Science.gov

Sample records for hormone receptor-negative tumours

  1. Evaluating Serum Markers for Hormone Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schummer, Michèl; Thorpe, Jason; Giraldez, Maria; Bergan, Lindsay; Tewari, Muneesh; Urban, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in females worldwide. Death rates have been declining, largely as a result of early detection through mammography and improved treatment, but mammographic screening is controversial because of over-diagnosis of breast disease that might not require treatment, and under-diagnosis of cancer in women with dense breasts. Breast cancer screening could be improved by pairing mammography with a tumor circulating marker, of which there are currently none. Given genomic similarities between the basal breast cancer subtype and serous ovarian cancer, and given our success in identifying circulating markers for ovarian cancer, we investigated the performance in hormone receptor-negative breast cancer detection of both previously identified ovarian serum markers and circulating markers associated with transcripts that were differentially expressed in breast cancer tissue compared to healthy breast tissue from reduction mammaplasties. Methods We evaluated a total of 15 analytes (13 proteins, 1 miRNA, 1 autoantibody) in sera drawn at or before breast cancer surgery from 43 breast cancer cases (28 triple-negative—TN—and 15 hormone receptor-negative—HRN—/ HER2-positive) and 87 matched controls. Results In the analysis of our whole cohort of breast cancer cases, autoantibodies to TP53 performed significantly better than the other selected 14 analytes showing 25.6% and 34.9% sensitivity at 95% and 90% specificity respectively with AUC: 0.7 (p<0.001). The subset of 28 TN cancers showed very similar results. We observed no correlation between anti-TP53 and the 14 other markers; however, anti-TP53 expression correlated with Body-Mass-Index. It did not correlate with tumor size, positive lymph nodes, tumor stage, the presence of metastases or recurrence. Conclusion None of the 13 serum proteins nor miRNA 135b identified women with HRN or TN breast cancer. TP53 autoantibodies

  2. Usefulness of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Huang, Zhou; Wang, Qiusheng; Sun, Bing; Ding, Lijuan; Meng, Xiangying; Wu, Shikai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the relationship between pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)/platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and the estimation of hormone-receptor-negative (HR−) breast cancer patients’ survival in a Chinese cohort. Patients and methods Of 434 consecutive HR− nonmetastatic breast cancer patients treated between 2004 and 2010 in the Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences, 318 eligible cases with complete data were included in the present study. Kaplan–Meier analysis was performed to determine the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to test the usefulness of NLR and PLR. Results Univariate analysis indicated that both elevated NLR and PLR (both P<0.001) were associated with poor OS. The utility of NLR remained in the multivariate analysis (P<0.001), but not PLR (P=0.104). The analysis results for DFS were almost the same as OS. Subgroup analysis revealed a significant association between increased NLR and PLR (P<0.001 and P=0.011) and poor survival in triple-negative breast cancer. However, for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer, only NLR was significantly associated with OS in the multivariate analysis (P=0.001). Conclusion The present study indicates that both increased NLR and PLR are associated with poor survival in HR−breast cancer patients. Meanwhile, NLR is independently correlated with OS and DFS, but PLR is not. PMID:27536129

  3. Pathological complete response rate in hormone receptor-negative breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant FEC, followed by weekly paclitaxel administration: A retrospective study and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    KIBA, TAKAYOSHI; MORII, NAO; TAKAHASHI, HIROTOSHI; OZAKI, SHINJI; ATSUMI, MISAO; MASUMOTO, FUMI; YAMASHIRO, HIROYASU

    2016-01-01

    While tumor size, the presence of inflammatory carcinoma and lymph node involvement are the main prognostic factors of women with locally advanced breast cancer, the prognostic value of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status has not been fully clarified. The present study examined the therapeutic efficacy of a neoadjuvant fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide regimen (FEC), followed by weekly paclitaxel and/or trastuzumab administration, in the treatment of hormone receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Between April 2012 and February 2014, 14 patients with hormone receptor-negative local breast cancer (triple-negative type, 9 patients; HER2 type, 5 patients) were included in the study. In all cases, the histological type of the primary cancer was invasive ductal carcinoma. Among the 14 women who received the regimen, 5 presented with stage I cancer (35.7%), 3 with stage IIA (21.4%), 3 with stage IIB (21.4%), 1 with stage IIIB (7.1%) and 2 with stage IIIC (14.3%), according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. With regard to the tumor-node-metastasis classification, 5 patients were T1N0M0 (35.7%), 3 were T2N0M0 (21.4%), 3 were T2N1M0 (21.4%), 2 were T3N3M0 (14.3%) and 1 was T4N1M0 (7.1%). The pathological response was evaluated using resected tissue following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, according to the criteria established by the Japanese Breast Cancer Society. Patients were classified into pathological responders (grades 2 and 3, 71.4% of all patients) and non-responders (grade 1, 28.6% of all patients). A pathological complete response (pCR) was achieved in 50.0% of all cases (7/14); 44.4% of triple-negative-type cases (4/9) and 60.0% of HER2-type cases (3/5). Hematological and non-hematological toxicity was reversible and manageable. No patients withdrew from treatment, and favorable compliance was achieved. The present study demonstrated that neoadjuvant FEC followed

  4. Phase IB randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, dose escalation study of polyphenon E in women with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Crew, Katherine D; Brown, Powel; Greenlee, Heather; Bevers, Therese B; Arun, Banu; Hudis, Clifford; McArthur, Heather L; Chang, Jenny; Rimawi, Mothaffar; Vornik, Lana; Cornelison, Terri L; Wang, Antai; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Ahmed, Aqeel; Terry, Mary Beth; Santella, Regina M; Lippman, Scott M; Hershman, Dawn L

    2012-09-01

    Epidemiologic data support an inverse association between green tea intake and breast cancer risk, and numerous experimental studies have shown the antitumor effects of its main component, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). We conducted a phase IB dose escalation trial in women with a history of stage I to III hormone receptor-negative breast cancer of an oral green tea extract, polyphenon E (Poly E) 400, 600, 800 twice daily or matching placebo for 6 months. The primary endpoint was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), defined as the dose that causes 25% dose-limiting toxicity (DLT, grade ≥II). Assignment to dose level was based upon an adaptive design, the continual reassessment method. A mammogram and random core biopsy of the contralateral breast were obtained at baseline and 6 months and serial blood/urine collections every 2 months for biomarker analyses. Forty women were randomized: 10 to placebo, 30 to Poly E (16 at 400 mg, 11 at 600 mg, 3 at 800 mg). There was one DLT at 400 mg (grade III rectal bleeding), three DLTs at 600 mg (grade II weight gain, grade III indigestion and insomnia), and one DLT at 800 mg (grade III liver function abnormality). The DLT rate at 600 mg was 27% (3 of 11). Pharmacologic levels of total urinary tea polyphenols were achieved with all three dose levels of Poly E. Using a novel phase I trial design, we determined the MTD for Poly E to be 600 mg twice daily. This study highlights the importance of assessing toxicity for any chemopreventive agent being developed for chronic use in healthy individuals. PMID:22827973

  5. Phase IB Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled, Dose Escalation Study of Polyphenon E in Women with Hormone Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crew, Katherine D.; Brown, Powel; Greenlee, Heather; Bevers, Therese B.; Arun, Banu; Hudis, Clifford; McArthur, Heather L.; Chang, Jenny; Rimawi, Mothaffar; Vornik, Lana; Cornelison, Terri L.; Wang, Antai; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Ahmed, Aqeel; Terry, Mary Beth; Santella, Regina M.; Lippman, Scott M.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic data support an inverse association between green tea intake and breast cancer risk and numerous experimental studies have demonstrated the anti-tumor effects of its main component, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). We conducted a phase IB dose escalation trial in women with a history of stage I-III hormone receptor-negative breast cancer of an oral green tea extract, Polyphenon E (Poly E) 400mg, 600mg, 800mg bid or matching placebo for 6 months. The primary endpoint was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), defined as the dose that causes 25% dose limiting toxicity (DLT, grade≥2). Assignment to dose level was based upon an adaptive design, the continual reassessment method. A mammogram and random core biopsy of the contralateral breast were obtained at baseline and 6 months and serial blood/urine collections every 2 months for biomarker analyses. Forty women were randomized: 10 to placebo, 30 to Poly E (16 at 400mg, 11 at 600mg, 3 at 800mg). There was 1 DLT at 400mg (grade 3 rectal bleeding), 3 DLTs at 600mg (grade 2 weight gain, grade 3 indigestion and insomnia), and 1 DLT at 800mg (grade 3 liver function abnormality). The DLT rate at 600mg was 27% (3/11). Pharmacologic levels of total urinary tea polyphenols were achieved with all three dose levels of Poly E. Using a novel phase I trial design, we determined the MTD for Poly E to be 600mg bid. This study highlights the importance of assessing toxicity for any chemopreventive agent being developed for chronic use in healthy individuals. PMID:22827973

  6. Tissue-steroid interactions in canine hormone-dependent tumours.

    PubMed

    Evans, C R; Pierrepoint, C G

    1975-12-13

    Mammary tumour tissue from two bitches and an anal adenoma from a dog were investigated for steroid receptor interaction. Both mammary tumours possessed cytoplasmic macromolecules sedimenting with coefficients of 4S and 8S that bound oestradiol-17beta. These receptors had molecular weights of approximately 60,000 and 180,000 respectively. Transfer of the oestrogen to the nucleus was shown and the presence of a 4-5S nuclear protein demonstrated. The anal adenoma had a cytoplasmic receptor, with a sedimentation value in a sucrose density gradient of 4-5S with respect to bovine serum albumin, that bound tritiated 5alpha-androstane-3alpha, 17alpha-diol. No affinity could be demonstrated for other C19-steroids examined. The significance of these findings in terms of the hormone dependence of the tumours investigated and the possible development of these studies to promote rational therapy in such cases is discussed. PMID:173072

  7. Serum and Tissue Steroid Hormone Levels in Canine Mammary Tumours: Clinical and Prognostic Implications.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, F L; Pérez-Alenza, D; González-Gil, A; Silván, G; Peña, L; Illera, J C

    2015-10-01

    Hormonal dependency of canine mammary tumours (CMT) has been studied over the last few decades. However, studies assessing the prognostic and predictive potential of serum and/or tissue steroid hormone levels are still scarce in CMT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report relating serum and tissue levels of steroid hormones and prognosis in dogs. Serum and tumour tissue from 45 female dogs with spontaneous CMT were included in the study. Moreover, serum and normal mammary tissue from 13 healthy female dogs were also included as controls. Steroid hormones were determined by competitive enzyme immunoassay. Overall, levels of steroid hormones in serum and tissue homogenates were significantly different between malignant and benign mammary tumours (p < 0.01), except for progesterone (P4) serum levels that revealed no statistical differences between groups. In malignant tumours, oestrone sulphate (SO4E1), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione (A4), testosterone (T) and P4 elevated tissue concentrations were significantly associated with tumour relapse and/or distant metastasis during follow-up. A significant association was found between elevated tissue SO4E1 (p = 0.003), 17β-oestradiol (E2) (p = 0.036), DHEA (p = 0.022), A4 (p = 0.001) and P4 (p = 0.013) concentrations and shorter disease-free survival and overall survival in female dogs with malignant mammary tumours. The high levels of tissue steroids found in cases of poor prognosis open the possibility of additional new therapeutic approaches. Future clinical trials will be needed to clarify the usefulness of targeting steroid hormones in the treatment of this neoplastic disease. PMID:26332137

  8. A short history of neuroendocrine tumours and their peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W; Rehfeld, Jens F; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas started in 1870, when Rudolf Heidenhain discovered the neuroendocrine cells, which can lead to the development of these tumours. Siegfried Oberndorfer was the first to introduce the term carcinoid in 1907. The pancreatic islet cells were first described in 1869 by Paul Langerhans. In 1924, Seale Harris was the first to describe endogenous hyperinsulinism/insulinoma. In 1942 William Becker and colleagues were the first to describe the glucagonoma syndrome. The first description of gastrinoma by Robert Zollinger and Edwin Ellison dates from 1955. The first description of the VIPoma syndrome by John Verner and Ashton Morrison dates from 1958. In 1977, the groups of Lars-Inge Larsson and Jens Rehfeld, and of Om Ganda reported the first cases of somatostatinoma. But only in 2013, Jens Rehfeld and colleagues described the CCK-oma syndrome. The most recently updated WHO classification for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours dates from 2010. PMID:26971840

  9. Genes related to growth regulation, DNA repair and apoptosis in an oestrogen receptor-negative (MDA-231) versus an oestrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) breast tumour cell line.

    PubMed

    Skog, Sven; He, Qimin; Khoshnoud, Reza; Fornander, Tommy; Rutqvist, Lars-Erik

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) behind the development of endocrine resistance in breast cancer remains controversial. Here, we compare the capability of oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative cells (MDA-231) versus ER-positive tamoxifen-sensitive cells (MCF-7) to handle DNA repair, transmit signals from damaged DNA, initiate cell death via apoptosis, and then to control transmitted signals from the cell cycle and to synthesize growth factors and receptors. Genes related to these events were studied by cDNA micro-array. Normal human breast cells (H2F) and human lymphoblastoid tumour cells (CEM) were used as controls. Of the 18 genes investigated, 10 genes showed differences in their expression between the cell types. The ER-negative cells showed higher expressions of BRCA1, BRCA2, cdc2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, cyclin E, IGFBP-3, TGF-alpha, TGF beta 2 and a lower expression of TGF beta R1. No differences in the expressions of bax, bcl-2, p53, p21 and GADD45 were found between the two cell lines. We found that the ER-negative cells were characterized by: (1) a stimulated expression of growth factors and cell cycle regulation compounds, (2) improved DNA repair capacity, but (3) no change in DNA damage signals and apoptotic pathways. Improved DNA repair capacity of ER-negative cells would have a growth advantage over ER-positive tumours when receiving antitumour therapy. PMID:15192311

  10. Possible Role of Hormones in Treatment of Metastatic Testicular Teratomas: Tumour Regression with Medroxyprogesterone Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, H. J. G.; Hendry, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    Three patients in a consecutive series of 16 cases of metastatic mallgnant teratoma testis have shown well-marked tumour regression during hormone treatment. In two cases multiple lung metastases had previously failed to respond to actinomycin D therapy, and following treatment with medroxyprogesterone acetate one patient had well-marked selective tumour regression for nine months while the other is alive, well, and free from disease at seven years. The third case was treated with a combination of actinomycin D and medroxyprogesterone acetate and is alive and disease-free at two years. Attention is drawn to this preliminary study in the hope of stimulating interest in the possible value of hormones, either alone or combined with chemotherapy and irradiation, in the treatment of metastatic testicular teratoma. Multicentre prospective clinical trials are now needed if knowledge is to be advanced in this field. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:4726928

  11. Comparative Analysis of Clinical, Hormonal and Morphological Studies in Patients with Neuroendocrine ACTH-Producing Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnikova, G. S.; Lapshina, A. M.; Voronkova, I. A.; Marova, E. I.; Arapova, S. D.; Goncharov, N. P.; Dedov, I. I.

