow are two different regimes. We thus designed and performed experiments in a sediment feed flume in the hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of South Carolina at Columbia to study the transition from upper plane bed to sheet flow regime. Periodic measurements of water surface and bed elevation, bedform geometry and thicknesses of the bedload layer were performed by eyes, and with cameras, movies and a system of six ultrasonic probes that record the variations of bed elevation at a point over time. We used the time series of bed elevations to determine the probability functions of bed elevation. These probability functions are implemented in a continuous model of river morphodynamics, i.e. a model that does not use the active layer approximation to describe the sediment fluxes between the bedload and the deposit and that should thus be able to capture the details of the vertical and streamwise variation of the deposit grain size distribution. This model is validated against the experimental results for the case of uniform material. We then use the validated model in the attempt to study if and how the spatial distribution of grain sizes in the deposit changes from upper plane bed regime to sheet flow and if these results are influenced by the imposed rates of base level rise.

  4. Pattern transitions of oil-water two-phase flow with low water content in rectangular horizontal pipes probed by terahertz spectrum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Wu, Shi-Xiang; Zhao, Kun; Wang, Wei; Zhan, Hong-Lei; Jiang, Chen; Xiao, Li-Zhi; Chen, Shao-Hua

    2015-11-30

    The flow-pattern transition has been a challenging problem in two-phase flow system. We propose the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to investigate the behavior underlying oil-water flow in rectangular horizontal pipes. The low water content (0.03-2.3%) in oil-water flow can be measured accurately and reliably from the relationship between THz peak amplitude and water volume fraction. In addition, we obtain the flow pattern transition boundaries in terms of flow rates. The critical flow rate Qc of the flow pattern transitions decreases from 0.32 m3 h to 0.18 m3 h when the corresponding water content increases from 0.03% to 2.3%. These properties render THz-TDS particularly powerful technology for investigating a horizontal oil-water two-phase flow system. PMID:26698815

  5. Experimental study on the flow patterns and the two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal impacting T-Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; Malandrone, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper analyzes the experimental results concerning the flow patterns and pressure drops in two-phase flow through a horizontal impacting T-junction, whose outlet pipes are aligned and perpendicular to the inlet pipe. The test section consists of plexiglass pipes with inner diameter of 10 mm. A mixture of water and air at ambient temperature and pressures up to 2.4 bar flows through the T-junction, with different splitting of flow rates in the two outlet branches; superficial velocities of air and water in the inlet pipe have been varied up to a maximum of 35 m/s and 3.5 m/s respectively. The flow patterns occurring in the inlet and branch pipes are compared with the predictions of the Baker and Taitel - Dukler maps. The pressure drops along the branches have been measured relatively to different splitting of the flow rate through the two branches and the pressure loss coefficients in the junction have been evaluated. Friction pressure drops have allowed us to evaluate two-phase friction multipliers, which have then been compared to the predictions of Lockhart-Martinelli, and Friedel correlations. Local pressure drops have been extrapolated at the junction centre and analyzed; the two-phase multiplier has been evaluated and compared with the predictions of Chisholm correlation; the value of the empirical coefficient that minimizes the discrepancy has also been evaluated.

  6. Experimental investigation of buoyancy effects on convection heat transfer of supercritical CO2 flow in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimizu, Katsuyoshi; Sadr, Reza

    2016-04-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) turbulent flow were investigated experimentally in a horizontal circular pipe with an inner diameter of 8.7 mm. Local convection coefficients and Nusselt numbers of the flow were obtained at different locations along the pipe with a constant heat flux ranging from 16 to 64 kW/m2. Experiments were performed for fluid mass flow rate ranging from 0.011 to 0.017 kg/s, an inlet fluid temperature ranging from 24 to 28 °C, and a flow pressure ranging from 7.5 to 9.0 MPa to investigate their effects on the convection heat transfer in the pipe. Both enhancement as well as deterioration in the heat transfer coefficient was observed for the flow conditions examined in this work. Experimental results were then compared with the widely used empirical correlation for pipe flow. Three commonly used buoyancy parameters were utilized to investigate their applicability in the present test conditions. Results indicate that all the parameters show a strong presence of buoyancy effects in the present test conditions. The trend and magnitude of these parameters, however, do not agree with the trend and magnitude of heat transfer enhancement and deterioration along the pipe.

  7. An evaluation of borehole flowmeters used to measure horizontal ground-water flow in limestones of Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, John T.; Mandell, Wayne A.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Bayless, E. Randall; Hanson, Randall T.; Kearl, Peter M.; Kerfoot, William B.; Newhouse, Mark W.; Pedler, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Three borehole flowmeters and hydrophysical logging were used to measure ground-water flow in carbonate bedrock at sites in southeastern Indiana and on the westcentral border of Kentucky and Tennessee. The three flowmeters make point measurements of the direction and magnitude of horizontal flow, and hydrophysical logging measures the magnitude of horizontal flowover an interval. The directional flowmeters evaluated include a horizontal heat-pulse flowmeter, an acoustic Doppler velocimeter, and a colloidal borescope flowmeter. Each method was used to measure flow in selected zones where previous geophysical logging had indicated water-producing beds, bedding planes, or other permeable features that made conditions favorable for horizontal-flow measurements. Background geophysical logging indicated that ground-water production from the Indiana test wells was characterized by inflow from a single, 20-foot-thick limestone bed. The Kentucky/Tennessee test wells produced water from one or more bedding planes where geophysical logs indicated the bedding planes had been enlarged by dissolution. Two of the three test wells at the latter site contained measurable vertical flow between two or more bedding planes under ambient hydraulic head conditions. Field measurements and data analyses for each flow-measurement technique were completed by a developer of the technology or by a contractor with extensive experience in the application of that specific technology. Comparison of the horizontal-flow measurements indicated that the three point-measurement techniques rarely measured the same velocities and flow directions at the same measurement stations. Repeat measurements at selected depth stations also failed to consistently reproduce either flow direction, flow magnitude, or both. At a few test stations, two of the techniques provided similar flow magnitude or direction but usually not both. Some of this variability may be attributed to naturally occurring changes in

  8. Prediction of strong and weak ignition regimes in turbulent reacting flows with temperature fluctuations: A direct numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Pinaki; Valorani, Mauro; Im, Hong; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    The present work investigates the auto-ignition characteristics of compositionally homogeneous reactant mixtures in the presence of thermal non-uniformities and turbulent velocity fluctuations. An auto-ignition regime diagram is briefly discussed, that provides the framework for predicting the expected ignition behavior based on the thermo-chemical properties of the reactant mixture and flow/scalar field conditions. The regime diagram classifies the ignition regimes mainly into three categories: weak (deflagration dominant), reaction-controlled strong and mixing-controlled strong (volumetric ignition/spontaneous propagation dominant) regimes. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of auto-ignition in a lean thermally-stratified syngas/air turbulent mixture at high-pressure, low-temperature conditions are performed to assess the validity of the regime diagram. Various parametric cases are considered corresponding to different locations on the regime diagram, by varying the characteristic turbulent Damköhler and Reynolds numbers. Detailed analysis of the reaction front propagation and heat release indicates that the observed ignition behaviors agree very well with the corresponding predictions by the regime diagram. U.S. DOE NETL award number DE-FE0007465; King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).

  9. Mixing of passive tracers in the decay Batchelor regime of a channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Yonggun; Steinberg, Victor

    2010-12-01

    We report detailed quantitative studies of passive scalar mixing in a curvilinear channel flow, where elastic turbulence in a dilute polymer solution of high molecular weight polyacrylamide in a high viscosity water-sugar solvent was achieved. For quantitative investigation of mixing, a detailed study of the profiles of mean longitudinal and radial components of the velocity in the channel as a function of Wi was carried out. Besides, a maximum of the average value as well as a rms of the longitudinal velocity was used to determine the threshold of the elastic instability in the channel flow. The rms of the radial derivatives of the longitudinal and radial velocity components was utilized to define the control parameters of the problem, the Weissenberg Wiloc and the Péclet Pe numbers. The main result of these studies is the quantitative test of the theoretical prediction about the value of the mixing length in the decay Batchelor regime. The experiment shows large quantitative discrepancy, more than 200 times in the value of the coefficient C, which appears in the theoretical expression for the mixing length, but with the predicted scaling relation. There are two possible reasons to this discrepancy. First is the assumption made in the theory about the δ-correlated velocity field, which is in odds with the experimental observations. Second, and probably a more relevant suggestion for the significantly increased mixing length and thus reduced mixing efficiency, is the observed jets, the rare, localized, and vigorous ejection of the scalar trapped near the wall, which protrudes into the peripheral region as well as the bulk. They are first found in the recent numerical calculations and then observed in the experiment reported. The jets definitely strongly reduce the mixing efficiency in particular in the peripheral region and so can lead to considerable increase of the mixing length. We hope that this result will initiate further numerical calculations of the

  10. Optimization of various coal-conversion systems. Quarterly report No. 4 for the period February 1, 1982-April 30, 1982. [Dependence on flow regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, C Y

    1982-01-01

    It is well known that the identification of flow regimes is important in scale-ups and designs of multiphase reactors. Therefore, it is natural that the selections of parameter prediction methods for the reactor models should be based on flow regimes. Very few correlations, theories and models are capable of covering the whole spectrum of flow regimes. Often, accuracy is sacrificed for generality. By concentrating on each individual flow regime and its characteristics, the correlations and models selected can be expected to give better results. The evaluation of correlations for phase holdups and liquid dispersion coefficients has been evaluated for both the slurry reactors and the three-phase fluidized bed reactors.

  11. Experimental investigation on thermo-physical properties and overall performance of MWCNT-water nanofluid flow inside horizontal coiled wire inserted tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan-Behabadi, M. A.; Shahidi, Mohamad; Aligoodarz, M. R.; Ghazvini, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    The present study is aimed to measure and analyze the thermo-physical properties and overall performance of MWCNT-water nanofluid in turbulent flow regimes under constant heat flux conditions inside horizontal coiled wire inserted tubes. For this purpose, stable MWCNT-water nanofluids with different particle weight fractions of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 % as well as deionized water were utilized as the working fluids. It was found that the existing theoretical models could not predict the thermo-physical property values accurately, especially in case of specific heat capacity. Therefore, new empirical correlations are presented based on the obtained experimental results to predict such properties for the nanofluids. In addition, the overall performance of heat transfer techniques considered in this paper was evaluated based on thermal performance factor. The results revealed that thermal performance factor for all cases are greater than unity which indicate that simultaneous usage of nanofluids and wire coil inserts enhances the heat transfer without huge penalty in pumping power. Hence, using nanofluids as the working fluid in combination with coiled wire inserted tubes can be considered for some practical applications.

  12. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase IV: Central Florida Flow Regime Based Climatologies of Lightning Probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2009-01-01

    The threat of lightning is a daily concern during the warm season in Florida. Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. Previously, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) calculated the gridded lightning climatologies based on seven flow regimes over Florida for 1-, 3- and 6-hr intervals in 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-NM diameter range rings around the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and eight other airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) county warning area (CWA). In this update to the work, the AMU recalculated the lightning climatologies for using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The AMU included all data regardless of flow regime as one of the stratifications, added monthly stratifications, added three years of data to the period of record and used modified flow regimes based work from the AMU's Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool, Phase II. The AMU made changes so the 5- and 10-NM radius range rings are consistent with the aviation forecast requirements at NWS MLB, while the 20- and 30-NM radius range rings at the SLF assist the Spaceflight Meteorology Group in making forecasts for weather Flight Rule violations during Shuttle landings. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface with the new data.

  13. Adapting of the Background-Oriented Schlieren (BOS) Technique in the Characterization of the Flow Regimes in Thermal Spraying Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Rademacher, H. G.; Anjami, N.; Hagen, L.

    2014-01-01

    In thermal spraying technique, the changes in the in-flight particle velocities are considered to be only a function of the drag forces caused by the dominating flow regimes in the spray jet. Therefore, the correct understanding of the aerodynamic phenomena occurred at nozzle out let and at the substrate interface is an important task in the targeted improvement in the nozzle and air-cap design as well as in the spraying process in total. The presented work deals with the adapting of an innovative technique for the flow characterization called background-oriented Schlieren. The flow regimes in twin wire arc spraying (TWAS) and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) were analyzed with this technique. The interfering of the atomization gas flow with the intersected wires causes in case of TWAS process a deformation of the jet shape. It leads also to areas with different aero dynamic forces. The configurations of the outlet air-caps in TWAS effect predominantly the outlet flow characteristics. The ratio between fuel and oxygen determine the dominating flow regimes in the HVOF spraying jet. Enhanced understanding of the aerodynamics at outlet and at the substrate interface could lead to a targeted improvement in thermal spraying processes.

  14. Forced convection and flow boiling with and without enhancement devices for top-side-heated horizontal channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Turknett, Jerry C.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly was studied. Studies are completed of the variations in the local (axial and circumferential) and mean heat transfer coefficients in horizontal, top-heated coolant channels with smooth walls and internal heat transfer enhancement devices. The working fluid is freon-11. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls; (2) examine the effect of channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel; and (3) develop and improved data reduction analysis. The case of the top-heated, horizontal flow channel with smooth wall (1.37 cm inside diameter, and 122 cm heated length) was completed. The data were reduced using a preliminary analysis based on the heated hydraulic diameter. Preliminary examination of the local heat transfer coefficient variations indicated that there are significant axial and circumferential variations. However, it appears that the circumferential variation is more significant than the axial ones. In some cases, the circumferential variations were as much as a factor of ten. The axial variations rarely exceeded a factor of three.

  15. Predicting the natural flow regime: Models for assessing hydrological alteration in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlisle, D.M.; Falcone, J.; Wolock, D.M.; Meador, M.R.; Norris, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the extent to which natural streamflow characteristics have been altered is an important consideration for ecological assessments of streams. Assessing hydrologic condition requires that we quantify the attributes of the flow regime that would be expected in the absence of anthropogenic modifications. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether selected streamflow characteristics could be predicted at regional and national scales using geospatial data. Long-term, gaged river basins distributed throughout the contiguous US that had streamflow characteristics representing least disturbed or near pristine conditions were identified. Thirteen metrics of the magnitude, frequency, duration, timing and rate of change of streamflow were calculated using a 20-50 year period of record for each site. We used random forests (RF), a robust statistical modelling approach, to develop models that predicted the value for each streamflow metric using natural watershed characteristics. We compared the performance (i.e. bias and precision) of national- and regional-scale predictive models to that of models based on landscape classifications, including major river basins, ecoregions and hydrologic landscape regions (HLR). For all hydrologic metrics, landscape stratification models produced estimates that were less biased and more precise than a null model that accounted for no natural variability. Predictive models at the national and regional scale performed equally well, and substantially improved predictions of all hydrologic metrics relative to landscape stratification models. Prediction error rates ranged from 15 to 40%, but were 25% for most metrics. We selected three gaged, non-reference sites to illustrate how predictive models could be used to assess hydrologic condition. These examples show how the models accurately estimate predisturbance conditions and are sensitive to changes in streamflow variability associated with long-term land-use change. We also

  16. Mapping flood regime descriptors for flow-duration-frequency characterisation at ungauged location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauquet, E.; Leblois, E.; Galéa, G.

    2003-04-01

    Flood Frequency Analysis (FFA) is a commonly used tool for describing the flood regime. However, most often, FFA characterises a flood event only by its instantaneous peak or its maximum daily flow. This information is essential but insufficient for many purposes. Flood severity is not only defined by its peak value, but also by its volume and duration. The recommended method is the flow-duration-frequency (QdF) approach, that is similar to the intensity-duration-frequency analysis (IdF) applied to rainfall. QdF curves can be estimated at ungauged location using an analytical expression derived from regional analysis. To recover these curves where no streamflow data are available, two parameters need to be interpolated: D, a duration related to the flood dynamic behaviour and a flood index, i.e. Q10, the 10-year-return period instantaneous peak flood. It allows estimating any T-year-return period discharge averaged over different durations d. The main problem is the way to estimate these parameters related to an area - the drainage basin - and that are hierarchised by the river network. The presentation is focused on the regionalisation methods of the two parameters D and Q10. Two approaches for interpolation are considered. The first one is based on regression analysis: the two parameters are derived from catchment characteristics. The second one consists in an interpolation of the requested values taking the river network into account within an adapted geostatistical framework. Hypothesis and results are discussed on a case study, the French part of the Mosel basin.

  17. Effect of diffusional mass transfer on the performance of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands in tropical climate conditions.

    PubMed

    Njau, K N; Gastory, L; Eshton, B; Katima, J H Y; Minja, R J A; Kimwaga, R; Shaaban, M

    2011-01-01

    The effect of mass transfer on the removal rate constants of BOD5, NH3, NO3 and TKN has been investigated in a Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetland (HSSFCW) planted with Phragmites mauritianus. The plug flow model was assumed and the inlet and outlet concentrations were used to determine the observed removal rate constants. Mass transfer effects were studied by assessing the influence of interstitial velocity on pollutant removal rates in CW cells of different widths. The flow velocities varied between 3-46 m/d. Results indicate that the observed removal rate constants are highly influenced by the flow velocity. Correlation of dimensionless groups namely Reynolds Number (Re), Sherwood Number (Sh) and Schmidt Number (Sc) were applied and log-log plots of rate constants against velocity yielded straight lines with values beta = 0.87 for BOD5, 1.88 for NH3, 1.20 for NO3 and 0.94 for TKN. The correlation matched the expected for packed beds although the constant beta was higher than expected for low Reynolds numbers. These results indicate that the design values of rate constants used to size wetlands are influenced by flow velocity. This paper suggests the incorporation of mass transfer into CW design procedures in order to improve the performance of CW systems and reduce land requirements. PMID:22049736

  18. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels. PMID:23956695

  19. Evaluation of Correlations of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer of R22 in Horizontal Channels

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels. PMID:23956695

  20. A two-phase flow regime map for a MAPLE-type nuclear research reactor fuel channel: Effect of hexagonal finned bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Harvel, G.D.; Chang, J.S.; Krishnan, V.S.

