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Sample records for hormonal anabolic compounds

  1. Anabolic hormone profiles in elite military men.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Marcus K; Kviatkovsky, Shiloah A; Hernández, Lisa M; Sargent, Paul; Segal, Sabrina; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-06-01

    We recently characterized the awakening responses and daily profiles of the catabolic stress hormone cortisol in elite military men. Anabolic hormones follow a similar daily pattern and may counteract the catabolic effects of cortisol. This companion report is the first to characterize daily profiles of anabolic hormones dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and testosterone in this population. Overall, the men in this study displayed anabolic hormone profiles comparable to that of healthy, athletic populations. Consistent with the cortisol findings in our prior report, summary parameters of magnitude (hormone output) within the first hour after awakening displayed superior stability versus summary parameters of pattern for both DHEA (r range: 0.77-0.82) and testosterone (r range: 0.62-0.69). Summary parameters of evening function were stable for the two hormones (both p<0.001), while the absolute decrease in testosterone across the day was a stable proxy of diurnal function (p<0.001). Removal of noncompliant subjects did not appreciably affect concentration estimates for either hormone at any time point, nor did it alter the repeatability of any summary parameter. The first of its kind, this report enables accurate estimations of anabolic balance and resultant effects upon health and human performance in this highly resilient yet chronically stressed population. PMID:27083310

  2. Magnesium and anabolic hormones in older men

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, M.; Ceda, G. P.; Lauretani, F.; Cattabiani, C.; Avantaggiato, E.; Morganti, S.; Ablondi, F.; Bandinelli, S.; Dominguez, L. J.; Barbagallo, M.; Paolisso, G.; Semba, R. D.; Ferrucci, L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Optimal nutritional and hormonal statuses are determinants of successful ageing. The age associated decline in anabolic hormones such as testosterone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a strong predictor of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and mortality in older men. Studies have shown that magnesium intake affects the secretion of total IGF-1 and increase testosterone bioactivity. This observation suggests that magnesium can be a modulator of the anabolic/catabolic equilibrium disrupted in the elderly people. However, the relationship between magnesium and anabolic hormones in men has not been investigated. We evaluated 399 ≥65-year-old men of CHIANTI in a study population representative of two municipalities of Tuscany (Italy) with complete data on testosterone, total IGF-1, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and serum magnesium levels. Linear regression models were used to test the relationship between magnesium and testosterone and IGF-1. Mean age of the population was 74.18 ± 6.43 (years ± SD, age range 65.2–92.4). After adjusting for age, magnesium was positively associated with total testosterone (β ± SE, 34.9 ± 10.3; p = 0.001) and with total IGF-1 (β ± SE, 15.9 ± 4.8; p = 0.001). After further adjustment for body mass index (BMI), log (IL-6), log (DHEAS), log (SHBG), log (insulin), total IGF-1, grip strength, Parkinson’s disease and chronic heart failure, the relationship between magnesium and total testosterone remained strong and highly significant (β ± SE, 48.72 ± 12.61; p = 0.001). In the multivariate analysis adjusted for age, BMI, log (IL-6), liver function, energy intake, log (insulin), log (DHEAS), selenium, magnesium levels were also still significantly associated with IGF-1 (β ± SE, 16.43 ± 4.90; p = 0.001) and remained significant after adjusting for total testosterone (β ± SE, 14.4 ± 4.9; p = 0.01). In a cohort of older men, magnesium levels are strongly and

  3. Detection of hormonal anabolic compounds in calf urine and unverified growth-promoting preparations: application of the AR-LUX bioassay for screening and determination of androgenic activity.

    PubMed

    Blankvoort, Barry M G; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Schilt, Robert; Geerdink, Peter; Spenkelink, Bert; Rodenburg, Richard J T

    2003-11-01

    Despite a ban by the European Union, the use of anabolic steroids and repartitioning agents in cattle is still occasionally observed. Due to continuing improvements in analytical techniques, very low detection limits for individual compounds have been achieved. In response to these developments, cocktails composed of several steroids have been applied, thus hampering detection due to lower levels of the individual compounds. Bioassays capable of measuring the integrated effect of cocktails might therefore provide valuable additional tools in controlling the use of illegal anabolics. We investigated the feasibility of using the AR-LUX assay to detect the presence in cattle urine of growth promoters that exert their effects via androgen response elements (AREs). The AR-LUX assay is based on a human cell line featuring a luciferase reporter gene under transcriptional control of an authenticated ARE. Several column purification and liquid/liquid extraction methods were investigated to optimize the efficiency of anabolic compounds extraction and minimize cytotoxic effects of the urine matrix. The AR-LUX assay was found to be applicable to the detection of anabolic steroids excreted in urine samples with a discriminatory power similar to that of GC-MS analysis. Finally, some liquid products probably destined for growth-promoting purposes confiscated outside the Netherlands were analyzed. Although common chemical-analytical methods did not detect any anabolic steroids in these samples, the presence of compounds activating ARE-mediated gene expression was clearly established. PMID:14700232

  4. Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    Anabolic steroids are man-made substances related to male sex hormones. Doctors use anabolic steroids to treat some hormone problems in men, delayed ... some diseases. Bodybuilders and athletes often use anabolic steroids to build muscles and improve athletic performance. Using ...

  5. Skeletal unloading induces selective resistance to the anabolic actions of growth hormone on bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Autry, C. P.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S.; Patterson-Buckendahl, P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of skeletal weight bearing or physical unloading of bone in the growing animal inhibits bone formation and induces a bone mineral deficit. To determine whether the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading in the growing animal is a consequence of diminished sensitivity to growth hormone (GH) we studied the effects of skeletal unloading in young hypophysectomized rats treated with GH (0, 50, 500 micrograms/100 g body weight/day). Skeletal unloading reduced serum osteocalcin, impaired uptake of 3H-proline into bone, decreased proximal tibial mass, and diminished periosteal bone formation at the tibiofibular junction. When compared with animals receiving excipient alone, GH administration increased bone mass in all animals. The responses in serum osteocalcin, uptake of 3H-proline and 45Ca into the proximal tibia, and proximal tibial mass in non-weight bearing animals were equal to those in weight bearing animals. The responses in trabecular bone volume in the proximal tibia and bone formation at the tibiofibular junction to GH, however, were reduced significantly by skeletal unloading. Bone unloading prevented completely the increase in metaphyseal trabecular bone normally induced by GH and severely dampened the stimulatory effect (158% vs. 313%, p < 0.002) of GH on periosteal bone formation. These results suggest that while GH can stimulate the overall accumulation of bone mineral in both weight bearing and non-weight bearing animals, skeletal unloading selectively impairs the response of trabecular bone and periosteal bone formation to the anabolic actions of GH.

  6. Overexpression of the Transcriptional Factor Runx2 in Osteoblasts Abolishes the Anabolic Effect of Parathyroid Hormone in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Merciris, Didier; Marty, Caroline; Collet, Corinne; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    There is convincing evidence that Runx2 could be a regulator of the anabolic action of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in bone. We therefore decided to determine how Runx2 overexpression in osteoblasts affects the anabolic response to PTH. Transgenic osteoporotic female mice overexpressing Runx2 (TG) and their wild-type littermates (WT) were treated with PTH (100 μg/kg/day, 7 days a week) or with the vehicle for 6 weeks. Unexpectedly, Runx2 overexpression blunted the increase in the mineral density and volume of bone induced by intermittent PTH in WT mice. Our findings also indicate that PTH failed to increase bone formation in TG mice overexpressing Runx2. This abolition of the effect of PTH by Runx2 overexpression was attributable to a decrease in the differentiation of osteoblastic cells both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, we showed that less cAMP was induced by PTH and that there were fewer PTH binding sites in TG than WT osteoblasts. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that in vivo a high level of Runx2 abolishes the anabolic effect of PTH, probably via a decrease in the sensitivity of TG osteoblasts to PTH, and that the level of expression of Runx2 is critical if PTH is to produce its anabolic effect on bone in vivo. PMID:17456773

  7. Role of paraoxonase-1 in bone anabolic effects of parathyroid hormone in hyperlipidemic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jinxiu; Cheng, Henry; Atti, Elisa; Shih, Diana M.; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Anabolic effects of PTH were tested in hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing PON1. ► Expression of antioxidant regulatory genes was induced in PON1 overexpression. ► Bone resorptive activity was reduced in PON1 overexpressing hyperlipidemic mice. ► PON1 restored responsiveness to intermittent PTH in bones of hyperlipidemic mice. -- Abstract: Hyperlipidemia blunts anabolic effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cortical bone, and the responsiveness to PTH are restored in part by oral administration of the antioxidant ApoA-I mimetic peptide, D-4F. To evaluate the mechanism of this rescue, hyperlipidemic mice overexpressing the high-density lipoprotein-associated antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg}) were generated, and daily PTH injections were administered to Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} and to littermate Ldlr{sup −/−} mice. Expression of bone regulatory genes was determined by realtime RT-qPCR, and cortical bone parameters of the femoral bones by micro-computed tomographic analyses. PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTH receptor (PTH1R), activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in femoral cortical bone, as well as significantly greater cortical bone mineral content, thickness, and area in femoral diaphyses compared with untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice. In contrast, in control mice (Ldlr{sup −/−}) without PON1 overexpression, PTH treatment did not induce these markers. Calvarial bone of PTH-treated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice also had significantly greater expression of osteoblastic differentiation marker genes as well as BMP-2-target and Wnt-target genes. Untreated Ldlr{sup −/−}PON1{sup tg} mice had significantly greater expression of PTHR1 than untreated Ldlr{sup −/−} mice, whereas sclerostin expression was reduced. In femoral cortical bones, expression levels of transcription factors, Fox

  8. Analysis of non-hormonal nutritional supplements for anabolic-androgenic steroids - results of an international study.

    PubMed

    Geyer, H; Parr, M K; Mareck, U; Reinhart, U; Schrader, Y; Schänzer, W

    2004-02-01

    Several recent studies have shown evidence of some nutritional supplements containing prohibited anabolic androgenic steroids, so-called prohormones, which were not declared on the label. Therefore, a broad-based investigation of the international nutritional supplement market was initiated to clarify the extent of this problem. From October 2000 until November 2001, 634 non-hormonal nutritional supplements were purchased in 13 countries from 215 different suppliers. Most supplements were bought in shops in the respective countries (578 samples = 91.2 %) and on the internet (52 samples = 8.2 %). 289 supplements were from prohormone-selling companies and 345 supplements came from companies which do not offer prohormones. After isolation from the supplement matrix 11 different anabolic androgenic steroids, mainly prohormones of testosterone and nandrolone, were analysed by gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry. Out of the 634 samples analysed 94 (14.8 %) contained anabolic androgenic steroids not declared on the label ("positive supplements"). We could not obtain reliable data for 66 samples (10.4 %) due to matrix effects. In relation to the total number of products purchased per country, most of the positive supplements were bought in the Netherlands (25.8 %), in Austria (22.7 %), in the UK (18.8 %) and the USA (18.8 %). According to the label, all positive supplements were from companies located in only five countries: the USA, the Netherlands, the UK, Italy and Germany. 21.1 % of the nutritional supplements from prohormone-selling companies contained anabolic androgenic steroids, whereas 9.6 % of the supplements from companies not selling prohormones were positive. The positive supplements showed anabolic androgenic steroid concentrations of 0.01 micro g/g up to 190 micro g/g. The administration of supplements containing nandrolone prohormones adding up to a total uptake of more than 1 micro g resulted in positive doping results for norandrosterone for several

  9. An alternative purification method for human serum paraoxonase 1 and its interactions with anabolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Demir, Dudu; Gencer, Nahit; Arslan, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an alternative purification method for human paraoxonase 1 (hPON1) enzyme was developed using two-step procedures, namely, ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sepharose-4B-L-tyrosine-3-aminophenantrene hydrophobic interaction chromatography. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the enzyme indicates a single band with an apparent M(W) of 43 kDa. The enzyme was purified 219-fold with a final specific activity of 4,408,400 U/mg and a yield of 10%. Furthermore, we examined the in vitro effects of some anabolic compounds, such as zeranol, 17 β-estradiol, diethylstilbestrol, oxytocin, and trenbolone on the enzyme activity to understand the better inhibitory properties of these molecules. The five anabolic compounds dose dependently decreased the activity of hPON1 with inhibition constants in the millimolar-micromolar range. The results show that these compounds exhibit inhibitory effects on hPON1 at low concentrations with IC50 values ranging from 0.064 to 16.900 µM. PMID:25792501

  10. Soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor 2, a serum marker of resistance to the anabolic actions of growth hormone in subjects with HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Gelato, Marie C; Mynarcik, Dennis; McNurlan, Margaret A

    2002-01-01

    Therapies are still being sought for the prevention of loss of body weight and lean body mass in HIV disease. The purpose of the present study was to identify a serum marker that would help in selecting patients who may be appropriate candidates for the use of anabolic agents, such as growth hormone, to restore lean body mass. This study included 26 HIV-infected patients and nine healthy controls, assessed previously for the effectiveness of 2 weeks of growth hormone administration in the stimulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Serum levels of interleukins-1beta, -6 and -10 were not useful predictors of the anabolic response to growth hormone. Serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) were significantly elevated (P<0.05) in patients with AIDS and AIDS-related weight loss, and there was a significant correlation between the serum concentration of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and stage of disease (P=0.03). However, the serum concentration of the soluble TNFalpha receptor type 2 was most predictive of an inability of muscle protein synthesis to respond anabolically to growth hormone (r=-0.42, P=0.01). These data suggest that inflammation impacts on the responsiveness of muscle tissue to an anabolic stimulus, and that the soluble TNFalpha receptor type 2 provides a useful serum marker for metabolic dysfunction in HIV disease, which can be used to identify individuals likely to respond to growth hormone-based anabolic therapy. PMID:11749664

  11. Mixed lactate and caffeine compound increases satellite cell activity and anabolic signals for muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yoshimi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Yokokawa, Takumi; Hirotsu, Keisuke; Shimazu, Mariko; Uchida, Kenji; Tomi, Hironori; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2015-03-15

    We examined whether a mixed lactate and caffeine compound (LC) could effectively elicit proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells or activate anabolic signals in skeletal muscles. We cultured C2C12 cells with either lactate or LC for 6 h. We found that lactate significantly increased myogenin and follistatin protein levels and phosphorylation of P70S6K while decreasing the levels of myostatin relative to the control. LC significantly increased protein levels of Pax7, MyoD, and Ki67 in addition to myogenin, relative to control. LC also significantly increased follistatin expression relative to control and stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and P70S6K. In an in vivo study, male F344/DuCrlCrlj rats were assigned to control (Sed, n = 10), exercise (Ex, n = 12), and LC supplementation (LCEx, n = 13) groups. LC was orally administered daily. The LCEx and Ex groups were exercised on a treadmill, running for 30 min at low intensity every other day for 4 wk. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in the mass of the gastrocnemius (GA) and tibialis anterior (TA) relative to both the Sed and Ex groups. Furthermore, the LCEx group showed a significant increase in the total DNA content of TA compared with the Sed group. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in myogenin and follistatin expression of GA relative to the Ex group. These results suggest that administration of LC can effectively increase muscle mass concomitant with elevated numbers of myonuclei, even with low-intensity exercise training, via activated satellite cells and anabolic signals. PMID:25571987

  12. Suppression of p38α MAPK Signaling in Osteoblast Lineage Cells Impairs Bone Anabolic Action of Parathyroid Hormone.

    PubMed

    Thouverey, Cyril; Caverzasio, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Intermittent parathyroid hormone administration (iPTH) increases bone mass and strength by stimulating osteoblast number and activity. PTH exerts its anabolic effects through cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway in mature osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we show that inactivation of the p38α MAPK-encoding gene with the use of an osteocalcin-cre transgene prevents iPTH bone anabolic action. Indeed, iPTH fails to increase insulin-like growth factor 1 expression, osteoblast number and activity, and bone formation in mice lacking p38α in osteoblasts and osteocytes. Moreover, iPTH-induced expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and subsequent increased bone resorption are suppressed in those mice. Finally, we found that PTH activates p38α MAPK downstream of cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in mature osteoblasts. Our findings identify p38α MAPK as a key component of PTH signaling in osteoblast lineage cells and highlight its requirement in iPTH osteoanabolic activity. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26643857

  13. Insulin-like growth factor I is required for the anabolic actions of parathyroid hormone on mouse bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, Daniel D.; Sakata, Takeshi; Leary, Colin; Elalieh, Hashem; Ginzinger, David; Rosen, Clifford J.; Beamer, Wesley; Majumdar, Sharmila; Halloran, Bernard P.

    2002-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a potent anabolic agent for bone, but the mechanism(s) by which it works remains imperfectly understood. Previous studies have indicated that PTH stimulates insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I production, but it remains uncertain whether IGF-I mediates some or all of the skeletal actions of PTH. To address this question, we examined the skeletal response to PTH in IGF-I-deficient (knockout [k/o]) mice. These mice and their normal littermates (NLMs) were given daily injections of PTH (80 microg/kg) or vehicle for 2 weeks after which their tibias were examined for fat-free weight (FFW), bone mineral content, bone structure, and bone formation rate (BFR), and their femurs were assessed for mRNA levels of osteoblast differentiation markers. In wild-type mice, PTH increased FFW, periosteal BFR, and cortical thickness (C.Th) of the proximal tibia while reducing trabecular bone volume (BV); these responses were not seen in the k/o mice. The k/o mice had normal mRNA levels of the PTH receptor and increased mRNA levels of the IGF-I receptor but markedly reduced basal mRNA levels of the osteoblast markers. Surprisingly, these mRNAs in the k/o bones increased several-fold more in response to PTH than the mRNAs in the bones from their wild-type littermates. These results indicate that IGF-I is required for the anabolic actions of PTH on bone formation, but the defect lies distal to the initial response of the osteoblast to PTH.

  14. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids - New anabolic compounds improving protein metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous animal studies demonstrated that chronic feeding of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) that modifies muscle membrane fatty acid composition promotes protein anabolism by blunting the age-associated deterioration in insulin sensitivity. The current study assessed, as a pr...

  15. Distinctive anabolic roles of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and parathyroid hormone in teeth and mandible versus long bones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Guo, Jian; Wang, Lin; Chen, Ning; Karaplis, Andrew; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2009-11-01

    To assess the roles of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in hard tissue formation in oro-facial tissues, we examined the effect of either 1,25(OH)(2)D or PTH deficiency on dentin and dental alveolar bone formation and mineralization in the mandibles, and osteoblastic bone formation in long bones of 1alpha-hydroxylase knockout (1alpha(OH)ase(-/-)) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, the mineral density was decreased in the teeth and mandibles, and unmineralized dentin (predentin and biglycan immunopositive dentin) and unmineralized bone matrix in the dental alveolar bone were increased in 1alpha(OH)ase(-/-) mice. The dental volume, reparative dentin volume, and dentin sialoprotein immunopositive areas were reduced in 1alpha(OH)ase(-/-) mice. The cortical thickness, dental alveolar bone volume, and osteoblast number were all decreased significantly in the mandibles; in contrast, the osteoblast number and surface were increased in the trabecular bone of the tibiae in 1alpha(OH)ase(-/-) mice consistent with their secondary hyperparathyroidism. The expression of PTH receptor and IGF1 was reduced slightly in mandibles, but enhanced significantly in the long bones in the 1alpha(OH)ase(-/-) mice. To control for the role of secondary hyperparathyroidism, we also examined teeth and mandibles in 6-week-old PTH(-/-) mice. In these animals, dental and bone volumes in mandibles were not altered when compared with their wild-type littermates. These results suggest that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) plays an anabolic role in both dentin and dental alveolar bone as it does in long bones, whereas PTH acts predominantly in long bones rather than mandibular bone. PMID:19713218

  16. Effects of glutamine-containing total parenteral nutrition on phagocytic activity and anabolic hormone response in rats undergoing gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Hsien; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Chen, Soul-Chin; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of glutamine (Gln)-containing parenteral nutrition on phagocytic activity and to elucidate the possible roles of Gln in the secretion of anabolic hormones and nitrogen balance in rats undergoing a gastrectomy. METHODS: Rats with an internal jugular catheter were divided into 2 experimental groups and received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The TPN solutions were isonitrogenous and identical in nutrient compositions except for differences in amino acid content. One group received conventional TPN (control), and in the other group, 25% of the total amino acid nitrogen was replaced with Gln. After receiving TPN for 3 d, one-third of the rats in each experimental group were sacrificed as the baseline group. The remaining rats underwent a partial gastrectomy and were killed 1 and 3 d, respectively, after surgery. Plasma, peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF), and urine samples were collected for further analysis. RESULTS: The Gln group had fewer nitrogen losses 1 and 2 d after surgery (d1, 16.6±242.5 vs -233.4±205.9 mg/d, d2, 31.8±238.8 vs -253.4±184.6 mg/d, P<0.05). There were no differences in plasma growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels between the 2 groups before or after surgery. The phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was higher in the Gln group than in the control group 1 d after surgery (A 1185±931 vs 323±201, P<0.05). There were no differences in the phagocytic activities of blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils between the 2 groups at the baseline or on the postoperative days. No significant differences in interleukin-1β or interleukin-6 concentrations in PLF were observed between the 2 groups. However, tumor necrosis factor-α level in PLF was significantly lower in the Gln group than in the control group on postoperative d 3. CONCLUSION: TPN supplemented with Gln can improve the nitrogen balance, and enhance macrophage phagocytic activity at the site of injury. However, Gln supplementation has no

  17. Anabolic therapy with growth hormone accelerates protein gain in surgical patients requiring nutritional rehabilitation.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, T A; Morrissey, T B; Gatzen, C; Benfell, K; Nattakom, T V; Scheltinga, M R; LeBoff, M S; Ziegler, T R; Wilmore, D W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the effects of exogenous growth hormone (GH) on protein accretion and the composition of weight gain in a group of stable, nutritionally compromised postoperative patients receiving standard hypercaloric nutritional therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A significant loss of body protein impairs normal physiologic functions and is associated with increased postoperative complications and prolonged hospitalization. Previous studies have demonstrated that standard methods of nutritional support enhance the deposition of fat and extracellular water but are ineffective in repleting body protein. METHODS: Fourteen patients requiring long-term nutritional support for severe gastrointestinal dysfunction received standard nutritional therapy (STD) providing approximately 50 kcal/kg/day and 2 g of protein/kg/day during an initial 7-day equilibrium period. The patients then continued on STD (n = 4) or, in addition, received GH 0.14 mg/kg/day (n = 10). On day 7 of the equilibrium period and again after 3 weeks of treatment, the components of body weight were determined; these included body fat, mineral content, lean (nonfat and nonmineral-containing tissue) mass, total body water, extracellular water (ECW), and body protein. Daily and cumulative nutrient balance and substrate oxidation studies determined the distribution, efficiency, and utilization of calories for protein, fat, and carbohydrate deposition. RESULTS: The GH-treated patients gained minimal body fat but had significantly more lean mass (4.311 +/- 0.6 kg vs. 1.988 +/- 0.2 kg, p < or = 0.03) and more protein (1.417 +/- 0.3 kg vs. 0.086 +/- 0.1 kg, p < or = 0.03) than did the STD-treated patients. The increase in lean mass was not associated with an inappropriate expansion of ECW. In contrast, patients receiving STD therapy tended to deposit a greater proportion of body weight as ECW and significantly more fat than did GH-treated patients (1.004 +/- 0.3 kg vs. 0.129 +/- 0.2 kg, p < 0

  18. [Determination of 11 anabolic hormones in fish tissue by multi-function impurity adsorption solid-phase extraction-ultrafast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shanshan; Zhao, Yonggang; Li, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiaohong; Jin, Micong

    2012-06-01

    A method was developed for the determination of 11 anabolic hormones (boldenone, androstenedione, nandrolone, methandrostenolone, methyltestosterone, testosterone, testosterone acetate, trenbolone, testosterone propionate, stanozolol, fluoxymesterone) in fish by multi-function impurity adsorption solid-phase extraction-ultrafast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. After the sample was extracted by methanol, the extract was cleaned-up quickly by C18 adsorbent, neutral alumina adsorbent and amino-functionalized nano-adsorbent. The separation was performed on a Shim-Pack XR-ODS II column (100 mm x 2.0 mm, 2.2 microm) using the mobile phases of 0.1% (v/v) formic acid in acetonitrile and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid solution in a gradient elution mode. The identification and quantification were achieved by using electrospray ionization in positive ion mode (ESI+) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The matrix-matched external standard calibration curves were used for quantitative determination. The results showed that the calibration curves were in good linearity for the eleven analytes with the correlation coefficients (r) more than 0.999. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N > 3) for the 11 anabolic hormones were from 0.03 microg/kg to 0.4 microg/kg and the limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N > 10) were from 0.1 microg/kg to 1.5 microg/kg. The average recoveries ranged from 80.9% to 98.1% with the relative standard deviations between 5.2% and 11.5%. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive, accurate and suitable for the quantitative determination and confirmation of the 11 anabolic hormones in fish. PMID:23016290

  19. Parathyroid Hormone (PTH)/PTH-related Peptide Type 1 Receptor (PPR) Signaling in Osteocytes Regulates Anabolic and Catabolic Skeletal Responses to PTH*

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Vaibhav; Marengi, Dean A.; Barry, Kevin J.; Fulzele, Keertik S.; Heiden, Erica; Liu, Xiaolong; Dedic, Christopher; Maeda, Akira; Lotinun, Sutada; Baron, Roland; Pajevic, Paola Divieti

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the only Food and Drug Administration-approved anabolic agent to treat osteoporosis; however, the cellular targets of PTH action in bone remain controversial. PTH modulates bone turnover by binding to the PTH/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) type 1 receptor (PPR), a G-protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in bone and kidneys. Osteocytes, the most abundant cells in adult bone, also express PPR. However, the physiological relevance of PPR signaling in osteocytes remains to be elucidated. Toward this goal, we generated mice with PPR deletion in osteocytes (Ocy-PPRKO). Skeletal analysis of these mice revealed a significant increase in bone mineral density and trabecular and cortical bone parameters. Osteoblast activities were reduced in these animals, as demonstrated by decreased collagen type I α1 mRNA and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression. Importantly, when subjected to an anabolic or catabolic PTH regimen, Ocy-PPRKO animals demonstrated blunted skeletal responses. PTH failed to suppress SOST/Sclerostin or induce RANKL expression in Ocy-PPRKO animals compared with controls. In vitro, osteoclastogenesis was significantly impaired in Ocy-PPRKO upon PTH administration, indicating that osteocytes control osteoclast formation through a PPR-mediated mechanism. Taken together, these data indicate that PPR signaling in osteocytes is required for bone remodeling, and receptor signaling in osteocytes is needed for anabolic and catabolic skeletal responses. PMID:23729679

  20. Anabolic and Catabolic Regimens of Human Parathyroid Hormone 1–34 Elicit Bone- and Envelope-Specific Attenuation of Skeletal Effects in Sost-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kedlaya, Rajendra; Ellis, Shana N.; Childress, Paul J.; Bidwell, Joseph P.; Bellido, Teresita; Turner, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    PTH is a potent calcium-regulating factor that has skeletal anabolic effects when administered intermittently or catabolic effects when maintained at consistently high levels. Bone cells express PTH receptors, but the cellular responses to PTH in bone are incompletely understood. Wnt signaling has recently been implicated in the osteo-anabolic response to the hormone. Specifically, the Sost gene, a major antagonist of Wnt signaling, is down-regulated by PTH exposure. We investigated this mechanism by treating Sost-deficient mice and their wild-type littermates with anabolic and catabolic regimens of PTH and measuring the skeletal responses. Male Sost+/+ and Sost−/− mice were injected daily with human PTH 1–34 (0, 30, or 90 μg/kg) for 6 wk. Female Sost+/+ and Sost−/− mice were continuously infused with vehicle or high-dose PTH (40 μg/kg · d) for 3 wk. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry-derived measures of intermittent PTH (iPTH)-induced bone gain were impaired in Sost−/− mice. Further probing revealed normal or enhanced iPTH-induced cortical bone formation rates but concomitant increases in cortical porosity among Sost−/− mice. Distal femur trabecular bone was highly responsive to iPTH in Sost−/− mice. Continuous PTH (cPTH) infusion resulted in equal bone loss in Sost+/+ and Sost−/− mice as measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. However, distal femur trabecular bone, but not lumbar spine trabecular bone, was spared the bone-wasting effects of cPTH in Sost−/− mice. These results suggest that changes in Sost expression are not required for iPTH-induced anabolism. iPTH-induced resorption of cortical bone might be overstimulated in Sost-deficient environments. Furthermore, Sost deletion protects some trabecular compartments, but not cortical compartments, from bone loss induced by high-dose PTH infusion. PMID:21652726

  1. Anabolic growth hormone action improves submaximal measures of physical performance in patients with HIV-associated wasting.