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the problem of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) with clinical symptoms of hypercorticism caused by hypersecretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) by tumour cells. In most cases (85%), the tumours were localized in the pituitary gland (Cushing's disease); 15% of the patients had an extrapituitary tumour that manifest as an ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS). Comparative analysis of clinical, hormonal, histological, and immunohistochemical characteristics of pituitary and extrapituitary ACTH-secreting NET was performed. It included 46 patients with CD and 38 ones exhibiting ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS). Results of the study suggest differences between CD and EAS in terms of the severity of clinical manifestations and duration of the disease. Hormonal studies showed that EAS unlike CD was associated with high plasma ACTH and cortisol levels, late-evening salivary cortisol and daily urinary free cortisol, the absence of a 60% or greater reduction of cortisol in the HDDST test, and the presence of a low (less than 2) ACTH gradient in response to desmopressin administration with catheterization of cavernous sinuses. The study of morphofunctional characteristics of the removed NET demonstrated the ability of both pituitary and extrapituitary NETs to express ACTH as well as GH, PRL, LH, and FSH. The angiogenic markers (CD31 and VEGF) were detected with equal frequency regardless of the NET localization. The histological structure of all corticotropinomas suggested their benign origin, but extrapituitary NETs were represented by different morphological types with varying malignancy, invasiveness, and metastatic properties. A higher cell proliferation potential (Ki-67) was documented for NET in patients presenting with an ectopic ACTH secretion compared to those having corticotropinomas. PMID:23509456

  12. Immunolocalization of steroid hormone receptors in normal and tumour cells: mechanisms of their cellular traffic.

    PubMed

    Perrot-Applanat, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Milgrom, E

    1992-01-01

    Experimental conditions are described for the detection of steroid receptors in tissue sections or cells at the light microscope level. Current knowledge about the ultrastructural distribution of these receptors is summarized; the mechanisms of their nuclear localization are described. Karyophilic signals involved in nuclear translocation are characterized by means of in vitro mutagenesis of steroid receptor cDNAs. Studies analysing the subcellular distribution of various transfected receptor mutants in energy depleted cells together with fusion experiments provide evidence for nucleoplasmic shuttling of progesterone receptors. We conclude that the "nuclear" location of the wild type progesterone receptor reflects a dynamic equilibrium between active nuclear import and outward diffusion. We also describe the use of immunocytochemistry in pathology, especially for the detection of steroid receptors in hormone dependent tumours. PMID:1423330

  13. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) enhance tumour growth inhibition induced by androgen deprivation in human MDA-Pca-2b prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Letsch, M; Schally, A V; Stangelberger, A; Groot, K; Varga, J L

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) antagonist JV-1-38 could enhance the effects of androgen deprivation produced by the anti-androgen Flutamide and luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist Decapeptyl in an experimental model of human androgen-sensitive MDA PCa 2b prostate carcinoma implanted subcutaneously (s.c.) into nude mice. We also evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) the effects of combined treatment on the mRNA expression for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and measured serum PSA levels. In experiment 1, GH-RH antagonist JV-1-38 greatly inhibited tumour growth in combination with Decapeptyl, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, combined therapy with JV-1-38 at 20 microg/day and Decapeptyl microcapsules releasing 12.5 microg/day for 29 days inhibited significantly (P<0.01) MDA PCa 2b tumour growth by 65%, compared with controls. Combined treatment also significantly (P<0.05) decreased serum PSA levels by 52% and reduced tumour weight by 54% vs. controls. In experiment 2, GH-RH antagonist JV-1-38 at 20 microg/day likewise showed powerful growth inhibitory effects when combined with Flutamide (25 mg/kg/day) for 21 days. Combined treatment with JV-1-38 and slow-release pellets of Flutamide significantly (P<0.001) inhibited tumour growth by 61% versus controls, and was significantly (P<0.05) more effective than Flutamide or JV-1-38 alone. Combination therapy also reduced significantly (P<0.001) tumour weight and serum PSA levels by 59 and 47%, respectively. The mRNA expression for PSA in MDA PCa 2b tumours was not changed by JV-1-38, Decapeptyl and Flutamide alone or in their respective combinations. Our findings suggest that GH-RH antagonists could enhance the tumour inhibitory effects of androgen deprivation for the primary therapy of patients with advanced prostate carcinoma. PMID:14746863

  14. Thyroid hormones and tetrac: new regulators of tumour stroma formation via integrin αvβ3.

    PubMed

    Schmohl, Kathrin A; Müller, Andrea M; Wechselberger, Alexandra; Rühland, Svenja; Salb, Nicole; Schwenk, Nathalie; Heuer, Heike; Carlsen, Janette; Göke, Burkhard; Nelson, Peter J; Spitzweg, Christine

    2015-12-01

    To improve our understanding of non-genomic, integrin αvβ3-mediated thyroid hormone action in tumour stroma formation, we examined the effects of triiodo-l-thyronine (T3), l-thyroxine (T4) and integrin-specific inhibitor tetrac on differentiation, migration and invasion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are an integral part of the tumour's fibrovascular network. Primary human bone marrow-derived MSCs were treated with T3 or T4 in the presence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell-conditioned medium (CM), which resulted in stimulation of the expression of genes associated with cancer-associated fibroblast-like differentiation as determined by qPCR and ELISA. In addition, T3 and T4 increased migration of MSCs towards HCC cell-CM and invasion into the centre of three-dimensional HCC cell spheroids. All these effects were tetrac-dependent and therefore integrin αvβ3-mediated. In a subcutaneous HCC xenograft model, MSCs showed significantly increased recruitment and invasion into tumours of hyperthyroid mice compared to euthyroid and, in particular, hypothyroid mice, while treatment with tetrac almost completely eliminated MSC recruitment. These studies significantly improve our understanding of the anti-tumour activity of tetrac, as well as the mechanisms that regulate MSC differentiation and recruitment in the context of tumour stroma formation, as an important prerequisite for the utilisation of MSCs as gene delivery vehicles. PMID:26307023

  15. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation. PMID:27241667

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI to evaluate tumour response and residual tumour size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Acea, Benigno; Soler, Rafaela; Iglesias, Ángela; Santiago, Paz; Mosquera, Joaquín; Calvo, Lourdes; Seoane-Pillado, Teresa; García, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim, of the study was to estimate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in assessing residual disease in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and to identify the clinico-pathological factors that affect the diagnostic accuracy of breast MRI to determine residual tumour size following NAC. Patients and methods 91 breast cancer patients undergoing NAC (92 breast lesions) were included in the study. Breast MRI was performed at baseline and after completion of NAC. Treatment response was evaluated by MRI and histopathological examination to investigate the ability of MRI to predict tumour response. Residual tumour size was measured on post-treatment MRI and compared with pathology in 89 lesions. Clinicopathological factors were analyzed to compare MRI-pathologic size differences. Results The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for diagnosing invasive residual disease by using MRI were 75.00%, 78.57%, 88.89%, 57.89%, and 76.09% respectively. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) between tumour sizes determined by MRI and pathology was r = 0.648 (p < 0.001). The size discrepancy was significantly lower in cancers with initial MRI size ≤ 5 cm (p = 0.050), in cancers with high tumour grade (p < 0.001), and in patients with hormonal receptor-negative cancer (p = 0.033). Conclusions MRI is an accurate tool for evaluating tumour response after NAC. The accuracy of MRI in estimating residual tumour size varies with the baseline MRI tumour size, the tumour grade and the hormonal receptor status. PMID:27069452

  17. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  18. Soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor 2, a serum marker of resistance to the anabolic actions of growth hormone in subjects with HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Gelato, Marie C; Mynarcik, Dennis; McNurlan, Margaret A

    2002-01-01

    Therapies are still being sought for the prevention of loss of body weight and lean body mass in HIV disease. The purpose of the present study was to identify a serum marker that would help in selecting patients who may be appropriate candidates for the use of anabolic agents, such as growth hormone, to restore lean body mass. This study included 26 HIV-infected patients and nine healthy controls, assessed previously for the effectiveness of 2 weeks of growth hormone administration in the stimulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Serum levels of interleukins-1beta, -6 and -10 were not useful predictors of the anabolic response to growth hormone. Serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) were significantly elevated (P<0.05) in patients with AIDS and AIDS-related weight loss, and there was a significant correlation between the serum concentration of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and stage of disease (P=0.03). However, the serum concentration of the soluble TNFalpha receptor type 2 was most predictive of an inability of muscle protein synthesis to respond anabolically to growth hormone (r=-0.42, P=0.01). These data suggest that inflammation impacts on the responsiveness of muscle tissue to an anabolic stimulus, and that the soluble TNFalpha receptor type 2 provides a useful serum marker for metabolic dysfunction in HIV disease, which can be used to identify individuals likely to respond to growth hormone-based anabolic therapy. PMID:11749664

  19. The effect of low dose carbidopa/levodopa on prolactin and growth hormone concentrations in patients with breast cancer and in benign breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M K; Ramsay, I D; Jenner, P G

    1978-01-01

    1 Low doses of carbidopa/levodopa (12.5 mg 1-alpha-methyl-dopahydrazine, 125 mg levodopa) were administered orally to 29 patients with tumours of the breast (16 with breast cancer, 13 with benign breast disease). 2 Plasma dopa response curves were similar in all the patients studied. 3 Prolactin and growth hormone showed similar responses to carbidopa/levodopa irrespective of age or diagnosis. 4 Prolactin showed an unusual reponse in four patients which has not previously been recorded. PMID:656281

  20. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal ...

  1. Outcomes of Estrogen Receptor Negative and Progesterone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Melissa; Chang, Martin C.; González, Rosa; Lategan, Belinda; del Barco, Elvira; Vera-Badillo, Francisco; Quesada, Paula; Goldstein, Robyn; Cruz, Ignacio; Ocana, Alberto; Cruz, Juan J.; Amir, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features and outcomes of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and progesterone receptor positive (PgR+) breast cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a well-characterized database of sequential patients diagnosed with early stage invasive breast carcinoma. Outcomes of interest were time to relapse (TTR) and overall survival (OS). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted to assess the association of ER-/PgR+ with TTR and OS in comparison to ER+ and to ER- and PgR negative (ER-/PgR-) tumors irrespective of HER2 status. ER and PgR expression was conservatively defined as 10% or greater staining of cancer cells. Results 815 patients were followed for a median of 40.5 months; 56 patients (7%) had ER-/PgR+, 624 (77%) had ER+ and 136 (17%) had ER-/PgR- phenotypes. Compared with ER+ tumors, ER-/PgR+ tumors were associated with younger age (50 versus 59 years, p=0.03), high grade (50% versus 24%, p<0.001) and more frequent HER2 overexpression/amplification (43% versus 14%, p<0.001). TTR for ER-/PgR+ was intermediate between ER+ and ER-/PgR- tumors, but was not significantly different from ER+ tumors. Recurrences in the ER-/PgR+ and ER-/PgR- groups occurred early in follow-up while in ER+ tumors recurrences continued to occur over the duration of follow-up. OS of ER-/PgR+ was similar to ER+ tumors and better than that of ER-/PgR- tumors. Conclusions The ER-/PgR+ phenotype is associated with higher grade with HER2 overexpression/amplification and occurs more commonly in younger women. Risk of relapse and death more closely resembles ER+ than ER-/PgR- tumors suggesting this phenotype represents a group of more aggressive hormone receptor positive tumors. PMID:26161666

  2. The global effect of follicle-stimulating hormone and tumour necrosis factor α on gene expression in cultured bovine ovarian granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oocytes mature in ovarian follicles surrounded by granulosa cells. During follicle growth, granulosa cells replicate and secrete hormones, particularly steroids close to ovulation. However, most follicles cease growing and undergo atresia or regression instead of ovulating. To investigate the effects of stimulatory (follicle-stimulating hormone; FSH) and inhibitory (tumour necrosis factor alpha; TNFα) factors on the granulosa cell transcriptome, bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir and pools of granulosa cells were cultured in vitro for six days under defined serum-free conditions with treatments present on days 3–6. Initially dose–response experiments (n = 4) were performed to determine the optimal concentrations of FSH (0.33 ng/ml) and TNFα (10 ng/ml) to be used for the microarray experiments. For array experiments cells were cultured under control conditions, with FSH, with TNFα, or with FSH plus TNFα (n = 4 per group) and RNA was harvested for microarray analyses. Results Statistical analysis showed primary clustering of the arrays into two groups, control/FSH and TNFα/TNFα plus FSH. The effect of TNFα on gene expression dominated that of FSH, with substantially more genes differentially regulated, and the pathways and genes regulated by TNFα being similar to those of FSH plus TNFα treatment. TNFα treatment reduced the endocrine activity of granulosa cells with reductions in expression of FST, INHA, INBA and AMH. The top-ranked canonical pathways and GO biological terms for the TNFα treatments included antigen presentation, inflammatory response and other pathways indicative of innate immune function and fibrosis. The two most significant networks also reflect this, containing molecules which are present in the canonical pathways of hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation and transforming growth factor β signalling, and these were up regulated. Upstream regulator analyses also predicted TNF, interferons γ and

  3. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  4. Activation of Estrogen Receptor Transfected into a Receptor-Negative Brest Cancer Cell Line Decreases the Metastatic and Invasive Potential of the Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marcel; Derocq, Danielle; Freiss, Gilles; Rochefort, Henri

