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Sample records for hormonal induced spermiation

  1. Preparation and ultrastructure of spermatozoa from green poison frogs, Dendrobates auratus, following hormonal induced spermiation (Amphibia, Anura, Dendrobatidae).

    PubMed

    Lipke, Christian; Meinecke-Tillmann, Sabine; Meyer, Wilfried; Meinecke, Burkhard

    2009-07-01

    Few ultrastructural studies have been performed on members of the Dendrobatidae, although such investigations can be useful for the understanding of reproductive patterns, as a diagnostic method for males in breeding programs for endangered amphibians and for phylogenetic analysis. The sperm ultrastructure of the Green Poison Frog, Dendrobates auratus, from Panama is described following induced spermiation in living animals. To date only testicular spermatozoa in other dendrobatid frogs have been analysed. Moreover, an electron microscopic preparation method (transmission and scanning electron microscopy) for dendrobatid sperm cells in low concentration is presented. Sperm cells from stimulated frogs (100 IU human chorionic gonadotropin, hCG, twice at an interval of 1h) were recovered via cloaca lavage using 600 microl isotonic phosphate-free amphibian saline (IPS). Centrifuged flushings (5 min, 173 x g) were deposited on microscopic slides. Adherent spermatozoa were treated with Karnovsky fixative (overnight, 4 degrees C). After postfixation (2h, 1% osmium tetroxide), samples were dehydrated in series of ascending acetones (30-100%). For transmission electron microscopy sperm cells were encapsulated using Epon and 1.5% 2,4,6-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol (DMP 30). Ultrathin sections (70 nm) were cut and stained with uranyl acetate (30 min) and lead citrate (5 min). Sperm cells are filiform with a 21.1+/-2.7 microm long and arcuated head and a single tail (35.0+/-4.2 microm length). Their acrosomal complex is located at the anterior portion of the head and consists of the acrosomal vesicle which has low electron density, and the subjacent electron-dense subacrosomal cone. In transverse section, the nucleus is circular (1.9+/-0.2 microm diameter) and conical in longitudinal section. It is surrounded by several groups of mitochondria. The chromatin is highly condensed and electron-dense but shows numerous electron-lucent inclusions. A short midpiece has a

  2. Effect of priming injections of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on spermiation and ovulation in Gϋnther's Toadlet, Pseudophryne guentheri

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the majority of vertebrates, gametogenesis and gamete-release depend on the pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) from the hypothalamus. Studies attempting to artificially stimulate ovulation and spermiation may benefit from mimicking the naturally episodic secretion of LHRH by administering priming injections of a synthetic analogue (LHRHa). This study investigated the impact of low-dose priming injections of LHRHa on gamete-release in the Australian toadlet Pseudophryne guentheri. Methods Toadlets were administered a single dose of two micrograms per. gram LHRHa without a priming injection (no priming), or preceded by one (one priming) or two (two priming) injections of 0.4 micrograms per. gram LHRHa. Spermiation responses were evaluated at 3, 7 and 12 hrs post hormone administration (PA), and sperm number and viability were quantified using fluorescent microscopy. Oocyte yields were evaluated by stripping females at 10-11 hrs PA. A sub-sample of twenty eggs per female was then fertilised (with sperm obtained from testis macerates) and fertilisation success determined. Results No priming induced the release of the highest number of spermatozoa, with a step-wise decrease in the number of spermatozoa released in the one and two priming treatments respectively. Peak sperm-release occurred at 12 hrs PA for all priming treatments and there was no significant difference in sperm viability. Females in the control treatment failed to release oocytes, while those administered an ovulatory dose without priming exhibited a poor ovulatory response. The remaining two priming treatments (one and two priming) successfully induced 100% of females to expel an entire clutch. Oocytes obtained from the no, or two priming treatments all failed to fertilise, however oocytes obtained from the one priming treatment displayed an average fertilisation success of 97%. Conclusion Spermiation was most effectively induced in male P. guentheri by

  3. Hormonal induction of Brycon cephalus (Characiformes, Characidae) to spermiation using D-ala6, pro9net-mGnRH + metoclopramide.

    PubMed

    Bashiyo-Silva, Cristiane; Costa, Raphael da Silva; Ribeiro, Douglas de Castro; Senhorini, José Augusto; Veríssimo-Silveira, Rosicleire; Ninhaus-Silveira, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to establish a hormonal induction protocol for spermiation of Brycon cephalus males, using Ala6, Pro9Net-mGnRH + metoclopramide (Ovopel®). Thus, 20 males were used divided into three inductor treatments [⅓ pellet/kg (T1), ⅔ pellet/kg (T2) and 1⅓ pellet/kg (T3)] and one control group (CO), which only received physiological solution applications (0.9% NaCl). All treatments were applied in a single dose. For evaluation of the availability of the treatment, the following seminal parameters were analyzed: seminal volume, subjective spermatic motility, duration of motility, pH, osmolality and spermatic concentration. T3 showed the highest seminal volume (4.66 ± 1.52 ml), and was significantly different in comparison with T1 (2.0 ± 0.9 ml), T2 (3.5 ± 1.3 ml) and CO (2.3 ± 1.2 ml). In relation to spermatic motility, T2 and T3 showed significantly higher levels [5, (81-100%)]. However, T3 showed significantly lower average sperm motility duration than T1, T2 and CO (30 ± 7 s; 28 ± 6 s; 32 ± 8 s, respectively). With regard to the seminal parameters of spermatic concentration, pH and osmolality, no significant variation was verified among treatments. In conclusion, mGnRH + metoclopramide used for hormonal induction of B. cephalus reproduction does not induce changes related to spermatic concentration, pH and osmolality parameters of the seminal fluid and the most adequate doses among tested treatments were ⅔ pellet/kg live fish. PMID:26174499

  4. A comparison of human chorionic gonadotropin and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone on the induction of spermiation and amplexus in the American toad (Anaxyrus americanus)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Captive breeding programs for endangered amphibian species often utilize exogenous hormones for species that are difficult to breed. The purpose of our study was to compare the efficacy of two different hormones at various concentrations on sperm production, quantity and quality over time in order to optimize assisted breeding. Methods Male American toads (Anaxyrus americanus) were divided into three separate treatment groups, with animals in each group rotated through different concentrations of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog (LHRH; 0.1, 1.0, 4.0 and 32 micrograms/toad), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; 50, 100, 200, and 300 IU), or the control over 24 hours. We evaluated the number of males that respond by producing spermic urine, the sperm concentration, percent motility, and quality of forward progression. We also evaluated the effects of hCG and LHRH on reproductive behavior as assessed by amplexus. Data were analyzed using the Generalized Estimating Equations incorporating repeated measures over time and including the main effects of treatment and time, and the treatment by time interaction. Results The hormone hCG was significantly more effective at stimulating spermiation in male Anaxyrus americanus than LHRH and showed a dose-dependent response in the number of animals producing sperm. At the most effective hCG dose (300 IU), 100% of the male toads produced sperm, compared to only 35% for the best LHRH dose tested (4.0 micrograms). In addition to having a greater number of responders (P < 0.05), the 300 IU hCG treatment group had a much higher average sperm concentration (P < 0.05) than the treatment group receiving 4.0 micrograms LHRH. In contrast, these two treatments did not result in significant differences in sperm motility or quality of forward progressive motility. However, more males went into amplexus when treated with LHRH vs. hCG (90% vs. 75%) by nine hours post-administration. Conclusion There is a clear

  5. Comparison of methods to improve induction of spermiation in wild-caught carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio), a threatened species from the Caspian Sea basin.

    PubMed

    Vazirzadeh, Arya; Farhadi, Ahmad; Naseri, Mahmood; Jeffs, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Wild carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio) forms the basis of an important fishery in the Southern Caspian Sea Basin which is increasingly underpinned by the release of cultured juveniles. A significant bottleneck to hatchery-rearing of juveniles is the spermiation of male broodstock. Therefore, four approaches to improving spermiation were investigated. The effectiveness of two delivery methods for the sustained release of salmon gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue (sGnRHa; i.e., via intramuscular cholesterol pellet vs emulsion injection) on the spermiation success and duration, sperm quality and quantity over 14days in wild-caught carp were compared to single injection of sGnRHa with Pimozide(®) (Linpe method) or carp pituitary extract (CPE). The consequence of the spermiation treatments on resulting embryonic quality was evaluated for subsequent fertilization and hatching success from wild male carp (mean weight±S.D. 1021±112g). All hormonal treatments, except for Linpe method, led to 100% spermiation of treated fish compared to only 25% in the control with no hormone intervention. The duration of spermiation, as well as the various quantitative variables of the sperm and the mean total sperm production were all generally improved with the sustained hormone delivery compared with the acute treatments. The GnRHa-FIA was the most effective method for improving spermiation. PMID:27133180

  6. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby entering the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come. PMID:24735648

  7. Mechanisms of spermiogenesis and spermiation and how they are disturbed

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Liza

    2014-01-01

    Haploid round spermatids undergo a remarkable transformation during spermiogenesis. The nucleus polarizes to one side of the cell as the nucleus condenses and elongates, and the microtubule-based manchette sculpts the nucleus into its species-specific head shape. The assembly of the central component of the sperm flagellum, known as the axoneme, begins early in spermiogenesis, and is followed by the assembly of secondary structures needed for normal flagella. The final remodelling of the mature elongated spermatid occurs during spermiation, when the spermatids line up along the luminal edge, shed their residual cytoplasm and are ultimately released into the lumen. Defects in spermiogenesis and spermiation are manifested as low sperm number, abnormal sperm morphology and poor motility and are commonly observed during reproductive toxicant administration, as well as in genetically modified mouse models of male infertility. This chapter summarizes the major physiological processes and the most commonly observed defects in spermiogenesis and spermiation, to aid in the diagnosis of the potential mechanisms that could be perturbed by experimental manipulation such as reproductive toxicant administration. PMID:26413397

  8. Naloxone does not Affect the Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone-Induced Inhibition of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A M; Porter, D W; Lincoln, D W

    1989-06-01

    Abstract Injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (21 pmol) into the third cerebral ventricle of long-term ovariectomized ewes caused a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly when compared with the control responses to saline (50 mul). A notable characteristic of the response was the delayed and sustained nature of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition. In the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone (4 +/- 25 mg iv), the central administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone still produced a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Again, mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly. When naloxone was injected iv, there was a significant rise in mean luteinizing hormone levels as a consequence of an increase in pulse frequency (in four out of five ewes) and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone pulse amplitude. In conclusion, these data suggest that central opioid pathways sensitive to blockade by naloxone are not involved in the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition of luteinizing hormone release. Furthermore, in the long-term ovariectomized ewe, endogenous opioid peptides exert a tonic inhibitory influence on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone/luteinizing hormone secretion. PMID:19210459

  9. Broodstock management and hormonal manipulations of fish reproduction.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, Constantinos C; Fostier, Alexis; Zanuy, Silvia

    2010-02-01

    Control of reproductive function in captivity is essential for the sustainability of commercial aquaculture production, and in many fishes it can be achieved by manipulating photoperiod, water temperature or spawning substrate. The fish reproductive cycle is separated in the growth (gametogenesis) and maturation phase (oocyte maturation and spermiation), both controlled by the reproductive hormones of the brain, pituitary and gonad. Although the growth phase of reproductive development is concluded in captivity in most fishes-the major exemption being the freshwater eel (Anguilla spp.), oocyte maturation (OM) and ovulation in females, and spermiation in males may require exogenous hormonal therapies. In some fishes, these hormonal manipulations are used only as a management tool to enhance the efficiency of egg production and facilitate hatchery operations, but in others exogenous hormones are the only way to produce fertilized eggs reliably. Hormonal manipulations of reproductive function in cultured fishes have focused on the use of either exogenous luteinizing hormone (LH) preparations that act directly at the level of the gonad, or synthetic agonists of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRHa) that act at the level of the pituitary to induce release of the endogenous LH stores, which, in turn act at the level of the gonad to induce steroidogenesis and the process of OM and spermiation. After hormonal induction of maturation, broodstock should spawn spontaneously in their rearing enclosures, however, the natural breeding behavior followed by spontaneous spawning may be lost in aquaculture conditions. Therefore, for many species it is also necessary to employ artificial gamete collection and fertilization. Finally, a common question in regards to hormonal therapies is their effect on gamete quality, compared to naturally maturing or spawning broodfish. The main factors that may have significant consequences on gamete quality-mainly on eggs-and should be considered

  10. Asprosin, a fasting-induced glucogenic protein hormone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatic glucose release into the circulation is vital for brain function and survival during periods of fasting and is modulated by an array of hormones that precisely regulate plasma glucose levels. We have identified a fasting-induced protein hormone that modulates hepatic glucose release. It is t...

  11. Stimulation of Spermiation by Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Carp Pituitary Extract in Grass Puffer, Takifugu niphobles

    PubMed Central

    Goo, In Bon; Park, In-Seok; Gil, Hyun Woo; Im, Jae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Spermiation was stimulated in the mature grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, with an injection of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) or carp pituitary extract (CPE). Spermatocrit and sperm density were reduced, but milt production was increased in both the HCG and CPE treatment groups relative to those in the control group (P <0.05). These results should be useful for increasing the fertilization efficiency in grass puffer breeding programs. PMID:26973977

  12. Asprosin, a Fasting-Induced Glucogenic Protein Hormone.

    PubMed

    Romere, Chase; Duerrschmid, Clemens; Bournat, Juan; Constable, Petra; Jain, Mahim; Xia, Fan; Saha, Pradip K; Del Solar, Maria; Zhu, Bokai; York, Brian; Sarkar, Poonam; Rendon, David A; Gaber, M Waleed; LeMaire, Scott A; Coselli, Joseph S; Milewicz, Dianna M; Sutton, V Reid; Butte, Nancy F; Moore, David D; Chopra, Atul R

    2016-04-21

    Hepatic glucose release into the circulation is vital for brain function and survival during periods of fasting and is modulated by an array of hormones that precisely regulate plasma glucose levels. We have identified a fasting-induced protein hormone that modulates hepatic glucose release. It is the C-terminal cleavage product of profibrillin, and we name it Asprosin. Asprosin is secreted by white adipose, circulates at nanomolar levels, and is recruited to the liver, where it activates the G protein-cAMP-PKA pathway, resulting in rapid glucose release into the circulation. Humans and mice with insulin resistance show pathologically elevated plasma asprosin, and its loss of function via immunologic or genetic means has a profound glucose- and insulin-lowering effect secondary to reduced hepatic glucose release. Asprosin represents a glucogenic protein hormone, and therapeutically targeting it may be beneficial in type II diabetes and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27087445

  13. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  14. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  15. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  16. Gravity-induced asymmetric distribution of a plant growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Schulze, A.; Momonoki, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Dolk (1936) demonstrated that gravistimulation induced an asymmetric distribution of auxin in a horizontally-placed shoot. An attempt is made to determine where and how that asymmetry arises, and to demonstrate that the endogenous auxin, indole-3-acetic acid, becomes asymmetrically distributed in the cortical cells of the Zea mays mesocotyl during 3 min of geostimulation. Further, indole-3-acetic acid derived by hydrolysis of an applied transport form of the hormone, indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol, becomes asymmetrically distributed within 15 min of geostimulus time. From these and prior data is developed a working theory that the gravitational stimulus induces a selective leakage, or secretion, of the hormone from the vascular tissue to the cortical cells of the mesocotyl.

  17. SERUM HORMONE CHARACTERIZATION AND EXOGENEOUS HORMONE RESCUE OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE-INDUCED PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE F344 RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    SERUM HORMONE CHARACTERIZATION AND EXOGENEOUS HORMONE RESCUE OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE-INDUCED
    PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE F344 RAT
    Susan R. Bielmeier*, Deborah S. Best^, and Michael G. Narotsky^

    ABSTRACT
    Previously, we demonstrated that bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a d...

  18. Quetiapine-Induced Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Antidiuretic Hormone

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) can be induced by various conditions, including malignant neoplasms, infections, central nervous system disorders, and numerous drugs. We here report a case of a 65-year-old female patient, treated with quetiapine for schizophrenia, who presented with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and was finally diagnosed with quetiapine-induced SIADH. Quetiapine-associated hyponatremia is extremely uncommon and only a few, relevant reports can be found in the literature. This case underlines the fact that patients on antipsychotic medication and more specifically on quetiapine should be closely monitored and routinely tested for electrolyte disorders. PMID:27034875

  19. Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone reduces pneumolysin-induced pulmonary permeability edema

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rudolf; Sridhar, Supriya; Rick, Ferenc G.; Gorshkov, Boris; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Yang, Guang; Oseghale, Aluya; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; White, Richard; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive treatment with antibiotics in patients infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae induces release of the bacterial virulence factor pneumolysin (PLY). Days after lungs are sterile, this pore-forming toxin can still induce pulmonary permeability edema in patients, characterized by alveolar/capillary barrier dysfunction and impaired alveolar liquid clearance (ALC). ALC is mainly regulated through Na+ transport by the apically expressed epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the basolaterally expressed Na+/K+-ATPase in type II alveolar epithelial cells. Because no standard treatment is currently available to treat permeability edema, the search for novel therapeutic candidates is of high priority. We detected mRNA expression for the active receptor splice variant SV1 of the hypothalamic polypeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), as well as for GHRH itself, in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of the GHRH agonist JI-34 on PLY-induced barrier and ALC dysfunction. JI-34 blunts PLY-mediated endothelial hyperpermeability in monolayers of HL-MVEC, in a cAMP-dependent manner, by means of reducing the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. In human airway epithelial H441 cells, PLY significantly impairs Na+ uptake, but JI-34 restores it to basal levels by means of increasing cAMP levels. Intratracheal instillation of PLY into C57BL6 mice causes pulmonary alveolar epithelial and endothelial hyperpermeability as well as edema formation, all of which are blunted by JI-34. These findings point toward a protective role of the GHRH signaling pathway in PLY-induced permeability edema. PMID:22308467

  20. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal ...

  1. Spermiogenesis and spermiation in a monotreme mammal, the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Lin, M; Jones, R C

    2000-02-01

    Spermatogenesis in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is of considerable biological interest as the structure of its gametes more closely resemble that of reptiles and birds than marsupial or eutherian mammals. The ultrastructure of 16 steps of spermatid development is described and provides a basis for determining the kinetics of spermatogenesis. Steps 1-3 correspond to the Golgi phase of spermatid development, steps 4-8 correspond to the cap phase, steps 9-12 are the acrosomal phase, and steps 13-16 are the maturation phase. Acrosomal development follows the reptilian model and no acrosomal granule is formed. Most other features of spermiogenesis are similar to processes in reptiles and birds. However, some are unique to mammals. For example, a thin, lateral margin of the acrosome of platypus sperm expands over the nucleus as in other mammals, and more than in reptiles and birds. Also, a tubulobulbar complex develops around the spermatid head, a feature which appears to be unique to mammals. Further, during spermiation the residual body is released from the caudal end of the nucleus of platypus sperm leaving a cytoplasmic droplet located at the proximal end of the middle piece as in marsupial and eutherian mammals. Other features of spermiogenesis in platypus appear to be unique to monotremes. For example, nuclear condensation involves the formation of a layer of chromatin granules under the nucleolemma, and development of the fibrous sheath of the principal piece starts much later in the platypus than in birds or eutherian mammals. PMID:10739018

  2. Protective Role of Growth Hormone against Hyperhomocysteinemia Induced Glomerular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia; Xia, Min; Abais, Justine M.; Liu, Xiaocheng; Li, Ningjun; Boini, Krishna M.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the protective role of growth hormone (GH) against hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys)-induced activations of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and consequent glomerular injury. A hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys) model was induced by folate free (FF) diet in mice. The urine protein excretion significantly increased while plasma GH levels dramatically decreased in hHcys. Real time RT-PCR showed that GH receptor (GHR) level increased in the cortex of hHcys mice, which mainly occurred in podocytes as shown by confocal microscopy. Recombinant mouse growth hormone (rmGH) treatment (0.02 mg/kg, once a day for 6 weeks) significantly restored the plasma GH, inhibited GHR up-regulation and attenuated proteinuria. Correspondingly, rmGH treatment also blocked hHcys-induced decrease in the expression of podocin, a podocyte slit diaphragm molecule, and inhibited the increases in the expression of desmin, a podocyte injury marker. It was also demonstrated that in hHcys the expression of epithelial markers, p-cadherin and ZO-1, decreased, while the expression of mesenchymal markers, FSP-1 and α-SMA, increased in podocytes, which together suggest the activation of EMT in podocytes. NADPH oxidase (Nox)-dependent superoxide anion (O2·−) and HIF-1α level in the hHcys mice cortex was markedly enhanced. These hHcys-induced EMT enhancement and Nox-dependant O2·−/HIF-1α activation were significantly attenuated by rmGH treatment. HIF-1α level increased in Hcys-treated cultured podocytes, which were blocked by rmGH treatment. Meanwhile, Hcys-induced EMT in cultured podocytes was significantly reversed by HIF-1α siRNA. All these results support the view that GH ameliorates hHcys-induced glomerular injury by reducing Nox-dependent O2·−/HIF-1α signal pathway and EMT. PMID:23529346

  3. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  4. Thyroid Hormone T3 Counteracts STZ Induced Diabetes in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Madaro, Luca; Ranieri, Danilo; Lupoi, Lorenzo; Stigliano, Antonio; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Bouchè, Marina; Toscano, Vincenzo; Misiti, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    This study intended to demonstrate that the thyroid hormone T3 counteracts the onset of a Streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes in wild type mice. To test our hypothesis diabetes has been induced in Balb/c male mice by multiple low dose Streptozotocin injection; and a group of mice was contemporaneously injected with T3. After 48 h mice were tested for glucose tolerance test, insulin serum levels and then sacrified. Whole pancreata were utilized for morphological and biochemical analyses, while protein extracts and RNA were utilized for expression analyses of specific molecules. The results showed that islets from T3 treated mice were comparable to age- and sex-matched control, untreated mice in number, shape, dimension, consistency, ultrastructure, insulin and glucagon levels, Tunel positivity and caspases activation, while all the cited parameters and molecules were altered by STZ alone. The T3-induced pro survival effect was associated with a strong increase in phosphorylated Akt. Moreover, T3 administration prevented the STZ-dependent alterations in glucose blood level, both during fasting and after glucose challenge, as well as in insulin serum level. In conclusion we demonstrated that T3 could act as a protective factor against STZ induced diabetes. PMID:21637761

  5. Circulating hormone concentrations in hypothyroid rats with induced polycystic ovaries.

    PubMed

    Lee, M T; Adams, W C; Bruot, B C

    1991-11-01

    The induction of polycystic ovaries in hypothyroid rats by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been studied for many years. A complete understanding of this phenomenon requires information regarding the circulating levels of the hormones of the hypophyseal-gonadal axis. In this study, serum prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone were measured by radioimmunoassay at intervals during the 40-day period in which large ovarian cysts were induced in hypothyroid rats by daily injections of hCG. After 20 injections, ovaries increased in weight 10-fold, and well-developed ovarian cysts were present, accompanied by lutein tissue; cyst development continued for the subsequent 20 days of hCG. Both PRL and LH rose during the first 5 days of treatment and were maintained at high levels from day 20 on. The pattern of change of gonadal steroids showed greater increases with hCG in hypothyroid than in euthyroid rats. Levels of estradiol in hypothyroid, hCG-injected rats increased in parallel to ovarian hypertrophy, whereas progesterone was high in initial stages and then declined. Testosterone increased in both euthyroid and hypothyroid animals, with no clear pattern coincident with cyst formation. The data suggest that the formation of polycystic ovaries in the hypothyroid rat is associated with high levels of PRL and LH followed by elevations of estradiol, which may serve to maintain continuous PRL, as well as LH, stimulation of the ovary. PMID:1924408

  6. Parathyroid hormone induces adipocyte lipolysis via PKA-mediated phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Sara; Jones, Helena A; Göransson, Olga; Degerman, Eva; Holm, Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is secreted from the parathyroid glands in response to low plasma calcium levels. Besides its classical actions on bone and kidney, PTH may have other important effects, including metabolic effects, as suggested for instance by increased prevalence of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Moreover, secondary hyperparathyroidism may contribute to the metabolic derangements that characterize states of vitamin D deficiency. PTH has been shown to induce adipose tissue lipolysis, but the details of the lipolytic action of PTH have not been described. Here we used primary mouse adipocytes to show that intact PTH (1-84) as well as the N-terminal fragment (1-37) acutely stimulated lipolysis in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the C-terminal fragment (38-84) was without lipolytic effect. The lipolytic action of PTH was paralleled by phosphorylation of known protein kinase A (PKA) substrates, i.e. hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and perilipin. The phosphorylation of HSL in response to PTH occurred at the known PKA sites S563 and S660, but not at the non-PKA site S565. PTH-induced lipolysis, as well as phosphorylation of HSL at S563 and S660, was blocked by both the PKA-inhibitor H89 and the adenylate cyclase inhibitor MDL-12330A, whereas inhibitors of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), protein kinase B (PKB), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) had little or no effect. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) strongly potentiated the lipolytic action of PTH, whereas inhibition of PDE3 had no effect. Our results show that the lipolytic action of PTH is mediated by the PKA signaling pathway with no or minor contribution of other signaling pathways and, furthermore, that the lipolytic action of PTH is limited by simultaneous activation of PDE4. Knowledge of the signaling pathways involved in the lipolytic action of PTH is important for our

  7. Hormones and Obesity: Changes in Insulin and Growth Hormone Secretion Following Surgically Induced Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Crockford, P. M.; Salmon, P. A.

    1970-01-01

    Ten obese patients were subjected to insulin tolerance tests (0.2 unit per kg. regular insulin intravenously) and/or treadmill exercise tolerance testing (2.6 m.p.h. at 11° angulation) before and after surgically induced weight reduction. Immunoreactive growth hormone (IRGH) responses returned to normal with weight reduction in all but one—a grossly obese woman studied relatively early in the postoperative period when still far from the ideal body weight. Five of these patients and two additional subjects had intravenous glucose tolerance tests (0.5 g. per kg.) before and after weight reduction. In all, there was a significant diminution in immunoreactive insulin (IRI) values, accompained by little or no change in the glucose disappearance rate (KG) and a significant improvement in insulin effectiveness as indicated by the calculated “insulinogenic index”. It was concluded that the abnormalities in IRGH and IRI secretion, as well as the insulin resistance in obesity, are probably secondary and not of primary importance in the etiology of this disorder. PMID:5430052

  8. Progestin-induced hypersecretion of growth hormone: an introductory review.

    PubMed

    Rijnberk, A; Mol, J A

    1997-01-01

    In the 1970s acromegalic features were reported in some dogs used in long-term toxicity studies of progestins. In 1980 confirmation that progestagen administration can lead to increased circulating growth hormone (GH) concentrations was obtained. This phenomenon appeared not to be confined to exogenous progestins, for an excess of GH was also found in bitches during the luteal phase of the oestrous cycle. In bitches with a progestin-induced excess of GH, GH secretion could neither be inhibited nor stimulated by well-known regulatory neurohormones, indicating autonomous secretion. Because it could not be attributed to a neoplasm and was reversible, an extra-pituitary site of GH production was investigated. The progestin-induced GH was found to originate from the mammary gland. This phenomenon seems to play a role in the mammary development that occurs during the luteal phase of the oestrous cycle. The increase in cell proliferative activity may also be responsible for the susceptibility of the mammary gland to neoplastic transformation. The discovery of mammary GH in the dog has recently become of wider importance now that expression of the GH gene has also been demonstrated in other species, namely, humans and cats. PMID:9404303

  9. Hormone induced changes in lactase glycosylation in developing rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit Kaur; Mahmood, Safrun; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2008-11-01

    Lactase exists in both soluble and membrane-bound forms in suckling rat intestine. The distribution of lactase and its glycosylated isoforms in response to thyroxine or cortisone administration has been studied in suckling rats. 75% of lactase activity was detected, associated with brush borders, compared to 24% in the soluble fraction of 8-day-old rats. Thyroxine treatment enhanced soluble lactase activity to 34%, whereas particulate fraction was reduced to 67% compared to controls. Cortisone administration reduced soluble lactase activity from 24% in controls to 12% with a concomitant increase in membrane-bound activity to 89%. Western blot analysis revealed lactase signal, corresponding to 220 kDa in both the soluble and membrane fractions, which corroborated the enzyme activity data. The elution pattern of papain solubilized lactase from agarose-Wheat Germ agglutinin, or Concanavalin A or Jacalin agglutinin columns was different in the suckling and adult rat intestines. Also the elution profile of lactase activity from agarose-lectin columns was modulated in cortisone, thyroxine, and insulin injected pups, which suggests differences in glycosylated isoforms of lactase under these conditions. These findings suggest the role of these hormones in inducing changes in lactase glycosylation during postnatal development of intestine, which may contribute to adult-type hypolactasia in rats. PMID:18712286

  10. Hormonal relations of radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Campell, B.R.; Persinger, S.M.; Town, C.D. )

    1989-04-01

    When gamma-irradiated Arabidopsis seed was germinated, tumors appeared on hypocotyls and apical meristems of the resulting plants. Several tumors have been cultured on hormone free medium for over two years since excision from the plants. The tumor lines display a range of phenotypes suggestive of abnormal hormone balance. To determine whether hormone overproduction or hypersensitivity is involved in tumorigenesis, we are measuring hormone levels in the tumor lines and characterizing their response to exogenously supplied growth regulators. Growth of two tumor lines is stimulated by either NAA or BAP, one is stimulated by NAA only, two by BAP only, and one is stimulated by neither. Growth of all lines tested thus far is inhibited by gibberellic acid, ethephon and ACC. The tumor lines appear more sensitive to ACC than normal callus tissue. Most tumors studied to date appear unlikely to have arisen due to increased hormone sensitivity. Experiments are in progress to determine auxin and cytokinin levels in the tumor lines.

  11. Exercise‐Induced growth hormone during acute sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ritsche, Kevin; Nindl, Bradly C.; Wideman, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effect of acute (24‐h) sleep deprivation on exercise‐induced growth hormone (GH) and insulin‐like growth factor‐1 (IGF‐1) was examined. Ten men (20.6 ± 1.4 years) completed two randomized 24‐h sessions including a brief, high‐intensity exercise bout following either a night of sleep (SLEEP) or (24‐h) sleep deprivation (SLD). Anaerobic performance (mean power [MP], peak power [PP], minimum power [MinP], time to peak power [TTPP], fatigue index, [FI]) and total work per sprint [TWPS]) was determined from four maximal 30‐sec Wingate sprints on a cycle ergometer. Self‐reported sleep 7 days prior to each session was similar between SLEEP and SLD sessions (7.92 ± 0.33 vs. 7.98 ± 0.39 h, P =0.656, respectively) and during the actual SLEEP session in the lab, the total amount of sleep was similar to the 7 days leading up to the lab session (7.72 ± 0.14 h vs. 7.92 ± 0.33 h, respectively) (P =0.166). No differences existed in MP, PP, MinP, TTPP, FI, TWPS, resting GH concentrations, time to reach exercise‐induced peak GH concentration (TTP), or free IGF‐1 between sessions. GH area under the curve (AUC) (825.0 ± 199.8 vs. 2212.9 ± 441.9 μg/L*min, P <0.01), exercise‐induced peak GH concentration (17.8 ± 3.7 vs. 39.6 ± 7.1 μg/L, P <0.01) and ΔGH (peak GH – resting GH) (17.2 ± 3.7 vs. 38.2 ± 7.3 μg/L, P <0.01) were significantly lower during the SLEEP versus SLD session. Our results indicate that the exercise‐induced GH response was significantly augmented in sleep‐deprived individuals. PMID:25281616

  12. Effects of a Model Inducer, Phenobarbital, on Thyroid Hormone Glucuronidation in Rat Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vivo, hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations. This decrease in circulating TH occurs in part through extrathyroidal mechanisms. Specifically, through the induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes...

  13. Impact of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Propylthiouracil on Brain Development and Function.*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The critical role of thyroid hormone (TH) in brain development is well established, severe deficiencies leading to significant neurological dysfunction. Much less information is available on more modest perturbations of TH on brain function. The present study induced varying degr...

  14. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  15. Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone (GHRH) Signaling Modulates Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress and Cognitive Deficits In Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Deepti; Ramesh, Vijay; Li, Richard C.; Schally, Andrew V.; Gozal, David

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, such as occurs in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), leads to degenerative changes in the hippocampus, and is associated with spatial learning deficits in adult mice. In both patients and murine models of OSA, the disease is associated with suppression of growth hormone (GH) secretion, which is actively involved in the growth, development and function of the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work showed that exogenous GH therapy attenuated neurocognitive deficits elicited by IH during sleep in rats. Here we show that administration of the Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 attenuates IH-induced neurocognitive deficits, anxiety, and depression in mice along with reduction in oxidative stress markers such as MDA and 8-OHDG, and increases in HIF-1α DNA binding and up-regulation of IGF-1 and erythropoietin expression. In contrast, treatment with a GHRH antagonist (MIA-602) during intermittent hypoxia did not affect any of the IH-induced deleterious effects in mice. Thus, exogenous GHRH administered as the formulation of a GHRH agonist may provide a viable therapeutic intervention to protect IH-vulnerable brain regions from OSA-associated neurocognitive dysfunction. PMID:23815362

  16. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  17. Gastrointestinal Hormones and Bariatric Surgery-induced Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ionut, Viorica; Burch, Miguel; Youdim, Adrienne; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity continues to be a major public health problem in the United States and worldwide. While recent statistics have demonstrated that obesity rates have begun to plateau, more severe classes of obesity are accelerating at a faster pace with important implications in regards to treatment. Bariatric surgery has a profound and durable effect on weight loss, being to date one of the most successful interventions for obesity. Objective To provide updates to the possible role of gut hormones in post bariatric surgery weight loss and weight loss maintenance. Design and Methods The current review examines the changes in gastro-intestinal hormones with bariatric surgery and the potential mechanisms by which these changes could result in decreased weight and adiposity. Results The mechanism by which bariatric surgery results in body weight changes is incompletely elucidated, but it clearly goes beyond caloric restriction and malabsorption. Conclusion Changes in gastro-intestinal hormones, including increases in GLP-1, PYY, and oxyntomodulin, decreases in GIP and ghrelin, or the combined action of all these hormones might play a role in induction and long-term maintenance of weight loss. PMID:23512841

  18. Diacylglycerol production induced by growth hormone in Ob1771 preadipocytes arises from phosphatidylcholine breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Catalioto, R.M.; Ailhaud, G.; Negrel, R. )

    1990-12-31

    Growth Hormone has recently been shown to stimulate the formation of diacylglycerol in Ob1771 mouse preadipocyte cells without increasing inositol lipid turnover. Addition of growth hormone to Ob1771 cells prelabelled with ({sup 3}H)glycerol or ({sup 3}H)choline led to a rapid, transient and stoechiometric formation of labelled diacylglycerol and phosphocholine, respectively. In contrast, no change was observed in the level of choline and phosphatidic acid whereas the release of water-soluble metabolites in ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine prelabelled cells exposed to growth hormone was hardly detectable. Stimulation by growth hormone of cells prelabelled with (2-palmitoyl 9, 10 ({sup 3}H))phosphatidylcholine also induced the production of labelled diacyglycerol. Pertussis toxin abolished both diacylglycerol and phosphocholine formation induced by growth hormone. It is concluded that growth hormone mediates diacylglycerol production in Ob1771 cells by means of phosphatidylcholine breakdown involving a phospholipase C which is likely coupled to the growth hormone receptor via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein.