    PubMed

    Esposito, John G; Thomas, Scott G; Kingdon, Lori; Ezzat, Shereen

    2005-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses the muscle loss allegedly responsible for diminished aerobic capacity and increased fatigue in patients with HIV-associated wasting. This study examined whether submaximal measures of physical performance can be used as objective measures of the functional impact of GH treatment-induced anabolism. We randomized 27 HIV-positive men [mean (SD) age, 43.9 (7.2) yr; body mass, 71.9 (10.4) kg; BMI, 23.1 (2.8) kg/m2] with unintentional weight loss despite antiretroviral therapy to receive GH (6 mg) or placebo in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial with a 3-mo washout. Lean body mass (LBM), maximum oxygen uptake (Vo2 peak), ventilatory threshold (VeT), 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance and work, profile of mood states (POMS) fatigue and vigor scores, and Nottingham health profile (NHP) energy and physical mobility scores were measured. LBM significantly increased after 3 mo of GH treatment vs. placebo (means +/- SE, 3.7 +/- 0.6 vs. 0.3 +/- 0.4 kg; P < 0.001). VeT significantly improved (17.6 +/- 3.7 vs. -5.9 +/- 2.5%; P < 0.001), but Vo2 peak did not change significantly. 6MWT distance improved (24.9 +/- 9.7 vs. 19.9 +/- 11.6 m; P > 0.05) and 6MWT work increased significantly more after 3 mo of GH treatment (33.3 +/- 8.8 vs. 16.5 +/- 7.5 kJ; P < 0.05). POMS scores of fatigue and vigor and the NHP score of energy improved, yet the changes were not statistically significant. GH treatment improved VeT linearly to the increase in LBM (r =0.43, P = 0.037) and 6MWT work (r = 0.51, P = 0.008), and the increase in 6MWT work correlated with increase in LBM (r = 0.45, P = 0.024). Improvement in 6MWT work above the median (27.3 kJ) showed a decrease in fatigue (r = -0.62, P = 0.024). We concluded that GH treatment-induced LBM gains in HIV-associated wasting were functionally relevant, as determined by effort-independent submaximal measures of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. PMID:15886228

  2. Loss of Gsα in the Postnatal Skeleton Leads to Low Bone Mass and a Blunted Response to Anabolic Parathyroid Hormone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Partha; Aarnisalo, Piia; Chubb, Rhiannon; Poulton, Ingrid J; Guo, Jun; Nachtrab, Gregory; Kimura, Takaharu; Swami, Srilatha; Saeed, Hamid; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Schipani, Ernestina; Sims, Natalie A; Kronenberg, Henry M; Wu, Joy Y

    2016-01-22

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an important regulator of osteoblast function and is the only anabolic therapy currently approved for treatment of osteoporosis. The PTH receptor (PTH1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that signals via multiple G proteins including Gsα. Mice expressing a constitutively active mutant PTH1R exhibited a dramatic increase in trabecular bone that was dependent upon expression of Gsα in the osteoblast lineage. Postnatal removal of Gsα in the osteoblast lineage (P-Gsα(OsxKO) mice) yielded markedly reduced trabecular and cortical bone mass. Treatment with anabolic PTH(1-34) (80 μg/kg/day) for 4 weeks failed to increase trabecular bone volume or cortical thickness in male and female P-Gsα(OsxKO) mice. Surprisingly, in both male and female mice, PTH administration significantly increased osteoblast numbers and bone formation rate in both control and P-Gsα(OsxKO) mice. In mice that express a mutated PTH1R that activates adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A (PKA) via Gsα but not phospholipase C via Gq/11 (D/D mice), PTH significantly enhanced bone formation, indicating that phospholipase C activation is not required for increased bone turnover in response to PTH. Therefore, although the anabolic effect of intermittent PTH treatment on trabecular bone volume is blunted by deletion of Gsα in osteoblasts, PTH can stimulate osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Together these findings suggest that alternative signaling pathways beyond Gsα and Gq/11 act downstream of PTH on osteoblast differentiation. PMID:26598522

  3. The Relationships between Anabolic Hormones and Body Composition in Middle-Aged and Elderly Men with Prediabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Rabijewski, Michał; Papierska, Lucyna; Piątkiewicz, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The influence of anabolic hormones and body composition in men with prediabetes (PD) is unknown. In a cross-sectional study we investigated the relationships between total testosterone (TT), calculated free testosterone (cFT), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and body composition assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method in 84 patients with PD (40–80 years) and 56 men in control group. Patients with PD had lower TT, cFT, and DHEAS levels but similar IGF-1 levels in both groups. Patients with PD presented the higher total and abdominal fat as well as the lower total and abdominal lean than control (p < 0.02, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, and p < 0.02, resp.). We observed negative relationship between TT and total fat (p = 0.014) and positive with abdominal lean mass (p = 0.034), while cFT was negatively associated with abdominal (p = 0.02), trunk (p = 0.024), and leg fat (p = 0.037) and positively associated with total (p = 0.022) and trunk lean (p = 0.024). DHEAS were negatively associated with total fat (p = 0.045), and IGF-1 were positively associated with abdominal (p = 0.003) and leg lean (p = 0.015). In conclusion, the lowered anabolic hormones are involved in body composition rearrangement in men with PD. Further studies are needed to establish whether the androgen replacement therapy would be beneficial in men with PD. PMID:27274996

  4. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  5. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  6. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  7. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  8. 21 CFR 1308.34 - Exempt anabolic steroid products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exempt anabolic steroid products. 1308.34 Section... SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.34 Exempt anabolic steroid products. The list of compounds, mixtures, or preparations that contain an anabolic steroid that have been exempted by the...

  9. Anabolic interventions in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Storer, Thomas W

    2009-11-01

    ESRD produces a chronic catabolic state that results in significant skeletal muscle atrophy, weakness, and physical dysfunction. Any intervention that can ameliorate this process can significantly improve quality of life. Some studies have shown that endurance exercise training, even at low intensities, may exhibit anabolic effects and improved physical function. However, resistance exercise training is of primary interest as an anabolic intervention because it is the mode of exercise that is most efficacious in stimulating anabolic responses, improved muscle performance, and physical function. A relatively small number of controlled trials of resistance training in ESRD patients have failed to show significant changes in LBM, although some studies have shown significant improvements in other markers of anabolism. Increases in muscle strength with resistance training are typical but improved physical function, either by objective measurement or self-report, are equivocal. Study durations, loads used during training, and relatively small sample sizes may in part explain the inability of previous studies to observe more substantial changes in LBM and physical function. Androgens and growth hormone have been shown to significantly improve LBM and strength, although longer-term studies for safety and efficacy are necessary before their general recommendation for patients with ESRD. PMID:19801139

  10. Basal Bone Phenotype and Increased Anabolic Responses to Intermittent Parathyroid Hormone in Healthy Male COX-2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Manshan; Choudhary, Shilpa; Voznesensky, Olga; Gao, Qi; Adams, Douglas; Diaz-Doran, Vilmaris; Wu, Qian; Goltzman, David; Raisz, Lawrence G.; Pilbeam, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) knockout (KO) mice in inbred strains can have renal dysfunction with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPTH), making direct effects of COX-2 KO on bone difficult to assess. COX-2 KO mice in an outbred CD-1 background did not have renal dysfunction but still had two-fold elevated PTH compared to wild type (WT) mice. Compared to WT mice, KO mice had increased serum markers of bone turnover, decreased femoral bone mineral density (BMD) and cortical bone thickness, but no differences in trabecular bone volume by μCT or dynamic histomorphometry. Because PTH is a potent inducer of COX-2 and prostaglandin (PG) production, we examined effects of COX-2 KO on bone responses after three weeks of intermittent PTH. Intermittent PTH increased femoral BMD and cortical bone area more in KO mice than in WT mice and increased trabecular bone volume in the distal femur in both WT and KO mice. Although not statistically significant, PTH-stimulated increases in trabecular bone tended to be greater in KO mice than in WT mice. PTH increased serum markers of bone formation and resorption more in KO than in WT mice but increased the ratio of osteoblastic surface to osteoclastic surface only in KO mice. PTH also increased femoral mineral apposition rates and bone formation rates in KO mice more than in WT mice. Acute mRNA responses to PTH of genes that might mediate some anabolic and catabolic effects of PTH tended to be greater in KO than WT mice. We conclude that (1) the basal bone phenotype in male COX-2 KO mice might reflect HPTH, COX-2 deficiency or both, and (2) increased responses to intermittent PTH in COX-2 KO mice, despite the presence of chronic HPTH, suggest that absence of COX-2 increased sensitivity to PTH. It is possible that manipulation of endogenous PGs could have important clinical implications for anabolic therapy with PTH. PMID:20471507

  11. The anabolic action of intermittent parathyroid hormone on cortical bone depends partly on its ability to induce nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gohin, S; Carriero, A; Chenu, C; Pitsillides, A A; Arnett, T R; Marenzana, M

    2016-03-01

    There is strong evidence that vasodilatory nitric oxide (NO) donors have anabolic effects on bone in humans. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), the only osteoanabolic drug currently approved, is also a vasodilator. We investigated whether the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME might alter the effect of PTH on bone by blocking its vasodilatory effect. BALB/c mice received 28 daily injections of PTH[1-34] (80 µg/kg/day) or L-NAME (30 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination. Hindlimb blood perfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging. Bone architecture, turnover and mechanical properties in the femur were analysed respectively by micro-CT, histomorphometry and three-point bending. PTH increased hindlimb blood flow by >30% within 10 min of injection (P < 0.001). Co-treatment with L-NAME blocked the action of PTH on blood flow, whereas L-NAME alone had no effect. PTH treatment increased femoral cortical bone volume and formation rate by 20% and 110%, respectively (P < 0.001). PTH had no effect on trabecular bone volume in the femoral metaphysis although trabecular thickness and number were increased and decreased by 25%, respectively. Co-treatment with L-NAME restricted the PTH-stimulated increase in cortical bone formation but had no clear-cut effects in trabecular bone. Co-treatment with L-NAME did not affect the mechanical strength in femurs induced by iPTH. These results suggest that NO-mediated vasorelaxation plays partly a role in the anabolic action of PTH on cortical bone. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26834008

  12. Nmp4/CIZ suppresses the response of bone to anabolic parathyroid hormone by regulating both osteoblasts and osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Childress, Paul; Philip, Binu K.; Robling, Alexander G.; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Kacena, Melissa A.; Bivi, Nicoletta; Plotkin, Lilian I.; Heller, Aaron; Bidwell, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    How parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases bone mass is unclear but understanding this phenomenon is significant to the improvement of osteoporosis therapy. Nmp4/CIZ is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling transcriptional repressor that suppresses PTH-induced osteoblast gene expression and hormone-stimulated gains in murine femoral trabecular bone. To further characterize Nmp4/CIZ suppression of hormone-mediated bone growth we treated 10 wk-old Nmp4-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice with intermittent human PTH (1-34) at 30μg/kg/day or vehicle, 7 days/wk, for 2, 3, or 7 wks. Null mice treated with hormone (7 wks) gained more vertebral and tibial cancellous bone than WT animals paralleling the exaggerated response in the femur. Interestingly, Nmp4/CIZ suppression of this hormone-stimulated bone formation was not apparent during the first 2 wks of treatment. Consistent with the null mice enhanced PTH-stimulated addition of trabecular bone these animals exhibited an augmented hormone-induced increase in serum osteocalcin 3 wks into treatment. Unexpectedly the Nmp4-KO mice displayed an osteoclast phenotype. Serum C-terminal telopeptides, a marker for bone resorption, was elevated in the null mice, irrespective of treatment. Nmp4-KO bone marrow cultures produced more osteoclasts, which exhibited an elevated resorbing activity, compared to WT cultures. The expression of several genes critical to the development of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts were elevated in Nmp4-KO mice at 2 wks but not 3 wks of hormone exposure. We propose that Nmp4/CIZ dampens PTH-induced improvement of trabecular bone throughout the skeleton by transiently suppressing hormone-stimulated increases in the expression of proteins key to the required enhanced activity/number of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:21607813

  13. Nmp4/CIZ suppresses the response of bone to anabolic parathyroid hormone by regulating both osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Childress, Paul; Philip, Binu K; Robling, Alexander G; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Kacena, Melissa A; Bivi, Nicoletta; Plotkin, Lilian I; Heller, Aaron; Bidwell, Joseph P

    2011-07-01

    How parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases bone mass is unclear, but understanding this phenomenon is significant to the improvement of osteoporosis therapy. Nmp4/CIZ is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling transcriptional repressor that suppresses PTH-induced osteoblast gene expression and hormone-stimulated gains in murine femoral trabecular bone. To further characterize Nmp4/CIZ suppression of hormone-mediated bone growth, we treated 10-week-old Nmp4-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice with intermittent human PTH(1-34) at 30 μg/kg daily or vehicle, 7 days/week, for 2, 3, or 7 weeks. Null mice treated with hormone (7 weeks) gained more vertebral and tibial cancellous bone than WT animals, paralleling the exaggerated response in the femur. Interestingly, Nmp4/CIZ suppression of this hormone-stimulated bone formation was not apparent during the first 2 weeks of treatment. Consistent with the null mice enhanced PTH-stimulated addition of trabecular bone, these animals exhibited an augmented hormone-induced increase in serum osteocalcin 3 weeks into treatment. Unexpectedly, the Nmp4-KO mice displayed an osteoclast phenotype. Serum C-terminal telopeptide, a marker for bone resorption, was elevated in the null mice, irrespective of treatment. Nmp4-KO bone marrow cultures produced more osteoclasts, which exhibited elevated resorbing activity, compared to WT cultures. The expression of several genes critical to the development of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts was elevated in Nmp4-KO mice at 2 weeks, but not 3 weeks, of hormone exposure. We propose that Nmp4/CIZ dampens PTH-induced improvement of trabecular bone throughout the skeleton by transiently suppressing hormone-stimulated increases in the expression of proteins key to the required enhanced activity and number of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:21607813

  14. Anabolic steroid boosts weight.

    PubMed

    1996-09-01

    A randomized study of nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin) showed that the anabolic steroid can increase weight in people with HIV infections. The group receiving nandrolone experienced a greater increase both in fat-free mass and body cell mass (although the latter measure did not reach statistical significance) than those on placebo. Deca-Durabolin had little to do with two occurrences of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in the study group, but until further studies are completed, caution is advised when using this steroid in patients with KS. A new study comparing nandrolone to growth hormone in patients with wasting is slated to begin in the next 3 or 4 months. PMID:11363845

  15. Small molecule inhibitors of the Dishevelled-CXXC5 interaction are new drug candidates for bone anabolic osteoporosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Yi; Choi, Sehee; Yoon, Ji-Hye; Lim, Hwan Jung; Lee, Hyuk; Choi, Jiwon; Ro, Eun Ji; Heo, Jung-Nyoung; Lee, Weontae; No, Kyoung Tai; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2016-01-01

    Bone anabolic agents promoting bone formation and rebuilding damaged bones would ideally overcome the limitations of anti-resorptive therapy, the current standard prescription for osteoporosis. However, the currently prescribed parathyroid hormone (PTH)-based anabolic drugs present limitations and adverse effects including osteosarcoma during long-term use. Also, the antibody-based anabolic drugs that are currently being developed present the potential limits in clinical application typical of macromolecule drugs. We previously identified that CXXC5 is a negative feedback regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway via its interaction with Dishevelled (Dvl) and suggested the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction as a potential target for anabolic therapy of osteoporosis. Here, we screened small-molecule inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction via a newly established in vitro assay system. The screened compounds were found to activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and enhance osteoblast differentiation in primary osteoblasts. The bone anabolic effects of the compounds were shown using ex vivo-cultured calvaria. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titration analysis confirmed interaction between Dvl PDZ domain and KY-02061, a representative of the screened compounds. Oral administration of KY-02327, one of 55 newly synthesized KY-02061 analogs, successfully rescued bone loss in the ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model. In conclusion, small-molecule inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction that block negative feedback regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling are potential candidates for the development of bone anabolic anti-osteoporosis drugs. PMID:26941261

  16. The standardization of nonsterile compounding: a study in quality control and assessment for hormone compounding.

    PubMed

    Wiley, T S; Odegard, R D; Raden, J; Haraldsen, J T

    2014-01-01

    Sterile and nonsterile compounding of medication has attracted much attention over the last few years due to the onset of various infections and negative compounding practices. This paper reports on the standardization of compounded hormones utilizing the Wiley Protocol, which provides nonsynthetic bioidentical estradiol, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and testosterone in a transdermal topical cream base for women and men in a standardized dosing regimen. Here, we present data from 2008 through 2012, which details the process of standardization and quality testing of the hormones through submission of random compounded samples for quality control and assessment. Pharmacies delivering the Wiley Protocol were required to follow the same compounding formulation, as well as submit random samples for quarterly testing. Sample concentrations were tested using high-performance liquid chromatography. We found that pharmacies that submitted samples had a 91% passing rating with a percent of target of 98.6% +/- 8.4%. It was also determined that pharmacies that prepared more compounded cream had a higher passing rating than those that prepared limited quantities. We found that standardization across multiple pharmacies could be achieved through quarterly testing of submitted samples by a third-party laboratory when following necessary procedures as defined by the Wiley Protocol. It was also determined that experience and training were a critical factor in the mixing of compounded prescriptions, with high consistency and accuracy providing patient safety. PMID:24881121

  17. 21 CFR 1308.33 - Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.33 Exemption of certain anabolic... compound, mixture, or preparation containing an anabolic steroid as defined in part 1300 of this...

  18. Bioassays of Compounds with Potential Juvenoid Activity on Drosophila melanogaster: Juvenile Hormone III, Bisepoxide Juvenile Hormone III and Methyl Farnesoates

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, Lawrence G.; Song, Ki-Duck; Casas, Josephina; Schuurmans, A.; Kuwano, Eichii; Kachman, Stephen D.; Riddiford, Lynn M.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolites of the 6,7,10,11 bisepoxide juvenile hormone III (JHB3), and other potential juvenoids, were tested for juvenile hormone activity using early instar or early stage pupae of Drosophila melanogaster. Importantly, methyl farnesoates were tested as they might have JH-like activity on Dipteran juveniles. Larvae were exposed to compounds in medium, or the compounds were applied to white puparia. In the assays employed in the present study, there was no indication for JH activity associated with the metabolites of JHB3. The activity of methyl farnesoate (MF) was higher than that of JH III and far greater than bisepoxide JH III. As opposed to the two endogenous juvenile hormones, methyl farnesoate has weak activity in the white puparial bioassaay. When fluorinated forms of methyl farnesoate, which is unlikely to be converted to JH, were applied to Drosophila medium to which fly eggs were introduced, there was a high degree of larval mortality, but no evidence of subsequent mortality at the pupal stage. One possible explanation for the results is that methyl farnesoate is active as a hormone in larval stages, but has little activity at the pupal stage where only juvenile hormone has a major effect. PMID:20599543

  19. Mind Over Matter: Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Term(s): Teachers / NIDA Teaching Guide / Mind Over Matter Teaching Guide and Series / Anabolic Steroids Print Mind Over Matter: Anabolic Steroids Order Free Publication in: English Spanish Download PDF 830.69 KB Anabolic steroids are ...

  20. The bone anabolic therapy.

    PubMed

    Nardi, A; Ventura, L; Cozzi, L; Tonini, G; Zennaro, R; Celi, M; Ramazzina, E

    2013-10-01

    Teriparatide (TPTD), the amino-terminal parathyroid hormone recombinant peptide [PTH (1–34)], is a drug with a proven anabolic action on the bone, effective in preventing vertebral and non-vertebral fragility fractures. Recent publications have investigated in great detail the TPTD action on the cortical bone, highlighting the increased strength in the critical zone of the hip with high risk of fracture in osteoporotic patients Poole (PLoS ONE 6:e16190, 2011). In November 2002, TPTD was approved by the FDA for use in post-menopausal women and men with osteoporosis at high risk of fracture and in patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and, since then, has been used to treat more than 1 million patients worldwide (J Bone Miner Res 27(12):2429-2437, 2012). The unchanged safety profile and the well-known mechanism of action of this drug have led doctors to explore the use of TPTD in other conditions such as delayed fracture healing, non-union, osteonecrosis of the jaw, etc. The positive reports that have resulted from these studies are helping to hypothesize a new perspective on the wider use of this drug, but warrant further clinical investigation to consolidate these results. PMID:24078441

  1. Compounded bioidentical hormone therapy: identifying use trends and knowledge gaps among US women

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Santoro, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Two surveys (Harris and Rose surveys) were conducted to quantify the use of compounded hormone therapy (CHT; or bioidentical hormone therapy) among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women in the United States, to assess women's knowledge of CHT versus Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved hormone therapy, and to gather information on menopausal experience. Methods: The Harris survey was administered to 801 women aged 45 to 60 years who had experienced at least one menopausal symptom. The Rose survey was administered to 2,044 women aged 40 years or older who were ever users of hormone therapy. Women were queried about menopausal symptoms, hormone therapy use, and knowledge of CHT. Findings from the Rose survey were extrapolated using US Census Bureau data and prescription claims for FDA-approved hormone therapy to estimate the prevalence of CHT use. Results: According to extrapolations using Rose data, up to 2.5 million US women aged 40 years or older may use CHT annually, accounting for 28% to 68% of hormone therapy prescriptions. Harris data showed that 86% of women surveyed were unaware that CHT products are not FDA-approved. The Rose survey asked a subset of 1,771 women whether their hormone therapy had been personalized based on hormone levels; 21% (378) answered “yes” whereas 27% (476) did not know. In both surveys, most hormone therapy users stated that their physician had recommended the treatment. Conclusions: We estimate that 1 million to 2.5 million US women aged 40 years or older use CHT. The data suggest that many women are unaware that compounded hormones have not been evaluated or approved by the FDA. Providers have an educational opportunity to ensure that women considering hormone therapy understand the risks and benefits of inadequately regulated CHT. PMID:25692877

  2. Anabolic effect of the traditional Chinese medicine compound tanshinone IIA on myotube hypertrophy is mediated by estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Piwen; Soukup, Sebastian Tobias; Hegevoss, Jonas; Ngueu, Sandrine; Kulling, Sabine Emma; Diel, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle loss during menopause is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes type II and the general development of the metabolic syndrome. Therefore, strategies combining nutritional and training interventions to prevent muscle loss are necessary. Danshen Si Wu is a traditional Chinese medicine used for menopausal complains. One of the main compounds of Danshen Si Wu is tanshinone IIA. Physiological effects of tanshinone IIA have been described as being mediated via the estrogen receptor. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine its tissue specific ERα- and ERβ-mediated estrogenic activity, to investigate its antiestrogenic properties, and, particularly, to study estrogen receptor-mediated biological responses to tanshinone IIA on skeletal muscle cells. The purity of tanshinone IIA was analyzed by LC-DAD-MS/MS analysis. ERα/ERβ-mediated activity was dose-dependently analyzed in HEK 239 cells transfected with ERα or ERβ expression vectors and respective reporter genes. Androgenic, antiandrogenic, and antiestrogenic properties of tanshinone IIA were analyzed in a yeast reporter gene assay. The effects of tanshinone IIA on proliferation and cell cycle distribution were investigated in ERα positive T47D breast cancer cells. The ability of tanshinone IIA to stimulate estrogen receptor-mediated myotube hypertrophy was studied in C2C12 myoblastoma cells. Our data show that tanshinone IIA is quite potent at stimulating ERα and ERβ reporter genes with comparable efficacy. Tanshinone IIA displayed antiestrogenic and also antiandrogenic properties in a yeast reporter gene assay. It inhibited the growth of T47D breast cancer cells by suppressing proliferation and arresting the cells in G0/G1. Tanshinone IIA also stimulated the hypertrophy of C2C12 myotubes via an estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism. Summarizing our results, tanshinone IIA can be characterized as an estrogen receptor partial agonist with antiandrogenic properties. It

  3. Research of stimulants and anabolic steroids in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Baume, N; Mahler, N; Kamber, M; Mangin, P; Saugy, M

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the composition of 103 dietary supplements bought on the internet. The supplements were dispatched in four different categories according to their announced contents [creatine, prohormones, "mental enhancers" and branched chain amino acids (BCAA)]. All the supplements were screened for the presence of stimulants and main anabolic steroids parent compounds. At the same time, the research was focused on the precursors and metabolites of testosterone and nandrolone. The study pointed out three products containing an anabolic steroid, metandienone, in a very high amount. The ingestion of such products induced a high quantity of metandienone metabolites in urines that would be considered as a positive antidoping test. The results have also shown that one creatine product and three "mental enhancers" contained traces of hormones or prohormones not claimed on the labels and 14 prohormone products contained substances other than those indicated by the manufacturer. The oral intake of the creatine product revealed the presence of the two main nandrolone metabolites (19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone) in urine. PMID:16430680

  4. Selling androgenic anabolic steroids by the pound: identification and analysis of popular websites on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Cordaro, F G; Lombardo, S; Cosentino, M

    2011-12-01

    Internet websites offering androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) were identified and available products were examined. Keywords for the website search were: "anabolic steroids," "anabolic steroids buy," "anabolic steroid purchase." The first 10 websites offering AAS in the first 10 pages of results were considered. At least two AAS-containing products per website were selected. Thirty AAS-selling websites were identified, mainly located in the United States (46.7%) and Europe (30%). Most websites sold other anabolic/ergogenic products (clenbuterol, 76.7%; GH/IGF, 60.0%; thyroid hormones, 46.7%; erythropoietin, 30.0%; insulin, 20.0%) or products for AAS-related adverse effects (mainly: estrogen antagonists, 63.3%; products for erectile dysfunction, 56.7%; 5α-reductase inhibitors, 33.3%; anti-acne products, 33.3%). AAS were sold as medicines (69.6%) or as dietary supplements (30.4%). AAS in medicines were mainly: nandronole (20.4%), methandrostenolone (18.4%), and testosterone (12.2%). Dietary supplements contained mainly DHEA and included several fake compounds. Manufacturers were declared for 97.9% of medicines and 66.7% of dietary supplements; however, several manufacturers were not found on the Internet. Described benefits were usually few adverse effects and no estrogenicity. Toxicity was seldom reported and presented as mild. Recommended doses were two-fourfold higher than current medical recommendations. In conclusion, misleading information and deceiving practices were common findings on AAS-selling websites, indicating their deleterious potential for public health. PMID:21210860

  5. Anabolic steroids and acute schizophrenic episode.

    PubMed

    Annitto, W J; Layman, W A

    1980-04-01

    The use of anabolic steroids by athletes to increase physical performance has vastly increased over the last 10 years. A case is described which temporally relates the use of these organic compounds with the development of an acute schizophreniform illness. The dearth of literature on this particular "side-effect" is noted, as are the diagnostic implications vis-a-vis anabolic steroids and the anamnestic interview in an athlete who presents with an acute schizophrenic mental status examination. Recommendation is made to consider this "side-effect" in differential diagnosis of schizophrenic episode. PMID:7364737

  6. Ecdysteroids: A novel class of anabolic agents?

    PubMed Central

    Botrè, F; Naß, A; Hengevoss, J; Diel, P; Wolber, G

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of dietary supplements with ecdysteroids are marketed as “natural anabolic agents”. Results of recent studies suggested that their anabolic effect is mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) binding. Within this study the anabolic potency of ecdysterone was compared to well characterized anabolic substances. Effects on the fiber sizes of the soleus muscle in rats as well the diameter of C2C12 derived myotubes were used as biological readouts. Ecdysterone exhibited a strong hypertrophic effect on the fiber size of rat soleus muscle that was found even stronger compared to the test compounds metandienone (dianabol), estradienedione (trenbolox), and SARM S 1, all administered in the same dose (5 mg/kg body weight, for 21 days). In C2C12 myotubes ecdysterone (1 µM) induced a significant increase of the diameter comparable to dihydrotestosterone (1 µM) and IGF 1 (1.3 nM). Molecular docking experiments supported the ERβ mediated action of ecdysterone. To clarify its status in sports, ecdysterone should be considered to be included in the class “S1.2 Other Anabolic Agents” of the list of prohibited substances of the World Anti-Doping Agency. PMID:26060342

  7. Ecdysteroids: A novel class of anabolic agents?

    PubMed

    Parr, M K; Botrè, F; Naß, A; Hengevoss, J; Diel, P; Wolber, G

    2015-06-01

    Increasing numbers of dietary supplements with ecdysteroids are marketed as "natural anabolic agents". Results of recent studies suggested that their anabolic effect is mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) binding. Within this study the anabolic potency of ecdysterone was compared to well characterized anabolic substances. Effects on the fiber sizes of the soleus muscle in rats as well the diameter of C2C12 derived myotubes were used as biological readouts. Ecdysterone exhibited a strong hypertrophic effect on the fiber size of rat soleus muscle that was found even stronger compared to the test compounds metandienone (dianabol), estradienedione (trenbolox), and SARM S 1, all administered in the same dose (5 mg/kg body weight, for 21 days). In C2C12 myotubes ecdysterone (1 µM) induced a significant increase of the diameter comparable to dihydrotestosterone (1 µM) and IGF 1 (1.3 nM). Molecular docking experiments supported the ERβ mediated action of ecdysterone. To clarify its status in sports, ecdysterone should be considered to be included in the class "S1.2 Other Anabolic Agents" of the list of prohibited substances of the World Anti-Doping Agency. PMID:26060342

  8. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  9. Impact of Four Weeks of a Multi-Ingredient Performance Supplement on Muscular Strength, Body Composition, and Anabolic Hormones in Resistance-Trained Young Men.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, Vince C; Allman, Brittany R; Kinsey, Amber W; Moffatt, Robert J; Hickner, Robert C; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Although multi-ingredient performance supplements (MIPS) have increased in popularity because of their array of ergogenic ingredients, their efficacy and safety remain in question. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of supplementation with T+ (SUP; Onnit Labs, Austin, TX, USA), an MIPS containing long jack root, beta-alanine, and branched-chain amino acids, and other proprietary blends, on strength, body composition, and hormones in young resistance-trained men. Subjects were randomized to consume either T+ (SUP; n = 14; age, 21 ± 3 years; body fat, 18.3 ± 4.7%) or an isocaloric placebo (PL; n = 13; age, 21 ± 3 years; body fat, 21.5 ± 6.2%) for 4 weeks. Both groups underwent a progressive, 4-week high-intensity resistance training protocol. Before and after the training protocol, mood state, body composition, blood hormones (also collected at midpoint), and maximal strength were measured. SUP had significantly greater increases in bench press (SUP, 102 ± 16 kg to 108 ± 16 kg vs. PL, 96 ± 22 kg to 101 ± 22 kg; p < 0.001) and total weight lifted (SUP, 379 ± 59 kg to 413 ± 60 kg vs. PL, 376 ± 70 kg to 400 ± 75 kg; p < 0.001) compared with PL. Additionally, deadlift strength relative to total body mass (calculated as weight lifted/body mass; kg:kg) (2.08 ± 0.18 to 2.23 ± 0.16; p = 0.036) and lean mass (2.55 ± 0.19 to 2.72 ± 0.16; p = 0.021) increased significantly in SUP but not PL (2.02 ± 0.30 to 2.15 ± 0.36 and 2.56 ± 0.31 to 2.70 ± 0.36, respectively). No other significant differences were detected between groups for the remaining variables. Supplementing with SUP enhanced resistance training adaptations independent of hormonal status, and thus SUP use may warrant inclusion into peri-workout nutrition regimens. This study was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT01971723). PMID:26595135

  10. Prenatal exposure to perfluorinated compounds affects thyroid hormone levels in newborn girls.

    PubMed

    Shah-Kulkarni, Surabhi; Kim, Byung-Mi; Hong, Yun-Chul; Kim, Hae Soon; Kwon, Eun Jin; Park, Hyesook; Kim, Young Ju; Ha, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are ubiquitous in the environment and have been detected in humans and wildlife. Exposure to PFCs has decreased in the United States recently, while exposure to PFCs continues in Asian countries, which represents a public health concern. Various mechanisms by which PFCs affect fetal growth have been proposed, such as activation of peroxisome proliferators, disruption of thyroid hormones and changes in lipid metabolism. However, the overall evidence for an association with thyroid hormones is not strong. Therefore, we examined the effect of various prenatal PFCs on cord blood thyroid hormones: triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, and explored the endocrine disrupting effect of these PFCs on thyroid hormone levels in children according to gender. Two hundred and seventy-nine study participants were selected from among the enrolled participants in the Ewha Birth & Growth Retrospective Cohort, a retrospective birth cohort study conducted at Ewha Womans University Hospital, Seoul, Korea between 2006 and 2010. A generalized linear model was constructed to explore the association of PFCs and thyroid hormones. Further, an analysis stratified by gender was conducted. Our study shows that cord blood perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA) was positively associated with cord blood T4 (p=0.01) level. Gender-specific analysis showed that prenatal PFCs: PFPeA and Perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) exposure significantly increased T4 (p<0.01) and T3 (p=0.03), respectively, while perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) decreased TSH (p=0.04) concentration in newborn girls. Thus, prenatal PFC exposure may disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in fetal development and may have gender specific action. Hence, these results are of utmost importance in high-risk groups, such as pregnant women and children. PMID:27395336

  11. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Ryan, Joseph N; Barber, Larry B

    2011-09-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (K(om), L kg(-1)) for 17β-estradiol (10(2.5-2.8) L kg(-1)), 17α-ethynylestradiol (10(2.5-2.9) L kg(-1)), 4-nonylphenol (10(3.4-4.6) L kg(-1)), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (10(3.5-4.0) L kg(-1)), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (10(3.9-4.3) L kg(-1)). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17β-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for

  12. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, J.H.; Ryan, J.N.; Barber, L.B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (K om, L kg-1) for 17??-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17??-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg -1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17??-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  13. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey H.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Barber, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (Kom, L kg-1) for 17β-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17α-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17β-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  14. Compounded non-FDA–approved menopausal hormone therapy prescriptions have increased: results of a pharmacy survey

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Constantine, Ginger D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: From a survey of compounding pharmacists, specific questions regarding compounded menopausal hormone therapy were used to estimate compounded hormone therapy (CHT) prescribing in the United States. Methods: A national online survey was conducted by Rose Research—a market research company consisting of 12,250 US pharmacists from independent community pharmacies (ICPs) and compounding pharmacies (CPs). Pharmacists who completed the survey and met the prespecified criteria were eligible. Data from the survey were extrapolated to estimate overall CHT prescription volume and annual costs of CHT prescriptions for the United States based upon industry data from the National Community Pharmacists Association and IBISWorld. Results: Surveys were completed by 483 pharmacies, including 365 ICPs and 118 CPs. On the basis of the survey responses and extrapolated industry data, an estimated 26 to 33 million CHT prescriptions were filled annually, with total sales estimated at $1.3 to $1.6 billion. CPs (vs ICPs) accounted for a higher proportion of CHT prescriptions. More than half of the ICPs (52%) and CPs (75%) expected continued compounding business growth, with most predicting 5% to 25% growth within 2 years, despite the potential effect of restrictive legislation regarding compounding. Conclusions: On the basis of extrapolated data from numbers of prescriptions reported by pharmacists participating in the survey, the volume of CHT seems to approach that of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved menopausal hormone therapy, and growth in the CHT market is expected. Thus, physicians should educate themselves and the women consulting them about the differences between the FDA-approved and the less-tested CHT formulations. More research on the efficacy, safety, and consistency of non-FDA–approved CHT is needed. PMID:26645819

  15. Anabolic effect of plant brassinosteroid

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Debora; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Shapses, Sue; Raskin, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are plant-derived polyhydroxylated derivatives of 5a-cholestane, structurally similar to cholesterol-derived animal steroid hormones and insect ecdysteroids, with no known function in mammals. 28-Homobrassinolide (HB), a steroidal lactone with potent plant growth-promoting property, stimulated protein synthesis and inhibited protein degradation in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells (EC50 4 μM) mediated in part by PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Oral administration of HB (20 or 60 mg/kg/d for 24 d) to healthy rats fed normal diet (protein content 23.9%) increased food intake, body weight gain, lean body mass, and gastrocnemius muscle mass as compared with vehicle-treated controls. The effect of HB administration increased slightly in animals fed a high-protein diet (protein content 39.4%). Both oral (up to 60 mg/kg) and subcutaneous (up to 4 mg/kg) administration of HB showed low androgenic activity when tested in the Hershberger assay. Moreover, HB showed no direct binding to the androgen receptor in vitro. HB treatment was also associated with an improved physical fitness of untrained healthy rats, as evident from a 6.7% increase in lower extremity strength, measured by grip test. In the gastrocnemius muscle of castrated animals, HB treatment significantly increased the number of type IIa and IIb fibers and the cross-sectional area of type I and type IIa fibers. These findings suggest that oral application of HB triggers selective anabolic response with minimal or no androgenic side-effects and begin to elucidate the putative cellular targets for plant brassinosteroids in mammals.—Esposito, D., Komarnytsky, S., Shapses, S., Raskin, I. Anabolic effect of plant brassinosteroid. PMID:21746867

  16. Identification of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Active Compounds Using a Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Platform

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Jaime; Miller, Nicole; Mengeling, Brenda J.; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Houck, Keith; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.; Furlow, J. David; Murk, Albertinka J.