    1997-05-01

    A two-phase flow regime map is developed experimentally and theoretically for a vertical hexagonal flow channel with and without a 36-finned rod hexagonal bundle. This type of flow channel is of interest to MAPLE-type nuclear research reactors. The flow regime maps are determined by visual observations and observation of waveforms shown by a capacitance-type void fraction meter. The experimental results show that the inclusion of the finned hexagonal bundle shifts the flow regime transition boundaries toward higher water flow rates. Existing flow regime maps based on pipe flow require slight modifications when applied to the hexagonal flow channel with and without a MAPLE-type finned hexagonal bundle. The proposed theoretical model agrees well with experimental results.

  1. Catalytic oxygen production mediated by smart capsules to modulate elastic turbulence under a laminar flow regime.

    PubMed

    Zizzari, A; Bianco, M; Miglietta, R; del Mercato, L L; Carraro, M; Sorarù, A; Bonchio, M; Gigli, G; Rinaldi, R; Viola, I; Arima, V

    2014-11-21

    Liquid flow in microchannels is completely laminar and uniaxial, with a very low Reynolds number regime and long mixing lengths. To increase fluid mixing and solubility of reactants, as well as to reduce reaction time, complex three-dimensional networks inducing chaotic advection have to be designed. Alternatively, turbulence in the liquid can be generated by active mixing methods (magnetic, acoustic waves, etc.) or adding small quantities of elastic materials to the working liquid. Here, polyelectrolyte multilayer capsules embodying a catalytic polyoxometalate complex have been suspended in an aqueous solution and used to create elastic turbulence and to propel fluids inside microchannels as an alternative to viscoelastic polymers. The overall effect is enhanced and controlled by feeding the polyoxometalate-modified capsules with hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, thus triggering an on-demand propulsion due to oxygen evolution resulting from H2O2 decomposition. The quantification of the process is done by analysing some structural parameters of motion such as speed, pressure, viscosity, and Reynolds and Weissenberg numbers, directly obtained from the capillary dynamics of the aqueous mixtures with different concentrations of H2O2. The increases in fluid speed as well as the capsule-induced turbulence effects are proportional to the H2O2 added and therefore dependent on the kinetics of H2O2 dismutation. PMID:25238401

  2. Filter feeders and plankton increase particle encounter rates through flow regime control.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Stuart

    2009-05-12

    Collisions between particles or between particles and other objects are fundamental to many processes that we take for granted. They drive the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, the onset of rain and snow precipitation, and the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, powders and crystals. Here, I show that the traditional assumption that viscosity dominates these situations leads to consistent and large-scale underestimation of encounter rates between particles and of deposition rates on surfaces. Numerical simulations reveal that the encounter rate is Reynolds number dependent and that encounter efficiencies are consistent with the sparse experimental data. This extension of aerosol theory has great implications for understanding of selection pressure on the physiology and ecology of organisms, for example filter feeders able to gather food at rates up to 5 times higher than expected. I provide evidence that filter feeders have been strongly selected to take advantage of this flow regime and show that both the predicted peak concentration and the steady-state concentrations of plankton during blooms are approximately 33% of that predicted by the current models of particle encounter. Many ecological and industrial processes may be operating at substantially greater rates than currently assumed. PMID:19416879

  3. CONDUCTION IN LOW MACH NUMBER FLOWS. I. LINEAR AND WEAKLY NONLINEAR REGIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Burns, Keaton J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2014-12-20

    Thermal conduction is an important energy transfer and damping mechanism in astrophysical flows. Fourier's law, in which the heat flux is proportional to the negative temperature gradient, leading to temperature diffusion, is a well-known empirical model of thermal conduction. However, entropy diffusion has emerged as an alternative thermal conduction model, despite not ensuring the monotonicity of entropy. This paper investigates the differences between temperature and entropy diffusion for both linear internal gravity waves and weakly nonlinear convection. In addition to simulating the two thermal conduction models with the fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations, we also study their effects in the reduced ''soundproof'' anelastic and pseudoincompressible (PI) equations. We find that in the linear and weakly nonlinear regime, temperature and entropy diffusion give quantitatively similar results, although there are some larger errors in the PI equations with temperature diffusion due to inaccuracies in the equation of state. Extrapolating our weakly nonlinear results, we speculate that differences between temperature and entropy diffusion might become more important for strongly turbulent convection.

  4. Gas Flux and Density Surrounding a Cylindrical Aperture in the Free Molecular Flow Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2011-01-01

    The equations for rigorously calculating the particle flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture in the free molecular flow regime are developed and presented. The fundamental equations for particle flux and density from a reservoir and a diffusely reflecting surface will initially be developed. Assumptions will include a Maxwell-Boltzmann speed distribution, equal particle and wall temperatures, and a linear flux distribution along the cylindrical aperture walls. With this information, the equations for axial flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture will be developed. The cylindrical aperture will be divided into multiple volumes and regions to rigorously determine the surrounding axial flux and density, and appropriate limits of integration will be determined. The results of these equations will then be evaluated. The linear wall flux distribution assumption will be assessed. The axial flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture with a thickness-to-radius ratio of 1.25 will be presented. Finally, the equations determined in this study will be verified using multiple methods.

  5. Low-Frequency Variability in a GCM: Three-Dimensional Flow Regimes and Their Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, A.

    1997-06-01

    . They found, within the 500-mb EOF phase space, two local minima of area-averaged -tendency (based on barotropic vorticity dynamics), which were identified as ±Pacific-North America (PNA). In this work, the author demands that both the flow and its tendency be within the phase space spanned by the 3D EOFs. The streamfunction tendency is computed from the two-level quasigeostrophic potential vorticity equation and projected onto the EOF phase space. This projection produces a finite dynamical system whose singular points are identified as the quasi-stationary states. Two blocking solutions and one zonal solution are found over the Pacific. The first blocking solution is closer to the west coast of North America than the other blocking, which is shifted slightly westward and has a larger scale, rather similar to the +PNA pattern, indicating that blocking over the Pacific may have two phases in the model. Further investigation of the GCM trajectory within the EOF phase space using a mixture analysis shows the existence of realistic three-dimensional weather regimes similar to the singular points. The same solutions were found when the transient eddy contributions to the climatological quasigeostrophic potential vorticity budget were included. It is also shown that this extended technique allows a direct study of the stability of these quasi-stationary states and helps in drawing transition pictures and determining the transition times between them.

  6. Slab Geometry Control on Mantle Flow Regime: A case study from Central South America Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryol, C. B.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    The subduction of oceanic lithosphere along convergent plate margins plays an important role in the dynamics of the upper mantle beneath convergent margins and major orogenic belts. Many studies of mantle dynamics show that the flow pattern of the mantle varies greatly between different subduction zones as well as within the same subduction zone. The factors that control such variations are poorly understood and need to be investigated further in order to develop a better understanding of various subduction zone processes such as the deformation of mantle beneath convergent plate margins and transport of melts and volatiles in the mantle wedge above subducting slabs. Earlier studies of mantle flow inferred from seismic anisotropy via shear-wave splitting analysis indicated that the dynamics and deformation of subducting and overriding plates as well as the slab geometry have important roles on mantle flow regime. In an effort to test the significance of these factors in constraining the mantle dynamics along the central South America subduction zone, we carried out a shear-wave splitting analysis. Our study area covers southern Peru and northwestern Bolivia encompassing the northernmost Altiplano plateau where subduction of the Nazca plate begins to gradually flatten towards the north. The major part of the data for our analysis comes from the CAUGHT temporary seismic deployment (2010 - 2012) with 49 three-component broadband seismometers. In our study we used SKS, SKKS and PKS arrivals from over 80 teleseismic earthquakes, located between the distance-range of 60 to 140 degrees. We determined polarization direction and delay-time of shear-wave arrivals that are polarized into fast and slow components and split in time. The resultant fast polarization directions indicate the direction of mantle flow beneath the study area and the delay-times show the strength and depth extend of the associated seismic anisotropy. The results of our analysis revealed a

  7. Bubble Size Control to Improve Oxygen-Based Bleaching: Characterization of Flow Regimes in Pulp-Water-Gas Three-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Ghiaasiaan and Seppo Karrila

    2006-03-20

    Flow characteristics of fibrous paper pulp-water-air slurries were investigated in a vertical circular column 1.8 m long, with 5.08 cm diameter. Flow structures, gas holdup (void fraction), and the geometric and population characteristics of gas bubbles were experimentally investigated, using visual observation, Gamma-ray densitometry, and flash X-ray photography. Five distinct flow regimes could be visually identified: dispersed bubbly, layered bubbly, plug, churn-turbulent, and slug. Flow regime maps were constructed, and the regime transition lines were found to be sensitive to consistency. The feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the identification of the flow regimes, using the statistical characteristics of pressure fluctuations measured by a single pressure sensor, was demonstrated. Local pressure fluctuations at a station were recorded with a minimally-intrusive transducer. Three-layer, feed-forward ANNs were designed that could identify the four major flow patterns (bubbly, plug, churn, and slug) well. The feasibility of a transportable artificial neural network (ANN) - based technique for the classification of flow regimes was also examined. Local pressures were recorded at three different locations using three independent but similar transducers. An ANN was designed, trained and successfully tested for the classification of the flow regimes using one of the normalized pressure signals (from Sensor 1). The ANN trained and tested for Sensor 1 predicted the flow regimes reasonably well when applied directly to the other two sensors, indicating a good deal of transportability. An ANN-based method was also developed, whereby the power spectrum density characteristics of other sensors were adjusted before they were used as input to the ANN that was based on Sensor 1 alone. The method improved the predictions. The gas-liquid interfacial surface area concentration was also measured in the study. The gas absorption technique was applied

  8. Annual regime of bedforms, roughness and flow resistance, Lillooet River, British Columbia, BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prent, Mariëtte T. H.; Hickin, Edward J.

    2001-12-01

    than critical, dunes appeared to wash out towards a plane bed as discharge increased due to a change from a bedload to suspended-load dominated sediment-transport regime. Flow resistance increased most rapidly during changes in base flow and at the beginning and end of the seasonal flood; resistance tended to be smaller in field A than B, reflecting local differences in energy gradient. Flow resistance increased until a dune steepness of 0.070 was attained and then decreased. The steepness value was considered to be coincident with kolk generation [Dyer, K.R., 1986. Coastal and Estuarine Sediment Dynamics. Wiley, NY, 342 pp.], suggesting that macroturbulent flow structures play an important role in defining the roughness of dunes on a channel bed.

  9. Flow structure of natural dehumidification over a horizontal finned-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirbodi, Kamran; Yaghoubi, Mahmood

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, structure of water drops formation, growth, coalescence and departure over a horizontal finned-tube during natural dehumidification is investigated experimentally. Starting time of repelling the drops as well as heat transfer rate and the rate of dripping condensates in quasi-steady-state conditions are presented. Furthermore, cold airflow pattern around the horizontal finned-tube is visualized by using smoke generation scheme during natural dehumidification process. The finned-tube has a length of 300 mm, and inner and outer fin diameters, fin thickness and fin spacing are 25.4, 56, 0.4 and 2 mm, respectively. The tests are conducted in an insulated control room with dimensions of 5.8 m × 3 m × 4 m. Ambient air temperature, relative humidity and fin base temperature are selected from 25 to 35 °C, from 40 to 70 % and from 4 to 8 °C, respectively. Observations show that natural condensation from humid air over the test case is completely dropwise. Droplets only form on the edge of the fin and lateral fin surfaces remain almost dry. Dehumidification process over the tested finned-tube is divided into four stages; nucleation, formation, growth and departure of drops. It is also observed that the condensate inundation leaves the tube bottom in the form of droplets. Smoke visualization depicts that humid airflows downward around the cold finned-tube surface without noticeable turbulence and separation in the initial stages of dehumidification process. But the airflow has some disturbances in the intermediate stage and especially during drop departure on the edge of the fins.

  10. Flow structure of natural dehumidification over a horizontal finned-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirbodi, Kamran; Yaghoubi, Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, structure of water drops formation, growth, coalescence and departure over a horizontal finned-tube during natural dehumidification is investigated experimentally. Starting time of repelling the drops as well as heat transfer rate and the rate of dripping condensates in quasi-steady-state conditions are presented. Furthermore, cold airflow pattern around the horizontal finned-tube is visualized by using smoke generation scheme during natural dehumidification process. The finned-tube has a length of 300 mm, and inner and outer fin diameters, fin thickness and fin spacing are 25.4, 56, 0.4 and 2 mm, respectively. The tests are conducted in an insulated control room with dimensions of 5.8 m × 3 m × 4 m. Ambient air temperature, relative humidity and fin base temperature are selected from 25 to 35 °C, from 40 to 70 % and from 4 to 8 °C, respectively. Observations show that natural condensation from humid air over the test case is completely dropwise. Droplets only form on the edge of the fin and lateral fin surfaces remain almost dry. Dehumidification process over the tested finned-tube is divided into four stages; nucleation, formation, growth and departure of drops. It is also observed that the condensate inundation leaves the tube bottom in the form of droplets. Smoke visualization depicts that humid airflows downward around the cold finned-tube surface without noticeable turbulence and separation in the initial stages of dehumidification process. But the airflow has some disturbances in the intermediate stage and especially during drop departure on the edge of the fins.

  11. Influence of local air flow regimes on the ozone content of two Pyrenean valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezcurra, A.; Benech, B.; Echelecou, A.; Santamaría, J. M.; Herrero, I.; Zulueta, E.

    2013-08-01

    The Pyrenees Mountains, the natural border between France and Spain, have experienced a large increase in road traffic in the last decade. Due to this fact, a research program named PAP (Pollution Atmospheric in the Pyrenees) was established in 2004 by several laboratories from Spain and France to address the influence of meteorological regimes on the pollution levels of two adjacent valleys, Aspe valley (France) and Canfranc valley (Spain), situated in the center of the Pyrenean range. Pollution measurements show that mean ozone concentrations increase with height. In Sarrance, the site placed at the bottom of the valleys at 335 m above sea level (ASL), the mean ozone value was 23 ppb, whereas at the Pic Midi observatory (2877 m ASL), the top of the PAP network, the value found for mean ozone values was 52 ppb. A linear trend fits this altitudinal variation with a vertical gradient of 17 ppb km-1. The data demonstrate that the observatories located over 1400 m ASL do not show the classical mean daily ozone cycle, and that mean ozone concentrations throughout the day are nearly constant. By contrast, below 1400 m ASL, the classical mean daily ozone cycle is clear, reaching a maximum around noon. These findings indicate that the photochemical reactions are almost inactive at the elevated observatories and, as a result, it can be concluded that ozone levels at those locations are mostly caused by advection of aged air masses. Consequently, we could find that the gradient inside the valleys follows a linear trend of 29 ppb km-1. Finally, it has been observed that in north Foehn situations, intrusions of polluted air coming from the Free Troposphere (FT) can be detected in the upper part of the Spanish valley of Canfranc, where the mean daily ozone cycle changes significantly and becomes similar to the ones measured at the stations situated above 1400 m ASL. However, the results also pointed out that, except for the Foehn situations, the different local air flow

  12. Invertebrates associated with a horizontal-flow, subsurface constructed wetland in a northern climate.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Rosanna; Weber, Everett; Darby, Brian J; Soto-Adames, Felipe N; Murray, Robert E; Drizo, Aleksandra

    2014-04-01

    Wetlands function as buffers between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, filtering pollutants generated by human activity. Constructed wetlands were developed to mimic the physical and biological filtering functions of natural systems for the treatment of human and animal waste under controlled conditions. Previous studies on the effect of constructed wetlands on native invertebrate populations have concentrated almost exclusively on mosquitoes. Here, we present the first study investigating the relationship between vegetation cover and aeration regime, and the diversity and abundance of nematodes and springtails (Collembola) in a constructed wetland designed to treat dairy farm wastewater in northwestern Vermont. We investigated four treatment cells differing in aeration regime and vegetation cover, but equally overlaid by a layer of compost to provide insulation. Analysis showed that nematodes were most abundant in the nonplanted and nonaerated cells, and that bacterivorous nematodes dominated the community in all cells. Springtails were found to be most numerous in the planted and nonaerated cells. We hypothesize that the vegetation provided differing environmental niches that supported a more diverse system of bacteria and fungi, as well as offering protection from predators and inclement weather. Nematodes were likely imported with the original compost material, while springtails migrated into the cells either via air, water, or direct locomotion. PMID:24534015

  13. Bubble formation during horizontal gas injection into downward-flowing liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hua; Thomas, Brian G.

    2001-12-01

    Bubble formation during gas injection into turbulent downward-flowing water is studied using high-speed videos and mathematical models. The bubble size is determined during the initial stages of injection and is very important to turbulent multiphase flow in molten-metal processes. The effects of liquid velocity, gas-injection flow rate, injection hole diameter, and gas composition on the initial bubble-formation behavior have been investigated. Specifically, the bubble-shape evolution, contact angles, size, size range, and formation mode are measured. The bubble size is found to increase with increasing gas-injection flow rate and decreasing liquid velocity and is relatively independent of the gas injection hole size and gas composition. Bubble formation occurs in one of four different modes, depending on the liquid velocity and gas flow rate. Uniform-sized spherical bubbles form and detach from the gas injection hole in mode I for a low liquid speed and small gas flow rate. Modes III and IV occur for high-velocity liquid flows, where the injected gas elongates down along the wall and breaks up into uneven-sized bubbles. An analytical two-stage model is developed to predict the average bubble size, based on realistic force balances, and shows good agreement with measurements. Preliminary results of numerical simulations of bubble formation using a volume-of-fluid (VOF) model qualitatively match experimental observations, but more work is needed to reach a quantitative match. The analytical model is then used to estimate the size of the argon bubbles expected in liquid steel in tundish nozzles for conditions typical of continuous casting with a slide gate. The average argon bubble sizes generated in liquid steel are predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the same flow conditions. However, the differences lessen with increasing liquid velocity.