    1992-12-01

    Breast cancers containing estrogen receptors are responsive to antiestrogen treatment and have a better prognosis than estrogen receptor-negative tumors. The loss of estrogen and progesterone receptors appears to be associated with a progression to less-differentiated tumors. We transfected the human estrogen receptor into the estrogen receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in an attempt to restore their sensitivity to antiestrogens. Two stable sublines of MDA-MB-231 cells (HC1 and HE5) expressing functional estrogen receptors were studied for their ability to grow and invade in vitro and to metastasize in athymic nude mice. The number and size of lung metastases developed by these two sublines in ovariectomized nude mice was not markedly altered by tamoxifen but was inhibited 3-fold by estradiol. Estradiol also significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation of these sublines and their invasiveness in Matrigel, a reconstituted basement membrane, whereas the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 reversed these effects. These results show that estradiol inhibits the metastatic ability of estrogen receptornegative breast cancer cells following transfection with the estrogen receptor, whereas estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers are stimulated by estrogen, indicating that factors other than the estrogen receptor are involved in progression toward hormone independence. Reactivation or transfer of the estrogen receptor gene can therefore be considered as therapeutic approaches to hormone-independent cancers

  5. Elevated Resistin Gene Expression in African American Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallega, Karin A.; Liu, NingNing; Myers, Jennifer S.; Yu, Kaixian; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction African American (AA) women diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to have aggressive subtypes. Investigating differentially expressed genes between patient populations may help explain racial health disparities. Resistin, one such gene, is linked to inflammation, obesity, and breast cancer risk. Previous studies indicated that resistin expression is higher in serum and tissue of AA breast cancer patients compared to Caucasian American (CA) patients. However, resistin expression levels have not been compared between AA and CA patients in a stage- and subtype-specific context. Breast cancer prognosis and treatments vary by subtype. This work investigates differential resistin gene expression in human breast cancer tissues of specific stages, receptor subtypes, and menopause statuses in AA and CA women. Methods Differential gene expression analysis was performed using human breast cancer gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We performed inter-race resistin gene expression level comparisons looking at receptor status and stage-specific data between AA and CA samples. DESeq was run to test for differentially expressed resistin values. Results Resistin RNA was higher in AA women overall, with highest values in receptor negative subtypes. Estrogen-, progesterone-, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative groups showed statistically significant elevated resistin levels in Stage I and II AA women compared to CA women. In inter-racial comparisons, AA women had significantly higher levels of resistin regardless of menopause status. In whole population comparisons, resistin expression was higher among Stage I and III estrogen receptor negative cases. In comparisons of molecular subtypes, resistin levels were significant higher in triple negative than in luminal A breast cancer. Conclusion Resistin gene expression levels were significantly higher in receptor negative subtypes, especially estrogen receptor negative cases in AA

  6. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. [Drug therapy for neuroendocrine tumours].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Miklós

    2013-09-29

    The author aims to review the established medical treatment options of neuroendocrine tumours, which have expanded greatly in recent years and present the most important aspects to be considered in planning patients' management. Medical treatment is usually considered in advanced stages of these tumours, as well as in cases of hormone overproduction. Somatostatin analogues have been known to be effective in alleviating hormone excess syndromes, especially carcinoid syndrome for the past 25 years. There is a convincing evidence that the somatostatin analogue octreotide is useful as an antitumor agent, at least in well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours and probably also in those of pancreatic origin. Interferons may be also used and the indications for their use may be almost the same. Optimal patient selection is mandatory for the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Streptozotocin- and, recently, temozolomide-based chemotherapies should be considered in progressive phases of well differentiated (G1/G2) pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. A cisplatin-etoposide combination is the first choice for the treatment of G3 neuroendocrine carcinomas of any origin. Recently, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus and the combined tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib were registered for the treatment of G1/G2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. The most recent drug treatment recommendations and therapeutic algorithms to improve systemic therapy in patients with neuroendocrine tumours are summarized and novel drug candidates with particular potential for future management of these tumours are outlined. PMID:24058101

  8. Brown tumour of the jaw

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Preeti P; Gharote, Harshkant P; Thomas, Shaji; R, Guruprasad; Singh, Neha

    2011-01-01

    Brown tumours are classic bony lesions that arise as a result of the effect of parathyroid hormone on bone tissue in some patients with hyperparathyroidism. They are erosive bony lesions caused by rapid osteolysis and peritrabecular fibrosis, resulting in a local destructive phenomenon. Facial skeleton is involved in about 2% of all cases of which the mandible is frequently affected. A 35-year-old female who was diagnosed with osteomalacia and brown tumour in posterior mandible as the sign of secondary hyperparathyroidism secondary to vitamin D deficiency is presented. PMID:22669885

  9. Delineating the molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen's oncolytic actions in estrogen receptor-negative cancers.

    PubMed

    Radin, Daniel P; Patel, Parth

    2016-06-15

    Since its clinical inception, tamoxifen (TAM) has proved to be a powerful tool in treating estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers while exhibiting manageable side effects. Although TAM was synthesized as an estrogen receptor antagonist, reports have found that a significant fraction of women with estrogen receptor-negative cancers have benefitted from TAM treatment, suggesting the possibility of an alternate anti-cancer mechanism. In this paper, we present a review of recent and past literature in an attempt to clarify how TAM inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in cells lacking the estrogen receptor. Our analysis indicates that micromolar concentrations of TAM selectively elevate intracellular calcium concentrations in malignant cells, possibly by inversely agonizing cannabinoid receptors, producing considerable mitochondrial distress followed by the rapid production of reactive oxygen species. In response, cytoplasmic proteins such as JNK1 are activated, which mediates the activation of caspase-8. Fyn kinase auto phosphorylates in response to increased reactive oxygen species and directs the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl to tag growth factor receptors for ubiquitination, potentially abrogating constitutively active survival pathways that are hallmarks of cancer progression. We attempt to differentiate the effect that TAM has on purified Protein Kinase C (PKC) compared to that in an intact cell, suggesting that low micromolar concentrations of TAM indirectly inhibit PKC by inducing EGFR destruction and high micromolar concentrations of TAM inhibits PKC through a direct binding mechanism. PMID:27083550

  10. Tamoxifen stimulates in vivo growth of drug-resistant estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maenpaa, J; Wiebe, V; Koester, S; Wurz, G; Emshoff, V; Seymour, R; Sipila, P; DeGregorio, M

    1993-01-01

    An estrogen receptor-negative, multidrug-resistant MDA-MB-A1 human breast cancer cell line was grown in culture with and without a noninhibitory concentration (0.5 microM) of tamoxifen for 122 days. Tamoxifen-treated and control cells were inoculated into opposite flanks of nine nude mice, where they produced measurable tumors in every case. Six of the animals were treated with tamoxifen at 500 micrograms/day for 22 days. Although no inhibitory nor stimulatory effect of tamoxifen was seen in vitro, tamoxifen had a clear tumor-growth-stimulating effect in mice. The most pronounced stimulatory effects were observed in the cells that had been cultured with tamoxifen. Within 3 weeks of the start of tamoxifen therapy, the cells grown in the presence of tamoxifen produced tumors with a mean size of 380 mm2, whereas the cells not pretreated with tamoxifen had tumors of 220 mm2. In contrast, in mice not receiving tamoxifen, the sizes of the tumors were 190 and 140 mm2, respectively. These preliminary results suggest that prolonged in vitro tamoxifen exposure induces cellular changes that result in tumors that are stimulated to grow faster in mice following tamoxifen treatment. PMID:8339392

  11. Mammary Adipose Tissue-Derived Lysophospholipids Promote Estrogen Receptor-Negative Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Volden, Paul A; Skor, Maxwell N; Johnson, Marianna B; Singh, Puneet; Patel, Feenalie N; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2016-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion through G protein-coupled receptors, has been implicated in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including cancer. LPA is converted from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by the secreted phospholipase autotaxin (ATX). Although various cell types can produce ATX, adipocyte-derived ATX is believed to be the major source of circulating ATX and also to be the major regulator of plasma LPA levels. In addition to ATX, adipocytes secrete numerous other factors (adipokines); although several adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer biology, the contribution of mammary adipose tissue-derived LPC/ATX/LPA (LPA axis) signaling to breast cancer is poorly understood. Using murine mammary fat-conditioned medium, we investigated the contribution of LPA signaling to mammary epithelial cancer cell biology and identified LPA signaling as a significant contributor to the oncogenic effects of the mammary adipose tissue secretome. To interrogate the role of mammary fat in the LPA axis during breast cancer progression, we exposed mammary adipose tissue to secreted factors from estrogen receptor-negative mammary epithelial cell lines and monitored changes in the mammary fat pad LPA axis. Our data indicate that bidirectional interactions between mammary cancer cells and mammary adipocytes alter the local LPA axis and increase ATX expression in the mammary fat pad during breast cancer progression. Thus, the LPC/ATX/LPA axis may be a useful target for prevention in patients at risk of ER-negative breast cancer. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 367-78. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26862086

  12. Extra gonadal sclerosing stromal tumour in the transverse mesocolon.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Samuel; Kyei, Ishmael; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Adjei, Ernest

    2016-03-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) is a rare benign sex cord stromal tumour of the ovary. We report a case of sclerosing stromal tumour of the mesentery in a 32-year-old Para one who presented with intra abdominal mass, menstrual irregularity and secondary infertility. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the completely excised tumour was consistent with sclerosing stromal tumour, immunoreactive only to vimentin. No ovarian tissue was found in the sectioned tumour. Her menses became regular and she conceived 3 months after complete excision and delivered after 9 months. Hormonal assay was not done because SST was least suspected. From literature this is the first case of SST in the transverse mesocolon reported in the West African subregion, and may probably be one of the rare cases of hormonally active SST. PMID:27605726

  13. Imaging of rare medullary adrenal tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Maciel, C A; Tang, Y Z; Coniglio, G; Sahdev, A

    2016-05-01

    Although adrenal medullary tumours are rare, they have important clinical implications. They form a heterogeneous group of tumours, ranging from benign, non-secretory, incidental masses to hormonally active tumours presenting acutely, or malignant tumours with disseminated disease and a poor prognosis. Increasingly, benign masses are incidentally detected due to the widespread use of imaging and routine medical check-ups. This review aims to illustrate the multimodality imaging appearances of rare adrenal medullary tumours, excluding the more common phaeochromocytomas, with clues to the diagnosis and to summarise relevant epidemiological and clinical data. Careful correlation of clinical presentation, hormone profile, and various imaging techniques narrow the differential diagnosis. Image-guided percutaneous adrenal biopsy can provide a definitive diagnosis, allowing for conservative management in selected cases. A close collaboration between the radiologist, endocrinologist, and surgeon is of the utmost importance in the management of these tumours. PMID:26944698

  14. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  15. HLA-dependent tumour development: a role for tumour associate macrophages?

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Maddalena; Andersson, Emilia; Villabona, Lisa; Seliger, Barbara; Lundqvist, Andreas; Kiessling, Rolf; Masucci, Giuseppe V

    2013-01-01

    HLA abnormalities on tumour cells for immune escape have been widely described. In addition, cellular components of the tumour microenvironment, in particular myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and alternatively activated M2 tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs), are involved in tumour promotion, progression, angiogenesis and suppression of anti-tumour immunity. However, the role of HLA in these activities is poorly understood. This review details MHC class I characteristics and describes MHC class I receptors functions. This analysis established the basis for a reflection about the crosstalk among the tumour cells, the TAMs and the cells mediating an immune response.The tumour cells and TAMs exploit MHC class I molecules to modulate the surrounding immune cells. HLA A, B, C and G molecules down-regulate the macrophage myeloid activation through the interaction with the inhibitory LILRB receptors. HLA A, B, C are able to engage inhibitory KIR receptors negatively regulating the Natural Killer and cytotoxic T lymphocytes function while HLA-G induces the secretion of pro-angiogenic cytokines and chemokine thanks to an activator KIR receptor expressed by a minority of peripheral NK cells. The open conformer of classical MHC-I is able to interact with LILRA receptors described as being associated to the Th2-type cytokine response, triggering a condition for the M2 like TAM polarization. In addition, HLA-E antigens on the surface of the TAMs bind the inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A expressed by a subset of NK cells and activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes protecting from the cytolysis.Furthermore MHC class II expression by antigen presenting cells is finely regulated by factors provided with immunological capacities. Tumour-associated macrophages show an epigenetically controlled down-regulation of the MHC class II expression induced by the decoy receptor DcR3, a member of the TNFR, which further enhances the M2-like polarization. BAT3, a positive regulator of MHC class

  16. Ovarian stimulation and granulosa-cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, W; Kruitwagen, R; Bastiaans, B; Hanselaar, T; Rolland, R

    1993-04-17

    Ovarian stimulation in the treatment of infertility is far from physiological because patients and their ovaries are exposed to high concentrations of gonadotropins. Many studies have focused on the two most common side-effects of ovarian stimulation--ie, hyperstimulation and multiple pregnancy. We describe 12 patients in whom granulosa-cell tumour was discovered after ovarian stimulation treatment with clomiphene citrate and/or gonadotropins. Although we cannot prove a causal link between the tumour and the medication, investigations in animals have shown a relation between gonadotropin exposition and the development of granulosa-cell tumours. The possible relation of ovarian stimulation and granulosa-cell tumours in human beings has not been published before. We postulate three explanations for this finding; first, the granulosa-cell tumour is present in the ovary, waiting for a hormonal trigger; second, increased follicle stimulating hormone concentrations are oncogenic to granulosa cell; and third, the onset of the granulosa-cell tumour during ovarian stimulation is coincidental. We recommend that ovarian stimulation is done only if there is a valid indication after proper assessment of the ovaries, and that women who have had ovarian stimulation are followed for longer than at present. PMID:8096944