    2014-01-01

    To adapt the use of GH3.TRE-Luc reporter gene cell line for a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) platform, we miniaturized the reporter gene assay to a 1536-well plate format. 1280 chemicals from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) 1408 compound collection were analyzed to identify potential thyroid hormone receptor (TR) agonists and antagonists. Of the 2688 compounds tested, eight scored as potential TR agonists when the positive hit cut-off was defined at ≥10% efficacy, relative to maximal triiodothyronine (T3) induction, and with only one of those compounds reaching ≥20% efficacy. One common class of compounds positive in the agonist assays were retinoids such as all-trans retinoic acid, which are likely acting via the retinoid-X receptor, the heterodimer partner with the TR. Five potential TR antagonists were identified, including the antiallergy drug tranilast and the anxiolytic drug SB 205384 but also some cytotoxic compounds like 5-fluorouracil. None of the inactive compounds were structurally related to T3, nor had been reported elsewhere to be thyroid hormone disruptors, so false negatives were not detected. None of the low potency (>100µM) TR agonists resembled T3 or T4, thus these may not bind directly in the ligand-binding pocket of the receptor. For TR agonists, in the qHTS, a hit cut-off of ≥20% efficacy at 100 µM may avoid identification of positives with low or no physiological relevance. The miniaturized GH3.TRE-Luc assay offers a promising addition to the in vitro test battery for endocrine disruption, and given the low percentage of compounds testing positive, its high-throughput nature is an important advantage for future toxicological screening. PMID:24772387

  17. Project Right Way: An Anabolic Steroid Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June

    There is increasing concern by medical experts in this country about the use of anabolic steroids by teenagers. Over one million Americans are believed to be currently using or have used the synthetic hormones in the past. While drug testing and a reduction in the supply of the drugs appear to be reducing the number of adult users, use by…

  18. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal ...

  19. The effects of six weeks of supplementation with multi-ingredient performance supplements and resistance training on anabolic hormones, body composition, strength, and power in resistance-trained men

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance training (RT) enhances muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy while increasing strength and power. Some multi-ingredient performance supplements (MIPS) have been shown to augment the physiological improvements associated with RT. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of specific pre- and post-workout MIPS on anabolic hormones, body composition, muscle strength, and power in resistance-trained men participating in a periodized RT program. Methods Twenty-four ( mean ± SE; 24.0 ± 0.9 years; 180.5 ± 5.8 cm; 83.7 ± 0.5 kg) resistance-trained men completed 6 wks of periodized RT (3x/wk). Participants were assigned to one of two groups based upon maximal voluntary contraction of the quadriceps (Biodex) to lean mass (LM) ratio. Group 1 (n = 13; MIPS) consumed one serving of NO-Shotgun® (whey protein, casein protein, branched-chain amino acids, creatine, beta alanine, and caffeine) before each workout and one serving of NO-Synthesize® (whey protein, casein protein, branched-chain amino acids, creatine, and beta alanine; Vital Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Davie, FL) immediately after each workout and on non-RT days. Group 2 (n = 11; Placebo; PLA) consumed a flavor-matched isocaloric maltodextrin placebo. Serum insulin-like growth factor 1, human growth hormone, testosterone, body composition (DXA), circumferences, 1-repetition maximal strength (1RM) of the upper (chest press) and lower body (leg press), and anaerobic power (Wingate test) were assessed before and after the intervention. Statistical analysis included a 2 × 2 (group x time) ANOVA with repeated measures. Tukey LSD post hoc tests were used to examine pairwise differences. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results There was a main time effect (p = 0.035) for testosterone to increase, but no differences between groups were observed. There were no differences in the other blood hormones. Group x time interactions were observed for LM

  20. Pharmacology of anabolic steroids

    PubMed Central

    Kicman, A T

    2008-01-01

    Athletes and bodybuilders have recognized for several decades that the use of anabolic steroids can promote muscle growth and strength but it is only relatively recently that these agents are being revisited for clinical purposes. Anabolic steroids are being considered for the treatment of cachexia associated with chronic disease states, and to address loss of muscle mass in the elderly, but nevertheless their efficacy still needs to be demonstrated in terms of improved physical function and quality of life. In sport, these agents are performance enhancers, this being particularly apparent in women, although there is a high risk of virilization despite the favourable myotrophic–androgenic dissociation that many xenobiotic steroids confer. Modulation of androgen receptor expression appears to be key to partial dissociation, with consideration of both intracellular steroid metabolism and the topology of the bound androgen receptor interacting with co-activators. An anticatabolic effect, by interfering with glucocorticoid receptor expression, remains an attractive hypothesis. Behavioural changes by non-genomic and genomic pathways probably help motivate training. Anabolic steroids continue to be the most common adverse finding in sport and, although apparently rare, designer steroids have been synthesized in an attempt to circumvent the dope test. Doping with anabolic steroids can result in damage to health, as recorded meticulously in the former German Democratic Republic. Even so, it is important not to exaggerate the medical risks associated with their administration for sporting or bodybuilding purposes but to emphasize to users that an attitude of personal invulnerability to their adverse effects is certainly misguided. PMID:18500378

  1. Anabolic Steroid Use: Federal Efforts to Prevent and Reduce Anabolic Steroid Abuse among Teenagers. Report to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives. GAO-08-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Government Accountability Office, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The abuse of anabolic steroids by teenagers--that is, their use without a prescription--is a health concern. Anabolic steroids are synthetic forms of the hormone testosterone that can be taken orally, injected, or rubbed on the skin. Although a 2006 survey funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) found that less than 3 percent of 12th…

  2. New anabolic therapies in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mishaela R; Bilezikian, John P

    2003-03-01

    Anabolic agents represent an important new advance in the therapy of osteoporosis. Their potential might be substantially greater than the anti-resorptives. Because the anti-resorptives and anabolic agents work by completely distinct mechanisms of action, it is possible that the combination of agents could be significantly more potent than either agent alone. Recent evidence suggests that a plateau in BMD might occur after prolonged exposure to PTH. Anti-resorptive therapy during or after anabolic therapy might prevent this skeletal adaptation. Protocols to consider anabolic agents as intermittent recycling therapy would be of interest. Of all the anabolics, PTH is the most promising. However, there are unanswered questions about PTH. More studies are needed to document an anabolic effect on cortical bone. More large-scale studies are needed to further determine the reduction in nonvertebral fractures with PTH, especially at the hip. In the future, PTH is likely to be modified for easier and more targeted delivery. Oral or transdermal delivery systems may become available. Recently, Gowen et al have described an oral calcilytic molecule that antagonizes the parathyroid cell calcium receptor, thus stimulating the endogenous release of PTH. This approach could represent a novel endogenous delivery system for intermittent PTH administration. Rising expectations that anabolic therapies for osteoporosis will soon play a major role in treating this disease are likely to fuel further studies and the development of even more novel approaches to therapy. PMID:12699304

  3. Anabolic Steroids...What's the Hype?...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Gregory L.; Wagner, Lauris L.

    This pamphlet uses a question-and-answer format to examine the use and abuse of anabolic steroids. It begins by explaining that all steroids are not anabolic steroids and that anabolic steroids are those used specifically to build muscles quickly. Medical uses of anabolic steroids are reviewed; how people get steroids, how they take them, and…

  4. Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: Knowledge about, Attitude toward, and Extent of Use by High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonker, R. J.; And Others

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AS) are pharmacologic derivatives of the hormone testosterone. They have therapeutic merit when used under a physician's prescription to treat certain hormonal imbalances and some forms of anemia; however, when taken in high doses they have a number of virilizing, feminizing, toxic, and psychological effects. This…

  5. Estrogenic compounds decrease growth hormone receptor abundance and alter osmoregulation in Atlantic salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lerner, Darren T.; Sheridan, Mark A.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Atlantic salmon smolts to estrogenic compounds is shown to compromise several aspects of smolt development. We sought to determine the underlying endocrine mechanisms of estrogen impacts on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis. Smolts in freshwater (FW) were either injected 3 times over 10 days with 2 μg g−1 17β-estradiol (E2) or 150 μg g−1 4-nonylphenol (NP). Seawater (SW)-acclimated fish received intraperitoneal implants of 30 μg g−1 E2 over two weeks. Treatment with these estrogenic compounds increased hepatosomatic index and total plasma calcium. E2 and NP reduced maximum growth hormone binding by 30–60% in hepatic and branchial membranes in FW and SW, but did not alter the dissociation constant. E2 and NP treatment decreased plasma levels of IGF-I levels in both FW and SW. In FW E2 and NP decreased plasma GH whereas in SW plasma GH increased after E2 treatment. Compared to controls, plasma chloride concentrations of E2-treated fish were decreased 5.5 mM in FW and increased 10.5 mM in SW. There was no effect of NP or E2 on gill sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+-ATPase) activity in FW smolts, whereas E2 treatment in SW reduced gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity and altered the number and size of ionocytes. Our data indicate that E2 downregulates the GH/IGF-I-axis and SW tolerance which may be part of its normal function for reproduction and movement into FW. We conclude that the mechanism of endocrine disruption of smolt development by NP is in part through alteration of the GH/IGF-I axis via reduced GH receptor abundance.

  6. Anabolic steroids and Norwegian weightlifters.

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, S.

    1982-01-01

    The mean bodyweight, in kilograms, and mean weightlifting result, in points, for the ten best weightlifters at the annual Norwegian championships 1962-82 have been studied. During the 21 years, the mean bodyweight for these ten increased by 18 kg, probably due to the effect of androgens. The weightlifting results improved rapidly from 1968 onwards, probably reflecting an increasingly widespread use of anabolic steroids by Norwegian weightlifters. In 1977 doping tests were introduced, and from then on, rate of improvement has increased much more slowly. The annual sale of anabolic steroids 1963-81 and testosterone 1974-81, in Norway have been recorded. The sale of anabolic steroids increased irregularly until 1974-75, and has since shown a 42% decrease. The sale of testosterone 1974-81 showed a slight reduction, thus giving no support to the suggestion that doping tests for anabolic steroids would lead to a transfer to testosterone abuse. PMID:7139228

  7. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and organic wastewater compounds in Pennsylvania waters, 2006-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reif, Andrew G.; Crawford, J. Kent; Loper, Connie A.; Proctor, Arianne; Manning, Rhonda; Titler, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Concern over the presence of contaminants of emerging concern, such as pharmaceutical compounds, hormones, and organic wastewater compounds (OWCs), in waters of the United States and elsewhere is growing. Laboratory techniques developed within the last decade or new techniques currently under development within the U.S. Geological Survey now allow these compounds to be measured at concentrations in nanograms per liter. These new laboratory techniques were used in a reconnaissance study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, to determine the occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern in streams, streambed sediment, and groundwater of Pennsylvania. Compounds analyzed for in the study are pharmaceuticals (human and veterinary drugs), hormones (natural and synthetic), and OWCs (detergents, fragrances, pesticides, industrial compounds, disinfectants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fire retardants and plasticizers). Reconnaissance sampling was conducted from 2006 to 2009 to identify contaminants of emerging concern in (1) groundwater from wells used to supply livestock, (2) streamwater upstream and downstream from animal feeding operations, (3) streamwater upstream from and streamwater and streambed sediment downstream from municipal wastewater effluent discharges, (4) streamwater from sites within 5 miles of drinking-water intakes, and (5) streamwater and streambed sediment where fish health assessments were conducted. Of the 44 pharmaceutical compounds analyzed in groundwater samples collected in 2006 from six wells used to supply livestock, only cotinine (a nicotine metabolite) and the antibiotics tylosin and sulfamethoxazole were detected. The maximum concentration of any contaminant of emerging concern was 24 nanograms per liter (ng/L) for cotinine, and was detected in a groundwater sample from a Lebanon County, Pa., well. Seven pharmaceutical compounds including acetaminophen

  8. Inhibition of catechol estrogen formation in rat liver microsomes by hormonal steroids and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Quail, J A; Newcombe, A M; Jellinck, P H

    1988-10-01

    The inhibitory action of a number of different hormonal steroids and related compounds on the 2-hydroxylation of estradiol by male rat liver microsomes was examined by a radiometric assay. Progesterone, Diethylstilbestrol, testosterone and 4-androstenedione were found to be the most potent of the compounds tested but inhibition was also observed with other steroids and a group of androgen analogs which are aromatization inhibitors. The kinetic constant Ki for those steroids which gave linear double reciprocal plots when added to [2-3H]estradiol was determined and the products from [14C]estradiol in the presence of the inhibitors were examined by TLC and autoradiography. The addition of steroids with a 17-hydroxyl group such as testosterone or dihydroequilin resulted in the formation of mainly 2-hydroxyestradiol with smaller amounts of other metabolites while those with a reducible ketonic group such as progesterone, 4-androstenedione, equilin or equilenin gave rise to considerable amounts of estrone in addition to the catechol estrogens. Further purification of the liver microsomes did not alter this effect. The possible role of progesterone and the catechol estrogens in the control of estrogen hydroxylation in liver as well as other aspects of steroid interaction are discussed. PMID:2845195

  9. TAp73 promotes anabolism

    PubMed Central

    Amelio, Ivano; Antonov, Alexey A.; Catani, Maria Valeria; Massoud, Renato; Bernassola, Francesca; Knight, Richard A.; Melino, Gerry; Rufini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation has emerged as a hallmark of cancer and a promising therapeutic target, as rapidly proliferating cancer cells adapt their metabolism increasing nutrient uptake and reorganizing metabolic fluxes to support biosynthesis. The transcription factor p73 belongs to the p53-family and regulates tumorigenesis via its two N-terminal isoforms, with (TAp73) or without (ΔNp73) a transactivation domain. TAp73 acts as tumor suppressor, at least partially through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and through regulation of genomic stability. Here, we sought to investigate whether TAp73 also affects metabolic profiling of cancer cells. Using high throughput metabolomics, we unveil a thorough and unexpected role for TAp73 in promoting Warburg effect and cellular metabolism. TAp73-expressing cells show increased rate of glycolysis, higher amino acid uptake and increased levels and biosynthesis of acetyl-CoA. Moreover, we report an extensive TAp73-mediated upregulation of several anabolic pathways including polyamine and synthesis of membrane phospholipids. TAp73 expression also increases cellular methyl-donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), possibly influencing methylation and epigenetics, and promotes arginine metabolism, suggestive of a role in extracellular matrix (ECM) modeling. In summary, our data indicate that TAp73 regulates multiple metabolic pathways that impinge on numerous cellular functions, but that, overall, converge to sustain cell growth and proliferation. PMID:25514460

  10. Identification of plant compounds that disrupt the insect juvenile hormone receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seok-Hee; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Fang, Ying; An, Saes-Byeol; Park, Doo-Sang; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Soo-Young; Kim, Seonghyun; Kim, Namjung; Raikhel, Alexander S.; Je, Yeon Ho; Shin, Sang Woon

    2015-01-01

    Insects impact human health through vector-borne diseases and cause major economic losses by damaging crops and stored agricultural products. Insect-specific growth regulators represent attractive control agents because of their safety to the environment and humans. We identified plant compounds that serve as juvenile hormone antagonists (PJHANs). Using the yeast two-hybrid system transformed with the mosquito JH receptor as a reporter system, we demonstrate that PJHANs affect the JH receptor, methoprene-tolerant (Met), by disrupting its complex with CYCLE or FISC, formation of which is required for mediating JH action. We isolated five diterpene secondary metabolites with JH antagonist activity from two plants: Lindera erythrocarpa and Solidago serotina. They are effective in causing mortality of mosquito larvae at relatively low LD50 values. Topical application of two diterpenes caused reduction in the expression of Met target genes and retardation of follicle development in mosquito ovaries. Hence, the newly discovered PJHANs may lead to development of a new class of safe and effective pesticides. PMID:25624480

  11. Identification of plant compounds that disrupt the insect juvenile hormone receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seok-Hee; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Fang, Ying; An, Saes-Byeol; Park, Doo-Sang; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Soo-Young; Kim, Seonghyun; Kim, Namjung; Raikhel, Alexander S; Je, Yeon Ho; Shin, Sang Woon

    2015-02-10

    Insects impact human health through vector-borne diseases and cause major economic losses by damaging crops and stored agricultural products. Insect-specific growth regulators represent attractive control agents because of their safety to the environment and humans. We identified plant compounds that serve as juvenile hormone antagonists (PJHANs). Using the yeast two-hybrid system transformed with the mosquito JH receptor as a reporter system, we demonstrate that PJHANs affect the JH receptor, methoprene-tolerant (Met), by disrupting its complex with CYCLE or FISC, formation of which is required for mediating JH action. We isolated five diterpene secondary metabolites with JH antagonist activity from two plants: Lindera erythrocarpa and Solidago serotina. They are effective in causing mortality of mosquito larvae at relatively low LD50 values. Topical application of two diterpenes caused reduction in the expression of Met target genes and retardation of follicle development in mosquito ovaries. Hence, the newly discovered PJHANs may lead to development of a new class of safe and effective pesticides. PMID:25624480

  12. Restoration of hormonal action and muscle protein.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Arny A; Wolfe, Robert R

    2007-09-01

    This review focuses on the effects of restoring hormonal levels and/or influence on muscle protein metabolism in the stressed state. We have highlighted our clinical experience in the administration of anabolic and anticatabolic agents in stressed clinical populations, primarily adult and pediatric burn injury, as well as patients undergoing elective hip arthroplasty. Our previous experience entails the administration of anabolic hormones, such as testosterone and its derivatives, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 combined with its binding protein 3, and insulin. Current efforts focus on the administration of anticatabolic agents to reduce the effects of hypercortisolemia. Muscle protein metabolism was determined by stable isotope methodology. Our results indicate that normalization of anabolic hormone concentrations or amelioration of hormonal resistance restores the effects of feeding on skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Anabolic hormone administration results in a more favorable muscle protein balance in severely burned patients. Amelioration of hypercortisolemia in the stressed state leads to an improvement in protein kinetics. To summarize, alterations in hormonal influence that accompany stress states favor the loss of muscle protein. Restoration or normalization of hormonal influence improves muscle protein kinetics and ameliorates the loss of muscle nitrogen. To restore hormonal influence, clinicians should consider reestablishing anabolic stimuli and reducing catabolic stimuli. PMID:17713420

  13. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Pickar, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. Methods: US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [FDCA]) through 2014, including chronologies, Congressional testimony, FDA guidelines and enforcements, and reports. The FDCA and DQSA were reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched for articles on compounded drugs, including CBHT. Results: Congress explicitly granted the FDA limited oversight of compounded drugs in a 1997 amendment to the FDCA, but the FDA has encountered obstacles in exercising that authority. After 64 patient deaths and 750 adversely affected patients from the 2012 meningitis outbreak due to contaminated compounded steroid injections, Congress passed the DQSA, authorizing the FDA to create a voluntary registration for facilities that manufacture and distribute sterile compounded drugs in bulk and reinforcing FDCA regulations for traditional compounding. Given history and current environment, concerns remain about CBHT product regulation and their lack of safety and efficacy data. Conclusions: The DQSA and its reinforcement of §503A of the FDCA solidifies FDA authority to enforce FDCA provisions against compounders of CBHT. The new law may improve compliance and accreditation by the compounding industry; support state and FDA oversight; and prevent the distribution of misbranded, adulterated, or inconsistently compounded medications, and false and misleading claims, thus reducing public health risk. PMID:26418479

  14. Sex steroid and growth hormone supplementation to enhance performance in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Rogol, A D

    2000-08-01

    Ergogenic aids are taken to enhance energy utilization by producing more, controlling its use, or increasing mechanical efficiency. Most athletes are looking toward enhancing performance by proper training modalities and methods; however, some look to the biochemical route for a "quick fix." Thus, the use of chemical agents is on the rise. Herein is provided information on the anabolic-androgenic agents androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone, and the "parent" compound, testosterone. The former two, at best, have equivocal activity, but testosterone is both anabolic and androgenic in doses that adolescents might receive. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 are anabolic, nonandrogenic compounds with undoubted effects on the lean body mass compartment. Both are expensive, not readily available, and subject to the art of counterfeiting. Thus, very few data are available in non-growth hormone-deficient adolescents. The discussion of these agents ends with issues of fairness, ethics, and the message we attempt to project to our teenagers, whether athletes or not. PMID:10943821

  15. [Dangers and risks of black market anabolic steroid abuse in sports --gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses].

    PubMed

    Ritsch, M; Musshoff, F

    2000-03-01

    Anabolic steroids have become increasingly popular among athletes even at subcompetitive or recreational level instead of extensive doping tests, educational campaigns and lethal incidents. Nowadays, the fitness boom has also produced a population of steroid users at high school level and also under non-sports practicing children. After opening the borders to East Europe an explosion of the black-market for anabolic steroids occurred. Beside the well-known side effects of anabolic steroids new problems and risks occurred due to fake drugs from the black market. This review ist subdivided into two parts: We provide a detailed review of the literature an anabolic steroids to the reader the information needed to make an informed decision an the relative risks and benefits of anabolic steroids. Secondly, we evaluated 40 "anabolic steroids" obtained from the black market using mass spectrometry or gas chromatography analysis to evaluate the real pharmacological compounds. As the results of this analysis, we found that 15 (37.5%) these drugs contained different or any pharmacological compounds as labeled. From the external packing, a differentiation between original and the fake drugs was impossible. Therefore, a large information and credibility gap concerning anabolic steroids particular those from the black market exists between the athletes and the medical and scientific communities. We believe that this gap can only be closed if both groups are be better informed about anabolic steroids. PMID:10859788

  16. HPLC-ICP/MS Analysis of Thyroid Hormone and Related Iodinated Compounds in Tissues and Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantifying thyroid hormone (TH) and the synthetic precursors and metabolic products of TH is important for developing models of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis as well as for understanding the effects of xenobiotics on HPT axis function. In this study, the developm...

  17. Tracing thyroid hormone-disrupting compounds: database compilation and structure-activity evaluation for an effect-directed analysis of sediment.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jana M; Andersson, Patrik L; Zhang, Jin; Simon, Eszter; Leonards, Pim E G; Hamers, Timo; Lamoree, Marja H

    2015-07-01

    A variety of anthropogenic compounds has been found to be capable of disrupting the endocrine systems of organisms, in laboratory studies as well as in wildlife. The most widely described endpoint is estrogenicity, but other hormonal disturbances, e.g., thyroid hormone disruption, are gaining more and more attention. Here, we present a review and chemical characterization, using principal component analysis, of organic compounds that have been tested for their capacity to bind competitively to the thyroid hormone transport protein transthyretin (TTR). The database contains 250 individual compounds and technical mixtures, of which 144 compounds are defined as TTR binders. Almost one third of these compounds (n = 52) were even more potent than the natural hormone thyroxine (T4). The database was used as a tool to assist in the identification of thyroid hormone-disrupting compounds (THDCs) in an effect-directed analysis (EDA) study of a sediment sample. Two compounds could be confirmed to contribute to the detected TTR-binding potency in the sediment sample, i.e., triclosan and nonylphenol technical mixture. They constituted less than 1% of the TTR-binding potency of the unfractionated extract. The low rate of explained activity may be attributed to the challenges related to identification of unknown contaminants in combination with the limited knowledge about THDCs in general. This study demonstrates the need for databases containing compound-specific toxicological properties. In the framework of EDA, such a database could be used to assist in the identification and confirmation of causative compounds focusing on thyroid hormone disruption. PMID:25986900

  18. How sex hormones promote skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Velders, Martina; Diel, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration efficiency declines with age for both men and women. This decline impacts on functional capabilities in the elderly and limits their ability to engage in regular physical activity and to maintain independence. Aging is associated with a decline in sex hormone production. Therefore, elucidating the effects of sex hormone substitution on skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration after injury or disuse is highly relevant for the aging population, where sarcopenia affects more than 30 % of individuals over 60 years of age. While the anabolic effects of androgens are well known, the effects of estrogens on skeletal muscle anabolism have only been uncovered in recent times. Hence, the purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic insight into the regulation of skeletal muscle regenerative processes by both androgens and estrogens. Animal studies using estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists and receptor subtype selective agonists have revealed that estrogens act through both genomic and non-genomic pathways to reduce leukocyte invasion and increase satellite cell numbers in regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. Although animal studies have been more conclusive than human studies in establishing a role for sex hormones in the attenuation of muscle damage, data from a number of recent well controlled human studies is presented to support the notion that hormonal therapies and exercise induce added positive effects on functional measures and lean tissue mass. Based on the fact that aging human skeletal muscle retains the ability to adapt to exercise with enhanced satellite cell activation, combining sex hormone therapies with exercise may induce additive effects on satellite cell accretion. There is evidence to suggest that there is a 'window of opportunity' after the onset of a hypogonadal state such as menopause, to initiate a hormonal therapy in order to achieve maximal benefits for skeletal muscle health. Novel receptor subtype selective

  19. Illicit anabolic-androgenic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, Gen; Hudson, James I; Pope, Harrison G

    2010-06-01

    The anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are a family of hormones that includes testosterone and its derivatives. These substances have been used by elite athletes since the 1950s, but they did not become widespread drugs of abuse in the general population until the 1980s. Thus, knowledge of the medical and behavioral effects of illicit AAS use is still evolving. Surveys suggest that many millions of boys and men, primarily in Western countries, have abused AAS to enhance athletic performance or personal appearance. AAS use among girls and women is much less common. Taken in supraphysiologic doses, AAS show various long-term adverse medical effects, especially cardiovascular toxicity. Behavioral effects of AAS include hypomanic or manic symptoms, sometimes accompanied by aggression or violence, which usually occur while taking AAS, and depressive symptoms occurring during AAS withdrawal. However, these symptoms are idiosyncratic and afflict only a minority of illicit users; the mechanism of these idiosyncratic responses remains unclear. AAS users may also ingest a range of other illicit drugs, including both "body image" drugs to enhance physical appearance or performance, and classical drugs of abuse. In particular, AAS users appear particularly prone to opioid use. There may well be a biological basis for this association, since both human and animal data suggest that AAS and opioids may share similar brain mechanisms. Finally, AAS may cause a dependence syndrome in a substantial minority of users. AAS dependence may pose a growing public health problem in future years but remains little studied. PMID:19769977

  20. Illicit Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Hudson, James I.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2009-01-01

    The anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are a family of hormones that includes testosterone and its derivatives. These substances have been used by elite athletes since the 1950s, but they did not become widespread drugs of abuse in the general population until the 1980s. Thus, knowledge of the medical and behavioral effects of illicit AAS use is still evolving. Surveys suggest that many millions of boys and men, primarily in Western countries, have abused AAS to enhance athletic performance or personal appearance. AAS use among girls and women is much less common. Taken in supraphysiologic doses, AAS show various long-term adverse medical effects, especially cardiovascular toxicity. Behavioral effects of AAS include hypomanic or manic symptoms, sometimes accompanied by aggression or violence, which usually occur while taking AAS, and depressive symptoms occurring during AAS withdrawal. However, these symptoms are idiosyncratic and afflict only a minority of illicit users; the mechanism of these idiosyncratic responses remains unclear. AAS users may also ingest a range of other illicit drugs, including both “body-image” drugs to enhance physical appearance or performance, and classical drugs of abuse. In particular, AAS users appear particularly prone to opioid use. There may well be a biological basis for this association, since both human and animal data suggest that AAS and opioids may share similar brain mechanisms. Finally, AAS may cause a dependence syndrome in a substantial minority of users. AAS dependence may pose a growing public health problem in future years, but remains little studied. PMID:19769977

  1. Regional variability in bed-sediment concentrations of wastewater compounds, hormones and PAHs for portions of coastal New York and New Jersey impacted by hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick J; Gibson, Catherine A; Fisher, Shawn C; Fisher, Irene J; Reilly, Timothy J; Smalling, Kelly L; Romanok, Kristin M; Foreman, William T; ReVello, Rhiannon C; Focazio, Michael J; Jones, Daniel K

    2016-06-30

    Bed sediment samples from 79 coastal New York and New Jersey, USA sites were analyzed for 75 compounds including wastewater associated contaminants, PAHs, and other organic compounds to assess the post-Hurricane Sandy distribution of organic contaminants among six regions. These results provide the first assessment of wastewater compounds, hormones, and PAHs in bed sediment for this region. Concentrations of most wastewater contaminants and PAHs were highest in the most developed region (Upper Harbor/Newark Bay, UHNB) and reflected the wastewater inputs to this area. Although the lack of pre-Hurricane Sandy data for most of these compounds make it impossible to assess the effect of the storm on wastewater contaminant concentrations, PAH concentrations in the UHNB region reflect pre-Hurricane Sandy conditions in this region. Lower hormone concentrations than predicted by the total organic carbon relation occurred in UHNB samples, suggesting that hormones are being degraded in the UHNB region. PMID:27177500

  2. Regional variability in bed-sediment concentrations of wastewater compounds, hormones and PAHs for portions of coastal New York and New Jersey impacted by hurricane Sandy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Patrick; Gibson, Cathy A; Fisher, Shawn C.; Fisher, Irene; Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly; Romanok, Kristin; Foreman, William; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Focazio, Michael J.; Jones, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Bed sediment samples from 79 coastal New York and New Jersey, USA sites were analyzed for 75 compounds including wastewater associated contaminants, PAHs, and other organic compounds to assess the post-Hurricane Sandy distribution of organic contaminants among six regions. These results provide the first assessment of wastewater compounds, hormones, and PAHs in bed sediment for this region. Concentrations of most wastewater contaminants and PAHs were highest in the most developed region (Upper Harbor/Newark Bay, UHNB) and reflected the wastewater inputs to this area. Although the lack of pre-Hurricane Sandy data for most of these compounds make it impossible to assess the effect of the storm on wastewater contaminant concentrations, PAH concentrations in the UHNB region reflect pre-Hurricane Sandy conditions in this region. Lower hormone concentrations than predicted by the total organic carbon relation occurred in UHNB samples, suggesting that hormones are being degraded in the UHNB region.