  14. Performance of system consisting of vertical flow trickling filter and horizontal flow multi-soil-layering reactor for treatment of rural wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Yan; Yang, Chunping; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Guangming; Lu, Li

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve nitrogen removal for rural wastewater, a novel two-stage hybrid system, consisting of a vertical flow trickling filter (VFTF) and a horizontal flow multi-soil-layering (HFMSL) bioreactor was developed. The performance of the apparatus was observed under various carbon-nitrogen ratios and water spraying frequencies separately. The maximum removal efficiency of total nitrogen (TN) for the hybrid system was 92.8% while the removal rates of CODCr, ammonium (NH4(+)-N), and total phosphorus (TP) were 94.1%, 96.1%, 92.0% respectively, and the corresponding effluent concentrations were 3.61, 21.20, 1.91, and 0.33 mg L(-1). The horizontal flow mode for MSL led the system to denitrifying satisfactorily as it ensured relatively long hydraulic retention time (HRT), ideal anoxic condition and adequate organic substrates supply. Also, higher water spraying frequency benefited intermittent feeding system for pollutants removal. Shock loading test indicated that the hybrid system could operate well even at hydraulic shock loadings. PMID:26151854

  15. Limitation of parallel flow in double diffusive convection: Two- and three-dimensional transitions in a horizontal porous domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mimouni, N.; Chikh, S.; Rahli, O.; Bennacer, R.

    2014-07-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of double diffusion natural convection in an elongated enclosure filled with a binary fluid saturating a porous medium are carried out in the present work. The Boussinesq approximation is made in the formulation of the problem, and Neumann boundary conditions for temperature and concentration are adopted, respectively, on vertical and horizontal walls of the cavity. The used numerical method is based on the control volume approach, with the third order quadratic upstream interpolation scheme in approximating the advection terms. A semi implicit method algorithm is used to handle the velocity-pressure coupling. To avoid the excessively high computer time inherent to the solution of 3D natural convection problems, full approximation storage with full multigrid method is used to solve the problem. A wide range of the controlling parameters (Rayleigh-Darcy number Ra, lateral aspect ratio Ay, Lewis number Le, and the buoyancy ration N) is investigated. We clearly show that increasing the depth of the cavity (i.e., the lateral aspect ratio) has an important effect on the flow patterns. The 2D perfect parallel flows obtained for small lateral aspect ratio are drastically destabilized by increasing the cavity lateral dimension. This yields a 3D fluid motion with a much more complex flow pattern and the usually considered 2D parallel flow model cannot be applied.

  16. Implication for horizontally-elongated fluid flow inferred from heat flow measurements in the Iheya-North hydrothermal field, Okinawa Trough back-arc basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Yuka; Kinoshita, Masataka; Kawada, Yoshifumi

    2010-05-01

    The Okinawa Trough is a back-arc basin located in the southwestern part of Japan. It is considered to be in the initial stage of rifting of continental crust, and the activity generates volcanic edifices in this area, accompanied by hydrothermal circulation. The Iheya-North is one of the most active hydrothermal fields among them. As a proposed drilling site for the Integrated ocean Drilling Program, extensive geophysical surveys have been carried out including single-channel seismic imaging, and precise side-scan sonar imaging by using autonomous underwater vehicle 'Urashima' of Japan Agency for Marine-Science and Technology. In the recent few years, we have measured heat flow in and around the Iheya-North hydrothermal field to understand the spatial of hydrothermal circulation in detail. 78 measurements show that heat flow is higher than 10 W/m2 with in 0.5 km of the hydrothermal vent complex, that it gradually decrease eastward to < 1 W/m2, and that very low heat flow around 0.01 W/m2 is observed at 1.5 km east from the hydrothermal field. The average heat flow outside of Iheya-North is ~0.1 W/m2. The low heat flow to the east is most likely caused by an inward flow of seawater into the formation. Seismic and side-scan sonar images as well as piston core samples suggest an impermeable sediment layer to a few hundreds meters below the seafloor in this area. This sediment layer should work as a hydrological barrier to suppress flow through the seafloor, whereas seawater can penetrate into the formation at 1.5 km east of the hydrothermal field, where sidescan images suggest coars sediments on the seafloor. We infer that the hydrothermal circulation within the Iheya-North involves one with a horizontally-elongated scale (~1.5 km horizontal vs. ~a few hundreds meters vertical). We performed numerical calculations of fluid flow and heat transportation to give constraints on the depth of hydrothermal circulation, the magnitude of darcy velocity, and the permeability at

  17. A contrast between nocturnal flow regimes: Observations and modeling simulations of katabatic intrusions in the Laramie Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliano, Timothy W.

    Katabatic winds commonly occur in mountainous regions under statically stable conditions when a sufficient deficit exists in the net radiation budget. Observations of these stable boundary layer (SBL) downslope flows have extended back to the 1930s. Their interactions with other SBL processes, including cold air pools (CAPs) and mountain waves, are quite complex, however, and have only more recently been deeply investigated. The University of Wyoming (UW) wind tower (WT) and flux tower (WT), situated in the Laramie Valley, were utilized in examining a dataset spanning from 14 December 2011 to 12 September 2013. A set of criteria were developed to determine katabatic intrusion events, and establish a climatology of these events, at the WT. The 21-22 December 2012 nighttime period was then studied in detail using data from the aforementioned towers in addition to weather stations throughout the Laramie Valley and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Both observations and modeling results indicated a competition between two strongly contrasting flow regimes: synoptic and katabatic. The synoptic regime was characterized by strong, southwesterly winds, warm temperatures, and turbulent flow, while the katabatic regime featured weaker, southeasterly winds, cooler temperatures, and intermittently turbulent flow. Sonic and propeller anemometers on the WT elucidated the chaotic transition between the regimes. At the WT, it was found that between regimes the wind speed decreased by up to 60%, wind direction often shifted over 120°, and potential temperature usually decreased more than 2°C. The katabatic wind depth was postulated to be variable in time and space, with its head sloping towards the trailing CAP. Topographically generated mountain waves and local terrain forcing are suspected to play an integral role in the development and evolution of the katabatic wind in the Laramie Valley. Results from this research yield promising insight into the intricate

  18. Effect of the inlet outlet positions on the hydraulic performance of horizontal subsurface-flow wetlands constructed with heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suliman, F.; Futsaether, C.; Oxaal, U.; Haugen, L. E.; Jenssen, P.

    2006-09-01

    Effects of the inlet and outlet position on flow patterns of saturated fluids in a horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland were investigated experimentally using a quasi two-dimensional flow cell representing a vertical cross-section in the longitudinal direction of the wetland. The filter medium consisted of glass beads that were either uniformly sized or a mixture of sizes with a distribution corresponding to wetland filter media. Flow through the filter bed was visualized by injecting dyed fluid into the water-saturated model. Next, breakthrough curves were obtained using chloride tracer. Flow through the homogeneous filter formed by uniformly sized beads displayed a clear density-driven component. Using mixed sizes, finer and coarser beads tended to separate into alternating and incomplete layers. Flow occurred preferentially along roughly horizontal high-conductivity paths of coarser filter material. Density-driven vertical flow was much slower than the horizontal flow. Nevertheless, appropriate positioning of the inlet and less importantly the outlet could to some extent mitigate the dominant effect of the medium stratification on the flow patterns. Using inlet-outlet configurations that forced the flow through larger portions of the filter bed by injecting into low-conductivity layers and opposing the gravity-driven flow increased the treatment efficiency.

  19. Mechanisms contributing to enhanced corrosion in three phase slug flow in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, M.; Kaul, A.; Jepson, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    Flow visualization experiments have been conducted in 7.5 cm and 10 cm I.D. three phase oil-water-gas pipes. The mechanisms that lead to increased corrosion rates in three-phase slug flow have been determined. The results show the existence of pulses of bubbles that have been formed in the mixing zone of the slug. These can impact on the lower pipe wall producing a cavitation-type effect leading to high rates of localized wall shear stress and associated high corrosion rates. This mechanism is sufficient to remove corrosion products and certain corrosion inhibitor film. The corrosion rate is strongly dependent on the flow composition and the Froude Number.

  20. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images. IV. Statistical properties of the dynamical environment around pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Solar pores are penumbra-lacking magnetic features, that mark two important transitions in the spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic processes: (1) the magnetic field becomes sufficiently strong to suppress the convective energy transport and (2) at some critical point some pores develop a penumbra and become sunspots. Aims: The purpose of this statistical study is to comprehensively describe solar pores in terms of their size, perimeter, shape, photometric properties, and horizontal proper motions. The seeing-free and uniform data of the Japanese Hinode mission provide an opportunity to compare flow fields in the vicinity of pores in different environments and at various stages of their evolution. Methods: The extensive database of high-resolution G-band images observed with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) is a unique resource to derive statistical properties of pores using advanced digital image processing techniques. The study is based on two data sets: (1) photometric and morphological properties inferred from single G-band images cover almost seven years from 2006 October 25 to 2013 August 31; and (2) horizontal flow fields derived from 356 one-hour sequences of G-band images using local correlation tracking (LCT) for a shorter period of time from 2006 November 3 to 2008 January 6 comprising 13 active regions. Results: A total of 7643/2863 (single/time-averaged) pores builds the foundation of the statistical analysis. Pores are preferentially observed at low latitudes in the southern hemisphere during the deep minimum of solar cycle No. 23. This imbalance reverses during the rise of cycle No. 24, when the pores migrate from high to low latitudes. Pores are rarely encountered in quiet-Sun G-band images, and only about 10% of pores exist in isolation. In general, pores do not exhibit a circular shape. Typical aspect ratios of the semi-major and -minor axes are 3:2 when ellipses are fitted to pores. Smaller pores (more than two-thirds are smaller than

  1. Geothermal regimes at Clearlake California: A preliminary review

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.; Zyvoloski, G.

    1992-08-01

    Three distinct geothermal regimes are inferred in the vicinity of the city of Clearlake, California. The first is a conductive heat flow regime, the second is a fault-controlled hot spring flow of ``magmatic`` fluids, and the third is a resurgent flow of meteoric warm water. The conductive heat flow results in flat, horizontal isotherms. The hot spring generates a localized spike in the isotherms. The advective disturbance carries heat laterally to a fault-line resurgence, lowering the apparent heat flow at the surface.

  2. A New Parameter Regime for Dust in Plasma: the Case of Dense and Supersonic Plasma Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, Catalin M.; Wang Zhehui; Wurden, Glen A.

    2008-09-07

    The co-existence between charged micron-size particulates of matter and plasma electrons and ions can lead to interesting physics phenomena. Some of the most spectacular observations in laboratory low ionized gases include the formation of aligned dust structures, the propagation of dust waves or self-organization leading to dust voids. Here, the dust dynamics is established by the forces of gravity, of electrostatic interaction with electric fields within the plasma, of friction with the neutral gas, and by the Coulomb repulsion between grains. Measurements of dust trajectories have been carried out in situ when the plasma density is about 6-7 orders of magnitude higher than in typical laboratory dusty plasmas, i.e. {approx}10{sup 22} m{sup -3}, and the ion temperature is a few eV. The plasma flows at speeds of the order of 20-60 km/s. Two observed features characterize dust in this new plasma regime: the plasma drag force dominates over all other forces acting on the grains and the microparticles are heated to temperatures sufficiently high, to become self-illuminated. Simultaneous observation at different moments in time of up to a few hundred flying dust grains has been possible due to the timing capabilities of a high-speed camera equipped with a telephoto lens. Dust speed of a few km/s and accelerations of {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} m/s{sup 2} have been inferred using the time-of-flight technique. Among the applications of hypervelocity dust are local diagnostics performed on hot plasmas, interstellar propulsion or simulation of meteorite impacts.

  3. Fluctuating zonal flows in the I-mode regime in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cziegler, I.; Diamond, P. H.; Fedorczak, N.; Manz, P.; Tynan, G. R.; Xu, M.; Churchill, R. M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Lipschultz, B.; Sierchio, J. M.; Terry, J. L.; Theiler, C.

    2013-05-01

    Velocity fields and density fluctuations of edge turbulence are studied in I-mode [F. Ryter et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 40, 725 (1998)] plasmas of the Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] tokamak, which are characterized by a strong thermal transport barrier in the edge while providing little or no barrier to the transport of both bulk and impurity particles. Although previous work showed no clear geodesic-acoustic modes (GAM) on C-Mod, using a newly implemented, gas-puff-imaging based time-delay-estimate velocity inference algorithm, GAM are now shown to be ubiquitous in all I-mode discharges examined to date, with the time histories of the GAM and the I-mode specific [D. Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)] Weakly Coherent Mode (WCM, f = 100-300 kHz, Δf/f≈0.5, and kθ≈1.3 cm-1) closely following each other through the entire duration of the regime. Thus, the I-mode presents an example of a plasma state in which zero frequency zonal flows and GAM continuously coexist. Using two-field (density-velocity and radial-poloidal velocity) bispectral methods, the GAM are shown to be coupled to the WCM and to be responsible for its broad frequency structure. The effective nonlinear growth rate of the GAM is estimated, and its comparison to the collisional damping rate seems to suggest a new view on I-mode threshold physics.

  4. Vadose Zone Flow and Transport of Dissolved Organic Carbon at Multiple Scales in Humid Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Philip M; Mayes, Melanie; Mulholland, Patrick J; Hanson, Paul J; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Luxmoore, Robert J; McCarthy, John F

    2006-06-01

    Scientists must embrace the necessity to offset global CO{sub 2} emissions regardless of politics. Efforts to enhance terrestrial organic carbon sequestration have traditionally focused on aboveground biomass and surface soils. An unexplored potential exists in thick lower horizons of widespread, mature soils such as Alfisols, Ultisols, and Oxisols. We present a case study of fate and transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a highly weathered Ultisol, involving spatial scales from the laboratory to the landscape. Our objectives were to interpret processes observed at various scales and provide an improved understanding of coupled hydrogeochemical mechanisms that control DOC mobility and sequestration in deep subsoils within humid climatic regimes. Our approach is multiscale, using laboratory-scale batch and soil columns (0.2 by 1.0 m), an in situ pedon (2 by 2 by 3 m), a well-instrumented subsurface facility on a subwatershed (0.47 ha), and ephemeral and perennial stream discharge at the landscape scale (38.4 ha). Laboratory-scale experiments confirmed that lower horizons have the propensity to accumulate DOC, but that preferential fracture flow tends to limit sequestration. Intermediate-scale experiments demonstrated the beneficial effects of C diffusion into soil micropores. Field- and landscape-scale studies demonstrated coupled hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological mechanisms that limit DOC sequestration, and their sensitivity to local environmental conditions. Our results suggest a multi-scale approach is necessary to assess the propensity of deep subsoils to sequester organic C in situ. By unraveling fundamental organic C sequestration mechanisms, we improve the conceptual and quantitative understanding needed to predict and alter organic C budgets in soil systems.

  5. A New Parameter Regime for Dust in Plasma: the Case of Dense and Supersonic Plasma Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticoş, Cătălin M.; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, Glen. A.

    2008-09-01

    The co-existence between charged micron-size particulates of matter and plasma electrons and ions can lead to interesting physics phenomena. Some of the most spectacular observations in laboratory low ionized gases include the formation of aligned dust structures, the propagation of dust waves or self-organization leading to dust voids. Here, the dust dynamics is established by the forces of gravity, of electrostatic interaction with electric fields within the plasma, of friction with the neutral gas, and by the Coulomb repulsion between grains. Measurements of dust trajectories have been carried out in situ when the plasma density is about 6-7 orders of magnitude higher than in typical laboratory dusty plasmas, i.e. ~1022 m-3, and the ion temperature is a few eV. The plasma flows at speeds of the order of 20-60 km/s. Two observed features characterize dust in this new plasma regime: the plasma drag force dominates over all other forces acting on the grains and the microparticles are heated to temperatures sufficiently high, to become self-illuminated. Simultaneous observation at different moments in time of up to a few hundred flying dust grains has been possible due to the timing capabilities of a high-speed camera equipped with a telephoto lens. Dust speed of a few km/s and accelerations of ~105-106 m/s2 have been inferred using the time-of-flight technique. Among the applications of hypervelocity dust are local diagnostics performed on hot plasmas, interstellar propulsion or simulation of meteorite impacts.

  6. Prediction of horizontal gas-solid flows under different gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laín, Santiago; Sommerfeld, Martin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper the performance of horizontal pneumatic conveying under different gravity environments is evaluated. An Euler-Lagrange approach validated versus ground experiments is employed to predict the relevant particle variables such as particle mass flux, mean conveying and fluctuating velocities in terrestrial, lunar and micro-gravity conditions. Gravity reduced computations predict a reduction in the global particle-wall collision frequency. Also, in the case of low wall roughness and small particle mass loading, reduction of gravity acceleration implies an increase of particle-wall collision frequency with the upper wall of the channel affecting greatly the particle mass flux profile. In the case of high wall roughness and/or high particle-to-fluid mass loading (i.e., around 1.0) particle conveying characteristics are similar in the three gravity conditions evaluated. This is due to the fact that both, wall roughness and inter-particle collisions reduce gravitational settling. However, the influence of gravity on the additional pressure loss along the channel due to the conveying of the particles is much reduced.

  7. Cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss model for horizontal narrow annular flow with rotating drillpipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofei, T. N.; Irawan, S.; Pao, W.

    2015-04-01

    During oil and gas drilling operations, frictional pressure loss is experienced as the drilling fluid transports the drilled cuttings from the bottom-hole, through the annulus, to the surface. Estimation of these pressure losses is critical when designing the drilling hydraulic program. Two-phase frictional pressure loss in the annulus is very difficult to predict, and even more complex when there is drillpipe rotation. Accurate prediction will ensure that the correct equivalent circulating density (ECD) is applied in the wellbore to prevent formation fracture, especially in formations with narrow window between the pore pressure and fracture gradient. Few researchers have attempted to propose cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models, nevertheless, these models fail when they are applied to narrow wellbores such as in casing- while-drilling and slimhole applications. This study proposes improved cuttings-liquid frictional pressure loss models for narrow horizontal annuli with drillpipe rotation using Dimensional Analysis. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids were considered. The proposed model constants were fitted by generated data from a full-scale simulation study using ANSYS-CFX. The models showed improvement over existing cuttings-liquid pressure loss correlations in literature.

  8. Free-surface flow in horizontally rotating cylinder: experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohacek, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.; Paar, A.; Brandner, M.; Elizondo, L.; Trickl, T.

    2016-07-01

    The horizontal centrifugal casting process targets on a liquid layer with a uniform thickness. To achieve this, the rotations of the mold have to be large enough so that the liquid can pick up the speed of the mold. In the present paper, an experiment was conducted using a laboratory plexi-glass mold with water as a working fluid. Starting with an initial volume fraction of liquid resting in the bottom of the mold, the mold rotations were gradually increased from 0 rpm to max rpm and a new position of the contact line was recorded. In addition, first critical rpm was recorded, at which the transition from the liquid pool to a uniform liquid layer occurred. While gradually going back from max rpm to 0 rpm, second critical rpm was recorded, at which the uniform liquid layer collapsed. The experiment was compared with the numerical simulation solving the modified shallow water equations using the Newton-Raphson method with the Wallington filter.