  17. A genome-wide association scan on estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and may be characterized on the basis of whether estrogen receptors (ER) are expressed in the tumour cells. ER status of breast cancer is important clinically, and is used both as a prognostic indicator and treatment predictor. In this study, we focused on identifying genetic markers associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk. Methods We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 285,984 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 617 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 4,583 controls. We also conducted a genome-wide pathway analysis on the discovery dataset using permutation-based tests on pre-defined pathways. The extent of shared polygenic variation between ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancers was assessed by relating risk scores, derived using ER-positive breast cancer samples, to disease state in independent, ER-negative breast cancer cases. Results Association with ER-negative breast cancer was not validated for any of the five most strongly associated SNPs followed up in independent studies (1,011 ER-negative breast cancer cases, 7,604 controls). However, an excess of small P-values for SNPs with known regulatory functions in cancer-related pathways was found (global P = 0.052). We found no evidence to suggest that ER-negative breast cancer shares a polygenic basis to disease with ER-positive breast cancer. Conclusions ER-negative breast cancer is a distinct breast cancer subtype that merits independent analyses. Given the clinical importance of this phenotype and the likelihood that genetic effect sizes are small, greater sample sizes and further studies are required to understand the etiology of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:21062454

  18. Anaesthetic management for caesarean section in a case of previously operated with residual pituitary tumour

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Prerana N; Sonawane, Darshana; Appukutty, Jithesh

    2011-01-01

    Successful anaesthetic management for caesarean section in a case with previous pituitary tumour resection, with residual tumour, is reported. The pituitary gland undergoes global hyperplasia during pregnancy. Functional pituitary tumours may exhibit symptomatic enlargement during pregnancy. Growth hormone secreting tumour is associated with acromegaly which has associated anaesthetic implications of difficult airway, systemic hypertension, and diabetes and electrolyte imbalance. Intracranial space occupying lesions can increase intra cranial pressure and compromise cerebral perfusion or cause herniation. We report management of this case. PMID:22223910

  19. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. PMID:25648860

  20. Current status of hormone therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, Elsa; Armengol-Alonso, Alejandra; Muñoz, Montserrat; Seguí-Palmer, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    The natural history of HR+ breast cancer tends to be different from hormone receptor-negative disease in terms of time to recurrence, site of recurrence and overall aggressiveness of the disease. The developmental strategies of hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer have led to the classes of selective estrogen receptor modulators, selective estrogen receptor downregulators, and aromatase inhibitors. These therapeutic options have improved breast cancer outcomes in the metastatic setting, thereby delaying the need for chemotherapy. However, a subset of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers do not benefit from endocrine therapy (intrinsic resistance), and all HR+ metastatic breast cancers ultimately develop resistance to hormonal therapies (acquired resistance). Considering the multiple pathways involved in the HR network, targeting other components of pathologically activated intracellular signaling in breast cancer may prove to be a new direction in clinical research. This review focuses on current and emerging treatments for HR+ metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25311296

  1. Plasma fluorescent oxidation products and risk of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in the Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II.

    PubMed

    Hirko, Kelly A; Fortner, Renée T; Hankinson, Susan E; Wu, Tianying; Eliassen, A Heather

    2016-07-01

    Findings from epidemiologic studies of oxidative stress biomarkers and breast cancer have been mixed, although no studies have focused on estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) tumors which may be more strongly associated with oxidative stress. We examined prediagnostic plasma fluorescent oxidation products (FlOP), a global biomarker of oxidative stress, and risk of ER- breast cancer in a nested case-control study in the Nurses' Health Study and Nurses' Health Study II. ER- breast cancer cases (n = 355) were matched to 355 controls on age, month/time of day of blood collection, fasting status, menopausal status, and menopausal hormone use. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine associations of plasma FlOP at three emission wavelengths (FlOP_360, FlOP_320, and FlOP_400) and risk of ER- breast cancer. We did not observe any significant associations between FlOP measures and risk of ER- breast cancer overall; the RRQ4vsQ1 (95 %CI) 0.70 (0.43-1.13), p trend = 0.09 for FlOP_360; 0.91(0.56-1.46), p trend = 0.93 for FlOP_320; and 0.62 (0.37-1.03), p trend = 0.10 for FlOP_400. Results were similar in models additionally adjusted for total carotenoid levels and in models stratified by age and total carotenoids. Although high (vs. low) levels of FIOP_360 and FIOP_400 were associated with lower risk of ER- breast cancer in lean women (body mass index (BMI) < 25 kg/m(2)) but not in overweight/obese women, these differences were not statistically significant (pint = 0.23 for FlOP_360; pint = 0.37 for FlOP_400). Our findings suggest that positive associations of plasma FlOP concentrations and ER- breast cancer risk are unlikely. PMID:27294610

  2. [Efficacy of somatostatin analogues in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours based on the results of recent clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Igaz, Péter

    2014-11-30

    Due to their inhibitory effects on hormone secretion, somatostatin analogues are of pivotal importance in the symptomatic treatment of hormone-secreting neuroendocrine tumours. Although several earlier clinical observations supported the view that these biological agents are capable of inhibiting the growth of neuroendocrine tumours, the PROMID study published in 2009 was the first to confirm the inhibitory effect of octreotide on tumour growth and demonstrated the prolongation of progression free survival. These findings have been confirmed and extended by the most recent CLARINET trial with lanreotide published in 2014. Somatostatin analogues are capable of inhibiting tumour growth and stabilizing disease irrespective of the hormonal activity of the tumour and, therefore, their applicability is expected to be extended to the treatment of hormonally inactive neuroendocrine tumours, as well. PMID:25417137

  3. Brain and spinal tumour.

    PubMed

    Goh, C H; Lu, Y Y; Lau, B L; Oy, J; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2014-12-01

    This study reviewed the epidemiology of brain and spinal tumours in Sarawak from January 2009 till December 2012. The crude incidence of brain tumour in Sarawak was 4.6 per 100,000 population/year with cumulative rate 0.5%. Meningioma was the most common brain tumour (32.3%) and followed by astrocytoma (19.4%). Only brain metastases showed a rising trend and cases were doubled in 4 years. This accounted for 15.4% and lung carcinoma was the commonest primary. Others tumour load were consistent. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and astrocytoma were common in paediatrics (60%). We encountered more primary spinal tumour rather than spinal metastases. Intradural schwannoma was the commonest and frequently located at thoracic level. The current healthcare system in Sarawak enables a more consolidate data collection to reflect accurate brain tumours incidence. This advantage allows subsequent future survival outcome research and benchmarking for healthcare resource planning. PMID:25934956

  4. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  5. An Ectopic ACTH Secreting Metastatic Parotid Tumour.

    PubMed

    Dacruz, Thomas; Kalhan, Atul; Rashid, Majid; Obuobie, Kofi

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year old woman presented with features of Cushing's syndrome (CS) secondary to an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secreting metastatic parotid tumour 3 years after excision of the original tumour. She subsequently developed fatal intestinal perforation and unfortunately died despite best possible medical measures. Ectopic ACTH secretion accounts for 5-10% of all patients presenting with ACTH dependent hypercortisolism; small cell carcinoma of lung (SCLC) and neuroendocrine tumours (NET) account for the majority of such cases. Although there are 4 previous case reports of ectopic ACTH secreting salivary tumours in literature, to our knowledge this is the first published case report in which the CS developed after 3 years of what was deemed as a successful surgical excision of primary salivary tumour. Our patient initially had nonspecific symptoms which may have contributed to a delay in diagnosis. Perforation of sigmoid colon is a recognised though underdiagnosed complication associated with steroid therapy and hypercortisolism. This case demonstrates the challenges faced in diagnosis as well as management of patients with CS apart from the practical difficulties faced while trying to identify source of ectopic ACTH. PMID:26904316

  6. An Ectopic ACTH Secreting Metastatic Parotid Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Dacruz, Thomas; Kalhan, Atul; Rashid, Majid; Obuobie, Kofi

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year old woman presented with features of Cushing's syndrome (CS) secondary to an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secreting metastatic parotid tumour 3 years after excision of the original tumour. She subsequently developed fatal intestinal perforation and unfortunately died despite best possible medical measures. Ectopic ACTH secretion accounts for 5–10% of all patients presenting with ACTH dependent hypercortisolism; small cell carcinoma of lung (SCLC) and neuroendocrine tumours (NET) account for the majority of such cases. Although there are 4 previous case reports of ectopic ACTH secreting salivary tumours in literature, to our knowledge this is the first published case report in which the CS developed after 3 years of what was deemed as a successful surgical excision of primary salivary tumour. Our patient initially had nonspecific symptoms which may have contributed to a delay in diagnosis. Perforation of sigmoid colon is a recognised though underdiagnosed complication associated with steroid therapy and hypercortisolism. This case demonstrates the challenges faced in diagnosis as well as management of patients with CS apart from the practical difficulties faced while trying to identify source of ectopic ACTH. PMID:26904316

  7. Tumours of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Head, K. W.; Nielsen, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lung tumours are not common in domestic animals; there has not been the increase in epidermoid carcinomas and anaplastic small-cell carcinomas that has occurred in man this century. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type in animals. The biological behaviour of each type of tumour in animals seems to be much the same as in man. The tumours are described histologically, the main categories being: epidermoid carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma, carcinoid tumours, bronchial gland tumours, benign tumours, and sarcomas. ImagesFig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:4371738

  8. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  9. A genome-wide "pleiotropy scan" does not identify new susceptibility loci for estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Campa, Daniele; Barrdahl, Myrto; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Severi, Gianluca; Diver, W Ryan; Siddiq, Afshan; Chanock, Stephen; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Berg, Christine D; Buys, Saundra S; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Le Marchand, Loïc; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Lindström, Sara; Hunter, David J; Hankinson, Susan E; Willett, Walter C; Kraft, Peter; Cox, David G; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Tjønneland, Anne; Dossus, Laure; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Panico, Salvatore; van Gils, Carla H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Barricarte, Aurelio; Sund, Malin; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham; Southey, Melissa; Baglietto, Laura; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 15-30% of all breast cancer tumors are estrogen receptor negative (ER-). Compared with ER-positive (ER+) disease they have an earlier age at onset and worse prognosis. Despite the vast number of risk variants identified for numerous cancer types, only seven loci have been unambiguously identified for ER-negative breast cancer. With the aim of identifying new susceptibility SNPs for this disease we performed a pleiotropic genome-wide association study (GWAS). We selected 3079 SNPs associated with a human complex trait or disease at genome-wide significance level (P<5 × 10(-8)) to perform a secondary analysis of an ER-negative GWAS from the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), including 1998 cases and 2305 controls from prospective studies. We then tested the top ten associations (i.e. with the lowest P-values) using three additional populations with a total sample size of 3509 ER+ cases, 2543 ER- cases and 7031 healthy controls. None of the 3079 selected variants in the BPC3 ER-GWAS were significant at the adjusted threshold. 186 variants were associated with ER- breast cancer risk at a conventional threshold of P<0.05, with P-values ranging from 0.049 to 2.3 × 10(-4). None of the variants reached statistical significance in the replication phase. In conclusion, this study did not identify any novel susceptibility loci for ER-breast cancer using a "pleiotropic approach". PMID:24523857

  10. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is critical for the growth of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stein, Rebecca A; Chang, Ching-Yi; Kazmin, Dmitri A; Way, James; Schroeder, Thies; Wergin, Melanie; Dewhirst, Mark W; McDonnell, Donald P

    2008-11-01

    Expression of estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) has recently been shown to carry negative prognostic significance in breast and ovarian cancers. The specific role of this orphan nuclear receptor in tumor growth and progression, however, is yet to be fully understood. The significant homology between estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and ERRalpha initially suggested that these receptors may have similar transcriptional targets. Using the well-characterized ERalpha-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, we sought to gain a genome-wide picture of ERalpha-ERRalpha cross-talk using an unbiased microarray approach. In addition to generating a host of novel ERRalpha target genes, this study yielded the surprising result that most ERRalpha-regulated genes are unrelated to estrogen signaling. The relatively small number of genes regulated by both ERalpha and ERRalpha led us to expand our study to the more aggressive and less clinically treatable ERalpha-negative class of breast cancers. In this setting, we found that ERRalpha expression is required for the basal level of expression of many known and novel ERRalpha target genes. Introduction of a small interfering RNA directed to ERRalpha into the highly aggressive breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell line dramatically reduced the migratory potential of these cells. Although stable knockdown of ERRalpha expression in MDA-MB-231 cells had no effect on in vitro cell proliferation, a significant reduction of tumor growth rate was observed when these cells were implanted as xenografts. Our results confirm a role for ERRalpha in breast cancer growth and highlight it as a potential therapeutic target for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer. PMID:18974123

  11. DSR-98776, a novel selective mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator with potent antidepressant and antimanic activity.