  3. Biological regulation of receptor-hormone complex concentrations in relation to dose-response assessments for endocrine-active compounds.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M E; Barton, H A

    1999-03-01

    Some endocrine-active compounds (EACs) act as agonists or antagonists of specific hormones and may interfere with cellular control processes that regulate gene transcription. Many mechanisms controlling gene expression are universal to organisms ranging from unicellular bacteria to more complex plants and animals. One mechanism, coordinated control of batteries of gene products, is critical in adaptation of bacteria to new environments and for development and tissue differentiation in multi-cellular organisms. To coordinately activate sets of genes, all living organisms have devised molecular modules to permit transitions, or switching, between different functional states over a small range of hormone concentration, and other modules to stabilize the new state through homeostatic interactions. Both switching and homeostasis are regulated by controlling concentrations of hormone-receptor complexes. Molecular control processes for switching and homeostasis are inherently nonlinear and often utilize autoregulatory feedback loops. Among the biological processes contributing to switching phenomena are receptor autoinduction, induction of enzymes for ligand synthesis, mRNA stabilization/activation, and receptor polymerization. This paper discusses a variety of molecular switches found in animal species, devises simple quantitative models illustrating roles of specific molecular interactions in creating switching modules, and outlines the impact of these switching processes and other feedback loops for risk assessments with EACs. Quantitative simulation modeling of these switching mechanisms made it apparent that highly nonlinear dose-response curves for hormones and EACs readily arise from interactions of several linear processes acting in concert on a common control point. These nonlinear mechanisms involve amplification of response, rather than multimeric molecular interactions as in conventional Hill relationships. PMID:10330682

  4. The effects of dietary boron compounds in supplemented diet on hormonal activity and some biochemical parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucukkurt, Ismail; Akbel, Erten; Karabag, Funda; Ince, Sinan

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the effects of dietary boric acid or borax, as a boron (B) source, on hormonal status (leptin, insulin, triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine) and some biochemical parameter levels as glucose, carnitine, nonesterified fatty acids, and betahydroxybutyric acid in rats. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into three equal groups: the animals in the first group (control) were fed with a standard rodent diet containing 6.4 mg B/kg, and the animals in the experimental group were fed with a standard rodent diet added with boric acid and borax (100 mg B/kg) throughout the experimental period of 28 days. The B compounds especially borax decreased leptin, insulin, and glucose levels, whereas increased T3 and carnitine levels in plasma. In addition, body weight of rats was found to be low in the boric acid group at the end of 4 weeks. Consequently, our results demonstrate that B supplementation (100 mg/kg) in diet decreases body weight, leptin, and insulin, whereas increases T3 levels in plasma, so enhances the metabolic activity of rats. Between the B compounds used in this study, it was found that borax had a greater effect on hormonal status than boric acid. PMID:23293135

  5. Risks and effectiveness of compounded bioidentical hormone therapy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ruth; Batur, Pelin; Thacker, Holly L

    2014-08-01

    After the publication of the Women's Health Initiative, attitudes towards management of menopausal symptoms changed dramatically. One alternative that has received much media attention is the use of bioidentical hormone therapy (BHT). The media and celebrity endorsements have promoted a number of misconceptions about the risks and benefits associated with the various forms of BHT. This article will review the available evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of BHT in comparison to conventional hormone therapy. We will also review several cases seen in our midlife women's referral clinics, which demonstrate concerns for the safety and efficacy of BHT, including unexplained endometrial cancer in otherwise healthy BHT users. Due to the lack of sufficient data to support the efficacy or safety of BHT, we recommend the use of United States Food and Drug Administration-approved regimens in the management of menopausal symptoms. PMID:25111856

  6. Drug metabolism: in vitro biotransformation of anabolic steroids in canines.

    PubMed

    Williams, T M; Kind, A J; Hill, D W

    2000-04-01

    Forensic drug testing of anabolic steroids in racing animals is required because of the potential for steroid abuse. Often when the metabolic products of an administered compound have not been identified, the analysis and verification of the administered compound is difficult. The objective of this study was to qualitatively identify the in vitro phase I biotransformation products of anabolic steroids that have a high potential for abuse in canines. The investigated steroids included testosterone, methyltestosterone, mibolerone and boldenone. Steroid biotransformation products were generated using beagle liver microsomes and analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/mass spectrometry (MS) with an electrospray ionization source. Characterization of steroid metabolites was based on HPLC retention, UV and mass spectra. The major testosterone metabolites were identified as androstenedione and 6beta- and 16alpha-hydroxytestosterone. 6beta-Hydroxymethyltestosterone was identified as a major metabolite in the methyltestosterone microsomal incubations. Several mibolerone metabolites were identified as monohydroxylated mibolerones as well as an oxidized mibolerone metabolite. Boldenone metabolites were identified as monohydroxylated boldenones, oxidized boldenone, and testosterone. This information should assist in the determination of anabolic steroid use in canines through the correlation of the urinary metabolites to the administered drug. PMID:10849249

  7. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens. PMID:24565564

  8. Bone Biology and Anabolic Therapies for Bone: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bone is continuously remodelled at many sites asynchronously throughout the skeleton, with bone formation and resorption balanced at these sites to retain bone structure. Negative balance resulting in bone loss and osteoporosis, with consequent fractures, has mainly been prevented or treated by anti-resorptive drugs that inhibit osteoclast formation and/or activity, with new prospects now of anabolic treatments that restore bone that has been lost. The anabolic effectiveness of parathyroid hormone has been established, and an exciting new prospect is presented of neutralising antibody against the osteocyte protein, sclerostin. The cellular actions of these two anabolic treatments differ, and the mechanisms will need to be kept in mind in devising their best use. On present evidence it seems likely that treatment with either of these anabolic agents will need to be followed by anti-resorptive treatment in order to maintain bone that has been restored. No matter how effective anabolic therapies for the skeleton become, it seems highly likely that there will be a continuing need for safe, effective anti-resorptive drugs. PMID:24707463

  9. Steroidal hormones and other endocrine active compounds in shallow groundwater in nonagricultural areas of Minnesota—Study design, methods, and data, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, Melinda L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, completed a study on the occurrence of steroidal hormones and other endocrine active compounds in shallow groundwater in nonagricultural areas of Minnesota during 2009–10. This report describes the study design and methods, and presents the data collected on steroidal hormones and other related compounds. Environmental and quality-control samples were collected from 40 wells as part of this study. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory for 16 steroidal hormones and 4 other related compounds, of which all but 2 compounds are endocrine active compounds. Most of the water samples did not contain detectable concentrations of any of the 20 compounds analyzed. Water samples from three wells had detectable concentrations of one or more compounds. Bisphenol A was detected in samples from three wells, and trans-diethylstilbestrol was detected in one of the samples in which bisphenol A also was detected.

  10. Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2002-10-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are mainly used to treat androgen deficiency syndromes and, more recently, catabolic states such as AIDS-associated wasting. There is no evidence in the reviewed literature that AAS abuse or dependence develops from the therapeutic use of AAS. Conversely, 165 instances of AAS dependence have been reported among weightlifters and bodybuilders who, as part of their weight training regimens, chronically administered supraphysiologic doses, often including combinations of injected and oral AAS as well as other drugs of abuse. A new model is proposed in which both the "myoactive" and psychoactive effects of AAS contribute to the development of AAS dependence. The adverse consequences of AAS are reviewed, as well as their assessment by means of a history and physical, mental status examination, and laboratory testing. When patients with AAS use disorders are compared with patients with other substance use disorders, both similarities and differences become apparent and have implications for treatment. PMID:12230967

  11. Endogenous anabolic agents in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Velle, W

    1976-01-01

    This presentation is limited to the three groups of steroid sex hormones which alone or in combination have been shown to be anabolic when used in farm animals. It seems essential for realistic evaluation of public health aspects of use of these hormones that the discussions include naturally occurring levels of the hormones. The following topics will be dealt with for each group of hormones: 1. Types and sources; 2. Production rates; 3. Plasma levels; 4. Tissue concentrations; 5. Metabolism and excretion. Gestagens. Progesterone and 20-dihydroprogesterones are mainly produced in ovaries and placenta. Production rates are estimated to 10 and 14 mg/24 hrs in pregnant goats and sheep, respectively. Plasma levels during the luteal phase are of the order of 2--10 ng/ml, during pregnancy somewhat higher. Muscular tissue from calves contain 0.25 mg/g. In dairy cows progesterone is excreted with the milk which contains up to 30 ng/ml; butterfat up to 300 mg/g. In ruminants progesterone is metabolized mainly to androgens excreted with faeces. In pigs large parts are metabolized to pregnanediols excreted with urine. Androgens. Testosterone is mainly secreted by testes. Boar testes also produce large amounts of dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulphate. Production rates have been estimated to be 10 mg and 40--50 mg/24 hrs. in boars and bulls respectively. Plasma levels in bulls and rams are generally 2--10 ng/ml, in boars 2--25 ng/ml. Adipose tissue levels up to 22 ng/g are reported for bulls. In ruminants epitestosterone seems to be a major metabolite excreted mainly with faeces. In boars, urinary 11-deoxy-17-ketosteroids are major metabolites of testicular dehydroepiandrosterone. Castration shows elimination to be rapid. Estrogens. 17beta-Estradiol and estrone are produced in ovaries and placenta and, in large amounts, in boar and stallion testes. Production rates in late pregnancy are estimated to 10 mg oestrone/24 hrs. in goats, 2 mg estrone and up to 28 mg 17beta

  12. [Use of the peptide hormone melanostatin and its analogs for the synthesis of new antitumor compounds].

    PubMed

    Lagova, N D; Smirnova, Z S; Sof'ina, Z P; Smirnova, L I; Kashnikova, N M

    1988-01-01

    A hypothalamic hormone--melanostatin H-L-Pro-L-Leu-NH2- and its 9 analogs were synthesized and their antitumor properties studied. Melanostatin caused a 52-72% inhibition of tumor growth (p less than 0.05) in mice bearing adenocarcinoma of the mammary gland Ca-755, cervical carcinoma CC-5 and melanoma B-16. Non-cytotoxic analogs containing D-leucine or L-lysine showed low activity. Among analogs containing sarcolysine stereomers, chlorphenacyl or chlorambucil, derivatives with L-sarcolysin exerted a high antitumor effect on Ca-755, CC-5, Lewis lung carcinoma, lymphoid leukemia L-1210, sarcoma-37, melanoma B-16 and S-91 (80-99% inhibition of tumor growth, p less than 0.05). L-sarcolysin alone had a higher effect on S-91 only (p less than 0.05). Antitumor effect of melanostatin is due to its amino acid sequences. Melanostatin analogs modified by L-phenylalanine retain their antitumor properties. PMID:2893489

  13. Spatial working memory is preserved in rats treated with anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Smith, S T; Stackman, R W; Clark, A S

    1996-10-21

    The effects of anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) compounds on spatial working memory were evaluated in male rats. Thirty days of administration of a high dose of three individual AAS compounds (17 alpha-methyltestosterone, methandrostenolone, or testosterone cypionate) had no effects on spatial memory or motivation as tested on a delayed non-match-to-sample radial arm maze task. Administration of these AAS compounds at doses within the human abuse range does not impair spatial working memory in rats. PMID:8930382

  14. Anabolic steroid use in high school students.

    PubMed

    Pallesen, Ståle; Jøsendal, Ola; Johnsen, Bjørn-Helge; Larsen, Svein; Molde, Helge

    2006-01-01

    A total of 1351 high school students (52.3% males, 47.7% females) with mean age 17.5 years (SD = 2.2) from randomized school classes in Hordaland County, Norway, participated in an Internet survey conducted in 2004 about the lifetime use of anabolic steroids and personal acquaintance with at least one user of anabolic steroids. In addition to questions about anabolic steroids the participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. They also answered questions about demography, smoking, and narcotic use. The lifetime prevalence for use of anabolic steroids was 3.6% for males and 0.6% for females. In all, 27.9% of the respondents reported having at least one acquaintance that used or had used anabolic steroids. Use of anabolic steroids and having acquaintances using such drugs were strongly related to use of other drugs such as alcohol, nicotine, and narcotics. Implications for prevention are discussed and the study's limitations are noted. PMID:17118811

  15. The anabolic steroid methandienone targets the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis and myostatin signaling in a rat training model.

    PubMed

    Mosler, Stephanie; Pankratz, Carlos; Seyfried, Alexis; Piechotta, Marion; Diel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the biological activity of myostatin (MSTN), a negative regulator of muscle growth, is affected by training but also anabolic steroids. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the frequently abused anabolic steroid methandienone (Md) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis and androgen-sensitive tissues in intact rats performing a treadmill training to simulate the situation of abusing athletes. The anabolic effects were correlated with the expression of members of the MSTN signaling cascade. Md treatment resulted in a significant stimulation of anabolic activity of the levator ani muscle, which was further increased by training, while prostate and seminal vesicle weights decreased in conformance with hormone concentrations of LH and testosterone. In gastrocnemius muscle, mRNA expression of genes of the MSTN signaling cascade (MSTN, Smad7 and MyoD) was reduced by training but not after Md treatment, in soleus muscle MSTN and its inhibitors, follistatin (FLST) and Smad-7 were only affected after training in combination with Md treatment. In summary, our data demonstrate that Md treatment of intact rats results in anabolic effects which are enhanced in combination with physical activity. Interestingly, the anabolic activity on the levator ani was increased in combination with training, although the levator ani muscle was not specifically stimulated by our training protocol. In the m. gastrocnemius and soleus, the anabolic effects correlate with changes in the expression patterns of genes involved in MSTN signaling. Our data provide evidence that the decrease in the weight of androgen-sensitive sexual glands, observed after Md treatment, is caused by a suppression of endogenous testosterone synthesis. These observations provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between anabolic steroids, training and MSTN signaling during skeletal muscle adaptation. PMID:21818626

  16. Effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hartgens, Fred; Kuipers, Harm

    2004-01-01

    Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone. They can exert strong effects on the human body that may be beneficial for athletic performance. A review of the literature revealed that most laboratory studies did not investigate the actual doses of AAS currently abused in the field. Therefore, those studies may not reflect the actual (adverse) effects of steroids. The available scientific literature describes that short-term administration of these drugs by athletes can increase strength and bodyweight. Strength gains of about 5-20% of the initial strength and increments of 2-5 kg bodyweight, that may be attributed to an increase of the lean body mass, have been observed. A reduction of fat mass does not seem to occur. Although AAS administration may affect erythropoiesis and blood haemoglobin concentrations, no effect on endurance performance was observed. Little data about the effects of AAS on metabolic responses during exercise training and recovery are available and, therefore, do not allow firm conclusions. The main untoward effects of short- and long-term AAS abuse that male athletes most often self-report are an increase in sexual drive, the occurrence of acne vulgaris, increased body hair and increment of aggressive behaviour. AAS administration will disturb the regular endogenous production of testosterone and gonadotrophins that may persist for months after drug withdrawal. Cardiovascular risk factors may undergo deleterious alterations, including elevation of blood pressure and depression of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-, HDL2- and HDL3-cholesterol levels. In echocardiographic studies in male athletes, AAS did not seem to affect cardiac structure and function, although in animal studies these drugs have been observed to exert hazardous effects on heart structure and function. In studies of athletes, AAS were not found to damage the liver. Psyche and behaviour seem to be strongly affected by AAS

  17. Short Anabolic Peptides for Bone Growth.

    PubMed

    Amso, Zaid; Cornish, Jillian; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Loss of bone occurs in the age-related skeletal disorder, osteoporosis, leading to bone fragility and increased incidence of fractures, which are associated with enormous costs and substantial morbidity and mortality. Recent data indicate that osteoporotic fractures are more common than other diseases, which usually attract public attention (e.g., heart attack and breast cancer). The prevention and treatment of this skeletal disorder are therefore of paramount importance. Majority of osteoporosis medications restore skeletal balance by reducing osteoclastic activity, thereby reducing bone resorption. These agents, however, do not regenerate damaged bone tissue, leaving limited options for patients once bone loss has occurred. Recently, attention has turned to bone-anabolic agents. Such agents have the ability to increase bone mass and strength, potentially reversing structural damage. To date, only one bone-anabolic drug is available in the market. The discovery of more novel, cost-effective bone anabolic agents is therefore a priority to treat those suffering from this disabling condition. Short peptides offer an important alternative for the development of novel bone-anabolic agents given their high target binding specificity, which translates into potent activity with limited side effects. This review summarizes attempts in the identification of bone-anabolic peptides, and their development for promoting bone growth. PMID:27297498

  18. Doping in sport and exercise: anabolic, ergogenic, health and clinical issues.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen R; Goebel, Catrin; Burke, Louise M; Greaves, Ronda F

    2016-03-01

    The use of doping agents is evident within competitive sport in senior and junior age groups, where they are taken by non-elite as well as elite participants. They are also taken in non-sporting contexts by individuals seeking to 'improve' their physique through an increase in muscle and/or decrease in fat mass. While attaining accurate data on the prevalence of their use has limitations, studies suggest the illicit use of doping agents by athletes and non-athletes may be 1-5% in the population and greater than 50% in some groups; with the prevalence being higher in males. There is conclusive evidence that some doping agents are anabolic and ergogenic. There is also evidence that the use of doping agents such as anabolic androgenic steroids, growth hormone and other anabolic agents, erythropoietin and stimulants conveys considerable health risks that include, but are not limited to: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, mental health issues, virilisation in females and the suppression of naturally produced androgens in males. This review will outline the anabolic, ergogenic and health impacts of selected doping agents and methods that may be used in both the sporting and physique development contexts. It also provides a brief tabulated overview of the history of doping and how doping agents may impact upon the analyses of clinical samples. PMID:26384361

  19. Parathyroid Hormone and Physical Exercise: a Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Bouassida, Anissa; Latiri, Imed; Bouassida, Semi; Zalleg, Dalenda; Zaouali, Monia; Feki, Youssef; Gharbi, Najoua; Zbidi, Abdelkarim; Tabka, Zouhair

    2006-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the major hormone regulating calcium metabolism and is involved in both catabolic and anabolic actions on bone. Intermittent PTH exposure can stimulate bone formation and bone mass when PTH has been injected. In contrast, continuous infusion of PTH stimulates bone resorption. PTH concentration may be affected by physical exercise and our review was designed to investigate this relationship. The variation in PTH concentration appears to be influenced by both exercise duration and intensity. There probably exists a stimulation threshold of exercise to alter PTH. PTH regulation is also influenced by the initial bone mineral content, age, gender, training state, and other hormonal and metabolic factors (catecholamines, lactic acid and calcium concentrations). Key Points Physical exercise can improve PTH secretion. Parathyroid hormone has both anabolic and catabolic effects on bone: intermittent treatment of PTH is anabolic whereas continuous treatment is catabolic. PMID:24353453

  20. Hyperlipidemia Induces Resistance to PTH Bone Anabolism in Mice via Oxidized Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Andrew P; Lu, Jinxiu; Atti, Elisa; Tetradis, Sotirios; Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Adams, Douglas J; Demer, Linda L; Tintut, Yin

    2011-01-01

    In hyperlipidemia, oxidized lipids accumulate in vascular tissues and trigger atherosclerosis. Such lipids also deposit in bone tissues, where they may promote osteoporosis. We found previously that oxidized lipids attenuate osteogenesis and that parathyroid hormone (PTH) bone anabolism is blunted in hyperlipidemic mice, suggesting that osteoporotic patients with hyperlipidemia may develop resistance to PTH therapy. To determine if oxidized lipids account for this PTH resistance, we blocked lipid oxidation products in hyperlipidemic mice with an ApoA-I mimetic peptide, D-4F, and the bone anabolic response to PTH treatment was assessed. Skeletally immature Ldlr−/− mice were placed on a high-fat diet and treated with D-4F peptide and/or with intermittent PTH(1–34) injections. As expected, D-4F attenuated serum lipid oxidation products and tissue lipid deposition induced by the diet. Importantly, D-4F treatment attenuated the adverse effects of dietary hyperlipidemia on PTH anabolism by restoring micro–computed tomographic parameters of bone quality—cortical mineral content, area, and thickness. D-4F significantly reduced serum markers of bone resorption but not bone formation. PTH and D-4F, together but not separately, also promoted bone anabolism in an alternative model of hyperlipidemia, Apoe−/− mice. In normolipemic mice, D-4F cotreatment did not further enhance the anabolic effects of PTH, indicating that the mechanism is through its effects on lipids. These findings suggest that oxidized lipids mediate hyperlipidemia-induced PTH resistance in bone through modulation of bone resorption. PMID:21611962

  1. Review of Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Use

    SciTech Connect

    T. Borges; G. Eisele; C. Byrd

    2001-07-31

    An area that has been overlooked within personnel security evaluations is employee use of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). Current drug testing within the federal government does not include testing for anabolic steroids, and the difficulties to implement such testing protocols-not to mention the cost involved-make AAS testing highly improbable. The basis of this report is to bring to the forefront the damage that anabolic steroids can cause from both a physical and a psychological standpoint. Most individuals who use AASs do so to increase their muscle mass because they wish to gain some type of competitive edge during athletic competition or they wish to enhance their physical features for self-satisfaction and self-esteem (i.e., body building). Security officers are one group of men who often take high doses of anabolic steroids, according to the Second Report of the Senate Standing Committee (1990). The negative psychological characteristics for AAS use is extensive and includes prominent hostility, aggressiveness, irritability, euphoria, grandiose beliefs, hyperactivity, reckless behavior, increased sexual appetite, unpredictability, poor impulse control, mood fluctuations, and insomnia. The drug may invoke a sense of power and invincibility (Leckman and Scahill, 1990). Depressive symptoms, such as anhedonia, fatigue, impaired concentration, decreased libido, and even suicidality (Pope and Katz, 1992) have been noted with steroid withdrawal. It appears that long-term users of AAS experience similar characteristics as other substance abusers (i.e., craving, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms).

  2. Preventing Anabolic Steroid Use: Guidelines and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June; Rauhe, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Information about anabolic steroids should be included in the school health curriculum as early as possible. The paper presents suggestions for planning education programs and offers a variety of activities and strategies appropriate for many age groups, including case studies, story completion, posters, demonstrations, projects, creative writing,…

  3. Growth Hormone and Craniofacial Tissues. An update

    PubMed Central

    Litsas, George

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone is an important regulator of bone homeostasis. In childhood, it determines the longitudinal bone growth, skeletal maturation, and acquisition of bone mass. In adulthood, it is necessary to maintain bone mass throughout life. Although an association between craniofacial and somatic development has been clearly established, craniofacial growth involves complex interactions of genes, hormones and environment. Moreover, as an anabolic hormone seems to have an important role in the regulation of bone remodeling, muscle enhancement and tooth development. In this paper the influence of growth hormone on oral tissues is reviewed. PMID:25674165

  4. Dilated cardiomyopathy and acute liver injury associated with combined use of ephedra, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brychan M; Schofield, Richard S

    2005-05-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that some athletes have used to enhance muscle mass and improve their athletic performance. Ephedrine is a potent sympathomimetic agent that can lead to cardiomyopathy similar to that seen with catecholamine excess. Adverse cardiovascular events attributed to anabolic steroid and ephedra use, such as arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy, and sudden death, are rarely reported. Bodybuilders have used gamma-hydroxybutyrate, a potent secretagogue of growth hormone, to promote muscle development. Although dilated cardiomyopathy is a known complication of excess growth hormone levels, it has not been associated with use of gamma-hydroxybutyrate. A healthy 40-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for new-onset congestive heart failure and severe acute hepatitis that developed several months after he began using anabolic-androgenic steroids, ephedra, and gamma-hydroxybutyrate supplements. Analysis with an objective causality assessment scale revealed a probable adverse drug reaction between the patient's use of anabolic steroids, ephedra, and gamma-hydroxybutyrate and the development of his cardiomyopathy and acute liver injury. PMID:15899737

  5. Cross-reactivity of steroid hormone immunoassays: clinical significance and two-dimensional molecular similarity prediction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunoassays are widely used in clinical laboratories for measurement of plasma/serum concentrations of steroid hormones such as cortisol and testosterone. Immunoassays can be performed on a variety of standard clinical chemistry analyzers, thus allowing even small clinical laboratories to do analysis on-site. One limitation of steroid hormone immunoassays is interference caused by compounds with structural similarity to the target steroid of the assay. Interfering molecules include structurally related endogenous compounds and their metabolites as well as drugs such as anabolic steroids and synthetic glucocorticoids. Methods Cross-reactivity of a structurally diverse set of compounds were determined for the Roche Diagnostics Elecsys assays for cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate, estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone. These data were compared and contrasted to package insert data and published cross-reactivity studies for other marketed steroid hormone immunoassays. Cross-reactivity was computationally predicted using the technique of two-dimensional molecular similarity. Results The Roche Elecsys Cortisol and Testosterone II assays showed a wider range of cross-reactivity than the DHEA sulfate, Estradiol II, and Progesterone II assays. 6-Methylprednisolone and prednisolone showed high cross-reactivity for the cortisol assay, with high likelihood of clinically significant effect for patients administered these drugs. In addition, 21-deoxycortisol likely produces clinically relevant cross-reactivity for cortisol in patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, while 11-deoxycortisol may produce clinically relevant cross-reactivity in 11β-hydroxylase deficiency or following metyrapone challenge. Several anabolic steroids may produce clinically significant false positives on the testosterone assay, although interpretation is limited by sparse pharmacokinetic data for some of these drugs. Norethindrone therapy may impact immunoassay measurement

  6. When color fails: illicit blue tablets containing anabolic androgen steroids.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Donata; Castagna, Franca; Maietti, Sergio; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2013-09-01

    The necessity of specific, confirmatory tests in the identification of seized illicit products was highlighted by the analysis of eighteen heart shaped, blue tablets confiscated by Police at a street control in the North East of Italy. The tablets responded as amphetamines to a preliminary color test (Marquis); a subsequent, confirmatory assay by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of two anabolic androgen steroids (AAS), methandienone and methyltestosterone, in concentration of 1.7 and 1.5mg respectively per tablet; no trace of amphetamine-like or nitrogen containing compounds was found. The observed orange coloration was due to the reaction of concentrated sulphuric acid, contained in the Marquis reagent, with the Δ(4) C-3 keto group of steroids. The two AAS, banned under the world antidoping code, are not considered as psychoactive drugs of abuse in most countries, although their trafficking may entangle severe public health concerns. PMID:23770638

  7. Mechanisms of bone anabolism regulated by statins

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Feng; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Jinfu

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease in the elderly population. The progress of this disease results in the reduction of bone mass and can increase the incidence of fractures. Drugs presently used clinically can block the aggravation of this disease. However, these drugs cannot increase the bone mass and may result in certain side effects. Statins, also known as HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been widely prescribed for CVD (cardiovascular disease) for decades. Nonetheless, several studies have demonstrated that statins exert bone anabolic effect and may be helpful for the treatment of osteoporosis. Several experiments have analysed the mechanisms of bone anabolism regulated by statins. In the present paper, we review the mechanisms of promoting osteogenesis, suppressing osteoblast apoptosis and inhibiting osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22799752

  8. Acute bile nephropathy secondary to anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Alkhunaizi, Ahmed M; ElTigani, Mohamed A; Rabah, Rola S; Nasr, Samih H

    2016-02-01

    Renal dysfunction in cholestatic liver disease is multifactorial. Acute kidney injury may develop secondary to renal vasoconstriction in the setting of peripheral vasodilation and relative hypovolemia, tubular obstruction by bile casts, and direct tubular toxicity from bile. Anabolic steroids are frequently used by athletes to boost endurance and increase muscle mass. These agents are a recently recognized cause of hepatotoxicity and jaundice and may lead to acute kidney injury. To increase awareness about this growing problem and to characterize the pathology of acute kidney injury in this setting, we report on a young male who developed acute kidney injury in the setting of severe cholestatic jaundice related to ingestion of anabolic steroids used for bodybuilding. Kidney biopsy showed bile casts within distal tubular lumina, filamentous bile inclusions within tubular cells, and signs of acute tubular injury. This report supports the recently re-emerged concept of bile nephropathy cholemic nephrosis. PMID:26587777

  9. Anabolic factors in degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Sandell, L J

    2007-02-01

    While a great deal of information is available on the cellular and molecular biology of cartilage degradation, less is known about anabolism in normal cartilage and degenerating cartilage. A consistent amount of evidence is now available on the neo-synthesis of matrix molecules and enzymes in OA: the entire cell metabolism appears to be increased leading to the hypothesis that chondrocytes in OA are actually "activated". This chapter will focus on anabolic events that are now known to occur in articular cartilage. We will begin to view articular cartilage as a complex three-dimensional tissue in which local events may be different. We will also be interested in viewing the development of degenerative arthritis as a continuum from functionally normal tissue to degeneration. PMID:17305513

  10. Anabolic steroid abuse: psychiatric and physical costs.

    PubMed

    Talih, Farid; Fattal, Omar; Malone, Donald

    2007-05-01

    The psychiatric effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (i.e., testosterone and its derivatives) have been less well studied than their physical effects but are reported to include depression, mania, psychosis, and aggression. Dependence can also occur, with withdrawal involving psychiatric and physical symptoms. Adverse effects of steroid abuse should be managed by discontinuing the drugs-by tapering if necessary-and by treating the symptoms. PMID:17506239

  11. Anabolic steroids abuse and male infertility.

    PubMed

    El Osta, Rabih; Almont, Thierry; Diligent, Catherine; Hubert, Nicolas; Eschwège, Pascal; Hubert, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, testosterone and its synthetic derivatives have been used with anabolic and androgenic purposes. These substances were first restricted to professional bodybuilders, but become more and more popular among recreational athletes. Up to date, 3,000,000 anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users have been reported in the United States with an increasing prevalence, making AAS consumption a major public health growing concern. Infertility is defined by the WHO as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse and a male factor is present in up to 50 % of all infertile couples. Several conditions may be related to male infertility. Substance abuse, including AAS, is commonly associated to transient or persistent impairment on male reproductive function, through different pathways. Herein, a brief overview on AAS is offered. Steroids biochemistry, patterns of use, physiological and clinical issues are enlightened. A further review about fertility outcomes among male AAS abusers is also presented, including the classic reports on transient anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH), and the more recent experimental reports on structural and genetic sperm damage. PMID:26855782

  12. Abnormal protein turnover and anabolic resistance to exercise in sarcopenic obesity.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Mats I; Dobson, Justin P; Greene, Nicholas P; Wiggs, Michael P; Shimkus, Kevin L; Wudeck, Elyse V; Davis, Amanda R; Laureano, Marissa L; Fluckey, James D

    2013-10-01

    Obesity may impair protein synthesis rates and cause anabolic resistance to growth factors, hormones, and exercise, ultimately affecting skeletal muscle mass and function. To better understand muscle wasting and anabolic resistance with obesity, we assessed protein 24-h fractional synthesis rates (24-h FSRs) in selected hind-limb muscles of sedentary and resistance-exercised lean and obese Zucker rats. Despite atrophied hind-limb muscles (-28% vs. lean rats), 24-h FSRs of mixed proteins were significantly higher in quadriceps (+18%) and red or white gastrocnemius (+22 or +38%, respectively) of obese animals when compared to lean littermates. Basal synthesis rates of myofibrillar (+8%) and mitochondrial proteins (-1%) in quadriceps were not different between phenotypes, while manufacture of cytosolic proteins (+12%) was moderately elevated in obese cohorts. Western blot analyses revealed a robust activation of p70S6k (+178%) and a lower expression of the endogenous mTOR inhibitor DEPTOR (-28%) in obese rats, collectively suggesting that there is an obesity-induced increase in net protein turnover favoring degradation. Lastly, the protein synthetic response to exercise of mixed (-7%), myofibrillar (+6%), and cytosolic (+7%) quadriceps subfractions was blunted compared to the lean phenotype (+34, +40, and +17%, respectively), indicating a muscle- and subfraction-specific desensitization to the anabolic stimulus of exercise in obese animals. PMID:23804240

  13. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  14. Anabolic-androgenic steroid effects on the sexual behavior of intact male rats.