  19. (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate induces secretion of anorexigenic gut hormones

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won-Young; Aihara, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Mizuno, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    The anorexigenic gut hormones, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), are released in response to food intake from the intestines. Dietary nutrients have been shown to stimulate these hormones. Some non-nutrients such as polyphenols show anorexigenic effects on humans. In the present study, we examined whether dietary polyphenols can stimulate secretion of these gut hormones. Caco-2 cells expressed mRNA of the gut hormones, CCK, PC1 (prohormone convertase 1), GCG (glucagon) and PYY. CCK, GLP-1 and PYY were secreted from Caco-2 cells after adding sugars, amino acids or fatty acids. Using Caco-2 cells, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), chlorogenic acid and ferulic acid induced secretion of anorexigenic gut hormones. Particularly, EGCG induced secretion of all three hormones. In an ex vivo assay using murine intestines, EGCG also released CCK from the duodenum, and GLP-1 from the ileum. These results suggest that EGCG may affect appetite via gut hormones. PMID:26388676

  20. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis. PMID:26309374

  1. Signal transduction in eclosion hormone-induced secretion of ecdysis-triggering hormone.

    PubMed

    Kingan, T G; Cardullo, R A; Adams, M E

    2001-07-01

    Inka cells of insect epitracheal glands (EGs) secrete preecdysis and ecdysis-triggering hormones (PETH and ETH) at the end of each developmental stage. Both peptides act in the central nervous system to evoke the ecdysis behavioral sequence, a stereotype behavior during which old cuticle is shed. Secretion of ETH is stimulated by a brain neuropeptide, eclosion hormone (EH). EH evokes accumulation of cGMP followed by release of ETH from Inka cells, and exogenous cGMP evokes secretion of ETH. The secretory responses to EH and cGMP are inhibited by the broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor staurosporine, and the response to EH is potentiated by the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A. Staurosporine did not inhibit EH-evoked accumulation of cGMP. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ in Inka cells during EH signaling were monitored via fluorescence ratioing with fura-2-loaded EGs. Cytoplasmic Ca2+ increases within 30-120 s after addition of EH to EGs, and it remains elevated for at least 10 min, corresponding with the time course of secretion. Secretion is increased in dose-dependent manner by the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin, a treatment that does not elevate glandular cGMP above basal levels. The secretory response to EH is partially inhibited in glands loaded with EGTA, while cGMP levels are unaffected. These findings suggest that EH activates second messenger cascades leading to cGMP accumulation and Ca2+ mobilization and/or influx and that both pathways are required for a full secretory response. cGMP activates a staurosporine-inhibitable protein kinase. We propose that Ca2+ acts via a parallel cascade with a time course that is similar to that for cGMP activation of a cGMP-dependent protein kinase. PMID:11313360

  2. Is radiation-induced ovarian failure in rhesus monkeys preventable by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists?: Preliminary observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ataya, K.; Pydyn, E.; Ramahi-Ataya

    1995-03-01

    With the advent of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of cancer patients are achieving long term survival. Impaired ovarian function after radiation therapy has been reported in several studies. Some investigators have suggested that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) can prevent radiation-induced ovarian injury in rodents. Adult female rhesus monkeys were given either vehicle or Leuprolide acetate before, during, and after radiation. Radiation was given in a dose of 200 rads/day for a total of 4000 rads to the ovaries. Frequent serum samples were assayed for estradiol (E{sub 2}) and FSH. Ovariectomy was performed later. Ovaries were processed and serially sectioned. Follicle count and size distribution were determined. Shortly after radiation started, E{sub 2} dropped to low levels, at which it remained, whereas serum FSH level, which was low before radiation, rose soon after starting radiation. In monkeys treated with a combination of LHRHa and radiation, FSH started rising soon after the LHRHa-loaded minipump was removed (after the end of radiation). Serum E{sub 2} increased after the end of LHRHa treatment in the non-irradiated monkey, but not in the irradiated monkey. Follicle counts were not preserved in the LHRHa-treated monkeys that received radiation. The data demonstrated no protective effect of LHRHa treatment against radiation-induced ovarian injury in this rhesus monkey model. 58 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Seasonal effect of gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone-induced gonadotroph functions in the goldfish pituitary.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, M; Wlasichuk, M; Chang, J P; Habibi, H R

    2013-05-01

    We have shown that native goldfish gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone (gGnIH) differentially regulates luteinsing hormone (LH)-β and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-β expression. To further understand the functions of gGnIH, we examined its interactions with two native goldfish gonadotrophin-releasing hormones, salmon gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (sGnRH) and chicken (c)GnRH-II in vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal injections of gGnIH alone reduced serum LH levels in fish in early and mid gonadal recrudescence; this inhibition was also seen in fish co-injected with either sGnRH or cGnRH-II during early recrudescence. Injection of gGnIH alone elevated pituitary LH-β and FSH-β mRNA levels at early and mid recrudescence, and FSH-β mRNA at late recrudescence. Co-injection of gGnIH attenuated the stimulatory influences of sGnRH on LH-β in early recrudescence, and LH-β and FSH-β mRNA levels in mid and late recrudescence, as well as the cGnRH-II-elicited increase in LH-β, but not FSH-β, mRNA expression at mid and late recrudescence. sGnRH and cGnRH-II injection increased pituitary gGnIH-R mRNA expression in mid and late recrudescence but gGnIH reduced gGnIH-R mRNA levels in late recrudescence. gGnIH did not affect basal LH release from perifused pituitary cells and continual exposure to gGnIH did not alter the LH responses to acute applications of GnRH. However, a short 5-min GnIH treatment in the middle of a 60-min GnRH perifusion selectively reduced the cGnRH-II-induced release of LH. These novel results indicate that, in goldfish, gGnIH and GnRH modulate pituitary GnIH-R expression and gGnIH differentially affects sGnRH and cGnRH-II regulation of LH secretion and gonadotrophin subunit mRNA levels. Furthermore, these actions are manifested in a reproductive stage-dependent manner. PMID:23331955

  4. Gene expression and hormone autonomy in radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Persinger, S.M.; Town, C.D. )

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the molecular genetics of factor controlling plant cell growth, we have isolated a group of radiation-induced tumors from Arabidopsis thaliana. Tumors appeared on plants derived from {sup 60}Co gamma-irradiated seed or seedlings, and are capable of hormone-autonomous growth in culture. We have used vertebrate oncogene probes to explore the hypothesis that the tumors arose by the radiation-induced activation of growth-regulating plant oncogenes. One probe, int-2, was used to isolate cDNA clones representing an mRNA differentially expressed between tumors and hormone-dependent callus tissue. The genomic organization and function of this and other differentially expressed Arabidopsis sequences are being further characterized. A second area of study concerns the hormonal status of individual tumors. Tumor tissue varies in color, texture, and degree of differentiation: while some tumors appear undifferentiated, one consistently produces roots, and others occasionally develop shoots or leaflets. The tumors have characteristic growth rates on hormone-free medium, and growth in response to exogenous hormones differs among the tumors themselves and from wild-type. Characterization of the relationships between hormonal status, morphogenesis, and gene expression should yield valuable insights into the mechanisms regulating plant growth and development.

  5. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G− or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-α activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-α activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-α-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the

  6. Growth hormone resistance exacerbates cholestasis-induced murine liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Stiedl, Patricia; McMahon, Robert; Blaas, Leander; Stanek, Victoria; Svinka, Jasmin; Grabner, Beatrice; Zollner, Gernot; Kessler, Sonja M.; Claudel, Thierry; Müller, Mathias; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Bilban, Martin; Esterbauer, Harald; Eferl, Robert; Haybaeck, Johannes; Trauner, Michael; Casanova, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) resistance has been associated with liver cirrhosis in humans but its contribution to the disease remains controversial. In order to elucidate whether GH resistance plays a causal role in the establishment and development of liver fibrosis, or rather represents a major consequence thereof, we challenged mice lacking the Growth hormone receptor gene (Ghr-/-, a model for GH resistance) by crossing them with Mdr2 knockout mice (Mdr2-/-), a mouse model of inflammatory cholestasis and liver fibrosis. Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice showed elevated serum markers associated with liver damage and cholestasis, extensive bile duct proliferation and increased collagen deposition relative to Mdr2 -/- mice, thus suggesting a more severe liver fibrosis phenotype. Additionally, Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice had a pronounced down-regulation of hepato-protective genes Hnf6, Egfr and Igf-1, and significantly increased levels of ROS and apoptosis in hepatocytes, compared to control mice. Moreover, single knockout mice (Ghr-/-) fed with a diet containing 1% cholic acid displayed an increase in hepatocyte ROS production, hepatocyte apoptosis and bile infarcts compared to their wildtype littermates, indicating that loss of Ghr renders hepatocytes more susceptible to toxic bile acid accumulation. Surprisingly, and despite their severe fibrotic phenotype, Ghr-/-;Mdr2-/- mice displayed a significant decrease in tumour incidence compared to Mdr2-/- mice, indicating that loss of Ghr signaling may slow the progression from fibrosis/cirrhosis to cancer in the liver. Conclusion Our findings suggest that GH resistance dramatically exacerbates liver fibrosis in a mouse model of inflammatory cholestasis, therefore suggesting that GH resistance plays a causal role in the disease and provides a novel target for the development of liver fibrosis treatments. PMID:25179284

  7. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  8. [Study on exogenous hormones inducing parthenocarpy fruit growth and development and quality of Siraitia grosvenorii].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Tu, Dong-ping; Ma, Xiao-jun; Mo, Chang-ming; Pan, Li-mei; Bai, Long-hua; Feng, Shi-xin

    2015-09-01

    To explore the growth and development and analyze the quality of the parthenocarpy fruit induced by exogenous hormones of Siraitia grosvenorii. the horizontal and vertical diameter, volume of the fruit were respectively measured by morphological and the content of endogenous hormones were determined by ELISA. The size and seed and content of mogrosides of mature fruit were determined. The results showed that the fruit of parthenocarpy was seedless and its growth and development is similar to the diploid fruit by hand pollination and triploid fruit by hand pollination or hormones. But the absolute value of horizontal and vertical diameter, volume of parthenocarpy fruit was less than those of fruit by hand pollination, while triploid was opposite. The content of IAA, ABA and ratio of ABA/GA was obviously wavy. At 0-30 d the content of IAA and ABA of parthenocarpy fruit first reduced then increased, content of IAA and GA parthenocarpy fruit was higher than that of fruit by hand pollination. Mogrosides of parthenocarpy fruit was close to pollination fruit. Hormones can induce S. grosvenorii parthenocarpy to get seedless fruit and the fruit shape and size and quality is close to normal diploid fruit by hand pollination and better than triploid fruit by hormone or hand pollination. PMID:26983201

  9. Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone promotes higher calcium mobilization to induce apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Pei, Xu-Yang; Zhao, Wen-Li; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-07-01

    Calcium ions are essential secondary messengers that regulate diverse cellular processes including gene transcription, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) promotes programmed cell death during insect metamorphosis, whereas juvenile hormone (JH) counteracts 20E activity to prevent metamorphosis. Both 20E and JH can induce cellular calcium increase; however, the mechanisms and physiological consequences resulting from calcium increase caused by the two counteracting hormones are unclear. Here, using Helicoverpa armigera epidermal cell line, we show that 20E via a G-protein-coupled receptor induced a major calcium rise in the cells, whereas JH via receptor tyrosine kinase induced a minor calcium increase. The calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1 (Orai1) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels were necessary for 20E-induced rapid calcium influx. A higher calcium level was maintained in a long time and more genes including Orai1 and TRP channels showed elevated expression after the treatment of 20E than did after JH treatment. Caspase3/7 activation, cell death and pro-apoptotic gene expression were elicited by 20E induction, but not by JH. JH could repress 20E-induced calcium influx, caspase3/7 activation and gene expression. Higher calcium levels induced apoptosis. These results suggest that 20E and JH via different pathways regulate calcium mobilization and homeostasis at different levels, thus inform different gene expression and cellular responses. PMID:27209368

  10. A requirement for fatty acid oxidation in the hormone-induced meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Valsangkar, Deepa; Downs, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    We have previously shown that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is required for AMP-activated protein kinase (PRKA)-induced maturation in vitro. In the present study, we have further investigated the role of this metabolic pathway in hormone-induced meiotic maturation. Incorporating an assay with (3)H-palmitic acid as the substrate, we first examined the effect of PRKA activators on FAO levels. There was a significant stimulation of FAO in cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO) treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) and RSVA405. In denuded oocytes (DO), AICAR stimulated FAO only in the presence of carnitine, the molecule that facilitates fatty acyl CoA entry into the mitochondria. The carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 activator C75 successfully stimulated FAO in CEO. All three of these activators trigger germinal vesicle breakdown. Meiotic resumption induced by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or amphiregulin was completely inhibited by the FAO inhibitors etomoxir, mercaptoacetate, and malonyl CoA. Importantly, FAO was increased in CEO stimulated by FSH and epidermal growth factor, and this increase was blocked by FAO inhibitors. Moreover, compound C, a PRKA inhibitor, prevented the FSH-induced increase in FAO. Both carnitine and palmitic acid augmented hormonal induction of maturation. In a more physiological setting, etomoxir eliminated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced maturation in follicle-enclosed oocytes. In addition, CEO and DO from hCG-treated mice displayed an etomoxir-sensitive increase in FAO, indicating that this pathway was stimulated during in vivo meiotic resumption. Taken together, our data indicate that hormone-induced maturation in mice requires a PRKA-dependent increase in FAO. PMID:23863407

  11. A histological investigation of the maturation of the acorn worm, an inhabitant of the Sea of Japan, and a suggestion about the relationship between synchronized spawning/spermiation and the tidal level.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, Shouzo; Sakai, Kei-ichi; Matada, Masahiro; Sasayama, Yuichi

    2005-05-01

    One species of Hemichordata, Balanoglossus misakiensis, is then acorn worm originally reported from the intertidal zone of the Miura Peninsula on the Pacific Ocean side of Japan. We histologically examined the reproductive cycle of the population of this species, which inhabits only the sublittoral zone in the Sea of Japan. Testes and ovaries began to develop at the beginning of May 2003 and were almost mature in the latter half of June in males and in the first half of July in females in the same year. Subsequently, spermiation and spawning followed in the latter half of July in males and in the first half of August in females. Progress in maturation appeared to be related to increases in the water temperature. Although some experiments were conducted in aquariums to identify the conditions responsible for the synchronization of the occurrence of spontaneous spawning/spermiation, no clues were obtained. During the experiments, however, 11, 2, and 4 individuals out of the 67 used achieved spawning/spermiation on separate days. The occurrence of spawning/spermiation in the laboratory corresponded to the latter half of the switch from high tide to low tide on those days. Also in the field, it was known that they released the gametes according to this specific schedule. Therefore, it was suggested that, in the Japan Sea population of this species, the tide level may be a condition for synchronized spawning/spermiation. PMID:15930831

  12. Distinct structural transitions of chromatin topological domains correlate with coordinated hormone-induced gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Le Dily, François; Baù, Davide; Pohl, Andy; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Serra, François; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Wright, Roni H.G.; Ballare, Cecilia; Filion, Guillaume; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    The human genome is segmented into topologically associating domains (TADs), but the role of this conserved organization during transient changes in gene expression is not known. Here we describe the distribution of progestin-induced chromatin modifications and changes in transcriptional activity over TADs in T47D breast cancer cells. Using ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing), Hi-C (chromosome capture followed by high-throughput sequencing), and three-dimensional (3D) modeling techniques, we found that the borders of the ∼2000 TADs in these cells are largely maintained after hormone treatment and that up to 20% of the TADs could be considered as discrete regulatory units where the majority of the genes are either transcriptionally activated or repressed in a coordinated fashion. The epigenetic signatures of the TADs are homogeneously modified by hormones in correlation with the transcriptional changes. Hormone-induced changes in gene activity and chromatin remodeling are accompanied by differential structural changes for activated and repressed TADs, as reflected by specific and opposite changes in the strength of intra-TAD interactions within responsive TADs. Indeed, 3D modeling of the Hi-C data suggested that the structure of TADs was modified upon treatment. The differential responses of TADs to progestins and estrogens suggest that TADs could function as “regulons” to enable spatially proximal genes to be coordinately transcribed in response to hormones. PMID:25274727

  13. Deciphering the hormonal signalling network behind the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Fernández, Iván; Sánchez-Guzmán, María J.; Jung, Sabine C.; Pascual, Jose A.; Pozo, María J.

    2013-01-01

    Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defense response that is effective against a broad-spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defense signaling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms [induced systemic resistance (ISR)]. Among them, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR) is believed to involve a wider variety of signaling routes, interconnected in a complex network of cross-communicating hormone pathways. Using tomato as a model, an integrative analysis of the main mechanisms involved in the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum against the necrotrophic leaf pathogen Botrytis cinerea was performed. Root colonization by T. harzianum rendered the leaves more resistant to B. cinerea independently of major effects on plant nutrition. The analysis of disease development in shoots of tomato mutant lines impaired in the synthesis of the key defense-related hormones JA, ET, salicylic acid (SA), and abscisic acid (ABA), and the peptide prosystemin (PS) evidenced the requirement of intact JA, SA, and ABA signaling pathways for a functional TISR. Expression analysis of several hormone-related marker genes point to the role of priming for enhanced JA-dependent defense responses upon pathogen infection. Together, our results indicate that although TISR induced in tomato against necrotrophs is mainly based on boosted JA-dependent responses, the pathways regulated by the plant hormones SA- and ABA are also required for successful TISR development. PMID:23805146

  14. Identification of two juvenile hormone inducible transcription factors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Ueno, Chihiro; Nakamura, Yuki; Kinjoh, Terunori; Ito, Yuka; Shimura, Sachiko; Noda, Hiroaki; Imanishi, Shigeo; Mita, Kazuei; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kamimura, Manabu

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates many physiological processes in insects. However, the signal cascades in which JH is active have not yet been fully elucidated, particularly in comparison to another major hormone ecdysteroid. Here we identified two JH inducible transcription factors as candidate components of JH signaling pathways in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. DNA microarray analysis showed that expression of two transcription factor genes, E75 and Enhancer of split mβ (E(spl)mβ), was induced by juvenile hormone I (JH I) in NIAS-Bm-aff3 cells. Real time RT-PCR analysis confirmed that expression of four E75 isoforms (E75A, E75B, E75C and E75D) and E(spl)mβ was 3-8 times greater after JH I addition. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide did not suppress JH-induced expression of the genes, indicating that they were directly induced by JH. JH-induced expression of E75 and E(spl)mβ was also observed in four other B. mori cell lines and in larval hemocytes of final instar larvae. Notably, E75A expression was induced very strongly in larval hemocytes by topical application of the JH analog fenoxycarb; the level of induced expression was comparable to that produced by feeding larvae with 20-hydroxyecdysone. These results suggest that E75 and E(spl)mβ are general and direct target genes of JH and that the transcription factors encoded by these genes play important roles in JH signaling. PMID:25770979

  15. Relationships between hormone-induced calcium release and 86rubidium uptake stimulation in starfish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Guerrier, P; Moreau, M; Dorée, M

    1979-09-01

    86Rubidium+ uptake, but not 86Rubidium efflux, is strongly stimulated after addition of the meiosis inducing hormone 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde) to prophase blocked oocytes of the starfish Marthasterias glacialis. This stimulation is a transient process which does not require the continuous presence of 1-MeAde and is elicited within 1 minute of contact. 1-MeAde and its biologically active structural analogs fully stimulate Rb+ uptake at concentrations which are about two orders of magnitude lower than those required to trigger meiosis reinitiation but which already release underthreshold levels of Ca2+ from the inner part of the plasma membrane. External Ca2+ concentrations effective in triggering meiosis reinitiation also stimulate Rb+ influx, while drugs like D600, theophyllin and caffein which suppress the hormone induced Ca2+ release, simultaneously preclude the stimulation of Rb+ uptake. Dithiothreitol (DTT) which mimicks 1-MeAde action in releasing Ca2+ and inducing meiosis acts both on the efflux and on active and passive Rb+ influxes. Ouabain, the classical inhibitor of the Na+, K+ pump does not preclude meiosis reinitiation under the influence of 1-MeAde, its agonists of mimetics. It suppresses the active component of Rb+ uptake both in control or stimulate oocytes. When applied only in preincubation before starting the hormone treatment, it cannot however inhibit the stimulation of Rb+ uptake, while basal pump inhibition is preserved. These results demonstrate that stimulation of the active Rb+ or K+ transport is not indispensable to meiosis reinitiation. They suggest moreover that the hormone induced Ca2+ release from the plasma membrane may be responsible for unmasking new ouabain sensitive transport sites. PMID:515475

  16. Evolutionary Changes in Sensitivity to Hormonally Induced Gonadal Sex Reversal in a Frog Species.

    PubMed

    Miura, Ikuo; Ohtani, Hiromi; Ogata, Mitsuaki; Ezaz, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese frog Glandirana rugosa is unique in that it shows geographic variation in sex chromosome differentiation and heterogametic sex determination. To elucidate the cause of interpopulation differences in gonadal sex differentiation, we investigated hormonally induced sex reversal and the expression patterns of genes associated with sex determination during early tadpole development. We found that sex reversal was easily induced in XX females and XY males of 2 forms (West-Japan and East-Japan) of G. rugosa with the ancestral homomorphic sex chromosomes under male heterogametic sex determination. During sex reversal, expression of CYP19 and/or FOXL2 was dependent on the phenotypic sex of the gonad. In contrast, sex reversal was not induced in ZW females of a population with a heteromorphic ZW sex chromosome system or in XX females or XY males in a population with a heteromorphic XY sex chromosome system. The latter 2 populations are evolutionarily derived forms. These results indicate an evolutionary direction for the gonadal sex differentiation mechanism. The original system was highly sensitive to sex hormones and allowed almost complete sex reversal. From this ancestral form, a new system evolved that was resistant to hormones and showed a change in the heterogametic sex and the sex chromosome differentiation mechanism. PMID:27160089

  17. Deletion of Ovarian Hormones Induces a Sickness Behavior in Rats Comparable to the Effect of Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Azizi-Malekabadi, Hamid; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Pourganji, Masoume; Zabihi, Hoda; Saeedjalali, Mohsen; Anaeigoudari, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimmune factors have been proposed as the contributors to the pathogenesis of sickness behaviors. The effects of female gonadal hormones on both neuroinflammation and depression have also been well considered. In the present study, the capability of deletion of ovarian hormones to induce sickness-like behaviors in rats was compared with the effect lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The groups were including Sham, OVX, Sham-LPS, and OVX-LPS. The Sham-LPS and OVX-LPS groups were treated with LPS (250 μg/kg) two hours before conducting the behavioral tests. In the forced swimming (FST), the immobility times in both OVX and Sham-LPS groups were higher than that of Sham (P < 0.001). In open-field (OP) test, the central crossing number by OVX and Sham-LPS groups were lower than Sham (P < 0.001) while there were no significant differences between OVX-LPS and OVX groups. In elevated plus maze (EPM), the percent of entries to the open arm by both OVX and Sham-LPS groups was lower than that of Sham group (P < 0.001). The results of present study showed that deletion of ovarian hormones induced sickness behaviors in rats which were comparable to the effects of LPS. Moreover, further investigations are required in order to better understand the mechanism(s) involved. PMID:25705518

  18. FoxO1 Deacetylation Regulates Thyroid Hormone-induced Transcription of Key Hepatic Gluconeogenic Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ−/−) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status. PMID:23995837

  19. Parathyroid Hormone Therapy Mollifies Radiation-Induced Biomechanical Degradation in Murine Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sagar S.; Gallagher, Katherine K.; Donneys, Alexis; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Nelson, Noah S.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Descriptions of mandibular distraction osteogenesis for tissue replacement after oncologic resection or for defects caused by osteoradionecrosis have been limited. Previous work demonstrated radiation decreases union formation, cellularity and mineral density in mandibular distraction osteogenesis. The authors posit that intermittent systemic administration of parathyroid hormone will serve as a stimulant to cellular function, reversing radiation-induced damage and enhancing bone regeneration. Methods Twenty male Lewis rats were randomly assigned to three groups: group 1 (radiation and distraction osteogenesis, n = 7) and group 2 (radiation, distraction osteogenesis, and parathyroid hormone, n = 5) received a human-equivalent dose of 35 Gy of radiation (human bioequivalent, 70 Gy) fractionated over 5 days. All groups, including group 3 (distraction osteogenesis, n = 8), underwent a left unilateral mandibular osteotomy with bilateral external fixator placement. Distraction osteogenesis was performed at a rate of 0.3 mm every 12 hours to reach a gap of 5.1 mm. Group 2 was injected with parathyroid hormone (60 μg/kg) subcutaneously daily for 3 weeks after the start of distraction osteogenesis. On postoperative day 40, all left hemimandibles were harvested. Biomechanical response parameters were generated. Statistical significance was considered at p ≤ 0.05. Results Parathyroid hormone–treated mandibles had significantly higher failure load and higher yield than did untreated mandibles. However, these values were still significantly lower than those of nonirradiated mandibles. Conclusions The authors have successfully demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of parathyroid hormone to stimulate and enhance bone regeneration in their irradiated murine mandibular model of distraction osteogenesis. Anabolic regimens of parathyroid hormone, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drug on formulary, significantly improve outcomes in a model of

  20. The influence of sex hormones on UVB induced erythema in man.

    PubMed

    Jemec, G B; Heidenheim, M

    1995-05-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that sex hormones can modify the inflammatory response in a number of diseases. In a pilot study the influence of sex hormones on UV-induced inflammation, testing was done with oestradiol-17beta, testosterone and progesterone, as a double-blind vehicle-controlled study in 47 healthy volunteers. Inflammation was graded using laser-doppler velocimetry. Oestradiol (5 mg/100 g) was found to increase the inflammatory response significantly when compared with placebo or testosterone treated areas (P < 0.03). These findings support previous experimental and epidemiological observations of an increased inflammation following oestrogenic stimulation, and suggest that non-lymphocyte-mediated mechanisms may be involved as well. PMID:8664221

  1. Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Erythrocytosis in a Patient Undergoing Hormonal Treatment for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Ogbonna, Onyekachi Henry; Oneal, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are most commonly used for breast cancer patients with hormone receptor positive disease. Although the side effect profile of aromatase inhibitors is well known, including common side effects like arthralgia, bone pain, arthritis, hot flashes, and more serious problems like osteoporosis, we present a case of an uncommon side effect of these medications. We report the case of a postmenopausal woman on adjuvant hormonal therapy with anastrozole after completing definitive therapy for stage IIIB estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, who was referred to hematology service for evaluation of persistent erythrocytosis. Primary and known secondary causes of polycythemia were ruled out. On further evaluation, we found that her erythrocytosis began after initiation of anastrozole and resolved after it was discontinued. We discuss the pathophysiology of aromatase inhibitor-induced erythrocytosis and reference of similar cases reported in the literature. PMID:26137331

  2. Effect of Naloxon on Counter Insulin Hormone Secretion in Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yeong Shil; Kim, Sung Woon; Yang, In Myung; Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Young Seol; Choi, Young Kil

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the normal physiologic role of endogenous opiates in glucose homeostasis and as a preliminary study for clarifying the association of endogenous opites with pathophysilogy of NIDDM, we obseved the changes in the secretion of counter-insulin hormones in response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia with or without naloxone. The results were as follows: Blood glucose was decreased significantly more rapidly with naloxone infusion than after insulin alone, which seems to play a role in the early responses of ACTH and GH.Not only was the more rapid response of ACTH and GH, but also the prolonged secretion of ACTH and Cortisol were observed after administration of insulin and naloxone. We concluded that endogenous opiates may be involved in the feedback regulation of secretion of ACTH and GH during hypoglycemia either at hypophysis or hypothalamus, and involved in glucose homeostasis via a certain direct mechanism other than regulation of counter hormone secretion. PMID:2856480

  3. GPR142 Controls Tryptophan-Induced Insulin and Incretin Hormone Secretion to Improve Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Efanov, Alexander M.; Fang, Xiankang; Beavers, Lisa S.; Wang, Xuesong; Wang, Jingru; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Ma, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    GPR142, a putative amino acid receptor, is expressed in pancreatic islets and the gastrointestinal tract, but the ligand affinity and physiological role of this receptor remain obscure. In this study, we show that in addition to L-Tryptophan, GPR142 signaling is also activated by L-Phenylalanine but not by other naturally occurring amino acids. Furthermore, we show that Tryptophan and a synthetic GPR142 agonist increase insulin and incretin hormones and improve glucose disposal in mice in a GPR142-dependent manner. In contrast, Phenylalanine improves in vivo glucose disposal independently of GPR142. Noteworthy, refeeding-induced elevations in insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide are blunted in Gpr142 null mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate GPR142 is a Tryptophan receptor critically required for insulin and incretin hormone regulation and suggest GPR142 agonists may be effective therapies that leverage amino acid sensing pathways for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27322810

  4. Gentamicin Induced Nephrotoxicity: The Role of Sex Hormones in Gonadectomized Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir; Moslemi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gentamicin (GM) induced nephrotoxicity may be sex hormones related. The effects of sex hormones on GM induced nephrotoxicity in gonadectomized rats were investigated. Methods. Ovariectomized rats received 0.25, 0.5, or 1 mg/kg/week of estradiol (ES) alone or accompanied with 10 mg/kg/week of progesterone (Pro) for two weeks followed by GM (100 mg/kg/day) for 9 days. Castrated rats were also treated with 10, 50, or 100 mg/kg/week of testosterone (TS) for two weeks and then received GM. In addition, a single castrated group received 0.25 mg/kg/week of ES plus GM. Results. GM increased the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) and kidney tissue damage score (KTDS) (P < 0.05). TS had no effect on the serum levels of BUN and Cr and KTDS, while low dose of ES intensified these parameters in male (P < 0.05). ES (0.5 mg/kg) without Pro ameliorated KTDS in female (P < 0.05) while ES (1 mg/kg) with or without Pro exacerbated the BUN values and Cr values, KTDS, and body weight loss (P < 0.05). Conclusion. ES (0.5 mg/kg) without Pro ameliorated kidney damage induced by GM in female while neither TS nor ES had beneficial effect on nephrotoxicity induced by GM in male, although ES aggravated it. PMID:27213082

  5. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes blocks the positive feedback release of luteinizing hormone in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Kienast, S G; Fadden, C; Steger, R W

    1993-01-01

    The effects of streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetes on the release of gonadotropins was studied in female rats. In the first experiment, rats were ovariectomized and 2 days later were injected with STZ. Three weeks later rats were treated with estrogen and progesterone and blood samples were taken via intraatrial cannulae for luteinizing hormone (LH) assay. Afternoon surges of LH were seen in 4/5 control but 0/8 STZ rats. Pituitary responses to LH-releasing hormone in vitro did not differ. In the 2nd experiment, ovariectomized estrogen-primed rats were killed prior to and during a progesterone-induced LH surge. As in Experiment 1, STZ-treatment inhibited the LH surge but did not effect the afternoon rise in median eminence norepinephrine turnover which has previously been shown to be important in stimulating LH release. Turnover of norepinephrine in the anterior hypothalamus was depressed in the diabetic rats both prior to and during the expected time of the LH surge. Dopamine turnover was depressed in all three brain regions studied. It can be concluded that the positive feedback control of LH release is severely attenuated in diabetic rats but the mechanism explaining the loss is not clear. Diabetes-induced alterations in hypothalamic catecholamine metabolism may be involved but further work is needed to more carefully define these relationships. PMID:8221130

  6. Physiology of Hormone Autonomous Tissue Lines Derived From Radiation-Induced Tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Campell, B R; Town, C D

    1991-11-01

    gamma-Radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana L. have been produced as a novel approach to isolation of genes that regulate plant development. Tumors excised from irradiated plants are hormone autonomous in culture and have been maintained on hormone-free medium for up to 4 years. Five tumor tissue lines having different morphologies and growth rates were analyzed for auxin, cytokinin, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) content, ethylene production, and response to exogenous growth regulators. Normal tissues and two crown gall tissue lines were analyzed for comparison. Rosettes and whole seedlings each contained approximately 30 nanograms. (gram fresh weight)(-1) free indoleacetic acid (IAA), 150 nanograms. (gram fresh weight)(-1) ester-conjugated IAA, and 10 to 20 micrograms. (gram fresh weight)(-1) amide-conjugated IAA. The crown gall lines contained similar amounts of free and ester-conjugated IAA but less amide conjugates. Whereas three of the radiation-induced tumor lines had IAA profiles similar to normal tissues, one line had 10- to 100-fold more free IAA and three- to 10-fold less amide-conjugated IAA. The fifth line had normal free IAA levels but more conjugated IAA than control tissues. Whole seedlings contained approximately 2 nanograms. (gram fresh weight)(-1) of both zeatin riboside and isopentenyladenosine. The crown gall lines had 100- to 1000-fold higher levels of each cytokinin. In contrast, the three radiation-induced tumor lines analyzed contained cytokinin levels similar to the control tissue. The radiation-induced tumor tissues produced very little ethylene, although each contained relatively high levels of ACC. Normal callus contained similar amounts of ACC but produced several times more ethylene than the radiation-induced tumor lines. Each of the radiation-induced tumor tissues displayed a unique set of responses to exogenously supplied growth regulators. Only one tumor line showed the same response as normal callus to

  7. Physiology of Hormone Autonomous Tissue Lines Derived From Radiation-Induced Tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana 1

    PubMed Central

    Campell, Bruce R.; Town, Christopher D.

    1991-01-01

    γ-Radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana L. have been produced as a novel approach to isolation of genes that regulate plant development. Tumors excised from irradiated plants are hormone autonomous in culture and have been maintained on hormone-free medium for up to 4 years. Five tumor tissue lines having different morphologies and growth rates were analyzed for auxin, cytokinin, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) content, ethylene production, and response to exogenous growth regulators. Normal tissues and two crown gall tissue lines were analyzed for comparison. Rosettes and whole seedlings each contained approximately 30 nanograms· (gram fresh weight)−1 free indoleacetic acid (IAA), 150 nanograms· (gram fresh weight)−1 ester-conjugated IAA, and 10 to 20 micrograms· (gram fresh weight)−1 amide-conjugated IAA. The crown gall lines contained similar amounts of free and ester-conjugated IAA but less amide conjugates. Whereas three of the radiation-induced tumor lines had IAA profiles similar to normal tissues, one line had 10- to 100-fold more free IAA and three- to 10-fold less amide-conjugated IAA. The fifth line had normal free IAA levels but more conjugated IAA than control tissues. Whole seedlings contained approximately 2 nanograms· (gram fresh weight)−1 of both zeatin riboside and isopentenyladenosine. The crown gall lines had 100- to 1000-fold higher levels of each cytokinin. In contrast, the three radiation-induced tumor lines analyzed contained cytokinin levels similar to the control tissue. The radiation-induced tumor tissues produced very little ethylene, although each contained relatively high levels of ACC. Normal callus contained similar amounts of ACC but produced several times more ethylene than the radiation-induced tumor lines. Each of the radiation-induced tumor tissues displayed a unique set of responses to exogenously supplied growth regulators. Only one tumor line showed the same response as normal callus to

  8. Hormonal changes during salinity-induced leaf senescence in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Michel Edmond; Albacete, Alfonso; Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; Acosta, Manuel; Romero-Aranda, Remedios; Dodd, Ian C.; Lutts, Stanley; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Leaf senescence is one of the most limiting factors to plant productivity under salinity. Both the accumulation of specific toxic ions (e.g. Na+) and changes in leaf hormone relations are involved in the regulation of this process. Tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv Moneymaker) were cultivated for 3 weeks under high salinity (100 mM NaCl) and leaf senescence-related parameters were studied during leaf development in relation to Na+ and K+ contents and changes in abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinins, the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), and the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Na+ accumulated to a similar extent in both leaves 4 and 5 (numbering from the base of the plant) and more quickly during the third week, while concurrently K+ contents sharply decreased. However, photosystem II efficiency, measured as the Fv/Fm ratio, decreased from the second week of salinization in leaf 4 but only at the end of the third week in the younger leaf 5. In the prematurely senescent leaf 4, ABA content increased linearly while IAA strongly decreased with salinization time. Although zeatin (Z) levels were scarcely affected by salinity, zeatin-riboside (ZR) and the total cytokinin content (Z+ZR) progressively decreased by 50% from the imposition of the stress. ACC was the only hormonal compound that increased in leaf tissue coincident with the onset of oxidative damage and the decline in chlorophyll fluorescence, and prior to massive Na+ accumulation. Indeed, (Z+ZR) and ACC contents and their ratio (Z+ZR/ACC) were the hormonal parameters best correlated with the onset and progression of leaf senescence. The influence of different hormonal changes on salt-induced leaf senescence is discussed. PMID:18573798

  9. GATA2 Mediates Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone-Induced Transcriptional Activation of the Thyrotropin β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Kenji; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) activates not only the secretion of thyrotropin (TSH) but also the transcription of TSHβ and α-glycoprotein (αGSU) subunit genes. TSHβ expression is maintained by two transcription factors, Pit1 and GATA2, and is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone (T3). Our prior studies suggest that the main activator of the TSHβ gene is GATA2, not Pit1 or unliganded T3 receptor (TR). In previous studies on the mechanism of TRH-induced activation of the TSHβ gene, the involvements of Pit1 and TR have been investigated, but the role of GATA2 has not been clarified. Using kidney-derived CV1 cells and pituitary-derived GH3 and TαT1 cells, we demonstrate here that TRH signaling enhances GATA2-dependent activation of the TSHβ promoter and that TRH-induced activity is abolished by amino acid substitution in the GATA2-Zn finger domain or mutation of GATA-responsive element in the TSHβ gene. In CV1 cells transfected with TRH receptor expression plasmid, GATA2-dependent transactivation of αGSU and endothelin-1 promoters was enhanced by TRH. In the gel shift assay, TRH signal potentiated the DNA-binding capacity of GATA2. While inhibition by T3 is dominant over TRH-induced activation, unliganded TR or the putative negative T3-responsive element are not required for TRH-induced stimulation. Studies using GH3 cells showed that TRH-induced activity of the TSHβ promoter depends on protein kinase C but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that the signaling pathway is different from that in the prolactin gene. These results indicate that GATA2 is the principal mediator of the TRH signaling pathway in TSHβ expression. PMID:21533184

  10. Loss of ATF3 promotes hormone-induced prostate carcinogenesis and the emergence of CK5(+)CK8(+) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Kim, J; Teng, Y; Ding, H-F; Zhang, J; Hai, T; Cowell, J K; Yan, C

    2016-07-01

    Steroid sex hormones can induce prostate carcinogenesis, and are thought to contribute to the development of prostate cancer during aging. However, the mechanism for hormone-induced prostate carcinogenesis remains elusive. Here, we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-a broad stress sensor-suppressed hormone-induced prostate carcinogenesis in mice. Although implantation of testosterone and estradiol (T+E2) pellets for 2 months in wild-type mice rarely induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in dorsal prostates (one out of eight mice), the loss of ATF3 led to the appearance of not only PIN but also invasive lesions in almost all examined animals. The enhanced carcinogenic effects of hormones on ATF3-deficient prostates did not appear to be caused by a change in estrogen signaling, but were more likely a consequence of elevated androgen signaling that stimulated differentiation of prostatic basal cells into transformation-preferable luminal cells. Indeed, we found that hormone-induced lesions in ATF3-knockout mice often contained cells with both basal and luminal characteristics, such as p63(+) cells (a basal-cell marker) showing luminal-like morphology, or cells double-stained with basal (CK5(+)) and luminal (CK8(+)) markers. Consistent with these findings, low ATF3 expression was found to be a poor prognostic marker for prostate cancer in a cohort of 245 patients. Our results thus support that ATF3 is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer. PMID:26522727

  11. Parathyroid hormone induces the Nrna family of nuclear orphan receptors in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Pirih, Flavia Q. . E-mail: fqpirih@ucla.edu; Aghaloo, Tara L. . E-mail: taghaloo@ucla.edu; Bezouglaia, Olga . E-mail: obezougl@ucla.edu; Nervina, Jeanne M. . E-mail: jnervina@ucla.edu; Tetradis, Sotirios; E-mail: sotirist@dent.ucla.edu

    2005-07-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has both anabolic and catabolic effects on bone metabolism, although the molecular mechanisms mediating these effects are largely unknown. Among the transcription factors induced by Pth in osteoblasts are the nerve growth factor-inducible factor B (NR4A; NGFI-B) family of orphan nuclear receptors: Nurr1, Nur77, and NOR-1. PTH induces NR4A members through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway in vitro. We report here that PTH rapidly and transiently induced expression of all three NR4A genes in PTH-target tissues in vivo. In calvaria, long bones, and kidneys, NR4A induction was maximal 0.5-1 h after a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 80 {mu}g/kg PTH. Nur77 demonstrated the highest expression, followed, in order, by Nurr1 and NOR-1. In calvaria and long bone, PTH-induced expression of each NR4A gene was detectable at 10 {mu}g/kg i.p. with maximum induction at 40-80 {mu}g/kg. PTH (3-34) did not induce NR4A mRNA levels in calvaria, long bone, and kidney in vivo, confirming our in vitro results that NR4A genes are induced primarily through the cAMP-PKA pathway. The magnitude of PTH-induced NR4A expression was comparable in vivo and in vitro. However, NR4A mRNA levels peaked and returned to baseline faster in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro, PTH induced NR4A pre-mRNA levels suggesting that induction of these genes is, at least in part, through activation of mRNA synthesis. The in vivo induction of the NR4A family members by PTH suggests their involvement in, at least some, PTH-induced changes in bone metabolism.