    PubMed

    Kato, Taro; Takata, Makoto; Kitaichi, Maiko; Kassai, Momoe; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Hirose, Wataru; Yoshida, Kozo; Shimizu, Isao

    2015-06-15

    Modulation of monoaminergic systems has been the main stream of treatment for patients with mood disorders. However, recent evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of these disorders. This study pharmacologically characterized a structurally novel metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor negative allosteric modulator, DSR-98776, and evaluated its effect on rodent models of depression and mania. First, DSR-98776 in vitro profile was assessed using intracellular calcium and radioligand binding assays. This compound showed dose-dependent inhibitory activity for mGlu5 receptors by binding to the same allosteric site as 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), a known mGlu5 inhibitor. The in vivo therapeutic benefits of DSR-98776 were evaluated in common rodent models of depression and mania. In the rat forced swimming test, DSR-98776 (1-3mg/kg) significantly reduced rats immobility time after treatment for 7 consecutive days, while paroxetine (3 and 10mg/kg) required administration for 2 consecutive weeks to reduce rats immobility time. In the mouse forced swimming test, acute administration of DSR-98776 (10-30 mg/kg) significantly reduced immobility time. This effect was not influenced by 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride-induced 5-HT depletion. Finally, DSR-98776 (30 mg/kg) significantly decreased methamphetamine/chlordiazepoxide-induced hyperactivity in mice, which reflects this compound antimanic-like effect. These results indicate that DSR-98776 acts as an orally potent antidepressant and antimanic in rodent models and can be a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of a broad range of mood disorders with depressive and manic states. PMID:25823809

  12. Effect of adding gefitinib to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in estrogen receptor negative early breast cancer in a randomized phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Bernsdorf, Mogens; Ingvar, Christian; Jörgensen, Leif; Tuxen, Malgorzata K; Jakobsen, Erik H; Saetersdal, Anna; Kimper-Karl, Marie Louise; Kroman, Niels; Balslev, Eva; Ejlertsen, Bent

    2011-04-01

    Gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown both anti-proliferative and anti-tumoral activity in breast cancer. This study was designed to determine the effect of adding gefitinib to neoadjuvant epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) on tumor response rates. Women with unilateral, primary operable, estrogen receptor negative invasive breast cancer ≥ 2 cm were eligible for inclusion. Randomized patients were to receive four cycles of neoadjuvant EC plus 12 weeks of either gefitinib (250 mg daily) or placebo. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR), and secondary endpoints were complete response (CR) and overall objective response (OR). 181 patients were randomized. A pCR was observed in 17% (12/71) of patients treated with gefitinib and in 12% (9/73) of patients treated with placebo (4.57% difference, 95% CI -7.19 to 6.33; P = 0.44). CR was observed in 10% of patients in both the gefitinib (7/71) and the placebo group (7/73) (0.27% difference, 95% CI -9.6 to 10.2; P = 0.96). There was no significant difference in OR (5.96%; 95% CI -9.9 to 21.9; P = 0.45) between the two groups. Post hoc subgroup analysis showed a significant difference in pCR between triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) and non-TNBC tumors (P = 0.03). More patients in the gefitinib arm had hematological toxicity (P = 0.15) and discontinued treatment (9/94 vs. 2/86) because of adverse events (AE). Tumor response rates were similar in the two groups. A significantly higher pCR rate was observed post hoc in TNBC versus non-TNBC independent of treatment. More patients in the gefitinib group discontinued treatment because of AE. PMID:21234672

  13. Effects of a green tea extract, Polyphenon E, on systemic biomarkers of growth factor signalling in women with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crew, K. D.; Ho, K. A.; Brown, P.; Greenlee, H.; Bevers, T. B.; Arun, B.; Sneige, N.; Hudis, C.; McArthur, H. L.; Chang, J.; Rimawi, M.; Cornelison, T. L.; Cardelli, J.; Santella, R. M.; Wang, A.; Lippman, S. M.; Hershman, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational and experimental data support a potential breast cancer chemopreventive effect of green tea. Methods We conducted an ancillary study using archived blood/urine from a phase IB randomised, placebo-controlled dose escalation trial of an oral green tea extract, Polyphenon E (Poly E), in breast cancer patients. Using an adaptive trial design, women with stage I–III breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment were randomised to Poly E 400 mg (n = 16), 600 mg (n = 11) and 800 mg (n = 3) twice daily or matching placebo (n = 10) for 6 months. Blood and urine collection occurred at baseline, and at 2, 4 and 6 months. Biological endpoints included growth factor [serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)], lipid (serum cholesterol, triglycerides), oxidative damage and inflammatory biomarkers. Results From July 2007-August 2009, 40 women were enrolled and 34 (26 Poly E, eight placebo) were evaluable for biomarker endpoints. At 2 months, the Poly E group (all dose levels combined) compared to placebo had a significant decrease in mean serum HGF levels (−12.7% versus +6.3%, P = 0.04). This trend persisted at 4 and 6 months but was no longer statistically significant. For the Poly E group, serum VEGF decreased by 11.5% at 2 months (P = 0.02) and 13.9% at 4 months (P = 0.05) but did not differ compared to placebo. At 2 months, there was a trend toward a decrease in serum cholesterol with Poly E (P = 0.08). No significant differences were observed for other biomarkers. Conclusions Our findings suggest potential mechanistic actions of tea polyphenols in growth factor signalling, angiogenesis and lipid metabolism. PMID:24646362

  14. Tumour ablation: technical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours. PMID:19965296

  15. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. What do we know of their history?].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Starting with Paul Langerhans, who first described pancreatic islets in 1869, this article reviews the various protagonists who, in the last century and a half, have contributed to the discovery of the main hormones originating in the pancreas, the analytical methods for their measurement, the imaging techniques for identifying tumoural location, and the various pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:26684677

  16. Chemotherapy for desmoid tumours in association with familial adenomatous polyposis: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Lisa; Blackstein, Martin; Berk, Terri; McLeod, Robin S.; Gallinger, Steven; Madlensky, Lisa; Cohen, Zane

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for inoperable desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. Design A review of three cases of unresectable desmoid tumours and of the literature on the subject. Setting The Steven Atanas Stavro Polyposis Registry at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. Patients Three patients with symptomatic, unresectable desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis and unresponsive to conventional hormone therapy. Intervention A chemotherapy regimen of seven cycles of doxorubicin (dose ranging from 60 to 90 mg/m2) and dacarbazine (1000 mg/m2), followed by carboplatin (400 mg/m2) and dacarbazine. Outcome Measures Clinical improvement and tumour regression demonstrated by computed tomography. Results In each of the three cases significant tumour regression was seen clinically and radiologically. Conclusions Cytotoxic chemotherapy is an effective treatment for desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. The chemotherapy should be started early in cases of symptomatic desmoid tumour unresponsive to conventional medical therapy. PMID:8640627

  17. A whole-genome massively parallel sequencing analysis of BRCA1 mutant oestrogen receptor negative and positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Weigelt, Britta; Wilkerson, Paul M; Manie, Elodie; Grigoriadis, Anita; A’Hern, Roger; van der Groep, Petra; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Popova, Tatiana; Mariani, Odette; Turaljic, Samra; Furney, Simon J; Marais, Richard; Rodruigues, Daniel-Nava; Flora, Adriana C; Wai, Patty; Pawar, Vidya; McDade, Simon; Carroll, Jason; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Green, Andrew R; Ellis, Ian O; Swanton, Charles; van Diest, Paul; Delattre, Olivier; Lord, Christopher J; Foulkes, William D; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Ashworth, Alan; Stern, Marc Henri; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1 encodes a tumour suppressor protein that plays pivotal roles in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and transcriptional regulation. BRCA1 germline mutations confer a high risk of early-onset breast and ovarian cancer. In >80% of cases, tumours arising in BRCA1 germline mutation carriers are oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative, however up to 15% are ER-positive. It has been suggested that BRCA1 ER-positive breast cancers constitute sporadic cancers arising in the context of a BRCA1 germline mutation rather than being causally related to BRCA1 loss-of-function. Whole-genome massively parallel sequencing of ER-positive and ER-negative BRCA1 breast cancers, and their respective germline DNAs, was used to characterise the genetic landscape of BRCA1 cancers at base-pair resolution. Only BRCA1 germline mutations and somatic loss of the wild-type allele, and TP53 somatic mutations were recurrently found in the index cases. BRCA1 breast cancers displayed a mutational signature consistent with that caused by lack of HR DNA repair in both ER-positive and ER-negative cases. Sequencing analysis of independent cohorts of hereditary BRCA1 and sporadic non-BRCA1 breast cancers for the presence of recurrent pathogenic mutations and/or homozygous deletions found in the index cases revealed that DAPK3, TMEM135, KIAA1797, PDE4D and GATA4 are potential additional drivers of breast cancers. This study demonstrates that BRCA1 pathogenic germline mutations coupled with somatic loss of the wild-type allele are not sufficient for hereditary breast cancers to display an ER-negative phenotype, and has led to the identification of three potential novel breast cancer genes (i.e. DAPK3, TMEM135 and GATA4). PMID:22362584

  18. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; Hohenberger, Peter; Corless, Christopher L

    2013-09-14

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms that arise in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. They can occur at any age, the median age being 60-65 years, and typically cause bleeding, anaemia, and pain. GISTs have variable malignant potential, ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. Most tumours stain positively for the mast/stem cell growth factor receptor KIT and anoctamin 1 and harbour a kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or PDGFRA. Tumours without such mutations could have alterations in genes of the succinate dehydrogenase complex or in BRAF, or rarely RAS family genes. About 60% of patients are cured by surgery. Adjuvant treatment with imatinib is recommended for patients with a substantial risk of recurrence, if the tumour has an imatinib-sensitive mutation. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors substantially improve survival in advanced disease, but secondary drug resistance is common. PMID:23623056

  19. Transport processes in tumours.

    PubMed

    Quastel, J H

    1965-12-01

    The characteristic features of transport systems controlling influx into tumour cells of nutrients and other chemicals are briefly described. Two notable features of transport of amino acids into tumour cells have been observed: extensive accumulation against a concentration gradient and equal accumulations, whether conditions are aerobic or anaerobic, provided glucose is present. This combination of features has not been observed in the majority of normal mammalian tissues so far examined. Important for considerations of chemotherapy is the ability of tumour transport carriers to transfer substances related in structure to amino acids and other nutrients. Amino acid analogues, for example, can either block transport of natural amino acids or can be transported into the cell where they may interfere with various aspects of amino acid metabolism. The study of transport carriers is essential for an understanding of tumour-host relationships and for considerations of chemotherapy. PMID:5842595

  20. Breast tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Stephen B; Generali, Daniele G; Harris, Adrian L

    2007-01-01

    The central importance of tumour neovascularization has been emphasized by clinical trials using antiangiogenic therapy in breast cancer. This review gives a background to breast tumour neovascularization in in situ and invasive breast cancer, outlines the mechanisms by which this is achieved and discusses the influence of the microenvironment, focusing on hypoxia. The regulation of angiogenesis and the antivascular agents that are used in an antiangiogenic dosing schedule, both novel and conventional, are also summarized. PMID:18190723

  1. [Tumours and liver transplants].

    PubMed

    Mejzlík, Vladimír; Husová, Libuše; Kuman, Milan; Štěpánková, Soňa; Ondrášek, Jiří; Němec, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation as a curative treatment method can be used for selected primary liver tumours, in particular for hepatocellular carcinoma and rather rare semi-malignant tumours such as epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, further for infiltration of liver by metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (provided that metastases are only located in the liver and the primary tumour was removed) and for benign tumours (hemangiomas and adenomas) with oppression symptoms and size progression. Cholangiocarcinoma is not indicated for liver transplantation at the CKTCH Brno. In recent years liver transplants for hepatocellular carcinoma have increased and hepatocellular carcinoma has also been more frequently found ex post, in the explanted livers. Liver transplantation is indicated in selected patients with a good chance of long-term survival after liver transplantation (a generally accepted limit is 5 year survival of 50 % after transplantation). By 20 March 2015 there were liver transplants carried out on 38 patients - in 25 of them was hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed before transplantation and in 13 it was found in the liver explants. 5 year survival following transplantation is reached by 53 % of this cohort. 32 % patients suffered from chronic hepatitis C. The longest surviving (32 years) patient at CKTCH Brno had liver transplanted for a big fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma, which points to the prognostic significance of tumour histology: the criterion only considered in some indication schemes for practical reasons. Benign liver tumours (adenomatosis, cystadenoma, hemangioma with oppression symptoms) are rather rare indications and the transplantation results are favourable. 4 patients underwent transplantation for infiltration of liver by carcinoid, tumour recurrence occurred in one. PMID:26375706

  2. Testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; McGlynn, Katherine A; Okamoto, Keisei; Jewett, Michael A S; Bokemeyer, Carsten

    2016-04-23

    Testicular germ cell tumours are at the crossroads of developmental and neoplastic processes. Their cause has not been fully elucidated but differences in incidences suggest that a combination of genetic and environment factors are involved, with environmental factors predominating early in life. Substantial progress has been made in understanding genetic susceptibility in the past 5 years on the basis of the results of large genome-wide association studies. Testicular germ cell tumours are highly sensitive to radiotherapy and chemotherapy and hence have among the best outcomes of all tumours. Because the tumours occur mainly in young men, preservation of reproductive function, quality of life after treatment, and late effects are crucial concerns. In this Seminar, we provide an overview of advances in the understanding of the epidemiology, genetics, and biology of testicular germ cell tumours. We also summarise the consensus on how to treat testicular germ cell tumours and focus on a few controversies and improvements in the understanding of late effects of treatment and quality of life for survivors. PMID:26651223

  3. Surgical implications of tumour immunology.

    PubMed Central

    Somers, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of immune infiltration of tumour deposits and the existence of effective in vitro anti-tumour immune responses would suggest the possibility of therapeutic manipulation against tumour cells. However, clinical immunotherapy has shown little promise as a cancer treatment. Numerous explanations for this inefficacy have been proposed, one of which involves the elaboration of immunosuppressive moieties from tumour cells. The results of studies presented below show that serum from patients with gastrointestinal and other tumours have immunosuppressive influences on normal lymphocytes. The degree of this in vitro inhibition is related to tumour 'bulk' and may reflect a systemic immunosuppressive influence of the tumour. Isolation and culture of lymphocytes from gastrointestinal tumour deposits demonstrated that these immune cells are functionally inert, suggesting the existence of an immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment. The isolation and partial purification of an immunosuppressive moiety from conditioned culture medium of a variety of human tumour cell lines further supports the hypothesis of tumour-mediated immunosuppression. A number of protein tumour cell products have been described with potent immunosuppressive properties. These include transforming growth factor-beta, interleukin-10, and the retroviral envelope protein p15E. The surgical implications of the proposed tumour-host immune relationship includes the hypothesis that clinically apparent disease may not be amenable to immune attack owing to tumour-mediated immune suppression. The use of immunostimulatory strategies as adjuvant perioperative therapy would seem a more effective environment for the activation of antitumour immune responses in the surgical patient. PMID:8678441

  4. Tumours of the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Sellors, T. Holmes; Thackray, A. C.; Thomson, A. D.