    PubMed

    Clark, A S; Harrold, E V; Fast, A S

    1997-02-01

    Six separate experiments were conducted which examined the effects of long-term administration of anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) compounds on the sexual behavior of gonadally intact male rats. The six AAS compounds analyzed in this study were 17alpha-methyltestosterone, methandrostenolone, nandrolone decanoate, stanozolol, oxymetholone, and testosterone cypionate. In each experiment, subjects received daily injections of a high, medium, or low dose of the AAS compound, or the oil vehicle, for 12 weeks. Sexual behavior was quantified weekly. Twelve weeks of administration of the high dose of three AAS compounds, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, stanozolol, and oxymetholone, eliminated male sexual behavior. These treatments also suppressed serum testosterone levels. The remaining compounds had minimal effects on sexual behavior at any dose. Thus, in intact male rats the six AAS compounds examined in these studies evoked a range of behavioral and endocrine responses that varied as a function of the specific compound and dose administered. PMID:9109597

  15. Collision-induced dissociation pathways of anabolic steroids by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fuyu; Soma, Lawrence R; Luo, Yi; Uboh, Cornelius E; Peterman, Scott

    2006-04-01

    Anabolic steroids are structurally similar compounds, and their product-ion spectra obtained by tandem mass spectrometry under electrospray ionization conditions are quite difficult to interpret because of poly-ring structures and lack of a charge-retaining center in their chemical structures. In the present study, the fragmentation of nine anabolic steroids of interest to the racing industry was investigated by using triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer, and a linear ion trap instrument. With the aid of an expert system software (Mass Frontier version 3.0), accurate mass measurements, and multiple stage tandem mass spectrometric (MS(n)) experiments, fragmentation pathways were elucidated for boldenone, methandrostenolone, tetrahydrogestrinone (THG), trenbolone, normethandrolone and mibolerone. Small differences in the chemical structures of the steroids, such as an additional double-bond or a methyl group, result in significantly different fragmentation pathways. The fragmentation pathways proposed in this paper allow interpretation of major product ions of other anabolic steroids reported by other researchers in a recent publication. The proposed fragmentation pathways are helpful for characterization of new steroids. The approach used in this study for elucidation of the fragmentation pathways is helpful in interpretation of complicated product-ion spectra of other compounds, drugs and their metabolites. PMID:16488153

  16. Abuse of supraphysiologic doses of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ryan C W; Hall, Richard C W

    2005-05-01

    The following article is a literature review of supraphysiologic doses of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). This article contains a brief review of the history of AAS, the chemistry of the varying forms of AAS, and proposed mechanisms of action. The article then focuses on how AAS are used in an illicit manner by the general population. Terms such as "stacking" and "pyramiding" are discussed. The article concludes by looking at the major detrimental side effects, such as liver damage and cardiovascular changes, which physicians may encounter when treating AAS abusers. PMID:15954512

  17. [Effect of anabolic steroid on immune response].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, H; Kobayashi, M; Konosu, H; Kurioka, H; Naito, K; Sonoyama, T; Nishimoto, T; Hashimoto, I

    1984-03-01

    Using lymphocyte, monocyte and eosinophil counts of the peripheral blood, PHA-blastoid transformation, immunoglobulin and beta 2-microglobulin, the influence of anabolic steroid on the immune reactivity of the host was dissected by administration of Deca-Durabolin ( nandrolone decanoate) to both tumor-bearing host and tumor-free host after operation for alimentary tract. The number of peripheral lymphocytes and monocytes, the PHA-blastoid transformation of peripheral lymphocytes and the IgG level were increased, and the beta 2-microglobulin level showed the tendency of decrease after the administration of Deca-Durabolin. PMID:6367663

  18. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  19. Nalbuphine hydrochloride dependence in anabolic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Wines, J D; Gruber, A J; Pope, H G; Lukas, S E

    1999-01-01

    Nalbuphine hydrochloride, a nonscheduled opioid agonist/antagonist analgesic, is currently approved for the treatment of pain. Recently, nalbuphine dependence was reported in three anabolic steroid users in Britain. To further document this phenomenon, we conducted interviews on eleven subjects who reported nalbuphine use. Eight subjects were clinically dependent on nalbuphine, and seven of the subjects who were asked about tolerance and withdrawal with nalbuphine acknowledged these symptoms. Eight subjects, who had never used drugs intravenously before, reported using nalbuphine by this route. Nalbuphine-related morbidity was extensive and included medical complications and psychiatric symptoms. Nalbuphine users also exhibited a high rate of comorbid Axis I disorders, including other substance misuse. Virtually all subjects described widespread nalbuphine use in the gymnasiums they frequented. These observations, together with the recent increase in nalbuphine-related articles in the lay press, suggest that nalbuphine may represent a new drug of abuse among athletes, especially those using anabolic steroids, and that nalbuphine's scheduling status may need to be re-evaluated. PMID:10365196

  20. Mechanical signals as anabolic agents in bone

    PubMed Central

    Ozcivici, Engin; Luu, Yen Kim; Adler, Ben; Qin, Yi-Xian; Rubin, Janet; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clinton T.

    2013-01-01

    Aging and a sedentary lifestyle conspire to reduce bone quantity and quality, decrease muscle mass and strength, and undermine postural stability, culminating in an elevated risk of skeletal fracture. Concurrently, a marked reduction in the available bone-marrow-derived population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) jeopardizes the regenerative potential that is critical to recovery from musculoskeletal injury and disease. A potential way to combat the deterioration involves harnessing the sensitivity of bone to mechanical signals, which is crucial in defining, maintaining and recovering bone mass. To effectively utilize mechanical signals in the clinic as a non-drug-based intervention for osteoporosis, it is essential to identify the components of the mechanical challenge that are critical to the anabolic process. Large, intense challenges to the skeleton are generally presumed to be the most osteogenic, but brief exposure to mechanical signals of high frequency and extremely low intensity, several orders of magnitude below those that arise during strenuous activity, have been shown to provide a significant anabolic stimulus to bone. Along with positively influencing osteoblast and osteocyte activity, these low-magnitude mechanical signals bias MSC differentiation towards osteoblastogenesis and away from adipogenesis. Mechanical targeting of the bone marrow stem-cell pool might, therefore, represent a novel, drug-free means of slowing the age-related decline of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:20046206

  1. The effects of compounded bioidentical transdermal hormone therapy on hemostatic, inflammatory, immune factors; cardiovascular biomarkers; quality-of-life measures; and health outcomes in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kenna; Neuenschwander, Pierre F; Kurdowska, Anna K

    2013-01-01

    Menopause impacts 25 million women world wide each year, and the World Health Organization estimates 1.2 billion women will be postmenopausal by 2030. Menopause has been associated with symptoms of hot flashes, night sweats, dysphoric mood, sleep disturbance, and conditions of cardiovascular disease, depression, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, depression, dementia, and frailty. Conventional hormone replacement therapy results in increased thrombotic events, and an increased risk of breast cancer and dementia as evidenced in large prospective clinical trials including Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study I and the Women's Health Initiative. A possible mechanism for these adverse events is the unfavorable net effects of conjugated equine estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate on the hemostatic balance and inflammatory and immune factors. Physiologic sex steroid therapy with transdermal delivery for peri/postmenopausal women may offer a different risk/benefit profile, yet long-term studies of this treatment model are lacking. The objective of this study was to examine the long-term effects of compounded bioidentical transdermal sex steroid therapy including estriol, estradiol, progesterone, DHEA, and testosterone on cardiovascular biomarkers, hemostatic, inflammatory, immune signaling factors; quality-of-life measures; and health outcomes in peri/postmenopausal women within the context of a hormone restoration model of care. A prospective, cohort, closed-label study received approval from the Human Subjects Committee. Recruitment from outpatient clinics at an academic medical center and the community at large resulted in three hundred women giving signed consent. Seventy-five women who met strict inclusion/exclusion criteria were enrolled. Baseline hormone evaluation was performed along with baseline experimental measures. Following this, women received compounded transdermal bioidentical hormone therapy of BiEst (80%Estriol/20%Estradiol), and

  2. Residue profiles of organohalogen compounds in human serum from e-waste recycling sites in North Vietnam: Association with thyroid hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Akifumi; Nomiyama, Kei; Minh Tue, Nguyen; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Hung Viet, Pham; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrated the contamination levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs), hydroxylated PBDEs (OH-PBDEs), and bromophenols (BPhs), and their relationships with thyroid hormones (THs), in the serum of human donors from an e-waste recycling site and a rural site in Hung Yen province, Vietnam. Occupationally related exposure was indicated by significantly higher residue levels of PCBs, OH-PCBs, PBDEs, and BPhs in the serum of donors from the e-waste recycling site (median: 420, 160, 290, and 300pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively) than those in the serum of donors from the rural site (median: 290, 82, 230, and 200pgg(-)(1) wet wt, respectively). On the other hand, levels of OH-/MeO-PBDEs were significantly higher in serum of donors from the reference site (median: 160 and 20pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively) than in those from the e-waste recycling site (median: 43 and 0.52pgg(-1) wet wt, respectively). In addition, we implemented stepwise generalized linear models to assess the association between the levels of TH and PCBs, PBDEs, and their related compounds. In females, we found positive associations of PCBs and OH-PCB concentrations with total thyroxine, free thyroxine, total triiodothyronine, and free triiodothyronine, and a negative association with thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations. PMID:25659948

  3. Modulation of steroidogenic gene expression and hormone production of H295R cells by pharmaceuticals and other environmentally active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gracia, Tannia Hilscherova, Klara; Jones, Paul D.; Newsted, John L.; Higley, Eric B.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hecker, Markus; Murphy, Margaret B.; Yu, Richard M.K.; Lam, Paul K.S.; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P.

    2007-12-01

    The H295R cell bioassay was used to evaluate the potential endocrine disrupting effects of 18 of the most commonly used pharmaceuticals in the United States. Exposures for 48 h with single pharmaceuticals and binary mixtures were conducted; the expression of five steroidogenic genes, 3{beta}HSD2, CYP11{beta}1, CYP11{beta}2, CYP17 and CYP19, was quantified by Q-RT-PCR. Production of the steroid hormones estradiol (E2), testosterone (T) and progesterone (P) was also evaluated. Antibiotics were shown to modulate gene expression and hormone production. Amoxicillin up-regulated the expression of CYP11{beta}2 and CYP19 by more than 2-fold and induced estradiol production up to almost 3-fold. Erythromycin significantly increased CYP11{beta}2 expression and the production of P and E2 by 3.5- and 2.4-fold, respectively, while production of T was significantly decreased. The {beta}-blocker salbutamol caused the greatest induction of CYP17, more than 13-fold, and significantly decreased E2 production. The binary mixture of cyproterone and salbutamol significantly down-regulated expression of CYP19, while a mixture of ethynylestradiol and trenbolone, increased E2 production 3.7-fold. Estradiol production was significantly affected by changes in concentrations of trenbolone, cyproterone, and ethynylestradiol. Exposures with individual pharmaceuticals showed the possible secondary effects that drugs may exert on steroid production. Results from binary mixture exposures suggested the possible type of interactions that may occur between drugs and the joint effects product of such interactions. Dose-response results indicated that although two chemicals may share a common mechanism of action the concentration effects observed may be significantly different.

  4. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: • Pharmaceutical products. These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy (a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  5. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: Pharmaceutical products . These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy(a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  6. The current preference for the immuno-analytical ELISA method for quantitation of steroid hormones (endocrine disruptor compounds) in wastewater in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Manickum, Thavrin; John, Wilson

    2015-07-01

    requirements for steroid hormone quantitation. Further optimization of the sensitivity of the chemical-analytical LC-tandem mass spectrometry methods, especially for wastewater screening, in South Africa is required. Risk assessment studies showed that it was not practical to propose standards or allowable limits for the steroid estrogens E1, E2, EE2, and E3; the use of predicted-no-effect concentration values of the steroid estrogens appears to be appropriate for use in their risk assessment in relation to aquatic organisms. For raw water sources, drinking water, raw and treated wastewater, the use of bioassays, with trigger values, is a useful screening tool option to decide whether further examination of specific endocrine activity may be warranted, or whether concentrations of such activity are of low priority, with respect to health concerns in the human population. The achievement of improved quantitation limits for immuno-analytical methods, like ELISA, used for compound quantitation, and standardization of the method for measuring E2 equivalents (EEQs) used for biological activity (endocrine: e.g., estrogenic) are some areas for future EDC research. PMID:25845526

  7. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  8. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  9. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  10. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  11. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are...

  12. Effect-directed analysis to explore the polar bear exposome: identification of thyroid hormone disrupting compounds in plasma.

    PubMed

    Simon, Eszter; van Velzen, Martin; Brandsma, Sicco H; Lie, Elisabeth; Løken, Katharina; de Boer, Jacob; Bytingsvik, Jenny; Jenssen, Bjørn M; Aars, Jon; Hamers, Timo; Lamoree, Marja H

    2013-08-01

    Compounds with transthyretin (TTR)-binding potency in the blood plasma of polar bear cubs were identified with effect-directed analysis (EDA). This approach contributes to the understanding of the thyroid disrupting exposome of polar bears. The selection of these samples for in-depth EDA was based on the difference between the observed TTR-binding potency on the one hand and the calculated potency (based on known concentrations of TTR-binding compounds and their relative potencies) on the other. A library-based identification was applied to the liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-ToF-MS) data by screening for matches between compound lists and the LC-ToF-MS data regarding accurate mass and isotope pattern. Then, isotope cluster analysis (ICA) was applied to the LC-ToF-MS data allowing specific screening for halogen isotope patterns. The presence of linear and branched nonylphenol (NP) was observed for the first time in polar bears. Furthermore, the presence of one di- and two monohydroxylated octachlorinated biphenyls (octaCBs) was revealed in the extracts. Linear and branched NP, 4'-OH-CB201 and 4,4'-OH-CB202 could be successfully confirmed with respect to their retention time in the analytical system. In addition, branched NP, mono- and dihydroxylated-octaCBs showed TTR-binding potencies and could explain another 32 ± 2% of the total measured activities in the extracts. PMID:23763488

  13. Anabolic androgenic steroid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bond, Peter; Llewellyn, William; Van Mol, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused for decades by both professional and amateur athletes in order to improve physical performance or muscle mass. AAS abuse can cause adverse effects, among which are hepatotoxic effects. These effects include cholestatic icterus and possibly peliosis hepatis and hepatocellular carcinoma or adenoma. In particular, 17α-alkylated AAS appear to be hepatotoxic, whereas nonalkylated AAS appear not to be. The 17α-alkyl substitution retards hepatic metabolism of the AAS rendering it orally bioavailable. The mechanism responsible for the hepatotoxicity induced by 17α-alkylated AAS remains poorly understood. However, oxidative stress has been repeatedly shown to be associated with it. In this manuscript we present a hypothesis which describes a potential mechanism responsible for AAS-induced hepatotoxicity, based on several observations from the literature which suggest oxidative stress being a causal factor. PMID:27372877

  14. [Control measures for anabolic androgenic steroid medicines].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Mourelle, Raquel; Carracedo-Martínez, Eduardo; Ces Gens, Eugenio; Cadórniga Valiño, Luis; Álvaro Esteban, Pilar; Pose Reino, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) can cause serious adverse effects when used without a therapeutic purpose. This article aims to show that the AAS are susceptible to being sold on the black market. We also aim to describe how certain limitations on the health inspection services of the Galician health service to pursue these illegal actions prompted a regulatory initiative demanding that additional actions be granted to community pharmacies when dispensing AAS. Four pharmacy inspections detected the diversion of a total of 3118 packages of AAS, which led to the opening of four disciplinary proceedings. In two of these, specialized police forces were called in as there was sufficient evidence of possible diversion to gymnasiums, resulting in a police operation called Operation Fitness. PMID:25778637

  15. TAp73 promotes anti-senescence-anabolism not proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Massimiliano; Niklison-Chirou, Maria Victoria; Catani, Maria Valeria; Knight, Richard A.; Melino, Gerry; Rufini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    TAp73, a member of the p53 family, has been traditionally considered a tumor suppressor gene, but a recent report has claimed that it can promote cellular proliferation. This assumption is based on biochemical evidence of activation of anabolic metabolism, with enhanced pentose phosphate shunt (PPP) and nucleotide biosynthesis. Here, while we confirm that TAp73 expression enhances anabolism, we also substantiate its role in inhibiting proliferation and promoting cell death. Hence, we would like to propose an alternative interpretation of the accumulating data linking p73 to cellular metabolism: we suggest that TAp73 promotes anabolism to counteract cellular senescence rather than to support proliferation. PMID:25554796

  16. Simultaneous determination of pharmaceuticals, endocrine disrupting compounds and hormone in soils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Wu, Laosheng; Chen, Weiping; Chang, Andrew C

    2008-08-22

    Analytical methods have been developed for simultaneous determination of six different pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) (clofibric acid, ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen, diclofenac, and triclosan), three endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, and bisphenol A (BPA)) and one estrogenic compound (estrone) in soil matrix. The soils were extracted by different solvents with the help of an ultrasonic treatment at 42 kHz, followed by a solid phase extraction (SPE) as a cleanup procedure. The purified extracts were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and then analyzed by GC-MSD (SIM mode). The method was evaluated by testing the following variables: initial spiking levels, extraction solvents, solvent volumes, and soil types (sandy and clay soils). For 5 g of soil, four successive extraction steps with the mixture of acetone-ethyl acetate provided satisfactory recoveries. In the sandy soil, the recoveries of all the compounds were from 63.8 to 110.7% for the spiking level of 100 ng/g dry soil, and from 52.2 to 108.2% for 5 ng/g dry soil, respectively. Result was similar for the clay soil. The precision across all recoveries was high, suggesting that this method has a good reproducibility. The method was successfully employed to soil samples collected from a golf course irrigated with reclaimed wastewater in southern California, and resulted in the detection of clofibric acid, ibuprofen, naproxen, triclosan, bisphenol A, and estrone at ng per gram dry weight concentration levels. The method is robust and simple, and provides straightforward analyses of these current-emerging trace organic pollutants in solid matrices. PMID:18639882

  17. Adverse health effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Opperhuizen, Antoon; Hartgens, Fred

    2010-06-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic drugs derived from testosterone. Illegally, these drugs are regularly self-administered by body builders and power lifters to enhance their sportive performance. Adverse side effects of AAS include sexual dysfunction, alterations of the cardiovascular system, psyche and behavior, and liver toxicity. However, severe side effects appear only following prolonged use of AAS at high dose and their occurrence is limited. Occasionally, AAS abuse may be linked to certain social and psychological traits of the user, like low self-esteem, low self-confidence, suffered hostility, childhood conduct disorder, and tendency to high-risk behavior. The overwhelming stereotype about AAS is that these compounds cause aggressive behavior in males. However, the underlying personality traits of a specific subgroup of the AAS abusers, who show aggression and hostility, may be relevant, as well. Use of AAS in combination with alcohol largely increases the risk of violence and aggression. The dependence liability of AAS is very low, and withdrawal effects are relatively mild. Based on the scores for acute and chronic adverse health effects, the prevalence of use, social harm and criminality, AAS were ranked among 19 illicit drugs as a group of drugs with a relatively low harm. PMID:20153798

  18. [Anabolic steroids: damages, effect on performance, and on metabolism (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Keul, J; Deus, B; Kindermann, W

    1976-03-19

    10 normal persons (age: x=22 years) and 15 weight lifters (age: x=27 years) were studied before and three months after taking Nandrolone danoate (ND). Strength exercises, hear rate during ergometer work, physical working capacity and certain biochemical variables were measured in the experimental group, as well as in a controll group of 7 weight lifters. Six weight lifters in the experimental group who had been taking ND for at least 3 years were also studied to determine whether there were any deleterious effects on their health. In addition, 75 athletes who had been taking anabolic steroids were investigated to determine the possible effects. It was found that: 1. In spite of an 7% increase in performance, the maximal heart rate was not higher when the subjects took ND. During submaximal work loads the heart rate (p less than 0.025) and the blood lactate level (p less than 0.05) were lower. During physical work, there was essentially no effect of ND on glucose or total lipids in serum. 2. The results from the three-months study, from the weight lifters taking ND for 3 years, as well as from 26 of the 57 athletes who had been taking ND showed no evidence of a deleterious effect of ND (based on 26 biochemical measurements). It would appear, therefore, that the general suggestion of a detrimental effect of anabolic hormones is not justified. 3. Damages or functional disturbances were found in 31 athletes and 3 weight lifters of the experimental group after oral application of anabolic alkyl-steroids. After a period of time without alkyl-steroid administration, all investigated biochemical parameters returned to normal levels; thus it appears that the aforementioned pathological findings are reversible changes in liver function. PMID:1263996

  19. Prolonged Hypogonadism in Males Following Withdrawal from Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: an Underrecognized Problem

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Hudson, James I.; DeLuca, James; Isaacs, Stephanie; Baggish, Aaron; Weiner, Rory; Bhasin, Shalender; Pope, Harrison G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the frequency and severity of hypogonadal symptoms in male long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) misusers who have discontinued AAS use. Design Cross-sectional, naturalistic. Setting Outpatient facility. Participants Twenty-four male former long-term AAS users and 36 non-AAS-using weightlifters, recruited by advertisement in Massachusetts, USA. Five of the former users were currently receiving treatment with physiologic testosterone replacement, leaving 19 untreated users for the numerical comparisons below. Measurements The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, questions regarding history of AAS use, physical examination, serum hormone determinations, and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Findings Compared with the 36 non-AAS-using weightlifters, the 19 untreated former AAS users displayed significantly smaller testicular volumes (estimated difference [95% confidence interval (CI)]: 2.3 [0.1, 4.5] ml; p = 0.042) and lower serum testosterone levels (estimated difference: 131 [25, 227] dL; p = 0.009), with five users showing testosterone levels below 200 ng/dL despite abstinence from AAS for 3–26 months. Untreated former users also displayed significantly lower scores on the IIEF Sexual Desire subscale (estimated difference: 2.4 [1.3, 3.5] points on a 10-point scale; p < 0.001). In the overall group of 24 treated plus untreated former users, 7 (29%) had experienced major depressive episodes during AAS withdrawal; 4 of these had not experienced major depressive episodes at any other time. Two men (8%) had failed to regain normal libidinal or erectile function despite adequate replacement testosterone treatment. Conclusions Among long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid misusers, anabolic-androgenic steroid-withdrawal hypogonadism appears to be common, frequently prolonged, and associated with substantial morbidity. PMID:25598171

  20. Medical Issues Associated with Anabolic Steroid Use: Are They Exaggerated?

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Jay R.; Ratamess, Nicholas A.

    2006-01-01

    For the past 50 years anabolic steroids have been at the forefront of the controversy surrounding performance enhancing drugs. For almost half of this time no attempt was made by sports governing bodies to control its use, and only recently have all of the major sports governing bodies in North America agreed to ban from competition and punish athletes who test positive for anabolic steroids. These punitive measures were developed with the primary concern for promotion of fair play and eliminating potential health risks associated with androgenic-anabolic steroids. Yet, controversy exists whether these testing programs deter anabolic steroid use. Although the scope of this paper does not focus on the effectiveness of testing, or the issue of fair play, it is of interest to understand why many athletes underestimate the health risks associated from these drugs. What creates further curiosity is the seemingly well-publicized health hazards that the medical community has depicted concerning anabolic steroidabuse. Is there something that the athletes know, or are they simply naïve regarding the dangers? The focus of this review is to provide a brief history of anabolic steroid use in North America, the prevalence of its use in both athletic and recreational populations and its efficacy. Primary discussion will focus on health issues associated with anabolic steroid use with an examination of the contrasting views held between the medical community and the athletes that are using these ergogenic drugs. Existing data suggest that in certain circumstances the medical risk associated with anabolic steroid use may have been somewhat exaggerated, possibly to dissuade use in athletes. Key Points For many years the scientific and medical communities depicted a lack of efficacy and serious adverse effects from anabolic steroid use. Clinical case studies continue to link anabolic steroid administration with myocardial infarct, suicide, and cancer, evidence to support a cause

  1. Dying to be big: a review of anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, H M; Wright, D; Littlepage, B N

    1992-01-01

    Anabolic steroids use is commonly perceived to be the domain of the higher echelons of competitive athletes. However, a great deal of anabolic steroid use occurs in private gymnasia (non-local authority) among non-competitive recreational athletes. Our study has attempted to give an insight into the prevalence of the use of these drugs, the hazards associated with it, and the public health responses which we have adopted. PMID:1490220

  2. Multidetection Of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Using Immunoarrays and Pattern Recognition Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, D.; Salvador, J. P.; Tort, N.; Centi, F.; Marco, M. P.; Marco, S.

    2009-05-01

    A first step towards the multidetection of anabolic androgenic steroids by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) has been performed in this study. This proposal combines an array of classical ELISA assays with different selectivities and multivariate data analysis techniques. Data has been analyzed by principal component analysis in conjunction with a k-nearest line classifier has been used. This proposal allows to detect simultaneously four different compounds in the range of concentration from 10-1.5 to 103 mM with a total rate of 90.6% of correct detection.