  9. First particle acceleration measurements for a shocked multiphase flow at a new horizontal shock tube facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlicz, Greg; Martinez, Adam; Prestridge, Kathy; Extreme Fluids Team

    2013-11-01

    The horizontal shock tube at Los Alamos, used for over 20 years to study shock-driven mixing between different density gases, has been retrofitted with a new particle seeding system, test section, and diaphragmless driver to investigate the unsteady forces on particles as they are accelerated by a shock wave. Current experiments are performed to measure the acceleration of dispersed glycol droplets, with nominal 0.5 μm diameter, carried in ambient air. Measurements at this facility will be used to develop and validate empirical models implemented in numerical codes. A Particle Image Velocimetry/Accelerometry (PIVA) system is implemented at the facility using eight laser pulses and an eight-frame high speed camera. The lasers are 532 nm Nd:YAGs with pulse widths of 20 ns, and the camera is a Specialised Imaging SIMD with 1280 × 960 resolution at up to 7 million frames per second. With this PIVA arrangement, eight particle fields are collected by independently varying the interframe times. Seven velocity and six acceleration fields are used to study the unsteady drag on the particles. Initial data sets are with a size distribution of known particle diameters. Plans are to vary the particle/gas density ratio, particle diameters, and particle phase (liquid/solid).

  10. Flow in horizontally anisotropic multilayered aquifer systems with leaky wells and aquitards

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow problems in an anisotropic domain can be transformed into ones in an equivalent isotropic domain by coordinate transformations. Once analytical solutions are obtained for the equivalent isotropic domain, they can be back transformed to the original anisotropic domain. The ex...

  11. Dispersion of overdamped diffusing particles in channel flows coupled to transverse acoustophoretic potentials: Transport regimes and scaling anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Garofalo, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    We address the dispersion properties of overdamped Brownian particles migrating in a two-dimensional acoustophoretic microchannel, where a pressure-driven axial Stokes flow coexists with a transverse acoustophoretic potential. Depending on the number and symmetries of the stable nodal points of the acoustophoretic force with respect to the axial velocity profile, different convection-enhanced dispersion regimes can be observed. Among these regimes, an anomalous scaling, for which the axial dispersion increases exponentially with the particle Peclét number, is observed whenever two or more stable acoustophoretic nodes are associated with different axial velocities. A theoretical explanation of this regime is derived, based on exact moment homogenization. Attention is also focused on transient dispersion, which can exhibit superballistic behavior <(x- ) 2> ˜t3 ,x being the axial coordinate.

  12. Electrospray characteristic curves: in pursuit of improved performance in the nano-flow regime

    PubMed Central

    Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi

    2008-01-01

    Depending on its coordinates in the parameter space, an electrospray can manifest in one of several known regimes – stable, quasi-stable, transitional-chaotic, and non-axial – that ultimately impact measurement sensitivity and precision. An electrospray operating in cone-jet regime provides large and stable spray current, as well as smaller initial droplets that are prerequisites for higher sensitivity and quality mass spectrometric analyses. However, the dynamic conditions encountered in gradient elution-based liquid separations create difficulties for continuous operation in this regime throughout the analysis. We present a preliminary study aimed at stabilizing the electrospray in the cone-jet regime. On the basis of spray current measurements obtained using solvent conditions typically found in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, an improved description of the cone-jet stability island is provided by including transitions to and from the recently described astable regime. Additionally, the experimental conditions in which the astable regime marks the transition between pulsating and cone-jet regimes are further clarified. PMID:17896826

  13. Effects of flow regime and flooding on heavy metal availability in sediment and soil of a dynamic river system.

    PubMed

    Poot, A; Gillissen, F; Koelmans, A A

    2007-08-01

    The acid volatile sulphide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SigmaSEM) method is increasingly used for risk assessment of toxic metals. In this study, we assessed spatial and temporal variations of AVS and SigmaSEM in river sediments and floodplain soils, addressing influence of flow regime and flooding. Slow-flowing sites contained high organic matter and clay content, leading to anoxic conditions, and subsequent AVS formation and binding of metals. Seasonality affected these processes through temperature and oxygen concentration, leading to increased levels of AVS in summer at slow-flowing sites (max. 37micromolg(-1)). In contrast, fast-flowing sites hardly contained AVS, so that seasonality had no influence on these sites. Floodplain soils showed an opposite AVS seasonality because of preferential inundation and concomitant AVS formation in winter (max. 3-30micromolg(-1)). We conclude that in dynamic river systems, flow velocity is the key to understanding variability of AVS and SigmaSEM. PMID:17418923

  14. Removal of trace elements in three horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Kröpfelová, Lenka; Vymazal, Jan; Svehla, Jaroslav; Stíchová, Jana

    2009-04-01

    Between March 2006 and June 2008 removal of 34 trace elements was measured on a monthly basis at three horizontal-flow constructed wetlands in the Czech Republic designed to treat municipal wastewater. In general, the results indicated a very wide range of removal efficiencies among studied elements. The highest degree of removal (average of 90%) was found for aluminum. High average removal was also recorded for zinc (78%). Elements removed in the range of 50-75% were uranium, antimony, copper, lead, molybdenum, chromium, barium, iron and gallium. Removal of cadmium, tin, mercury, silver, selenium and nickel varied between 25 and 50%. Low retention (0-25%) was observed for vanadium, lithium, boron, cobalt and strontium. There were two elements (manganese and arsenic) for which average outflow concentrations were higher compared to inflow concentrations. Reduced manganese compounds are very soluble and therefore they are washed out under anaerobic conditions. PMID:19124182

  15. Image processing analysis on the air-water slug two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinaryanto, Okto; Widyatama, Arif; Majid, Akmal Irfan; Deendarlianto, Indarto

    2016-06-01

    Slug flow is a part of intermittent flow which is avoided in industrial application because of its irregularity and high pressure fluctuation. Those characteristics cause some problems such as internal corrosion and the damage of the pipeline construction. In order to understand the slug characteristics, some of the measurement techniques can be applied such as wire-mesh sensors, CECM, and high speed camera. The present study was aimed to determine slug characteristics by using image processing techniques. Experiment has been carried out in 26 mm i.d. acrylic horizontal pipe with 9 m long. Air-water flow was recorded 5 m from the air-water mixer using high speed video camera. Each of image sequence was processed using MATLAB. There are some steps including image complement, background subtraction, and image filtering that used in this algorithm to produce binary images. Special treatments also were applied to reduce the disturbance effect of dispersed bubble around the bubble. Furthermore, binary images were used to describe bubble contour and calculate slug parameter such as gas slug length, gas slug velocity, and slug frequency. As a result the effect of superficial gas velocity and superficial liquid velocity on the fundamental parameters can be understood. After comparing the results to the previous experimental results, the image processing techniques is a useful and potential technique to explain the slug characteristics.

  16. Analysis of the Complex Fracture Flow in Multiple Fractured Horizontal Wells with the Fractal Tree-Like Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wendong; Su, Yuliang; Zhang, Xiao; Sheng, Guanglong; Ren, Long

    2015-03-01

    This paper formulates a fractal-tree network model to address the challenging problem of characterizing the hydraulic fracture network in unconventional reservoirs. It has been proved that the seepage flow in tight/shale oil reservoirs is much more complicated to the conventional formation. To further understand the flow mechanisms in such a complex system, a semi-analytical model considering "branch network fractures" was established stage by stage using point source method and superposition principle. Fractal method was employed to generate and represent induced fracture network around bi-wing fractures. In addition, based on the new established model and solution, deterministic fractal-tree-like fracture network patterns and heterogeneity were carefully investigated and compared with the simulation model. Results show that the fractal dimension for the fracture network has significant effect on the connectivity of the stimulated reservoir. The proposed fractal model may capture the characteristics of the heterogeneous complex fracture network and help in understanding the flow and transport mechanisms of multiple fractured horizontal wells.

  17. Influence of intra-event-based flood regime on sediment flow behavior from a typical agro-catchment of the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le-Tao; Li, Zhan-Bin; Wang, He; Xiao, Jun-Bo

    2016-07-01

    The pluvial erosion process is significantly affected by tempo-spatial patterns of flood flows. However, despite their importance, only a few studies have investigated the sediment flow behavior that is driven by different flood regimes. The study aims to investigate the effect of intra-event-based flood regimes on the dynamics of sediment exports at Tuanshangou catchment, a typical agricultural catchment (unmanaged) in the hilly loess region on the Chinese Loess Plateau. Measurements of 193 flood events and 158 sediment-producing events were collected from Tuanshangou station between 1961 and 1969. The combined methods of hierarchical clustering approach, discriminant analysis and One-Way ANOVA were used to classify the flood events in terms of their event-based flood characteristics, including flood duration, peak discharge, and event flood runoff depth. The 193 flood events were classified into five regimes, and the mean statistical features of each regime significantly differed. Regime A includes flood events with the shortest duration (76 min), minimum flood crest (0.045 m s-1), least runoff depth (0.2 mm), and highest frequency. Regime B includes flood events with a medium duration (274 min), medium flood crest (0.206 m s-1), and minor runoff depth (0.7 mm). Regime C includes flood events with the longest duration (822 min), medium flood crest (0.236 m s-1), and medium runoff depth (1.7 mm). Regime D includes flood events with a medium duration (239 min), large flood crest (4.21 m s-1), and large runoff depth (10 mm). Regime E includes flood events with a medium duration (304 min), maximum flood crest (8.62 m s-1), and largest runoff depth (25.9 mm). The sediment yield by different flood regimes is ranked as follows: Regime E > Regime D > Regime B > Regime C > Regime A. In terms of event-based average and maximum suspended sediment concentration, these regimes are ordered as follows: Regime E > Regime D > Regime C > Regime B > Regime A. Regimes D and E

  18. Flow structure in the near wake of a horizontal axis marine current turbine under steady and unsteady inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luznik, Luksa; Lust, Ethan; Flack, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Near wake flow field results are presented for a 1/25 scale, 0.8 m diameter (D) two bladed horizontal axis tidal turbine. The 2D PIV measurements were obtained in the USNA 380 ft tow tank for two inflow conditions. The first case had steady inflow conditions, i.e. the turbine was towed at a constant carriage speed (Utow = 1.68 m/s) and the second case had a constant carriage speed and incoming regular waves with a period of 2.3 seconds and 0.18 m wave height. The underwater PIV system is comprised of two submersible housings with forward looking submersible containing laser sheet forming optics, and the side looking submersible includes a camera and remote focus/aperture electronics. The resulting individual field of view for this experiment was nominally 30x30 cm2. Near wake mapping is accomplished by ``tiling'' individual fields of view with approximately 5 cm overlap. All measurements were performed at the nominal tip speed ratio (TSR) of 7. The mapping is accomplished in a vertical streamwise plane (x-z plane) centered on the turbine nacelle and the image pair captures were phase locked to two phases: reference blade horizontal and reference blade vertical. Results presented include distribution of mean velocities, Reynolds stresses, 2D turbulent kinetic energy. The discussion will focus on comparisons between steady and unsteady case. Further discussion will include comparisons between the current high resolution PIV measurements and the previous point measurements with the same turbine at different lateral planes in the same flow conditions.

  19. Restoring a flow regime through the coordinated operation of a multireservoir system: The case of the Zambezi River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmant, A.; Beevers, L.; Muyunda, B.

    2010-07-01

    Large storage facilities in hydropower-dominated river basins have traditionally been designed and managed to maximize revenues from energy generation. In an attempt to mitigate the externalities downstream due to a reduction in flow fluctuation, minimum flow requirements have been imposed to reservoir operators. However, it is now recognized that a varying flow regime including flow pulses provides the best conditions for many aquatic ecosystems. This paper presents a methodology to derive a trade-off relationship between hydropower generation and ecological preservation in a system with multiple reservoirs and stochastic inflows. Instead of imposing minimum flow requirements, the method brings more flexibility to the allocation process by building upon environmental valuation studies to derive simple demand curves for environmental goods and services, which are then used in a reservoir optimization model together with the demand for energy. The objective here is not to put precise monetary values on environmental flows but to see the marginal changes in release policies should those values be considered. After selecting appropriate risk indicators for hydropower generation and ecological preservation, the trade-off curve provides a concise way of exploring the extent to which one of the objectives must be sacrificed in order to achieve more of the other. The methodology is illustrated with the Zambezi River basin where large man-made reservoirs have disrupted the hydrological regime.

  20. Circumventing Imprecise Geometric Information and Development of a Unified Modeling Technique for Various Flow Regimes in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Bahman

    2012-11-01

    Owing to their manufacturability and reliability, capillary tubes are the most common expansion devices in household refrigerators. Therefore, investigating flow properties in the capillary tubes is of immense appeal in the said business. The models to predict pressure drop in two-phase internal flows invariably rely upon highly precise geometric information. The manner in which capillary tubes are manufactured makes them highly susceptible to geometric imprecisions, which renders geometry-based models unreliable to the point of obsoleteness. Aware of the issue, manufacturers categorize capillary tubes based on Nitrogen flow rate through them. This categorization method presents an opportunity to substitute geometric details with Nitrogen flow data as the basis for customized models. The simulation tools developed by implementation of this technique have the singular advantage of being applicable across flow regimes. Thus the error-prone process of identifying compatible correlations is eliminated. Equally importantly, compressibility and chocking effects can be incorporated in the same model. The outcome is a standalone correlation that provides accurate predictions, regardless of any particular fluid or flow regime. Thereby, exploratory investigations for capillary tube design and optimization are greatly simplified. Bahman Abbasi, Ph.D., is Lead Advanced Systems Engineer at General Electric Appliances in Louisville, KY. He conducts research projects across disciplines in the household refrigeration industry.

  1. Some spectral and pulsation characteristics of the horizontal flow of a gas-liquid suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovnyi, P. M.

    1980-02-01

    In the experiments described, the turbulence characteristics of a two-phase gas-liquid pipe flow were studied, using a 6 m long, 19-mm-diam tube. The inlet temperature of the suspension was maintained at 25 C. The friction energy spectra and the relative intensity of the friction pulsations were measured. The spectral and pulsation characteristics were obtained by an electrodiffusion technique which provided reliable data on the pulsations of the wall shear stress.

  2. Estimation of Liquid Wall and Interfacial Shear Stress in Horizontal Stratified Gas-liquid Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiping; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing

    2007-06-01

    A modified two-phase shear stress calculation method for pipe flow problems is explored. A force balance has been set up on the control volume of liquid phase to determine the interfacial friction factor by employing both the measured pressure gradient and liquid height. The gradient of height of liquid layer has been taken into account, which is suitable for the case where the interface may be smooth, rippled or wavy. The correlation of model indicates that the careful estimation for liquid-wall shear stress is necessary, and the assumption of a stationary liquid element is not applicable for the case of higher gas flow rates. The interfacial friction factor evaluated indirectly from experimental liquid height and pressure loss measurements, which are obtained in 50mm ID pipeline for air and water in cocurrent stratified flow, is used to achieve its correlation with the combination of characteristic parameters. The evaluation of new correlation has been conducted by the comparison of the predicted pressure drop with the experimental data. The performance of correlation depends on the form of the gas-liquid interface.

  3. Classification of Unsteady Flow Patterns in a Rotodynamic Blood Pump: Introduction of Non-Dimensional Regime Map.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fangjun; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Brackett, Jaclyn; Antaki, James F

    2015-09-01

    Rotodynamic blood pumps (also known as rotary or continuous flow blood pumps) are commonly evaluated in vitro under steady flow conditions. However, when these devices are used clinically as ventricular assist devices (VADs), the flow is pulsatile due to the contribution of the native heart. This study investigated the influence of this unsteady flow upon the internal hemodynamics of a centrifugal blood pump. The flow field within the median axial plane of the flow path was visualized with particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a transparent replica of the Levacor VAD. The replica was inserted in a dynamic cardiovascular simulator that synchronized the image acquisition to the cardiac cycle. As compared to steady flow, pulsatile conditions produced periodic, transient recirculation regions within the impeller and separation in the outlet diffuser. Dimensional analysis revealed that the flow characteristics could be uniquely described by the non-dimensional flow coefficient (Φ) and its time derivative ([Formula: see text]), thereby eliminating impeller speed from the experimental matrix. Four regimes within the Φ-[Formula: see text] plane were found to classify the flow patterns, well-attached or disturbed. These results and methods can be generalized to provide insights for both design and operation of rotodynamic blood pumps for safety and efficacy. PMID:26577357

  4. Horizontal drilling developments

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.

    1997-05-01

    The advantages of horizontal drilling are discussed. Use of horizontal drilling has climbed in the past half decade as technology and familiarity offset higher costs with higher production rates and greater recoveries from new and existing wells. In essence, all types of horizontal wells expose a larger section of the reservoir to the wellbore with a resulting increase in flow rates. (A horizontal well may also be drilled to provide coning control or to intersect vertical fractures.) Thus, drilling horizontally, both onshore and offshore, reduces the number of wells necessary to develop a field.

  5. Stability of thermocapillary convection and regimes of a fluid flow acted upon by a standing surface wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feonychev, A. I.

    2007-09-01

    It has been established that, in the case where a standing surface wave acts on a thermocapillary-convection flow in a cylindrical volume, there arises an oscillating-convection zone between the laminar and turbulent regimes of flow. It is shown that the boundary between these regimes is determined by the amplitude δ and the number of periods n of the standing wave and is practically independent of the Marangoni number and the oscillation frequency of this wave. At n = 2, in the range 0.004 < δ < 0.006, the parameters of the fluid cease to oscillate. The mechanisms by which the thermocapillary convection in closed volumes loses its stability are discussed.