    1967-01-01

    Eighty-eight cases of thymoma are discussed with the object of trying to co-ordinate the histological and clinical features. The pathological specimens were in all cases obtained at operation. The pathology classification introduced by Thomson and Thackray in 1957 has been found to correspond adequately with the clinical pattern. The most common groups of tumours are basically epithelial and can be separated into five or six subdivisions, each of which has a separate pattern of behaviour. Lymphoid and teratomatous tumours also occur, but there were only two examples in this series. Clinically, separation of patients who suffered from myasthenia (38) and those who did not (50) affords the first main grouping. The majority of patients who had myasthenia gravis had tumours classified as epidermoid (19) and lymphoepithelial (14), the former with a more malignant appearance and behaviour than the latter. Removal of the tumour with or without radiation gave considerable and sometimes complete relief from myasthenic symptoms. Non-myasthenic thymoma (50) was usually discovered as a result of pressure signs or in the course of routine radiography. Spindle or oval celled tumours followed a benign pattern whereas undifferentiated thymoma was in every sense malignant, as also were teratomatous growths. Granulomatous or Hodgkin-like thymomas were of special interest and had an unpredictable course, some patients surviving many years after what was regarded as inadequate treatment. The place of radiotherapy as a pre- or post-operative agent complementary to surgery is discussed. Images PMID:6033387

  5. Tumours of the ovary

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Svend W.; Misdorp, W.; McEntee, Kenneth

    1976-01-01

    Ovarian tumours are common in animals, the majority occurring in bitches and cows. The two most important germ cell tumours were dysgerminoma and teratoma; these morphologically resemble their counterparts in women, with the exception that teratomas in animals tend less to malignancy. The granulosa cell tumour is the most frequent sex cord-stromal tumour in all six species and it may contain luteinized areas or show differentiation towards a Sertoli cell pattern. The canine papillary adenoma and papillary adenocarcinoma, which are as common as granulosa tumours, have several features in common with their counterparts in women: they are of similar histological appearance, are frequently bilateral, and the adenocarcinomas have a great propensity for peritoneal implantation metastasis. Ovarian cysts are frequent in the bitch, sow, and cow and may originate from five different anatomical structures in the ovary. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 and 3Fig. 20-22Fig. 8-10Fig. 15 and 16Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 17-19Fig. 4 and 5Fig. 6 and 7Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13 and 14 PMID:1086151

  6. Reproductive risk factors and oestrogen/progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Work, M E; John, E M; Andrulis, I L; Knight, J A; Liao, Y; Mulligan, A M; Southey, M C; Giles, G G; Dite, G S; Apicella, C; Hibshoosh, H; Hopper, J L; Terry, M B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oestrogen receptor (ER)- and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative (ER−PR−) breast cancer is associated with poorer prognosis compared with other breast cancer subtypes. High parity has been associated with an increased risk of ER−PR− cancer, but emerging evidence suggests that breastfeeding may reduce this risk. Whether this potential breastfeeding benefit extends to women at high risk of breast cancer remains critical to understand for prevention. Methods: Using population-based ascertained cases (n=4011) and controls (2997) from the Breast Cancer Family Registry, we examined reproductive risk factors in relation to ER and PR status. Results: High parity (⩾3 live births) without breastfeeding was positively associated only with ER−PR− tumours (odds ratio (OR)=1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10–2.24); there was no association with parity in women who breastfed (OR=0.93, 95% CI 0.71–1.22). Across all race/ethnicities, associations for ER−PR− cancer were higher among women who did not breastfeed than among women who did. Oral contraceptive (OC) use before 1975 was associated with an increased risk of ER−PR− cancer only (OR=1.32, 95% CI 1.04–1.67). For women who began OC use in 1975 or later there was no increased risk. Conclusions: Our findings support that there are modifiable factors for ER−PR− breast cancer and that breastfeeding in particular may mitigate the increased risk of ER−PR− cancers seen from multiparity. PMID:24548865

  7. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-02-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25-30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  8. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-01-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25–30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  9. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours.

    PubMed

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  10. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  11. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome. PMID:23716380

  12. [Epidemiology and risk factors of testicular tumours].

    PubMed

    Kozłowski, Piotr; Starosławska, Elżbieta; Szumiło, Justyna; Jankiewicz, Małgorzata; Kozłowska, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2016-04-01

    Testicular tumours are rare neoplasms, which most commonly affects men aged 25 to 35 years. Among young adult males it is the most common cause of testicular swelling. In recent decades, the number of cases of testicular tumours has greatly increased. The most significant predisposing factors are cryptorchidism and some endocrine disorders, especially increased levels of gonadotropins and female sex hormones. Testicular trauma, inguinal hernia, extreme values of body mass index (BMI), high-calorie diet rich in dairy products as well as high social status are also regarded as risk factors. Furthermore, some chromosomal abnormalities like increased number of chromosomes 7, 8. 12, 21 and X, loss of chromosomes 4, 5, 11, 13, 18, or Y, mutation in the gene Xq27; as well as multiplied copy of the gene i(12p) are associated with tumor development. It has been proven that high testosterone levels and regular physical activity may prevent testicular tumours. Since one of the first sign the lesion is often a lump or swelling of the testis and the appearance of abnormal structure in the scrotum routine testicular self-examination seems to be important in early detection. In all suspected cases an immediate ultrasound examination of both testicles is highly recommended. It is also advised to conduct a computerized tomography (CT) and a positron emission tomography (PET) scan for staging of the tumor to select the best mode of treatment. PMID:27137819

  13. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  14. Increased serum levels of circulating exosomal microRNA-373 in receptor-negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Eichelser, Corinna; Stückrath, Isabel; Müller, Volkmar; Milde-Langosch, Karin; Wikman, Harriet; Pantel, Klaus; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2014-10-30

    In this study, we compared the blood serum levels of circulating cell-free and exosomal microRNAs, and their involvement in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer patients. Our analyses on cell-free miR-101, miR-372 and miR-373 were performed in preoperative blood serum of 168 patients with invasive breast cancer, 19 patients with benign breast diseases and 28 healthy women. MicroRNAs were additionally quantified in exosomes of 50 cancer patients and 12 healthy women from the same cohort. Relative concentrations were measured by quantitative TaqMan MicroRNA assays and correlated to clinicopathological risk factors. The concentrations of cell-free miR-101 (p=0.013) and miR-373 (p=0.024) were significantly different between patients with breast cancer and benign tumors. A prevalence of miR-101, miR-372 and miR-373 were found in exosomes. The levels of circulating exosomal (but not cell-free) miR-373 were higher in triple negative than luminal carcinomas (p=0.027). Also, estrogen-negative (p=0.021) and progesterone-negative (p=0.01) tumors displayed higher concentrations of exosomal miR-373 than patients with hormone-receptor positive tumors. Overexpression of miR-373 by transfection of MCF-7 cells showed downregulated protein expression of the estrogen receptor, and inhibition of apoptosis induced by camptothecin. Our data indicate that serum levels of exosomal miR-373 are linked to triple negative and more aggressive breast carcinomas. PMID:25333260

  15. A model of spontaneous mouse mammary tumor for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LIXIANG; ZHOU, BUGAO; MENG, XIANMING; ZHU, WEIFENG; ZUO, AIREN; WANG, XIAOMIN; JIANG, RUNDE; YU, SHIPING

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequently malignancy in women. Therefore, establishment of an animal model for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for tumors is required. A novel heterogeneous spontaneous mammary tumor animal model of Kunming mice was generated. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spontaneous mammary tumor model. Histopathologically, invasive nodular masses of pleomorphic tubular neoplastic epithelial cells invaded fibro-vascular stroma, adjacent dermis and muscle tissue. Metastatic spread through blood vessel into liver and lungs was observed by hematoxylin eosin staining. No estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) immunoreactivity was detected in their associated malignant tumors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) protein weak expression was found by immunohistochemistry. High expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), moderate or high expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1 were observed in tumor sections at different stages (2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after cancer being found) when compared with that of the normal mammary glands. The result showed that the model is of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Remarkably in the mouse model, ER and PR-negative and HER2 weak positivity are observed. The high or moderate expressions of breast cancer markers (VEGF, c-Myc and cyclin D1) in mammary cancer tissue change at different stages. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous mammary model displaying colony-strain, outbred mice. This model will be an attractive tool to understand the biology of anti-hormonal breast cancer in women. PMID:25230850

  16. Inhibition of tumour-induced lipolysis in vitro and cachexia and tumour growth in vivo by eicosapentaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Tisdale, M J; Beck, S A

    1991-01-01

    Stimulation of lipolysis in murine adipocytes in response to a lipid-mobilizing factor produced by a cachexia-inducing murine adenocarcinoma was inhibited by eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) with a Ki value of 104 microM. The inhibitory effect was strictly structurally specific, since other related fatty acids of both the (n-3) and (n-6) series were ineffective as inhibitors of the lipolytic process. Induction of lipolysis by both salbutamol and ACTH was also inhibited by EPA, suggesting that the effect is exerted on a step central to the process of lipolysis. Lipolysis induced with the tumour lipid-mobilizing factor was associated with a prolonged elevation of the intracellular level of cyclic AMP in adipocytes, in contrast with ACTH and salbutamol. The elevation of adipocyte cyclic AMP in response to the tumour lipid-mobilizing factor and lipolytic hormones was inhibited by EPA. In vivo, administration of pure EPA to weight losing mice bearing the MAC16 adenocarcinoma completely prevented weight loss and tumour growth rate. In contrast both the other (n-3) fatty acid present in fish oil, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and linoleic acid were ineffective in inhibiting weight loss or the growth of the MAC16 tumour. This suggests that inhibition of tumour lipolytic activity accounts for the anticachectic effect of EPA, and that a correlation may exist between the inhibition of cachexia and the inhibition of tumour growth. PMID:1846070

  17. Steroid receptors in canine and human female genital tract tumours with smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Millán, Y; Gordon, A; de los Monteros, A Espinosa; Reymundo, C; de las Mulas, J Martín

    2007-01-01

    The expression of oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and progesterone receptor (PR) was examined in 32 canine genital tract tumours diagnosed as smooth muscle tumours (benign or malignant, pure or mixed). The immunohistochemical expression of calponin was used to assess the smooth muscle differentiation of the tumours. Nineteen human uterine leiomyomas were also examined. Calponin expression was detected in 89.3% of canine and 100% of human genital tract tumours diagnosed as leiomyomas, as well as in the majority of other tumours examined (canine or human, genital or extragenital, benign or malignant) with the exception of canine negative control tumours (cutaneous fibroma and hepatoid gland adenoma). ERalpha was found in 56.3% of canine and 52.6% of human leiomyomas, while PR was found in 84.4% of canine and 94.7% of human tumours. These results indicate that calponin is a good marker for differentiating neoplasia of the canine genital system of uncertain origin, as in human patients. They also show that canine tumours with smooth muscle differentiation of the genital tract of the bitch express steroid hormone receptors, a finding that opens up the possibility of hormone therapy. PMID:17362977

  18. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  19. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... based lubricants include petroleum jelly, baby oil, or mineral oil. Oil-based types should not be used ... caused by low levels of these hormones. Hysterectomy: Removal of the uterus. Menopause: The time in a ...

  20. Fatty tumours of the uterus.

    PubMed Central

    Pounder, D J

    1982-01-01

    Uterine fatty tumours (UFT) are uncommon and have received little attention in the English literature. They have aroused interest as a consequence of occasional diagnostic confusion with sarcomas and the continuing unresolved dispute as to their histogenesis. Three cases of UFT are described and the pathological features of note discussed. The viewpoint that these tumours are hamartomas/choristomas is rejected. UFT most probably represent tumour metaplasia within a leiomyoma. There is no uniform accepted nomenclature for such tumours and it is suggested that they be designated "uterine fatty tumours" and subdivided into "lipoma" and "mixed lipoma/leiomyoma" (synonym lipoleiomyoma). Images PMID:7174848

  1. Glomus tumour of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Troller, Rebekka; Soll, Christopher; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Glomus tumours are benign tumours typically arising from the glomus bodies and primarily found under the fingernails or toenails. These rare neoplasms account for <2% of all soft tissue tumours and are generally not found in the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 40-year-old man presenting with recurrent epigastric pain and pyrosis. Endoscopy revealed a solitary tumour in the antrum of the stomach. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy was suspicious for a gastrointestinal stroma tumour. After CT indicated the resectability of the tumour, showing neither lymphatic nor distant metastases, a laparoscopic-assisted gastric wedge resection was performed. Surprisingly, histology revealed a glomus tumour of the stomach. PMID:27343282

  2. Growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma with admixed gangliocytoma and ganglioglioma.

    PubMed

    Jukes, Alistair; Allan, Rodney; Rawson, Robert; Buckland, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenomas are the most common tumours found in the sellar region and, when both functioning and non-functioning adenomas are combined, account for 7-15% of primary brain tumours in adults. Rarely, admixed or discrete groups of cells comprising two or more tumour subtypes are seen; the so-called 'collision tumour'. We present a case of a 54-year-old-woman with a growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma admixed with both ganglioglioma and gangliocytoma. The possible mechanisms by which this may occur include a pre-existing gangliocytoma promoting the development of pituitary adenoma by hypersecretion of releasing hormones or aberrant migration of hypothalamic neurons in early embryogenesis. PMID:27068013

  3. Borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Tropé, Claes Göran; Kaern, Janne; Davidson, Ben

    2012-06-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours account for 10-20% of all epithelial ovarian cancer. Historically, standard primary surgery has included borderline ovarian tumours, omentectomy, peritoneal washing and multiple biopsies. As one-third of borderline ovarian tumours are diagnosed in women under the age of 40 years, fertility-sparing treatment has been more frequently used in the past 10 years. Fertility drugs are well tolerated in women with infertility after fertility-sparing surgery. Careful selection of candidates is necessary. Laparoscopic techniques can be used, but should be reserved for oncologic surgeons. This conservative treatment increases the rate of recurrence, albeit with no effect on survival. The pregnancy rate is nearly 50%, and most are achieved spontaneously. These women should be closely followed up. The question is whether this is acceptable from a gynaecologic oncologic point of view. For this reason, we will discuss recently published studies and gynaecologic oncologic concerns about the mode of fertility-sparing surgery and its consequences. PMID:22321906

  4. Tumours of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Svend W.; Mackey, L. J.; Misdorp, W.

    1976-01-01

    The most frequent renal tumours of animals are renal cell carcinoma and nephroblastoma. Renal cell carcinomas are seen mainly in dogs and cattle and nephroblastoma is encountered in pigs, puppies, and calves. Renal cell carcinomas are usually papillary in the dog. They show a marked propensity for vascular invasion, penetration of the posterior vena cava, and subsequent pulmonary metastasis. Nephroblastoma, which is morphologically identical to Wilms' tumour of children, is almost always a benign tumour in animals. It is one of the most frequent neoplasms of pigs, possibly owing to the fact that most pigs are slaughtered (and examined) when a few months old. Lymphosarcoma involving the kidney is particularly frequent in the cat, but is also seen in other species as part of a generalized disease. ImagesFig. 5,6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 1,2Fig. 3,4Fig. 16,17,18,19Fig. 9,10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14,15 PMID:1086154

  5. Biophysical models of tumour growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracqui, P.

    2009-05-01

    Tumour growth is a multifactorial process, which has stimulated in recent decades the development of numerous models trying to figure out the mechanisms controlling solid tumours morphogenesis. While the earliest models were focusing on cell proliferation kinetics, modulated by the availability of supplied nutrients, new modelling approaches emphasize the crucial role of several biophysical processes, including local matrix remodelling, active cell migration and traction, and reshaping of host tissue vasculature. After a brief presentation of this experimental background, this review will outline a number of representative models describing, at different scales, the growth of avascular and vascularized tumours. Special attention will be paid to the formulation of tumour-host tissue interactions that selectively drive changes in tumour size and morphology, and which are notably mediated by the mechanical status and elasticity of the tumour microenvironment. Emergence of invasive behaviour through growth instabilities at the tumour-host interface will be presented considering both reaction-diffusion and mechano-cellular models. In the latter part of the review, patient-oriented implications of tumour growth modelling are outlined in the context of brain tumours. Some conceptual views of the adaptive strategies and selective barriers that govern tumour evolution are presented in conclusion as potential guidelines for the development of future models.