  12. Pre-emptive oral dexmethorphan reduces fentanyl-induced cough as well as immediate postoperative adrenocortico-tropic hormone and growth hormone level

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Avik; Kundu, Asim Kumar; Ghosh, Sudipta; Choudhuri, Rajat; Bandopadhyay, Bijoy Kumar; Dasgupta, Sugata

    2011-01-01

    Background: Fentanyl-induced cough is not always benign and brief and can be remarkably troublesome, spasmodic, and explosive. Dextromethorphan, an opioid derivative with an antitussive action, may be effective in reducing the fentanyl-induced cough. Dextromethorphan, a N-methyl D aspartate receptor antagonist, may have some effect on diminishing the stress response to surgery. This study was undertaken to determine whether preoperative dextromethorphan could effectively attenuate its incidence, severity, and effect on postoperative stress hormone levels. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and twenty patients of American society of anesthesiologists I-II, aged 18–60 years, undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy or appendicectomy were randomly allocated into two groups (Group C, control; Group D, dextromethorphan) consisting of 160 patients each. Patients in Group D received dextromethorphan 40 mg orally and in Group C received placebo tablets 60 minutes before induction of anesthesia. The incidence of cough was recorded for 1 minute after fentanyl injection and graded as none (0), mild (1–2), moderate (3–5), and severe (>5 cough). Blood samples were collected for estimation of stress hormone levels before surgery and again at 1 hour and 24 hours postoperatively and compared. The appearance of adverse reactions was recorded. Results: The incidence of reflex fentanyl cough was lower in dextromethorphan group (3.9%) in comparison to placebo (59.8%). Five patients developed mild and one moderate cough in the dextromethorphan group. In the control group, 31 patients developed mild, 29 moderate, and 32 severe cough. The stress hormones were significantly higher at 1 hour and 24 hours postoperatively in both groups in comparison to its preoperative values. However, at 1 hour postoperatively, adrenocorticotropic hormone, epinephrine, and growth hormone values were significantly low in the dextromethorphan group (61.5 ± 21.1 pg/ ml, 142.1 ± 11.2 pg

  13. Steroidogenic and maturation-inducing potency of native gonadotropic hormones in female chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The gonadotropins (GtHs), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are produced in the pituitary gland and regulates gametogenesis through production of gonadal steroids. However, respective roles of two GtHs in the teleosts are still incompletely characterized due to technical difficulties in the purification of native GtHs. Methods Native FSH and LH were purified from the pituitaries of adult chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus by anion-exchange chromatography and immunoblotting using specific antisera. The steroidogenic potency of the intact chub mackerel FSH (cmFSH) and LH (cmLH) were evaluated in mid- and late-vitellogenic stage follicles by measuring the level of gonadal steroids, estradiol-17beta (Ε2) and 17,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20beta-P). In addition, we evaluated the maturation-inducing potency of the GtHs on same stage follicles. Results Both cmFSH and cmLH significantly stimulated E2 production in mid-vitellogenic stage follicles. In contrast, only LH significantly stimulated the production of 17,20beta-P in late-vitellogenic stage follicles. Similarly, cmLH induced final oocyte maturation (FOM) in late-vitellogenic stage follicles. Conclusions Present results indicate that both FSH and LH may regulate vitellogenic processes, whereas only LH initiates FOM in chub mackerel. PMID:22950645

  14. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor deficiency in mice protects against obesity‐induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Louise E.; Morgan, David G.; Balthasar, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS‐R) signaling has been associated with growth hormone release, increases in food intake and pleiotropic cardiovascular effects. Recent data demonstrated that acute GHS‐R antagonism leads to increases in mean arterial pressure mediated by the sympathetic nervous system in rats; a highly undesirable effect if GHS‐R antagonism was to be used as a therapeutic approach to reducing food intake in an already obese, hypertensive patient population. However, our data in conscious, freely moving GHS‐R deficient mice demonstrate that chronic absence of GHS‐R signaling is protective against obesity‐induced hypertension. GHS‐R deficiency leads to reduced systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV); in response to acute high‐fat diet (HFD)‐feeding, increases in the sympathetic control of SBPV are suppressed in GHS‐R KO mice. Our data further suggest that GHS‐R signaling dampens the immediate HFD‐mediated increase in spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. In diet‐induced obesity, absence of GHS‐R signaling leads to reductions in obesity‐mediated hypertension and tachycardia. Collectively, our findings thus suggest that chronic blockade of GHS‐R signaling may not result in adverse cardiovascular effects in obesity. PMID:24760503

  15. Hormone replacement therapy in morphine-induced hypogonadic male chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In male patients suffering from chronic pain, opioid administration induces severe hypogonadism, leading to impaired physical and psychological conditions such as fatigue, anaemia and depression. Hormone replacement therapy is rarely considered for these hypogonadic patients, notwithstanding the various pharmacological solutions available. Methods To treat hypogonadism and to evaluate the consequent endocrine, physical and psychological changes in male chronic pain patients treated with morphine (epidural route), we tested the administration of testosterone via a gel formulation for one year. Hormonal (total testosterone, estradiol, free testosterone, DHT, cortisol), pain (VAS and other pain questionnaires), andrological (Ageing Males' Symptoms Scale - AMS) and psychological (POMS, CES-D and SF-36) parameters were evaluated at baseline (T0) and after 3, 6 and 12 months (T3, T6, T12 respectively). Results The daily administration of testosterone increased total and free testosterone and DHT at T3, and the levels remained high until T12. Pain rating indexes (QUID) progressively improved from T3 to T12 while the other pain parameters (VAS, Area%) remained unchanged. The AMS sexual dimension and SF-36 Mental Index displayed a significant improvement over time. Conclusions In conclusion, our results suggest that a constant, long-term supply of testosterone can induce a general improvement of the male chronic pain patient's quality of life, an important clinical aspect of pain management. PMID:21332999

  16. Hormonal responses to exercise after partial sleep deprivation and after a hypnotic drug-induced sleep.

    PubMed

    Mougin, F; Bourdin, H; Simon-Rigaud, M L; Nguyen, N U; Kantelip, J P; Davenne, D

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the hormonal responses, which are dependent on the sleep wake cycle, to strenuous physical exercise. Exercise was performed after different nocturnal regimens: (i) a baseline night preceded by a habituation night; (ii) two nights of partial sleep deprivation caused by a delayed bedtime or by an early awakening; and (iii) two nights of sleep after administration of either a hypnotic compound (10 mg zolpidem) or a placebo. Eight well-trained male endurance athletes with a maximal oxygen uptake of 63.5 +/- 3.8 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) (mean value +/- s(x)) were selected on the basis of their sleeping habits and their physical training. Polygraphic recordings of EEG showed that both nights with partial sleep loss led to a decrease (P< 0.01) in stage 2 and rapid eye movement sleep. A delayed bedtime also led to a decrease (P < 0.05) in stage 1 sleep. Zolpidem had no effect on the different stages of sleep. During the afternoon after an experimental night, exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer. After a 10-min warm-up, the participants performed 30 min steady-state cycling at 75% VO(2-max) followed by a progressively increased workload until exhaustion. The recovery period lasted 30 min. Plasma growth hormone, prolactin, cortisol, catecholamine and lactate concentrations were measured at rest, during exercise and after recovery. The concentration of plasma growth hormone and catecholamine were not affected by partial sleep deprivation, whereas that of plasma prolactin was higher (P < 0.05) during the trial after an early awakening. Plasma cortisol was lower (P < 0.05) during recovery after both sleep deprivation conditions. Blood lactate was higher (P < 0.05) during submaximal exercise performed after both a delayed bedtime and an early awakening. Zolpidem-induced sleep did not affect the hormonal and metabolic responses to subsequent exercise. Our results demonstrate only minor alterations in the hormonal responses to exercise

  17. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story

    PubMed Central

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models. PMID:26146529

  18. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story.

    PubMed

    Elnakish, Mohammad T; Ahmed, Amany A E; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models. PMID:26146529

  19. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone treatment induces follicular growth and ovulation in seasonally anestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L

    1987-06-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse infusion to stimulate follicular development and induce ovulation in seasonally anestrous standardbred mares. Seventeen mares were selected for use in this experiment, on the basis of a previous normal reproductive history, and were housed under a photoperiod of 8L:16D beginning one week prior to the start of the experiment (second week in January). Mares were infused with 20 micrograms (n = 7) or 2 micrograms (n = 6) GnRH/h, or were subjected to photoperiod treatment only (controls, n = 4). Serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and progesterone did not vary, and neither significant follicular development nor ovulation was observed in any control mare throughout the experimental period (greater than 60 days). By contrast, both groups of GnRH-treated mares showed elevated serum concentrations of LH and FSH within one day after the start of infusion. Mares infused with 20 micrograms GnRH/h had at least one follicle greater than or equal to 25 mm in 7.4 +/- 1.3 (mean +/- SEM) days following the start of infusion, and ovulated in 12.0 +/- 0.7 days. In the 2-microgram-GnRH/h treatment group, a 25-mm follicle was detected in 5.7 +/- 0.7 days, and ovulation occurred after 10.0 +/- 0.3 days of infusion. Ovulation in every instance was followed by a functional luteal phase, as indicated by the profiles of progesterone secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3113502

  20. The adverse effects of high fat induced obesity on female reproductive cycle and hormones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donthireddy, Laxminarasimha Reddy

    The prevalence of obesity, an established risk and progression factor for abnormal reproductive cycle and tissue damage in female mice. It leads to earlier puberty, menarche in young females and infertility. There are extensive range of consequences of obesity which includes type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Obesity is the interaction between dietary intake, genes, life style and environment. The interplay of hormones estrogen, insulin, and leptin is well known on energy homeostasis and reproduction. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of high fat induced obesity on reproductive cycles and its hormonal abnormalities on mice model. Two week, 3 month and 8 month long normal (WT) and very high fat diet (VHFD) diet course is followed. When mice are fed with very high fat diet, there is a drastic increase in weight within the first week later. There was a significant (p<0.001) increase in leptin levels in 6 month VHFD treated animals. 2 week, 3 month and 6 month time interval pap smear test results showed number of cells, length of estrous cycle and phases of the estrous cycle changes with VHFD mice(n=30) compared to normal diet mice(n=10). These results also indicate that the changes in the reproductive cycles in VHFD treated female mice could be due to the changes in hormones. Histo-pathological analyses of kidney, ovary, liver, pancreas, heart and lungs showed remarkable changes in some tissue on exposure to very high fat. Highly deposited fat packets observed surrounding the hepatocytes and nerve cells.

  1. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ameliorates disease activity in an induced murine lupus-like model.

    PubMed

    Botte, D A C; Noronha, I L; Malheiros, D M A C; Peixoto, T V; de Mello, S B V

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, no studies thus far have examined the effects of α-MSH on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to determine the effects of an α-MSH agonist in induced murine lupus. Here we employed female Balb/cAn mice in which lupus was induced by pristane. Groups of lupus animals were treated daily with the α-MSH analogue [Nle4, DPhe7]-α-MSH (NDP-MSH) (1·25 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally or saline for 180 days. Normal animals comprised the control group. Arthritis incidence, plasma immunoglobulin (Ig)G isotypes, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and plasma cytokines were evaluated. Renal function was assessed by proteinuria and histopathological lesion. Glomerular levels of IgG, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), C3, CD3, melanocortin receptors (MCR)1, corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and α-MSH was estimated by immunohistochemistry. When compared with normal controls, lupus animals exhibited increased arthritis, IgG levels, ANA, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, proteinuria and mesangial cell proliferation together with glomerular expression of α-SMA and iNOS. Glomerular expression of MCR1 was reduced in lupus animals. NDP-MSH treatment reduced arthritis scores by 70% and also diminished IgG1 and IgG2a levels and ANA incidence. In the glomerulus, NDP-MSH treatment reduced cellularity by 50% together with reducing IgG deposits, and expression levels of α-SMA, iNOS and CRF were also all decreased. Taken together, our results suggest for the first time that α-MSH treatment improves several parameters of SLE disease activity in mice, and indicate that this hormone is an interesting potential future treatment option. PMID:24666423

  2. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ameliorates disease activity in an induced murine lupus-like model

    PubMed Central

    Botte, D A C; Noronha, I L; Malheiros, D M A C; Peixoto, T V; de Mello, S B V

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, no studies thus far have examined the effects of α-MSH on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to determine the effects of an α-MSH agonist in induced murine lupus. Here we employed female Balb/cAn mice in which lupus was induced by pristane. Groups of lupus animals were treated daily with the α-MSH analogue [Nle4, DPhe7]-α-MSH (NDP–MSH) (1·25 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally or saline for 180 days. Normal animals comprised the control group. Arthritis incidence, plasma immunoglobulin (Ig)G isotypes, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and plasma cytokines were evaluated. Renal function was assessed by proteinuria and histopathological lesion. Glomerular levels of IgG, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), C3, CD3, melanocortin receptors (MCR)1, corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and α-MSH was estimated by immunohistochemistry. When compared with normal controls, lupus animals exhibited increased arthritis, IgG levels, ANA, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, proteinuria and mesangial cell proliferation together with glomerular expression of α-SMA and iNOS. Glomerular expression of MCR1 was reduced in lupus animals. NDP-MSH treatment reduced arthritis scores by 70% and also diminished IgG1 and IgG2a levels and ANA incidence. In the glomerulus, NDP–MSH treatment reduced cellularity by 50% together with reducing IgG deposits, and expression levels of α-SMA, iNOS and CRF were also all decreased. Taken together, our results suggest for the first time that α-MSH treatment improves several parameters of SLE disease activity in mice, and indicate that this hormone is an interesting potential future treatment option. PMID:24666423

  3. Cytoplasmic kinases downstream of GPR30 suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from bovine anterior pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    RUDOLF, Faidiban O.; KADOKAWA, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    GPR30 is known as a membrane receptor for picomolar concentrations of estradiol. The GPR30-specific agonist G1 causes a rapid, non-genomic suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. A few studies have recently clarified that protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) might be involved in cytoplasmic signaling pathways of GPR30 in other cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PKA and ERK kinase (MEK) are important cytoplasmic mediators for GPR30-associated non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells. Bovine AP cells (n = 8) were cultured for 3 days under steroid-free conditions. The AP cells were previously treated for 30 min with one of the following: 5000 nM of PKA inhibitor (H89), 1000 nM of MEK inhibitor (U0126), or a combination of H89 and U0126. Next, the AP cells were treated with 0.01 nM estradiol for 5 min before GnRH stimulation. Estradiol treatment without inhibitor pretreatment significantly suppressed GnRH-induced LH secretion (P < 0.01). In contrast, estradiol treatment after pretreatment with H89, U0126 or their combination had no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH secretion. The inhibitors also inhibited the G1 suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion. Therefore, these data supported the hypothesis that PKA and MEK (thus, also pERK) are the intracellular mediators downstream of GPR30 that induce the non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells by estradiol or G1. PMID:26522383

  4. Stress hormones mediate predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in amphibian tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Middlemis Maher, Jessica; Werner, Earl E; Denver, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    Amphibian tadpoles display extensive anti-predator phenotypic plasticity, reducing locomotory activity and, with chronic predator exposure, developing relatively smaller trunks and larger tails. In many vertebrates, predator exposure alters activity of the neuroendocrine stress axis. We investigated predator-induced effects on stress hormone production and the mechanistic link to anti-predator defences in Rana sylvatica tadpoles. Whole-body corticosterone (CORT) content was positively correlated with predator biomass in natural ponds. Exposure to caged predators in mesocosms caused a reduction in CORT by 4 hours, but increased CORT after 4 days. Tadpoles chronically exposed to exogenous CORT developed larger tails relative to their trunks, matching morphological changes induced by predator chemical cue; this predator effect was blocked by the corticosteroid biosynthesis inhibitor metyrapone. Tadpole tail explants treated in vitro with CORT increased tissue weight, suggesting that CORT acts directly on the tail. Short-term treatment of tadpoles with CORT increased predation mortality, likely due to increased locomotory activity. However, long-term CORT treatment enhanced survivorship, likely due to induced morphology. Our findings support the hypothesis that tadpole physiological and behavioural/morphological responses to predation are causally interrelated. Tadpoles initially suppress CORT and behaviour to avoid capture, but increase CORT with longer exposure, inducing adaptive phenotypic changes. PMID:23466985

  5. Growth hormone protects human lymphocytes from irradiation-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, Laurence; Brambilla, Daria; Maria Scoto, Giovanna; D'Alcamo, Maria; Goffin, Vincent; Crosta, Lucia; Palmucci, Tullio; Rampello, Liborio; Bernardini, Renato; Cantarella, Giuseppina

    2003-01-01

    Undesired effects of cancer radiotherapy mainly affect the hematopoietic system. Growth hormone (GH) participates in both hematopoiesis and modulation of the immune response. We report both r-hGH cell death prevention and restoration of secretory capacities of irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in vitro. r-hGH induced cell survival and increased proliferation of irradiated cells. Western blot analysis indicated that these effects of GH were paralleled by increased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. r-hGH restored mitogen-stimulated release of IL-2 by PBL. Preincubation of irradiated lymphocytes with the growth hormone receptor (GHR) antagonists B2036 and G120 K abrogated r-hGH-dependent IL-2 release. These results demonstrate that r-hGH protects irradiated PBL from death in a specific, receptor-mediated manner. Such effect of r-hGH on PBL involves activation of the antiapoptotic gene bcl-2 and prevention of cell death, associated with preserved functional cell capacity. Finally, potential use of GH as an immunopotentiating agent could be envisioned during radiation therapy of cancer. PMID:12721095

  6. Plasma levels of trace elements and exercise induced stress hormones in well-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Soria, Marisol; González-Haro, Carlos; Ansón, Miguel; López-Colón, José L; Escanero, Jesús F

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the variation and relationship of several trace elements, metabolic substrates and stress hormones activated by exercise during incremental exercise. Seventeen well-trained endurance athletes performed a cycle ergometer test: after a warm-up of 10 min at 2.0 W kg(-1), the workload was increased by 0.5 W kg(-1) every 10 min until exhaustion. Prior diet, activity patterns, and levels of exercise training were controlled, and tests timed to minimize variations due to the circadian rhythm. Oxygen uptake, blood lactate concentration, plasma ions (Zn, Se, Mn and Co), serum glucose, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and several hormones were measured at rest, at the end of each stage and 3, 5 and 7 min post-exercise. Urine specific gravity was measured before and after the test, and participants drank water ad libitum. Significant differences were found in plasma Zn and Se levels as a function of exercise intensity. Zn was significantly correlated with epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol (r = 0.884, P < 0.01; r = 0.871, P < 0.01; and r = 0.808, P = 0.05); and Se showed significant positive correlations whit epinephrine and cortisol (r = 0.743, P < 0.05; and r = 0.776, P < 0.05). Neither Zn nor Se levels were associated with insulin or glucagon, and neither Mn nor Co levels were associated with any of the hormones or substrate metabolites studied. Further, while Zn levels were found to be associated only with lactate, plasma Se was significantly correlated with lactate and glucose (respectively for Zn: r = 0.891, P < 0.01; and for Se: r = 0.743, P < 0.05; r = 0.831, P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data suggest that there is a positive correlation between the increases in plasma Zn or Se and stress hormones variations induced by exercise along different submaximal intensities in well-hydrated well-trained endurance athletes. PMID:26004901

  7. Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inadequate levels of thyroid hormone during critical developmental periods lead to stunted growth, mental retardation, and neurological 'cretinism'. Animal models of developmental thyroid hormone deficiency mirror well the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system. However, ...

  8. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mediates glucocorticoid effects on hormone secretion induced by volume and osmotic changes.

    PubMed

    Ruginsk, S G; Uchoa, E T; Elias, L L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    2012-02-01

    The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mediates the effects of dexamethasone on hormone release induced by changes in circulating volume and osmolality. Male adult rats were administered with the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (10 mg/Kg, p.o.), followed or not in 1 hour by dexamethasone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.). Extracellular volume expansion (EVE, 2 mL/100 g of body weight, i.v.) was performed 2 hours after dexamethasone or vehicle treatment using either isotonic (I-EVE, 0.15 mol/L) or hypertonic (H-EVE, 0.30 mol/L) NaCl solution. Five minutes after EVE, animals were decapitated and trunk blood was collected for all plasma measurements. Rimonabant potentiated oxytocin (OT) secretion induced by H-EVE and completely reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone in response to the same stimulus. These data suggest that glucocorticoid modulation of OT release is mediated by the CB(1) receptor. Although dexamethasone did not affect vasopressin (AVP) secretion induced by H-EVE, the administration of rimonabant potentiated AVP release in response to the same stimulus, supporting the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor regulates AVP secretion independently of glucocorticoid-mediated signalling. Dexamethasone alone did not affect atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release stimulated by I-EVE or H-EVE. However, pretreatment with rimonabant potentiated ANP secretion induced by H-EVE, suggesting a possible role for the CB(1) receptor in the control of peripheral factors that modulate cardiovascular function. Rimonabant also reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on H-EVE-induced corticosterone secretion, reinforcing the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor may be involved in the negative feedback exerted by glucocorticoids on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that the CB(1) receptor modulates neurohypophyseal hormone secretion and

  9. Skeletal unloading induces selective resistance to the anabolic actions of growth hormone on bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Autry, C. P.; Currier, P. A.; Tanner, S.; Patterson-Buckendahl, P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of skeletal weight bearing or physical unloading of bone in the growing animal inhibits bone formation and induces a bone mineral deficit. To determine whether the inhibition of bone formation induced by skeletal unloading in the growing animal is a consequence of diminished sensitivity to growth hormone (GH) we studied the effects of skeletal unloading in young hypophysectomized rats treated with GH (0, 50, 500 micrograms/100 g body weight/day). Skeletal unloading reduced serum osteocalcin, impaired uptake of 3H-proline into bone, decreased proximal tibial mass, and diminished periosteal bone formation at the tibiofibular junction. When compared with animals receiving excipient alone, GH administration increased bone mass in all animals. The responses in serum osteocalcin, uptake of 3H-proline and 45Ca into the proximal tibia, and proximal tibial mass in non-weight bearing animals were equal to those in weight bearing animals. The responses in trabecular bone volume in the proximal tibia and bone formation at the tibiofibular junction to GH, however, were reduced significantly by skeletal unloading. Bone unloading prevented completely the increase in metaphyseal trabecular bone normally induced by GH and severely dampened the stimulatory effect (158% vs. 313%, p < 0.002) of GH on periosteal bone formation. These results suggest that while GH can stimulate the overall accumulation of bone mineral in both weight bearing and non-weight bearing animals, skeletal unloading selectively impairs the response of trabecular bone and periosteal bone formation to the anabolic actions of GH.

  10. Effects of mental resilience on neuroendocrine hormones level changes induced by sleep deprivation in servicemen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinyang; Dai, Xuyan; Yang, Tingshu; Song, Hongtao; Yang, Jialin; Bai, Jing; Zhang, Liyi

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mental resilience on the changes of serum rennin, angiotensin, and cortisol level induced by sleep deprivation in servicemen. By random cluster sampling, a total of 160 servicemen, aged from 18 to 30, were selected to undergo 24-hour total sleep deprivation and administered the military personnel mental resilience scale after the deprivation procedure. The sleep deprivation procedure started at 8 a.m. on Day 8 and ended at 8 a.m. on Day 9 after 7 days of normal sleep for baseline preparation. Blood samples were drawn from the 160 participants at 8 a.m. respectively on Day 8 and Day 9 for hormonal measurements. All blood samples were analyzed using radioimmunoassay. As hypothesized, serum rennin, angiotensin II, and cortisol level of the participants after sleep deprivation were significantly higher than those before (P < 0.05). The changes of serum rennin and cortisol in the lower mental resilience subgroup were significantly greater (P < 0.05); problem-solving skill and willpower were the leading influence factors for the increases of serum rennin and cortisol respectively induced by sleep deprivation. We conclude that mental resilience plays a significant role in alleviating the changes of neurohormones level induced by sleep deprivation in servicemen. PMID:24633577

  11. Ethanol blocks the cold-induced increase in thyrotropin-releasing hormone mRNA in paraventricular nuclei but not the cold-induced increase in thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, R T; Rudeen, P K

    1992-05-01

    The effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (3 g/kg b.wt.) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid system was explored as a possible explanation of the hypothermic effect of ethanol. Serum thyroid hormones were significantly reduced by ethanol injection, but ethanol did not affect the cold-induced increase in serum thyroid hormones or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Since cold-exposure stimulates serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones by stimulating thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH) release from neurons of the PVN, these findings demonstrate that ethanol did not block pituitary response to TRH or thyroid response to TSH. Paradoxically, ethanol increased cellular levels of TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and blocked the cold-induced increase in TRH mRNA, suggesting that ethanol uncouples the regulation of TRH gene expression from the regulation of TRH release specifically in neurons of the PVN. Measurements of the effects of ethanol on TRH mRNA in thalamus, and beta-actin, vasopressin, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNAs in the PVN in addition to TRH mRNA revealed very specific effects of ethanol on the TRH neuronal system. PMID:1352612

  12. Thyroid hormone alleviates demyelination induced by cuprizone through its role in remyelination during the remission period.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao; Zhan, Xiao L; Ma, Zi Y; Chen, Xing S; Cai, Qi Y; Yao, Zhong X

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease induced by demyelination in the central nervous system, and the remission period of MS is crucial for remyelination. In addition, abnormal levels of thyroid hormone (TH) have been identified in MS. However, in the clinic, insufficient attention has been paid to the role of TH in the remission period. Indeed, TH not only functions in the development of the brain but also affects myelination. Therefore, it is necessary to observe the effect of TH on remyelination during this period. A model of demyelination induced by cuprizone (CPZ) was used to observe the function of TH in remyelination during the remission period of MS. Through weighing and behavioral tests, we found that TH improved the physical symptoms of mice impaired by CPZ. Supplementation of TH led to the repair of myelin as detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot. In addition, a sufficient TH supply resulted in an increase in myelinated axons without affecting myelin thickness and g ratio in the corpus callosum, as detected by electron microscopy. Double immunostaining with myelin basic protein and neurofilament 200 (NF200) showed that the CPZ-induced impairment of axons was alleviated by TH. Conversely, insufficient TH induced by 6-propyl-2-thiouracil resulted in the enlargement of mitochondria. Furthermore, we found that an adequate supply of TH promoted the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte lineage cells by immunofluorescence, which was beneficial to remyelination. Further, we found that TH reduced the number of astrocytes without affecting microglia. Conclusively, it was shown that TH alleviated demyelination induced by CPZ by promoting the development of oligodendrocyte lineage cells and remyelination. The critical time for remyelination is the remission period of MS. TH plays a significant role in alleviating demyelination during the remission period in the clinical treatment of MS. PMID:25577802

  13. Growth Hormone Induces Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Induced Protein in Podocytes: Implications for Podocyte Depletion and Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Chitra, P Swathi; Swathi, T; Sahay, Rakesh; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Menon, Ram K; Kumar, P Anil

    2015-09-01

    The glomerular podocytes form a major size selective barrier for the filtration of serum proteins and reduced podocyte number is a critical event in the pathogenesis of proteinuria during diabetic nephropathy (DN). An elevated level of growth hormone (GH) is implicated as a causative factor in the development of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that podocytes express GH receptor and are a target for GH action. To elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of GH on podocyte depletion, we conducted PCR-array analyses for extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in podocytes. Our studies reveal that GH increases expression of a gene that encodes transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) expression. Similarly, microarray data retrieved from the Nephromine database revealed elevation of TGFBIp in patients with DN. Treatment with GH results in increased secretion of extracellular TGFBIp by podocytes. Both GH and TGFBIp induced apoptosis and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes. Exposure of podocytes to GH and TGFBIp resulted in increased migration of cells and altered podocyte permeability to albumin across podocyte monolayer. Administration of GH to rats induced EMT and apoptosis in the glomerular fraction of the kidney. Therefore, we conclude that the GH-dependent increase in TGFBIp in the podocyte is one of the mechanisms responsible for podocyte depletion in DN. PMID:25740786

  14. Normal or induced secretory patterns of luteinising hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone in anoestrous gonadotrophin-releasing hormone-immunised and cyclic control heifers.

    PubMed

    Prendiville, D J; Enright, W J; Crowe, M A; Finnerty, M; Roche, J F

    1996-12-16

    The objective was to determine the effect of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GnRH analogue (GnRH-A) or oestradiol administration on luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release in GnRH-immunised anoestrous and control cyclic heifers. Thirty-two heifers (477 +/- 7.1 kg) were immunised against either human serum albumin (HSA; controls; n = 8), or a HSA-GnRH conjugate. On day 70 after primary immunisation, control heifers (n = 4 per treatment; day 3 of cycle) received either (a) 2.5 micrograms GnRH or (b) 2.5 micrograms of GnRH-A (Buserelin) and GnRH-immunised heifers (blocked by GnRH antibody titre; n = 6 per treatment) received either (c) saline, (d) 2.5 micrograms GnRH, (e) 25 micrograms GnRH or (f) 2.5 micrograms GnRH-A, intravenously. On day 105, 1 mg oestradiol was injected (intramuscularly) into control (n = 6) and GnRH-immunised anoestrous heifers with either low (13.4 +/- 1.9% binding at 1:640; n = 6) or high GnRH antibody titres (33.4 +/- 4.8% binding; n = 6). Data were analysed by ANOVA. Mean plasma LH and FSH concentrations on day 69 were higher (P < 0.05) in control than in GnRH-immunised heifers (3.1 +/- 0.16 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.12 ng LH ml-1 and 22.5 +/- 0.73 vs. 17.1 +/- 0.64 ng FSH ml-1, respectively). The number of LH pulses was higher (P < 0.05) in control than in GnRH-immunised heifers on day 69 (3.4 +/- 0.45 and 1.0 +/- 0.26 pulses per 6 h, respectively). On day 70, 2.5 micrograms GnRH increased (P < 0.05) LH concentrations in control but not in GnRH-immunised heifers, while both 25 micrograms GnRH and 2.5 micrograms GnRH-A increased (P < 0.05) LH concentrations in GnRH-immunised heifers, and 2.5 micrograms GnRH-A increased LH in controls. FSH was increased (P < 0.05) in GnRH-immunised heifers following 25 micrograms GnRH and 2.5 micrograms GnRH-A. Oestradiol challenge increased (P < 0.05) LH concentrations during the 13-24 h period after challenge with a greater (P < 0.05) increase in control than in Gn

  15. Vasopressin-induced taurine efflux from rat pituicytes: a potential negative feedback for hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Lia; Peteri-Brunbäck, Brigitta; Poujeol, Philippe; Hussy, Nicolas; Mienville, Jean-Marc

    2004-02-01

    Previous work on the whole neurohypophysis has shown that hypotonic conditions increase release of taurine from neurohypophysial astrocytes (pituicytes). The present work confirms that taurine is present in cultured pituicytes, and that its specific release increases in response to a hypotonic shock. We next show that vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) also specifically release taurine from pituicytes. With an EC(50) of approximately 2 nm, VP is much more potent than OT, and the effects of both hormones are blocked by SR 49059, a V(1a) receptor antagonist. This pharmacological profile matches the one for VP- and OT-evoked calcium signals in pituicytes, consistent with the fact that VP-induced taurine efflux is blocked by BAPTA-AM. However, BAPTA-AM also blocks the taurine efflux induced by a 270 mosmol l(-1) challenge, which per se does not evoke any calcium signal, suggesting a permissive role for calcium in this case. Nevertheless, the fact that structurally unrelated calcium-mobilizing agents and ionomycin are able to induce taurine efflux suggests that calcium may also play a signalling role in this event. It is widely accepted that in hypotonic conditions taurine exits cells through anionic channels. Antagonism by the chloride channel inhibitors 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) suggests the same pathway for VP-induced taurine efflux, which is also blocked in hypertonic conditions (330 mosmol l(-1)). Moreover, it is likely that the osmosensitivity of the taurine channel is up-regulated by calcium. These results, together with our in situ experiments showing stimulation of taurine release by endogenous VP, strengthen the concept of a glial control of neurohormone output. PMID:14617676

  16. Vasopressin-induced taurine efflux from rat pituicytes: a potential negative feedback for hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Lia; Peteri-Brunbäck, Brigitta; Poujeol, Philippe; Hussy, Nicolas; Mienville, Jean-Marc

    2004-01-01

    Previous work on the whole neurohypophysis has shown that hypotonic conditions increase release of taurine from neurohypophysial astrocytes (pituicytes). The present work confirms that taurine is present in cultured pituicytes, and that its specific release increases in response to a hypotonic shock. We next show that vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) also specifically release taurine from pituicytes. With an EC50 of ∼2 nm, VP is much more potent than OT, and the effects of both hormones are blocked by SR 49059, a V1a receptor antagonist. This pharmacological profile matches the one for VP- and OT-evoked calcium signals in pituicytes, consistent with the fact that VP-induced taurine efflux is blocked by BAPTA-AM. However, BAPTA-AM also blocks the taurine efflux induced by a 270 mosmol l−1 challenge, which per se does not evoke any calcium signal, suggesting a permissive role for calcium in this case. Nevertheless, the fact that structurally unrelated calcium-mobilizing agents and ionomycin are able to induce taurine efflux suggests that calcium may also play a signalling role in this event. It is widely accepted that in hypotonic conditions taurine exits cells through anionic channels. Antagonism by the chloride channel inhibitors 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) suggests the same pathway for VP-induced taurine efflux, which is also blocked in hypertonic conditions (330 mosmol l−1). Moreover, it is likely that the osmosensitivity of the taurine channel is up-regulated by calcium. These results, together with our in situ experiments showing stimulation of taurine release by endogenous VP, strengthen the concept of a glial control of neurohormone output. PMID:14617676

  17. The thyroid hormone receptor β induces DNA damage and premature senescence

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Alberto; García-Carpizo, Verónica; Gallardo, María Esther; Villamuera, Raquel; Gómez-Ferrería, Maria Ana; Pascual, Angel; Buisine, Nicolas; Sachs, Laurent M.; Garesse, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the thyroid hormone (TH) receptors (THRs) can play a role in aging, cancer and degenerative diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of TH T3 (triiodothyronine) to THRB induces senescence and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in cultured cells and in tissues of young hyperthyroid mice. T3 induces a rapid activation of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)/PRKAA (adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase) signal transduction and recruitment of the NRF1 (nuclear respiratory factor 1) and THRB to the promoters of genes with a key role on mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiration leads to production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which in turn causes oxidative stress and DNA double-strand breaks and triggers a DNA damage response that ultimately leads to premature senescence of susceptible cells. Our findings provide a mechanism for integrating metabolic effects of THs with the tumor suppressor activity of THRB, the effect of thyroidal status on longevity, and the occurrence of tissue damage in hyperthyroidism. PMID:24395638

  18. Antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance and postprandial hormonal dysregulation independent of weight gain or psychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L; Rickels, Michael R; Grudziak, Joanna; Fuller, Carissa; Nguyen, Huong-Lan; Rickels, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) medications that have revolutionized the treatment of mental illness have become stigmatized by metabolic side effects, including obesity and diabetes. It remains controversial whether the defects are treatment induced or disease related. Although the mechanisms underlying these metabolic defects are not understood, it is assumed that the initiating pathophysiology is weight gain, secondary to centrally mediated increases in appetite. To determine if the AAPs have detrimental metabolic effects independent of weight gain or psychiatric disease, we administered olanzapine, aripiprazole, or placebo for 9 days to healthy subjects (n = 10, each group) under controlled in-patient conditions while maintaining activity levels. Prior to and after the interventions, we conducted a meal challenge and a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp to evaluate insulin sensitivity and glucose disposal. We found that olanzapine, an AAP highly associated with weight gain, causes significant elevations in postprandial insulin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and glucagon coincident with insulin resistance compared with placebo. Aripiprazole, an AAP considered metabolically sparing, induces insulin resistance but has no effect on postprandial hormones. Importantly, the metabolic changes occur in the absence of weight gain, increases in food intake and hunger, or psychiatric disease, suggesting that AAPs exert direct effects on tissues independent of mechanisms regulating eating behavior. PMID:23835329

  19. A model of transcriptional and morphological changes during thyroid hormone-induced metamorphosis of the axolotl

    PubMed Central

    Page, Robert B.; Monaghan, James R.; Walker, John A.; Voss, S. Randal

    2009-01-01

    Anuran (frog) metamorphosis has long-served as a model of how thyroid hormones regulate post-embryonic development in vertebrates. However, comparatively little is known about urodele (salamander) metamorphosis. We conducted a detailed time-course study of induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that probed metamorphic changes in morphology and gene expression in the skin. Using morphometrics, quantitative PCR, histology, and in situ hybridization we demonstrate that the development of transcriptional markers is fundamental to the resolution of early metamorphic events in axolotls. We then use linear and piecewise linear models to identify a sequence of morphological and transcriptional changes that define larval to adult remodeling events throughout metamorphosis. In addition, we show that transcriptional biomarkers are expressed in specific larval and adult cell populations of the skin and that temporal changes in these biomarkers correlate with tissue remodeling. We compare our results with other studies of natural and induced metamorphosis in urodeles and highlight what appear to be conserved features between urodele and anuran metamorphosis. PMID:19275901

  20. Progressive Transverse Microtubule Array Organization in Hormone-Induced Arabidopsis Hypocotyl Cells[W

    PubMed Central

    Vineyard, Laura; Elliott, Andrew; Dhingra, Sonia; Lucas, Jessica R.; Shaw, Sidney L.

    2013-01-01

    The acentriolar cortical microtubule arrays in dark-grown hypocotyl cells organize into a transverse coaligned pattern that is critical for axial plant growth. In light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, the cortical array on the outer (periclinal) cell face creates a variety of array patterns with a significant bias (>3:1) for microtubules polymerizing edge-ward and into the side (anticlinal) faces of the cell. To study the mechanisms required for creating the transverse coalignment, we developed a dual-hormone protocol that synchronously induces ∼80% of the light-grown hypocotyl cells to form transverse arrays over a 2-h period. Repatterning occurred in two phases, beginning with an initial 30 to 40% decrease in polymerizing plus ends prior to visible changes in the array pattern. Transverse organization initiated at the cell’s midzone by 45 min after induction and progressed bidirectionally toward the apical and basal ends of the cell. Reorganization corrected the edge-ward bias in polymerization and proceeded without transiting through an obligate intermediate pattern. Quantitative comparisons of uninduced and induced microtubule arrays showed a limited deconstruction of the initial periclinal array followed by a progressive array reorganization to transverse coordinated between the anticlinal and periclinal cell faces. PMID:23444330

  1. Protective effects of analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone against x-radiation-induced testicular damage in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Schally, A.V.; Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Schlosser, J.V.; Karashima, T.; Debeljuk, L.; Gandle, B.; Sampson, M.