  3. Exome sequencing reveals two novel compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutations in a Polish patient with Desbuquois dysplasia type 2 and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jamsheer, Aleksander; Olech, Ewelina M; Kozłowski, Kazimierz; Niedziela, Marek; Sowińska-Seidler, Anna; Obara-Moszyńska, Monika; Latos-Bieleńska, Anna; Karczewski, Marek; Zemojtel, Tomasz

    2016-07-01

    Desbuquois dysplasia type 2 (DBQD2) is a rare recessively inherited skeletal genetic disorder characterized by severe prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, generalized joint laxity with dislocation of large joints and facial dysmorphism. The condition was recently described to result from autosomal recessive mutations in XYLT1, encoding the enzyme xylosyltransferase-1. In this paper, we report on a Polish patient with DBQD2 who presented with severe short stature of prenatal onset, joint laxity, psychomotor retardation and multiple radiological abnormalities including short metacarpals, advanced bone age and exaggerated trochanters. Endocrinological examinations revealed that sleep-induced growth hormone (GH) release and GH peak in clonidine- and glucagon-induced provocative tests as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein-3 levels were all markedly decreased, confirming deficiency of GH secretion. Bone age, unlikely to GH deficiency, was significantly advanced. To establish the diagnosis at a molecular level, we performed whole-exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis in the index patient, which revealed compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutations: c.595C>T(p.Gln199*) and c.1651C>T(p.Arg551Cys), both of which are novel. Sanger sequencing showed that the former mutation was inherited from the healthy mother, whereas the latter one most probably occurred de novo. Our study describes the first case of DBQD2 resulting from compound heterozygous XYLT1 mutation, expands the mutational spectrum of the disease and provides evidence that the severe growth retardation and microsomia observed in DBQD2 patients may result not only from the skeletal dysplasia itself but also from GH and IGF-1 deficiency. PMID:27030147

  4. Metabolism of anabolic steroids by recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Rendic, S; Nolteernsting, E; Schänzer, W

    1999-11-26

    Metabolism of steroid hormones with anabolic properties was studied in vitro using human recombinant CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and 2B6 enzymes. The enzyme formats used for CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 were insect cell microsomes expressing human CYP enzymes and purified recombinant human CYP enzymes in a reconstituted system. CYP3A4 enzyme formats incubated with anabolic steroids, testosterone, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, metandienone, boldenone and 4-chloro-1,2-dehydro-17alpha-methyltestosterone, produced 6beta-hydroxyl metabolites identified as trimethylsilyl (TMS)-ethers by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. When the same formats of CYP2C9 were incubated with the anabolic steroids, no 6beta-hydroxyl metabolites were formed. Human lymphoblast cell microsomes expressing human CYP2B6 incubated with the steroids investigated produced traces of 6beta-hydroxyl metabolites with testosterone and 17alpha-methyltestosterone only. We suggest that the electronic effects of the 3-keto-4-ene structural moiety contribute to the selectivity within the active site of CYP3A4 enzyme resulting in selective 6beta-hydroxylation. PMID:10630892

  5. Determination of anabolic agents in dietary supplements by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Odoardi, Sara; Castrignanò, Erika; Martello, Simona; Chiarotti, Marcello; Strano-Rossi, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive method for the identification and quantification of anabolic steroids and clenbuterol at trace levels in dietary supplements by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) in atmospheric pressure ionisation (APCI) mode using a single-stage Orbitrap analyser operating at a resolution power of 100 000 full width at half maximum (FWHM) was developed and validated. A total of 1 g of dietary supplement was added with testosterone-d3 as internal standard, dissolved in methanol, evaporated to dryness, diluted in sodium hydroxide solution and extracted with a mixture of pentane/ethyl ether 9:1. The extract was directly injected into the LC-HRMS system. The method was fully validated. Limits of detection (LODs) obtained for anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) varied from 1 to 25 ng g(-1) and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 50 ng g(-1) for all analytes. The calibration was linear for all compounds in the range from the LOQ to 2000 ng g(-1), with correlation coefficients always higher than 0.99. Accuracy (intended as %E) and repeatability (%CV) were always lower than 15%. Good values of matrix effect and recovery were achieved. The ease of the sample preparation together with a fast run time of only 16 min permitted rapid identification of the analytes. The method was applied to the analysis of 30 dietary supplements in order to check for the presence of anabolic agents not labelled as being present in these supplements. Many AASs were often detected in the same sample: indeed, androstenedione was detected in nine supplements, 5-androsten-3β-ol-17-one (DHEA) in 12, methandienone in three, stanozolol in one, testosterone in seven and testosterone esters in four of them. A retrospective analysis of suspected compounds not included at the beginning of the method development was also possible by means of the full acquisition spectra obtained with the HRMS technique. PMID:25719897

  6. The energetics of anabolism in natural settings.

    PubMed

    LaRowe, Douglas E; Amend, Jan P

    2016-06-01

    The environmental conditions that describe an ecosystem define the amount of energy available to the resident organisms and the amount of energy required to build biomass. Here, we quantify the amount of energy required to make biomass as a function of temperature, pressure, redox state, the sources of C, N and S, cell mass and the time that an organism requires to double or replace its biomass. Specifically, these energetics are calculated from 0 to 125 °C, 0.1 to 500 MPa and -0.38 to +0.86 V using CO2, acetate or CH4 for C, NO3(-) or NH4(+) for N and SO4(2-) or HS(-) for S. The amounts of energy associated with synthesizing the biomolecules that make up a cell, which varies over 39 kJ (g cell)(-1), are then used to compute energy-based yield coefficients for a vast range of environmental conditions. Taken together, environmental variables and the range of cell sizes leads to a ~4 orders of magnitude difference between the number of microbial cells that can be made from a Joule of Gibbs energy under the most (5.06 × 10(11) cells J(-1)) and least (5.21 × 10(7) cells J(-1)) ideal conditions. When doubling/replacement time is taken into account, the range of anabolism energies can expand even further. PMID:26859771

  7. Anabolic Effects of Oxandrolone After Severe Burn

    PubMed Central

    Hart, David W.; Wolf, Steven E.; Ramzy, Peter I.; Chinkes, David L.; Beauford, Robert B.; Ferrando, Arny A.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Herndon, David N.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To explore the hypothesis that oxandrolone may reverse muscle catabolism in cachectic, critically ill pediatric burn patients. Summary Background Data Severe burn causes exaggerated muscle protein catabolism, contributing to weakness and delayed healing. Oxandrolone is an anabolic steroid that has been used in cachectic hepatitis and AIDS patients. Methods Fourteen severely burned children were enrolled during a 5-month period in a prospective cohort analytic study. There was a prolonged delay in the arrival of these patients to the burn unit for definitive care. This neglect of skin grafting and nutritional support resulted in critically ill children with significant malnutrition. On arrival, all patients underwent excision and skin grafting and received similar clinical care. Subjects were studied 5 to 7 days after admission, and again after 1 week of oxandrolone treatment at 0.1 mg/kg by mouth twice daily or no pharmacologic treatment. Muscle protein kinetics were derived from femoral arterial and venous blood samples and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies during a stable isotope infusion. Results Control and oxandrolone subjects were similar in age, weight, and percentage of body surface area burned. Muscle protein net balance decreased in controls and improved in the oxandrolone group. The improvement in the oxandrolone group was associated with increased protein synthesis efficiency. Muscle protein breakdown was unchanged. Conclusions In burn victims, oxandrolone improves muscle protein metabolism through enhanced protein synthesis efficiency. These findings suggest the efficacy of oxandrolone in impeding muscle protein catabolism in cachectic, critically injured children. PMID:11303139

  8. Anabolic-androgenic steroids and brain reward.

    PubMed

    Clark, A S; Lindenfeld, R C; Gibbons, C H

    1996-03-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) effects on brain reward were investigated in male rats with electrodes implanted in the lateral hypothalamus using the rate-frequency curve shift paradigm of brain stimulation reward. In the first experiment, treatment for 2 weeks with the AAS methandrostenolone had no effect on either the reward or performance components of intracranial self-stimulation. In the second experiment, treatment for 15 weeks with an AAS "cocktail" consisting of testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate, and boldenone undecylenate did not alter brain reward but did produce a slight but significant change in bar press rate. In addition to the AAS treatment, animals in the second study were administered a single injection of d-amphetamine before and after 15 weeks of AAS exposure. The rate-frequency curve shift observed in response to a systemic injection of amphetamine was significantly greater in animals after 15 weeks of treatment with the AAS cocktail. Although AAS do not appear to alter the rewarding properties of brain stimulation, AAS may influence the sensitivity of brain reward systems. PMID:8866980

  9. Targeting the osteoblast: approved and experimental anabolic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Toulis, Konstantinos A; Anastasilakis, Athanasios D; Polyzos, Stergios A; Makras, Polyzois

    2011-01-01

    Targeting osteoblast may be the means of effectively improving both bone quality and mass, thus offering an intriguing alternative in the treatment of osteoporosis. Aside from injectable parathyroid hormone (PTH) and its novel preparations, PTH-related peptide (PTHrP), calcilytics, beta-adrenergic receptors, enhancement of Wnt signaling (mainly via sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 neutralization), regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LPR) 5/osteoblast axis, activin, IGF-1, and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) are reviewed for their basic rationale and evidence of bone anabolic potential. Sclerostin neutralizing antibody, teriparatide transdermal patch, and PTHrP (1-36) are currently at an advanced stage of research. Safety and tissue specificity are the prerequisites in the development of a novel treatment, especially when addressing a chronic condition such as osteoporosis. PMID:22001129

  10. Detection, quantification and confirmation of anabolic steroids in equine plasma by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fuyu; Uboh, Cornelius E; Soma, Lawrence R; Luo, Yi; Rudy, Jeffery; Tobin, Thomas

    2005-12-27

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are related to the male sex hormones and are abused in equine sports. In an effort to deter the abuse of anabolic steroids, a sensitive LC-MS/MS method was developed for detection, quantification and confirmation of eight major anabolic steroids (testosterone, normethandrolone, nandrolone, boldenone, methandrostenolone, tetrahydrogestrinone (THG), trenbolone, and stanozolol) in equine plasma. Formation of solvent adduct ions of the analytes was observed under electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions, and desolvation of the solvent adduct ions by source collision-induced decomposition (CID) increased the abundance of the [M+H]+ ions as well as the multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) signals. ESI (+) and APCI (+) were compared with respect to sensitivity for the analytes and the former provided better sensitivity. The matrix effect on ion suppression or enhancement was evaluated, and was negligible. Confirmation of the analytes was performed using criteria of three ion transitions and LC retention time of each analyte. The limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) was 25 pg/mL. The limit of confirmation (LOC) was 25 pg/mL for boldenone; 50 pg/mL for normethandrolone, nandrolone, and methandrostenolone; and 100 pg/mL for testosterone, THG, trenbolone, and stanozolol. The analytes were evaluated for stability and found to be stable in plasma for 24h at room temperature, 13 days at 4 degrees C, and 34 days at -20 and -70 degrees C. The method was successfully applied to analyses of equine plasma samples for pharmacokinetics study. This method is sensitive and useful for detection, quantification and confirmation of these anabolic steroids in equine plasma. PMID:16289956

  11. Bioidentical Hormones for Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Variation on a Theme

    PubMed Central

    Bythrow, Jenna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progesterone creams and natural or bioidentical compounded estrogen preparations are being promoted to consumers as safe alternatives to conventional menopausal hormone therapy and as health-promoting tonics. No reliable data support these claims. SAFETY Natural hormones, including estradiol, estriol, estrone, and progesterone, can be expected to have the same adverse event profile as conventional menopausal hormone regimens. SALIVARY HORMONE TESTS Salivary tests may be used to persuade asymptomatic consumers to use hormones (or symptomatic patients to use higher doses than those needed to mitigate symptoms), a practice that can be expected to result in adverse events. PMID:17549577

  12. Determination of steroid hormones and related compounds in filtered and unfiltered water by solid-phase extraction, derivatization, and gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Lindley, Chris E.; Losche, Scott A.; Barber, Larry B.

    2012-01-01

    A new analytical method has been developed and implemented at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory that determines a suite of 20 steroid hormones and related compounds in filtered water (using laboratory schedule 2434) and in unfiltered water (using laboratory schedule 4434). This report documents the procedures and initial performance data for the method and provides guidance on application of the method and considerations of data quality in relation to data interpretation. The analytical method determines 6 natural and 3 synthetic estrogen compounds, 6 natural androgens, 1 natural and 1 synthetic progestin compound, and 2 sterols: cholesterol and 3--coprostanol. These two sterols have limited biological activity but typically are abundant in wastewater effluents and serve as useful tracers. Bisphenol A, an industrial chemical used primarily to produce polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins and that has been shown to have estrogenic activity, also is determined by the method. A technique referred to as isotope-dilution quantification is used to improve quantitative accuracy by accounting for sample-specific procedural losses in the determined analyte concentration. Briefly, deuterium- or carbon-13-labeled isotope-dilution standards (IDSs), all of which are direct or chemically similar isotopic analogs of the method analytes, are added to all environmental and quality-control and quality-assurance samples before extraction. Method analytes and IDS compounds are isolated from filtered or unfiltered water by solid-phase extraction onto an octadecylsilyl disk, overlain with a graded glass-fiber filter to facilitate extraction of unfiltered sample matrices. The disks are eluted with methanol, and the extract is evaporated to dryness, reconstituted in solvent, passed through a Florisil solid-phase extraction column to remove polar organic interferences, and again evaporated to dryness in a reaction vial. The method compounds are reacted with

  13. Effect of hydration state on resistance exercise-induced endocrine markers of anabolism, catabolism, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Judelson, Daniel A; Maresh, Carl M; Yamamoto, Linda M; Farrell, Mark J; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S; Spiering, Barry A; Casa, Douglas J; Anderson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    Hypohydration (decreased total body water) exacerbates the catabolic hormonal response to endurance exercise with unclear effects on anabolic hormones. Limited research exists that evaluates the effect of hypohydration on endocrine responses to resistance exercise; this work merits attention as the acute postexercise hormonal environment potently modulates resistance training adaptations. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hydration state on the endocrine and metabolic responses to resistance exercise. Seven healthy resistance-trained men (age = 23 +/- 4 yr, body mass = 87.8 +/- 6.8 kg, body fat = 11.5 +/- 5.2%) completed three identical resistance exercise bouts in different hydration states: euhydrated (EU), hypohydrated by approximately 2.5% body mass (HY25), and hypohydrated by approximately 5.0% body mass (HY50). Investigators manipulated hydration status via controlled water deprivation and exercise-heat stress. Cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, testosterone, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin, glucose, lactate, glycerol, and free fatty acids were measured during euhydrated rest, immediately preceding resistance exercise, immediately postexercise, and during 60 min of recovery. Body mass decreased 0.2 +/- 0.4, 2.4 +/- 0.4, and 4.8 +/- 0.4% during EU, HY25, and HY50, respectively, supported by humoral and urinary changes that clearly indicated subjects achieved three distinct hydration states. Hypohydration significantly 1) increased circulating concentrations of cortisol and norepinephrine, 2) attenuated the testosterone response to exercise, and 3) altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These results suggest that hypohydration can modify the hormonal and metabolic response to resistance exercise, influencing the postexercise circulatory milieu. PMID:18617629

  14. Adolescent ischemic stroke associated with anabolic steroid and cannabis abuse.

    PubMed

    El Scheich, Tarik; Weber, Artur-Aron; Klee, Dirk; Schweiger, Daniel; Mayatepek, Ertan; Karenfort, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 16-year-old body builder who suffered from an acute ischemic stroke. In the urine, cannabis metabolites as well as metabolites of the oral androgenic-anabolic steroid methandrostenolone were detected, both known to be associated with stroke events. This report highlights the role of cannabis and steroid abuse that induce strokes in the absence of arteriopathy, cardioembolism or thrombophilia. Owing to new upcoming socio-behavioral aspects of late childhood and early adolescent life, this formally rare abuse of cannabis and/or anabolic steroids as well as their associations with strokes becomes more current than ever. PMID:23382306

  15. On the Free Energy That Drove Primordial Anabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A key problem in understanding the origin of life is to explain the mechanism(s) that led to the spontaneous assembly of molecular building blocks that ultimately resulted in the appearance of macromolecular structures as they are known in modern biochemistry today. An indispensable thermodynamic prerequisite for such a primordial anabolism is the mechanistic coupling to processes that supplied the free energy required. Here I review different sources of free energy and discuss the potential of each form having been involved in the very first anabolic reactions that were fundamental to increase molecular complexity and thus were essential for life. PMID:19468343

  16. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  17. Knowledge about Anabolic Steroids of Rhode Island Adolescents: Implications for Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, June

    Although anabolic steroids are associated with short term behavior and long term health problems, few schools address this issue. Adolescents were surveyed to determine their general knowledge of anabolic steroids, attitudes related to fair play, and interest in limiting anabolic steroid use. Data from 322 boys and 331 girls in grades 7-12 were…

  18. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  19. 21 CFR 1308.33 - Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.33 Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products; application. (a) The Administrator, upon the recommendation of Secretary of Health...

  20. 21 CFR 1308.33 - Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.33 Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products; application. (a) The Administrator, upon the recommendation of Secretary of Health...

  1. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  2. 21 CFR 1308.33 - Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.33 Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products; application. (a) The Administrator, upon the recommendation of Secretary of Health...

  3. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  4. 21 CFR 1308.33 - Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exempt Anabolic Steroid Products § 1308.33 Exemption of certain anabolic steroid products; application. (a) The Administrator, upon the recommendation of Secretary of Health...

  5. 21 CFR 1308.25 - Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant... OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.25 Exclusion of a veterinary anabolic steroid implant product; application. (a) Any person...

  6. The Effect of Anabolic Steroid Education on Knowledge and Attitudes of At-Risk Preadolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenhaile, Jay; Choi, Hee-Sook; Proctor, Theron B.; Work, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the effect of anabolic steroid education on preadolescents' knowledge of and attitudes toward anabolic steroids with 35 male athletes. Information on psychological and physiological aspects of anabolic steroid use, weight training techniques, nutrition, social decision making, and self-esteem training were provided. Participants…

  7. Bleeding oesophageal varices associated with anabolic steroid use in an athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Winwood, P. J.; Robertson, D. A.; Wright, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old bodybuilder who had been taking anabolic steroids for 18 months presented with bleeding oesophageal varices. Serious liver disease secondary to anabolic steroids including peliosis hepatis, nodular hyperplasia and malignant change is well recognized. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first case of bleeding oesophageal varices associated with the use of anabolic steroids. PMID:2099434

  8. Human growth hormone doping in sport

    PubMed Central

    Saugy, M; Robinson, N; Saudan, C; Baume, N; Avois, L; Mangin, P

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) has been on the list of forbidden substances since availability of its recombinant form improved in the early 1990s. Although its effectiveness in enhancing physical performance is still unproved, the compound is likely used for its potential anabolic effect on the muscle growth, and also in combination with other products (androgens, erythropoietin, etc.). The degree of similarity between the endogenous and the recombinant forms, the pulsatile secretion and marked interindividual variability makes detection of doping difficult. Two approaches proposed to overcome this problem are: the indirect method, which measures a combination of several factors in the biological cascade affected by administration of GH; and the direct method, which measures the difference between the circulating and the recombinant (represented by the unique 22 kD molecule) forms of GH. This article gives an overview of what is presently known about hGH in relation to sport. The available methods of detection are also evaluated. Methods Review of the literature on GH in relation to exercise, and its adverse effects and methods of detection when used for doping. Results and conclusion The main effects of exercise on hGH production and the use and effects of rhGH in athletes are discussed. Difficulties encountered by laboratories to prove misuse of this substance by both indirect and direct analyses are emphasised. The direct method currently seems to have the best reliability, even though the time window of detection is too short. hGH doping is a major challenge in the fight against doping. The effect of exercise on hGH and its short half‐life are still presenting difficulties during doping analysis. To date the most promising method appears to be the direct approach utilising immunoassays. PMID:16799101

  9. Protein supplementation does not alter intramuscular anabolic signaling or endocrine response after resistance exercise in trained men.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Boone, Carleigh H; Beyer, Kyle S; Baker, Kayla M; Wells, Adam J; Church, David D; Mangine, Gerald T; Oliveira, Leonardo P; Moon, Jordan R; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway appears to be the primary regulator of muscle protein synthesis. A variety of stimuli including resistance exercise, amino acids, and hormonal signals activate mTORC1 signaling. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a protein supplement on mTORC1 signaling following a resistance exercise protocol designed to promote elevations in circulating hormone concentrations. We hypothesized that the protein supplement would augment the intramuscular anabolic signaling response. Ten resistance-trained men (age, 24.7 ± 3.4 years; weight, 90.1 ± 11.3 kg; height, 176.0 ± 4.9 cm) received either a placebo or a supplement containing 20 g protein, 6 g carbohydrates, and 1 g fat after high-volume, short-rest lower-body resistance exercise. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, immediately, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 5 hours after exercise. Fine-needle muscle biopsies were completed at baseline, 1 hour, and 5 hours after exercise. Myoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactate concentrations were significantly elevated after resistance exercise (P < .0001); however, no differences were observed between trials. Resistance exercise also elicited a significant insulin, growth hormone, and cortisol response (P < .01); however, no differences were observed between trials for insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, testosterone, growth hormone, or cortisol. Intramuscular anabolic signaling analysis revealed significant elevations in RPS6 phosphorylation after resistance exercise (P = .001); however, no differences were observed between trials for signaling proteins including Akt, mTOR, p70S6k, and RPS6. The endocrine response and phosphorylation status of signaling proteins within the mTORC1 pathway did not appear to be altered by ingestion of supplement after resistance exercise in resistance-trained men. PMID:26428621

  10. Investigation of the composition of anabolic tablets using near infrared spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Rebiere, Hervé; Ghyselinck, Céline; Lempereur, Laurent; Brenier, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    The use of performance enhancing drugs is a widespread phenomenon in professional and leisure sports. A spectroscopic study was carried out on anabolic tablets labelled as 5 mg methandienone tablets provided by police departments. The analytical approach was based on a two-step methodology: a fast analysis of tablets using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to assess sample homogeneity based on their global composition, followed by Raman chemical imaging of one sample per NIR profile to obtain information on sample formulation. NIR spectroscopy assisted by a principal components analysis (PCA) enabled fast discrimination of different profiles based on the excipient formulation. Raman hyperspectral imaging and multivariate curve resolution - alternating least square (MCR-ALS) provided chemical images of the distribution of the active substance and excipients within tablets and facilitated identification of the active compounds. The combination of NIR spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging highlighted dose-to-dose variations and succeeded in the discrimination of four different formulations out of eight similar samples of anabolic tablets. Some samples contained either methandienone or methyltestosterone whereas one sample did not contain an active substance. Other ingredients were sucrose, lactose, starch or talc. Both techniques were fast and non-destructive and therefore can be carried out as exploratory methods prior to destructive screening methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26198290

  11. Anabolic steroids detected in bodybuilding dietary supplements - a significant risk to public health.

    PubMed

    Abbate, V; Kicman, A T; Evans-Brown, M; McVeigh, J; Cowan, D A; Wilson, C; Coles, S J; Walker, C J

    2015-07-01

    Twenty-four products suspected of containing anabolic steroids and sold in fitness equipment shops in the United Kingdom (UK) were analyzed for their qualitative and semi-quantitative content using full scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), accurate mass liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), high pressure liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), UV-Vis, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, X-ray crystallography enabled the identification of one of the compounds, where reference standard was not available. Of the 24 products tested, 23 contained steroids including known anabolic agents; 16 of these contained steroids that were different to those indicated on the packaging and one product contained no steroid at all. Overall, 13 different steroids were identified; 12 of these are controlled in the UK under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. Several of the products contained steroids that may be considered to have considerable pharmacological activity, based on their chemical structures and the amounts present. This could unwittingly expose users to a significant risk to their health, which is of particular concern for naïve users. PMID:25284752

  12. In vivo and in vitro metabolism of the designer anabolic steroid furazadrol in thoroughbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Waller, Christopher C; Cawley, Adam T; Suann, Craig J; Ma, Paul; McLeod, Malcolm D

    2016-05-30

    Furazadrol ([1',2']isoxazolo[4',5':2,3]-5α-androstan-17β-ol) is a designer anabolic androgenic steroid that is readily available via the internet. It contains an isoxazole fused to the steroid A-ring which offers metabolic stability and noteworthy anabolic activity raising concerns over the potential for abuse of this compound in equine sports. The metabolism of furazadrol was studied by in vivo and in vitro methods for the first time. Urinary furazadrol 17-sulfate and furazadrol 17-glucuronide metabolites were detected in vivo after a controlled administration and compared with synthetically-derived reference materials in order to confirm their identities. They were quantified to establish the excretion profile and a suitable limit of detection. Minor metabolites were also detected, including epifurazadrol, hydroxylated furazadrol, and hydroxylated and oxidised furazadrol, present as the sulfate and glucuronide conjugates. Phase II metabolites were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis by Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase and Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase to further confirm the identity of the corresponding phase I metabolites. The metabolism profile was compared to the products obtained from an in vitro phase I metabolism study, with all but two of the minor in vivo phase I metabolites observed in the in vitro system. These investigations identify the key urinary metabolites of furazadrol following oral administration, which can be incorporated into anti-doping screening and confirmation procedures. PMID:26962720

  13. Use of dried blood spots in doping control analysis of anabolic steroid esters.

    PubMed

    Tretzel, Laura; Thomas, Andreas; Geyer, Hans; Gmeiner, Günter; Forsdahl, Guro; Pop, Valentin; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling, a technique for whole blood sampling on a piece of filter paper, has more than 50-years tradition, particularly in the diagnostic analysis of metabolic disorders in neonatal screening. Due to the minimal invasiveness, straightforwardness, robustness against manipulation and fastness DBS sampling recommends itself as an advantageous technique in doping control analysis. The present approach highlights the development of a screening assay for the analysis of eight anabolic steroid esters (nandrolone phenylpropionate, trenbolone enanthate, testosterone acetate, testosterone cypionate, testosterone isocaproate, testosterone phenylpropionate, testosterone decanoate and testosterone undecanoate) and nandrolone in DBS. The detection of the intact esters allows an unequivocal proof of the administration of conjugates of exogenous testosterone and its derivatives. Precise, specific and linear conditions were obtained by means of liquid chromatography high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry. Sensitivity in the low ppb range was accomplished by the preparation of the methyloxime derivatives of the target compounds. Labeled internal standards (d3-nandrolone, d3-nandrolone caproate and d3-nandrolone undecanoate) were applied to compensate for the broad range in chain length of the esters. The assay presented here outlines the application of DBS for the analysis of anabolic steroid esters in doping controls for the first time providing great potential to simplify the proof of exogenous administration of testosterone. PMID:24713476

  14. Anabolic Steroid Use: Indications of Habituation among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yesalis, Charles E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Identified characteristics of adolescent male anabolic steroid (AS) user and addictive potential. Found AS user population different from nonuser in self-perceptions of health and strength, interest in controlling AS use, and perception of peer AS use. Found subgroups with significantly different attitudes and/or behaviors. Suggests prevention…

  15. Psychological Predictors of Anabolic Steroid Use: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwerin, Michael J.; Corcoran, Kevin J.; LaFleur, Bonnie J.; Fisher, Leslee; Patterson, David; Olrich, Tracy

    1997-01-01

    Examined social physique anxiety, upper body esteem, social anxiety, and body dissatisfaction as possible predictors of anabolic steroid (AS) use. Results based on 185 AS-using bodybuilders and various control groups indicated that the upper body strength subscale of two measures, along with age, were significant predictors of AS use. (RJM)

  16. The Incidence of Anabolic Steroid Use among Competitive Bodybuilders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tricker, Ray; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Investigated incidence of anabolic steroid use among 380 competitive male and female bodybuilders in Kansas and Missouri. Results indicated more than half (54 percent) of the male bodybuilders were using steroids on a regular basis compared to 10 percent of the female competitors. Found main reason for use of steroids was desire to win. (Author/TE)

  17. Hypercholesterolemia in Male Power Lifters Using Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of serum cholesterol concentrations in male power lifters who used anabolic-androgenic steroids for eight weeks, three years, or eight years indicated that mean serum cholesterol levels increased with drug use, but decreased promptly to near pre-steroid levels after steroid use ended. (Author/CB)

  18. The incidence of anabolic steroid use among competitive bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Tricker, R; O'Neill, M R; Cook, D

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of anabolic steroid use among competitive male and female bodybuilders in Kansas and Missouri. A profile was established for users and non-users of anabolic steroids. The results of this study indicated that more than half of the male bodybuilders (54%) were using steroids on a regular basis compared to 10 percent of the female competitors. The types of steroid used were investigated and revealed that on average, four different types of anabolic steroid were used during the year, with individual use ranging from one to fifteen different types; including Dianabol, Deca Durabolin, Anavar, Testosterone, Androl 50, Winstrol, Primobolan, Equipoise, Finaject, Parabolin, HCG, Primacetate, Enanthate, Halotestin, and Maxibolin, in order of the most to least frequently used. The female bodybuilders reported that they had used an average of two different steroids including Deca Durabolin, Anavar, Testosterone, Dianabol, Equipoise, and Winstrol. The principal reason bodybuilders used steroids was related to their perception that these drugs were an important factor in winning competitions. Another important motivating factor for use was consistent with reports that significant gains in strength could be achieved by including anabolic steroids as part of the training regimen in spite of the reported adverse side-effects. PMID:2621538

  19. Psychological and Behavioral Effects of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrke, Michael S.

    This review of the literature on the psychological and behavioral effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AS) first looks at aspects of the history and prevalence of AS use in competitive sports. Research suggests that one-quarter to one-half million adolescents in the United States have used, or are currently using AS. Some effects of androgens…

  20. Chronic Ethanol Consumption Inhibits Postlactational Anabolic Rebuilding in Female Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite significant loss of bone during lactation, bone mineral density (BMD) is restored by a powerful anabolic rebuilding process following weaning. A significant number of women resume alcohol consumption after weaning their offspring from breast feeding. The objectives of the present study were ...

  1. Anabolic steroid usage in athletics: facts, fiction, and public relations.

    PubMed

    Berning, Joseph M; Adams, Kent J; Stamford, Bryant A

    2004-11-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests the widespread usage of anabolic steroids among athletes (20-90%), particularly at the professional and elite amateur levels. In contrast, scientific studies indicate that usage is rare and no higher than 6%. Conclusions from scientific studies suggest that anabolic steroid usage declines progressively from high school to college and beyond; however, anecdotal evidence claims the opposite trend. In this clash between "hard" scientific data vs. "soft" anecdotal information, it is natural that professionals would gravitate toward scientifically based conclusions. However, in the case of anabolic steroids (a stigmatized and illegal substance), should word-of-mouth testimony from individuals closest to the issues--those who have participated in and coached sports, those who have served as drug-testing overseers, and journalists who relentlessly track leads and verify sources--be set aside as irrelevant? Not if a complete picture is to emerge. In this review, hard scientific evidence is placed on the table side-by-side with soft anecdotal evidence, without weighting or bias. The purpose is to allow the opportunity for each to illuminate the other and, in so doing, potentially bring us a step closer to determining the true extent of anabolic steroid usage in athletics. PMID:15574100

  2. Androgenic anabolic steroid exposure during adolescence: Ramifications for brain development and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Rebecca L.; Lumia, Augustus R.; McGinnis, Marilyn Y.