  6. Maspin as a Tumour Suppressor in Salivary Gland Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Sheirawan, Mohammad Kinan; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Alenzi, Faris; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Maspin is a protein that belongs to serin protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. The purpose of this study was to review the literature concerning the expression of maspin in salivary gland tumours. A literature search was done using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface. Statistical analysis was not done because only seven studies were available in literature, the collected data were different and the results could not be compared. Expression of maspin was down regulated in more aggressive salivary gland tumours. Maspin may function as a tumour suppressor in salivary gland tumours. PMID:25654053

  7. Serially heterotransplanted human prostate tumours as an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Barcons, Lluis-A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical research on prostate cancer (PC) therapies uses several models to represent the human disease accurately. A common model uses patient prostate tumour biopsies to develop a cell line by serially passaging and subsequent implantation, in immunodeficient mice. An alternative model is direct implantation of patient prostate tumour biopsies into immunodeficient mice, followed by serial passage in vivo. The purpose of this review is to compile data from the more than 30 years of human PC serial heterotransplantation research. Serially heterotransplanted tumours are characterized by evaluating the histopathology of the resulting heterotransplants, including cellular differentiation, karyotype, marker expression, hormone sensitivity, cellular proliferation, metastatic potential and stromal and vascular components. These data are compared with the initial patient tumour specimen and, depending on available information, the patient’s clinical outcome was compared with the heterotransplanted tumour. The heterotansplant model is a more accurate preclinical model than older generation serially passaged or genetic models to investigate current and newly developed androgen-deprivation agents, antitumour compounds, anti-angiogenic drugs and positron emission tomography radiotracers, as well as new therapeutic regimens for the treatment of PC. PMID:19874422

  8. Challenges of treating incidental synchronous bilateral breast cancer with differing tumour biology.

    PubMed

    Esclovon, Jonathan Walter; Ponder, Melissa; Aydin, Nail; Misra, Subhasis

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman with right breast mass was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Workup consisted of bilateral diagnostic mammogram and ultrasound (US); both showed a right breast mass with normal left breast. Core biopsy showed IDC with estrogen receptor negative (ER-)/progesterone receptor negative (PR-) and HER2/neu positive receptor status. The patient underwent carboplatin-based chemotherapy with Herceptin. The mass completely resolved. The patient desired to proceed with bilateral total mastectomy with right sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). Pathology showed complete resolution of the right-sided breast mass without malignancy in right SLN. Incidentally, IDC was found in the left breast specimen, which was ER+/PR+ and HER 2/neu negative. Tumour board consensus was to obtain a left axilla US with MRI in 6 months if the US was unremarkable. Biologically different synchronous bilateral breast cancer poses a difficult clinical challenge for management due to differing responses to treatment. Use of MRI may be a diagnostic option in women who choose contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. PMID:27539136

  9. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  10. The Endocannabinoid System and Sex Steroid Hormone-Dependent Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Anthony H.; Marczylo, Timothy H.; Willets, Jonathon M.; Konje, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    The “endocannabinoid system (ECS)” comprises the endocannabinoids, the enzymes that regulate their synthesis and degradation, the prototypical cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), some noncannabinoid receptors, and an, as yet, uncharacterised transport system. Recent evidence suggests that both cannabinoid receptors are present in sex steroid hormone-dependent cancer tissues and potentially play an important role in those malignancies. Sex steroid hormones regulate the endocannabinoid system and the endocannabinoids prevent tumour development through putative protective mechanisms that prevent cell growth and migration, suggesting an important role for endocannabinoids in the regulation of sex hormone-dependent tumours and metastasis. Here, the role of the endocannabinoid system in sex steroid hormone-dependent cancers is described and the potential for novel therapies assessed. PMID:24369462

  11. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    International Resource Center Online Store Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Healthy Living ...

  12. Adiposity, hormone replacement therapy use and breast cancer risk by age and hormone receptor status: a large prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Associations of hormone-receptor positive breast cancer with excess adiposity are reasonably well characterized; however, uncertainty remains regarding the association of body mass index (BMI) with hormone-receptor negative malignancies, and possible interactions by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use. Methods Within the European EPIC cohort, Cox proportional hazards models were used to describe the relationship of BMI, waist and hip circumferences with risk of estrogen-receptor (ER) negative and progesterone-receptor (PR) negative (n = 1,021) and ER+PR+ (n = 3,586) breast tumors within five-year age bands. Among postmenopausal women, the joint effects of BMI and HRT use were analyzed. Results For risk of ER-PR- tumors, there was no association of BMI across the age bands. However, when analyses were restricted to postmenopausal HRT never users, a positive risk association with BMI (third versus first tertile HR = 1.47 (1.01 to 2.15)) was observed. BMI was inversely associated with ER+PR+ tumors among women aged ≤49 years (per 5 kg/m2 increase, HR = 0.79 (95%CI 0.68 to 0.91)), and positively associated with risk among women ≥65 years (HR = 1.25 (1.16 to 1.34)). Adjusting for BMI, waist and hip circumferences showed no further associations with risks of breast cancer subtypes. Current use of HRT was significantly associated with an increased risk of receptor-negative (HRT current use compared to HRT never use HR: 1.30 (1.05 to 1.62)) and positive tumors (HR: 1.74 (1.56 to 1.95)), although this risk increase was weaker for ER-PR- disease (Phet = 0.035). The association of HRT was significantly stronger in the leaner women (BMI ≤22.5 kg/m2) than for more overweight women (BMI ≥25.9 kg/m2) for, both, ER-PR- (HR: 1.74 (1.15 to 2.63)) and ER+PR+ (HR: 2.33 (1.84 to 2.92)) breast cancer and was not restricted to any particular HRT regime. Conclusions An elevated BMI may be positively associated with risk of ER-PR- tumors among postmenopausal women

  13. Antiproliferative effect of the Ginkgo biloba extract is associated with the enhancement of cytochrome P450 1B1 expression in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, XIAO-DAN; DONG, NI; MAN, HONG-TAO; FU, ZHONG-LIN; ZHANG, MEI-HONG; KOU, SHUANG; MA, SHI-LIANG

    2013-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba is a dioecious tree and its extract is a complex mixture that has been used for thousands of years to treat a variety of ailments in traditional Chinese medicine. The aim of this study was to present our observations on the inhibitory effects of different Ginkgo biloba extracts on human breast cancer cell proliferation and growth. Our results demonstrated that treatment of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells with Ginkgo biloba leaves and ginkgo fruit extract inhibited cell proliferation. It was also observed that this inhibition was accompanied by the enhancement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, treatment with ginkgo fruit extract resulted in a higher CYP1B1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells compared to treatment with the Ginkgo biloba leaves extract. Our results suggested that the inhibitory effects of the Ginkgo biloba extract on estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer proliferation and the induction of CYP1B1 expression may be exerted through an alternative pathway, independent of the estrogen receptor or the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway. PMID:24649031

  14. Life history theory and breast cancer risk: methodological and theoretical challenges: Response to "Is estrogen receptor negative breast cancer risk associated with a fast life history strategy?".

    PubMed

    Aktipis, Athena

    2016-01-01

    In a meta-analysis published by myself and co-authors, we report differences in the life history risk factors for estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers. Our meta-analysis did not find the association of ER- breast cancer risk with fast life history characteristics that Hidaka and Boddy suggest in their response to our article. There are a number of possible explanations for the differences between their conclusions and the conclusions we drew from our meta-analysis, including limitations of our meta-analysis and methodological challenges in measuring and categorizing estrogen receptor status. These challenges, along with the association of ER+ breast cancer with slow life history characteristics, may make it challenging to find a clear signal of ER- breast cancer with fast life history characteristics, even if that relationship does exist. The contradictory results regarding breast cancer risk and life history characteristics illustrate a more general challenge in evolutionary medicine: often different sub-theories in evolutionary biology make contradictory predictions about disease risk. In this case, life history models predict that breast cancer risk should increase with faster life history characteristics, while the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis predicts that breast cancer risk should increase with delayed reproduction. Whether life history tradeoffs contribute to ER- breast cancer is still an open question, but current models and several lines of evidence suggest that it is a possibility. PMID:26874356

  15. One very rare and one new tracheal tumour found by electron microscopy: glomus tumour and acinic cell tumour resembling carcinoid tumours by light microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Heard, B E; Dewar, A; Firmin, R K; Lennox, S C

    1982-01-01

    Tracheal tumours were removed surgically from two patients and diagnosed as carcinoid tumours by routine light microscopy. At a later date, electron microscopy was performed on stored tumour tissue and no neurosecretory granules were found in either case. One showed features of a glomus tumour and the other of an acinic cell tumour. Only two glomus tumours appear to have been reported previously in the trachea, and no acinic cell tumours. Electron microscopy is thus sometimes of great assistance in diagnosing accurately unusual tumours of the lower respiratory tract. Images PMID:6281934

  16. Metabolic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yazhi; Zhao, Shimin; Zhou, Binhua P; Mi, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Tumour cells, stromal cells and the stroma comprise the tumour microenvironment. The metabolism of both tumour cells and several types of tumour stromal cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, is reprogrammed. Current studies have found that stromal cells promote tumour progression and metastasis, through not only the paracrine secretion of cytokines or chemokines, but also intermediate metabolites. Here, we summarize the latest insights into the mechanism of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, and their potential roles in tumour progression and metastasis. PMID:26255648

  17. Recurrent hyperphosphatemic tumoural calcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Sonal; Agarwal, Asha; Nigam, Anand; Rao, Yashwant Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Tumoural calcinosis (TC) is a benign gradually developing disorder that can occur in a variety of clinical settings, characterised by subcutaneous deposition of calcium phosphate with or without giant cell reaction. We describe a case of 11-year-old girl presenting with recurrent hard swellings in the vicinity of shoulder and hip joints associated with elevated serum phosphate and normal serum calcium levels. TC has been mainly reported from Africa, with very few cases reported from India. After the diagnosis of hyperphosphatemic TC was established, the patient was treated with oral sevelamer and is under constant follow-up to detect recurrence, if any. The present case highlights the fact that although an uncommon lesion, TC must be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous hard lump in the vicinity of a joint. PMID:23010461

  18. Tumours of bones and joints

    PubMed Central

    Misdorp, W.; Van Der Heul, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of bones and joints are not infrequent in dogs but are rare in other domestic animals. In the dog, most bone tumours are malignant; osteosarcomas are by far the most frequently encountered tumours, especially in giant breeds and boxers. The following main categories of bone tumour are described: bone-forming, cartilage-forming, giant cell, marrow, vascular, miscellaneous, metastatic, unclassified, and tumour-like lesions. The tumours of joints and related structures are classified as synovial sarcomas, fibroxanthomas, and malignant giant cell tumour of soft tissues. ImagesFig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:1086157

  19. Tumours of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Pamukcu, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Tumours of the urinary bladder are uncommon in all domestic animals except cattle in certain regions. Where cattle eat bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) there is a high incidence of these tumours. Epithelial tumours are the most frequently encountered neoplasms in cattle and in dogs—the two species most studied. They are described under the following names: papilloma, adenoma, transitional cell carcinoma (with variants), squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16 PMID:4371741

  20. Downregulation of GLUT4 contributes to effective intervention of estrogen receptor-negative/HER2-overexpressing early stage breast disease progression by lapatinib.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sunil; Xu, Jia; Wang, Xiao; Jain, Shalini; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Qingling; Chang, Chia-Chi; Bower, Joseph; Arun, Banu; Seewaldt, Victoria; Yu, Dihua

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have shown efficacy in prevention of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer; however, there exists no proven prevention strategy for estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer. Up to 40% of ER- breast cancers have human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression (HER2+), suggesting HER2 signaling might be a good target for chemoprevention for certain ER- breast cancers. Here, we tested the feasibility of the HER2-targeting agent lapatinib in prevention and/or early intervention of an ER-/HER2+ early-stage breast disease model. We found that lapatinib treatment forestalled the progression of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH)-like acini to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)-like acini in ER-/HER2+ human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in 3D culture. Mechanistically, we found that inhibition of HER2/Akt signaling by lapatinib led to downregulation of GLUT4 and a reduced glucose uptake in HER2-overexpressing cells, resulting in decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells in 3D culture. Additionally, our data suggest that HER2-driven glycolytic metabolic dysregulation in ER-/HER2+ HMECs might promote early-stage breast disease progression, which can be reversed by lapatinib treatment. Furthermore, low-dose lapatinib treatment, starting at the early stages of mammary grand transformation in the MMTV-neu* mouse model, significantly delayed mammary tumor initiation and progression, extended tumor-free survival, which corresponded to effective inhibition of HER2/Akt signaling and downregulation of GLUT4 in vivo. Taken together, our results indicate that lapatinib, through its inhibition of key signaling pathways and tumor-promoting metabolic events, is a promising agent for the prevention/early intervention of ER-/HER2+ breast cancer progression. PMID:27293993

  1. Downregulation of GLUT4 contributes to effective intervention of estrogen receptor-negative/HER2-overexpressing early stage breast disease progression by lapatinib

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Sunil; Xu, Jia; Wang, Xiao; Jain, Shalini; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Qingling; Chang, Chia-Chi; Bower, Joseph; Arun, Banu; Seewaldt, Victoria; Yu, Dihua

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have shown efficacy in prevention of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer; however, there exists no proven prevention strategy for estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer. Up to 40% of ER- breast cancers have human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression (HER2+), suggesting HER2 signaling might be a good target for chemoprevention for certain ER- breast cancers. Here, we tested the feasibility of the HER2-targeting agent lapatinib in prevention and/or early intervention of an ER-/HER2+ early-stage breast disease model. We found that lapatinib treatment forestalled the progression of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH)-like acini to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)-like acini in ER-/HER2+ human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in 3D culture. Mechanistically, we found that inhibition of HER2/Akt signaling by lapatinib led to downregulation of GLUT4 and a reduced glucose uptake in HER2-overexpressing cells, resulting in decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells in 3D culture. Additionally, our data suggest that HER2-driven glycolytic metabolic dysregulation in ER-/HER2+ HMECs might promote early-stage breast disease progression, which can be reversed by lapatinib treatment. Furthermore, low-dose lapatinib treatment, starting at the early stages of mammary grand transformation in the MMTV-neu* mouse model, significantly delayed mammary tumor initiation and progression, extended tumor-free survival, which corresponded to effective inhibition of HER2/Akt signaling and downregulation of GLUT4 in vivo. Taken together, our results indicate that lapatinib, through its inhibition of key signaling pathways and tumor-promoting metabolic events, is a promising agent for the prevention/early intervention of ER-/HER2+ breast cancer progression. PMID:27293993

  2. Circadian variations in 32P uptake of DMBA-induced mammary tumour and Walker carcinosarcoma in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Møoller, U.; Bojsen, J.