  6. DNS of Horizontal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Scotti, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    We perform three-dimensional DNS of Horizontal Convection in a rectangular tank with idealized boundary conditions. The flow is driven by imposing the profile for the buoyancy b at the surface, where it ranges from b0 to b0 + Δb and the transition region is confined to a very small area. The Rayleigh based on the domain depth ranges from 105 to 1012. The scaling observed for the Nusselt number and the strength of the circulation is consistent with Rossby's scaling across the range of Rayleigh numbers considered, indicating that the dynamics in the boundary layer under the ``warming'' side throttles the flow. Energetically, we find that Available Potential Energy (APE) is generated along the surface, and converted to Kinetic Energy (KE). Along the descending plume energy goes from APE to KE up to Ra ~1011 . For higher Rayleigh numbers the plume becomes a net sink of APE. When the switch occurs, a stagnant layer develops near the bottom, and the overall circulation becomes characterized by a narrow plume which retroflects rapidly towards the surface, with a shallow recirculation to close the flow. This may indicate the beginning of a Sandström regime characterized by a stagnant abyssal region and a shallow circulation. Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  7. Experimental and numerical simulations of heat transfers between flowing water and a horizontal frozen porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, N.; Costard, F.; Grenier, C. F.

    2013-12-01

    In permafrost-affected regions, hydrological changes due to global warming are still under investigation. But yet, we can already foresee from recent studies that for example, the variability and intensity of surface/subsurface flow are likely to be affected by permafrost degradation. And the feedback induced by such changes on permafrost degradation is still not clearly assessed. Of particular interest are lake and river-taliks. A talik is a permanently unfrozen zone that lies below rivers or lake. They should play a key role in these interactions given that they are the only paths for groundwater flow in permafrost regions. Thus heat transfers on a regional scale are potentially influenced by groundwater circulation. The aim of our study is therefore to investigate the evolution of river taliks. We developed a multidisciplinary approach coupling field investigation, experimental studies in a cold room and numerical modeling. In Central Yakutia, Siberia, where permafrost is continuous, we recently installed instruments to monitor ground temperature and water pressure in a river talik between two thermokarst lakes. We present here the coupling of numerical modeling and laboratory experiments in order to look after the main parameters controlling river-talik installation. In a cold room at IDES, where a metric scale channel is filled with sand as a porous medium, we are able to control air, water and permafrost temperature, but also water flow, so that we can test various parameter sets for a miniaturized river. These results are confronted with a numerical model developed at the LSCE with Cast3m (www-cast3m.cea.fr), that couples heat and water transfer. In particular, expressions for river-talik heat exchange terms are investigated. A further step will come in the near future with results from field investigation providing the full complexity of a natural system. Keywords: Talik, River, Numerical Modeling, Cold Room, Permafrost.

  8. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-29

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  9. Prediction of light aircraft horizontal tail onset flows: A review and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summey, D. C.; Smetana, F. O.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical basis of the two computer programs (WASH and WAKE) are developed. WASH calculates the location of wake-sheet streamlines behind the wing, and upwash and downwash angles ahead of and behind the wing, respectively. WAKE computes two-dimensional velocity profiles along the wake streamlines given the upper and lower surface velocity profiles at the wing trailing edge. Comparisons with experiment indicate good agreement for wake location, downwash angles, and two-dimensional velocity profiles at low to moderate angles of attack. The adaptation of the results of the two programs to predict the total onset flow at the tail is discussed.

  10. Tracing Nitrate Contributions to Streams During Varying Flow Regimes at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Shanley, J. B.; Boyer, E. W.; Ohte, N.; Doctor, D. H.; Kendall, C.

    2003-12-01

    Quantifying sources and transformations of nitrate in headwater catchments is fundamental to understanding the movement of nitrogen to streams. At the Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont (USA), we are using multiple chemical tracer and mixing model approaches to quantify sources and transport of nitrate to streams under varying flow regimes. We sampled streams, lysimeters, and wells at nested locations from the headwaters to the outlet of the 41 ha W-9 watershed under the entire range of flow regimes observed throughout 2002-2003, including baseflow and multiple events (stormflow and snowmelt). Our results suggest that nitrogen sources, and consequently stream nitrate concentrations, are rapidly regenerated during several weeks of baseflow and nitrogen is flushed from the watershed by stormflow events that follow baseflow periods. Both basic chemistry data (anions, cations, & dissolved organic carbon) and isotopic data (nitrate, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved inorganic carbon) indicate that nitrogen source contributions vary depending upon the extent of saturation in the watershed, the initiation of shallow subsurface water inputs, and other hydrological processes. Stream nitrate concentrations typically peak with discharge and are higher on the falling than the rising limb of the hydrograph. Our data also indicate the importance of terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical processes, in addition to hydrological connectivity in controlling how nitrate moves from the terrestrial landscape to streams. Our detailed sampling data from multiple flow regimes are helping to identify and quantify the "hot spots" and "hot moments" of biogeochemical and hydrological processes that control nitrogen fluxes in streams.

  11. Data acquisition and interpretation of horizontal well pressure-transient tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, G.J. )

    1994-02-01

    For both vertical and horizontal wells, pressure-transient testing is a powerful tool for evaluating in-situ reservoir and wellbore parameters that describe the production characteristics of a well. Although many operators use horizontal well technology, many engineers consider pressure-transient testing of horizontal wells impractical and too complex. Experience has shown, however, that with adequate test planning, based on the concept of low regimes and focused on optimizing test conditions, horizontal well testing can be as successful as vertical well testing. Using the concept of flow regimes and drawing on analogies with vertical wells, this paper reviews the pressure-transient behavior of horizontal wells. Practical guidelines are given for planning, executing, and interpreting horizontal well tests. The application of various interpretation techniques is illustrated with field examples.

  12. An experimental investigation on the effects of surface gravity waves on the water evaporation rate in different air flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodat, Amin; Moghiman, Mohammad; Shirkhani, Golshad

    2013-12-01

    Estimating rate of evaporation from undisturbed water surfaces to moving and quiet air has been the topic a vast number of research activities. The obvious presence of various shapes of gravity waves on the water body surfaces was the motivation of this experimental investigation. In this investigation experimental measurements have been done to quantify evaporation rate from wavy water surfaces in free, mixed and forced convection regimes. The effects of a wide range of surface gravity waves from low steepness, round shaped crest with slow celerity, to steep and very slight spilling crest waves, on the water evaporation rate have been investigated. A wide range of was achieved by applying different air flow velocities on a large heated wave flume equipped with a wind tunnel. Results reveal that wave motion on the water surface increase the rate of evaporation for all air flow regimes. For free convection, due to the effect of wave motion for pumping rotational airflows at the wave troughs and the dominant effect of natural convection for the air flow advection, the maximum evaporation increment percentage from wavy water surface is about 70 %. For mixed and forced convection, water evaporation rate increment is more sensitive to the air flow velocity for the appearance of very slight spilling on the steep wave crests and the leeward air flow structures.

  13. Inspiration of slip effects on electromagnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) nanofluid flow through a horizontal Riga plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M.; Abbas, T.; Bhatti, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    The boundary layer flow of nanofluid that is electrically conducting over a Riga plate is considered. The Riga plate is an electromagnetic actuator which comprises a spanwise adjusted cluster of substituting terminal and lasting magnets mounted on a plane surface. The numerical model fuses the Brownian motion and the thermophoresis impacts because of the nanofluid and the Grinberg term for the wall parallel Lorentz force due to the Riga plate in the presence of slip effects. The numerical solution of the problem is presented using the shooting method. The novelties of all the physical parameters such as modified Hartmann number, Richardson number, nanoparticle concentration flux parameter, Prandtl number, Lewis number, thermophoresis parameter, Brownian motion parameter and slip parameter are demonstrated graphically. Numerical values of reduced Nusselt number, Sherwood number are discussed in detail.

  14. Analysis of single phase flow pressure drop and heat transfer in a horizontal rifled tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Soo Poey; Wahab, Abas Abdul; Ariffin, Saparudin; Kiow, Lee Woon

    2012-06-01

    Analysis by using Fluent® has been carried out to investigate the pressure drop and heat transfer of single phase flow (Reynolds number ranging from 2.0×104 - 1.4×105) in a 2 meter long of rifled tube and smooth tube which are heated at the outer wall at constant temperature. The rifled tube or also known as spiral internally ribbed tube which is used in this investigation has an outside diameter 45.0 mm and inside equivalent diameter of 33.1 mm while the smooth tube has an outside diameter 45.0 mm and inside diameter 34.1 mm. The working fluid that is used in this investigation is water. In this analysis, realizable k-epsilon model has been chosen to solve the fully developed turbulence flow in both the tubes. The result from simulation shows that the pressure drop in rifled tube is about 1.69-2.0 times higher than in the smooth tube while the heat transfer coefficient of water in the rifle tube is 0.97-1.27 times than in the smooth tube. The high pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in rifled tube comparing to smooth tube is due to the helical rib in the rifled tube which not only acted as rough surface, but also causes swirling effect near the wall which enhance heat transfer. The present study has proved that although the rifled tube produces high pressure drop but it is good in heat transfer enhancement through the ratio of heat flux to the pumping power. Correlations have been proposed for the single phase friction factor and Nusselt number of the rifled tube.

  15. Effects of climate change on three flow regime-related ecosystem services in a highly-regulated Alpine river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolli, Mauro; Zolezzi, Guido; Geneletti, Davide; Majone, Bruno; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    River systems provide several flow regime-related ecosystem services (ES) to society. The flow regime of several Alpine rivers is often regulated by hydropower production, which represents one of the most relevant ES in the area. Climate change is expected to modify the flow regime of rivers, with possible relevant consequences on the suitability of related ES. In this work we applied an approach aimed at evaluating the variations of ES under different flow regime conditions and consequently, the possibility to quantify the effects of different climate change scenarios on river ecosystem services. The case-study is the Noce River, a gravel-bed river in the Italian Alps (Trentino, North East Italy) which hydrological regime is subject to daily alterations of flow regime (hydropeaking) induced by the management of large hydropower plants. Here we considered three ES indicators: habitat for adult marble trout as representative for habitat provisioning service, rafting for recreational services, and small hydropower production as provisioning service. In particular, we evaluated the daily variations of these indicators under three different operating scenarios: a reference scenarios (REF, from 1970 to 2000) and two future scenarios (from 2040 to 2070), with (FUT) and without (FUT CC) the inclusion of the required minimum environmental flow (minimum vital flow) recently implemented in the regional water resources policy. For each scenario, four climate models have been applied (see Majone et al., 2016). Future scenarios indicate a modification of the flow regime, with a direct effect on the suitability of related ES. The effects on ES differ according with climate models and management scenarios: as a general result and considering the comparison with respect to the reference period, the applied models predict a temporal shift from late to early summer in the rafting suitability, a decrease of the suitability for trout in spring months and an increase of the suitability

  16. Enhancement of azo dye Acid Orange 7 removal in newly developed horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Tee, Heng-Chong; Lim, Poh-Eng; Seng, Chye-Eng; Mohd Nawi, Mohd Asri; Adnan, Rohana

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal subsurface-flow (HSF) constructed wetland incorporating baffles was developed to facilitate upflow and downflow conditions so that the treatment of pollutants could be achieved under multiple aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions sequentially in the same wetland bed. The performances of the baffled and conventional HSF constructed wetlands, planted and unplanted, in the removal of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) were compared at the hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 5, 3 and 2 days when treating domestic wastewater spiked with AO7 concentration of 300 mg/L. The planted baffled unit was found to achieve 100%, 83% and 69% AO7 removal against 73%, 46% and 30% for the conventional unit at HRT of 5, 3 and 2 days, respectively. Longer flow path provided by baffled wetland units allowed more contact of the wastewater with the rhizomes, microbes and micro-aerobic zones resulting in relatively higher oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and enhanced performance as kinetic studies revealed faster AO7 biodegradation rate under aerobic condition. In addition, complete mineralization of AO7 was achieved in planted baffled wetland unit due to the availability of a combination of aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:25284799

  17. Modeling total phosphorus removal in an aquatic environment restoring horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland based on artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Cui, Lijuan; Zhang, Manyin; Wang, Yifei

    2015-08-01

    A horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSF-CW) was designed to improve the water quality of an artificial lake in Beijing Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, Beijing, China. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), including multilayer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF), were used to model the removal of total phosphorus (TP). Four variables were selected as the input parameters based on the principal component analysis: the influent TP concentration, water temperature, flow rate, and porosity. In order to improve model accuracy, alternative ANNs were developed by incorporating meteorological variables, including precipitation, air humidity, evapotranspiration, solar heat flux, and barometric pressure. A genetic algorithm and cross-validation were used to find the optimal network architectures for the ANNs. Comparison of the observed data and the model predictions indicated that, with careful variable selection, ANNs appeared to be an efficient and robust tool for predicting TP removal in the HSSF-CW. Comparison of the accuracy and efficiency of MLP and RBF for predicting TP removal showed that the RBF with additional meteorological variables produced the most accurate results, indicating a high potentiality for modeling TP removal in the HSSF-CW. PMID:25903184

  18. Modelling impacts of present and future hydropower operations on flow regimes in data scarce mountain river ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geris, Josie; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Seibert, Jan; Vis, Marc; Soulsby, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Mountain river ecosystems in many parts of the world are increasingly exploited for hydropower production in order to meet pressing renewable energy targets. These systems also provide important ecosystem services, including the provision of high quality downstream water supplies and the maintenance of in-stream habitats. With future supply and demand of water resources both impacted by environmental change, a good understanding of the impacts and the resilience of hydropower regimes within the context of the wider ecosystem is important. However, quantifying these is often limited by inadequate pre-regulation data and information on current regimes. In such cases, where complex models with high data demands are inappropriate, there is a need for simple conceptual modelling approaches that can still capture the dominant natural runoff generation and artificial regulation processes. Here we present a new modelling tool that can be used in data sparse mountain river ecosystems to assess hydropower effects on natural flow regimes, predict water availability, and test system resilience for present and future hydropower production schemes. Model routines for simulation of runoff regulation (reservoirs and water transfers) were implemented into the HBV rainfall-runoff model, allowing for situations where regulation amounts are known and those where regulation amounts have to be estimated based on simple regulation rules. The new model was applied to the heavily regulated River Lyon (391 km2), Scotland, UK, which has a long history of hydropower generation that is supported by a complex network of inter- and intra-catchment water transfers and river impoundments. There are concerns that these are affecting high conservation freshwater populations of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar), highlighting the need for a good understanding of present impacts and the extent to which flow variables can be modified without major degradation to the river's ecosystem. The model was used to

  19. Impact pressures and flow regimes in dense snow avalanches observed at the Vallée de la Sionne test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovilla, Betty; Schaer, M.; Kern, M.; Bartelt, P.

    2008-03-01

    A fundamental problem in avalanche engineering is to determine the impact pressures exerted on structures. This task is complicated because snow avalanches flow in a variety of regimes, primarily depending on snow temperature and moisture content. In this paper we address this problem by analyzing measured impact pressures, flow velocities, and flow depths of five Vallée de la Sionne avalanches. The measurements are made on a 20 m high tubular pylon instrumented with high-frequency pressure transducers and optoelectronic velocity sensors. In the observed avalanches, we find both subcritical and supercritical flow regimes. Typical Froude numbers were smaller than 6. The subcritical regime (Fr < 1) is characterized by a flow plug riding above a highly sheared basal layer. The measured pressures are large and velocity-independent in contradiction to calculation procedures. Pressure fluctuations increase with flow depth, indicating a kinematic stick-slip phenomena which is largest at the basal layer. Supercritical flow regimes (1 < Fr < 6) are characterized by a sheared flow all over the avalanche depth. In this regime the impact pressure is velocity-dependent. We derive relationships governing impact pressure as a function of the Froude number, and therefore flow regime, encompassing all the observed avalanches.

  20. Numerical modeling of the conditions for realization of flow regimes in supersonic axisymmetric conical inlets of internal compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounko, Yu. P.; Mazhul, I. I.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the numerical investigation of flow regimes in the axisymmetric inlets of internal compression at a supersonic flow around them are presented in the work. The main attention is paid to the determination of the ranges of the duct geometric convergence, in which a supersonic inflow in the inlet realizes. The investigation has been carried out at high supersonic freestream velocities corresponding to the Mach numbers M = 2-8 by the example of the frontal conical (funnel-shaped) inlets with the angles of the internal cone wall inclination δ w = 7.5-15° under the variation of the relative area of the throat cross section. The flow structure alteration was studied and the critical relative areas of the inlet throat were determined, at which either there is no starting of the inlet in the process of flow steadying at the initial subsonic flow in it or a flow breakdown occurs in the process of flow steadying at an initial supersonic inflow. Numerical computations of the axisymmetric flow were done on the basis of the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations and the k-ω SST turbulence model.

  1. Detailed predictions of climate induced changes in the thermal and flow regimes in mountain streams of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, José M.; Muñoz-Mas, Rafael; García de Jalón, Diego; Solana, Joaquín; Alonso, Carlos; Martínez-Capel, Francisco; Ribalaygua, Jaime; Pórtoles, Javier; Monjo, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Streamflow and temperature regimes are well-known to influence on the availability of suitable physical habitat for instream biological communities. General Circulation Models (GCMs) have predicted significant changes in timing and geographic distribution of precipitation and atmospheric temperature for the ongoing century. However, differences in these predictions may arise when focusing on different spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, to perform substantiated mitigation and management actions detailed scales are necessary to adequately forecast the consequent thermal and flow regimes. Regional predictions are relatively abundant but detailed ones, both spatially and temporally, are still scarce. The present study aimed at predicting the effects of climate change on the thermal and flow regime in the Iberian Peninsula, refining the resolution of previous studies. For this purpose, the study encompassed 28 sites at eight different mountain rivers and streams in the central part of the Iberian Peninsula (Spain). The daily flow was modelled using different daily, monthly and quarterly lags of the historical precipitation and temperature time series. These precipitation-runoff models were developed by means of M5 model trees. On the other hand water temperature was modelled at similar time scale by means of nonlinear regression from dedicated site-specific data. The developed models were used to simulate the temperature and flow regime under two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs) climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) until the end of the present century by considering nine different GCMs, which were pertinently downscaled. The precipitation-runoff models achieved high accuracy (NSE>0.7), especially in regards of the low flows of the historical series. Results concomitantly forecasted flow reductions between 7 and 17 % (RCP4.5) and between 8 and 49% (RCP8.5) of the annual average in the most cases, being variable the magnitude and timing at each

  2. Pareto-optimal solutions for environmental flow schemes incorporating the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2007-06-01

    The temporal variations of natural flows are essential elements for preserving the ecological health of a river which are addressed in this paper by the environmental flow schemes that incorporate the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime. We present an optimization framework to find the Pareto-optimal solutions for various flow schemes. The proposed framework integrates (1) the range of variability approach for evaluating the hydrologic alterations; (2) the standardized precipitation index approach for establishing the variation criteria for the wet, normal, and dry years; (3) a weir operation model for simulating the system of flows; and (4) a multiobjective optimization genetic algorithm for search of the Pareto-optimal solutions. The proposed framework is applied to the Kaoping diversion weir in Taiwan. The results reveal that the time-varying schemes incorporating the intra-annual variability in the environmental flow prescriptions promote the ecosystem and human needs fitness. Incorporation of the interannual flow variability using different criteria established for three types of water year further promotes both fitnesses. The merit of incorporating the interannual variability may be superimposed on that of incorporating only the intra-annual flow variability. The Pareto-optimal solutions searched with a limited range of flows replicate satisfactorily those obtained with a full search range. The limited-range Pareto front may be used as a surrogate of the full-range one if feasible prescriptions are to be found among the regular flows.