    2013-01-01

    Puberty is a critical period for brain maturation that is highly dependent on gonadal sex hormones. Modifications in the gonadal steroid environment, via the use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), have been shown to affect brain development and behavior. Studies in both humans and animal models indicate that AAS exposure during adolescence alters normal brain remodeling, including structural changes and neurotransmitter function. The most commonly reported behavioral effect is an increase in aggression. Evidence has been presented to identify factors that influence the effect of AAS on the expression of aggression. The chemical composition of the AAS plays a major role in determining whether aggression is displayed, with testosterone being the most effective. The hormonal context, the environmental context, physical provocation and the perceived threat during the social encounter have all been found to influence the expression of aggression and sexual behavior. All of these factors point toward an altered behavioral state that includes an increased readiness to respond to a social encounter with heightened vigilance, and enhanced motivation. This AAS-induced state may be defined as emboldenment. The evidence suggests that the use of AAS during this critical period of development may increase the risk for maladaptive behaviors along with neurological disorders. PMID:23274699

  3. Development of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis after Anabolic Steroid Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Herlitz, Leal C.; Markowitz, Glen S.; Farris, Alton B.; Schwimmer, Joshua A.; Stokes, Michael B.; Kunis, Cheryl; Colvin, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse adversely affects the endocrine system, blood lipids, and the liver, but renal injury has not been described. We identified an association of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and proteinuria in a cohort of 10 bodybuilders (six white and four Hispanic; mean body mass index 34.7) after long-term abuse of anabolic steroids. The clinical presentation included proteinuria (mean 10.1 g/d; range 1.3 to 26.3 g/d) and renal insufficiency (mean serum creatinine 3.0 mg/dl; range 1.3 to 7.8 mg/dl); three (30%) patients presented with nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed FSGS in nine patients, four of whom also had glomerulomegaly, and glomerulomegaly alone in one patient. Three biopsies revealed collapsing lesions of FSGS, four had perihilar lesions, and seven showed ≥40% tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Among eight patients with mean follow-up of 2.2 yr, one progressed to ESRD, the other seven received renin-angiotensin system blockade, and one also received corticosteroids. All seven patients discontinued anabolic steroids, leading to weight loss, stabilization or improvement in serum creatinine, and a reduction in proteinuria. One patient resumed anabolic steroid abuse and suffered relapse of proteinuria and renal insufficiency. We hypothesize that secondary FSGS results from a combination of postadaptive glomerular changes driven by increased lean body mass and potential direct nephrotoxic effects of anabolic steroids. Because of the expected rise in serum creatinine as a result of increased muscle mass in bodybuilders, this complication is likely underrecognized. PMID:19917783

  4. Syntheses of precursors and reference compounds of the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) tracers [¹¹C]SNAP-7941 and [¹⁸F]FE@SNAP for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Eva; Shanab, Karem; Datterl, Barbara; Neudorfer, Catharina; Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Philippe, Cécile; Spreitzer, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The MCH receptor has been revealed as a target of great interest in positron emission tomography imaging. The receptor's eponymous substrate melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a cyclic peptide hormone, which is located predominantly in the hypothalamus with a major influence on energy and weight regulation as well as water balance and memory. Therefore, it is thought to play an important role in the pathophysiology of adiposity, which is nowadays a big issue worldwide. Based on the selective and high-affinity MCH receptor 1 antagonist SNAP-7941, a series of novel SNAP derivatives has been developed to provide different precursors and reference compounds for the radiosyntheses of the novel PET radiotracers [(11)C]SNAP-7941 and [(18)F]FE@SNAP. Positron emission tomography promotes a better understanding of physiologic parameters on a molecular level, thus giving a deeper insight into MCHR1 related processes as adiposity. PMID:24084017

  5. Determination of hormones, a plasticizer, preservatives, perfluoroalkylated compounds, and a flame retardant in water samples by ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2015-10-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) is a novel extraction technique commonly applied for the extraction on a specific group of compounds. In this paper, the applicability of ultrasound-assisted DLLME-SFO for multiresidue extraction has been evaluated. A method for the simultaneous extraction of four hormones (17α-ethinylestradiol, 17β-estradiol, estriol and estrone), a plasticizer (bisphenol A), three preservatives (methyl-, ethyl- and propylparaben), six perfluoroalkylated compounds (perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and five perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, from C4 to C8), and a brominated flame retardant (hexabromocyclododecane) has been developed and validated for their extraction from surface water and tap water. Determination was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Recoveries of the target compounds were highly dependent on their log K(ow) values. Linear relationship between recoveries and log K(ow) values was observed for compounds from the same group (hormones, preservatives and perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acids). The lowest recoveries were obtained for the less hydrophobic compounds (estriol (43%), methylparaben (32%), ethylparaben (45%) and the perfluorinated compounds of shorter alkyl chain (C4: 17%, C5: 41% and C6: 57%)). Recoveries of the other pollutants were higher than 80%. Precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was in the range from 1% to 16%. Method detection limits were in the range 0.001-1.126 µg L(-1), for surface water, and 0.001-1.446 µg L(-1) for tap water. No important matrix effect was observed. PMID:26078168

  6. Urinary detection of conjugated and unconjugated anabolic steroids by dilute-and-shoot liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tudela, Eva; Deventer, Koen; Geldof, Lore; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are an important class of doping agents. The metabolism of these substances is generally very extensive and includes phase-I and phase-II pathways. In this work, a comprehensive detection of these metabolites is described using a 2-fold dilution of urine and subsequent analysis by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The method was applied to study 32 different metabolites, excreted free or conjugated (glucuronide or sulfate), which permit the detection of misuse of at least 21 anabolic steroids. The method has been fully validated for 21 target compounds (8 glucuronide, 1 sulfate and 12 free steroids) and 18 out of 21 compounds had detection limits in the range of 1-10 ng mL(-1) in urine. For the conjugated compounds, for which no reference standards are available, metabolites were synthesized in vitro or excretion studies were investigated. The detection limits for these compounds ranged between 0.5 and 18 ng mL(-1) in urine. The simple and straightforward methodology complements the traditional methods based on hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). PMID:24753397

  7. Combined effects of androgen anabolic steroids and physical activity on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Hengevoss, Jonas; Piechotta, Marion; Müller, Dennis; Hanft, Fabian; Parr, Maria Kristina; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Diel, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Analysing effects of pharmaceutical substances and training on feedback mechanisms of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be helpful to quantify the benefit of strategies preventing loss of muscle mass, and in the fight against doping. In this study we analysed combined effects of anabolic steroids and training on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Therefore intact male Wistar rats were dose-dependently treated with metandienone, estradienedione and the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S-1. In serum cortisol, testosterone, 17β-estradiol (E2), prolactin, inhibin B, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and thyroxine (T4) concentrations were determined. Six human volunteers were single treated with 1-androstenedione. In addition abusing and clean body builders were analysed. Serum concentrations of inhibin B, IGF-1, cortisol, prolactin, T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), testosterone and LH were determined. In rats, administration of metandienone, estradienedione and S-1 resulted in an increase of muscle fiber diameter. Metandienone and estradienedione but not S-1 administration significantly decreases LH and inhibin B serum concentration. Administration of estradienedione resulted in an increase of E2 and S-1 in an increase of cortisol. Single administration of 1-androstenedione in humans decreased cortisol and inhibin B serum concentrations. LH was not affected. In abusing body builders a significantly decrease of LH, TSH and inhibin B and an increase of prolactin, IGF-1 and T4 was detected. In clean body builders only T4 and TSH were affected. PMID:25797375

  8. ANABOLIC-ANDROGENIC STEROID DEPENDENCE? INSIGHTS FROM ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, with negative health consequences. As a result, in 1991 testosterone and related AAS were declared controlled substances. However, the relative abuse and dependence liability of AAS have not been fully characterized. In humans, it is difficult to separate the direct psychoactive effects of AAS from reinforcement due to their systemic anabolic effects. However, using conditioned place preference and self-administration, studies in animals have demonstrated that AAS are reinforcing in a context where athletic performance is irrelevant. Furthermore, AAS share brain sites of action and neurotransmitter systems in common with other drugs of abuse. In particular, recent evidence links AAS with opioids. In humans, AAS abuse is associated with prescription opioid use. In animals, AAS overdose produces symptoms resembling opioid overdose, and AAS modify the activity of the endogenous opioid system. PMID:18275992

  9. Anabolic androgenic steroids in delayed diagnosis of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Suneet K.; Sharma, Archana; Rai, Deependra K.; Thawani, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    This is the first case report depicting masking of symptoms of intestinal tuberculosis by anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) causing delay in diagnosis which lead to a major surgery. Negative tuberculosis skin test (TST) probably due to immunomodulating effects of AAS also contributed to the delay. Patient also had early dependence on AAS and rapid growth of scrotal sebaceous cysts, findings of which have not yet been reported. PMID:23326112

  10. Anabolic-androgenic steroid effects on sexual receptivity in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Blasberg, M E; Clark, A S

    1997-12-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) compounds are synthetic androgens taken by athletes to increase physical strength and endurance. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that AAS administration disrupts the estrous cycle of Long-Evans rats. The present experiments examined the effects of six commonly abused AAS compounds on sexual receptivity in ovariectomized rats. Adult female Long-Evans rats received estradiol benzoate (EB; 2.0 micrograms/day s.c.) for 6 consecutive days followed by 15 days of EB concurrent with daily s.c. injections of 7.5 mg/kg of one of the following AAS compounds: 17 alpha-methyltestosterone, methandrostenolone, nandrolone decanoate, stanozolol, oxymetholone, testosterone cypionate, or the oil vehicle. On Day 15, all female rats received progesterone (1.0 mg/rat) 4 h before testing. Tests for sexual receptivity were conducted on Days 3, 6, 14, and 15 of AAS treatment. Although the time course of AAS effects on sexual receptivity varied, some overall effects were clear. For example, 17 alpha-methyltestosterone, methandrostenolone, nandrolone decanoate, and stanozolol interfered with the display of sexual receptivity on Day 14, whereas oxymetholone and testosterone cypionate had no effect. Rats in all groups displayed high levels of sexual receptivity after receiving progesterone on Day 15. Our results show that AAS compounds vary in their degree of inhibition of female sexual behavior in ovariectomized rats. PMID:9454671

  11. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Analogs as Osteoporosis Therapies.

    PubMed

    Esbrit, Pedro; Herrera, Sabina; Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Nogués, Xavier; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo

    2016-04-01

    The only bone anabolic agent currently available for osteoporosis treatment is parathyroid hormone (PTH)-either its N-terminal 1-34 fragment or the whole molecule of 1-84 aminoacids-whose intermittent administration stimulates new bone formation by targeting osteoblastogenesis and osteoblast survival. PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is an abundant factor in bone which shows N-terminal homology with PTH and thus exhibits high affinity for the same PTH type 1 receptor in osteoblasts. Therefore, it is not surprising that intermittently administered N-terminal PTHrP peptides induce bone anabolism in animals and humans. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of PTHrP also elicits osteogenic features in vitro in osteoblastic cells and in various animal models of osteoporosis. In this review, we discuss the current concepts about the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby PTHrP may induce anabolic actions in bone. Pre-clinical studies and clinical data using N-terminal PTHrP analogs are also summarized, pointing to PTHrP as a promising alternative to current bone anabolic therapies. PMID:26259869

  12. β-Blockade and Growth Hormone After Burn

    PubMed Central

    Hart, David W.; Wolf, Steven E.; Chinkes, David L.; Lal, Sofia O.; Ramzy, Peter I.; Herndon, David N.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine whether propranolol and growth hormone (GH) have additive effects to combat burn-induced catabolism. Summary Background Data Both GH and propranolol have been attributed anabolic properties after severe trauma and burn. It is conceivable that the two in combination would have additive effects. Methods Fifty-six children with more than 40% TBSA burns were randomized to one of four anabolic regimens: untreated control, GH treatment, propranolol treatment, or combination GH plus propranolol therapy. Clinical treatment was identical for all groups. Resting energy expenditure was determined by indirect calorimetry and skeletal muscle protein kinetics were measured using stable amino acid isotope infusions before and after each anabolic regimen. Results There were no differences in age, sex, or burn size between groups. Tachycardia and energy expenditure were decreased during propranolol treatment (P < .05). The net balance of muscle protein synthesis and breakdown was improved during proprandol and GH plus propranolol treatment (P < .05). There was no significant benefit of GH alone. No additive effect of combination therapy was seen. Conclusions Propranolol is a strongly anabolic drug during the early, hypercatabolic period after burn. No synergistic effect between propranolol and GH was identified. PMID:12368673

  13. [Artificial illness as a result of non-medical use of anabolic androgenic steroids: A case report and a review of literature].

    PubMed

    Povzun, S A

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year-old female body builder who had used anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) for 18 years to build up muscle mass died from liver rupture. The cause of the latter was multiple abscesses caused by Actinomyces, which developed in the presence of immunodeficiency. The postmortem changes in different organs were due to hormonal imbalance. The paper gives the data available in the literature pertaining to the analysis of the effects of AASs taken in supraphysiological doses on the body and their non-medical application. PMID:27600782

  14. The thyroid hormone mimetic compound KB2115 lowers plasma LDL cholesterol and stimulates bile acid synthesis without cardiac effects in humans.

    PubMed

    Berkenstam, Anders; Kristensen, Jens; Mellström, Karin; Carlsson, Bo; Malm, Johan; Rehnmark, Stefan; Garg, Neeraj; Andersson, Carl Magnus; Rudling, Mats; Sjöberg, Folke; Angelin, Bo; Baxter, John D

    2008-01-15

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a major problem despite the availability of drugs that influence major risk factors. New treatments are needed, and there is growing interest in therapies that may have multiple actions. Thyroid hormone modulates several cardiovascular risk factors and delays atherosclerosis progression in humans. However, use of thyroid hormone is limited by side effects, especially in the heart. To overcome this limitation, pharmacologically selective thyromimetics that mimic metabolic effects of thyroid hormone and bypass side effects are under development. In animal models, such thyromimetics have been shown to stimulate cholesterol elimination through LDL and HDL pathways and decrease body weight without eliciting side effects. We report here studies on a selective thyromimetic [KB2115; (3-[[3,5-dibromo-4-[4-hydroxy-3-(1-methylethyl)-phenoxy]-phenyl]-amino]-3-oxopropanoic acid)] in humans. In moderately overweight and hypercholesterolemic subjects KB2115 was found to be safe and well tolerated and elicited up to a 40% lowering of total and LDL cholesterol after 14 days of treatment. Bile acid synthesis was stimulated without evidence of increased cholesterol production, indicating that KB2115 induced net cholesterol excretion. KB2115 did not provoke detectable effects on the heart, suggesting that the pharmacological selectivity observed in animal models translates to humans. Thus, selective thyromimetics deserve further study as agents to treat dyslipidemia and other risk factors for atherosclerosis. PMID:18160532

  15. Detecting growth hormone misuse in athletes.

    PubMed

    Holt, Richard I G

    2013-10-01

    Athletes have been misusing growth hormone (GH) for its anabolic and metabolic effects since the early 1980s, at least a decade before endocrinologists began to treat adults with GH deficiency. Although there is an ongoing debate about whether GH is performance enhancing, recent studies suggest that GH improves strength and sprint capacity, particularly when combined with anabolic steroids. The detection of GH misuse is challenging because it is an endogenous hormone. Two approaches have been developed to detect GH misuse; the first is based on the measurement of pituitary GH isoforms and the ratio of 22-kDa isoform to total GH. The second is based on the measurement of insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (P-III-NP) which increase in a dose-dependent manner in response to GH administration. Both methodologies have been approved by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and have led to the detection of a number of athletes misusing GH. PMID:24251151

  16. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners. PMID:26980272

  17. Feasibility of capillary liquid chromatography/microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry in analyzing anabolic steroids in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Ahonen, Linda L; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2010-04-15

    We examined the feasibility of capillary liquid chromatography/microchip atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry (capLC/microAPPI-MS/MS) for the analysis of anabolic steroids in human urine. The urine samples were pretreated by enzymatic hydrolysis (with beta-glucuronidase from Helix pomatia), and the compounds were liquid-liquid extracted with diethyl ether. After separation the compounds were vaporized by microchip APPI, photoionized by a 10 eV krypton discharge lamp, and detected by selected reaction monitoring. The capLC/microAPPI-MS/MS method showed good sensitivity with detection limits at the level of 1.0 ng mL(-1), good linearity with correlation coefficients between 0.9954 and 0.9990, and good repeatability with relative standard deviations below 10%. These results demonstrate that microchip APPI combined with capLC/MS/MS provides a new potential method for analyzing non-polar and neutral compounds in biological samples. PMID:20209666

  18. Pulmonary embolism associated with protein C deficiency and abuse of anabolic-androgen steroids.

    PubMed

    Alhadad, Alaa; Acosta, Stefan; Sarabi, Latif; Kölbel, Tilo

    2010-04-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old male athlete with protein C deficiency who developed proximal deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism while abusing anabolic-androgenic steroids. Anabolic-androgenic steroids have been reported to have anticoagulatory and profibrinolytic effects in patients with protein C deficiency. Despite these antithrombotic effects, the patient developed repeated venous thromboembolism during treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin. The net effect of anabolic-androgenic steroids on the haemostatic system may change from antithrombotic to prothrombotic in male abusers of anabolic steroids with protein C deficiency. PMID:18977778

  19. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L.; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT-7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory. PMID:23792034

  20. Hormonal regulators of muscle and metabolism in aging (HORMA): Design and conduct of a complex, double-masked, multicenter trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Older persons often lose muscle mass, strength, and physical function. This report describes the challenges of conducting a complex clinical investigation assessing the effects of anabolic hormones on body composition, physical function, and metabolism during aging. METHODS: HORMA is a m...

  1. What can allostasis tell us about anabolic-androgenic steroid addiction?

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Yehuda, Rachel; Alfano, Lauren

    2011-08-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) are synthetic hormones used by individuals who want to look better or perform better in athletics and at the gym. Their use raises an interesting paradox in which drug use is associated with a number of health benefits, but also the possibility of negative health consequences. Existing models of AAS addiction follow the traditional framework of drug abuse and dependence, which suggest that harmful use occurs as a result of the drug's ability to hijack the motivation-reward system. However, AASs, unlike typical drugs of abuse, are not used for acute intoxication effects or euphoria. Rather, AASs are used to affect the body through changes to the musculoskeletal system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis as opposed to stimulating the reward system. We offer an allostatic model of AAS addiction to resolve this inconsistency between traditional drug addiction and AAS addiction. This allostatic framework provides a way to (a) incorporate exercise into AAS misuse, (b) identify where AAS use transitions from recreational use into a drug problem, and (c) describe individual differences in vulnerability or resilience to AASs. Implications for this model of AAS addiction are discussed. PMID:21756441

  2. Dissolved Organic Matter Assisted Transport of Hormones Through An Agricultural Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jann, S.; Totsche, K. U.; Koegel-Knabner, I.; Schiffer, B.; Meyer, H. H. D.

    In the last years the disrupting activity of steroidal sex hormones like estrogens has been discussed for various ecosystems and even for human fertility. Once released into the environment, steroids pose a severe risk to fauna and man. After excretion of the relevant compounds or their metabolites by the target animals, the transition of biologically active substances via dung or manure onto soils and into the groundwa- ter cannot be excluded. Yet there is only little knowledge on the stability, degradation and transport pathways of steroids in soils. Just as little is known about the fate of anabolic steroids which are licensed as growth promotants for farm animals in many meat-exporting countries outside the EU (e.g. USA, Australia). We therefore studied the transport of Trenbolone-17 and Melengestrolacetate (MGA) with col- umn experiments employing aggregated agricultural field soil materials (Luvisol E and Bt horizons). The columns (14.6 cm in height, 4.7 cm in diameter) were perco- lated from bottom to top using a peristaltic pump. The mean volumetric flow rate was kept constant throughout the experiments at 20 ml h-1. Chloride was used as nonreac- tive tracer. The flow regime is controlled by two flow regions reflecting the dual mode pore size distribution of the aggregated soil material. Our results show that although the very high KOC values U Trenbolone: 24311 within the E-horizon; 21622 within the Bt-horizon and MGA: 16708 within the E-horizon; 59459 within the Bt horizon - we observe a quick breakthrough of low concentrations of the hormones simultaneous with the non-reactive tracer chloride. This points to the fact that within aggregated field soil, the risk for deep seepage of low concentrations of hormones is high.

  3. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  4. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... based lubricants include petroleum jelly, baby oil, or mineral oil. Oil-based types should not be used ... caused by low levels of these hormones. Hysterectomy: Removal of the uterus. Menopause: The time in a ...

  5. Anabolic-androgenic steroid use among 133 prisoners.

    PubMed

    Pope, H G; Kouri, E M; Powell, K F; Campbell, C; Katz, D L

    1996-01-01

    We performed a forensic evaluation of a 16-year-old boy convicted of murdering his 14-year-old girlfriend while he was taking anabolic steroids. Prior to steroid use, he had displayed no features of antisocial personality disorder and no criminal record. Prompted by this index case, we interviewed 133 consecutive male convicts at the same facility where this boy was incarcerated to assess whether steroid use frequently contributed to criminal acts. Two other cases of apparent steroid-induced crimes were found in this cohort, suggesting that steroid use is an uncommon, though occasionally significant, factor in criminal behavior. PMID:8879906

  6. Anabolic androgenic steroids, an easily forgotten cause of polycythaemia and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Low, M S Y; Vilcassim, S; Fedele, P; Grigoriadis, G

    2016-04-01

    Excessive anabolic androgenic steroids (both exogenous and endogenous) are known causes of polycythaemia and ischaemic cardiovascular events. Despite this, they are commonly forgotten in the workup of patients. We report a case of exogenous anabolic androgenic steroid-induced polycythaemia and stroke and explore possible pitfalls for clinicians. PMID:27062206

  7. Anabolic Steroids: A Threat to Body and Mind. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report, based on findings of recent studies on the use of anabolic steroids in the United States, was written to educate the public about these drugs and the dangers of misusing them. It notes that the nonmedical use of anabolic/androgenic steroids among adolescents and young adults is of growing concern, with possibly as many as half a…

  8. OVERVIEW OF EXPOSURE TO DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS AND PCBS ON DEVELOPMENTAL, IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE, AND HORMONE-RELATED EFFECTS IN MAMMALS, INCLUDING HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to TCDD and related compounds leads to a plethora of effects in multiple species, tissues and stages of development. The response spectrum ranges from simple biochemical alterations to overtly toxic responses, including lethality. Many of the effects of TCDD and relate...

  9. [Comparative study of anabolizing activity of apilac and methandrostenolone on a model of isolated overload of the rat skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Gadzhieva, D M; Paniushkin, V V; Seĭfulla, R D; Ordzhonikidze, Z G

    2002-01-01

    The anabolic activity of apilac was studied in rats in comparison to methanrdostenolone A 10-day administration of apilac (200 mg/kg) produced a pronounced anabolic effect manifested by a hypertrophy of m. soleus. Methanrdostenolone (10 mg/kg) also favored a gain in the muscle weight. The anabolic action of apilac was comparable to that of methanrdostenolone. PMID:12025788

  10. Spatiotemporal variations in estrogenicity, hormones, and endocrine-disrupting compounds in influents and effluents of selected wastewater-treatment plants and receiving streams in New York, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Ernst, Anne G.; Gray, James L.; Hemming, Jocelyn D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in wastewater effluents have been linked to changes in sex ratios, intersex (in males), behavioral modifications, and developmental abnormalities in aquatic organisms. Yet efforts to identify and regulate specific EDCs in complex mixtures are problematic because little is known about the estrogen activity (estrogenicity) levels of many common and emerging contaminants. The potential effects of EDCs on the water quality and health of biota in streams of the New York City water supply is especially worrisome because more than 150 wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) are permitted to discharge effluents into surface waters and groundwaters of watersheds that provide potable water to more than 9 million people. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), and New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) began a pilot study to increase the understanding of estrogenicity and EDCs in effluents and receiving streams mainly in southeastern New York. The primary goals of this study were to document and assess the spatial and temporal variability of estrogenicity levels; the effectiveness of various treatment-plant types to remove estrogenicity; the concentrations of hormones, EDCs, and pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs); and the relations between estrogenicity and concentrations of hormones, EDCs, and PPCPs. The levels of estrogenicity and selected hormones, non-hormone EDCs, and PPCPs were characterized in samples collected seasonally in effluents from 7 WWTPs, once or twice in effluents from 34 WWTPs, and once in influents to 6 WWTPs. Estrogenicity was quantified, as estradiol equivalents, using both the biological e-screen assay and a chemical model. Results generally show that (1) estrogenicity levels in effluents varied spatially and seasonally, (2) a wide range of known and unknown EDCs

  11. Anabolic and Antiresorptive Modulation of Bone Homeostasis by the Epigenetic Modulator Sulforaphane, a Naturally Occurring Isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Roman; Maurizi, Antonio; Roschger, Paul; Sturmlechner, Ines; Khani, Farzaneh; Spitzer, Silvia; Rumpler, Monika; Zwerina, Jochen; Karlic, Heidrun; Dudakovic, Amel; Klaushofer, Klaus; Teti, Anna; Rucci, Nadia; Varga, Franz; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-03-25

    Bone degenerative pathologies like osteoporosis may be initiated by age-related shifts in anabolic and catabolic responses that control bone homeostasis. Here we show that sulforaphane (SFN), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate, promotes osteoblast differentiation by epigenetic mechanisms. SFN enhances active DNA demethylation viaTet1andTet2and promotes preosteoblast differentiation by enhancing extracellular matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblastic markers (Runx2,Col1a1,Bglap2,Sp7,Atf4, andAlpl). SFN decreases the expression of the osteoclast activator receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in osteocytes and mouse calvarial explants and preferentially induces apoptosis in preosteoclastic cells via up-regulation of theTet1/Fas/Caspase 8 and Caspase 3/7 pathway. These mechanistic effects correlate with higher bone volume (∼20%) in both normal and ovariectomized mice treated with SFN for 5 weeks compared with untreated mice as determined by microcomputed tomography. This effect is due to a higher trabecular number in these mice. Importantly, no shifts in mineral density distribution are observed upon SFN treatment as measured by quantitative backscattered electron imaging. Our data indicate that the food-derived compound SFN epigenetically stimulates osteoblast activity and diminishes osteoclast bone resorption, shifting the balance of bone homeostasis and favoring bone acquisition and/or mitigation of bone resorptionin vivo Thus, SFN is a member of a new class of epigenetic compounds that could be considered for novel strategies to counteract osteoporosis. PMID:26757819

  12. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function.

    PubMed

    Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria G; Tucci, Paolo; Bove, Maria; Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming androgen anabolic steroids (AAS). These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, their off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combinations of different steroids and doses generally higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. The frequency of side effects is higher among AAS abusers, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because data collection is very difficult due to the subjects' reticence and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in the reward process, leading to increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The goal of this article is to review the literature on steroid abuse and changes to the reward system in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26379484

  13. Nutrition and anabolic pharmacotherapies in the care of burn patients.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, Abdikarim; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-10-01

    Thermal injury is a devastating injury that results in a number of pathological alterations in almost every system in the body. Hypermetabolism, muscle wasting, depressed immunity, and impaired wound healing are all clinical features of burns. Failure to address each of these specific pathological alterations can lead to increased mortality. Nutrition supplementation has been recommended as a therapeutic tool to help attenuate the hypermetabolism and devastating catabolism evident following burn. Despite the wide consensus on the need of nutrition supplementation in burn patients, controversy exists with regard to the type and amount of nutrition recommended. Nutrition alone is also not enough in these patients to halt and reverse some of the damage done by the catabolic pathways activated following severe burn injury. This has led to the use of anabolic pharmacologic agents in conjunction with nutrition to help improve patient outcome following burn injury. In this review, we examine the relevant literature on nutrition after burn injury and its contribution to the attenuation of the postburn hypermetabolic response, impaired wound healing, and suppressed immunological responses. We also review the commonly used anabolic agents clinically in the care of burn patients. Finally, we provide nutrition and pharmacological recommendations gained from prospective trials, retrospective analyses, and expert opinions based on our practice at the Ross Tilley Burn Center in Toronto, Canada. PMID:25606644

  14. Nutrition and Anabolic Pharmacotherapies in the Care of Burn Patients.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, Abdikarim; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-05-14

    Thermal injury is a devastating injury that results in a number of pathological alterations in almost every system in the body. Hypermetabolism, muscle wasting, depressed immunity, and impaired wound healing are all clinical features of burns. Failure to address each of these specific pathological alterations can lead to increased mortality. Nutrition supplementation has been recommended as a therapeutic tool to help attenuate the hypermetabolism and devastating catabolism evident following burn. Despite the wide consensus on the need of nutrition supplementation in burn patients, controversy exists with regard to the type and amount of nutrition recommended. Nutrition alone is also not enough in these patients to halt and reverse some of the damage done by the catabolic pathways activated following severe burn injury. This has led to the use of anabolic pharmacologic agents in conjunction with nutrition to help improve patient outcome following burn injury. In this review, we examine the relevant literature on nutrition after burn injury and its contribution to the attenuation of the postburn hypermetabolic response, impaired wound healing, and suppressed immunological responses. We also review the commonly used anabolic agents clinically in the care of burn patients. Finally, we provide nutrition and pharmacological recommendations gained from prospective trials, retrospective analyses, and expert opinions based on our practice at the Ross Tilley Burn Center in Toronto, Canada. PMID:24829299

  15. Anabolic steroids and the athlete: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Oklobdzija, Edward; Weyrauch, David

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the pharmacokinetic activities of anabolic steroids and their potential deleterious effects. A review of literature reveals the most significant pathological sequelae resulting from anabolic use to be peliosis hepatis and liver cell carcinoma. These ill effects have been more closely associated with those steroids whose chemical structures are specifically alkylated at the 17th carbon in the Alpha position as opposed to their Beta esterified counterparts. Testing of these drugs was attempted by way of a single case study. A 23 yr old male bodybuilder was subject to both oral and parenteral forms of steroid over a six week period of his training program. Serum, urinalysis and subjective parameters were monitored before during and after steroid administration. The results show elevated levels of urea, creatinine, bilirubin, CPK, AST, ALT and LDH. In this case study, the elevated parameters appear to be more a function of muscle breakdown induced by a combination of severe exercise and intramuscular injection than a measure of organ (liver) pathology.

  16. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria G.; Tucci, Paolo; Bove, Maria; Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming androgen anabolic steroids (AAS). These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, their off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combinations of different steroids and doses generally higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. The frequency of side effects is higher among AAS abusers, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because data collection is very difficult due to the subjects' reticence and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in the reward process, leading to increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The goal of this article is to review the literature on steroid abuse and changes to the reward system in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26379484

  17. Targeting of androgen receptor in bone reveals a lack of androgen anabolic action and inhibition of osteogenesis A model for compartment-specific androgen action in the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Wiren, Kristine M.; Semirale, Anthony A.; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Woo, Adrian; Tommasini, Steven M.; Price, Christopher; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Jepsen, Karl J.

    2008-01-01

    Androgens are anabolic hormones that affect many tissues, including bone. However, an anabolic effect of androgen treatment on bone in eugonadal subjects has not been observed and clinical trials have been disappointing. The androgen receptor (AR) mediates biological responses to androgens. In bone tissue, both AR and the estrogen receptor (ER) are expressed. Since androgens can be converted into estrogen, the specific role of the AR in maintenance of skeletal homoeostasis remains controversial. The goal of this study was to use skeletally targeted overexpression of AR in differentiated osteoblasts as a means of elucidating the specific role(s) for AR transactivation in the mature bone compartment. Transgenic mice overexpressing AR under the control of the 2.3-kb α1(I)-collagen promoter fragment showed no difference in body composition, testosterone, or 17β-estradiol levels. However, transgenic males have reduced serum osteocalcin, CTx and TRAPC5b levels, and a bone phenotype was observed. In cortical bone, high-resolution micro-computed tomography revealed no difference in periosteal perimeter but a significant reduction in cortical bone area due to an enlarged marrow cavity. Endocortical bone formation rate was also significantly inhibited. Biomechanical analyses showed decreased whole bone strength and quality, with significant reductions in all parameters tested. Trabecular morphology was altered, with increased bone volume comprised of more trabeculae that were closer together but not thicker. Expression of genes involved in bone formation and bone resorption was significantly reduced. The consequences of androgen action are compartment-specific; anabolic effects are exhibited exclusively at periosteal surfaces, but in mature osteoblasts androgens inhibited osteogenesis with detrimental effects on matrix quality, bone fragility and whole bone strength. Thus, the present data demonstrate that enhanced androgen signaling targeted to bone results in low bone

  18. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  19. The effect of anabolic-androgenic steroids on aromatase activity and androgen receptor binding in the rat preoptic area.

    PubMed

    Roselli, C E

    1998-05-11

    The level of aromatase in the preoptic area of rats is transcriptionally regulated through a specific androgen-receptor mediated mechanism and can be used as a measure of central androgenic effect. Therefore, several commonly abused anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) were tested for their ability to induce aromatase activity in the preoptic area of castrated rats. In addition, we determined the relative binding affinities of these compounds for the androgen receptor, as well as their ability to bind androgen receptor in vivo following subcutaneous injections. All of the AAS compounds tested significantly stimulated POA aromatase activity above castrate levels. The compounds that produced the greatest stimulation of aromatase activity were those that bound most avidly to the androgen receptor in vitro (i.e., testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and nandrolone). In contrast, the 17alpha-alkylated compounds that were tested (stanozolol, danazol, methandrostenolone) modestly stimulated aromatase and were weak competitors for the androgen receptor. The subcutaneous injection of AAS compounds increased the concentrations of occupied nuclear androgen receptors in the brain, but the magnitude of effect was not related to their potency for inducing aromatase or their relative binding affinity for the androgen receptor suggesting that androgen receptor occupancy in POA is not correlated with the action of androgen on aromatase. The present results help explain the behavioral effects of AAS compounds in rats. PMID:9593936

  20. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    International Resource Center Online Store Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Healthy Living ...

  1. [Recent aspects of therapy with androgenic and anabolic steroids].

    PubMed

    Schambach, H; Nitschke, U; Kröhne, H J

    1983-11-15

    From the pharmacology of the therapeutically available androgen preparations and the clinical experience results that a highly dosed androgen long-term therapy is effectively possible only by testosterone esters which are to be injected intramuscularly (e.g. testosterone oenanthate). It is indicated in all forms of endocrine hypogonadism, certain aplastic anaemias and if necessary in extreme male high growth. In partial androgen deficiency (pubertas tarda, Klinefelter's syndrome, climacterium virile and others) orally applicable androgens such as testosterone-undecanoate (Andriol) and mesterolone (Vistimon) can be used. The latter is to be preferred when a hyperoestrogenism is present, e.g. in liver cirrhosis. When 17-alpha-alkylated oral androgens are used, their often not sufficiently confirmed anabolic effect and their potential liver toxicity should more be taken into consideration. PMID:6666179

  2. Anabolic-androgenic steroid use among Brazilian bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Fabiana Ranielle de Siqueira; Brito, Aline de Freitas; Oliveira, Caio Victor Coutinho de; Vieira, Thaiza Isidro; Gouveia, Rachel Linka Beniz

    2014-07-01

    This cross-sectional, quantitative, exploratory study investigated the prevalence and profile of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users amongst a convenience sample of 510 bodybuilders from 52 gyms, in João Pessoa, Brazil, with a structured questionnaire containing selected questions about socioeconomic and training variables on the use of AAS. Data were analyzed using frequency and chi-square tests. AAS prevalence use was 20.6%; mostly young men (98.1%), of a low education level (46.7%), who trained for more than 4 years (49.5%). The use of AAS was related to the use of dietary supplements. About 81% of consumed AAS consisted of Deca-Durabolin, Winstrol, and Sustanon. Study's limitations are noted. PMID:24832911

  3. Inherited antithrombin deficiency and anabolic steroids: a risky combination.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hannah; Elfil, Mohamed; DeSancho, Maria T

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old male with asymptomatic inherited type 1 antithrombin deficiency and a family history of thrombosis started injecting himself with testosterone 250 mg intramuscularly twice weekly for 5 weeks. He presented to the hospital with progressive dyspnea on exertion, chest pain and hemoptysis. Workup revealed bilateral submassive pulmonary embolism and proximal right lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. He was treated with intravenous (IV) unfractionated heparin and underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis with alteplase to the main pulmonary arteries. Postprocedure, he remained on IV alteplase infusion for 24 h and unfractionated heparin in the intensive care unit. Concomitantly he received plasma-derived antithrombin concentrate. He was transitioned to subcutaneous enoxaparin twice daily and discharged from the hospital on oral rivaroxaban 15 mg twice a day. This case highlights the heightened thrombogenic effect of anabolic steroids in the setting of underlying thrombophilia especially in younger subjects. PMID:26588446

  4. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Robert D.; Elliot, Diane L.; Goldberg, Linn; Kanayama, Gen; Leone, James E.; Pavlovich, Mike; Pope, Harrison G.