    1987-02-01

    Possible protective effects of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH and antagonist N-Ac(D-Phe(pCl)/sup 1,2/,D-Trp/sup 3/,D-Arg/sup 6/,D-Ala/sup 10/)LH-RH against testicular damage caused by x-radiation were investigated in rats. Three months after being subjected to x-irradiation of the testes with 415 or 622 rads, control rats showed marked reduction in the weights of the testes and elevated levels of LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), indicating tubular damage. Histological studies demonstrated that, in testes of rats given 415 rads, most seminiferous tubules had only Sertoli cells and no germinal cells, and, in the group give 622 rads, the depression of spermatogenesis was even more marked. Rats pretreated for 50 days with LH-RH antagonist showed a complete recovery of testicular weights and spermatogenesis 3 months after 415 rads and showed partial recovery after 622 rads, and LH and FSH levels returned to normal in both of these groups. Three experiments were also carried out in which the rats were pretreated for 1-2 months with long-acting microcapsules of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH. Some rats were then subjected to gonadal irradiation with 415 or 622 rads and allowed a recovery period of 2-4 months. On the basis of testicular weights, histology, and gonadotropin levels, it could be concluded that the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH did not protect the rat testes exposed to 622 rads and, at most, only partially protected against 415 rads. These results suggest that pretreatment with LH-RH antagonists and possibly agonists, might decrease the testicular damage caused by radiation and accelerate the recovery of reproductive functions.

  2. Age-related dynamics of follicles and hormones during an induced ovulatory follicular wave in mares.

    PubMed

    Ginther, O J; Gastal, M O; Gastal, E L; Jacob, J C; Beg, M A

    2009-03-15

    An ovulatory follicular wave was induced by ablation of follicles > or =6mm and treatment with prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF) on Day 10 (ovulation=Day 0). Follicle and hormone dynamics of the induced waves were compared among three age groups: young (5-6 y, n=14 waves), intermediate (10-14 y, n=16), and old (> or =18, n=15). During the common-growth phase of the induced wave (Days 12-17), diameter of the future ovulatory follicle was not different among ages, but the young group had more (P<0.05) follicles that reached > or =10mm. The number was correlated (r=+0.7; P<0.0001) within mares between consecutive interovulatory intervals, indicating repeatability. Concentrations of LH increased in all age groups during Days 12-17, but were greatest (P<0.002) in the young group and continued to be greater (P<0.0001) throughout the ovulatory LH surge. During several days before Day-1, there were no age-related effects on systemic estradiol concentrations, diameter of the preovulatory follicle, or B-mode echotexture or color-Doppler signals of blood flow in the follicle wall. Interpretations were: (1) greater number of follicles in the young group reflected a greater follicle reserve, (2) greater LH concentrations throughout the ovulatory surge in the young group reflected a more positive response to an extraovarian/environmental influence after removal of the negative effect of progesterone, and (3) lower LH concentrations in the older groups were adequate for the preovulatory changes in the follicle. PMID:19004489

  3. Trialkyltin Rexinoid-X Receptor Agonists Selectively Potentiate Thyroid Hormone Induced Programs of Xenopus laevis Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Mengeling, Brenda J; Murk, Albertinka J; Furlow, J David

    2016-07-01

    The trialkyltins tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT) can function as rexinoid-X receptor (RXR) agonists. We recently showed that RXR agonists can alter thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in a mammalian pituitary TH-responsive reporter cell line, GH3.TRE-Luc. The prevalence of TBT and TPT in the environment prompted us to test whether they could also affect TH signaling. Both trialkyltins induced the integrated luciferase reporter alone and potentiated TH activation at low doses. Trimethyltin, which is not an RXR agonist, did not. We turned to a simple, robust, and specific in vivo model system of TH action: metamorphosis of Xenopus laevis, the African clawed frog. Using a precocious metamorphosis assay, we found that 1nM TBT and TPT, but not trimethyltin, greatly potentiated the effect of TH treatment on resorption phenotypes of the tail, which is lost at metamorphosis, and in the head, which undergoes extensive remodeling including gill loss. Consistent with these responses, TH-induced caspase-3 activation in the tail was enhanced by cotreatment with TBT. Induction of a transgenic reporter gene and endogenous collagenase 3 (mmp13) and fibroblast-activating protein-α (fap) genes were not induced by TBT alone, but TH induction was significantly potentiated by TBT. However, induction of other TH receptor target genes such as TRβ and deiodinase 3 by TH were not affected by TBT cotreatment. These data indicate that trialkyltins that can function as RXR agonists can selectively potentiate gene expression and resultant morphological programs directed by TH signaling in vivo. PMID:27167774

  4. Wolbachia-induced paternal defect in Drosophila is likely by interaction with the juvenile hormone pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jia-Lin; Zheng, Ya; Xiong, En-Juan; Li, Jing-Jing; Yuan, Lin-Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2014-06-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbionts that infect many insect species. They can manipulate the host's reproduction to increase their own maternal transmission. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is one such manipulation, which is expressed as embryonic lethality when Wolbachia-infected males mate with uninfected females. However, matings between males and females carrying the same Wolbachia strain result in viable progeny. The molecular mechanisms of CI are currently not clear. We have previously reported that the gene Juvenile hormone-inducible protein 26 (JhI-26) exhibited the highest upregulation in the 3rd instar larval testes of Drosophila melanogaster when infected by Wolbachia. This is reminiscent of an interaction between Wolbachia and juvenile hormone (JH) pathway in flies. Considering that Jhamt gene encodes JH acid methyltransferase, a key regulatory enzyme of JH biosynthesis, and that methoprene-tolerant (Met) has been regarded as the best JH receptor candidate, we first compared the expression of Jhamt and Met between Wolbachia-infected and uninfected fly testes to investigate whether Wolbachia infection influence the JH signaling pathway. We found that the expressions of Jhamt and Met were significantly increased in the presence of Wolbachia, suggesting an interaction of Wolbachia with the JH signaling pathway. Then, we found that overexpression of JhI-26 in Wolbachia-free transgenic male flies caused paternal-effect lethality that mimics the defects associated with CI. JhI-26 overexpressing males resulted in significantly decrease in hatch rate. Surprisingly, Wolbachia-infected females could rescue the egg hatch. In addition, we showed that overexpression of JhI-26 caused upregulation of the male accessory gland protein (Acp) gene CG10433, but not vice versa. This result suggests that JhI-26 may function at the upstream of CG10433. Likewise, overexpression of CG10433 also resulted in paternal-effect lethality. Both JhI-26 and CG10433 overexpressing males

  5. Reproductive Hormone and Transcriptomic Responses of Pituitary Tissue in Anestrus Gilts Induced by Nutrient Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengyu; Wang, Dingyue; Zhou, Dongsheng; Lin, Yan; Che, Lianqiang; Fang, Zhengfeng; Wu, De

    2015-01-01

    The onset of estrus is a critical sign of female sexual maturity. The pituitary plays a vital role in this process by the secretion of reproductive hormones. To investigate the effects of nutrient restriction on reproductive function and the underlying mechanisms involved, deep RNA sequencing of pituitary gland tissue was carried out to determine the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between gilts in normal estrus, and gilts in which anestrus was induced by nutrient restriction. Gilts which had gone through two estrus cycles were fed a normal (CON, 2.86kg/d, n = 10) or nutrient restricted (NR, 1kg/d, n = 10) diet. The NR gilts experienced another three estrus cycles, but did not express estrus symptoms at the anticipated 6th and 7th cycles. Body weight gain in NR gilts was significantly decreased by nutrient restriction. Gilts were considered as anestrus when blood progesterone concentrations lower than 1.0 ng/mL from three consecutive blood samples were recorded. Circulating concentrations of progesterone (< 1.0 ng/mL vs. 2.1 ng/mL) and estradiol (208.6 ng/mL vs. 371.8 ng/mL) were significantly lower in the NR gilts than in the CON gilts. Between 5,360,000 and 5,370,000 sequence reads per sample from the CON and NR gilts’ pituitaries were obtained and mapped to the porcine genome. Analysis of read counts revealed 185 DEGs. Expression of selected genes was validated by the use of quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Bioinformatic analysis identified that the genes identified were enriched in the GO terms “neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction”, “GnRH signaling pathway” and “immune response system”. Our findings provide a new perspective for understanding the nutrient restriction-induced reproductive impairment at the pituitary transcriptional level, and how this is linked to hormone secretion. Moreover, the transcriptomic changes in anestrus gilts associated with nutrient restriction could be a resource for targeted studies of genes and pathways

  6. Analysis of hormone-induced changes of phosphoinositide metabolism in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.A.; Fain, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between hormone-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover and Ca/sup 2 +/ flux can be investigated using radiolabelled hepatocytes and the subcellular fractions derived from them or from whole liver. Comparison of the results obtained using intact cells to those from subcellular fractions should ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the transmembrane signaling events through which hormone such as vasopressin, angiotensin, and catecholamines acutely activate liver glycogenolysis. The paper reviews hormone-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in intact hepatocytes as well as hepatic enzymes involved in phosphoinositide metabolism. Also discussed is the current status of studies on hormone action in broken cell preparations in liver.

  7. Early hyperbaric oxygen therapy inhibits aquaporin 4 and adrenocorticotropic hormone expression in the pituitary gland of rabbits with blast-induced craniocerebral injury★

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Jian; Liu, Jiachuan; Wang, Jinbiao; Zhang, Yongming; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Yanyan; Sun, Wenjiang; Xu, Shaonian

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, rabbits were treated with hyperbaric oxygen for 1 hour after detonator-blast- induced craniocerebral injury. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly reduced aquaporin 4 expression and adrenocorticotropic hormone expression in the pituitary gland of rabbits with craniocerebral injury. Aquaporin 4 expression was positively correlated with adrenocorticotropic hormone expression. These findings indicate that early hyperbaric oxygen therapy may suppress adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion by inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression. PMID:25624795

  8. Inhibition of autophagy stimulate molecular iodine-induced apoptosis in hormone independent breast tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Preeti; Godbole, Madan; Rao, Geeta; Annarao, Sanjay; Mitra, Kalyan; Roy, Raja; Ingle, Arvind; Agarwal, Gaurav; Tiwari, Swasti

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular iodine (I{sub 2}) causes non-apoptotic cell death in MDA-MB231 breast tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy is activated as a survival mechanism in response to I{sub 2} in MDA-MB231. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to I{sub 2}-induced apoptotic cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy inhibitor potentiates apoptosis and tumor regressive effects of I{sub 2} in mice. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor negative (ER{sup -ve}) and p53 mutant breast tumors are highly aggressive and have fewer treatment options. Previously, we showed that molecular Iodine (I{sub 2}) induces apoptosis in hormone responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and non-apoptotic cell death in ER{sup -ve}-p53 mutant MDA-MB231 cells (Shrivastava, 2006). Here we show that I{sub 2} (3 {mu}M) treatment enhanced the features of autophagy in MDA-MB231 cells. Since autophagy is a cell survival response to most anti-cancer therapies, we used both in vitro and in vivo systems to determine whether ER{sup -ve} mammary tumors could be sensitized to I{sub 2}-induced apoptosis by inhibiting autophagy. Autophagy inhibition with chloroquine (CQ) and inhibitors for PI3K (3MA, LY294002) and H+/ATPase (baflomycin) resulted in enhanced cell death in I{sub 2} treated MDA-MB231 cells. Further, CQ (20 {mu}M) in combination with I{sub 2}, showed apoptotic features such as increased sub-G1 fraction ({approx}5-fold), expression of cleaved caspase-9 and -3 compared to I{sub 2} treatment alone. Flowcytometry of I{sub 2} and CQ co-treated cells revealed increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability (p < 0.01) and translocation of cathepsin D activity to cytosol relative to I{sub 2} treatment. For in vivo studies ICRC mice were transplanted subcutaneously with MMTV-induced mammary tumors. A significant reduction in tumor volumes, as measured by MRI, was found in I{sub 2} and CQ co-treated mice relative to I{sub 2} or

  9. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration

    PubMed Central

    Rouver, Wender Nascimento; Delgado, Nathalie Tristão Banhos; Menezes, Jussara Bezerra; Santos, Roger Lyrio; Moyses, Margareth Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium–dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM), castrated (CAST), castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group) or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group) of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose–response curve for bradykinin (BK) was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO), L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT). We observed significant endothelium–dependent, BK–induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium–dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP. PMID:26322637

  10. Diofenolan induces male offspring production through binding to the juvenile hormone receptor in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ryoko; Toyota, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Haruna; Oka, Tomohiro; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Iguchi, Taisen; Tatarazako, Norihisa

    2015-02-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) and JH agonists have been reported to induce male offspring production in various daphnid species including Daphnia magna. We recently established a short-term in vivo screening assay to detect chemicals having male offspring induction activity in adult D. magna. Diofenolan has been developed as a JH agonist for insect pest control, but its male offspring induction activity in daphnids has not been investigated yet. In this study, we found that the insect growth regulator (IGR) diofenolan exhibited a potent male offspring induction activity at low ng/L to μg/L concentrations, as demonstrated by the short-term in vivo screening assay and the recently developed TG211 ANNEX 7 test protocol. A two-hybrid assay performed using the D. magna JH receptor confirmed that diofenolan had a strong JH activity. Global whole body transcriptome analysis of D. magna exposed to 10 ng/L diofenolan showed an up-regulation of JH-responsive genes and modulation of several genes involved in the ecdysone receptor signaling pathway. These results clearly demonstrate that diofenolan has strong JH activity and male offspring induction activity, and that a combination of modified standardized regulatory testing protocols and rapid in vitro and in vivo screening assays are able to identify potential endocrine disruptors in D. magna. The observation that diofenolan modulates multiple endocrine signaling pathways in D. magna suggests that further investigation of potential interference with growth, development and reproduction is warranted. PMID:25506888

  11. Dose dependency of time of onset of radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, P.E.; Shalet, S.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was assessed on 133 occasions in 82 survivors of childhood malignant disease. All had received cranial irradiation with a dose range to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of 27 to 47.5 Gy (estimated by a schedule of 16 fractions over 3 weeks) and had been tested on one or more occasions between 0.2 and 18.9 years after treatment. Results of one third of the GH tests were defined as normal (GH peak response, greater than 15 mU/L) within the first 5 years, in comparison with 16% after 5 years. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that dose (p = 0.007) and time from irradiation (p = 0.03), but not age at therapy, had a significant influence on peak GH responses. The late incidence of GH deficiency was similar over the whole dose range (4 of 26 GH test results normal for less than 30 Gy and 4 of 25 normal for greater than or equal to 30 Gy after 5 years), but the speed of onset over the first years was dependent on dose. We conclude that the requirement for GH replacement therapy and the timing of its introduction will be influenced by the dose of irradiation received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  12. STRESS HORMONES COLLABORATE TO INDUCE LYMPHOCYTE APOPTOSIS AFTER HIGH LEVEL SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Lucin, Kurt M.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2009-01-01

    Post-traumatic immune suppression renders individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) susceptible to infection. Normally, proper immune function is regulated by collaboration between the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and involves the controlled release of glucocorticoids (GCs) and norepinephrine (NE). Recently, we showed that after high thoracic (T3) SCI, aberrant levels of GCs and NE accumulate in the blood and spleen, respectively. These changes are associated with splenic atrophy, splenic leucopenia, increased intrasplenic caspase-3 levels and suppressed B lymphocyte function. Since GCs boost SNS function, in part by increasing the expression and affinity of beta-2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) while simultaneously preventing β2AR down-regulation, we predicted that surges in stress hormones (i.e., GCs and NE) in the blood and spleen of mice with high-level SCI would act concurrently to adversely affect lymphocyte function and survival. Here, we show that post-SCI concentrations of GCs enhance the sensitivity of lymphocytes to β2AR stimulation causing an increase in intracellular Bim (Bcl2-Interacting Mediator of Cell Death) and subsequent apoptosis. In vivo, the combined antagonism of GC receptors and β2ARs significantly diminished lymphocyte Bim levels and SCI-induced splenic lymphopenia. Together, these data suggest that pharmacological antagonists of the HPA/SNS axes should be considered as adjunct therapies for ameliorating post-traumatic immune suppression in quadriplegics and high paraplegics. PMID:19545280

  13. Comparison of Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Collision Induced Dissociation of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotham, Scott A.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to better characterize the fragmentation pathways promoted by ultraviolet photoexcitation in comparison to collision induced dissociation (CID), six adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) peptides in a range of charge states were subjected to 266 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD), 193 nm UVPD, and CID. Similar fragment ions and distributions were observed for 266 nm UVPD and 193 nm UVPD for all peptides investigated. While both UVPD and CID led to preferential cleavage of the Y-S bond for all ACTH peptides [except ACTH (1-39)], UVPD was far less dependent on charge state and location of basic sites for the production of C-terminal and N-terminal ions. For ACTH (1-16), ACTH (1-17), ACTH (1-24), and ACTH (1-39), changes in the distributions of fragment ion types ( a, b, c, x, y, z, and collectively N-terminal ions versus C-terminal ions) showed only minor changes upon UVPD for all charge states. In contrast, CID displayed significant changes in the fragment ion type distributions as a function of charge state, an outcome consistent with the dependence on the number and location of mobile protons that is not prominent for UVPD. Sequence coverages obtained by UVPD showed less dependence on charge state than those determined by CID, with the latter showing a consistent decrease in coverage as charge state increased.

  14. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P < 0.05) in longitudinal bone length (6%), middiaphyseal cross-sectional area (20%), and the amount of newly accreted bone collagen (28%) in the total pool of middiaphyseal bone collagen. Cortical bone density, mean hydroxyapatite crystal size, and the calcium and collagen contents (microgram/mm3) were significantly smaller in the GH group (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that the processes regulating new collagen accretion, bone collagen maturation, and mean hydroxyapatite crystal size may be independently regulated during rapid growth.

  15. Severe hyponatremia caused by nab-paclitaxel-induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Babai, Samy; Kempf, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Géraldine; Rousseau, Benoît; Le-Louët, Hervé; Christophe Tournigand

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increasing. Most patients have advanced disease at diagnosis and therapeutic options in this setting are limited. Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel regimen was demonstrated to increase survival compared with gemcitabine monotherapy and is therefore indicated as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic PDAC and performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2. The safety profile of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel combination includes neutropenia, fatigue, and neuropathy as most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher. No case of severe hyponatremia associated with the use of nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of PDAC has been reported to date. We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with a metastatic PDAC treated with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel regimen, who presented with a severe hyponatremia (grade 4) caused by a documented syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This SIADH was attributed to nab-paclitaxel after a rigorous imputability analysis, including a rechallenge procedure with dose reduction. After dose and schedule adjustment, nab-paclitaxel was pursued without recurrence of severe hyponatremia and with maintained efficacy. Hyponatremia is a rare but potentially severe complication of nab-paclitaxel therapy that medical oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of. Nab-paclitaxel-induced hyponatremia is manageable upon dose and schedule adaptation, and should not contraindicate careful nab-paclitaxel reintroduction. This is of particular interest for a disease in which the therapeutic options are limited. PMID:27368013

  16. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration.

    PubMed

    Rouver, Wender Nascimento; Delgado, Nathalie Tristão Banhos; Menezes, Jussara Bezerra; Santos, Roger Lyrio; Moyses, Margareth Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium-dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM), castrated (CAST), castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group) or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group) of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin (BK) was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO), L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT). We observed significant endothelium-dependent, BK-induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP. PMID:26322637

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma: thyroid hormone promotes tumorigenicity through inducing cancer stem-like cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Xia, Lei; Ma, Sicong; Qi, Xingxing; Li, Qigen; Xia, Yun; Tang, Xiaoyin; Cui, Dan; Wang, Zhi; Chi, Jiachang; Li, Ping; Feng, Yu-xiong; Xia, Qiang; Zhai, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) play a key role in maintaining the aggressiveness of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the cell-biological regulation of CSCs is unclear. In the study, we report that thyroid hormone (TH) promotes cell self-renewal in HCC cells. TH also increases the percentage of CD90 + HCC cells and promotes drug resistance of HCC cells. By analyzing primary human HCC samples, we found that TRα transcript level is significantly elevated in primary liver cancer and portal vein metastatic tumor, compared to that of adjacent normal liver tissue. Knocking down TRα not only inhibits HCC self-renewal in vitro but also suppresses HCC tumor growth in vivo. Interestingly, treatment of TH leads to activation of NF-κB, which is required for the function of TH on inducing HCC cell self-renewal. We also found TRα and p65 cooperatively drive the expression of BMI1 by co-binding to the promoter region of BMI1 gene. In summary, our study uncovers a novel function of TH signaling in regulating the CSCs of HCC, and these findings might be useful for developing novel therapies by targeting TH function in HCC cells. PMID:27174710

  18. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola; Hartmann, Johannes; Schittl, Heike; Gerschpacher, Marion; Quint, Ruth Maria

    2011-08-01

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light (λ=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF TOXICANT-INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE CONTROL OF OVULATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the female rat, the large surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary into the general circulation that takes place on the afternoon of the day of vaginal proestrus is both a measurable and functional hormonal event. ince its occurrence is necessary for the expression...

  20. Parathyroid Hormone (1-34) Transiently Protects Against Radiation-Induced Bone Fragility.

    PubMed

    Oest, Megan E; Mann, Kenneth A; Zimmerman, Nicholas D; Damron, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Radiation therapy for soft tissue sarcoma or tumor metastases is frequently associated with damage to the underlying bone. Using a mouse model of limited field hindlimb irradiation, we assessed the ability of parathyroid hormone (1-34) fragment (PTH) delivery to prevent radiation-associated bone damage, including loss of mechanical strength, trabecular architecture, cortical bone volume, and mineral density. Female BALB/cJ mice received four consecutive doses of 5 Gy to a single hindlimb, accompanied by daily injections of either PTH or saline (vehicle) for 8 weeks, and were followed for 26 weeks. Treatment with PTH maintained the mechanical strength of irradiated femurs in axial compression for the first eight weeks of the study, and the apparent strength of irradiated femurs in PTH-treated mice was greater than that of naïve bones during this time. PTH similarly protected against radiation-accelerated resorption of trabecular bone and transient decrease in mid-diaphyseal cortical bone volume, although this benefit was maintained only for the duration of PTH delivery. Overall, PTH conferred protection against radiation-induced fragility and morphologic changes by increasing the quantity of bone, but only during the period of administration. Following cessation of PTH delivery, bone strength and trabecular volume fraction rapidly decreased. These data suggest that PTH does not negate the longer-term potential for osteoclastic bone resorption, and therefore, finite-duration treatment with PTH alone may not be sufficient to prevent late onset radiotherapy-induced bone fragility. PMID:26847434

  1. Noradrenaline concentrations in the hypothalamus of anoestrus ewes following the ram-induced luteinizing hormone release.

    PubMed

    Fabre-Nys, Claude; Kendrick, Keith M

    2015-05-01

    Sheep are seasonal breeders, but exposure of anoestrus ewes to rams results in a rapid increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, eventually leading to surge in LH. Although LH secretion is known to be under the control of many neurotransmitters, noradrenaline (NA) is of particular importance for the LH surge in induced ovulators, although little is known about its role in LH secretion induced by males in spontaneous ovulators. To address this question, anoestrus ewes fitted with guide-tubes in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) or the ventromedial hypothalamus were subjected to microdialysis and blood sampling every 15 min for an hour before and 2 h after exposure to rams, and the concentrations of LH, monoamine and amino acid transmitters were measured. In ewes implanted in the posterior MPOA that responded to the ram by an increase in LH pulses, NA concentrations changed after exposure to the ram (P<0.018) and were higher at 15 (P<0.054) and 45 min (P<0.03) after male introduction than before. By contrast, no change in NA could be detected in ewes implanted in the same region, but not responding to the ram, or in those showing increased LH pulsatility, but implanted in the anterior MPOA or in the ventromedial hypothalamus. No changes were observed in other neurotransmitters or when the ewes were exposed to male odour alone. These results suggest that NA release in the posterior MPOA is selectively involved in the triggering of LH secretion by rams in anoestrus ewes. PMID:25839177

  2. Beneficial effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists on rat INS-1 cells and on streptozotocin-induced NOD/SCID mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianyang; Cui, Tengjiao; He, Jinlin; Wang, Haibo; Cai, Renzhi; Popovics, Petra; Vidaurre, Irving; Sha, Wei; Schmid, Janine; Ludwig, Barbara; Block, Norman L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    Agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) have been previously reported to promote growth, function, and engraftment of islet cells following transplantation. Here we evaluated recently synthesized GHRH agonists on the proliferation and biological functions of rat pancreatic β-cell line (INS-1) and islets. In vitro treatment of INS-1 cells with GHRH agonists increased cell proliferation, the expression of cellular insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), and GHRH receptor, and also stimulated insulin secretion in response to glucose challenge. Exposure of INS-1 cells to GHRH agonists, MR-356 and MR-409, induced activation of ERK and AKT pathways. Agonist MR-409 also significantly increased the levels of cellular cAMP and the phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in INS-1 cells. Treatment of rat islets with agonist, MR-409 significantly increased cell proliferation, islet size, and the expression of insulin. In vivo daily s.c. administration of 10 μg MR-409 for 3 wk dramatically reduced the severity of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. The maximal therapeutic benefits with respect to the efficiency of engraftment, ability to reach normoglycemia, gain in body weight, response to high glucose challenge, and induction of higher levels of serum insulin and IGF1 were observed when diabetic mice were transplanted with rat islets preconditioned with GHRH agonist, MR-409, and received additional treatment with MR-409 posttransplantation. This study provides an improved approach to the therapeutic use of GHRH agonists in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26474831

  3. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  4. Lead (Pb) alters the norepinephrine-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone from the median eminence of adult male rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, G.R.; Hiney, J.K.; Dees, W.L. )

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the authors evaluated the in vitro effects of lead (Pb) on basal and stimulated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) and Prostaglandin E[sub 2] (PGE[sub 2]) secretion. Median eminences (ME) were removed from brains of adult male rats and preincubated for 15 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate glucose buffer in an atmosphere of 95% O[sub 2]-5% CO[sub 2]. These media were discarded and all MEs were subjected to one of the following experiments. In Experiment 1, all MEs were incubated for 30 minutes in medium only. These media were collected and replaced with medium only (controls) or with medium containing Pb doses ranging from 5 to 20 [mu]M. After this 60-minute incubation, media were collected, then replaced with new medium containing 60 [mu]M norepinephrine (NE), or NE plus each dose of Pb, then incubated for a final 30-minute period. Experiment 2 was conducted as above, except PGE[sub 2] (2.8 [mu]M) replaced the NE. In both experiments, the amounts of LHRH released was measured by RIA. In experiment 3, NE was again used for the challenge; however, this time, the amount of PGE[sub 2] released was measured by RIA. Results indicate that Pb did not alter basal LHRH release, but compared with controls, significantly blocked NE-induced LHRH release in a dose-related manner. Conversely, Pb had no effect on the PGE[sub 2]-induced release of LHRH. Additionally, Pb did not alter basal PGE[sub 2] release; however, it significantly blocked the NE-induced release of PGE[sub 2]. Since NE-induced LHRH release is mediated by PGE[sub 2], these results support the hypothesis that Pb is capable of altering the hypothalamus and suggest that this effect is due, at least in part, to the diminished PGE[sub 2] synthesis/release within the ME, resulting in diminished LHRH secretion.

  5. Genistein selectively inhibits estrogen-induced cell proliferation and other responses to hormone stimulation in the prepubertal rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Gaete, Leonardo; Tchernitchin, Andrei N; Bustamante, Rodrigo; Villena, Joan; Lemus, Igor; Gidekel, Manuel; Cabrera, Gustavo; Carrillo, Omar

    2011-12-01

    Sex hormone replacement therapy helps improve quality of life in climacteric women. However, estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus and mammary gland increases the risk for cancer in these organs. The lower incidence of mammary cancer in Asian women than in western women has been attributed to high intake of soy isoflavones, including genistein. Our previous work in the prepubertal rat uterus model showed that genistein (0.5 mg/kg body weight subcutaneously) caused an estradiol-like hypertrophy in myometrial and uterine luminal epithelial cells and an increase in RNA content in luminal epithelium; however, it did not induce cell proliferation, uterine eosinophilia, or endometrial edema. The present study investigated, in the same animal model, the effect of genistein administration (0.5 mg/kg body weight subcutaneously) before treatment with estradiol-17β (0.33 mg/kg body weight subcutaneously) on uterine responses that were not induced by genistein. Pretreatment with this phytoestrogen completely inhibited estradiol-induced mitoses in uterine luminal epithelium, endometrial stroma, and myometrium and partially inhibited estradiol-induced uterine eosinophilia and endometrial edema. These findings indicate that genistein protects against estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus and suggest that future studies should investigate the possibility of using this agent to decrease the risk for uterine cancer after hormone replacement therapy in climacteric women. PMID:21612459

  6. Growth hormone reverses excitotoxic damage induced by kainic acid in the green iguana neuroretina.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Mora, Janeth; Carranza, Martha; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    It is known that growth hormone (GH) is expressed in extrapituitary tissues, including the nervous system and ocular tissues, where it is involved in autocrine/paracrine actions related to cell survival and anti-apoptosis in several vertebrates. Little is known, however, in reptiles, so we analyzed the expression and distribution of GH in the eye of green iguana and its potential neuroprotective role in retinas that were damaged by the intraocular administration of kainic acid (KA). It was found, by Western blotting, that GH-immunoreactivity (GH-IR) was expressed as two isoforms (15 and 26kDa, under reducing conditions) in cornea, vitreous, retina, crystalline, iris and sclera, in varying proportions. Also, two bands for the growth hormone receptor (GHR)-IR were observed (70 and 44kDa, respectively) in the same tissues. By immunofluorescence, GH-IR was found in neurons present in several layers of the neuroretina (inner nuclear [INL], outer nuclear [ONL] and ganglion cell [GCL] layers) as determined by its co-existence with NeuN, but not in glial cells. In addition, GH and GHR co-expression was found in the same cells, suggesting paracrine/autocrine interactions. KA administration induced retinal excitotoxic damage, as determined by a significant reduction of the cell density and an increase in the appearance of apoptotic cells in the INL and GCL. In response to KA injury, both endogenous GH and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) expression were increased by 70±1.8% and 33.3±16%, respectively. The addition of exogenous GH significantly prevented the retinal damage produced by the loss of cytoarchitecture and cell density in the GCL (from 4.9±0.79 in the control, to 1.45±0.2 with KA, to 6.35±0.49cell/mm(2) with KA+GH) and in the INL (19.12±1.6, 10.05±1.9, 21.0±0.8cell/mm(2), respectively) generated by the long-term effect of 1mM KA intraocular administration. The co-incubation with a specific anti-GH antibody, however, blocked the protective effect of GH

  7. UV-radiation-induced electron emission by hormones. Hypothesis for specific communication mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola

    2009-11-01

    The highlights of recently observed electron emission from electronically excited sexual hormones (17β-estradiol, progesterone, testosterone) and the phytohormone genistein in polar media are briefly reviewed. The electron yield, Q(e aq-), dependence from substrate concentration, hormone structure, polarity of solvent, absorbed energy and temperature are discussed. The hormones reactivity with e aq- and efficiency in electron transfer ensure them the ability to communicate with other biological systems in an organism. A hypothesis is presented for the explanation of the mechanisms of the distinct recognition of signals transmitted by electrons, originating from different types of hormones to receiving centres. Biological consequences of the electron emission in respect to cancer are mentioned.

  8. Properties and sequence of a female-specific, juvenile hormone-induced protein from locust hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; McCracken, A; Wyatt, G R

    1993-02-15

    In the fat body of Locusta migratoria, an RNA transcript of about 800 nucleotides has been detected that is specific to the adult female and dependent on induction by juvenile hormone (JH) or an analog. The corresponding cDNA has been cloned (lambda 21) and a 718-base pair sequence determined. It encodes a 196-amino acid polypeptide, including a signal peptide. An NH2-terminal sequence has 24 out of 28 amino acids identical with those of a previously described 19K locust hemolymph protein, but the remainder of the sequence shows no similarity. From adult female hemolymph, a 21-kDa protein, designated 21K protein, has been purified, with an NH2-terminal sequence exactly matching that deduced from clone lambda 21. This 21K protein is found only in the adult female, is dependent on induction by JH, and is assumed to represent the product of the lambda 21 gene. It shows no immunochemical cross-reaction with locust 19K protein, apolipophorin III, nor with vitellogenin (Vg). Its isoelectric point is pH 5.4; it contains some carbohydrate. 21K protein is synthesized in adult female fat body, accumulates in hemolymph, and is taken up into the developing oocytes in parallel with Vg. In locusts deprived of JH with precocene, production of 21K protein and of lambda 21-hybridizing transcripts is induced by the JH analog, methoprene, in parallel with Vg and its mRNA. Because of its sex-, stage-, and JH-dependent regulation, coordinate with Vg, the 21K protein will be valuable for analysis of gene expression. PMID:7679110

  9. Steroid sex hormone dynamics during estradiol-17β induced gonadal differentiation in Paralichthys olivaceus (Teleostei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; You, Feng; Liu, Mengxia; Wu, Zhihao; Wen, Aiyun; Li, Jun; Xu, Yongli; Zhang, Peijun

    2010-03-01

    Steroid sex hormones, such as estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T), are important regulators of sex change in fish. In this study, we examined the effects of E2 treatment on the dynamics of E2 and T during gonadal differentiation in the olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using histology and radioimmunoassay (RIA). Flounder larvae were divided into five groups (G0-G4), and fed with 0 (control), 0.2, 2, 20 and 100 mg E2/kg feed from 35 to 110 day post hatching (dph). Fish growth in the G1 and G2 groups was not significantly different from that of the control group ( P>0.05), while fish in the G3 and G4 groups were less active and showed growth depression and high mortality. The gonads of fish in the G3 and G4 groups were smaller and surrounded by hyperplastic connective tissue. The frequency of females in the G0-G4 groups was 54.5%, 75.0%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. The RIA analyses of E2 and T showed that T levels decreased during gonadal differentiation, and increased slightly at the onset of ovarian differentiation, while E2 levels increased gradually and peaked at the onset of ovarian differentiation in the control group. In the E2-treated groups, T levels decreased before the onset of ovarian differentiation. E2 levels were high on the 48 dph, but declined to a lower level on the 54 dph, and then increased gradually during gonadal differentiation. And a sharp increase of E2 levels were observed in all E2-treated groups at the onset of ovarian differentiation. The data suggest that T and E2 play important roles during gonadal differentiation, and an E2 dose of 2 mg/kg feed could induce sex reversal in P. olivaceus.