  3. Wire-mesh sensor, ultrasound and high-speed videometry applied for the characterization of horizontal gas-liquid slug flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofuchi, C. Y.; Morales, R. E. M.; Arruda, L. V. R.; Neves, F., Jr.; Dorini, L.; do Amaral, C. E. F.; da Silva, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    Gas-liquid flows occur in a broad range of industrial applications, for instance in chemical, petrochemical and nuclear industries. Correct understating of flow behavior is crucial for safe and optimized operation of equipments and processes. Thus, measurement of gas-liquid flow plays an important role. Many techniques have been proposed and applied to analyze two-phase flows so far. In this experimental research, data from a wire-mesh sensor, an ultrasound technique and high-speed camera are used to study two-phase slug flows in horizontal pipes. The experiments were performed in an experimental two-phase flow loop which comprises a horizontal acrylic pipe of 26 mm internal diameter and 9 m length. Water and air were used to produce the two-phase flow and their flow rates are separately controlled to produce different flow conditions. As a parameter of choice, translational velocity of air bubbles was determined by each of the techniques and comparatively evaluated along with a mechanistic flow model. Results obtained show good agreement among all techniques. The visualization of flow obtained by the different techniques is also presented.

  4. Mixed convection laminar flow and heat transfer of liquids in horizontal internally finned tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shome, B.

    1998-01-01

    Energy and material savings, as well as economic incentives, have led to concentrated efforts over the past several decades in the field of heat transfer enhancement to produce more efficient and compact heat exchangers. Internally finned tubes are widely used for heat transfer enhancement, particularly in chemical process and petroleum industries. A finned tube heat exchanger with optimum geometry could offer 35--40% increase in heat duty for equal pumping power and size over a smooth tube heat exchanger or a comparable decrease in the heat exchanger size for a given heat duty. Developing mixed convection flow in internally finned tubes with variable viscosity was numerically investigated for a fin geometry range of 8 {le} N {le} 24, 0.1 {le} H {le} 0.3 and an operating condition range of 50 {le} Pr{sub in} {le} 1,250, 0 {le} Ra{sub in} {le} 10{sup 7}, and 0 {le} q{sub w}d/k{sub in} {le} 2,000. The numerical model was validated by comparison with existing numerical and experimental data. Internal finning was found to produce a complex two-cell, buoyancy-induced vortex structure. The results show that coring (retarded velocity in the interfin region) leads to poor heat transfer performance of tubes with large numbers of fins or with tall fins. The overall results indicated that large enhancement in the heat transfer can be obtained in the entrance region. Furthermore, variable viscosity effects are seen to have a pronounced effect on the friction factor and Nusselt number predictions.

  5. Application of acoustic tomography to reconstruct the horizontal flow velocity field in a shallow river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Kaneko, Arata; Nistor, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    A novel acoustic tomographic measurement system capable of resolving sound travel time in extremely shallow rivers is introduced and the results of an extensive field measurements campaign are presented and further discussed. Acoustic pulses were transmitted over a wide frequency band of 20-35 kHz between eight transducers for about a week in a meandering reach of theBāsen River, Hiroshima, Japan. The purpose of the field experiment was validating the concept of acoustic tomography in rivers for visualizing current fields. The particular novelty of the experiment resides in its unusual tomographic features: subbasin scale (100 m × 270 m) and shallowness (0.5-3.0 m) of the physical domain, frequency of the transmitted acoustic signals (central frequency of 30 kHz), and the use of small sampling intervals (105 s). Inverse techniques with no a priori statistical information were used to estimate the depth-average current velocity components from differential travel times. Zeroth-order Tikhonov regularization, in conjunction with L-curve method deployed to stabilize the solution and to determine the weighting factor appearing in the inverse analysis. Concurrent direct environmental measurements were provided in the form of ADCP readings close to the right and left bank. Very good agreement found between along-channel velocities larger than 0.2 m/s obtained from the two techniques. Inverted quantities were, however, underestimated, perhaps due to vicinity of the ADCPs to the banks and strong effect of river geometry on the readings. In general, comparing the visualized currents with direct nodal measurements illustrate the plausibility of the tomographically reconstructed flow structures.

  6. Horizontal gene flow from Eubacteria to Archaebacteria and what it means for our understanding of eukaryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Akanni, Wasiu A; Siu-Ting, Karen; Creevey, Christopher J; McInerney, James O; Wilkinson, Mark; Foster, Peter G; Pisani, Davide

    2015-09-26

    The origin of the eukaryotic cell is considered one of the major evolutionary transitions in the history of life. Current evidence strongly supports a scenario of eukaryotic origin in which two prokaryotes, an archaebacterial host and an α-proteobacterium (the free-living ancestor of the mitochondrion), entered a stable symbiotic relationship. The establishment of this relationship was associated with a process of chimerization, whereby a large number of genes from the α-proteobacterial symbiont were transferred to the host nucleus. A general framework allowing the conceptualization of eukaryogenesis from a genomic perspective has long been lacking. Recent studies suggest that the origins of several archaebacterial phyla were coincident with massive imports of eubacterial genes. Although this does not indicate that these phyla originated through the same process that led to the origin of Eukaryota, it suggests that Archaebacteria might have had a general propensity to integrate into their genomes large amounts of eubacterial DNA. We suggest that this propensity provides a framework in which eukaryogenesis can be understood and studied in the light of archaebacterial ecology. We applied a recently developed supertree method to a genomic dataset composed of 392 eubacterial and 51 archaebacterial genera to test whether large numbers of genes flowing from Eubacteria are indeed coincident with the origin of major archaebacterial clades. In addition, we identified two potential large-scale transfers of uncertain directionality at the base of the archaebacterial tree. Our results are consistent with previous findings and seem to indicate that eubacterial gene imports (particularly from δ-Proteobacteria, Clostridia and Actinobacteria) were an important factor in archaebacterial history. Archaebacteria seem to have long relied on Eubacteria as a source of genetic diversity, and while the precise mechanism that allowed these imports is unknown, we suggest that our results

  7. Flow Regime Study in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Riser with an Abrupt Exit: [1] High Density Suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Lee, G.T.; Seachman, S.M.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2008-05-13

    Flow regime study was conducted in a 0.3 m diameter, 15.5 m tall circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser with an abrupt exit at the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U. S. Department of Energy. A statistical designed test series was conducted including four (4) operating set points and a duplicated center point (therefore a total of 6 operating set points). Glass beads of mean diameter 200 μm and particle density of 2,430 kg/m3 were used as bed material. The CFB riser was operated at various superficial gas velocities ranging from 5.6 to 7.6 m/s and solid mass flux from a low of 86 to a high of 303 kg/m2-s. Results of the apparent solids fraction profile as well as the radial particle velocity profile were analyzed in order to identify the presence of Dense Suspension Upflow (DSU) conditions. DSU regime was found to exist at the bottom of the riser, while the middle section of the riser was still exhibiting core-annular flow structure. Due to the abrupt geometry of the exit, the DSU regime was also found at the top of the riser. In addition the effects of the azimuthal angle, riser gas velocity, and mass solids flux on the particle velocity were investigated and are discussed in this paper.

  8. RELATIONSHIP OF STREAM FLOW REGIME IN THE WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR BASIN TO WATERSHED TYPE CHARACTERISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To test a conceptual model of nonlinear response of hydrologic regimes to watershed characteristics, we selected 48 second- and third-order study sites on the North and South Shores of western Lake Superior, MN (USA) using a random-stratified design based on hydrogeomorphic regio...

  9. Can Horizontal Hydraulic Fracturing Lead to Less Expensive Achievement of More Natural River Flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, J.; Characklis, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    order to reduce this financial uncertainty, we propose the use of "collar" agreements between a downstream stakeholder and a third party insurer that would provide a stable price for parties "buying" more natural flows.

  10. Mathematical Analysis of Hall Effect on Transient Hartman Flow about a Rotating Horizontal Permeable Surface in a Porous Medium under Inclined Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, M.; Manglik, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the exact solution for unsteady flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past a impulsively started infinite horizontal surface which is rotating with an angular velocity embedded in a saturated porous medium under the influence of strong magnetic field with hall effect. Our study focuses on the change of direction of the external magnetic field on the flow system which leads to change in the flow behavior and skin frictional forces at the boundary. Systems of flow equations are solved using Laplace transform technique. The impacts of control parameters Hartman number, rotation of the system, hall effect, inclination of the magnetic field, and Darcy number on primary and secondary velocities are shown graphically, skin friction at horizontal boundary in tabular form. For validating our results, in the absence of permeability of the porous medium and inclination of the magnetic field the results are in good agreement with the published results.

  11. Drought-induced changes in flow regimes lead to long-term losses in mussel-provided ecosystem services

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Caryn C; Atkinson, Carla L; Julian, Jason P

    2015-01-01

    Extreme hydro-meteorological events such as droughts are becoming more frequent, intense, and persistent. This is particularly true in the south central USA, where rapidly growing urban areas are running out of water and human-engineered water storage and management are leading to broad-scale changes in flow regimes. The Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma, USA, has high fish and freshwater mussel biodiversity. However, water from this rural river is desired by multiple urban areas and other entities. Freshwater mussels are large, long-lived filter feeders that provide important ecosystem services. We ask how observed changes in mussel biomass and community composition resulting from drought-induced changes in flow regimes might lead to changes in river ecosystem services. We sampled mussel communities in this river over a 20-year period that included two severe droughts. We then used laboratory-derived physiological rates and river-wide estimates of species-specific mussel biomass to estimate three aggregate ecosystem services provided by mussels over this time period: biofiltration, nutrient recycling (nitrogen and phosphorus), and nutrient storage (nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon). Mussel populations declined over 60%, and declines were directly linked to drought-induced changes in flow regimes. All ecosystem services declined over time and mirrored biomass losses. Mussel declines were exacerbated by human water management, which has increased the magnitude and frequency of hydrologic drought in downstream reaches of the river. Freshwater mussels are globally imperiled and declining around the world. Summed across multiple streams and rivers, mussel losses similar to those we document here could have considerable consequences for downstream water quality although lost biofiltration and nutrient retention. While we cannot control the frequency and severity of climatological droughts, water releases from reservoirs could be used to augment stream flows and

  12. Drought-induced changes in flow regimes lead to long-term losses in mussel-provided ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Caryn C; Atkinson, Carla L; Julian, Jason P

    2015-03-01

    Extreme hydro-meteorological events such as droughts are becoming more frequent, intense, and persistent. This is particularly true in the south central USA, where rapidly growing urban areas are running out of water and human-engineered water storage and management are leading to broad-scale changes in flow regimes. The Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma, USA, has high fish and freshwater mussel biodiversity. However, water from this rural river is desired by multiple urban areas and other entities. Freshwater mussels are large, long-lived filter feeders that provide important ecosystem services. We ask how observed changes in mussel biomass and community composition resulting from drought-induced changes in flow regimes might lead to changes in river ecosystem services. We sampled mussel communities in this river over a 20-year period that included two severe droughts. We then used laboratory-derived physiological rates and river-wide estimates of species-specific mussel biomass to estimate three aggregate ecosystem services provided by mussels over this time period: biofiltration, nutrient recycling (nitrogen and phosphorus), and nutrient storage (nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon). Mussel populations declined over 60%, and declines were directly linked to drought-induced changes in flow regimes. All ecosystem services declined over time and mirrored biomass losses. Mussel declines were exacerbated by human water management, which has increased the magnitude and frequency of hydrologic drought in downstream reaches of the river. Freshwater mussels are globally imperiled and declining around the world. Summed across multiple streams and rivers, mussel losses similar to those we document here could have considerable consequences for downstream water quality although lost biofiltration and nutrient retention. While we cannot control the frequency and severity of climatological droughts, water releases from reservoirs could be used to augment stream flows and

  13. Experimental insights into flow impingement in cerebral aneurysm by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry: transition from a laminar regime

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Takanobu; Sato, Ayaka; Shinke, Manabu; Takahashi, Sara; Tobe, Yasutaka; Takao, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Yuichi; Umezu, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    This study experimentally investigated the instability of flow impingement in a cerebral aneurysm, which was speculated to promote the degradation of aneurysmal wall. A patient-specific, full-scale and elastic-wall replica of cerebral artery was fabricated from transparent silicone rubber. The geometry of the aneurysm corresponded to that found at 9 days before rupture. The flow in a replica was analysed by quantitative flow visualization (stereoscopic particle image velocimetry) in a three-dimensional, high-resolution and time-resolved manner. The mid-systolic and late-diastolic flows with a Reynolds number of 450 and 230 were compared. The temporal and spatial variations of near-wall velocity at flow impingement delineated its inherent instability at a low Reynolds number. Wall shear stress (WSS) at that site exhibited a combination of temporal fluctuation and spatial divergence. The frequency range of fluctuation was found to exceed significantly that of the heart rate. The high-frequency-fluctuating WSS appeared only during mid-systole and disappeared during late diastole. These results suggested that the flow impingement induced a transition from a laminar regime. This study demonstrated that the hydrodynamic instability of shear layer could not be neglected even at a low Reynolds number. No assumption was found to justify treating the aneurysmal haemodynamics as a fully viscous laminar flow. PMID:23427094

  14. Effects of the spring snowmelt recession on abiotic and biotic conditions in northern Sierra Nevada CA rivers with varying flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnell, S. M.; Peek, R.; Viers, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has discussed the importance of the spring snowmelt recession in montane environments for driving physical and biological stream processes and supporting the success of native riverine species adapted to its predictability, yet there have been no field-based studies that directly address the relationship between the snowmelt recession and stream ecology. There are a variety of studies that explore the relationship between the flow regime and an individual species, the flow regime and riparian habitat, and flow and sediment movement. However, there are few, if any, studies that attempt to delineate the relationship between recession flows and stream ecology or quantify key characteristics of the flow regime beyond determinations of minimum instream flows or peak magnitudes of geomorphic flows. Regulated flow management issues such as suitable ramping rates to transition from peak flows to baseflow or a suitable duration of flooding that provides the greatest habitat heterogeneity during the ecologically-sensitive spring season have not previously been addressed. In this study, we examined the geomorphic, hydraulic and riparian habitat in relation to aquatic biological diversity at six stream study sites across two basins with varying flow regime types: unimpaired, semi-impaired (regulated-bypass reaches), and fully impaired (regulated-peaking or regulated-augmented reaches). In two very different water year types (2011-wet, 2012-dry), we quantified the variability in the spring flow regime using flow metrics (e.g. daily recession rate, timing) and compared it to variability in abiotic stream conditions (e.g. diversity of hydraulic habitat, diversity of riparian habitat) and diversity of biotic conditions (e.g. algal abundance, EPT index). In addition, we analyzed the relationship between habitat heterogeneity and species diversity across flow regime types in both water years. Results indicate both flow regime and water year type contribute to the

  15. Visco-elastic effects with simultaneous thermal and mass diffusion in MHD free convection flow near an oscillating plate in the slip flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bandita; Choudhury, Rita

    2016-06-01

    The present study analyzes the influence of visco-elastic flow of fluid through a porous medium bounded by an oscillating porous plate with heat source in the slip flow regime. Effects of heat transfer, mass transfer and chemical reaction are also taken into account. The porous plate is subjected to a transverse suction velocity. The dimensionless governing equations of the problem are solved by regular perturbation technique. The analytical expressions for the velocity, temperature, concentration, and Shearing stress have been obtained and illustrated graphically for different values of physical parameters involved in the problem. The investigation reveals that the visco-elastic fluid has significant effects on the considered flow field in comparison with Newtonian fluid flow phenomenon.

  16. Changes in Bedform Shape at the Transition Between Upper Plane-Bed and Sheet-Flow Bedload Transport Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez Moreira, R. R.; Huffman, B.; Vautin, D.; Viparelli, E.

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between flow hydrodynamics and bedform characteristics at the transition between upper plane-bed bedload transport regime and sheet-flow have not yet been thoroughly described and still remain poorly understood. The present study focuses on the experimental study of this transition in open channel mode. The experiments were performed in the hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the University of South Carolina in a sediment-feed flume, 9-m long by 19-cm wide with uniform material sediment of geometric mean grain size diameter of 1.11 mm. Sediment feed rates ranged between 0.5 kg/min and 20 kg/min with two different flow rates of 20 l/s and 30 l/s. We recorded periodic measurements of water surface and bed elevation to estimate the global flow parameters, e.g. mean flow velocity and bed shear stress, and to determine when the flow and the sediment transport reached conditions of mobile bed equilibrium. We define mobile bed equilibrium as a condition in which the mean bed elevation does not change in time. At equilibrium, measurements of bed elevation fluctuations were taken with an ultrasonic transducer system at six discrete locations. In the runs with low and medium feed rates, i.e. smaller than ~12 kg/min, the long wavelength and small amplitude bedforms typical of the upper plane bed regime, which were observed in previous experimental work, formed and migrated downstream. In particular, with increasing feed rates, the amplitude of the bedforms decreases and their geometry changes, from well-defined triangular shapes, to rounded shapes to flat bed with very small amplitude, long wavelength undulations. The decrease in amplitude corresponds to a decrease in form drag and an increase in the thickness of the bedload layer. The ultrasonic measurements are analyzed to statistically describe the observed transition in terms of probability distribution functions of the bed elevation fluctuations.