    2012-01-01

    This NATA position statement was developed by the NATA Research & Education Foundation. Objective This manuscript summarizes the best available scholarly evidence related to anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) as a reference for health care professionals, including athletic trainers, educators, and interested others. Background Health care professionals associated with sports or exercise should understand and be prepared to educate others about AAS. These synthetic, testosterone-based derivatives are widely abused by athletes and nonathletes to gain athletic performance advantages, develop their physiques, and improve their body image. Although AAS can be ergogenic, their abuse may lead to numerous negative health effects. Recommendations Abusers of AAS often rely on questionable information sources. Sports medicine professionals can therefore serve an important role by providing accurate, reliable information. The recommendations provide health care professionals with a current and accurate synopsis of the AAS-related research. PMID:23068595

  5. Myeloid regeneration after whole body irradiation, autologous bone marrow transplantation, and treatment with an anabolic steroid.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, C M; Ambrus, J L

    1975-01-01

    Stumptail monkeys (Macaca speciosa) received lethal whole body radiation. Autologous bone marrow injection resulted in survival of the majority of the animals. Treatment with Deca-Durabolin, an anabolic steroid, caused more rapid recovery of colony-forming cell numbers in the bone marrow than in control animals. Both the Deca-Durabolin-treated and control groups were given autologous bone marrow transplantation. Anabolic steroid effect on transplanted bone marrow colonyforming cells may explain the increased rate of leukopoietic regeneration in anabolic steroid-treated animals as compared to controls. PMID:124758

  6. [Coronary thrombosis and ectasia of coronary arteries after long-term use of anabolic steroids].

    PubMed

    Tischer, K-H; Heyny-von Haussen, R; Mall, G; Doenecke, P

    2003-04-01

    Chronic abuse of anabolic steroids is widespread. Hypertrophy of skeletal and heart muscle is a well-known effect of chronic anabolic steroid abuse. Structural alterations of blood vessels are new side effects. We report a case of a 32-year-old bodybuilder after long-term use of anabolic steroids who died of cardiac arrest. Coronary angiography and autopsy findings showed especially a hypertrophic heart, structural changes of coronary arteries, intracoronary thrombosis and myocardial infarction, ventricular thrombosis and systemic embolism PMID:12707792

  7. Anabolic steroids and male infertility: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Guilherme Leme; Hallak, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The negative impact of AAS abuse on male fertility is well known by urologists. The secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is often highlighted when AAS and fertility are being discussed. On the other hand, the patterns of use, mechanisms of action and direct effects over the testicle are usually overseen. The present study reviews the vast formal and "underground" culture of AAS, as well as their overall implications. Specific considerations about their impact on the male reproductive system are made, with special attention to the recent data on direct damage to the testicle. To our knowledge this kind of overview is absolutely unique, offering a distinguished set of information to the day-by-day urologists. For several decades, testosterone and its synthetic derivatives have been used with anabolic and androgenic purposes. Initially, these substances were restricted to professional bodybuilders, becoming gradually more popular among recreational power athletes. Currently, as many as 3 million anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users have been reported in the United States, and considering its increasing prevalence, it has become an issue of major concern. Infertility is defined as the failure to achieve a successful pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected intercourse, with male factor being present in up to 50% of all infertile couples. Several conditions may be related to male infertility. Substance abuse, including AAS, is commonly associated to transient or persistent impairment on male reproductive function, through different pathways. Herein, a brief overview on AAS, specially oriented to urologists, is offered. Steroids biochemistry, patterns of use, physiological and clinical issues are enlightened. A further review about fertility outcomes among male AAS abusers is also presented, including the classic reports on transient axial inhibition, and the more recent experimental reports

  8. Anabolic Steroid Abuse among Teenage Girls: An Illusory Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Boynes, Matthew; Hudson, James I.; Field, Alison E.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent media reports have portrayed an alarming increase in apparent anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use among American teenage girls; Congress even held hearings on the subject in June 2005. We questioned whether AAS use among teenage girls was as widespread as claimed. Methods We reviewed four large national surveys and many smaller surveys examining the prevalence of AAS use among teenage girls. Virtually all of these surveys used anonymous questionnaires. We asked particularly whether the language of survey questions might generate false-positive responses among girls who misinterpreted the term “steroid.” We also reviewed data from other countries, together with results from the only recent study (to our knowledge) in which investigators personally interviewed female AAS users. Results The surveys produced remarkably disparate findings, with the lifetime prevalence of AAS use estimated as high as 7.3% among ninth-grade girls in one study, but only 0.1% among teenage girls in several others. Upon examining the surveys reporting an elevated prevalence, it appeared that most used questions that failed to distinguish between anabolic steroids, corticosteroids, and over-the-counter supplements that respondents might confuse with “steroids.” Other features in the phrasing of certain questions also seemed likely to further bias results in favor of false-positive responses. Conclusions Many anonymous surveys, using imprecise questions, appear to have greatly overestimated the lifetime prevalence of AAS use among teenage girls; the true lifetime prevalence may well be as low as 0.1%. Future studies can test this impression by using a carefully phrased question regarding AAS use. PMID:17127018

  9. Anabolic and antiresorptive drugs improve trabecular microarchitecture and reduce fracture risk following radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Arrington, Sarah A; Fisher, Erica R; Willick, Gordon E; Mann, Kenneth A; Allen, Matthew J

    2010-09-01

    Many patients with symptomatic bone metastases receive radiation therapy, even though radiation is known to have potential adverse effects on bone. We hypothesized that the concurrent use of a bisphosphonate drug (zoledronic acid, ZA) or a combination of ZA plus an anabolic agent (parathyroid hormone, PTH) would lead to improvements in the microarchitecture and mechanical properties of irradiated bone. Human breast cancer cells were injected into the distal femur of 56 female nude mice, which were then divided into four groups: no treatment (0 Gy), radiation administered 4 weeks postinjection (20 Gy), radiation plus ZA (12.5 microg/kg weekly from weeks 4 to 12) (20 Gy + ZA), and radiation followed by ZA (25 microg/kg weekly from weeks 4 to 8) and PTH(1-34) (100 microg microg/kg daily from weeks 8 to 12) (20 Gy + ZA + PTH). Left limbs served as normal control bones. Bone loss over the 12-week study was tracked with serial radiography and bone densitometry. At the end of the study, micro-computed tomography and mechanical testing were used to quantify bone microarchitecture and bone strength. Radiation alone failed to prevent tumor-induced decreases in bone mineral density (BMD), trabecular bone volume, and bone strength. Treatment with 20 Gy + ZA or 20 Gy + ZA + PTH as adjuncts to radiation was effective at preserving trabecular bone architecture and bone strength at normal levels. ZA reduced the risk of mechanical fragility following irradiation of a lytic bone lesion. Supplemental use of PTH did not result in further increases in bone strength but was associated with significant increases in BMD and bone mass, suggesting that it may be beneficial in enhancing bone architecture following radiation therapy. PMID:20563797

  10. Anabolic Steroids: Metabolism, Doping and Detection in Human and Equestrian Sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kicman, A. T.; Houghton, E.; Gower, D. B.

    This chapter highlights the important aspects of detection of doping with synthetic anabolic steroids and discusses some of the problems with, and solutions to, the detection of misuse of the naturally occurring ones.

  11. The Use and Abuse of Anabolic Steroids: A Discussion for Health and Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John A.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    This article reviews research on anabolic steroids, indicating that athletes are mistaken in believing that taking them will improve their physical performance. Dangerous side-effects are also discussed. (JA)

  12. Altered Serum Lipoprotein Profiles in Male and Female Power Lifters Ingesting Anabolic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Serum lipoprotein profiles were measured in nine male and three female weightlifters who were taking anabolic steroids. The profiles suggest that steriod users may face an increased risk of coronary artery disease. (Author/MT)

  13. Molecularly imprinted polymer applied to the selective isolation of urinary steroid hormones: an efficient tool in the control of natural steroid hormones abuse in cattle.

    PubMed

    Doué, Mickael; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Pichon, Valérie; Chapuis-Hugon, Florence; Lesellier, Eric; West, Caroline; Monteau, Fabrice; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2012-12-28

    The use of anabolic substances to promote growth in livestock is prohibited within the European Union as laid down in Directive 96/22/EC. Nowadays, efficient methods such as steroid profiling or isotopic deviation measurements allow to control natural steroid hormones abuse. In both cases, urine is often selected as the most relevant matrix and, due to its relatively high content of potential interferents, its preparation before analysis is considered as a key step. In this context, the use of a selective sorbent such as molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was investigated. A MIP was synthesized based on 17β-estradiol, methacrylic acid and acetonitrile as template, monomer and porogen, respectively. Two approaches were then tested for non-conjugated (aglycons and glucuronides deconjugated) steroid purification: (i) molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) and (ii) semi-preparative supercritical fluid chromatography with a commercial MIP as stationary phase (SFC-MIP). Parameters for both approaches were optimized based on the main bovine metabolites of testosterone, estradiol, nandrolone and boldenone. The MISPE protocol developed for screening purposes allowed satisfactory recoveries (upper 65% for the 12 target steroids) with sufficient purification for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. For confirmatory purposes, the use of isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) requires a higher degree of purity of the target compounds, which can be reached by the SFC-MIP protocol with three steps less compared to the official and current method. Purity, concentration and absence of isotopic fractionation of target steroids extracted from urine of treated cattle (treated with testosterone, estradiol, androstenedione, and boldenone) allowed the measurement of (13)C/(12)C isotopic ratios of corresponding metabolites and endogenous reference compounds (ERC) and proved the relevance of the strategy. PMID:23195708

  14. Impact of nandrolone decanoate on gene expression in endocrine systems related to the adverse effects of anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Alsiö, Johan; Birgner, Carolina; Björkblom, Lars; Isaksson, Pernilla; Bergström, Lena; Schiöth, Helgi B; Lindblom, Jonas

    2009-11-01

    Elite athletes, body builders and adolescents misuse anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) in order to increase muscle mass or to enhance physical endurance and braveness. The high doses misused are associated with numerous adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of chronic supratherapeutic AAS treatment on circulating hormones and gene expression in peripheral tissues related to such adverse effects. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure expression levels of in total 37 genes (including peptide hormones, cell membrane receptors, nuclear receptors, steroid synthesising enzymes and other enzymes) in the pituitary, testes, adrenals, adipose tissue, kidneys and liver of male Sprague-Dawley rats after 14-day administration of the AAS nandrolone decanoate, 3 or 15 mg/kg. Plasma glucose and levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), adiponectin, corticosterone, ghrelin, insulin and leptin were also measured. We found several expected effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, while the treatment also caused a number of other not previously identified changes in circulating factors and gene transcription levels such as the dose-dependent reduction of the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor in adipose tissue, reduction of both circulating and mRNA levels of adiponectin, up-regulation of both hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA-reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo synthesis of cholesterol, and the receptor for ACTH in the adrenals. The results provide evidence for wide ranging effects of AAS on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, adipose tissue and substrates of the renal control of blood pressure. PMID:19549128

  15. Supraphysiological doses of performance enhancing anabolic-androgenic steroids exert direct toxic effects on neuron-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Basile, John R.; Binmadi, Nada O.; Zhou, Hua; Yang, Ying-Hua; Paoli, Antonio; Proia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are lipophilic hormones often taken in excessive quantities by athletes and bodybuilders to enhance performance and increase muscle mass. AAS exert well known toxic effects on specific cell and tissue types and organ systems. The attention that androgen abuse has received lately should be used as an opportunity to educate both athletes and the general population regarding their adverse effects. Among numerous commercially available steroid hormones, very few have been specifically tested for direct neurotoxicity. We evaluated the effects of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone on sympathetic-like neuron cells. Vitality and apoptotic effects were analyzed, and immunofluorescence staining and western blot performed. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone are toxic to the neuron-like differentiated pheochromocytoma cell line PC12, as confirmed by toxicity on neurite networks responding to nerve growth factor and the modulation of the survival and apoptosis-related proteins ERK, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and heat-shock protein 90. We observe, in contrast to some previous reports but in accordance with others, expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in neuron-like cells, which when inhibited mitigated the toxic effects of AAS tested, suggesting that the AR could be binding these steroid hormones to induce genomic effects. We also note elevated transcription of neuritin in treated cells, a neurotropic factor likely expressed in an attempt to resist neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that supraphysiological exposure to the AAS methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone exert neurotoxic effects by an increase in the activity of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and alterations in neurite networks. PMID:23675320

  16. Prevalence of Use of Anabolic Steroids by Bodybuilders Using Three Methods in a City of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaee, Mohammad Reza; Pakravan, Faezeh; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of substance use among bodybuilding athletes has been poorly studied in Iran. This study was conducted to examine the prevalence of drug use, especially anabolic steroids, among bodybuilding athletes. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in the first half of 2013 among body building athletes referring to gyms located in Kerman, Iran. Five gyms were selected randomly and 380 athletes were invited to complete a self-administered anonymous questionnaire, consecutively. The questionnaire included two parts; baseline characteristics and substance related questions. The prevalence of anabolic steroids was estimated based on three methods; self-report, projective question, and crosswise model. Findings We enrolled 298 male athletes in the final analysis. Mean ± SD age of subjects was 25.9 ± 8.4. The most frequent recent (past 30 days) drug use was waterpipe smoking (45%). The second most frequently used drug was alcohol (26.5%, recent use). Based on self-reports, the prevalence of lifetime anabolic steroid use was calculated to be 24.5%. The corresponding figure based on crosswise method was obtained to be 56.8%. Participants believed that a median of 40% of athletes had used anabolic steroids in their lifetime. The prevalence of anabolic steroid was higher in single and less educated individuals (P < 0.05). The main reason for using anabolic steroids was to increase muscle size. Conclusion The prevalence of drug use, especially tobacco, alcohol, and anabolic steroids, was high among bodybuilding athletes. We could not rely on self-reports to examine anabolic steroid use. PMID:24494162

  17. Age-related anabolic resistance after endurance-type exercise in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Durham, William J.; Casperson, Shanon L.; Dillon, Edgar L.; Keske, Michelle A.; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Sanford, Arthur P.; Hickner, Robert C.; Grady, James J.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle loss is thought to stem from suboptimal nutrition and resistance to anabolic stimuli. Impaired microcirculatory (nutritive) blood flow may contribute to anabolic resistance by reducing delivery of amino acids to skeletal muscle. In this study, we employed contrast-enhanced ultrasound, microdialysis sampling of skeletal muscle interstitium, and stable isotope methodology, to assess hemodynamic and metabolic responses of older individuals to endurance type (walking) exercise during controlled amino acid provision. We hypothesized that older individuals would exhibit reduced microcirculatory blood flow, interstitial amino acid concentrations, and amino acid transport when compared with younger controls. We report for the first time that aging induces anabolic resistance following endurance exercise, manifested as reduced (by ∼40%) efficiency of muscle protein synthesis. Despite lower (by ∼40–45%) microcirculatory flow in the older than in the younger participants, circulating and interstitial amino acid concentrations and phenylalanine transport into skeletal muscle were all equal or higher in older individuals than in the young, comprehensively refuting our hypothesis that amino acid availability limits postexercise anabolism in older individuals. Our data point to alternative mediators of age-related anabolic resistance and importantly suggest correction of these impairments may reduce requirements for, and increase the efficacy of, dietary protein in older individuals. Durham, W. J., Casperson, S. L., Dillon, E. L., Keske, M. A., Paddon-Jones, D., Sanford, A. P., Hickner, R. C., Grady, J. J., Sheffield-Moore, M. Age-related anabolic resistance after endurance-type exercise in healthy humans. PMID:20547663

  18. The use and abuse of anabolic steroids in Olympic-caliber athletes.

    PubMed

    Bergman, R; Leach, R E

    1985-09-01

    Self-medication with anabolic steroids by athletes, particularly in the sports of weight lifting and track and field, has become increasingly popular. In the 1983 Pan American Games, 15 athletes were disqualified for taking anabolic steroids. Athletes take steroids believing the steroids will allow increased periods of intensive training and will increase muscle strength with proper weight training. The athletes assume this increased strength and training will translate into better athletic performance. Most athletes taking anabolic steroids are taking very large doses with no thought as to the potential adverse side effects. They ignore the possibility of long-term problems relating to hypertension, liver dysfunction, and atherosclerosis for what they see as the immediate performance benefits. In an attempt to keep sports competition "clean" and to help protect athletes from harmful drugs, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the United States Olympic Committee have rules stating that the use of anabolic steroids is illegal. Drug testing is performed in Olympic and in many international competitions. Those people found using anabolic steroids are disqualified. This use of anabolic steroids indicates that for some athletes the need to win or to maximize performance supersedes any worries about future health. PMID:4028547

  19. [Existence of an anabolically acting principle in an extract of E. coli].

    PubMed

    Schole, J; Sallmann, H P; Sonnenschein, B

    1986-08-01

    Colibiogen, extracted from E. coli (in the following called coli extract) was examined for factors with anabolic efficiency, especially for anabolically efficient bases of nucleic acids and for peptides. The results obtained are the following: Tests for nucleotides, nucleosides and bases of nucleic acids by thin-layer chromatography technique turned out negative. To test anabolically efficient substances the so-called glutathione state test in the rat liver was used. In this test intraportal dosages of 200 micrograms coli extract and also 200 micrograms of the enzymatically decomposed muscle proteins (Pepton resp. Lab Lemco) gave rise to positive effects within 2 min. Contrary to peptides from the culture medium the efficiency of coli extract was considerably increased by previous tryptic fission (efficient concentration 6 micrograms). The quantities applied were related on microgram peptide. A coli extract preparation the phase of growth of which had been shortened to 12 h was separated into 4 fractions. The fourth fraction (lowest molecular weight) showed anabolic efficiency with 6 micrograms peptide in the state test. Before the denaturative extraction took place, the coli extract was separated by centrifugation in a third test series into coli extract bacteria mass and coli extract supernatant. Nothing but the supernatant showed anabolic properties. Two fractions, obtained by the separation of the bacteria mass, did not show any activity in the glutathione state test. It is discussed that E. coli-specific peptides with anabolic efficiency are candidates for the coli extract effects. PMID:3535812

  20. Sex steroids and growth hormone interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; de Mirecki-Garrido, Mercedes; Guerra, Borja; Díaz, Mario; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    GH and sex hormones are critical regulators of body growth and composition, somatic development, intermediate metabolism, and sexual dimorphism. Deficiencies in GH- or sex hormone-dependent signaling and the influence of sex hormones on GH biology may have a dramatic impact on liver physiology during somatic development and in adulthood. Effects of sex hormones on the liver may be direct, through hepatic receptors, or indirect by modulating endocrine, metabolic, and gender-differentiated functions of GH. Sex hormones can modulate GH actions by acting centrally, regulating pituitary GH secretion, and peripherally, by modulating GH signaling pathways. The endocrine and/or metabolic consequences of long-term exposure to sex hormone-related compounds and their influence on the GH-liver axis are largely unknown. A better understanding of these interactions in physiological and pathological states will contribute to preserve health and to improve clinical management of patients with growth, developmental, and metabolic disorders. PMID:26775014

  1. Neurotoxic properties of the anabolic androgenic steroids nandrolone and methandrostenolone in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Pistarà, V; Corsaro, A; Tomasello, Flora; Giuffrida, Maria Laura; Sortino, Maria Angela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Copani, Agata

    2011-04-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse is associated with multiple neurobehavioral disturbances. The sites of action and the neurobiological sequels of AAS abuse are unclear at present. We investigated whether two different AASs, nandrolone and methandrostenolone, could affect neuronal survival in culture. The endogenous androgenic steroid testosterone was used for comparison. Both testosterone and nandrolone were neurotoxic at micromolar concentrations, and their effects were prevented by blockade of androgen receptors (ARs) with flutamide. Neuronal toxicity developed only over a 48-hr exposure to the steroids. The cell-impermeable analogues testosterone-BSA and nandrolone-BSA, which preferentially target membrane-associated ARs, were also neurotoxic in a time-dependent and flutamide-sensitive manner. Testosterone-BSA and nandrolone-BSA were more potent than their parent compounds, suggesting that membrane-associated ARs were the relevant sites for the neurotoxic actions of the steroids. Unlike testosterone and nandrolone, toxicity by methandrostenolone and methandrostenolone-BSA was insensitive to flutamide, but it was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU-486. Methandrostenolone-BSA was more potent than the parent compound, suggesting that its toxicity relied on the preferential activation of putative membrane-associated GRs. Consistently with the evidence that membrane-associated GRs can mediate rapid effects, a brief challenge with methandrostenolone-BSA was able to promote neuronal toxicity. Activation of putative membrane steroid receptors by nontoxic (nanomolar) concentrations of either nandrolone-BSA or methandrostenolone-BSA became sufficient to increase neuronal susceptibility to the apoptotic stimulus provided by β-amyloid (the main culprit of AD). We speculate that AAS abuse might facilitate the onset or progression of neurodegenerative diseases not usually linked to drug abuse. PMID:21290409

  2. Insulin is protein-anabolic in chronic renal failure patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Victoria S; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Crowley, Jan R; Fangman, Jerry; Flanigan, Michael

    2003-09-01

    To examine the protein anabolic actions of insulin in chronic renal failure, the authors measured four sets of whole body leucine fluxes during insulin alone and insulin with amino acid infusion in nine uremic patients before hemodialysis (B-HD). Seven were restudied 8 wk after initiation of maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Six normal subjects served as control (N). All values ( micro mol/kg/h, mean +/- SEM) are presented in the sequence of B-HD, HD, and N, and only P < 0.05 are listed. During Flux 1 (baseline), D (leucine release from body protein degradation) were 114 +/- 7, 126 +/- 4, and 116 +/- 6, respectively. C (leucine oxidation rates) were 18 +/- 2, 17 +/- 2, and 21 +/- 3, respectively. S (leucine disappearance into body protein [index of protein synthesis]) were 96 +/- 6, 107 +/- 4, and 94 +/- 4, respectively, and balances (net leucine flux into protein [values were negative during fasting]) were -18 +/- 2, -17 +/- 2, and -21 +/- 3, respectively. During Flux 2 (low-dose insulin infusion), D were 89 +/- 3, 98 +/- 6, and 94 +/- 5, respectively; C were 12 +/- 1, 11 +/- 2, and 18 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.02); S were 77 +/- 4, 87 +/- 5, and 76 +/- 5, respectively, and balances were -12 +/- 1, -11 +/- 2, and -18 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.02). During Flux 3 (high-dose insulin infusion): D were 77 +/- 3, 82 +/- 7, and 84 +/- 5, respectively; C were 9 +/- 1, 8 +/- 1, and 14 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.005); S were 68 +/- 4, 74 +/- 6, and 70 +/- 5, respectively, and balances were -9 +/- 1, -8 +/- 1, and -14 +/- 1, respectively (P = 0.005). In Flux 4 (insulin infused with amino acids): D were 73 +/- 3, 107 +/- 18, and 85 +/- 7, respectively; C were 35 +/- 4, 29 +/- 5, and 39 +/- 3, respectively; S were 105 +/- 5, 145 +/- 15, and 113 +/- 6, respectively (P = 0.02), and balances were 32 +/- 4, 38 +/- 5, and 27 +/- 3, respectively. These data show that B-HD and HD patients were as sensitive as normal subjects to the protein anabolic actions of insulin. Insulin alone

  3. Sepsis attenuates the anabolic response to skeletal muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Jennifer L.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Electrically stimulated muscle contraction is a potential clinical therapy to treat sepsis-induced myopathy; however, whether sepsis alters contraction-induced anabolic signaling is unknown. Polymicrobial peritonitis was produced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male C57BL/6 mice and time-matched, pair-fed controls (CON). At ~24 h post-CLP, the right hindlimb was electrically stimulated via the sciatic nerve to evoke maximal muscle contractions and the gastrocnemius was collected 2 h later. Protein synthesis was increased by muscle contraction in CON mice. Sepsis suppressed the rate of synthesis in both the non-stimulated (31%) and stimulated (57%) muscle versus CON. Contraction of muscle in CON mice increased the phosphorylation of mTORC1 substrates S6K1 Thr389 (8-fold), S6K1 Thr421/Ser424 (7-fold) and 4E-BP1 Ser65 (11-fold). Sepsis blunted the contraction-induced phosphorylation of S6K1 Thr389 (67%), S6K1 Thr421/Ser424 (46%) and 4E-BP1 Ser65 (85%). Conversely, sepsis did not appear to modulate protein elongation as eEF2 Thr56 phosphorylation was decreased similarly by muscle contraction in both groups. MAPK signaling was discordant following muscle contraction in septic muscle; phosphorylation of ERK Thr202/Tyr204 and p38 Thr180/Tyr182 was increased similarly in both CON and CLP mice while sepsis prevented the contraction-induced phosphorylation of JNK Thr183/Tyr185 and c-JUN Ser63. The expression of IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA in muscle was increased by sepsis, and contraction increased TNF-α to a greater extent in muscle from septic than CON mice. Injection of the mTOR inhibitor Torin2 in separate mice confirmed that contraction-induced increases in S6K1 and 4E-BP1 were mTOR-mediated. These findings demonstrate that resistance to contraction-induced anabolic signaling occurs during sepsis and is predominantly mTORC1-dependent. PMID:25423127

  4. Anabolic function of phenylalanine hydroxylase in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Ana C; Pey, Angel L; Ying, Ming; Loer, Curtis M; Martinez, Aurora

    2008-08-01

    In humans, liver phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) has an established catabolic function, and mutations in PAH cause phenylketonuria, a genetic disease characterized by neurological damage, if not treated. To obtain novel evolutionary insights and information on molecular mechanisms operating in phenylketonuria, we investigated PAH in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (cePAH), where the enzyme is coded by the pah-1 gene, expressed in the hypodermis. CePAH presents similar molecular and kinetic properties to human PAH [S(0.5)(L-Phe) approximately 150 microM; K(m) for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) approximately 35 microM and comparable V(max)], but cePAH is devoid of positive cooperativity for L-Phe, an important regulatory mechanism of mammalian PAH that protects the nervous system from excess L-Phe. Pah-1 knockout worms show no obvious neurological defects, but in combination with a second cuticle synthesis mutation, they display serious cuticle abnormalities. We found that pah-1 knockouts lack a yellow-orange pigment in the cuticle, identified as melanin by spectroscopic techniques, and which is detected in C. elegans for the first time. Pah-1 mutants show stimulation of superoxide dismutase activity, suggesting that cuticle melanin functions as oxygen radical scavenger. Our results uncover both an important anabolic function of PAH and the change in regulation of the enzyme along evolution. PMID:18460651

  5. Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Dependence: An Emerging Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Brower, Kirk J.; Wood, Ruth I.; Hudson, James I.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are widely used illicitly to gain muscle and lose body fat. Here we review the accumulating human and animal evidence showing that AAS may cause a distinct dependence syndrome, often associated with adverse psychiatric and medical effects. Method We present an illustrative case of AAS dependence, followed by a summary of the human and animal literature on this topic, based on publications known to us or obtained by searching the PubMed database. Results About 30% of AAS users appear to develop a dependence syndrome, characterized by chronic AAS use despite adverse effects on physical, psychosocial, or occupational functioning. AAS dependence shares many features with classical drug dependence. For example, hamsters will self-administer AAS, even to the point of death, and both humans and animals exhibit a well-documented AAS withdrawal syndrome, mediated by neuroendocrine and cortical neurotransmitter systems. AAS dependence may particularly involve opioidergic mechanisms. However, AAS differ from classical drugs in that they produce little immediate reward of acute intoxication, but instead a delayed effect of muscle gains. Thus standard diagnostic criteria for substance dependence, usually crafted for acutely intoxicating drugs, must be slightly adapted for cumulatively acting drugs such as AAS. Conclusions AAS dependence is a valid diagnostic entity, and likely a growing public health problem. AAS dependence may share brain mechanisms with other forms of substance dependence, especially opioid dependence. Future studies are needed to better characterize AAS dependence, identify risk factors for this syndrome, and develop treatment strategies. PMID:19922565

  6. The effect of anabolic steroids on mandibular growth.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Alexander; Pancherz, Hans

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of nandrolone (Deca-Durabolin, AKZO Nobel, Cambridge, United Kingdom) on mandibular growth in juvenile and adult rats with radiographic cephalometry and immunoradiology. Juvenile (n = 16) and adult (n = 16) inbred female Wistar-Kyoto rats were compared. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups with 8 experimental (E) and 8 control (C) animals in each subgroup. Lateral headfilms taken before and after the 70-day study period were analyzed. Body weight and blood serum IGF-I levels were monitored weekly. The results showed marked mandibular growth changes in both the juvenile and the adult E rats. Body weight increase was larger in the E than in the C animals. The IGF-I blood serum levels were similar in the juvenile E and C rats but higher in the adult E animals than in the adult C animals. It was found that the anabolic steroid (Deca-Durabolin) had a significant effect on mandibular growth in both juvenile and adult rats. PMID:12695771

  7. Sudden or unnatural deaths involving anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Torok, Michelle; Duflou, Johan

    2014-07-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) are frequently misused. To determine causes of death, characteristics, toxicology, and pathology of AAS positive cases, all cases (n = 24) presenting to the New South Wales Department of Forensic Medicine (1995-2012) were retrieved. All were male, and the mean age was 31.7 years. Deaths were mainly due to accidental drug toxicity (62.5%), then suicide (16.7%) and homicide (12.5%). Abnormal testosterone/epitestosterone ratios were reported in 62.5%, followed by metabolites of nandrolone (58.3%), stanozolol (33.3%), and methandienone (20.8%). In 23 of 24 cases, substances other than steroids were detected, most commonly psychostimulants (66.7%). In nearly half, testicular atrophy was noted, as was testicular fibrosis and arrested spermatogenesis. Left ventricular hypertrophy was noted in 30.4%, and moderate to severe narrowing of the coronary arteries in 26.1%. To summarize, the typical case was a male polydrug user aged in their thirties, with death due to drug toxicity. Extensive cardiovascular disease was particularly notable. PMID:24611438

  8. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  9. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  10. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.