  10. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasni Ebou, Moina; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Tronche, François; Ferré, Pascal; Gautier, Jean-François; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Bréant, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs) treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synthesis was evaluated in vitro after treatment with GCs of either islets from CD1 mice or MIN6 cells, a beta-cell line. We also explored the effect of GCs on the stimulation of serotonin synthesis by several hormones such as prolactin and GLP 1. We finally studied this regulation in islet in two in vivo models: mice treated with GCs and with liraglutide, a GLP1 analog, and mice deleted for the glucocorticoid receptor in the pancreas. We showed in isolated islets and MIN6 cells that GCs decreased expression and activity of the two key enzymes of serotonin synthesis, Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and 2 (Tph2), leading to reduced serotonin contents. GCs also blocked the induction of serotonin synthesis by prolactin or by a previously unknown serotonin activator, the GLP-1 analog exendin-4. In vivo, activation of the Glucagon-like-Peptide-1 receptor with liraglutide during 4 weeks increased islet serotonin contents and GCs treatment prevented this increase. Finally, islets from mice deleted for the GR in the pancreas displayed an increased expression of Tph1 and Tph2 and a strong increased serotonin content per islet. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an original inhibition of serotonin synthesis by GCs, both in basal condition and after stimulation by prolactin or activators of the GLP-1 receptor. This regulation may contribute to the deleterious effects of GCs on beta cells. PMID:26901633

  11. Hormone induced expression of brush border lactase in suckling rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit Kaur; Mahmood, Safrun; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2008-05-01

    The postnatal development of intestine is associated with a decline in brush border lactase activity in rodents. This is similar to adulthood hypolactasia, a phenomenon prevalent in humans worldwide. In the present study, the effect of luminal proteases from adult rat intestine was studied in vitro on intestinal lactase activity in saline control, thyroxine, insulin and cortisone treated rat pups. Lactase levels were determined by enzyme analysis and Western blotting. mRNA levels encoding lactase were determined by Northern blotting. Administration of thyroxine for 4 days reduced (P<0.05) lactase activity, but insulin treatment had no effect in 8-day-old rat intestine. However, cortisone administration augmented (P<0.01) lactase activity, under these conditions. Western blot analysis showed decreased lactase signal corresponding to 220-kDa protein band in thyroxine treated animals. However, the intensity of lactase signal was high in cortisone treated animals compared to controls. mRNA levels encoding lactase showed a 6.8-kb mRNA transcript in saline and hormone treated rats. mRNA levels encoding lactase were increased in cortisone treated animals but were reduced in thyroxine injected pups compared to controls. Microvillus membranes from saline (P<0.01) and thyroxine (P<0.05) or insulin (P<0.01) treated rats upon incubation with luminal wash from adult rat intestine showed a significant decline in lactase activity. These findings suggest that thyroxine, insulin or cortisone induced changes in lactase expression in suckling rat intestine make it susceptible to luminal proteases, which may in part be responsible for observed maturational decline in lactase activity in adult rat intestine. PMID:18273561

  12. Temperature-induced variation in yolk androgen and thyroid hormone levels in avian eggs.

    PubMed

    Ruuskanen, Suvi; Groothuis, Ton G G; Schaper, Sonja V; Darras, Veerle M; de Vries, Bonnie; Visser, Marcel E

    2016-09-01

    Global warming has substantially changed the environment, but the mechanisms to cope with these changes in animals, including the role of maternal effects, are poorly understood. Maternal effects via hormones deposited in eggs, have important environment-dependent effects on offspring development and fitness: thus females are expected to adjust these hormones to the environment, such as the ambient temperature. Longer-term temperature variation could function as a cue, predicting chick rearing conditions to which yolk hormone levels are adjusted, while short-term temperature variation during egg formation may causally affect hormone transfer to eggs. We studied the effects of ambient temperature on yolk androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) and thyroid hormones (thyroxine and triiodothyronine) in great tits (Parus major) using data from unmanipulated clutches from a wild population and from aviary birds (ad libitum food) exposed to different experimental temperature treatments during five years. Both in the wild and in captivity, longer-term pre-laying ambient temperature was not associated with clutch mean yolk hormone levels, while the way androstenedione and thyroxine levels varied across the laying sequence did associate with pre-laying temperature in the wild. Yolk testosterone levels were positively correlated with short-term temperature (during yolk formation) changes within clutches in both wild and captivity. We also report, for the first time in a wild bird, that yolk thyroxine levels correlated with a key environmental factor: thyroxine levels were negatively correlated with ambient temperature during egg formation. Thus, yolk hormone levels, especially testosterone, seem to be causally affected by ambient temperature. These short-term effects might reflect physiological changes in females with changes in ambient temperature. The adaptive value of the variation with ambient temperatures pre-laying or during egg formation should be studied with

  13. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2(+) and Sox9(+) adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  14. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  15. Research resource: estrogen-driven prolactin-mediated gene-expression networks in hormone-induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Tam, Neville N C; Szeto, Carol Y Y; Freudenberg, Johannes M; Fullenkamp, Amy N; Medvedovic, Mario; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2010-11-01

    Cotreatment with testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) is an established regimen for inducing of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer in rodent models. We previously used the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI) and bromocriptine, a dopamine receptor agonist, to inhibit PIN induction and systemic hyperprolactinemia in Noble rats and found that the carcinogenic action of T+E2 is mediated directly by the effects of E2 on the prostate and/or indirectly via E2-induced hyperprolactinemia. In this study, we delineate the specific action(s) of E2 and prolactin (PRL) in early prostate carcinogenesis by an integrated approach combining global transcription profiling, gene ontology, and gene-network mapping. We identified 2504 differentially expressed genes in the T+E2-treated lateral prostate. The changes in expression of a subset of 1990 genes (∼80%) were blocked upon cotreatment with ICI and bromocriptine, respectively, whereas those of 262 genes (∼10%) were blocked only by treatment with ICI, suggesting that E2-induced pituitary PRL is the primary mediator of the prostatic transcriptional response to the altered hormone milieu. Bioinformatics analyses identified hormone-responsive gene networks involved in immune responses, stromal tissue remodeling, and the ERK pathway. In particular, our data suggest that IL-1β may mediate, at least in part, hormone-induced changes in gene expression during PIN formation. Together, these data highlight the importance of pituitary PRL in estrogen-induced prostate tumorigenesis. The identification of both E2- and pituitary PRL-responsive genes provides a comprehensive resource for future investigations of the complex mechanisms by which changes in the endocrine milieu contribute to prostate carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:20861223

  16. A Histopathological Study of Multi-hormone Producing Proliferative Lesions in Estrogen-induced Rat Pituitary Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takekoshi, Susumu; Yasui, Yuzo; Inomoto, Chie; Kitatani, Kanae; Nakamura, Naoya; Osamura, Robert Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Rats with estrogen-induced prolactin-producing pituitary adenoma (E2-PRLoma) have been employed as an animal model of human PRL-producing pituitary adenoma in a large number of studies. Presently, we found that long-term administration of estrogen to SD rats resulted in the development of E2-PRLomas, some of which included multi-hormone producing nodules. We herein report results of histopathological analyses of these lesions. PRLoma models were created in female SD rats by 22 weeks or longer administration of a controlled-release preparation of estradiol at a dose of 10 mg/kg/2 weeks. Ten of the 11 PRLoma model rats had proliferative nodular lesions composed of large eosinophilic cells like gonadotrophs inside the PRLoma. These lesions were positive for PRL, TSHβ, and α subunits and were negative for GH, LHβ, ACTH, and S-100. Double immunostaining revealed that these large eosinophilic cells showed coexpression of PRL and TSHβ, PRL and α subunits, and TSHβ and α subunits. Those results clarified that long-term estrogen administration to female SD rats induced multi-hormone producing neoplastic pituitary nodules that expressed PRL, TSHβ, and α subunits. We studied these neoplastic nodules obtained by laser microdissection to acquire findings similar to those of the immuno­histochemical analysis. We consider that this animal model is useful for pathogenesis analyses and therapeutic agent development concerning human multi-hormone producing pituitary adenomas. PMID:25392569

  17. Abnormal secretion of reproductive hormones and antioxidant status involved in quinestrol-induced reproductive toxicity in adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Jiliang; Zhou, Bianhua; Si, Lifang; Wei, Lan; Li, Xiang

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of quinestrol, a synthetic oestrogen homologue with reproductive toxicity, on the secretion of reproductive hormones and antioxidant status in adult male rat. Our results showed that quinestrol exposure significantly decreased the weight of the testis, epididymides, seminal vesicle, and prostate, as well as the sperm counts in the cauda epididymis of rats. Quinestrol significantly reduced the size of seminiferous tubules and the total number of spermatogenic cells. Serum testosterone, follitropin, and lutropin were also significantly reduced in a dose-related manner after quinestrol exposure. Meanwhile, the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and total antioxide capacity significantly decreased, whereas the malondialdehyde and nitric oxide concentrations significantly increased in the testes. These findings revealed that endocrine disorders of reproductive hormones and oxidative stress may be involved in reproductive toxicity induced by quinestrol in adult male rats. PMID:24183492

  18. Sequence elements in the human osteocalcin gene confer basal activation and inducible response to hormonal vitamin D sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, S.A.; Scott, R.A.; Pike, J.W. )

    1989-06-01

    Osteoblast-specific expression of the bone protein osteocalcin is controlled at the transcriptional level by the steroid hormone 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. As this protein may represent a marker for bone activity in human disease, the authors examined the regulation of its expression at the molecular level by evaluating human osteocalcin gene promoter function. They describe regions within the promoter that contribute to basal expression of the gene in osteoblast-like cells in culture. Further, they define a 21-base-pair DNA element with the sequence 5{prime}-GTGACTCACCGGGTGAACGGG-3{prime}, which acts in cis to mediate 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} inducibility of the osteocalcin gene. This response element bears sequence similarity with other short DNA segments, particularly those for estrogen and thyroid hormone, which act together with their respective trans-acting receptors to modulate gene transcription.

  19. Ca(2+)-mobilizing hormones induce sequentially ordered Ca2+ signals in multicellular systems of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Combettes, L; Tran, D; Tordjmann, T; Laurent, M; Berthon, B; Claret, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of hormone-mediated Ca2+ signals was analysed in polarized doublets, triplets and quadruplets of rat hepatocytes by video imaging of fura2 fluorescence. These multicellular models showed dilated bile canaliculi, and gap junctions were observed by using an anti-connexin-32 antibody. They also showed highly organized Ca2+ signals in response to vasopressin or noradrenaline. Surprisingly, the primary rises in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) did not start randomly from any cell of the multiplet. It originated invariably in the same hepatocyte (first-responding cell), and then was propagated in a sequential manner to the nearest connected cells (cell 2, then 3, in triplets; cell 2, 3, then 4 in quadruplets). The sequential activation of the cells appeared to be an intrinsic property of multiplets of rat hepatocytes. (1) In the continued presence of hormones, the same sequential order was observed up to six times, i.e. at each train of oscillations occurring between the cells. (2) The order of [Ca2+]i responses was modified neither by the repeated addition of hormones nor by the hormonal dose. (3) The mechanical disruption of an intermediate cell slowed down the speed of the propagation, suggesting a role of gap junctions in the rapidity of the sequential activation of cells. (4) The same multiplet could have a different first-responding cell for vasopressin or noradrenaline, suggesting a role of the hormonal receptors in the sequentiality of cell responses. It is postulated that a functional heterogeneity of hormonal receptors, and the presence of functional gap junctions, are involved in the existence of sequentially ordered hormone-mediated [Ca2+]i rises in the multiplets of rat hepatocytes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7998996

  20. Sex steroid induced apoptosis as a rational strategy to treat anti-hormone resistant breast and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jordan, V Craig; Fan, Ping; Abderrahman, Balkees; Maximov, Philipp Y; Hawsawi, Yousef M; Bhattacharya, Poulomi; Pokharel, Niranjana

    2016-05-01

    The combined incidence and the extended disease course of breast and prostate cancer is a major challenge for health care systems. The solution for society requires an economically viable treatment strategy to maintain individuals disease free and productive, so as to avoid the fracture of the family unit. Forty years ago, translational research using the antiestrogen tamoxifen was targeted to estrogen receptor (ER) positive micrometastatic tumor cells and established the long-term antihormone adjuvant treatment strategy used universally today. The antihormone strategy was the accepted structure of cancer biology. Sex steroid deprivation therapy remains the orthodox strategy for the treatment of both breast and prostate cancer. Despite major initial therapeutic success, the strategies of long term anti-hormone therapies with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors (AI) or antiandrogens or abiraterone for breast and prostate cancer, respectively, eventually lead to a significant proportion of anti-hormone resistant or stimulated tumor growth. Remarkably, a general principle of anti-hormone resistance has emerged for both breast and prostate cancer based primarily on clinical and supportive laboratory data. Paradoxically, anti-hormone resistant cell populations emerge and grow but are vulnerable to the cytotoxicity of estrogen or androgen-induced apoptosis for both breast and prostate cancer, respectively. These consistent anticancer actions of sex steroids appear to recapitulate the more complex mechanism of bone remodeling in elderly men and women during sex steroid deprivation. Estrogen is the key hormone in both sexes because in men androgen is first converted to estrogen. Estrogen regulates and triggers apoptosis in osteoclasts that develop during estrogen deprivation and destroy bone to cause osteoporosis. Sex steroid deprived breast and prostate cancer has recruited a streamlined natural apoptotic program from the human genome, but this is suppressed in the

  1. Serotonergic receptor mechanisms underlying antidepressant-like action in the progesterone withdrawal model of hormonally induced depression in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Raaby, Kasper F; Sánchez, Connie; Gulinello, Maria

    2013-11-01

    Hormonally induced mood disorders such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) are characterized by a range of physical and affective symptoms including anxiety, irritability, anhedonia, social withdrawal and depression. Studies demonstrated rodent models of progesterone withdrawal (PWD) have a high level of constructive and descriptive validity to model hormonally-induced mood disorders in women. Here we evaluate the effects of several classes of antidepressants in PWD female Long-Evans rats using the forced swim test (FST) as a measure of antidepressant activity. The study included fluoxetine, duloxetine, amitriptyline and an investigational multimodal antidepressant, vortioxetine (5-HT(3), 5-HT(7) and 5-HT(1D) receptor antagonist; 5-HT(1B) receptor partial agonist; 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist; inhibitor of the serotonin transporter (SERT)). After 14 days of administration, amitriptyline and vortioxetine significantly reduced immobility in the FST whereas fluoxetine and duloxetine were ineffective. After 3 injections over 48 h, neither fluoxetine nor duloxetine reduced immobility, whereas amitriptyline and vortioxetine significantly reduced FST immobility during PWD. When administered acutely during PWD, the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, flesinoxan, significantly reduced immobility, whereas the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, WAY-100635, increased immobility. The 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, ondansetron, significantly reduced immobility, whereas the 5-HT(3) receptor agonist, SR-57227, increased immobility. The 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, SB-269970, was inactive, although the 5-HT(7) receptor agonist, AS-19, significantly increased PWD-induced immobility. None of the compounds investigated (ondansetron, flesinoxan and SB-269970) improved the effect of fluoxetine during PWD. These data indicate that modulation of specific 5-HT receptor subtypes is critical for manipulating FST immobility in this model of hormone-induced depression. PMID:24016840

  2. Hormonal modulation of food intake in response to low leptin levels induced by hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, M. M.; Stein, T. P.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    A loss in fat mass is a common response to centrifugation and it results in low circulating leptin concentrations. However, rats adapted to hypergravity are euphagic. The focus of this study was to examine leptin and other peripheral signals of energy balance in the presence of a hypergravity-induced loss of fat mass and euphagia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were centrifuged for 14 days at gravity levels of 1.25, 1.5, or 2 G, or they remained stationary at 1 G. Urinary catecholamines, urinary corticosterone, food intake, and body mass were measured on Days 11 to 14. Plasma hormones and epididymal fat pad mass were measured on Day 14. Mean body mass of the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than controls, and no differences were found in food intake (g/day/100 g body mass) between the hypergravity groups and controls. Epididymal fat mass was 14%, 14%, and 21% lower than controls in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups, respectively. Plasma leptin was significantly reduced from controls by 46%, 45%, and 65% in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups, respectively. Plasma insulin was significantly lower in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups than controls by 35%, 38%, and 33%. No differences were found between controls and hypergravity groups in urinary corticosterone. Mean urinary epinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Mean urinary norepinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.25, 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Significant correlations were found between G load and body mass, fat mass, leptin, urinary epinephrine, and norepinephrine. During hypergravity exposure, maintenance of food intake is the result of a complex relationship between multiple pathways, which abates the importance of leptin as a primary signal.

  3. The effect of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog regime and stage of oocyte maturity for induced ovulation of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effective LHRHa (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog) dose based on the gonadal maturity of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus to optimize channel x blue hybrid catfish production was evaluated in 4 trials (twice in early part of the season and twice in the peak spawning season) in a ...

  4. Flow cytometry analysis of hormone receptors on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify stress-induced neuroendocrine effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the role of circulating peptide hormones in the pathogenesis of space-flight induced disorders would be greatly facilitated by a method which monitors chronic levels of hormones and their effects upon in vivo cell physiology. Single and simultaneous multiparameter flow cytometry analysis was employed to identify subpopulations of mononuclear cells bearing receptors for ACTH, Endorphin, and Somatomedin-C using monoclonal antibodies and monospecific antisera with indirect immunofluorescence. Blood samples were obtained from normal donors and subjects participating in decompression chamber studies (acute stress), medical student academic examination (chronic stress), and a drug study (Dexamethasone). Preliminary results indicate most ACTH and Endorphin receptor positive cells are monocytes and B-cells, exhibit little diurnal variation but the relative percentages of receptor positive cells are influenced by exposure to various stressors and ACTH inhibition. This study demonstrates the capability of flow cytometry analysis to study cell surface hormone receptor regulation which should allow insight into neuroendocrine modulation of the immune and other cellular systems during exposure to stress or microgravity.

  5. Effects of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents on Thyroid Hormone Receptor Action and Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ariyani, Winda; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Miyazaki, Wataru; Khongorzul, Erdene; Nakajima, Takahito; Kameo, Satomi; Koyama, Hiroshi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance the quality of magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. After intravenous injection, GBCAs can accumulate in the brain. Thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the development and functional maintenance of the central nervous system. TH actions in brain are mainly exerted through nuclear TH receptors (TRs). We examined the effects of GBCAs on TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells using transient transfection-based reporter assay and TH-mediated cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis in primary culture. We also measured the cellular accumulation and viability of Gd after representative GBCA treatments in cultured CV-1 cells. Both linear (Gd-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-bis methyl acid, Gd-DTPA-BMA) and macrocyclic (Gd-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid, Gd-DOTA) GBCAs were accumulated without inducing cell death in CV-1 cells. By contrast, Gd chloride (GdCl3) treatment induced approximately 100 times higher Gd accumulation and significantly reduced the number of cells. Low doses of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10(-8) to 10(-6)M) augmented TR-mediated transcription, but the transcription was suppressed at higher dose (10(-5) to 10(-4)M), with decreased β-galactosidase activity indicating cellular toxicity. TR-mediated transcription was not altered by Gd-DOTA or GdCl3, but the latter induced a significant reduction in β-galactosidase activity at high doses, indicating cellular toxicity. In cerebellar cultures, the dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells induced by 10(-9)M T4 was augmented by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (10(-7)M) but was suppressed by higher dose (10(-5)M). Such augmentation by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA was not observed with 10(-9)M T3, probably because of the greater dendrite arborization by T3; however, the arborization by T3 was suppressed by a higher dose of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10(-5)M) as seen in T4 treatment. The effect of Gd-DOTA on dendrite arborization was much weaker

  6. Effects of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents on Thyroid Hormone Receptor Action and Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ariyani, Winda; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Miyazaki, Wataru; Khongorzul, Erdene; Nakajima, Takahito; Kameo, Satomi; Koyama, Hiroshi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance the quality of magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. After intravenous injection, GBCAs can accumulate in the brain. Thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the development and functional maintenance of the central nervous system. TH actions in brain are mainly exerted through nuclear TH receptors (TRs). We examined the effects of GBCAs on TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells using transient transfection-based reporter assay and TH-mediated cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis in primary culture. We also measured the cellular accumulation and viability of Gd after representative GBCA treatments in cultured CV-1 cells. Both linear (Gd-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-bis methyl acid, Gd-DTPA-BMA) and macrocyclic (Gd-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid, Gd-DOTA) GBCAs were accumulated without inducing cell death in CV-1 cells. By contrast, Gd chloride (GdCl3) treatment induced approximately 100 times higher Gd accumulation and significantly reduced the number of cells. Low doses of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−8 to 10−6M) augmented TR-mediated transcription, but the transcription was suppressed at higher dose (10−5 to 10−4M), with decreased β-galactosidase activity indicating cellular toxicity. TR-mediated transcription was not altered by Gd-DOTA or GdCl3, but the latter induced a significant reduction in β-galactosidase activity at high doses, indicating cellular toxicity. In cerebellar cultures, the dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells induced by 10−9M T4 was augmented by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−7M) but was suppressed by higher dose (10−5M). Such augmentation by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA was not observed with 10−9M T3, probably because of the greater dendrite arborization by T3; however, the arborization by T3 was suppressed by a higher dose of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−5M) as seen in T4 treatment. The effect of Gd-DOTA on dendrite arborization was much weaker

  7. Juvenile hormone prevents 20-hydroxyecdysone-induced metamorphosis by regulating the phosphorylation of a newly identified broad protein.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; Pei, Xu-Yang; Li, Xiang-Ru; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-09-19

    The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) initiates insect molting and metamorphosis. By contrast, juvenile hormone (JH) prevents metamorphosis. However, the mechanism by which JH inhibits metamorphosis remains unclear. In this study, we propose that JH induces the phosphorylation of Broad isoform Z7 (BrZ7), a newly identified protein, to inhibit 20E-mediated metamorphosis in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. The knockdown of BrZ7 in larvae inhibited metamorphosis by repressing the expression of the 20E response gene. BrZ7 was weakly expressed and phosphorylated during larval growth but highly expressed and non-phosphorylated during metamorphosis. JH regulated the rapid phosphorylation of BrZ7 via a G-protein-coupled receptor-, phospholipase C-, and protein kinase C-triggered pathway. The phosphorylated BrZ7 bound to the 5'-regulatory region of calponin to regulate its expression in the JH pathway. Exogenous JH induced BrZ7 phosphorylation to prevent metamorphosis by suppressing 20E-related gene transcription. JH promoted non-phosphorylated calponin interacting with ultraspiracle protein to activate the JH pathway and antagonize the 20E pathway. This study reveals one of the possible mechanisms by which JH counteracts 20E-regulated metamorphosis by inducing the phosphorylation of BrZ7. PMID:25096576

  8. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2012-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts proinflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5-2 μM) for 6 hours significantly increases corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 μM) to LAD2 cells, which are "primed" with SP for 48 hours and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hours later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 μM) for 6 hours induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared with controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 μM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, whereas CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  9. Significance of the metastasis-inducing protein AGR2 for outcome in hormonally treated breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Innes, H E; Liu, D; Barraclough, R; Davies, M P A; O'Neill, P A; Platt-Higgins, A; de Silva Rudland, S; Sibson, D R; Rudland, P S

    2006-04-10

    The anterior gradient protein-2 (AGR2) is inducible by oestrogen and itself can induce metastasis in a rat model for breast cancer. Here, a rabbit antibody to recombinant human AGR2 was used to assess its prognostic significance in a retrospective cohort of 351 breast cancer patients treated by adjuvant hormonal therapy. The antibody stains 66% of breast carcinomas to varying degrees. The percentage of positive carcinoma cells in tumours directly correlates with the level of AGR2 mRNA (Spearman's rank correlation, P = 0.0007) and protein (linear regression analysis r2 = 0.95, P = 0.0002). There is a significant association of staining of carcinomas for AGR2 with oestrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) staining and with low histological grade (both Fisher's Exact test P<0.0001). In the ERalpha-positive cases, but not the ERalpha-negative cases, when subdivided into the separate staining classes for AGR2, there is a significantly progressive decrease in patient survival with increased staining (log rank test, P = 0.006). The significant association of staining for AGR2 with patient death over a 10-year period (log rank test P = 0.007, hazard ratio = 3) only becomes significant at 6 years of follow-up. This may be due to the cessation of adjuvant hormonal therapy at an earlier time, resulting in adverse re-expression of the metastasis-inducing protein AGR2. PMID:16598187

  10. Hormonal Correlates of Clozapine-Induced Weight Gain in Psychotic Children: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sporn, Alexandra L.; Bobb, Aaron J.; Gogtay, Nitin; Stevens, Hanna; Greenstein, Deanna K.; Clasen, Liv S.; Tossell, Julia W.; Nugent, Thomas; Gochman, Peter A.; Sharp, Wendy S.; Mattai, Anand; Lenane, Marge C.; Yanovski, Jack A.; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Weight gain is a serious side effect of atypical antipsychotics, especially in childhood. In this study, the authors examined six weight gain-related hormones in patients with childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) after 6 weeks of clozapine treatment. Method: Fasting serum samples for 24 patients with COS and 21 matched healthy controls…

  11. Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 Attenuation of Protein Kinase C-Induced Inflammation in Human Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yi-Ning; Sun, David; Peng, Yen-Chun; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are two important inflammatory mediators in ovulation. Ghrelin may modulate inflammatory signaling via growth hormone secretagogue receptors. We investigated the role of ghrelin in KGN human ovarian granulosa cells using protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (PDD) and synthetic ghrelin analog growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2). GHRP-2 attenuated PDD-induced expression of protein and mRNA, the promoter activity of COX-2 and IL-8 genes, and the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-8. GHRP-2 promoted the degradation of PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 proteins with the involvement of proteasomal and lysosomal pathways. PDD-mediated COX-2 production acts via the p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways; PDD-mediated IL-8 production acts via the p38, JNK and ERK pathways. GHRP-2 reduced the PDD-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and activator protein 1 (AP-1) reporter activation and PDD-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and reporter activation. The inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) reduced the inhibitory effect of GHRP-2 on PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 expression. Our findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory role for ghrelin (GHRP-2) in PKC-mediated inflammation of granulosa cells, at least in part, due to its inhibitory effect on PKC-induced activation of p38, JNK and NF-κB, possibly by targeting to MKP-1 and PP2A. PMID:27548147

  12. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  13. Specificity of herbivore-induced hormonal signaling and defensive traits in five closely related milkweeds (Asclepias spp.).

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag A; Hastings, Amy P; Patrick, Eamonn T; Knight, Anna C

    2014-07-01

    Despite the recognition that phytohormonal signaling mediates induced responses to herbivory, we still have little understanding of how such signaling varies among closely related species and may generate herbivore-specific induced responses. We studied closely related milkweeds (Asclepias) to link: 1) plant damage by two specialist chewing herbivores (milkweed leaf beetles Labidomera clivicolis and monarch caterpillars Danaus plexippus); 2) production of the phytohormones jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), and abscisic acid (ABA); 3) induction of defensive cardenolides and latex; and 4) impacts on Danaus caterpillars. We first show that A. syriaca exhibits induced resistance following monarch herbivory (i.e., reduced monarch growth on previously damaged plants), while the defensively dissimilar A. tuberosa does not. We next worked with a broader group of five Asclepias, including these two species, that are highly divergent in defensive traits yet from the same clade. Three of the five species showed herbivore-induced changes in cardenolides, while induced latex was found in four species. Among the phytohormones, JA and ABA showed specific responses (although they generally increased) to insect species and among the plant species. In contrast, SA responses were consistent among plant and herbivore species, showing a decline following herbivore attack. Jasmonic acid showed a positive quantitative relationship only with latex, and this was strongest in plants damaged by D. plexippus. Although phytohormones showed qualitative tradeoffs (i.e., treatments that enhanced JA reduced SA), the few significant individual plant-level correlations among hormones were positive, and these were strongest between JA and ABA in monarch damaged plants. We conclude that: 1) latex exudation is positively associated with endogenous JA levels, even among low-latex species; 2) correlations among milkweed hormones are generally positive, although herbivore damage induces a

  14. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, Patrick R. Brannick, Katherine E. Wang, Wei Gupta, Rupesh K. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  15. UV filters induce transcriptional changes of different hormonal receptors in Chironomus riparius embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Aquilino, Mónica; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are emerging contaminants that are ubiquitous in fresh and marine aquatic systems due to their extensive use in cosmetics, plastics, paints, textiles, and many other industrial products. The estrogenic effects of organic UV filters have been long demonstrated in vertebrates, and other hormonal activities may be altered, according to more recent reports. The impact of UV filters on the endocrine system of invertebrates is largely unknown. We have previously reported that some UV filters may affect ecdysone-related genes in the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius, an ecotoxicologically important model organism. To further analyze other possible effects on endocrine pathways, we first characterized four pivotal genes related with hormonal pathways in insects; thereafter, these genes were assessed for alterations in transcriptional activity after exposure to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) or benzophenone-3 (BP-3), two extensively used sunscreens. We found that both chemicals disturbed the expression of all four genes analyzed: hormonal receptor 38 (HR38), methoprene-tolerant (Met), membrane-associate progesterone receptor (MAPR) and insulin-like receptor (INSR), measured by changes in mRNA levels by real-time PCR. An upregulatory effect at the genomic level was detected in different developmental stages. Interestingly, embryos appeared to be more sensitive to the action of the UV filters than larvae. Our results suggest that the risk of disruption through different endocrine routes is not negligible, considering the significant effects of UV filters on key hormonal receptor and regulatory genes. Further effort is needed to develop environmental risk assessment studies on these pollutants, particularly for aquatic invertebrate model organisms. PMID:27089421

  16. The effect of parathyroid hormones on hair follicle physiology: implications for treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Skrok, Anna; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Skwarek, Agata; Popow, Michał; Rudnicka, Lidia; Olszewska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) influence hair follicles through paracrine and intracrine routes. There is significant evidence that PTH and PTHrP influence the proliferation and differentiation of hair follicle cells. The PTH/PTHrP receptor signalling plays an important role in the hair follicle cycle and may induce premature catagen-telogen transition. Transgenic mice with an overexpression or blockade (PTH/PTHrP receptor knockout mice) of PTHrP activity revealed impaired or increased hair growth, respectively. Some findings also suggest that PTHrP may additionally influence the hair cycle by inhibiting angiogenesis. Antagonists of the PTH/PTHrP receptor have been shown to stimulate proliferation of hair follicle cells and hair growth. A hair-stimulating effect of a PTH/PTHrP receptor antagonist applied topically to the skin has been observed in hairless mice, as well as in mice treated with cyclophosphamide. These data indicate that the PTH/PTHrP receptor may serve as a potential target for new (topical) hair growth-stimulating drugs, especially for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:25721772

  17. On the thyroid hormone-induced increase in respiratory capacity of isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gregory, R B; Berry, M N

    1991-12-01

    The respiratory capacities of hepatocytes, derived from hypothyroid, euthyroid and hyperthyroid rats, have been compared by measuring rates of oxygen uptake and by titrating components of the respiratory chain with specific inhibitors. Thyroid hormone increased the maximal rate of substrate-stimulated respiration and also increased the degree of ionophore-stimulated oxygen uptake. In titration experiments, similar concentrations of oligomycin or antimycin were required for maximal inhibition of respiration regardless of thyroid state, suggesting that the changes in respiratory capacity were not the result of variation in the amounts of ATP synthase or cytochrome b. However, less rotenone was required for maximal inhibition of respiration in the hypothyroid state than in cells from euthyroid or hyperthyroid rats, implying that hepatocytes from hypothyroid animals contain less NADH dehydrogenase. The concentration of carboxyatractyloside necessary for maximal inhibition of respiration was 100 microM in hepatocytes from hypothyroid rats, but 200 microM and 300 microM in hepatocytes from euthyroid and hyperthyroid rats, respectively, indicating a possible correlation between levels of thyroid hormone and the amount or activity of adenine nucleotide translocase. The increased capacity for coupled respiration in response to thyroid hormone is not associated with an increase in the components of the electron transport chain or ATP synthase, but correlates with an increased activity of adenine nucleotide translocase. PMID:1751550

  18. Dimeric Arrangement of the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and a Structural Mechanism for Ligand-induced Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G.; Parker, Naomi R.; Miller, Laurence J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-06-25

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP). Little is known about the oligomeric state of the receptor and its regulation by hormone. The crystal structure of the ligand-free PTH1R extracellular domain (ECD) reveals an unexpected dimer in which the C-terminal segment of both ECD protomers forms an {alpha}-helix that mimics PTH/PTHrP by occupying the peptide binding groove of the opposing protomer. ECD-mediated oligomerization of intact PTH1R was confirmed in living cells by bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. As predicted by the structure, PTH binding disrupted receptor oligomerization. A receptor rendered monomeric by mutations in the ECD retained wild-type PTH binding and cAMP signaling ability. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that PTH1R forms constitutive dimers that are dissociated by ligand binding and that monomeric PTH1R is capable of activating G protein.

  19. The effect of an extended artificial photoperiod and gonadotrophin-releasing hormone infusions in inducing fertile oestrus in anoestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Lowis, T C; Hyland, J H

    1991-12-01

    The occurrence of fertile oestrus early in the breeding season is of paramount importance to the Thoroughbred industry to facilitate early conception. This paper compares 2 techniques for inducing fertile oestrus in anoestrous mares using either an extended photoperiod alone or together with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) infusions. Eleven mares were placed under conditions of 16 h light and 8 h darkness and 5 of these were implanted with osmotic minipumps delivering approximately 100 ng GnRH/kg/h for 28 days (treated mares). The treated mares ovulated 27.7 days earlier than and conceived 32 days earlier than the 6 mares not given GnRH. GnRH-induced ovulations were followed by a competent luteal phase. The combination of GnRH pumps implanted 2 weeks before commencement of service together with extended photoperiod from July 1 has promise in assisting the stud breeder to improve reproductive efficiency on commercial stud farms. PMID:1807248

  20. Metabolic clues regarding the enhanced performance of elite endurance athletes from orchiectomy-induced hormonal changes.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the metabolic performance of an elite cyclist, Lance Armstrong, before and after his diagnosis with testicular cancer. Although a champion cyclist in 1-day events prior to his diagnosis of testicular cancer at age 25, he was not a contender in multi-day endurance cycle races such as the 3-week Tour de France. His genetic makeup and physiology (high VO2max, long femur, strong heavy build) coupled with his ambition and motivation enabled him at an early age to become one of the best 1-day cyclists in the world. Following his cancer diagnosis, he underwent a unilateral orchiectomy, brain surgery and four cycles of chemotherapy. After recovering, he returned to cycling and surprisingly excelled in the Tour de France, winning this hardest of endurance events 7 years running. This dramatic transformation from a 1-day to a 3-week endurance champion has led many to query how this is possible, and under the current climate, has led to suggestions of doping as to the answer to this metamorphosis. Physiological tests following his recovery indicated that physiological parameters such as VO2max were not affected by the unilateral orchiectomy and chemotherapy. We propose that his dramatic improvement in recovery between stages, the most important factor in winning multi-day stage races, is due to his unilateral orchiectomy, a procedure that results in permanent changes in serum hormones. These hormonal changes, specifically an increase in gonadotropins (and prolactin) required to maintain serum testosterone levels, alter fuel metabolism; increasing hormone sensitive lipase expression and activity, promoting increased free fatty acid (FFA) mobilization to, and utilization by, muscles, thereby decreasing the requirement to expend limiting glycogen stores before, during and after exercise. Such hormonal changes also have been associated with ketone body production, improvements in muscle repair and haematocrit levels and may facilitate the loss of body weight

  1. Trial of Recombinant Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Pretreatment for GnRH-Induced Fertility in Patients with Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Andrew A.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Hayes, Frances J.; Boepple, Paul A.; Lee, Hang; Loughlin, Kevin R.; Dym, Martin; Sluss, Patrick M.; Crowley, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Context and Objective: The optimal strategy for inducing fertility in men with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is equivocal. Albeit a biologically plausible approach, pretreatment with recombinant FSH (rFSH) before GnRH/human chorionic gonadotropin administration has not been sufficiently assessed. The objective of the study was to test this method. Design and Setting: This was a randomized, open-label treatment protocol at an academic medical center. Patients and Interventions: GnRH-deficient men (CHH) with prepubertal testes (<4 mL), no cryptorchidism, and no prior gonadotropin therapy were randomly assigned to either 24 months of pulsatile GnRH therapy alone (inducing endogenous LH and FSH release) or 4 months of rFSH pretreatment followed by 24 months of GnRH therapy. Patients underwent serial testicular biopsies, ultrasound assessments of testicular volume, serum hormone measurements, and seminal fluid analyses. Results: rFSH treatment increased inhibin B levels into the normal range (from 29 ± 9 to 107 ± 41 pg/mL, P < .05) and doubled testicular volume (from 1.1 ± 0.2 to 2.2 ± 0.3 mL, P < .005). Histological analysis showed proliferation of both Sertoli cells (SCs) and spermatogonia, a decreased SC to germ cell ratio (from 0.74 to 0.35), and SC cytoskeletal rearrangements. With pulsatile GnRH, the groups had similar hormonal responses and exhibited significant testicular growth. All men receiving rFSH pretreatment developed sperm in their ejaculate (7 of 7 vs 4 of 6 in the GnRH-only group) and showed trends toward higher maximal sperm counts. Conclusions: rFSH pretreatment followed by GnRH is successful in inducing testicular growth and fertility in men with CHH with prepubertal testes. rFSH not only appears to maximize the SC population but also induces morphologic changes, suggesting broader developmental roles. PMID:24037890

  2. Physical Exercise Counteracts Stress-induced Upregulation of Melanin-concentrating Hormone in the Brain and Stress-induced Persisting Anxiety-like Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kyung; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2016-08-01

    Chronic stress induces anxiety disorders, whereas physical exercise is believed to help people with clinical anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying stress-induced anxiety and its counteraction by exercise using an established animal model of anxiety. Mice treated with restraint for 2 h daily for 14 days exhibited anxiety-like behaviors, including social and nonsocial behavioral symptoms, and these behavioral impairments lasted for more than 12 weeks after the stress treatment was removed. Despite these lasting behavioral changes, wheel-running exercise treatment for 1 h daily from post-stress days 1 - 21 counteracted anxiety-like behaviors, and these anxiolytic effects of exercise persisted for more than 2 months, suggesting that anxiolytic effects of exercise stably induced. Repeated restraint treatment up-regulated the expression of the neuropeptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala, the brain regions important for emotional behaviors. In an in vitro study, treatment of HT22 hippocampal cells with glucocorticoid increased MCH expression, suggesting that MCH upregulation can be initially triggered by the stress hormone, corticosterone. In contrast, post-stress treatment with wheel-running exercise reduced the stress-induced increase in MCH expression to control levels in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus and basolateral amygdala. Administration of an MCH receptor antagonist (SNAP94847) to stress-treated mice was therapeutic against stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest that repeated stress produces long-lasting anxiety-like behaviors and upregulates MCH in the brain, while exercise counteracts stress-induced MCH expression and persisting anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:27574483

  3. Physical Exercise Counteracts Stress-induced Upregulation of Melanin-concentrating Hormone in the Brain and Stress-induced Persisting Anxiety-like Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces anxiety disorders, whereas physical exercise is believed to help people with clinical anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying stress-induced anxiety and its counteraction by exercise using an established animal model of anxiety. Mice treated with restraint for 2 h daily for 14 days exhibited anxiety-like behaviors, including social and nonsocial behavioral symptoms, and these behavioral impairments lasted for more than 12 weeks after the stress treatment was removed. Despite these lasting behavioral changes, wheel-running exercise treatment for 1 h daily from post-stress days 1 - 21 counteracted anxiety-like behaviors, and these anxiolytic effects of exercise persisted for more than 2 months, suggesting that anxiolytic effects of exercise stably induced. Repeated restraint treatment up-regulated the expression of the neuropeptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala, the brain regions important for emotional behaviors. In an in vitro study, treatment of HT22 hippocampal cells with glucocorticoid increased MCH expression, suggesting that MCH upregulation can be initially triggered by the stress hormone, corticosterone. In contrast, post-stress treatment with wheel-running exercise reduced the stress-induced increase in MCH expression to control levels in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus and basolateral amygdala. Administration of an MCH receptor antagonist (SNAP94847) to stress-treated mice was therapeutic against stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest that repeated stress produces long-lasting anxiety-like behaviors and upregulates MCH in the brain, while exercise counteracts stress-induced MCH expression and persisting anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:27574483

  4. In planta changes in protein phosphorylation induced by the plant hormone abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Kelli G.; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a hormone that controls seed dormancy and germination as well as the overall plant response to important environmental stresses such as drought. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ABA-bound receptor binds to and inhibits a class of protein phosphatases. To identify more broadly the phosphoproteins affected by this hormone in vivo, we used 14N/15N metabolic labeling to perform a quantitative untargeted mass spectrometric analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana phosphoproteome following ABA treatment. We found that 50 different phosphopeptides had their phosphorylation state significantly altered by ABA over a treatment period lasting 5–30 min. Among these changes were increases in phosphorylation of subfamily 2 SNF1-related kinases and ABA-responsive basic leucine zipper transcription factors implicated in ABA signaling by previous in vitro studies. Furthermore, four members of the aquaporin family showed decreased phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal serine which is predicted to cause closure of the water-transporting aquaporin gate, consistent with ABA's role in ameliorating the effect of drought. Finally, more than 20 proteins not previously known to be involved with ABA were found to have significantly altered phosphorylation levels. Many of these changes are phosphorylation decreases, indicating that an expanded model of ABA signaling, beyond simple phosphatase inhibition, may be necessary. This quantitative proteomics dataset provides a more comprehensive, albeit incomplete, view both of the protein targets whose biochemical activities are likely to be controlled by ABA and of the nature of the emerging phosphorylation and dephosphorylation cascades triggered by this hormone. PMID:20733066

  5. Organophosphorus insecticide induced decrease in plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in white-footed mice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Michael, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Oral intubation of 50 and 100 mg/kg acephate inhibited brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by 45% and 56%, and reduced basal luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration by 29% and 25% after 4 h in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus noveboracensis). Dietary exposure to 25, 100, and 400 ppm acephate for 5 days substantially inhibited brain AChE activity, but did not affect plasma LH concentration. These preliminary findings suggest that acute exposure to organophosphorus insecticides may affect LH secretion and possibly reproductive function.