  17. Influence of flow regime and channel morphology on larval drift and dispersion in a large regulated river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, S.; Jacobson, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Larval drift is a critical phase of ontogenetic development for many species of lotic fishes. Downstream advection and dispersion of passively drifting larvae or eggs is controlled by the complex interaction of flow regime, channel planform, local channel morphology, and the resulting hydraulic gradients. In many regulated rivers, channel engineering and perturbations to the flow regime may disrupt natural drift processes and impact successful recruitment of native fishes. Here we explore the influence of flow regime and channel morphology on the downstream transport, dispersion, and retention of Pallid Sturgeon larvae, an endangered species endemic to the Mississippi River basin and the focus of significant conservation effort on the Missouri River. The transition from drifting free embryo to exogenously feeding larvae has been identified as a potential life stage bottleneck for the Pallid Sturgeon. Previous studies have indicated that river regulation and fragmentation may contribute to mortality of larval Pallid Sturgeon by reducing the extent of free-flowing river required by free embryos to complete the transition to exogenous feeding. Additionally, channelization may have increased the rate at which larvae are advected downstream out of the Missouri River basin. We describe the complex interactions and influence of morphologic and hydraulic factors on larval drift using an extensive library of hydroacoustic data collected along more than 1300 km of the Lower Missouri River. We use a one-dimensional advection-dispersion model to estimate total drift distance and employ the longitudinal dispersion coefficient as a measure to quantify the tendency towards dispersion or retention of passively drifting larvae in geomorphically distinct segments of river. We use a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model to evaluate the sensitivity of drift and dispersion to in-channel navigation structures and flood hydrology. Based on insights gained from the analysis of field data and

  18. Determining the flow regime in a biofilm carrier by means of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Herrling, Maria P; Guthausen, Gisela; Wagner, Michael; Lackner, Susanne; Horn, Harald

    2015-05-01

    Biofilms on cylindrical carrier material originating from a lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) were investigated by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to determine the local flow velocities at the inner face of the biofilm carrier. To get an insight into the mass transport processes, flow velocity maps of blank and with biofilm cultivated carriers were measured. A single carrier was placed in a tube in three different orientations and exposed to flow velocities of 0.21, 0.42, and 0.64 mm/s. The interplay of the biofilm morphology and the local flow pattern was then analyzed including the effect of the orientation of the carrier in relation to the upstream flow angle. Within this study, the biofilm carrier can be understood as an interconnected system of four sections in which the incoming fluid volume will be distributed depending on the biomass occupation and morphology. In sections with high biofilm occupation, the flow resistance is increased. Depending on the orientation of the carrier in the flow field, this effect leads to flow evasion through less covered sections showing higher flow velocities and consequently the risk of biofilm detachment. However, there was no clear correlation between biofilm coverage and flow ratio. PMID:25425488

  19. An ecological economic assessment of flow regimes in a hydropower dominated river basin: the case of the lower Zambezi River, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Fanaian, Safa; Graas, Susan; Jiang, Yong; van der Zaag, Pieter

    2015-02-01

    The flow regime of rivers, being an integral part of aquatic ecosystems, provides many important services benefiting humans in catchments. Past water resource developments characterized by river embankments and dams, however, were often dominated by one (or few) economic use(s) of water. This results in a dramatically changed flow regime negatively affecting the provision of other ecosystem services sustained by the river flow. This study is intended to demonstrate the value of alternative flow regimes in a river that is highly modified by the presence of large hydropower dams and reservoirs, explicitly accounting for a broad range of flow-dependent ecosystem services. In this study, we propose a holistic approach for conducting an ecological economic assessment of a river's flow regime. This integrates recent advances in the conceptualization and classification of ecosystem services (UK NEA, 2011) with the flow regime evaluation technique developed by Korsgaard (2006). This integrated approach allows for a systematic comparison of the economic values of alternative flow regimes, including those that are considered beneficial for aquatic ecosystems. As an illustration, we applied this combined approach to the Lower Zambezi Basin, Mozambique. Empirical analysis shows that even though re-operating dams to create environmentally friendly flow regimes reduces hydropower benefits, the gains to goods derived from the aquatic ecosystem may offset the forgone hydropower benefits, thereby increasing the total economic value of river flow to society. The proposed integrated flow assessment approach can be a useful tool for welfare-improving decision-making in managing river basins. PMID:25461048

  20. Sedimentary structures formed by upper-regime flows on a Pleistocene carbonate ramp (Favignana Calcarenite, Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slootman, Arnoud; Moscariello, Andrea; Cartigny, Matthieu; de Boer, Poppe

    2015-04-01

    Antidune, chute-and-pool and cyclic step deposits are found in the outcrops of the Pleistocene calcarenite wedge of Favignana Island. These deposits were formed on a prograding carbonate ramp. Three zones are identified: inner-mid ramp (shoreface), ramp slope, and outer ramp (offshore). The ramp slope dips 3° to 10° and drops 30-40 m over 400-600 m. The ramp slope and outer ramp show a succession of bioturbated dune cross beds with up to 10 m-thick, intercalated event beds containing supercritical-flow structures. Grain sizes range from coarse sand to granules, with large rhodoliths (algal balls) and shells as gravel-sized clasts. It is our aim to provide insight into the processes that create upper-regime flow structures and the hydraulic parameters of their generating flows. During normal storms, wind-driven currents generated submarine dunes that migrated across the sea floor. During exceptional high-energy events (megastorms, tsunamis), large amounts of skeletal debris from the carbonate factory were transported towards the top of the ramp slope, where under the effect of gravity sustained supercritical sediment gravity flows were generated. In a case study of bedform evolution, we present the formation of a large downstream-asymmetric bedform with two antidunes superimposed on its upstream flank. A stepwise flow reconstruction reveals the progressive steepening of the antidunes until critical steepness is reached, and the first and, shortly after, the second antidune wave breaks. The two hydraulic jumps thus formed, developed a temporary cyclic step morphology (i.e. hydraulic jump, accelerating subcritical flow, supercritical chute, hydraulic jump etc.). The bedform geometries are used to reconstruct the nature of the catastrophic events that were active on the ramp slope. The wave length of the antidunes is measured from outcrop, which, through hydraulic equations, allows for estimation of mean flow velocity as a function of sediment concentration in the

  1. Pathways of nitrobenzene degradation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: Effect of intermittent aeration and glucose addition.

    PubMed

    Kirui, Wesley K; Wu, Shubiao; Kizito, Simon; Carvalho, Pedro N; Dong, Renjie

    2016-01-15

    Intermittent aeration and addition of glucose were applied to horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands in order to investigate the effect on pathways of nitrobenzene (NB) degradation and interactions with microbial nitrogen and sulphur transformations. The experiment was carried out in three phases A, B and C consisting of different NB loading and glucose dosing. For each phase, the effect of aeration was assessed by intermittently aerating one wetland and leaving one unaerated. Regardless of whether or not the wetland was aerated, at an influent NB concentration of 140 mg/L, both wetlands significantly reduced NB to less than 2 mg/L, a reduction efficiency of 98%. However, once the influent NB concentration was increased to 280 mg/L, the aerated wetland had a higher removal performance 82% compared to that of the unaerated wetland 71%. Addition of glucose further intensified the NB removal to 95% in the aerated wetlands and 92% in the unaerated. Aeration of wetlands enhanced NB degradation, but also resulted in higher NB volatilization of 6 mg m(-2) d(-1). The detected high concentration of sulphide 20-60 mg/L in the unaerated wetland gave a strong indication that NB may act as an electron donor to sulphate-reducing bacteria, but this should be further investigated. Aeration positively improved NB removal in constructed wetlands, but resulted in higher NB volatilization. Glucose addition induced co-metabolism to enhance NB degradation. PMID:26468606

  2. High-resolution digital movies of emerging flux and horizontal flows in active regions on the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topka, K.; Ferguson, S.; Frank, Z.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution observations of active regions in many wavelength bands obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope of NSO/Sunspot (Sacramento Peak) are presented. The SOUP tunable filter, HRSO 1024 x 1024 CCD camera, and a sunspot tracker for image stabilization were used. Subarrays of 512 x 512 pixels were processed digitally and recorded on videodisk in movie format. The movies with 0.5 to 1 arcsecond resolution of the following simultaneous observations were shown: green continuum, longitudinal magnetogram, Doppler velocity, Fe I 5576 A line center, H alpha wings, and H alpha line center. The best set of movies show a 90 x 90 arcsecond field-of-view of an active region at S29, W11. When viewed at speeds of a few thousand times real-time, the photospheric movies clearly show the active region fields being distorted by a remarkable combination of systematic flows and small eruptions of new flux. Flux emergence is most easily discovered in line center movies: an elongated dark feature appears first, followed soon after by bright points at one or both ends. A brief, strong upflow is seen when the dark feature first appears; downflow in the bright points persists much longer. The magnetic flux appears to increase gradually over this extended period. Some of the flux emergence events were studied in detail, with measurements of horizontal and vertical velocities and magnetic flux versus time within one footpoint of the loop.

  3. High-quality GaN epilayer grown by newly designed horizontal counter-flow MOCVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheul-Ro; Son, Sung-Jin; Lee, In-Hwan; Leem, Jae-Young; Noh, Sam Kyu

    1997-12-01

    We have fabricated a newly designed horizontal counter-flow reactor for growing high-quality III-V nitrides and characterized the GaN/sapphire(0 0 0 1) grown in it. The surface morphology of the film was featureless and smooth without any defects such as hillocks or truncated hexagonals. The measured background concentration and carrier mobility of the film 1.5 m thick are 4 × 1017/cm3 and 180 cm2/V s, respectively. The defect density measured by TEM is about 1 × 109/cm2 and the FWHM of DCX-ray curving is 336 arcsec, respectively. This crystallinity is similar to what was commonly obtained for GaN on sapphire until recently. The FWHM of the band-edge emission peak measured by PL at room temperature is typically around 14 and 4 meV for the main extonic peak(DBE) at 10 K. Except DBE at 3.490 eV, two minor structures are detected on the high-energy and low-energy shoulder of DBE at 3.498 eV(FE) and 3.483(ABE).

  4. Nitrogen removal performance in planted and unplanted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands treating different influent COD/N ratios.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Ullman, Jeffrey L; Ambrose, Richard F; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Zhao, Zhimiao

    2016-05-01

    Microcosm horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCWs) were used to examine the impacts of vegetation on nitrogen dynamics treating different influent COD/N ratios (1:1, 4:1, and 8:1). An increase in the COD/N ratio led to increased reductions in NO3 and total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) in planted and unplanted wetlands, but diminished removal of NH4. The HSSFCW planted with Canna indica L. exhibited a significant reduction in NH4 compared to the unplanted system, particularly in the active root zone where NH4 removal performance increased by up to 26 % at the COD/N ratio of 8:1. There was no significant difference in NO3 removal between the planted and unplanted wetlands. TIN removal efficiency in the planted wetland increased with COD/N ratios, which was likely influenced by plant uptake. NH4 reductions were greater in planted wetland at the 20- and 40-cm depths while NO3 reductions were uniformly greater with depth in all cases, but no statistical difference was impacted by depth on TIN removal. These findings show that planting a HSSFCW can provide some benefit in reducing nitrogen loads in effluents, but only when a sufficient carbon source is present. PMID:26822218

  5. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation in novel Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors dominated by an Acidithiobacillus and a Thiobacillus species.

    PubMed

    Gerrity, S; Kennelly, C; Clifford, E; Collins, G

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is an odourous, highly toxic gas commonly encountered in various commercial and municipal sectors. Three novel, laboratory-scale, Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors (HFBRs) were tested for the removal of H2S gas from air streams over a 178-day trial at 10°C. Removal rates of up to 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1) were achieved, demonstrating the HFBRs as a feasible technology for the treatment of H2S-contaminated airstreams at low temperatures. Bio-oxidation of H2S in the reactors led to the production of H(+) and sulfate (SO(2-)4) ions, resulting in the acidification of the liquid phase. Reduced removal efficiency was observed at loading rates of 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1). NaHCO3 addition to the liquid nutrient feed (synthetic wastewater (SWW)) resulted in improved H2S removal. Bacterial diversity, which was investigated by sequencing and fingerprinting 16S rRNA genes, was low, likely due to the harsh conditions prevailing in the systems. The HFBRs were dominated by two species from the genus Acidithiobacillus and Thiobacillus. Nonetheless, there were significant differences in microbial community structure between distinct HFBR zones due to the influence of alkalinity, pH and SO4 concentrations. Despite the low temperature, this study indicates HFBRs have an excellent potential to biologically treat H2S-contaminated airstreams. PMID:26829048

  6. Direct numerical simulation of horizontal open channel flow with finite-size, heavy particles at low solid volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidanemariam, Aman G.; Chan-Braun, Clemens; Doychev, Todor; Uhlmann, Markus

    2013-02-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulation of turbulent open channel flow over a smooth horizontal wall in the presence of finite-size, heavy particles. The spherical particles have a diameter of approximately 7 wall units, a density of 1.7 times the fluid density and a solid volume fraction of 5 × 10-4. The value of the Galileo number is set to 16.5, while the Shields parameter measures approximately 0.2. Under these conditions, the particles are predominantly located in the vicinity of the bottom wall, where they exhibit strong preferential concentration which we quantify by means of Voronoi analysis and by computing the particle-conditioned concentration field. As observed in previous studies with similar parameter values, the mean streamwise particle velocity is smaller than that of the fluid. We propose a new definition of the fluid velocity ‘seen’ by finite-size particles based on an average over a spherical surface segment, from which we deduce in the present case that the particles are instantaneously lagging the fluid only by a small amount. The particle-conditioned fluid velocity field shows that the particles preferentially reside in the low-speed streaks, leading to the observed apparent lag. Finally, a vortex eduction study reveals that spanwise particle motion is significantly correlated with the presence of vortices with the corresponding sense of rotation which are located in the immediate vicinity of the near-wall particles.

  7. Phytoextraction, phytotransformation and rhizodegradation of ibuprofen associated with Typha angustifolia in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifei; Zhang, Jiefeng; Zhu, Guibing; Liu, Yu; Wu, Bing; Ng, Wun Jern; Appan, Adhityan; Tan, Soon Keat

    2016-10-01

    Widespread occurrence of trace pharmaceutical residues in aquatic environments is of great concerns due to the potential chronic toxicity of certain pharmaceuticals including ibuprofen on aquatic organisms even at environmental levels. In this study, the phytoextraction, phytotransformation and rhizodegradation of ibuprofen associated with Typha angustifolia were investigated in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland system. The experimental wetland system consisted of a planted bed with Typha angustifolia and an unplanted bed (control) to treat ibuprofen-loaded wastewater (∼107.2 μg L(-1)). Over a period of 342 days, ibuprofen was accumulated in leaf sheath and lamina tissues at a mean concentration of 160.7 ng g(-1), indicating the occurrence of the phytoextraction of ibuprofen. Root-uptake ibuprofen was partially transformed to ibuprofen carboxylic acid, 2-hydroxy ibuprofen and 1-hydroxy ibuprofen which were found to be 1374.9, 235.6 and 301.5 ng g(-1) in the sheath, respectively, while they were 1051.1, 693.6 and 178.7 ng g(-1) in the lamina. The findings from pyrosequencing analysis of the rhizosphere bacteria suggest that the Dechloromonas sp., the Clostridium sp. (e.g. Clostridium saccharobutylicum), the order Sphingobacteriales, and the Cytophaga sp. in the order Cytophagales were most probably responsible for the rhizodegradation of ibuprofen. PMID:27372652

  8. Assessment of temporal hydrologic anomalies coupled with drought impact for a transboundary river flow regime: The Diyala watershed case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Faraj, Furat A. M.; Scholz, Miklas

    2014-09-01

    Recent increases in human activities in shared river basins have unquestionably raised concerns about potential hydrological impacts, especially impacts of dams and large-scale water withdrawal schemes in the highlands. Anthropogenic pressures twinned with drought impacts have exacerbated water management challenges. This article assesses the cumulative consequences of upstream anthropogenic pressures and drought spells on temporal river flow regimes for the downstream country. The size and complexity of problems confronting transboundary river watersheds makes it necessary to use a representative example basin to study the problems and potential solutions. The Diyala (Sīrvān) river basin, which shares dozens of transboundary watersheds between Iraq and Iran, has been selected as a representative case study. A subset of the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) was utilised and climate variability was considered in assessing the combined effect of various forms of upstream human-river regulations and climatic conditions on natural flow regimes in the downstream state. Findings indicated that the anthropogenic river-regulation coupled with the impact of drought periods have noticeably modified the natural flow paradigm. The yearly average runoffs, which are no longer available for the downstream country, have soared to very high levels, particularly over the last fifteen years. More adverse impacts were detected in the non-rainy season. Findings reveal also that damming and considerable water diversion to large-scale irrigation projects in the upstream state are the main regulations affecting the management of shared water resources in the downstream country.

  9. Influence of substrate heterogeneity on the hydraulic residence time and removal efficiency of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza-Diaz, O.; Brovelli, A.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Horizontal, subsurface flow constructed wetlands are wastewater treatment devices. The influent polluted water flows through a porous substrate where the contaminants are removed, for example by microbial oxidation, surface adsorption and mineral precipitation. These systems are widely used with varying degrees of success to treat municipal and agricultural contaminated waters and remove the organic carbon and nutrient load. Constructed wetlands are an appealing and promising technology, because they (i) are potentially very efficient in removing the pollutants, (ii) require only a small external energy input and (iii) require low maintenance. However, practical experience has shown that the observed purification rate is highly variable and is often much smaller than expected. One of the numerous reasons proposed to explain the variable efficiency of constructed wetlands is the existence of highly conductive zones within the porous substrate, which produce a dramatic reduction of the hydraulic residence time and therefore directly decreases the overall water purification rate. This work aims to understand quantitatively the relationship between the spatial variability in the hydraulic properties of the substrate and the effective residence time in constructed wetlands. We conducted two suites of stochastic numerical simulations, modelling the transport of a conservative tracer in a three-dimensional simulated constructed wetland in one case, and the microbial oxidation of a carbon source in the other. Within each group of simulations, different hydraulic conductivity fields were tested. These were based on a log-normal, spatially correlated random field (with exponential spatial correlation). The amount of heterogeneity was varied by changing the variance correlation length in the three directions. For each set of parameters, different realizations are considered to deduce both the expected residence time for a certain amount of heterogeneity, and its range of

  10. THE HYDROLOGIC SYSTEM: GEOMORPHIC AND HYDROGEOLOGIC CONTROLS ON SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE FLOW REGIMES IN RIPARIAN MEADOW ECOSYSTEMS IN THE CENTRAL GREAT BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian corridors in upland watersheds in the Great Basin of central Nevada contain the majority of the region's biodiversity. Water, in both surface and subsurface flow regimes, is an important resource sustaining these sensitive ecosystems and other similar riparian ecosystem...