  6. Expansion of specialized epidermis induced by hormonal state and mechanical strain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-Jung; Easwaran, Teresa; Offutt, Carlos D.; Elgar, Richard Levi; Spandau, Dan F.; Koyama, Sachiko; Foley, John

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, some sites of specialized skin such as the palms, soles, and lips grow proportionally with the animal. However, other types of specialized skin such as the nipple and anal/genital region are dramatically altered with changes of reproductive status. The specific cell types that mediate the growth of these sites have not been identified. In the mouse, we observed a dramatic expansion of the specialized epidermis of the nipple, coupled to changes in connective tissue and hair shaft density, which we designate as areola formation. During this process thymidine analog uptake was elevated in the epidermis and hair follicles. Although there were no changes in connective tissue cell proliferation, we did observe an altered expression of extracellular matrix genes. In addition, the fibroblasts of the virgin nipple areola and region showed increased transcript and protein levels for estrogen, progesterone, relaxin, and oxytocin relative to those of ventral skin. To determine the role of pregnancy, lactation hormonal milieu, and localized mechanical strain on areola formation, we created models that separated these stimuli and evaluated changes in gross structure, proliferation and protein expression. While modest increases of epidermal proliferation and remodeling of connective tissue occurred as a result of individual stimuli, areola formation required exposure to pregnancy hormones, as well as mechanical strain. PMID:25680535

  7. Thymoquinone ameliorated elevated inflammatory cytokines in testicular tissue and sex hormones imbalance induced by oral chronic toxicity with sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Alyoussef, Abdullah; Al-Gayyar, Mohammed M H

    2016-07-01

    Scientific evidence illustrated the health hazards of exposure to nitrites for prolonged time. Nitrites affected several body organs due to oxidative, inflammatory and apoptosis properties. Furthermore, thymoquinone (TQ) had curative effects against many diseases. We tried to discover the impact of both sodium nitrite and TQ on inflammatory cytokines contents in testicular tissues and hormonal balance both in vivo and in vitro. Fifty adult male SD rats received 80mg/kg sodium nitrite and treated with either 25 or 50mg/kg TQ daily by oral-gavage for twelve weeks. Testis were removed for sperms' count. Testicular tissue homogenates were used for assessment of protein and gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, Nrf2 and caspase-3. Serum samples were used for measurement of testosterone, LH, FSH and prolactin. Moreover, all the parameters were measured in human normal testis cell-lines, CRL-7002. Sodium nitrite produced significant decrease in serum testosterone associated with raised FSH, LH and prolactin. Moreover, sodium nitrite significantly elevated TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, caspase-3 and reduced Nrf2. TQ significantly reversed all these effects both in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, TQ ameliorated testicular tissue inflammation and restored the normal balance of sex hormones induced by sodium nitrite both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27038016

  8. Glucoreceptors located in different areas mediate the hypoglycemia-induced release of growth hormone, prolactin, and adrenocorticotropin in man.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Tatár, P; Jurcovicová, J; Jezová, D

    1990-03-01

    In young male volunteers, the changes in growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in response to insulin injection combined with the infusion of saline, glucose, and fructose were evaluated. Glucose infusion in a dose which prevented insulin hypoglycemia completely abolished endocrine responses. Infusion of fructose, which is known not to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), did not influence the GH release during hypoglycemia; however, it inhibited PRL secretion. The ACTH response was slightly attenuated and delayed, while the hypoglycemia-induced rise in cortisol levels was not modified by fructose infusion. These data indicate that the glucoreceptors mediating the signals for a complete counterregulatory neuroendocrine response are not located in a single brain structure. Stimuli for GH release are produced in areas of the central nervous system protected by the BBB, while those for PRL release are presumably present in structures not protected by the BBB. Glucoreceptors triggering ACTH release are located both inside and outside the BBB. PMID:2157998

  9. Induced carotenoid accumulation in Dunaliella salina and Tetraselmis suecica by plant hormones and UV-C radiation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faruq; Fanning, Kent; Netzel, Michael; Schenk, Peer M

    2015-11-01

    Carotenoids prevent different degenerative diseases and improve human health. Microalgae are commercially exploited for carotenoids, including astaxanthin and β-carotene. Two commercially important microalgae, Dunaliella salina and Tetraselmis suecica, were treated with plant hormones salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MJ), or by UV-C radiation (T. suecica only) and a combination thereof. Significant increases in total carotenoids were found for D. salina and T. suecica after treatment with MJ (10 μmol/L) and SA (70-250 μmol/L), respectively. T. suecica also had significant increases in total carotenoids following UV-C radiation compared to control cultures. Among the carotenoids, lutein was the highest induced carotenoid. A combination of these two treatments also showed a significant increase in total carotenoids and lutein for T. suecica, when compared to controls. Plant hormones and UV-C radiation may be useful tools for increasing carotenoid accumulation in green microalgae although the responses are species- and dose-specific and should be trialed in medium to large scale to explore commercial production. PMID:26201492

  10. Microarray analysis of thyroid hormone-induced changes in mRNA expression in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Haas, Michael J; Mreyoud, Amjad; Fishman, Miriam; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2004-07-15

    To determine which genes in the adult rat brain are regulated by thyroid hormone (TH), we used microarrays to examine the effect of hyperthyroidism on neuron-specific gene expression. Four-month-old male Fisher 344 rats were rendered hyperthyroid by intraperitoneal injection of 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine (T3, 15 microg/100 g body weight) for 10 consecutive days. To minimize interindividual variability, pooled cerebral tissue RNA from four-control and five-hyperthyroid rats was hybridized in duplicates to the Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) U34N rat neurobiology microarray, which contains probes for 1224 neural-specific genes. Changes in gene expression were considered significant only if they were observed in both pair-wise comparisons as well as by Northern blot analysis. Hyperthyroidism was associated with modest changes in the expression of only 11 genes. The expression of the phosphodiesterase Enpp2, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), growth hormone (GH), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase beta-subunit (Camk2b), neuron-specific protein PEP-19 (Pcp4), a sodium-dependent neurotransmitter, and the myelin-associated glycoprotein (S-MAG) was significantly increased. Three genes were suppressed by hyperthyroidism, including the activity and neurotransmitter-induced early genes-1 and -7 (ANIA-1 and ANIA-7) and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein one (Gnb1). The present study underscores the paucity of TH responsive genes in adult cerebral tissue. PMID:15234464

  11. A rare complication of transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis: parathyroid hormone-related peptide-induced hypercalcaemia.

    PubMed

    O Sullivan, Eoin; Plant, William

    2014-01-01

    We describe a rare occurrence of parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrp) associated hypercalcaemia with a recurrence of transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis. Our patient presented with serum calcium of 3.9 mmol/L, PTH of 5 ng/L and a PTHrp of 9.8 pmol/L (<2 pmol/L). He had no evidence of metastatic disease. His hypercalcaemia responded to bisphosphonate therapy. He chose to be treated conservatively and died 5 weeks after presentation. This is the seventh such case described in the literature. PTHrp-induced hypercalcaemia is associated with a grave prognosis, with a mean survival of 65 days from presentation. PMID:24951595

  12. Ultrastructural and hormonal changes in rat cauda epididymal spermatozoa induced by Boswellia papyrifera and Boswellia carterii.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mukhtar; Ali, Daoud; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Hussain, Tajamul; Al-Daghri, Nasser; Alokail, Majed S; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Ghodesawar, Mukhtar Ahmed G

    2014-04-01

    Boswellia papyrifera and Boswellia carterii diffuses smoke polluting air that adversely affects indoor environment that certainly harm human health. Therefore, this study aims at ascertaining the effect of these plants on gonadal hormones and molecular changes in rat spermatozoa. The animals were exposed to 4 g/kg body weight of B. papyrifera and B. carterii daily for 120 days along with suitable controls. Significant decreases in FSH, LH and testosterone levels were evidenced, along with a reduction of protein, sialic acid, and carnitine levels. In sperm physiology, sperm count, motility, speed decrease, whereas sperm anomalies increase. TEM observation indicates morphological changes in plasma and acrosomal membranes, cytoplasmic droplet in the tail region, vacuolated, and disorganization of the mitochondrial sheath. These findings demonstrate that B. papyrifera and B. carterii smoke affects the process of sperm formation and maturation, which indicates the detrimental effects of these plants on the reproductive system. PMID:24702894

  13. Hyper-G stress-induced hyperglycemia in rats mediated by glucoregulatory hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daligcon, B. C.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with possible relations of the hyperglycemic response of rats exposed to hyper-G stress to (1) alterations in blood levels of the glucoregulatory hormones and gluconeogenic substrates, and (2) changes in insulin response on muscle glucose uptake. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250-300 g were used in the study. The results of the experiments indicate that the initial rapid rise in blood glucose of rats exposed to hyper-G stress is mediated by increases in circulating catecholamines and glucagon, both potent stimulators of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Lactate, derived from epinephrine stimulation of muscle glycogenolysis, appears to be a major precursor for the initial rise in blood glucose. The inhibition of the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by muscle tissues may be a factor in the observed sustained hyperglycemia.

  14. Treatment for chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice using parathyroid hormone agonists and antagonists linked to a collagen binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Suda, Hirofumi; Miyata, Shigeru; Sakon, Joshua; Matsushita, Osamu; Gensure, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) agonists and antagonists have been shown to improve hair growth after chemotherapy; however, rapid clearance and systemic side-effects complicate their usage. To facilitate delivery and retention to skin, we fused PTH agonists and antagonists to the collagen binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. in-vitro studies showed that the agonist fusion protein, PTH-CBD, bound collagen and activated the PTH/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor in SaOS-2 cells. The antagonist fusion proteins, PTH(7–33)-CBD and PTH([−1]–33)-CBD, also bound collagen and antagonized PTH(1–34) effect in SaOS-2 cells; however, PTH(7–33)-CBD had lower intrinsic activity. Distribution studies confirmed uptake of PTH-CBD to the skin at 1 and 12 hr after subcutaneous injection. We assessed in vivo efficacy of PTH-CBD and PTH(7–33)-CBD in C57BL/6J mice. Animals were depilated to synchronize the hair follicles; treated on Day 7 with agonist, antagonist, or vehicle; treated on Day 9 with cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle; and sacrificed on Day 39. Normal mice (no chemo and no treatment) showed rapid regrowth of hair and normal histology. Chemo + Vehicle mice showed reduced hair regrowth and decreased pigmentation; histology revealed reduced number and dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Chemo + Antagonist mice were grossly and histologically indistinguishable from Chemo + Vehicle mice. Chemo + Agonist mice showed more rapid regrowth and repigmentation of hair; histologically, there was a normal number of hair follicles, most of which were in the anagen phase. Overall, the agonist PTH-CBD had prominent effects in reducing chemotherapy-induced damage of hair follicles and may show promise as a therapy for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:22130912

  15. Hormonal and metabolic effects of polyunsaturated fatty acid (omega-3) on polycystic ovary syndrome induced rats under diet

    PubMed Central

    Ouladsahebmadarek, Elaheh; Khaki, Arash; Khanahmadi, Sharareh; Ahmadi Ashtiani, Hamidreza; Paknejad, Pooya; Ayubi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome) produces symptoms in approximately 5% to 10% of women of reproductive age (12–45 years old). It is thought to be one of the leading causes of female subfertility. This study aimed to confirm the role of nutrition containing omega-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acid) on control of experimental PCO induced by estradiol-valerat in rats. Materials and Methods: Wistar female rats (n=40) were allocated into control (n=10) and test groups (n= 30), test group was subdivided into 3 groups: G1, received omega-3 (240 mg/kg/orally/daily); G2 and G3 groups were induced PCO by single injection of estradiol-valerate (16 mg/kg/IM). Group 3 received omega-3 (240 mg/kg/orally/daily) and low carbohydrate feeding for 60 subsequent days; on sixtieth day 5 ml blood samples and ovarian tissues of all rats in the group were removed and prepared for biochemical and hormonal analysis. Results: Catalase, GPX (Glutathione peroxidase), SOD (Superoxide dismutase) in groups that received omega-3 showed higher levels, but MDA (malondialdehyde) level was significantly decreased (P<0.05) in comparison with other experimental groups. Ovarian weights in both experimental and control groups were similar (P<0.05). Level of serum FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) was decreased, but level of testosterone was significantly increased (P<0.05) in PCO group in comparison with control and omega-3 groups. Conclusion: Results revealed that administration of omega-3 plus lower carbohydrate food significantly controlled   PCO syndrome and balanced FSH and testosterone. PMID:24711896

  16. Photochemical induced changes of in vitro estrogenic activity of steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Whidbey, Christopher M; Daumit, Kelly E; Nguyen, Thanh-Hoa; Ashworth, Danielle D; Davis, Jasmine C C; Latch, Douglas E

    2012-10-15

    Steroid estrogens are endocrine disrupting contaminants frequently detected in natural waters. Because these estrogens can elicit significant biological responses in aquatic organisms, it is important to study their rates and pathways of degradation in natural waters and to identify whether the transformation products retain biological activity. Photochemical kinetics experiments were conducted under simulated solar light for the hormones 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), estrone (E1), equilin (EQ), and equilenin (EQN) under direct and indirect photolysis conditions. All of these hormones were susceptible to direct photodegradation, with half-lives ranging from 40 min for E1 to about 8 h for E2 and EE2. Indirect photolysis experiments with added Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) lead to faster degradation rates for E2, EE2, and EQ. Added SRFA caused slower photodegradation rates for E1 and EQN, indicating that it acts primarily as an inner filter for these analytes. The well-established yeast estrogen screen (YES) was used to measure the estrogenicity of the analytes and their photoproducts. Results of YES assay experiments show that only the direct photolysis of E1 gave estrogenic products. Lumiestrone, the major E1 direct photolysis product, was isolated and characterized. It formed in 53% yield and exhibited moderate estrogenic activity. When photolysed in the presence of perinaphthenone, a potent synthetic sensitizer, E1 degraded via an indirect photolysis pathway and did not produce lumiestrone or any other active products. These results suggest that under typical natural water conditions photochemical reactions of E2, EE2, EQ, and EQN are expected to produce inactive products while E1 will give the estrogenic product lumiestrone in moderate yield. PMID:22877877

  17. Triphenylmethylphosphonium cation distribution as a measure of hormone-induced alterations in white adipocyte membrane potential

    SciTech Connect

    Vallano, M.L.; Sonenberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    Triphenylmethylphosphonium (TPMP+) partitions into the mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments in the rat white adipocyte in a potential-dependent fashion. The relationship between (/sup 3/H)TPMP+ distribution, intracellular cAMP generation and lipolysis in response to hormones and cAMP-mimetic compounds was examined. Half-maximal (/sup 3/H)TPMP+ efflux and glycerol release were produced by 15 and 9 nM adrenocorticotropin, 170 and 110 nM 1-epinephrine, 70 and 27 microM isobutylmethylxanthine and 800 and 750 microM dibutyryl cAMP, respectively. Hormone-stimulated cAMP generation was also correlated with (/sup 3/H)TPMP+ efflux and lipolysis in terms of concentration dependency. In kinetic experiments, glycerol release and (/sup 3/H)TPMP+ efflux in response to adrenocorticotropin or cholera toxin proceeded over a similar time course, whereas an earlier rise in cAMP generation was detected. The depolarizing effect of lipolytic compounds was localized to the mitochondrial compartment. When cells were incubated in elevated-(K+)0 buffer, the stimulatory effect of dibutyryl cAMP on (/sup 3/H)TPMP+ efflux and lipolysis persisted, suggesting that maintenance of the plasma membrane potential is not critical for demonstration of these responses. When the extracellular concentration of serum albumin, which provides binding sites for free fatty acids, was increased from 1 to 3%, an increase in glycerol release and a decrease in (/sup 3/H)TPMP+ efflux was observed. We suggest that intracellular free fatty acid accumulation in response to lipolytic agents causes dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and efflux of (/sup 3/H)TPMP+ from the organelle and cell.

  18. Reproductive hormones in the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low detections of reproductive hormones, at the part per trillion concentrations, are frequently measured in surface and subsurface waters. These exogenous hormones are a concern because they can bind strongly to hormone receptors in animals and induce an endocrine response or disruption. Human heal...

  19. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C.

    2012-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts pro-inflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5–2 µM) for 6 hr significantly increases CRHR-1 mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 µM) to LAD2 cells “primed” with SP for 48 hr and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hr later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 µM) for 6 hr induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared to controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 µM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, while CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  20. A controlled study of human chorionic gonadotrophin induced ovulation versus urinary luteinizing hormone surge for timing of intrauterine insemination.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A R; Bernadus, R E; Voorhorst, F J; Vermeiden, J P; Schoemaker, J

    1991-10-01

    Forty-eight patients in a programme of intrauterine insemination (IUI) were randomized in a cross-over study. All were stimulated with clomiphene citrate (CC) and inseminated either after follicular rupture induced by human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) or after a spontaneous urinary luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The HCG was administered when follicles of 18-22 mm in diameter were observed on ultrasound and IUI was performed 37-40 h thereafter. The monitoring of a urinary LH peak was carried out using a rapid urinary LH test. IUI took place approximately 22 h after detection of the LH surge. Overall, the pregnancy rates were 9.3% (4/43) after HCG induced ovulation and 20.5% (9/44) after spontaneous ovulation (P = 0.12). Analysis of mid-cycle events showed that following sonographic criteria, the HCG injection was performed significantly earlier in the cycle compared with the spontaneous LH surge. In addition, the mean diameter of the preovulatory follicles was significantly smaller and insemination was substantially earlier in the HCG induced cycles. These findings suggest that a beneficial effect arises from allowing the natural process of final follicular maturation to occur. PMID:1752926

  1. Melanin-concentrating hormone induces insulin resistance through a mechanism independent of body weight gain.

    PubMed

    Pereira-da-Silva, Márcio; De Souza, Cláudio T; Gasparetti, Alessandra L; Saad, Mário J A; Velloso, Lício A

    2005-07-01

    Transgenic hyperexpression of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) produces a phenotype of obesity and glucose intolerance. However, it is not known whether under this specific condition, glucose intolerance develops as a direct consequence of hyperexpressed MCH or is secondary to increased adiposity. Here, rats were treated i.c.v. with MCH or with an antisense oligonucleotide to MCH (MCH-ASO). MCH promoted an increase in blood glucose and a decrease in blood insulin levels during a glucose tolerance test. MCH also caused a decrease in the constant of glucose disappearance during an insulin tolerance test. All these effects of MCH were independent of body weight variation and were accompanied by reduced insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 engagement of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3-kinase) in white and brown adipose tissues, skeletal muscle and liver and by reduced Akt activation in skeletal muscle. MCH also led to a significant reduction in ERK activation in white adipose tissue. Finally, inhibition of hypothalamic MCH expression promoted a significant increase in ERK activation in brown adipose tissue. We conclude that hypothalamic MCH controls glucose homeostasis through mechanisms that are, at least in part, independent of adiposity. PMID:16002548

  2. High juvenile hormone titre and abdominal activation of JH signalling may induce reproduction of termite neotenics.

    PubMed

    Saiki, R; Gotoh, H; Toga, K; Miura, T; Maekawa, K

    2015-08-01

    Termite castes are a key example of polyphenism, in which reproductive division of labour is clearly seen in colonies. The reproductive castes in termites include primary and neotenic reproductives; primary reproductives found a new colony whereas neotenics succeed them in the reproductive role when the primary reproductives die or become senescent. Neotenics usually differentiate from nymphs or workers by developing functional gonads while retaining juvenile characteristics; however, the developmental mechanism during neotenic differentiation remains poorly understood. Juvenile hormone (JH) mediates a number of aspects of developmental regulation in caste differentiation in termites. In the present study we quantified JH titres in neotenic reproductives of Reticulitermes speratus, and compared these with other developmental stages. In addition, expression changes in JH signalling gene homologues (Methoprene-tolerant [Met], Krüppel-homolog1, Broad-Complex) in the head, thorax and abdomen were investigated during neotenic differentiation. Finally, we examined the function of Met in reproduction of neotenics by RNA interference (RNAi). Our results showed that the JH titres of neotenics were significantly higher than those of nymphs and workers. JH signalling genes were highly expressed in neotenic abdomens, compared with those in workers and nymphs. Met RNAi resulted in the inhibition of vitellogenin gene expression in newly moulted neotenics. These results suggest that the fertility of neotenics might be controlled by a large increase of JH titres and body-part-specific activation of JH signalling pathways. PMID:25847681

  3. Hormonal contraceptives suppress oxytocin-induced brain reward responses to the partner's face.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Dirk; Plota, Jessica; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Maier, Wolfgang; Hurlemann, René

    2016-05-01

    The hypothalamic peptide oxytocin (OXT) has been identified as a key modulator of pair-bonding in men, but its effects in women are still elusive. Moreover, there is substantial evidence that hormonal contraception (HC) influences partner preferences and sexual satisfaction, which constitute core domains of OXT function. We thus hypothesized that OXT effects on partner-related behavioral and neural responses could be significantly altered in women using HC. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study involving 40 pair-bonded women, 21 of whom were using HC, we investigated whether a 24-IU nasal dose of OXT would modulate brain reward responses evoked by the romantic partner's face relative to the faces of familiar and unfamiliar people. Treatment with OXT increased the perceived attractiveness of the partner relative to other men, which was paralleled by elevated responses in reward-associated regions, including the nucleus accumbens. These effects of OXT were absent in women using HC. Our results confirm and extend previous findings in men that OXT interacts with the brain reward system to reinforce partner value representations, indicating a common OXT-dependent mechanism underlying partner attraction in both sexes. This mechanism may be disturbed in women using HC, suggesting that gonadal steroids could alter partner-specific OXT effects. PMID:26722017

  4. Distribution and responsiveness of rat anti-Muellerian hormone during ovarian development and VCD-induced ovotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Mark-Kappeler, Connie J.; Sen, Nivedita; Keating, Aileen F.; Sipes, I. Glenn; Hoyer, Patricia B.

    2010-11-15

    Anti-Muellerian hormone (AMH) is produced by granulosa cells in primary to small antral follicles of the adult ovary and helps maintain primordial follicles in a dormant state. The industrial chemical, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) causes specific ovotoxicity in primordial and small primary follicles of mice and rats. Previous studies suggest that this ovotoxicity involves acceleration of primordial to primary follicle recruitment via interactions with the Kit/Kit ligand signaling pathway. Because of its accepted role in inhibiting primordial follicle recruitment, the present study was designed to investigate a possible interaction between AMH and VCD-induced ovotoxicity. Protein distribution of AMH was compared in neonatal and adult F344 rat ovaries. AMH protein was visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy in large primary and secondary follicles of the adult ovary, but in small primary follicles in neonatal rat ovaries. In cultured postnatal day (PND) 4 F344 rat ovaries, VCD exposure (30 {mu}M, 2-8 days) decreased (P < 0.05) AMH mRNA (d4-8) and protein (d6-8). Recombinant AMH (100-400 mg/ml) in PND4 ovaries cultured 8 days {+-} VCD (30 {mu}M) caused an increase (P < 0.05) in primordial, and a decrease (P < 0.05) in small primary follicles, supporting that AMH retarded primordial follicle recruitment. However, no concentration of AMH had an effect on VCD-induced ovotoxicity. Whereas, VCD caused a reduction in expression of AMH (d4-d8), it followed previously reported initial disruptions in Kit signaling induced by VCD (d2). Thus, collectively, these results do not support a mechanism whereby VCD causes ovotoxicity via generalized activation of primordial follicle recruitment, but instead provide further support for the specificity of other intracellular mechanisms involved in VCD-induced ovotoxicity.

  5. Histamine released from epidermal keratinocytes plays a role in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-induced itching in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kyoko; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2015-11-01

    Sunburn, wound repair, and chronic renal failure with hemodialysis are usually accompanied by both pigmentation and itching. Proopiomelanocortin-derived α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is produced in response to external stimuli, such as UV irradiation, and is involved in cutaneous pigmentation. However, it is unclear whether α-MSH is also involved in the itching. We therefore investigated whether α-MSH elicited itch-related responses in mice. We found that an intradermal injection of α-MSH induced hind-paw scratching, an itch-related response, in mice. The α-MSH-induced scratching was inhibited by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. In mast cell-deficient mice, α-MSH also elicited scratching, which was inhibited by terfenadine. The immunoreactivity for l-histidine decarboxylase, a key enzyme required for the production of histamine, histamine, and the melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors were shown in not only mast cells but also keratinocytes in murine skin. In addition to the expression of l-histidine decarboxylase and melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors, the mouse keratinocyte cell lines (Pam212) also showed immunoreactivity for l-histidine decarboxylase, histamine, and melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors. The application of α-MSH induced the release of histamine from Pam212 cells. These findings indicate that α-MSH may play an important role in the itching associated with pigmented cutaneous lesions and that the histamine released from keratinocytes is involved in this α-MSH-induced itching. PMID:26358220

  6. Distribution and responsiveness of rat anti-Müllerian hormone during ovarian development and VCD-induced ovotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mark-Kappeler, Connie J; Sen, Nivedita; Keating, Aileen F; Sipes, I Glenn; Hoyer, Patricia B

    2010-11-15

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is produced by granulosa cells in primary to small antral follicles of the adult ovary and helps maintain primordial follicles in a dormant state. The industrial chemical, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) causes specific ovotoxicity in primordial and small primary follicles of mice and rats. Previous studies suggest that this ovotoxicity involves acceleration of primordial to primary follicle recruitment via interactions with the Kit/Kit ligand signaling pathway. Because of its accepted role in inhibiting primordial follicle recruitment, the present study was designed to investigate a possible interaction between AMH and VCD-induced ovotoxicity. Protein distribution of AMH was compared in neonatal and adult F344 rat ovaries. AMH protein was visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy in large primary and secondary follicles of the adult ovary, but in small primary follicles in neonatal rat ovaries. In cultured postnatal day (PND) 4 F344 rat ovaries, VCD exposure (30 μM, 2-8 days) decreased (P<0.05) AMH mRNA (d4-8) and protein (d6-8). Recombinant AMH (100-400 mg/ml) in PND4 ovaries cultured 8 days±VCD (30 μM) caused an increase (P<0.05) in primordial, and a decrease (P<0.05) in small primary follicles, supporting that AMH retarded primordial follicle recruitment. However, no concentration of AMH had an effect on VCD-induced ovotoxicity. Whereas, VCD caused a reduction in expression of AMH (d4-d8), it followed previously reported initial disruptions in Kit signaling induced by VCD (d2). Thus, collectively, these results do not support a mechanism whereby VCD causes ovotoxicity via generalized activation of primordial follicle recruitment, but instead provide further support for the specificity of other intracellular mechanisms involved in VCD-induced ovotoxicity. PMID:20816688

  7. Atypical behavior in the electron capture induced dissociation of biologically relevant transition metal ion complexes of the peptide hormone oxytocin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J.; Mihalca, Romulus; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2006-07-01

    Doubly protonated ions of the disulfide bond containing nonapeptide hormone oxytocin and oxytocin complexes with different transition metal ions, that have biological relevance under physiological conditions, were subjected to electron capture dissociation (ECD) to probe their structural features in the gas phase. Although, all the ECD spectra were strikingly different, typical ECD behavior was observed for complexes of the nonapeptide hormone oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, i.e., abundant c/z' and a'/y backbone cleavages and ECD characteristic S-S and S-C bond cleavages were observed. We propose that, although in the oxytocin-transition metal ion complexes the metal ions serve as the main initial capture site, the captured electron is transferred to other sites in the complex to form a hydrogen radical, which drives the subsequent typical ECD fragmentations. The complex of oxytocin with Cu2+ displayed noticeably different ECD behavior. The fragment ions were similar to fragment ions typically observed with low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID). We propose that the electrons captured by the oxytocin-Cu2+ complex might be favorably involved in reducing the Cu2+ metal ion to Cu+. Subsequent energy redistribution would explain the observed low-energy CID-type fragmentations. Electron capture resulted also in quite different specific cleavage sites for the complexes of oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. This is an indication for structural differences in these complexes possibly linked to their significantly different biological effects on oxytocin-receptor binding, and suggests that ECD may be used to study subtle structural differences in transition metal ion-peptide complexes.

  8. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Patrick R; Brannick, Katherine E; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A

    2015-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1-100 μg/ml) for 24-96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24-96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. PMID:25701202

  9. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1-100μg/ml) for 24-96 hr to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24-96 hr of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydorxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. PMID:25701202

  10. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)-induced alterations in vitamin A and thyroid hormone concentrations in the rat during lactation and early postnatal development

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis-Hutchings, Robert G.; Cherr, Gary N.; Hanna, Lynn A.; Keen, Carl L. . E-mail: clkeen@ucdavis.edu

    2006-09-01

    In experimental animals fed standard laboratory diets, penta-BDE mixtures can decrease circulating thyroid hormone and liver vitamin A concentrations. A substantial number of pregnant women and their children have marginal vitamin A status, potentially increasing their risk of adverse effects to penta-BDE exposure. The current study investigated the effects of maternal gestational and lactational penta-BDE exposure on thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis in rats of sufficient vitamin A (VAS) or marginal vitamin A (VAM) status and their offspring. Dams were administered daily oral doses of 18 mg/kg DE-71 (a penta-BDE mixture) or a corn oil vehicle from gestation day 6 through lactation day (LD) 18. Thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis were assessed in plasma and tissues of LD 19 dams and postnatal day (PND) 12, 18, and 31 pups. DE-71 exposure induced hepatomegaly in VAS and VAM pups at all timepoints and increased testes weights at PND 31. While liver vitamin A concentrations were low in DE-71 treated dams and pups, plasma retinol concentrations and plasma retinol binding protein levels were only low in VAM animals exposed to DE-71. DE-71 exposure lowered plasma thyroxine concentrations in VAS and VAM dams and pups. Plasma thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations were high in VAM dams exposed to DE-71, suggesting that marginal vitamin A status enhances the susceptibility to thyroid hormone axis disruption by DE-71. These results support the concept that marginal vitamin A status in pregnant women may increase the risk for PBDE-induced disruptions in vitamin A and thyroid hormone homeostasis.

  11. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) enhance tumour growth inhibition induced by androgen deprivation in human MDA-Pca-2b prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Letsch, M; Schally, A V; Stangelberger, A; Groot, K; Varga, J L

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) antagonist JV-1-38 could enhance the effects of androgen deprivation produced by the anti-androgen Flutamide and luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist Decapeptyl in an experimental model of human androgen-sensitive MDA PCa 2b prostate carcinoma implanted subcutaneously (s.c.) into nude mice. We also evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) the effects of combined treatment on the mRNA expression for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and measured serum PSA levels. In experiment 1, GH-RH antagonist JV-1-38 greatly inhibited tumour growth in combination with Decapeptyl, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, combined therapy with JV-1-38 at 20 microg/day and Decapeptyl microcapsules releasing 12.5 microg/day for 29 days inhibited significantly (P<0.01) MDA PCa 2b tumour growth by 65%, compared with controls. Combined treatment also significantly (P<0.05) decreased serum PSA levels by 52% and reduced tumour weight by 54% vs. controls. In experiment 2, GH-RH antagonist JV-1-38 at 20 microg/day likewise showed powerful growth inhibitory effects when combined with Flutamide (25 mg/kg/day) for 21 days. Combined treatment with JV-1-38 and slow-release pellets of Flutamide significantly (P<0.001) inhibited tumour growth by 61% versus controls, and was significantly (P<0.05) more effective than Flutamide or JV-1-38 alone. Combination therapy also reduced significantly (P<0.001) tumour weight and serum PSA levels by 59 and 47%, respectively. The mRNA expression for PSA in MDA PCa 2b tumours was not changed by JV-1-38, Decapeptyl and Flutamide alone or in their respective combinations. Our findings suggest that GH-RH antagonists could enhance the tumour inhibitory effects of androgen deprivation for the primary therapy of patients with advanced prostate carcinoma. PMID:14746863

  12. Antagonism of corticotropin-releasing hormone alters serotonergic-induced changes in brain temperature, but not sleep, of rats.

    PubMed

    Imeri, Luca; Bianchi, Susanna; Opp, Mark R

    2005-10-01

    Serotonin is involved in many physiological processes, including the regulation of sleep and body temperature. Administration into rats of low doses (25, 50 mg/kg) of the 5-HT precursor l-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) at the beginning of the dark period of the 12:12-h light-dark cycle initially increases wakefulness. Higher doses (75, 100 mg/kg) increase nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. The initial enhancement of wakefulness after low-dose 5-HTP administration may be a direct action of 5-HT in brain or due to 5-HT-induced activation of other arousal-promoting systems. One candidate arousal-promoting system is corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Serotonergic activation by 5-HTP at the beginning of the dark period also induces hypothermia. Because sleep and body temperature are influenced by circadian factors, one aim of this study was to determine responses to 5-HTP when administered at a different circadian time, the beginning of the light period. Results obtained show that all doses of 5-HTP (25-100 mg/kg) administered at light onset initially increase wakefulness; NREM sleep increases only after a long delay, during the subsequent dark period. Serotonergic activation by 5-HTP at light onset induces hypothermia, the time course of which is biphasic after higher doses (75, 100 mg/kg). Intracerebroventricular pretreatment with the CRH receptor antagonist alpha-helical CRH does not alter the impact of 5-HTP on sleep-wake behavior but potentiates the hypothermic response to 50 mg/kg 5-HTP. These data suggest that serotonergic activation by peripheral administration of 5-HTP may modulate sleep-wake behavior by mechanisms in addition to direct actions in brain and that circadian systems are important determinants of the impact of serotonergic activation on sleep and body temperature. PMID:15994374

  13. Effect of thyroid hormone concentration on the transcriptional response underlying induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma)

    PubMed Central

    Page, Robert B; Voss, Stephen R; Samuels, Amy K; Smith, Jeramiah J; Putta, Srikrishna; Beachy, Christopher K

    2008-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones (TH) induce gene expression programs that orchestrate amphibian metamorphosis. In contrast to anurans, many salamanders do not undergo metamorphosis in nature. However, they can be induced to undergo metamorphosis via exposure to thyroxine (T4). We induced metamorphosis in juvenile Mexican axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) using 5 and 50 nM T4, collected epidermal tissue from the head at four time points (Days 0, 2, 12, 28), and used microarray analysis to quantify mRNA abundances. Results Individuals reared in the higher T4 concentration initiated morphological and transcriptional changes earlier and completed metamorphosis by Day 28. In contrast, initiation of metamorphosis was delayed in the lower T4 concentration and none of the individuals completed metamorphosis by Day 28. We identified 402 genes that were statistically differentially expressed by ≥ two-fold between T4 treatments at one or more non-Day 0 sampling times. To complement this analysis, we used linear and quadratic regression to identify 542 and 709 genes that were differentially expressed by ≥ two-fold in the 5 and 50 nM T4 treatments, respectively. Conclusion We found that T4 concentration affected the timing of gene expression and the shape of temporal gene expression profiles. However, essentially all of the identified genes were similarly affected by 5 and 50 nM T4. We discuss genes and biological processes that appear to be common to salamander and anuran metamorphosis, and also highlight clear transcriptional differences. Our results show that gene expression in axolotls is diverse and precise, and that axolotls provide new insights about amphibian metamorphosis. PMID:18267027

  14. Effects of maturation-inducing hormone on heterologous gap junctional coupling in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yoshizaki, G.; Patino, R.; Thomas, P.; Bolamba, D.; Chang, Xiaotian

    2001-01-01

    A previous ultrastructural study of heterologous (granulosa cell-oocyte) gap junction (GJ) contacts in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker suggested that these contacts disappear late during the process of resumption of oocyte meiosis. This observation suggested that, unlike scenarios proposed for a number of other species, uncoupling of GJ is not necessary for the onset of meiotic resumption in croaker follicles. However, the functionality of heterologous GJ contacts and the temporal association between maturation-inducing hormone (MIH)-induced changes in heterologous coupling and resumption of oocyte meiosis have not been examined in Atlantic croaker. These questions were addressed with a cell-cell coupling assay that is based on the transfer of a GJ marker, Lucifer Yellow, from oocytes to granulosa cells. Follicle-enclosed oocytes injected with Lucifer Yellow allowed transfer of the dye into the follicle cell layer, thus confirming that there is functional heterologous coupling between the oocyte and the granulosa cells. Dye transfer was observed in vitellogenic, full-grown/maturation-incompetent, and full-grown /maturation-competent follicles. Treatment of maturation-competent follicles with MIH caused a time-dependent decline in the number of follicles transferring dye. However, although GJ uncoupling in some of the follicles was observed before germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD, index of meiotic resumption), about 50% of the follicles maintained the ability to transfer dye even after GVBD had occurred. Further, a known GJ inhibitor (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) blocked heterologous GJ within a time frame similar to that seen with MIH but without inducing any of the morphological changes (including GVBD) associated with follicular maturation. In conclusion, uncoupling of heterologous GJ seems insufficient and unnecessary for the onset of meiotic resumption in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science.

  15. Profiling follicle stimulating hormone-induced gene expression changes in normal and malignant human ovarian surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shuk-Mei; Lau, Kin-Mang; Mok, Samuel Chi-Ho; Syed, Viqar

    2003-07-01

    Epidemiological data have implicated the pituitary gonadotropin follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) as both a risk factor for and a protective agent against epithelial ovarian cancer. Yet, little is known about how this hormone could play such opposing roles in ovarian carcinogenesis. Complementary DNA microarrays containing 2400 named genes were used to examine FSH-induced gene expression changes in ovarian cancer (OC) and immortalized normal human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cell lines. Two-way t-statistics analyses of array data identified two distinct sets of FSH-regulated genes in HOSE and in established OC cell lines established from patients (OVCA cell lines). Among the HOSE cell lines, FSH increased expression of 57% of the 312 genes and downregulated 43%. In contrast, FSH diminished expression of 92% of the 177 genes in the OVCA cell lines. All but 18 of the genes affected by FSH in HOSE cell lines were different from those altered in OVCA cell lines. Among the 18 overlapping genes, nine genes exhibited the same direction of change following FSH challenge, while the other nine showed discordance in response between HOSE and OVCA cell lines. The FSH-induced differential expression of seven out of nine genes was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Gene-specific antisense oligonuleotides (ODNs) were used to inhibit the expression of genes encoding GTPase activating protein (rap1GAP), neogenin, and restin in HOSE and OVCA cells. Antisense ODNs to neogenin and restin, but not an antisense ODN to rap1GAP, were effective in inhibiting OVCA cell growth, diminishing proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression, and increasing caspase 3 activities. Furthermore, the ODN to rap1GAP was further shown to be ineffective in altering migration properties of OVCA cell lines. HOSE cell proliferation was not affected by treatment with any of the antisense ODNs. In summary, gene profiling data reveal for the first time that FSH may exert different biological actions on OVCA

  16. Natural Variation in Stress Hormones, Comparisons Across Matrices, and Impacts Resulting from Induced Stress in the Bottlenose Dolphin.

    PubMed

    Houser, Dorian S; Champagne, Cory D; Crocker, Daniel E; Kellar, Nicholas M; Cockrem, John; Romano, Tracy; Booth, Rebecca K; Wasser, Samuel K

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge regarding stress hormones and how they vary in response to seasonality, gender, age, and reproductive status for any marine mammal is limited. Furthermore, stress hormones may be measured in more than one matrix (e.g., feces, blood, blubber), but the relationships between levels of a given hormone across these matrices are unknown, further complicating the interpretations of hormones measured in samples collected from wild animals. A study is underway to address these issues in a population of bottlenose dolphins trained for voluntary participation in sample collections from different matrices and across season and time of day. PMID:26610993

  17. Exogenous leptin administered intramuscularly induces sex hormone disorder and Ca loss via downregulation of Gnrh and PI3K expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lihong; Liu, Wen; Bayaer, Nashun; Gu, Weiwang; Song, Jieli

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem that increases the risk of metabolic disease, infertility, and other chronic health problems. The present study aimed to develop a new rat model for sex hormone disorder with overweight and Ca loss by intramuscular injection of exogenous leptin (LEP). Thirty female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (40 days old) were injected thrice intramuscularly with LEP or keyhole limpet hemocyanin immunogen. The following analyses were performed to determine the development of appetite, overweight, reproductive related-hormones, and calcium (Ca)/phosphorus (Pi) in SD rats: measurement of Lee's index, body weight, food intake; serum Ca, Pi, and hormone tests by enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis; histological analysis of abdominal fat; real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of neuropeptide Y, pro-opiomelanocortin, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) mRNA, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) mRNA expression; and western blotting analysis of enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). Rats injected with LEP immunogen displayed significantly increased body weight, food intake, Lee's index, serum LEP, serum cortisol, fat deposition in the abdomen, and decreased hormones including follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, cholecystokinin, and Ca. Exogenous LEP administered intramuscularly also downregulate Gnrh and PI3K. In conclusion, exogenous LEP administered intramuscularly is a novel animal model for sex hormones disorder with overweight and Ca loss in SD rats. The downregulation of PI3K and Gnrh may be involved in the development of this animal model. PMID:25048263

  18. Exogenous Leptin Administered Intramuscularly Induces Sex Hormone Disorder and Ca Loss via Downregulation of Gnrh and PI3K Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lihong; Liu, Wen; Bayaer, Nashun; Gu, Weiwang; Song, Jieli

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem that increases the risk of metabolic disease, infertility, and other chronic health problems. The present study aimed to develop a new rat model for sex hormone disorder with overweight and Ca loss by intramuscular injection of exogenous leptin (LEP). Thirty female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (40 days old) were injected thrice intramuscularly with LEP or keyhole limpet hemocyanin immunogen. The following analyses were performed to determine the development of appetite, overweight, reproductive related-hormones, and calcium (Ca)/phosphorus (Pi) in SD rats: measurement of Lee’s index, body weight, food intake; serum Ca, Pi, and hormone tests by enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis; histological analysis of abdominal fat; real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of neuropeptide Y, pro-opiomelanocortin, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) mRNA, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) mRNA expression; and western blotting analysis of enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). Rats injected with LEP immunogen displayed significantly increased body weight, food intake, Lee’s index, serum LEP, serum cortisol, fat deposition in the abdomen, and decreased hormones including follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, cholecystokinin, and Ca. Exogenous LEP administered intramuscularly also downregulate Gnrh and PI3K. In conclusion, exogenous LEP administered intramuscularly is a novel animal model for sex hormones disorder with overweight and Ca loss in SD rats. The downregulation of PI3K and Gnrh may be involved in the development of this animal model. PMID:25048263

  19. Honey and metformin ameliorated diabetes-induced damages in testes of rat; correlation with hormonal changes

    PubMed Central

    Nasrolahi, Ozra; Khaneshi, Fereshteh; Rahmani, Fatemeh; Razi, Mazdak

    2013-01-01

    Background: The global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is on rise. Diabetes-induced oxidative stress has been known to affect liver, pancreas, kidney and reproductive organs pathologically. Honey is a natural product of bee with antioxidant properties. Objective: Current study aimed to analyze the protective effects of Metformin (MF) alone and MF+ natural honey co-administration on diabetes-induced histological derangements in testis of rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty six, mature male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups including; control, honey-dosed non-diabetic, diabetes-induced (65 mg/kg, single dose), honey-administrated diabetic (1.0 g/kg/day), Metformin-received diabetic (100 mg/kg/day), Metformin and honey-co-treated diabetic which were followed 40 days. The animals were anesthetized by diethyl ether and the blood samples were collected. The serum levels of testosterone, Insulin, LH and FSH analyzed using antibody enzyme immunoassay method. The testicular tissues were dissected out and underwent to histological analyses. Results: The biochemical analyses revealed that the diabetes resulted in significantly reduced testosterone (p<0.01), LH and FSH (P<0.01, 0.001) levels in serum. Light microscopic analyses showed remarkable (p<0.01) reduction in seminiferous tubules diameter (STD), spermiogenesis index (SPI) and thickness of the epithelium in the diabetic group versus control and co-treated groups. Simultaneous administration of the honey with MF could fairly up-regulate testosterone, LH and FSH levels. The animals in metformin and honey-treated group exhibited with improved tubules atrophy, elevated spermiogenesis index and germinal epithelium thickness. Conclusion: Our data indicated that co-administration of Metformin and honey could inhibit the diabetes-induced damages in testicular tissue. Moreover, the simultaneous administration of metformin and honey up-regulated the diabetes-reduced insulin, LH, FSH and testosterone levels. This

  20. Hormonal and behavioural abnormalities induced by stress in utero: an animal model for depression.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Darnaudery, M; Van Reeth, O

    2001-09-01

    Prenatal stress in rats can exert profound influence on the off spring's development, inducing abnormalities such as increased "anxiety", "emotionality" or "depression-like" behaviours.Prenatal stress has long-term effects on the development of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal(HPA) axis and forebrain cholinergic systems. These long-term neuroendocrinological effects are mediated, at least in part, by stress-induced maternal corticosterone increase during pregnancy and stress-induced maternal anxiety during the postnatal period. We have shown a significant phase advance in the circadian rhythms of corticosterone secretion and locomotor activity in prenatally-stressed (PNS) rats. When subjected to an abrupt shift in the light-dark(LD) cycle, PNS rats resynchronized their activity rhythm more slowly than control rats. In view of the data suggesting abnormalities in the circadian timing system in these animals, we have investigated the effects of prenatal stress on the sleep-wake cycle in adult male rats. PNS rats exhibited various changes in sleep-wake parameters, including a dramatic increase in the amount of paradoxical sleep. Taken together, our results indicate that prenatal stress can induce increased responses to stress and abnormal circadian rhythms and sleep in adult rats.Various clinical observations in humans suggest a possible pathophysiological link between depression and disturbances in circadian rhythmicity. Circadian abnormalities in depression can be related to those found in PNS rats. Interestingly, we have recently shown that the increased immobility in the forced swimming test observed in PNS rats can be corrected by chronic treatment with the antidepressant tianeptine, or with melatonin or S23478, a melatonin agonist. Those results reinforce the idea of the usefulness of PNS rats as an appropriate animal model to study human depression and support a new antidepressant-like effect of melatonin and the melatonin agonist S23478. PMID:22432138

  1. Follicular characteristics and luteal development after follicle-stimulating hormone induced multiple ovulations in heifers.

    PubMed

    Glick, G; Hogeg, M; Moallem, U; Lavon, Y; Wolfenson, D

    2013-01-01

    A protocol based on small doses of FSH was examined for the induction of double or triple (multiple) ovulations in cattle. Ovulation rate, follicular characteristics, and luteal responses were determined. In Exp. 1, three groups of estrous-synchronized, cyclic Holstein heifers were treated once daily, on d 3 to 6 of the cycle, with a FSH product (Folltropin-V): large FSH dose (total of 150 mg; n=18), medium FSH dose (total of 130 mg, n=12), and small FSH dose (total of 80 mg; n=7). Controls received saline (n=6). Prostaglandin F(2α) was injected on d 6, ultrasound-guided aspiration of surplus follicles (if needed) was performed on d 7, and GnRH was injected on d 8 to induce ovulation. The large FSH dose induced growth of more (2.6±0.3, P<0.05) large follicles than controls on d 8; medium and small FSH doses insufficiently stimulated growth of <2 large follicles. Ovulation rates were determined in subgroups of heifers (n=10, 13, 4, and 6, respectively). The large FSH dose induced greater rates (P<0.01) of mostly double and triple ovulations (90% multiple ovulations, 70% double ovulations), most of which (89%) were bilateral, with only 2 out of 10 heifers requiring aspiration of surplus follicles. Medium and small FSH doses induced fewer multiple ovulations (38% and 25%, respectively). Estradiol concentrations on d 8 did not differ among treatments, but the concentration per large follicle in controls was greater (P<0.05) than in FSH treatments. Mean corpus luteum (CL) volume in single-ovulation controls was greater (P<0.05) than that of multiple ovulations in the large FSH group and total CL volume and progesterone concentrations were numerically greater in multiple ovulations. In Exp. 2, the characteristics of follicles aspirated on d 7 from large FSH (n=11) and control heifers (n=10) were compared. Based on estradiol-to-progesterone ratio, 57% of the large FSH-treated follicles were classified as codominant/healthy follicles and 43% as subordinate/early atretic

  2. Regulation of hormone-induced Ca sup 2+ mobilization in the human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, M.F.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1990-03-01

    {alpha}-Thrombin, {gamma}-thrombin, and platelet-activating factor each stimulated the mobilization of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores in aspirin-treated human platelets. This was followed by desensitization of the receptors, as shown by the return of the Ca{sup 2+} level to basal values and by the fact that a subsequent addition of a second different agonist, but not the same agonist, could again elicit a response. Epinephrine, acting on {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors, was by itself ineffective at mobilizing Ca{sup 2+} stores. However, when added after the thrombin-induced response, epinephrine could evoke a considerable release of Ca{sup 2+} from cellular stores. This appeared to be due to epinephrine recoupling thrombin receptors to phospholipase C. In support of this, epinephrine was able to induce the formation of inositol triphosphate when added after the response to thrombin had also become desensitized. Alone, epinephrine was without effect. Pre-activation of protein kinase C with the phorbol ester abolished these effects of epinephrine, suggesting that epinephrine was working by activating a protein which could be inactivated by phosphorylation. The current work is to characterize this protein that may be a member of the G{sub i}, GTP-binding protein family.

  3. Induced Disruption of the Iron-Regulatory Hormone Hepcidin Inhibits Acute Inflammatory Hypoferraemia.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Andrew E; Lim, Pei Jin; Frost, Joe N; Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Soilleux, Elizabeth J; Evans, Emma; Morovat, Alireza; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Davies, Benjamin; Gileadi, Uzi; Robbins, Peter A; Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Drakesmith, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Withdrawal of iron from serum (hypoferraemia) is a conserved innate immune antimicrobial strategy that can withhold this critical nutrient from invading pathogens, impairing their growth. Hepcidin (Hamp1) is the master regulator of iron and its expression is induced by inflammation. Mice lacking Hamp1 from birth rapidly accumulate iron and are susceptible to infection by blood-dwelling siderophilic bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus. In order to study the innate immune role of hepcidin against a background of normal iron status, we developed a transgenic mouse model of tamoxifen-sensitive conditional Hamp1 deletion (termed iHamp1-KO mice). These mice attain adulthood with an iron status indistinguishable from littermate controls. Hamp1 disruption and the consequent decline of serum hepcidin concentrations occurred within hours of a single tamoxifen dose. We found that the TLR ligands LPS and Pam3CSK4 and heat-killed Brucella abortus caused an equivalent induction of inflammation in control and iHamp1-KO mice. Pam3CSK4 and B. abortus only caused a drop in serum iron in control mice, while hypoferraemia due to LPS was evident but substantially blunted in iHamp1-KO mice. Our results characterise a powerful new model of rapidly inducible hepcidin disruption, and demonstrate the critical contribution of hepcidin to the hypoferraemia of inflammation. PMID:27423740

  4. Growth Hormone Promotes Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banziger-Tobler, Nadja Erika; Halin, Cornelia; Kajiya, Kentaro; Detmar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined using comparative transcriptional profiling studies of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, growth hormone receptor was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. Growth hormone induced in vitro proliferation, sprouting, tube formation, and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells, and the mitogenic effect was independent of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 or -3 activation. Growth hormone also inhibited serum starvation-induced lymphatic endothelial cell apoptosis. No major alterations of lymphatic vessels were detected in the normal skin of bovine growth hormone-transgenic mice. However, transgenic delivery of growth hormone accelerated lymphatic vessel ingrowth into the granulation tissue of full-thickness skin wounds, and intradermal delivery of growth hormone resulted in enlargement and enhanced proliferation of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in wild-type mice. These results identify growth hormone as a novel lymphangiogenic factor. PMID:18583315

  5. High Sensitivity of Aged Mice to Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Anorexia Corresponds to Elevated Proinflammatory Cytokine and Satiety Hormone Responses

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erica S.; Flannery, Brenna M.; Gardner, Elizabeth M.; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal grains, is a public health concern because of its adverse effects on the gastrointestinal and immune systems. The objective of this study was to compare effects of DON on anorectic responses in aged (22 mos) and adult (3 mos) mice. Aged mice showed increased feed refusal with both acute i.p. (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and dietary (1, 2.5, 10 ppm) DON exposure in comparison to adult mice. In addition to greater suppression of food intake from dietary DON exposure, aged mice also exhibited greater but transient body weight suppression. When aged mice were acutely exposed to 1 mg/kg bw DON i.p., aged mice displayed elevated DON and DON3GlcA tissue levels and delayed clearance in comparison with adult mice. Acute DON exposure also elicited higher proinflammatory cytokine and satiety hormone responses in the plasma of the aged group compared with the adult group. Increased susceptibility to DON-induced anorexia in aged mice relative to adult mice suggests that advanced life stage could be a critical component in accurate human risk assessments for DON and other trichothecenes. PMID:26492270

  6. Is anti-mullerian hormone a marker of acute cyclophosphamide-induced ovarian follicular destruction in mice pretreated with cetrorelix?

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Hyacinth N.; Moon, Kimberly S.; Mumford, Sunni L.; Schisterman, Enrique F.; DeCherney, Alan H.; Segars, James H.; Armstrong, Alicia Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To define whether anti-mullerian hormone may be a marker of acute cyclophosphamide-induced germ cell destruction in mice pretreated with the GnRH antagonist, cetrorelix. Design Controlled, experimental study. Setting Research laboratory in a federal research facility. Animals Balb/c female mice (6 weeks old). Interventions Mice were treated with GnRH antagonist (cetrorelix) or saline for 15 days followed by 75 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide or saline control on day 9. Main Outcome Measure(s) Number of primordial follicles (PMF), DNA damage, AMH protein expression, and AMH serum levels. Results Ovaries in mice pre-treated with cetrorelix had significantly more PMF and reduced DNA damage compared to those exposed to cyclophosphamide alone. Immunohistochemical staining for AMH expression and serum AMH levels did not differ significantly between treatment groups. Conclusions Cetrorelix protected primordial follicles and reduced DNA damage in follicles of mice treated with cyclophosphamide, but AMH levels in tissue and serum did not correlate with germ cell destruction. Further research is needed to determine the mechanism responsible for the protective effects on PMF counts observed with cetrorelix. PMID:21550044

  7. Oleic acid induces specific alterations in the morphology, gene expression and steroid hormone production of cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Yenuganti, Vengala Rao; Viergutz, Torsten; Vanselow, Jens

    2016-06-01

    After parturition, one of the major problems related to nutritional management that is faced by the majority of dairy cows is negative energy balance (NEB). During NEB, excessive lipid mobilization takes place and hence the levels of free fatty acids, among them oleic acid, increase in the blood, but also in the follicular fluid. This accumulation can be associated with serious metabolic and reproductive disorders. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of physiological concentrations of oleic acid on cell morphology, apoptosis, necrosis, proliferation and steroid production, and on the abundance of selected transcripts in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Increasing oleic acid concentrations induced intracellular lipid droplet accumulation, thus resulting in a foam cell-like morphology, but had no effects on apoptosis, necrosis or proliferation. Oleic acid also significantly reduced the transcript abundance of the gonadotropin hormone receptors, FSHR and LHCGR, steroidogenic genes STAR, CYP11A1, HSD3B1 and CYP19A1, the cell cycle regulator CCND2, but not of the proliferation marker PCNA. In addition, treatment increased the transcript levels of the fatty acid transporters CD36 and SLC27A1, and decreased the production of 17-beta-estradiol and progesterone. From these data it can be concluded that oleic acid specifically affects morphological and physiological features and gene expression levels thus altering the functionality of granulosa cells. Suggestively, these effects might be partly due to the reduced expression of FSHR and thus the reduced responsiveness to FSH stimulation. PMID:27118706

  8. MODEST THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY DURING DEVELOPMENT INDUCES A CELLULAR MALFORMATION IN THE CORPUS CALLOSUM: A MODEL OF CORTICAL DYSPLASIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing body of evidence that subtle decreases in maternal thyroid hormone during gestation can impact fetal brain development. The present study examined the impact of graded levels of thyroid hormone insufficiency on brain development in rodents. Maternal thyroid ho...

  9. Parathyroid hormone attenuates radiation-induced increases in collagen crosslink ratio at periosteal surfaces of mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Oest, Megan E; Gong, Bo; Esmonde-White, Karen; Mann, Kenneth A; Zimmerman, Nicholas D; Damron, Timothy A; Morris, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    As part of our ongoing efforts to understand underlying mechanisms contributing to radiation-associated bone fragility and to identify possible treatments, we evaluated the longitudinal effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment on bone quality in a murine model of limited field irradiation. We hypothesized PTH would mitigate radiation-induced changes in the chemical composition and structure of bone, as measured by microscope-based Raman spectroscopy. We further hypothesized that collagen crosslinking would be especially responsive to PTH treatment. Raman spectroscopy was performed on retrieved tibiae (6-7/group/time point) to quantify metrics associated with bone quality, including: mineral-to-matrix ratio, carbonate-to-phosphate ratio, mineral crystallinity, collagen crosslink (trivalent:divalent) ratio, and the mineral and matrix depolarization ratios. Irradiation disrupted the molecular structure and orientation of bone collagen, as evidenced by a higher collagen crosslink ratio and lower matrix depolarization ratio (vs. non-irradiated control bones), persisting until 12weeks post-irradiation. Radiation transiently affected the mineral phase, as evidenced by increased mineral crystallinity and mineral-to-matrix ratio at 4weeks compared to controls. Radiation decreased bone mineral depolarization ratios through 12weeks, indicating increased mineral alignment. PTH treatment partially attenuated radiation-induced increases in collagen crosslink ratio, but did not restore collagen or mineral alignment. These post-radiation matrix changes are consistent with our previous studies of radiation damage to bone, and suggest that the initial radiation damage to bone matrix has extensive effects on the quality of tissue deposited thereafter. In addition to maintaining bone quality, preventing initial radiation damage to the bone matrix (i.e. crosslink ratio, matrix orientation) may be critical to preventing late-onset fragility fractures. PMID:26960578

  10. Luteinizing Hormone-Induced RUNX1 Regulates the Expression of Genes in Granulosa Cells of Rat Periovulatory Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Misung; Curry, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    The LH surge induces specific transcription factors that regulate the expression of a myriad of genes in periovulatory follicles to bring about ovulation and luteinization. The present study determined 1) the localization of RUNX1, a nuclear transcription factor, 2) regulation of Runx1 mRNA expression, and 3) its potential function in rat ovaries. Up-regulation of mRNA and protein for RUNX1 is detected in preovulatory follicles after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) injection in gonadotropin-treated immature rats as well as after the LH surge in cycling animals by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. The regulation of Runx1 mRNA expression was investigated in vitro using granulosa cells from rat pre-ovulatory ovaries. Treatments with hCG, forskolin, or phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate stimulated Runx1 mRNA expression. The effects of hCG were reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase A, MAPK kinase, or p38 kinase, indicating that Runx1 expression is regulated by the LH-initiated activation of these signaling mediators. In addition, hCG-induced Runx1 mRNA expression was inhibited by a progesterone receptor antagonist and an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas amphiregulin stimulated Runx1 mRNA expression, demonstrating that the expression is mediated by the activation of the progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor. Finally, knockdown of Runx1 mRNA by small interfering RNA decreased progesterone secretion and reduced levels of mRNA for Cyp11a1, Hapln1, Mt1a, and Rgc32. The hormonally regulated expression of Runx1 in periovulatory follicles, its involvement in progesterone production, and regulation of preovulatory gene expression suggest important roles of RUNX1 in the periovulatory process. PMID:16675540

  11. Sex hormone-related neurosteroids differentially rescue bioenergetic deficits induced by amyloid-β or hyperphosphorylated tau protein.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Amandine; Biliouris, Emily E; Lang, Undine E; Götz, Jürgen; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease marked by a progressive cognitive decline. Metabolic impairments are common hallmarks of AD, and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and hyperphosphorylated tau protein--the two foremost histopathological signs of AD--have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Neurosteroids have recently shown promise in alleviating cognitive and neuronal sequelae of AD. The present study evaluates the impact of neurosteroids belonging to the sex hormone family (progesterone, estradiol, estrone, testosterone, 3α-androstanediol) on mitochondrial dysfunction in cellular models of AD: human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) stably transfected with constructs encoding (1) the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) resulting in overexpression of APP and Aβ, (2) wild-type tau (wtTau), and (3) mutant tau (P301L), that induces abnormal tau hyperphosphorylation. We show that while APP and P301L cells both display a drop in ATP levels, they present distinct mitochondrial impairments with regard to their bioenergetic profiles. The P301L cells presented a decreased maximal respiration and spare respiratory capacity, while APP cells exhibited, in addition, a decrease in basal respiration, ATP turnover, and glycolytic reserve. All neurosteroids showed beneficial effects on ATP production and mitochondrial membrane potential in APP/Aβ overexpressing cells while only progesterone and estradiol increased ATP levels in mutant tau cells. Of note, testosterone was more efficient in alleviating Aβ-induced mitochondrial deficits, while progesterone and estrogen were the most effective neurosteroids in our model of AD-related tauopathy. Our findings lend further support to the neuroprotective effects of neurosteroids in AD and may open new avenues for the development of gender-specific therapeutic approaches in AD. PMID:26198711

  12. Roles of parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor and reactive oxygen species in hyperlipidemia-induced PTH resistance in preosteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Garcia, Jamie; Lu, Jinxiu; Iriana, Sidney; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rowe, David; Demer, Linda L; Tintut, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive lipids initiate inflammatory reactions leading to pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Evidence shows that they also contribute to bone loss by inhibiting parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) expression and differentiation of osteoblasts. We previously demonstrated that bone anabolic effects of PTH(1-34) are blunted in hyperlipidemic mice and that these PTH effects are restored by antioxidants. However, it is not clear which osteoblastic cell developmental stage is targeted by bioactive lipids. To investigate the effects of hyperlipidemia at the cellular level, hyperlipidemic Ldlr(-/-) mice were bred with Col3.6GFPtpz mice, in which preosteoblasts/osteoblasts carry a topaz fluorescent label, and with Col2.3GFPcyan mice, in which more mature osteoblasts/osteocytes carry a cyan fluorescent label. Histological analyses of trabecular bone surfaces in femoral as well as calvarial bones showed that intermittent PTH(1-34) increased fluorescence intensity in WT-Tpz mice, but not in Tpz-Ldlr(-/-) mice. In contrast, PTH(1-34) did not alter fluorescence intensity in femoral cortical envelopes of either WT-Cyan or Ldlr(-/-)-Cyan mice. To test the mechanism of PTH1R downregulation, preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with bioactive lipids and the antioxidant Trolox. Results showed that inhibitory effects of PTH1R levels by bioactive lipids were rescued by pretreatment with Trolox. The inhibitory effects on expression of PTH1R as well as on PTH-induced osteoblastic genes were mimicked by xanthine/xanthine oxidase, a known generator of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest an important role of the preosteoblastic development stage as the target and downregulation of PTH receptor expression mediated by intracellular oxidant stress as a mechanism in hyperlipidemia-induced PTH resistance. PMID:24038594

  13. Bone and hormonal changes induced by skeletal unloading in the mature male rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehority, W.; Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Curren, T.; Kostenuik, P. J.; Wronski, T. J.; Shen, Y.; Rabkin, B.; Bouraoui, A.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1999-01-01

    To determine whether the rat hindlimb elevation model can be used to study the effects of spaceflight and loss of gravitational loading on bone in the adult animal, and to examine the effects of age on bone responsiveness to mechanical loading, we studied 6-mo-old rats subjected to hindlimb elevation for up to 5 wk. Loss of weight bearing in the adult induced a mild hypercalcemia, diminished serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, decreased vertebral bone mass, and blunted the otherwise normal increase in femoral mass associated with bone maturation. Unloading decreased osteoblast numbers and reduced periosteal and cancellous bone formation but had no effect on bone resorption. Mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate decreased during unloading. Our results demonstrate the utility of the adult rat hindlimb elevation model as a means of simulating the loss of gravitational loading on the skeleton, and they show that the effects of nonweight bearing are prolonged and have a greater relative effect on bone formation in the adult than in the young growing animal.

  14. Protection from radiation-induced damage to spermatogenesis by hormone treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdoglu, B.; Wilson, G.; Parchuri, N.; Ye, W.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Infertility caused by killing of the spermatogonial stem cells occurs frequently in men treated for cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment of rats with testosterone plus estradiol, which reversibly inhibits the completion of spermatogenesis and protects spermatogonial stem cells from procarbazine-induced damage, would also protect these cells from radiation. Adult male LBNF rats were implanted for 6 weeks with capsules containing testosterone and estradiol and then irradiated with doses from 2.5-7.0 Gy. Controls were irradiated with 1.8-3.5 Gy. Implants were removed 1 day after irradiation, and all animals were killed 10 weeks later for assessment of stem cell survival by counting repopulating tubules in histological sections and by sperm head counts. At doses of 2.5 and 3.5 Gy the repopulation indices and sperm head counts were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the rats treated with testosterone and estradiol than in the controls. Protection factors calculated from the dose-response curves were in the range of 1.5-2.2. Elucidation of the mechanism of protection is essential to apply it to clinical situations. The fact that the spermatogonia are protected against radiation as well as procarbazine indicates that the mechanism does not involve drug delivery or metabolism. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Tyrosol and its analogues inhibit alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone induced melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Kuo-Ching; Chang, Chih-Shiang; Chien, Yin-Chih; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Wu, Wan-Chen; Wu, Chin-Sheng; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Melanin is responsible for skin color and plays a major role in defending against harmful external factors such as ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Tyrosinase is responsible for the critical steps of melanogenesis, including the rate-limiting step of tyrosine hydroxylation. The mechanisms of action of skin hypopigmenting agents are thought to be based on the ability of a given agent to inhibit the activity of tyrosinase and, hence, down regulate melanin synthesis. Tyrosol and its glycoside, salidroside, are active components of Rhodiola rosea, and in our preliminary study we found that Rhodiola rosea extract inhibited melanogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of tyrosol and its analogues on melanin synthesis. We found that treatment of B16F0 cells to tyrosol (1), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (5), 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (6), 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (7), or salidroside (11) resulted in a reduction in melanin content and inhibition of tyrosinase activity as well as its expression. Tyrosol (1), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (5) and 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (7) suppressed MC1R expression. Tyrosol (1), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (5), 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (6), and 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (7) inhibited α-MSH induced TRP-1 expression, but salidroside (11) did not. All the compounds did not affect MITF and TRP-2 expression. Furthermore, we found that the cell viability of tyrosol (1), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (5), 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (6), and 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (7) at concentrations below 4 mM and salidroside (11) at concentrations below 0.5 mM were higher than 90%. The compounds exhibited metal-coordinating interactions with copper ion in molecular docking with tyrosinase. Our results suggest that tyrosol, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and salidroside are potential hypopigmenting agents. PMID:24287915

  16. Parathyroid hormone induces c-fos and c-jun messenger RNA in rat osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clohisy, J. C.; Scott, D. K.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    PTH is a potent regulator of osteoblast gene expression, yet the nuclear events that mediate PTH action are poorly understood. We were interested in identifying immediate early genes which may regulate PTH-altered gene expression in the osteoblast. Therefore, we examined the effects of PTH on c-fos and c-jun gene expression in a rat osteoblastic cell line (UMR 106-01). Under control conditions, c-fos and c-jun mRNAs were present at low basal levels. After PTH treatment, c-fos mRNA abundance dramatically increased, with a maximal and transient response at 30 min. PTH also stimulated an increase in c-jun mRNA, but in a biphasic manner, with maximal levels at 30 min and 2 h. These responses were dose dependent, not altered by cotreatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, and preceded PTH-induced expression of matrix metallo-proteinase-1 mRNA. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated an increased rate of c-fos and c-jun transcription after PTH exposure. To determine the signal transduction pathways involved, second messenger analogs were tested for their ability to mimic the effects of PTH. 8-Bromo-cAMP and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused increases in the abundance of c-fos and c-jun transcripts. Ionomycin had no effect on the expression of these genes. Pretreatment of the cells with PMA resulted in a decrease in basal c-jun expression, but did not alter the PTH-mediated increase in c-fos, c-jun, or matrix metalloproteinase-1 mRNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  17. Tyrosol and Its Analogues Inhibit Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Induced Melanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Kuo-Ching; Chang, Chih-Shiang; Chien, Yin-Chih; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Wu, Wan-Chen; Wu, Chin-Sheng; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Melanin is responsible for skin color and plays a major role in defending against harmful external factors such as ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Tyrosinase is responsible for the critical steps of melanogenesis, including the rate-limiting step of tyrosine hydroxylation. The mechanisms of action of skin hypopigmenting agents are thought to be based on the ability of a given agent to inhibit the activity of tyrosinase and, hence, down regulate melanin synthesis. Tyrosol and its glycoside, salidroside, are active components of Rhodiola rosea, and in our preliminary study we found that Rhodiola rosea extract inhibited melanogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of tyrosol and its analogues on melanin synthesis. We found that treatment of B16F0 cells to tyrosol (1), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (5), 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (6), 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (7), or salidroside (11) resulted in a reduction in melanin content and inhibition of tyrosinase activity as well as its expression. Tyrosol (1), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (5) and 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (7) suppressed MC1R expression. Tyrosol (1), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (5), 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (6), and 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (7) inhibited α-MSH induced TRP-1 expression, but salidroside (11) did not. All the compounds did not affect MITF and TRP-2 expression. Furthermore, we found that the cell viability of tyrosol (1), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (5), 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (6), and 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (7) at concentrations below 4 mM and salidroside (11) at concentrations below 0.5 mM were higher than 90%. The compounds exhibited metal-coordinating interactions with copper ion in molecular docking with tyrosinase. Our results suggest that tyrosol, 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and salidroside are potential hypopigmenting agents. PMID:24287915

  18. Gestational flu exposure induces changes in neurochemicals, affiliative hormones and brainstem inflammation, in addition to autism-like behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, V M; Zhu, Y; Bucher, C; McGinnis, W; Ryan, L K; Siegel, A; Zalcman, S

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism is increasing, however the etiology of these disorders is unclear and thought to involve a combination of genetic, environmental and immune factors. A recent epidemiological study found that gestational viral exposure during the first trimester increases risk of autism in offspring by twofold. In mice gestational viral exposures alter behavior of offspring, but the biological mechanisms which underpin these behavioral changes are unclear. We hypothesized that gestational viral exposure induces changes in affiliative hormones, brainstem autonomic nuclei and neurotransmitters which are associated with behavioral alterations in offspring. To address this hypothesis, we exposed pregnant mice to influenza A virus (H3N2) on gestational day 9 and determined behavioral, hormonal and brainstem changes in male and female offspring. We found that gestational flu exposure induced dose-dependent alterations in social and aggressive behaviors (p≤0.05) in male and female offspring and increases in locomotor behaviors particularly in male offspring (p≤0.05). We found that flu exposure was also associated with reductions in oxytocin and serotonin (p≤0.05) levels in male and female offspring and sex-specific changes in dopamine metabolism. In addition we found changes in catecholaminergic and microglia density in brainstem tissues of male flu exposed offspring only (p≤0.05). This study demonstrates that gestational viral exposure induces behavioral changes in mice, which are associated with alterations in affiliative hormones. In addition we found sex-specific changes in locomotor behavior, which may be associated with sex-specific alterations in dopamine metabolism and brainstem inflammation. Further investigations into maternal immune responses are necessary to unravel the molecular mechanisms which underpin abnormal hormonal, immune and behavioral responses in offspring after gestational viral exposure. PMID

  19. The effects of palm vitamin E on stress hormone levels and gastric lesions in stress-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Aziz Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel; Kamisah, Yusof; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This study examines the effects of palm vitamin E (PVE) or α-tocopherol (α-TF) supplementation on adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), corticosterone and gastric lesions in rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS). Material and methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were divided into three groups. Group I: 20 rats as a control group were given a normal diet. Group II: 20 rats received oral supplementation of PVE at 60 mg/kg body weight. Group III: 20 rats received oral supplementation of α-TF at 60 mg/kg body weight. After the treatment period of 28 days, each group was further subdivided into two groups: 10 rats not exposed to stress, and the other 10 rats subjected to WIRS for 3.5 h. Blood samples were taken to measure the ACTH and corticosterone levels. The rats were then sacrificed and the stomach excised and opened along the greater curvature and examined for lesions. Results Rats exposed to WIRS had lesions in their stomach mucosa. Our findings showed that dietary supplementation of PVE or α-TF was able to reduce gastric lesions significantly in comparison to the stressed controls. The WIRS increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone significantly. Palm vitamin E and α-TF treatments reduced these parameters significantly compared to the stressed controls. Conclusions Supplementation with either PVE or α-TF reduces the formation of gastric lesions, probably by inhibiting the elevation of ACTH and corticosterone levels induced by stress. PMID:22457670

  20. Hormone crosstalk in wound stress response: wound-inducible amidohydrolases can simultaneously regulate jasmonate and auxin homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Poudel, Arati N.; Jewell, Jeremy B.; Kitaoka, Naoki; Staswick, Paul; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Koo, Abraham J.