  11. The use of habitat structure preferenda for establishing flow regimes necessary for maintenance of fish habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stalnaker, Clair B.

    1979-01-01

    The pursuit of simplicity in the complex management of instream and out-of-stream water uses very early led to the minimum, or “base,” flow concept and the myth that a consistent methodology could be used to establish the desired minimum flow. Such a single flow value has not proven to be practical. As water becomes fully appropriated to upstream use and storage, the minimum flow, if not violated, tends to become the average condition. This situation is manifest in a flat or stepped but fixed hydrograph throughout the stream reach of concern for much of the year.

  12. Measurement of the oil holdup for a two-phase oil-water flow through a sudden contraction in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, L. P. M.; Guilizzoni, M.; Sotgia, G. M.; Bortolotti, S.; Pavan, L.

    2014-04-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow experiments were conducted in a horizontal duct made of Plexiglas® to determine the holdup of oil by means of the quick closing valves technique, using mineral oil (viscosity: 0.838 Pa s at 20 °C density: 890 kg m-3) and tap water. The duct presents a sudden contraction, with contraction ratio of 0.64. About 200 tests were performed by varying the flow rates of the phases. Flow patterns were investigated for both the up- and downstream pipe. Due to the relatively high value of the contraction ratio, it was not observed any relevant variation of the flow patterns across the sudden contraction. Data were then compared with predictions of a specific correlation for oil-water flow and some correlations for gas-water flow. A drift-flux model was also applied to determine the distribution parameter. The results agree quite well with flow pattern visualization.

  13. Flow regime in a restored wetland determines trophic links and species composition in the aquatic macroinvertebrate community.

    PubMed

    González-Ortegón, E; Walton, M E M; Moghaddam, B; Vilas, C; Prieto, A; Kennedy, H A; Pedro Cañavate, J; Le Vay, L

    2015-01-15

    In a restored wetland (South of Spain), where different flow regimes control water exchange with the adjacent Guadalquivir estuary, the native Palaemon varians coexists with an exotic counterpart species Palaemon macrodactylus. This controlled m\\acrocosm offers an excellent opportunity to investigate how the effects of water management, through different flow regimes, and the presence of a non-native species affect the aquatic community and the trophic niche (by gut contents and C-N isotopic composition) of the native shrimp Palaemon varians. We found that increased water exchange rate (5% day(-1) in mixed ponds vs. 0.1% day(-1) in extensive ponds) modified the aquatic community of this wetland; while extensive ponds are dominated by isopods and amphipods with low presence of P. macrodactylus, mixed ponds presented high biomass of mysids, corixids, copepods and both shrimp species. An estuarine origin of nutrients and primary production might explain seasonal and spatial differences found among ponds of this wetland. A combined analysis of gut contents and isotopic composition of the native and the exotic species showed that: (1) native P. varians is mainly omnivorous (2) while the non-native P. macrodactylus is more zooplanktivorous and (3) a dietary overlap occurred when both species coexist at mixed ponds where a higher water exchange and high abundance of mysids and copepods diversifies the native species' diet. Thus differences in the trophic ecology of both species are clearly explained by water management. This experimental study is a valuable tool for integrated management between river basin and wetlands since it allows quantification of wetland community changes in response to the flow regime. PMID:25242150

  14. The effect of different flow regimes on the growth and metabolic rates of the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutter, M.; Crocker, J.; Paijmans, A.; Janse, M.; Osinga, R.; Verreth, A. J.; Wijffels, R. H.

    2010-09-01

    To study the effect of water flow on coral growth, four series of ten coral nubbins of Galaxea fascicularis were exposed to four different flow regimes (0, 10, 20, and 25 cm s-1, bidirectional flow) for 42 weeks. Buoyant weight, surface area, and polyp number were measured at regular intervals. Net photosynthesis and dark respiration were measured at the corresponding flow speeds, and daily amount of photosynthetic carbon left for coral growth was calculated. Finally, skeletal density and CN content, chlorophyll concentration and dry weight of coral tissue were determined for each coral. Specific growth rate (in day-1) decreased with time in each flow treatment. Absence of flow resulted in significantly lower growth rates. Average specific growth rate calculated over the entire experiment was not significantly different between 10 and 20 cm s-1, while it was significantly higher at 25 cm s-1. From 10 to 25 cm s-1, average net photosynthetic rate decreased and average dark respiration rate did not change significantly. Scope for growth based on phototrophic carbon decreased with increasing flow. Growth was not positively correlated with either photosynthesis or respiration, or scope for growth. It is suggested that higher flow rates reduce the chance of disturbance of coral growth by competing algae or cyanobacteria, allowing corals to grow more readily with the maximum specific growth rate possible under the given environmental conditions. Notably, other effects of increased flow, such as increased respiratory rates and increased (in)organic nutrient uptake, might have been equally responsible for the increased growth of the corals in 25 cm s-1.

  15. Revisiting Maxwell's accommodation coefficient: A study of nitrogen flow in a silica microtube across all flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wenwen; McKenzie, David R.

    2014-12-01

    Gas flows have been studied quantitatively for more than a hundred years and have relevance in modern fields such as the control of gas inputs to processes, the measurement of leak rates and the separation of gaseous species. Cha and McCoy have derived a convenient formula for the flow of an ideal gas applicable across a wide range of Knudsen numbers (Kn) that approaches the Navier-Stokes equations at small Kn and the Smoluchowski extension of the Knudsen flow equation at large Kn. Smoluchowski's result relies on the Maxwell definition of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient α, recently challenged by Arya et al. We measure the flow rate of nitrogen gas in a smooth walled silica tube across a wide range of Knudsen numbers from 0.0048 to 12.4583. We find that the nitrogen flow obeys the Cha and McCoy equation with a large value of α, unlike carbon nanotubes which show flows consistent with a small value of α. Silica capillaries are therefore not atomically smooth. The flow at small Kn has α = 0.91 and at large Kn has α close to one, consistent with the redefinition of accommodation coefficient by Arya et al., which also resolves a problem in the literature where there are many observations of α of less than one at small Kn and many equal to one at large Kn. Silica capillaries are an excellent choice for an accurate flow control system.

  16. Heat flows to the combustion chamber walls in detonation and turbulent combustion regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskii, F. A.

    1991-02-01

    Measuremens of heat flows to the walls of an annular combustion chamber under conditions of combustion and continuous detonation are reported for a propane-oxygen mixture. It is shown that specific heat flows to the chamber walls under conditions of detonation are significantly lower than those observed during ordinary combustion. The experimental equipment and details of the experimental procedure are described.

  17. Impact of flow regulation and power plant effluents on the flow and temperature regimes of the Chattahoochee River; Atlanta to Whitesburg, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.; Jobson, Harvey E.; Land, Larry F.

    1978-01-01

    A calibrated and verified transient-flow temperature model was used to evaluate the effects of flow regulation and powerplant loadings on the natural temperature regime of the Chattahoochee River in northeast Georgia. Estimates were made of both instantaneous and average natural temperatures in the river during an 8-day period in August 1976. Differences between the computed average natural temperature and an independent estimateof natural temperature based on observed equilibrium temperatures were less than 0.5C. The combined thermal effects of flow regulation and powerplant effluents resulted in mean daily river temperatures downstreams of the powerplants about equal to or less than computed mean natural temperatures. The range and rates of change of computed natural diurnal temperature fluctuations were considerably less than those presently observed (1976) in the river. Except during periods of peak water-supply demand, differences between computed year 2000 river temperatures and observed present-day temperatures were less than 2C. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Boundary condition for lattice Boltzmann modeling of microscale gas flows with curved walls in the slip regime.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shi; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-04-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been widely used to simulate microgaseous flows in recent years. However, it is still a challenging task for LBM to model that kind of microscale flow involving complex geometries, owing to the use of uniform Cartesian lattices in space. In this work, a boundary condition for microflows in the slip regime is developed for LBM in which the shape of a solid wall is well considered. The proposed treatment is a combination of the Maxwellian diffuse reflection scheme and the simple bounce-back method. A portion of each part is determined by the relative position between the boundary node and curved walls, which is the key point that distinguishes this method from some previous schemes where the smooth curved surface was assumed to be zigzag lines. The present curved boundary condition is implemented with the multiple-relaxation-times model and verified for several established cases, including the plane microchannel flow (aligned and inclined), microcylindrical Couette flow, and the flow over an inclined microscale airfoil. The numerical results agree well with those predicted by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. PMID:25974610

  19. Boundary condition for lattice Boltzmann modeling of microscale gas flows with curved walls in the slip regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Shi; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-04-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been widely used to simulate microgaseous flows in recent years. However, it is still a challenging task for LBM to model that kind of microscale flow involving complex geometries, owing to the use of uniform Cartesian lattices in space. In this work, a boundary condition for microflows in the slip regime is developed for LBM in which the shape of a solid wall is well considered. The proposed treatment is a combination of the Maxwellian diffuse reflection scheme and the simple bounce-back method. A portion of each part is determined by the relative position between the boundary node and curved walls, which is the key point that distinguishes this method from some previous schemes where the smooth curved surface was assumed to be zigzag lines. The present curved boundary condition is implemented with the multiple-relaxation-times model and verified for several established cases, including the plane microchannel flow (aligned and inclined), microcylindrical Couette flow, and the flow over an inclined microscale airfoil. The numerical results agree well with those predicted by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  20. Convection of tin in a Bridgman system. II - An electrochemical method for detecting flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, B.; Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Woodell, G. A.; Anderson, T. J.; Narayanan, R.

    1992-01-01

    An ampoule was designed in order to obtain local flow behavior of the flow fields for convection of tin in a vertical Bridgman configuration. Multiple electrochemical cells were located along the periphery of the ampoule. Oxygen was titrated into the ampoule at one of the cell locations using a potentiostat and the concentration of oxygen was monitored at the other cell locations by operating the cells in a galvanic mode. Onset of oscillations were detected by means of thermocouples. We conclude that the flows are generally three dimensional for an aspect ratio of 5. Results on oscillations concurred with those of earlier workers. Suggestions for improved designs were made.

  1. Evaluating Key Watershed Components of Low Flow Regimes in New England Streams.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Alisa C; Gold, Arthur J; Pelletier, Marguerite C

    2016-05-01

    Water resource managers seeking to optimize stream ecosystem services and abstractions of water from watersheds need an understanding of the importance of land use, physical and climatic characteristics, and hydrography on different low flow components of stream hydrographs. Within 33 USGS gaged watersheds of southern New England, we assessed relationships between watershed variables and a set of low flow parameters by using an information-theoretical approach. The key variables identified by the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) weighting factors as generating positive relationships with low flow events included percent stratified drift, mean elevation, drainage area, and mean August precipitation. The extent of wetlands in the watershed was negatively related to low flow magnitudes. Of the various land use variables, the percentage of developed land was found to have the highest importance and a negative relationship on low flow magnitudes, but was less important than wetlands and physical and climatic features. Our results suggest that management practices aimed to sustain low flows in fluvial systems can benefit from attention to specific watershed features. We draw attention to the finding that streams located in watersheds with high proportions of wetlands may require more stringent approaches to withdrawals to sustain fluvial ecosystems during drought periods, particularly in watersheds with extensive development and limited deposits of stratified drift. PMID:27136170

  2. Ecomorphological variation in shell shape of the freshwater turtle Pseudemys concinna inhabiting different aquatic flow regimes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel

    2008-12-01

    Populations of species that inhabit a range of environments frequently display divergent morphologies that correlate with differences in ecological parameters. The velocity of water flow (i.e., flow velocity) is a critical feature of aquatic environments that has been shown to influence morphology in a broad range of taxa. The focus of this study was to evaluate the relationship between flow velocity and shell morphology for males and females of the semi-aquatic freshwater turtle Pseudemys concinna. For both sexes, the carapace and plastron show significant morphological differences between habitats characterized by slow-flowing (i.e., lentic) and fast-flowing (i.e., lotic) water. In general, the most prominent pattern for both sexes is that the shells of individuals from lotic habitats are more streamlined (small height-to-length ratio) than the shells of individuals from lentic habitats. Of the two shell components (carapace and plastron), the carapace shows greater divergence between habitats, particularly for males. These results are consistent with adaptations to flow velocity, and suggest that variation in shape may be more constrained in females. I also provide empirical evidence for an adaptive benefit of the observed shape change (i.e., drag reduction) and a brief comment on the relative roles of genetic divergence and phenotypic plasticity in generating shape differences observed in this species. PMID:21669831

  3. 3D crustal-scale heat-flow regimes at a developing active margin (Taranaki Basin, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, K. F.; Funnell, R. H.; Nicol, A.; Fohrmann, M.; Bland, K. J.; King, P. R.

    2013-04-01

    The Taranaki Basin in the west of New Zealand's North Island has evolved from a rifted Mesozoic Gondwana margin to a basin straddling the Neogene convergent Australian-Pacific plate margin. However, given its proximity to the modern subduction front, Taranaki Basin is surprisingly cold when compared to other convergent margins. To investigate the effects of active margin evolution on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin we developed a 3D crustal-scale forward model using the petroleum industry-standard basin-modelling software Petromod™. The crustal structure inherited from Mesozoic Gondwana margin breakup and processes related to modern Hikurangi convergent margin initiation are identified to be the main controls on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin. Present-day surface heat flow across Taranaki on average is 59 mW/m2, but varies by as much as 30 mW/m2 due to the difference in crustal heat generation between mafic and felsic basement terranes alone. In addition, changes in mantle heat advection, tectonic subsidence, crustal thickening and basin inversion, together with related sedimentary processes result in variability of up to 10 mW/m2. Modelling suggests that increased heating of the upper crust due to additional mantle heat advection following the onset of subduction is an ongoing process and heating has only recently begun to reach the surface, explaining the relatively low surface heat flow. We propose that the depth of the subducted slab and related mantle convection processes control the thermal and structural regimes in the Taranaki Basin. The thermal effects of the subduction initiation process are modified and overprinted by the thickness, structure and composition of the lithosphere.

  4. Land use and flow regime effects on phosphorus chemical dynamics in the fluvial sediment of the Winooski River, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, R.W.; Sharpley, A.N.; Chalmers, A.T.

    2002-01-01

    In the last century, fourfold increase in phosphorus (P) loadings to Lake Champlain, Vermont (VT), USA, have led to nuisance levels of algal growth occurring more often. To better understand the transport, storage, and cycling of P within the lake's catchment, we examined the chemistry, bioavailability and processes controlling sediment P release to waters of the Winooski River, VT, the largest tributary to Lake Champlain. Iron-oxide strip P (algal-bioavailable P) of the river sediments adjacent to agricultural land (3.6 mg kg-1) was greater (P < 0.05) than adjacent to forested land (2.4 mg kg-1). When compared among flow regimes, impoundment (731 mg kg-1) and reservoir sediments (803 mg kg-1) had greater total P concentrations than river sediment (462 mg kg-1). This was attributed to more fines (< 63 ??m) in impoundments and reservoirs (64%) than in river sediments (33%), which also decreased the ability of impoundment sediments to release P to solution and thereby be a sink for P. Although land use and flow regime influenced whether Winooski River sediments acted as a sink or source of P to Lake Champlain, long-term remedial strategies for the catchment should continue to focus on decreasing P losses in agricultural and urban runoff. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Managing flow, sediment, and hydropower regimes in the Sre Pok, Se San, and Se Kong Rivers of the Mekong basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Thomas B.; Loucks, Daniel P.

    2014-06-01

    The Lancang/Mekong River Basin is presently undergoing a period of rapid hydropower development. In its natural undeveloped state, the river transports about 160 million metric tons of sediment per year, maintaining the geomorphologic features of the basin, sustaining habitats, and transporting the nutrients that support ecosystem productivity. Despite the importance of sediment in the river, currently little attention is being paid to reservoir sediment trapping. This study is devoted to assessing the potential for managing sediment and its impact on energy production in the Se San, Sre Pok, and Se Kong tributaries of the Mekong River. These tributaries drain a set of adjacent watersheds that are important with respect to biodiversity and ecological productivity, and serve as a significant source of flow and sediment to the mainstream Mekong River. A daily sediment transport model is used to assess tradeoffs among energy production and sediment and flow regime alteration in multiple reservoir systems. This study finds that eventually about 40%-80% of the annual suspended sediment load may be trapped in reservoirs. Clearly, these reservoirs will affect the rivers' sediment regimes. However, even after 100 years of simulated sedimentation, reservoir storage capacities and hydropower production at most reservoir sites are not significantly reduced. This suggests that the strongest motivation for implementing measures to reduce trapped sediment is their impact not on hydropower production but on fish migration and survival and on sediment-dependent ecosystems such as the Vietnam Delta and Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake.

  6. The influence of water depth and flow regime on phytoplankton biomass and community structure in a shallow, lowland river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.

    2003-01-01

    The taxonomic composition and biomass of phytoplankton in the San Joaquin River, California, were examined in relation to water depth, flow regime, and water chemistry. Without substantial tributary inflow, maintenance demands exceeded algal production during summer and autumn in this eutrophic, 'lowland type' river due to light-limiting conditions for algal growth. Streamflow from tributaries that drain the Sierra Nevada contributed to a substantial net gain in algal production during the spring and summer by increasing water transparency and the extent of turbulence. Abundances of the major taxa (centric diatoms, pennate diatoms and chlorophytes) indicated differing responses to the longitudinal variation in water depth and flow regime, with the areal extent of pools and other geomorphic features that influence time-for-development being a major contributing factor to the selection of species. Tychoplanktonic species were most abundant upstream and in tributaries that drain the San Joaquin Valley. Seasonally-varying factors such as water temperature that influence algal growth rates also contributed significantly to the selection of species. Nutrient limitation appears not to be a primary constraint on species selection in the phytoplankton of this river.

  7. Balancing power production and instream flow regime for small scale hydropower