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) and auxin are essential hormones in plant development and stress responses. While the two govern distinct physiological processes, their signaling pathways interact at various levels. Recently, members of the Arabidopsis indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) amidohydrolase (IAH) family were reported to metabolize jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile), a bioactive form of JA. Here, we characterized three IAH members, ILR1, ILL6, and IAR3, for their function in JA and IAA metabolism and signaling. Expression of all three genes in leaves was up-regulated by wounding or JA, but not by IAA. Purified recombinant proteins showed overlapping but distinct substrate specificities for diverse amino acid conjugates of JA and IAA. Perturbed patterns of the endogenous JA profile in plants overexpressing or knocked-out for the three genes were consistent with ILL6 and IAR3, but not ILR1, being the JA amidohydrolases. Increased turnover of JA-Ile in the ILL6- and IAR3-overexpressing plants created symptoms of JA deficiency whereas increased free IAA by overexpression of ILR1 and IAR3 made plants hypersensitive to exogenous IAA conjugates. Surprisingly, ILL6 overexpression rendered plants highly resistant to exogenous IAA conjugates, indicating its interference with IAA conjugate hydrolysis. Fluorescent protein-tagged IAR3 and ILL6 co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum-localized JA-Ile 12-hydroxylase, CYP94B3. Together, these results demonstrate that in wounded leaves JA-inducible amidohydrolases contribute to regulate active IAA and JA-Ile levels, promoting auxin signaling while attenuating JA signaling. This mechanism represents an example of a metabolic-level crosstalk between the auxin and JA signaling pathways. PMID:26672615

  1. The thyroid hormone, triiodothyronine, enhances fluoxetine-induced neurogenesis in rats: possible role in antidepressant-augmenting properties.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Renana; Landshut, Galit; Lifschytz, Tzuri; Einstein, Ofira; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Lerer, Bernard

    2010-06-01

    The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) may accelerate and augment the action of antidepressants. Antidepressants up-regulate neurogenesis in adult rodent hippocampus. We studied the effect of T3 and T3+fluoxetine in enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis beyond that induced by fluoxetine alone and the correlation with antidepressant behaviour in the novelty suppressed feeding test (NSFT). Rats were administered fluoxetine (5 mg/kg.d), T3 (50 mug/kg.d), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg.d)+T3 (50 mug/kg.d) or saline, for 21 d. Neurogenesis was studied by doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). In the NSFT, latency to feeding in animals deprived of food was measured. Fluoxetine and fluoxetine+T3 increased the number of doublecortin-positive (DCX+) cells in the SGZ compared to saline (p=0.00005, p=0.008, respectively). There was a trend towards an increased number of DCX+ cells by T3 compared to saline (p=0.06). Combined treatment with fluoxetine+T3 further increased the number of DCX+ cells compared to T3 or fluoxetine alone (p=0.001, p=0.014, respectively). There was no effect of any of the treatments on number of DCX+ cells in the SVZ. In the NSFT, all treatments (T3, fluoxetine+T3 and fluoxetine) reduced latency to feeding compared to saline (p=0.0004, p=0.00001, p=0.00009, respectively). Fluoxetine+T3 further reduced latency to feeding compared to T3 alone (p=0.05). The results suggest that enhancement of antidepressant action by T3 may be related to its effect of increasing hippocampal neurogenesis and that the antidepressant effect of these treatments is specific to the hippocampus and does not represent a general effect on cell proliferation. PMID:19835665

  2. INTERACTION BETWEEN GABA AND NOREPINEPHRINE IN INTERLEUKIN-1β-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE SURGE

    PubMed Central

    Sirivelu, Madhu P.; Burnett, Robert; Shin, Andrew C.; Kim, Charlotte; MohanKumar, P.S.; MohanKumar, Sheba M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a cytokine that is closely associated with inflammation and immune stress, is known to interfere with reproductive functions. Earlier studies have demonstrated that IL-1β inhibits the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during the afternoon of proestrus in female rats. We have shown that this effect is most probably mediated through a reduction in norepinephrine (NE) levels in the medial preoptic area (MPA) of the hypothalamus. However, the mechanism by which IL-1β decreases NE levels in the MPA is unclear. We hypothesized that the inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA could play a role in decreasing NE levels in the MPA. To test this, ovariectomized, steroid-primed rats were injected (i.p.) with either PBS-BSA (control) or 5 μg of IL-1β, alone or in combination with i.c.v. administration of GABA-A and GABA-B receptor antagonists, Bicuculline and CGP 35348 (CGP) respectively. Animals were subjected to push-pull perfusion of the MPA and perfusates collected at 30 min intervals were analyzed for both NE and GABA levels using HPLC-EC. Simultaneously, serial plasma samples were obtained through jugular catheters and were analyzed for LH levels using RIA. Compared to control rats, NE levels decreased significantly in the MPA in IL-1β-treated rats (p<0.05). Concurrently, there was a significant increase in GABA levels in the MPA (p<0.05). The GABA-A receptor antagonist, bicuculline, was able to reverse the effect of IL-1β on NE and LH, while the GABA-B receptor antagonist, CGP 35348 was without any effect. This leads us to conclude that the IL-1β-induced suppression of the LH surge is most probably mediated through an increase in GABA levels in the MPA which causes a reduction in NE levels. This is probably one of the mechanisms by which IL-1β inhibits reproductive functions. PMID:19014915

  3. Foliar application of methyl jasmonate induced physio-hormonal changes in Pisum sativum under diverse temperature regimes.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Raheem; Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Hamayun, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-11-01

    Global climate change brings with it unwarranted shifts in both abiotic (heat stress, cold stress, wind, precipitation) and biotic (pathogens, pests) environmental factors, thus posing a threat to agricultural productivity across the world. In plants, lodging due to storms or herbivory causes wounding stress and consequently enhances endogenous jasmonates. In response, the plant growth is arrested as plant defense is prioritized. We pre-treated pea plants with elevated methyl jasmonate (MeJA) levels i.e. 50 μM, 100 μM and 200 μM under controlled growth chamber conditions. The pre-treated plants were then kept at 40 °C (heat stress--HS), 4 °C (cold stress--CS) and 20 °C (optimum/control temperature--OT) for 72 h. The effect of such treatments on plant growth attributes, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, cell death rate, and regulation of endogenous hormones were observed. Elevated MeJA application hindered plant growth attributes under HS, CS and OT conditions. Moreover, elevated MeJA levels lowered the rate of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, induced stomatal closure, caused higher cells mortality in leaves under HS, CS, and OT conditions. Endogenous ABA contents significantly declined in all MeJA treatments under HS and OT, but increased under CS conditions. Exogenous MeJA enhanced endogenous jasmonic acid contents of pea plants, but altered endogenous salicylic acid contents under varying temperatures. Current study shows that higher concentrations of exogenous MeJA strengthen plant defense mechanism by hindering plant growth under stress conditions. PMID:26379199

  4. Sensorimotor cortex ablation induces time-dependent response of ACTH cells in adult rats: behavioral, immunohistomorphometric and hormonal study.

    PubMed

    Lavrnja, Irena; Trifunovic, Svetlana; Ajdzanovic, Vladimir; Pekovic, Sanja; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Stojiljkovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Verica

    2014-02-10

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a serious event with far reaching complications, including pituitary dysfunction. Pars distalis corticotropes (ACTH cells), that represent the active module of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, seem to be affected as well. Since pituitary failure after TBI has been associated with neurobehavioral impairments the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of TBI on recovery of motor functions, morphology and secretory activity of ACTH cells in the pituitary of adult rats. Wistar male rats, initially exposed to sensorimotor cortex ablation (SCA), were sacrificed at the 2nd, 7th, 14th and 30th days post-surgery (dps). A beam walking test was used to evaluate the recovery of motor functions. Pituitary glands and blood were collected for morphological and hormonal analyses. During the first two weeks post-injury increased recovery of locomotor function was detected, reaching almost the control value at day 30. SCA induces significant increase of pituitary weights compared to their time-matched controls. The volume of ACTH-immunopositive cells was reduced at the 7th dps, while at the 14th dps their volume was enlarged, in comparison to corresponding sham controls. Volume density of ACTH cells was increased only at 14th dps, while at day 30 this increase was insignificant. The plasma level of ACTH transiently increased after the injury. The most pronounced changes were observed at the 7th and 14th dps, and were followed by decrease toward control levels at the 30th dps. Thus, temporal changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis after traumatic brain injury appear to correlate with the recovery process. PMID:24291385

  5. PGC-1alpha induces dynamic protein interactions on the ERRalpha gene multi-hormone response element nucleosome in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangli; Li, Yin; Hu, Peng; Teng, Christina T

    2008-12-15

    ERR (oestrogen-related receptor)-alpha modulates the oestrogen signalling pathway and regulates genes participating in the physiological energy balance programme. Oestrogen and PGC-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha), the master regulator of the energy homoeostasis programme, both regulate the expression of ERRalpha through the MHRE (multi-hormone response element) of the ERRalpha gene. Although the molecular mechanism of oestrogen action on ERRalpha regulation is well characterized, the mechanism of PGC-1alpha induction is unclear. In this study, we examine chromatin structural changes and protein interactions at the MHRE nucleosome in response to PGC-1alpha expression in HK2 human kidney cells. We mapped the nucleosome positions of the ERRalpha gene promoter and examined the changes of histone acetylation in response to PGC-1alpha expression. The interactions of DNA-binding proteins, ERRalpha and ERRgamma, co-activators {CBP [CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein)-binding protein], p300, PCAF (p300/CBP-associated factor)}, co-repressor [RIP140 (receptor-interacting protein of 140 kDa)] and RNA polymerase II at the MHRE nucleosome region were investigated over time before and after PGC-1alpha expression in the HK2 cells. We found a dynamic cyclic interaction of these proteins shortly after PGC-1alpha expression and a slower cycling interaction, with fewer proteins involved, 20 h later. By using the siRNA (small interfering RNA) knockdown approach, we discovered that ERRgamma was involved in the initial phase, but not in the later phase, of PGC-1alpha-induced ERRalpha expression. PMID:18673300

  6. Enhanced bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced ectopic and orthotopic bone formation by intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34) administration.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Diederik H R; Lu, Lichun; Hefferan, Theresa E; Creemers, Laura B; Heijink, Andras; Maran, Avudaiappan; Dhert, Wouter J A; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2010-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play a central role in local bone regeneration strategies, whereas the anabolic features of parathyroid hormone (PTH) are particularly appealing for the systemic treatment of generalized bone loss. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether local BMP-2-induced bone regeneration could be enhanced by systemic administration of PTH (1-34). Empty or BMP-2-loaded poly(lactic-co glycolic acid)/poly(propylene fumarate)/gelatin composites were implanted subcutaneously and in femoral defects in rats (n = 9). For the orthotopic site, empty defects were also tested. Each of the conditions was investigated in combination with daily administered subcutaneous PTH (1-34) injections in the neck. After 8 weeks of implantation, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone volume were analyzed using microcomputed tomography and histology. Ectopic bone formation and almost complete healing of the femoral defect were only seen in rats that received BMP-2-loaded composites. Additional treatment of the rats with PTH (1-34) resulted in significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced BMD and bone volume in the BMP-2 composites at both implantation sites. Despite its effect on BMD in the humerus and vertebra, PTH (1-34) treatment had no significant effect on BMD and bone volume in the empty femoral defects and the ectopically or orthotopically implanted empty composites. Histological analysis showed that the newly formed bone had a normal woven and trabecular appearance. Overall, this study suggests that intermittent administration of a low PTH dose alone has limited potential to enhance local bone regeneration in a critical-sized defect in rats. However, when combined with local BMP-2-releasing scaffolds, PTH administration significantly enhanced osteogenesis in both ectopic and orthotopic sites. PMID:20666615

  7. Parathyroid hormone 1 receptor is essential to induce FGF23 production and maintain systemic mineral ion homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Bi, Ruiye; Densmore, Michael J; Sato, Tadatoshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Yuan, Quan; Zhou, Xuedong; Erben, Reinhold G; Lanske, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid-hormone-type 1 receptor (PTH1R) is extensively expressed in key regulatory organs for systemic mineral ion homeostasis, including kidney and bone. We investigated the bone-specific functions of PTH1R in modulating mineral ion homeostasis by generating a novel mouse model in which PTH1R is ablated in the limb mesenchyme using Prx1Cre transgenic mice. Such ablation decreased FGF23 protein and serum levels by 50%, despite normal Fgf23 mRNA levels in long bones. Circulating calcium and PTH levels were unchanged, but inorganic phosphate and 1,25(OH)2D3 levels were significantly decreased and accompanied by elevated urinary calcium and phosphate wasting. Key renal genes for balancing mineral ion homeostasis, calbindinD28k, Klotho, and Napi2a were suppressed by 30-40%. Intermittent hPTH(1-34) injections increased Fgf23 mRNA (7.3-fold), Nurr1 mRNA (3.1-fold), and serum intact-FGF23 (1.6-fold) in controls, but failed to induce Fgf23, Nurr1 mRNA, or intact FGF23 production in mutants. Moreover, a significant elevation in serum C-terminal-FGF23 levels (4-fold) was detected in both genotypes. PTH markedly downregulated Galnt3 expression (2.7-fold) in controls but not in mutants. These results demonstrate the pivotal role of PTH1R in long bones to regulate systemic mineral ion homeostasis and the direct induction of FGF23 by PTH1R signaling. PMID:26428657

  8. Characterization of Overexpressed cDNAs Isolated from a Hormone-Autonomous, Radiation-Induced Tumor Tissue Line of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Campell, B R; Town, C D

    1992-12-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of hormonal control of growth, we constructed a subtracted cDNA library enriched for sequences expressed more in a hormone-autonomous, radiation-induced tumor tissue line of Arabidopsis thaliana than in normal, hormone-dependent callus. Ten cDNA clones, which are expressed 1.3- to 10-fold more in the tumor line, were isolated and partially characterized. The clones differ greatly in their level of expression in tumor tissue and in their pattern of expression in plant organs. Southern blot hybridization and sequence analysis showed that this group contains three pairs of closely related clones. Northern blot analysis indicates that one pair of clones represents two members of a gene family that are expressed in different plant organs. One of the isolated sequences shows strong sequence similarity to a cDNA encoding a lipid transfer protein. Two sequences are highly similar to those of previously described membrane channel proteins but have different organ specificities. Two other cDNAs have significant sequence similarity to glycine-rich proteins and hydroxy-proline-rich glycoproteins. When used to probe Southern blots, none of the cDNAs identified polymorphisms between tumor and callus DNA, which might be expected if their overexpression were due to local genome rearrangements induced by radiation. The diversity observed among these 10 clones suggests that some are likely to be involved in tumorous growth and not simply specific to a certain cell or tissue type present in the tumor. PMID:16653233

  9. Unliganded progesterone receptor-mediated targeting of an RNA-containing repressive complex silences a subset of hormone-inducible genes

    PubMed Central

    Vicent, Guillermo Pablo; Nacht, A. Silvina; Zaurin, Roser; Font-Mateu, Jofre; Soronellas, Daniel; Le Dily, Francois; Reyes, Diana; Beato, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    A close chromatin conformation precludes gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Genes activated by external cues have to overcome this repressive state by locally changing chromatin structure to a more open state. Although much is known about hormonal gene activation, how basal repression of regulated genes is targeted to the correct sites throughout the genome is not well understood. Here we report that in breast cancer cells, the unliganded progesterone receptor (PR) binds genomic sites and targets a repressive complex containing HP1γ (heterochromatin protein 1γ), LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1), HDAC1/2, CoREST (corepressor for REST [RE1 {neuronal repressor element 1} silencing transcription factor]), KDM5B, and the RNA SRA (steroid receptor RNA activator) to 20% of hormone-inducible genes, keeping these genes silenced prior to hormone treatment. The complex is anchored via binding of HP1γ to H3K9me3 (histone H3 tails trimethylated on Lys 9). SRA interacts with PR, HP1γ, and LSD1, and its depletion compromises the loading of the repressive complex to target chromatin-promoting aberrant gene derepression. Upon hormonal treatment, the HP1γ–LSD1 complex is displaced from these constitutively poorly expressed genes as a result of rapid phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser 10 mediated by MSK1, which is recruited to the target sites by the activated PR. Displacement of the repressive complex enables the loading of coactivators needed for chromatin remodeling and activation of this set of genes, including genes involved in apoptosis and cell proliferation. These results highlight the importance of the unliganded PR in hormonal regulation of breast cancer cells. PMID:23699411

  10. Farnesol induces thyroid hormone receptor (THR) {beta}1 but inhibits THR-mediated signaling in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Robin E.; Archer, Michael C. . E-mail: m.archer@utoronto.ca

    2006-04-28

    Anti-cancer effects of farnesol are well established, although mechanisms mediating these effects are not fully understood. Since farnesol has been shown to regulate gene transcription through activation of the farnesoid X receptor and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-{alpha} and -{gamma}, we hypothesized that farnesol may also mediate some of its effects through other nuclear hormone receptors. Here we showed that in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, farnesol induced the expression of thyroid hormone receptor (THR) {beta}1 mRNA and protein at concentrations that inhibited cell growth. Changes in the expression of THR responsive genes, however, suggested that farnesol inhibits THR-mediated signaling. Protein extracts from cells treated with farnesol displayed decreased binding to oligodeoxynucleotides containing a consensus sequence for the THR response element, despite the higher THR{beta}1 content, providing a mechanism to explain the decreased transcriptional activity of cellular THRs.

  11. Melatonin Attenuates Noise Stress-induced Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder and Gastric Stress Ulcer: Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Ji T; Zhang, Hu Q; Song, Quan H; Xu, Guang H; Cai, Lei; Tang, Xiao D; Zhang, Hai F; Liu, Fang-E; Jia, Zhan S; Zhang, Hong W

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims There are increasing evidences for gastrointestinal motility disorder (GIMD) and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The present study was to investigate the reversed effect of melatonin on GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress and potential mechanism. Methods Noise stress was induced on rats, and melatonin (15 mg/kg) was administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection. Differences were assessed in gastric residual rate (GRR), small intestine propulsion rate (SPR), Guth injury score, cortisol, gastrointestinal hormones (calcitonin-gene-related peptide and motilin) and oxidative stress markers (superoxide dismutase and malondialde hyde) in blood plasma as well as gastric mucosa homogenate with or without melatonin. The pathological examination of gastric mucosa was also performed. Results The GRR and SPR were improved by noise stress compared with control (P < 0.05). The pathological examination and Guth injury score revealed gastric stress ulcer. Moreover, the levels of cortisol, motilin and malondialdehyde in blood plasma and malondialdehyde in gastric mucosa homogenate were increased by noise stress (P < 0.05). CGRP and superoxide dismutase activity in both of blood plasma and gastric mucosa homogenate were significantly decreased (P< 0.05). Furthermore, melatonin reversed changes in GRR, SPR, pathological examination, Guth injury score, cortisol, motilin, CGRP, superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdehyde (P < 0.05). Conclusions Melatonin is effective in reversing the GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The underlying mechanism may be involved in oxidative stress and gastrointestinal hormones. PMID:25537679

  12. Reversal by Growth Hormone of Homocysteine-induced Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition through Membrane Raft-Redox Signaling in Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cai-Xia; Xia, Min; Han, Wei-Qing; Li, Xiao-Xue; Zhang, Chun; Boini, Krishna M.; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Li, Pin-Lan

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is an important pathogenic mechanism mediating glomerular injury or sclerosis in a variety of renal and systemic diseases such as hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys). The present study was designed to test whether Hcys-induced EMT in podocytes is reversed by growth hormone (GH), a hormone regulating cell differentiation and growth and to explore the cellular and molecular mechanism mediating its action. It was found that Hcys induced significant EMT in podocytes, as shown by marked decreases in slit diaphragm-associated protein P-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 as epithelial markers and by dramatic increases in the expression of mesenchymal markers, fibroblast specific protein-1 and α-smooth muscle actin, which were detected by all examinations via immunocytochemistry, real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. When podocytes were treated with GH at 25 ng/mL, however, Hcys failed to induce podocyte EMT. Using electromagnetic spin resonance spectrometry, Hcys-induced superoxide (O2.−) production via NADPH oxidase was found to be significantly inhibited by GH (66%). Functionally, GH was shown to substantially inhibit Hcys-induced increases in the permeability of podocyte monolayers and to block the decrease in podocin expression in these cells. In addition, NADPH oxidase subunit, gp91phox and GH receptors aggregated in membrane raft clusters, which produced O2.− in response to Hcys and could be blocked by GH, membrane raft disruptors filipin and MCD or NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin. It is concluded that Hcys-induced podocyte EMT is associated with transmembrane membrane raft-redox signaling and that GH reverses this Hcys-induced EMT protecting podocytes from functional disturbance. PMID:21691087

  13. Absence of testicular protection by a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue against cyclophosphamide-induced testicular cytotoxicity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, M F; Meistrich, M L; Nader, S

    1987-02-15

    Protection of testicular integrity against damage from cyclophosphamide (CY) by simultaneous treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue was reported in BALB/c mice (L.M. Glode et al., Lancet, 1: 1132-1134, 1981). This approach has been used as the basis for clinical trials in various treatment centers (D. H. Johnson et al., Blood, 65:832-836, 1985) in an attempt to prevent iatrogenic sterility in males. This study aims at duplicating the original findings and obtaining quantitative data on spermatogonial killing by CY, and possible protection by GnRH, of differentiating and stem cell spermatogonia. Mice were treated with 23 daily injections of 0.4 micrograms D-leucine-6 GnRH, and with 200 mg/kg CY on Days 8, 15, and 22. Three additional groups of mice received phosphate-buffered saline and bovine serum albumin only, GnRH only, and CY only. Animals were killed at 29 days after the last injection to determine the number of late spermatids in testicular homogenates, and at 56 days for histological measurement of the ratio of elongated spermatids to Sertoli cells in the tubules. The twenty-ninth day assay was a measure of damage to differentiating spermatogonia, whose killing results in temporary sterility. The fifty-sixth day point assay assessed damage to stem spermatogonia, whose killing results in long-term or permanent sterility. Sperm counts at 29 days were identical in saline-treated control mice and GnRH-treated mice; no sperm were present in the CY-treated mice, both with and without GnRH. Thus, killing of differentiating spermatogonia by CY is not prevented by GnRH treatment. Similarly, counts of spermatids at 56 days showed no difference between saline- and GnRH-treated groups; a reduction to approximately 40% of control counts was observed equally with CY and CY plus GnRH treatments. Since GnRH treatment did not alter spermatogonial kinetics in BALB/c mice, it is not surprising that it did not protect against CY-induced damage. Thus

  14. Feedback effects of estradiol and progesterone on ovulation and fertility of dairy cows after gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced release of luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J S; Pulley, S L

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted with the objective to determine the effects of estradiol, progesterone, presence of a corpus luteum (CL), and size of a dominant follicle on the characteristics and patterns of GnRH-induced LH release and subsequent ovulation during a timed artificial insemination (TAI) program, or a combination of these. In 70 lactating dairy cows, a total of 163 blood collection periods resulting in a GnRH-induced LH release were analyzed. Concentrations of LH were measured in hourly samples (0 through 6 h after GnRH) during each of the blood collection periods, whereas concentrations of progesterone and estradiol were measured in the sample before GnRH treatment (0 h). Measures of LH included time to LH peak concentration during the 6-h blood collection period, the 2 largest concentrations of LH, mean, and variance of the 6 LH concentrations under each LH curve. Individual and combination effects of CL presence and a dominant follicle≤or >13.5mm, in addition to individual and combination effects of progesterone: low (<0.45 ng/mL; n=83), medium (0.53 to 2.41 ng/mL; n=25), and high (2.66 to 10.7 ng/mL; n=55), and estradiol: low (<4.0 pg/mL; n=89) and high (≥4.0 pg/mL; n=74) were independent variables in models to determine their influence on characteristics of LH and ovulation. Injections of GnRH induced LH release during 6 h after each of 163 injections. Measures of GnRH-induced LH concentration were inhibited at greater concentrations of progesterone and in the presence of a CL. In contrast, GnRH-induced LH concentrations were increased when estradiol was ≥4.0 pg/mL, but relatively unaffected by the size of the dominant follicle. Furthermore, resulting incidences of ovulation were decreased at greater progesterone concentrations and presence of a CL, and increased at greater estradiol concentrations and presence of follicles >13.5mm. In cows with or without a CL, the presence of a follicle >13.5mm did not increase mean LH concentration or

  15. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  16. The Effect of Growth Hormone, Insulin and Alloxan-Induced Diabetes on Carcinogenesis in the Genital Tract of Intact and Castrate Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Cora P.; Glucksmann, A.

    1971-01-01

    Castrate female rats given weekly applications of DMBA to the genital tract and treated additionally with growth hormone, insulin or alloxan (to induce diabetes) are heavier and have more sarcomatous and epithelial cervico-vaginal neoplasms than intact animals under the same experimental conditions. Promotion of carcinogenesis and gain in body weight are independent phenomena caused by castration in the medicated rats. Growth hormone is most effective in enhancing body weight in all animals, but least as regards tumour formation. It reduces the incidence of sarcomas in intacts, but raises that of epithelial neoplasms, and promotes both types of neoplasms in castrates. The highest incidence of cervico-vaginal epithelial and sarcomatous tumours occurs in spayed diabetics. Squamous celled epitheliomas of the vulva are not affected by castration or additional medication, while basal celled neoplasms tend to be more frequent in intacts than in castrates and particularly numerous in intact failed diabetics. Vulval sarcomas are usually rare but are increased in numbers in diabetic and in insulin treated intacts. Granular myoblastomas of the cervico-vaginal tract occur in intacts only and particularly in diabetics and those medicated with growth hormone or insulin. PMID:4335634

  17. Hormonal changes and increased anxiety-like behavior in a perimenopause-animal model induced by 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) in female rats.

    PubMed

    Reis, F M C V; Pestana-Oliveira, N; Leite, C M; Lima, F B; Brandão, M L; Graeff, F G; Del-Ben, C M; Anselmo-Franci, J A

    2014-11-01

    Perimenopause, a transition period that precedes menopause, is characterized by neuroendocrine, metabolic and behavioral changes, and is associated with increased vulnerability to affective disorders. The decrease in ovarian follicles during perimenopause contributes to a dynamic and complex hormonal milieu that is not yet well characterized. In rodents, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) induces a gradual depletion of ovarian follicles, modeling the transition to menopause in women. This study was aimed to investigate, in VCD-treated rats, the hormonal status and the behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM), a widely used test to assess anxiety-like behavior. From the postnatal day 28, rats were treated with VCD or vehicle for 15 days. At 80±5 days after the beginning of treatment the experiments were performed at proestrus and diestrus. In the first experiment rats were decapitated, ovary was collected and blood samples were taken for estradiol, progesterone, follicle stimulant hormone (FSH), testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and corticosterone measurements. In the second experiment, rats were subjected to the EPM for 5 min, and behavioral categories recorded. Administration of VCD induced follicular depletion as well as an increase of the number of atretic follicles demonstrating the treatment efficacy. The transitional follicular depletion was accompanied by lower progesterone, testosterone and DHT with no changes in the FSH, estradiol and corticosterone plasma levels. On the EPM, rats showed decreased open arm exploration and increased risk assessment behavior, indicating increased anxiety. These findings show that administration of VCD to induce ovarian failure results in endocrine and anxiety-related changes that are similar to the symptoms exhibited by women during menopause transition. Thus, this model seems to be promising in the study of perimenopause-related changes. PMID:25080405

  18. Temporal pattern and effect of sex on lipopolysaccharide-induced stress hormone and cytokine response in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temporal pattern and gender effect of immune and stress hormone responses to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge were assessed using a pig model. Secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 increased in a time-dependent manner f...

  19. CHANGES IN FETAL TESTIS GENE EXPRESSION AND STEROID HORMONE SYNTHESIS INDUCED IN MALE OFFSPRING AFTER MATERNAL TREATMENT WITH PHTHALATE ESTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Targeted inactivation of the insulin-like hormone 3 (insl3) gene in male mice results in altered gubernacular development, disrupted testis decent, and cryptorchidism. Cryptorchidism is a fairly common human malformation, being displayed in 1-3% of males at birth. Since only a s...

  20. MODE OF ACTION: NEUROTOXICITY INDUCED BY DEVELOPMENTAL THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY -- NEUROLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO PROPYLTHIOURACIL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manuscript summarizes a workshop aimed at developing a framework to determine the relevancy of animal modes-of-action for extrapolation to humans. This specific report used animal data on neurodevelopmental effects of thyroid hormone disruption to test the framework. Polyhaloge...

  1. Temporal pattern and effect of sex on lipopolysaccharide-induced stress hormone and cytokine response in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temporal pattern and gender effect on immune and stress hormone responses to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was assessed using a pig model. Secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta and IL-6 increased (P < 0.05) in a time-depend...

  2. Regulation of Wheat Seed Dormancy by After-Ripening Is Mediated by Specific Transcriptional Switches That Induce Changes in Seed Hormone Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Yuri; Jordan, Mark C.; Kamiya, Yuji; Seo, Mitsunori; Ayele, Belay T.

    2013-01-01

    Treatments that promote dormancy release are often correlated with changes in seed hormone content and/or sensitivity. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of after-ripening (seed dry storage) in triggering hormone related changes and dormancy decay in wheat (Triticum aestivum), temporal expression patterns of genes related to abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), jasmonate and indole acetic acid (IAA) metabolism and signaling, and levels of the respective hormones were examined in dormant and after-ripened seeds in both dry and imbibed states. After-ripening mediated developmental switch from dormancy to germination appears to be associated with declines in seed sensitivity to ABA and IAA, which are mediated by transcriptional repressions of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C, SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2, ABA INSENSITIVE5 and LIPID PHOSPHATE PHOSPHTASE2, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR and RELATED TO UBIQUITIN1 genes. Transcriptomic analysis of wheat seed responsiveness to ABA suggests that ABA inhibits the germination of wheat seeds partly by repressing the transcription of genes related to chromatin assembly and cell wall modification, and activating that of GA catabolic genes. After-ripening induced seed dormancy decay in wheat is also associated with the modulation of seed IAA and jasmonate contents. Transcriptional control of members of the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE, 3-KETOACYL COENZYME A THIOLASE, LIPOXYGENASE and 12-OXOPHYTODIENOATE REDUCTASE gene families appears to regulate seed jasmonate levels. Changes in the expression of GA biosynthesis genes, GA 20-OXIDASE and GA 3-OXIDASE, in response to after-ripening implicate this hormone in enhancing dormancy release and germination. These findings have important implications in the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of seed dormancy in cereals. PMID:23437172

  3. Gonadotropins and Growth Hormone Family Characterization in an Endangered Siluriform Species, Steindachneridion parahybae (Pimelodidae): Relationship With Annual Reproductive Cycle and Induced Spawning in Captivity.

    PubMed

    Honji, Renato Massaaki; Caneppele, Danilo; Pandolfi, Matias; Nostro, Fabiana Laura Lo; Moreira, Renata Guimarães

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize pituitary cells of Steindachneridion parahybae females in captivity, highlighting the possible relationship with reproductive disorders at this level, since this species shows oocyte final maturation, ovulation and spawning dysfunction in captivity. The localization and distribution of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), somatolactin (SL), β-luteinizing hormone (β-LH), and β-follicle stimulating hormone (β-FSH) immunoreactive (-ir) cells in the adenohypophysis was studied by immunohistochemical and Western blot methods. In addition, cellular morphometric analyses and semi-quantification of ir-cells optical density (OD) during the annual reproductive cycle and after artificial induced spawning (AIS) were performed. Results showed that the distribution and general localization of pituitary cell types were similar to that of other teleost species. However, the morphometrical study of adenohypophysial cells showed differences along the reproductive cycle and following AIS. In general, females at the vitellogenic stage presented greater OD values for GH, PRL and SL than at other maturation stages (previtellogenic and regression stages), probably indicating an increased cellular activity during this stage. Conversely, β-LH OD did not vary during the annual reproductive cycle. After AIS, β-LH, SL and GH ir-cells showed an increase in OD values suggesting a possible involvement on oocyte final maturation, ovulation and spawning or a feedback control on the brain-pituitary-gonads axis. Reproductive dysfunction in S. parahybae females in captivity may be due to alteration of the synthesis pathways of β-LH. In addition, GH family of hormones could modulate associated mechanisms that influence the reproductive status in this species. PMID:25989288

  4. Regulation of wheat seed dormancy by after-ripening is mediated by specific transcriptional switches that induce changes in seed hormone metabolism and signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aihua; Gao, Feng; Kanno, Yuri; Jordan, Mark C; Kamiya, Yuji; Seo, Mitsunori; Ayele, Belay T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments that promote dormancy release are often correlated with changes in seed hormone content and/or sensitivity. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of after-ripening (seed dry storage) in triggering hormone related changes and dormancy decay in wheat (Triticum aestivum), temporal expression patterns of genes related to abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA), jasmonate and indole acetic acid (IAA) metabolism and signaling, and levels of the respective hormones were examined in dormant and after-ripened seeds in both dry and imbibed states. After-ripening mediated developmental switch from dormancy to germination appears to be associated with declines in seed sensitivity to ABA and IAA, which are mediated by transcriptional repressions of PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C, SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2, ABA INSENSITIVE5 and LIPID PHOSPHATE PHOSPHTASE2, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR and RELATED TO UBIQUITIN1 genes. Transcriptomic analysis of wheat seed responsiveness to ABA suggests that ABA inhibits the germination of wheat seeds partly by repressing the transcription of genes related to chromatin assembly and cell wall modification, and activating that of GA catabolic genes. After-ripening induced seed dormancy decay in wheat is also associated with the modulation of seed IAA and jasmonate contents. Transcriptional control of members of the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE, 3-KETOACYL COENZYME A THIOLASE, LIPOXYGENASE and 12-OXOPHYTODIENOATE REDUCTASE gene families appears to regulate seed jasmonate levels. Changes in the expression of GA biosynthesis genes, GA 20-OXIDASE and GA 3-OXIDASE, in response to after-ripening implicate this hormone in enhancing dormancy release and germination. These findings have important implications in the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of seed dormancy in cereals. PMID:23437172

  5. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  6. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... based lubricants include petroleum jelly, baby oil, or mineral oil. Oil-based types should not be used ... caused by low levels of these hormones. Hysterectomy: Removal of the uterus. Menopause: The time in a ...

  7. STRESS-INDUCED REDISTRIBUTION OF IMMUNE CELLS - FROM BARRACKS TO BOULEVARDS TO BATTLEFIELDS: A TALE OF THREE HORMONES - CURT RICHTER AWARD WINNER

    PubMed Central

    Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Malarkey, William B.; Neri, Eric; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The surveillance and effector functions of the immune system are critically dependent on the appropriate distribution of immune cells in the body. An acute or short-term stress response induces a rapid and significant redistribution of immune cells among different body compartments. Stress-induced leukocyte redistribution may be a fundamental survival response that directs leukocyte subpopulations to specific target organs during stress, and significantly enhances the speed, efficacy and regulation of an immune response. Immune responses are generally enhanced in compartments (e.g., skin) that are enriched with leukocytes, and suppressed in compartments that are depleted of leukocytes during/following stress. The experiments described here were designed to elucidate the: 1) Time-course, trajectory, and subpopulation-specificity of stress-induced mobilization and trafficking of blood leukocytes. 2) Individual and combined actions of the principal stress hormones, norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EPI), and corticosterone (CORT), in mediating mobilization or trafficking of specific leukocyte subpopulations. 3) Effects of stress/stress hormones on adhesion molecule, L-selectin (CD62L), expression by each subpopulation to assess its adhesion / functional / maturation status. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were stressed (short-term restraint, 2–120 min), or adrenalectomized and injected with vehicle (VEH), NE, EPI, CORT, or their combinations, and blood was collected for measurement of hormones and flow cytometric quantification of leukocyte subpopulations. Results Acute stress induced an early increase/mobilization of neutrophils, lymphocytes, helper T cells (Th), cytolytic T cells (CTL), and B cells into the blood, followed by a decrease/trafficking of all cell types out of the blood, except neutrophil numbers that continued to increase. CD62L expression was increased on neutrophils, decreased on Th, CTL, and natural killer (NK) cells, and showed a

  8. Characterization of Overexpressed cDNAs Isolated from a Hormone-Autonomous, Radiation-Induced Tumor Tissue Line of Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Campell, Bruce R.; Town, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of hormonal control of growth, we constructed a subtracted cDNA library enriched for sequences expressed more in a hormone-autonomous, radiation-induced tumor tissue line of Arabidopsis thaliana than in normal, hormone-dependent callus. Ten cDNA clones, which are expressed 1.3- to 10-fold more in the tumor line, were isolated and partially characterized. The clones differ greatly in their level of expression in tumor tissue and in their pattern of expression in plant organs. Southern blot hybridization and sequence analysis showed that this group contains three pairs of closely related clones. Northern blot analysis indicates that one pair of clones represents two members of a gene family that are expressed in different plant organs. One of the isolated sequences shows strong sequence similarity to a cDNA encoding a lipid transfer protein. Two sequences are highly similar to those of previously described membrane channel proteins but have different organ specificities. Two other cDNAs have significant sequence similarity to glycine-rich proteins and hydroxy-proline-rich glycoproteins. When used to probe Southern blots, none of the cDNAs identified polymorphisms between tumor and callus DNA, which might be expected if their overexpression were due to local genome rearrangements induced by radiation. The diversity observed among these 10 clones suggests that some are likely to be involved in tumorous growth and not simply specific to a certain cell or tissue type present in the tumor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16653233

  9. Effect of excessive, hormonally induced intrauterine crowding in the gilt on fetal development on day 40 of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    van der Waaij, E H; Hazeleger, W; Soede, N M; Laurenssen, B F A; Kemp, B

    2010-08-01

    Selection for litter size may result in an increase in uterine crowding due to a faster increase in ovulation rate than in litter size. Increased ovulation rate does not result in a proportionally increased number of piglets born alive. In this study, the effect of ovulation rate on vitality characteristics of fetal-placental units at d 40 of pregnancy was investigated. For this, 43 Large White gilts were treated with hormones to induce superovulation. Average ovulation rate was 45.16 +/- 13.22; average number of vital fetuses at d 40 of pregnancy was 17.09 +/- 3.61 that weighed 11.26 +/- 1.99 g; their placenta weighed 31.88 +/- 14.79 g; and they occupied 11.69 +/- 4.90 cm of the uterus. Loss in oocytes (i.e., that did not result in a vital fetus at d 40) increased with increasing ovulation rate and occurred before (early mortality; P = 0.0003) and after implantation (late mortality, i.e., traces visible at d 40; P < 0.0001). With respect to the vital fetuses, increased ovulation rate resulted in decreased fetal (P = 0.0008) and placental weight (P = 0.0008) and decreased length of the area in the uterus that was occupied by the placenta (P = 0.0011). Strong correlations existed between placental and fetal weight [0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64 to 0.72], and placental weight and length (0.78; 95% CI = 0.74 to 0.82). Fetal-placental characteristics were weakly correlated to distance to the implantation sites of neighboring fetuses, a measure of crowdedness [-0.002 (95% CI = -0.042 to 0.038) with fetal weight to 0.16 (95% CI = 0.12 to 0.20) with placental length]. Increased ovulation rates, but more specifically increased late mortality rates, have negative effects on the remaining vital fetuses with respect to the fetal (P = 0.0085) and placental weight (P < 0.0001) and length of the implantation site (P = 0.0016). The most extreme effect was on placental weight, in which a uterus with <10 cases of late mortality was on average 25% greater than placental

  10. Characterization of lipid droplets in steroidogenic MLTC-1 Leydig cells: Protein profiles and the morphological change induced by hormone stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Fujikawa, Noriyuki; Nimura, Satomi; Tokuoka, Yutaro; Tsuda, Sonoka; Aiuchi, Toshihiro; Kato, Rina; Obama, Takashi; Itabe, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are functional subcellular organelles involved in multiple intracellular processes. LDs are found in nearly all types of eukaryotic cells, but their properties are highly variable in different types of tissues. Steroidogenic cells synthesize steroid hormones de novo from the cholesterol deposited in cytosolic LDs. However, the roles of LD proteins in steroidogenesis under pituitary hormone stimulation have not been well elucidated. The protein profile of isolated LDs from the mouse Leydig tumor cell line MLTC-1 was distinct from that of hepatic cells or macrophages. By proteomic analysis of the components using mass spectrometry, two enzymes for steroidogenesis, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3βHSD1) and 17 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 11 (17βHSD11), were identified in two strong bands in the LD fractions. The LD fraction of MLTC-1 cells also included CYP11A1 and CYP17, suggesting that the LDs contain all the enzymes needed for testosterone synthesis. The steroidogenesis in Leydig cells is activated by luteinizing hormone through a PKA-dependent pathway. Stimulation of MLTC-1 cells with luteinizing hormone or 8-bromo-cAMP caused drastic changes in the morphology of the LDs in the MLTC-1 cells. Upon stimulation, large perinuclear LDs are turned into much smaller LDs and dispersed throughout the cytosol. These results raise the possibility that LDs are involved in a regulatory pathway of steroidogenesis, not just by serving as a storage depot for cholesterol esters, but also by providing enzymes and generating sites for enzymatic activity. PMID:26143378