    1976-01-01

    The 32P uptake in a mammary tumour induced by DMBA and in the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma was measured by external GM -tubes. The uptake was significantly higher than in the skin. During exposure to a synchronized light regime a circadian variation was present in the 32P uptake of the hormone-dependent DMBA-induced tumour. The maximal 32P uptake was in the dark period, in which the highest temperature in the tumour has also been found (Møoller and Bojsen, 1975). In the hormone-independent Walker 256 carcinosarcoma there was no periodicity in 32P uptake. No variation in 32P uptake was registered in the skin of normal controls or in tumour-bearing rats. PMID:820364

  3. Distribution of Photofrin between tumour cells and tumour associated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, M.; Krosl, G.; Olive, P. L.; Chaplin, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Photofrin levels in cells derived from SCCVII tumours, excised from mice that previously received the drug, were measured using a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS). Concomitantly, in the same cells the FACS was used to measure fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) fluorescence that originated from FITC-conjugated antimouse IgG added to the cell suspension before sorting. This later measurement enabled discrimination between IgG negative tumour malignant cells and IgG positive host cells (primarily macrophages). In addition, cellular Photofrin content in 'tumour' and 'host' cells sorted by FACS was determined by chemical extraction. The measurements were performed for the time intervals 1-96 h post Photofrin administration. The data showed consistently higher Photofrin levels in the 'host cells', i.e., tumour associated macrophages (TAM), than in 'tumour' cells. On a per cell basis, at any time point studied there was a minimum of 1.7 times more Photofrin in 'host' than in 'tumour cells', while at 4-12 h postadministration, ratios of up to 3.0 times were observed. This corresponds to ratio values greater than 9, when based on Photofrin content per micrograms cell protein. PMID:1832927

  4. Rewiring macrophages for anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunqin; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-06-28

    Tumour-associated macrophages facilitate cancer progression, but whether they can be reprogrammed to elicit an anti-tumour response remains unclear. Deletion of the microRNA-processing enzyme Dicer is now shown to rewire macrophages to an anti-tumour mode, leading to an enhanced response to immunotherapy and inhibition of tumour progression. PMID:27350442

  5. Quantifying tumour heterogeneity with CT

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heterogeneity is a key feature of malignancy associated with adverse tumour biology. Quantifying heterogeneity could provide a useful non-invasive imaging biomarker. Heterogeneity on computed tomography (CT) can be quantified using texture analysis which extracts spatial information from CT images (unenhanced, contrast-enhanced and derived images such as CT perfusion) that may not be perceptible to the naked eye. The main components of texture analysis can be categorized into image transformation and quantification. Image transformation filters the conventional image into its basic components (spatial, frequency, etc.) to produce derived subimages. Texture quantification techniques include structural-, model- (fractal dimensions), statistical- and frequency-based methods. The underlying tumour biology that CT texture analysis may reflect includes (but is not limited to) tumour hypoxia and angiogenesis. Emerging studies show that CT texture analysis has the potential to be a useful adjunct in clinical oncologic imaging, providing important information about tumour characterization, prognosis and treatment prediction and response. PMID:23545171

  6. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  7. A rare benign ovarian tumour.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) of the ovary is an extremely rare and benign ovarian neoplasm, accounting for 6% of the sex cord stromal ovarian tumours subtype. Usually, it is found during the second and third decades of life. Patients commonly present with pelvic pain, a palpable pelvic mass or menstrual irregularity. We report a case of a 20-year-old woman reporting of mild pelvic pain, with normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a large right adnexal tumour was found, with features suggesting an ovarian sex cord tumour. The patient underwent right salpingo-oophorectomy, diagnosing a SST of the ovary. This paper also reviews the literature, and emphasises the typical pathological and imaging characteristics of these rare benign ovarian lesions, and their impact, in a conservative surgery. PMID:26933186

  8. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  9. [Hormones and mammary tumors in the bitch: a review].

    PubMed

    Rutteman, G R

    1992-02-01

    Toxicity studies as well as epidemiological studies in veterinary medicine have shown that both ovarian steroids and a large number of synthetic derivatives may promote the formation of mammary tumours in dogs. Abnormalities in pituitary function, particularly in the secretion of growth hormones, have been assumed to be involved in this process. In the present paper the possible role of endogenous and exogenous hormones in the pathogenesis of mammary tumours in bitches is reviewed. The available evidence suggests that steroid hormones may act at an early stage in the development of tumours by stimulating the proliferation of normal epithelium. This results in an increase in the number of susceptible cells. In addition a growth-stimulating action may be exerted upon cells which have undergone partial malignant transformation, but possibly to a lesser extent upon fully malignant cells at a late stage of tumour development. In advanced mammary cancers steroid receptors are frequently absent, which may indicate a more autonomous pattern of growth. It seems justified to conclude that in clinical practice ovariectomy at an early age as a measure to prevent oestrus is to be preferred to progestin treatment with regard to the risk of mammary carcinoma. Still, there is no indication that in dogs, ovariectomy will reduce the risk of metastasis once the animal is presented with a mammary carcinoma. The earlier assumption that overproduction of growth hormone is an important factor in the pathogenesis of spontaneous mammary tumours in the dogs could not be proven. The role of prolactin and of thyroid hormones in this process continues to be uncertain. PMID:1736405

  10. Canine mammary tumours, an overview.

    PubMed

    Sleeckx, N; de Rooster, H; Veldhuis Kroeze, E J B; Van Ginneken, C; Van Brantegem, L

    2011-12-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMTs) are the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs. Although the prevalence of these tumours decreases in regions where preventive ovari(ohyster)ectomy is performed, it remains an important disease entity in veterinary medicine. Moreover, treatment options are limited in comparison with human breast cancer. Nevertheless, recent human treatment protocols might have potential in bitches suffering from CMTs. PMID:21645126

  11. Imaging of skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Thust, Stefanie Catherine; Yousry, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    The skull base is a highly complex and difficult to access anatomical region, which constitutes a relatively common site for neoplasms. Imaging plays a central role in establishing the differential diagnosis, to determine the anatomic tumour spread and for operative planning. All skull base imaging should be performed using thin-section multiplanar imaging, whereby CT and MRI can be considered complimentary. An interdisciplinary team approach is central to improve the outcome of these challenging tumours. PMID:27330416

  12. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  13. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  14. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  15. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  16. Considerations concerning a tailored, individualized therapeutic management of patients with (neuro)endocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas.

    PubMed

    de Herder, W W; Krenning, E P; Van Eijck, C H J; Lamberts, S W J

    2004-03-01

    Endocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas may present at different disease stages with either hormonal or hormone-related symptoms/syndromes, or without hormonal symptoms. They may occur either sporadically or as part of hereditary syndromes. In the therapeutic approach to a patient with these tumours, excessive hormonal secretion and/or its effects should always be controlled first. Tumour-related deficiencies or disorders should also be corrected. Subsequently, control should be aimed at the tumour growth. Surgery is generally considered as first-line therapy for patients with localized disease, as it can be curative. However, in patients with metastatic disease the role of first-line surgery is not clearly established and other therapies should be considered, such as non-surgical cytoreductive therapies, biotherapy (with somatostatin analogues or interferon-alpha), embolization and chemoembolization of liver metastases, chemotherapy (with single or multiple dose regimens) and peptide receptor-targeted radiotherapy. The delicate balance of the use of the different therapeutical options in patients with endocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas emphasizes the importance of team approach and team expertise. PMID:15027883

  17. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: retrospective analysis of a University Hospital's experience.

    PubMed

    Toh, Y F; Cheah, P L; Looi, L M; Teoh, K H; Tan, P H

    2016-04-01

    Taking cognizance of the purported variation of phyllodes tumours in Asians compared with Western populations, this study looked at phyllodes tumours of the breast diagnosed at the Department of Pathology, University of Malaya Medical Centre over an 8-year period with regards to patient profiles, tumour parameters, treatment offered and outcome. Sixty-four new cases of phyllodes tumour were diagnosed during the period, however only 30 (21 benign, 4 borderline and 5 malignant) finally qualified for entry into the study. These were followed-up for 4-102 months (average = 41.7 months). Thirteen cases (8 benign, 3 borderline, 2 malignant) were Chinese, 9 (all benign) Malay, 7 (4 benign, 1 borderline, 2 malignant) Indian and 1 (malignant) Indonesian. Prevalence of benign versus combined borderline and malignant phyllodes showed a marginally significant difference (p=0.049) between the Malays and Chinese. Patients' ages ranged from 21-70 years with a mean of 44.9 years with no significant difference in age between benign, borderline or malignant phyllodes tumours. Except for benign phyllodes tumours (mean size = 5.8 cm) being significantly smaller at presentation compared with borderline (mean size = 12.5 cm) and malignant (mean size = 15.8 cm) (p<0.05) tumours, history of previous pregnancy, breast feeding, hormonal contraception and tumour laterality did not differ between the three categories. Family history of breast cancer was noted in 2 cases of benign phyllodes. Local excision was performed in 17 benign, 2 borderline and 3 malignant tumours and mastectomy in 4 benign, 2 borderline and 2 malignant tumours. Surgical clearance was not properly recorded in 10 benign phyllodes tumours. Six benign and all 4 borderline and 5 malignant tumours had clearances of <10 mm. Two benign tumours recurred locally at 15 and 49 months after local excision, however information regarding surgical clearance was not available in both cases. One patient with a malignant tumour developed

  18. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  19. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Aspirin Suppresses NF-κB Signaling in Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nath, Niharika; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Rodes, Deborah B; Nazarenko, Anna; Kodela, Ravinder; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor negative (ER(-)) breast cancer is aggressive, responds poorly to current treatments and has a poor prognosis. The NF-κB signaling pathway is implicated in ER(-) tumorigenesis. Aspirin (ASA) is chemopreventive against ER(+) but not for ER(-) breast cancers. Nitric oxide-releasing aspirin (NO-ASA) is a safer ASA where ASA is linked to an NO-releasing moiety through a spacer. In vitro, we investigated anti-proliferation effects of NO-ASA (para- and meta-isomers) against ER(-) breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-23, effects on NF-κB signaling, and reactive oxygen species by standard techniques. In vivo, effects of NO-ASA were evaluated in a mouse xenograft model using MDA-MB-231 cells. p-NO-ASA inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells at 24 h, the respective IC50s were 13 ± 2 and 17 ± 2 μM; ASA had an IC50 of >3000 μM in both cell lines. The IC50s for m-NO-ASA in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 were 173 ± 15 and 185 ± 12 μM, respectively, therefore, implying p-NO-ASA as a stronger inhibitor of growth p-NO-ASA reduced cell growth by inhibiting proliferation, inducing apoptosis and causing G0/G1 cell cycle block. Activation of NF-κB was inhibited by both isomers as demonstrated by decreases in NF-κB-DNA binding and luciferase activity at 24 h, However, m-NO-ASA produced transient effects at 3 h such as increased NF-κB-DNA-binding, increased levels of nuclear p50, even though both isomers inhibited IκB degradation. Increase in nuclear p50 by m-NO-ASA was associated with translocation of p50 in to the nucleus as observed by immunoflouresence at 3 h. NO-ASA induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) as evidenced by overall increases in both H2DCFDA (2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein) and DHE (dihydroethidium)-derived fluorescence. Inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-cysteine reversed the m-NO-ASA-mediated translocation of p50 in to the nucleus. In xenografts, p-NO-ASA inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting proliferation (PCNA and tumor volume

  20. Tumours of the upper alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Head, K W

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the oropharynx of domestic animals are common in most parts of the world, but squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alimentary tract shows differences in prevalence in different geographical areas and occurs at different sites in the various species. Oral tumours of the melanogenic system are more common in dogs than in man. The following main histological categories, which broadly correspond to those used in the classification of tumours of man, are described: papilloma; squamous cell carcinoma; salivary gland tumours; malignant melanoma; tumours of soft (mesenchymal) tissues; tumours of the facial bones; tumours of haematopoietic and related tissues; and odontogenic tumours and jaw cysts. Papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, fibroma, and fibrosarcoma account for about 80% of the tumours that occur in the upper alimentary tract of domestic animals. PMID:1086147

  1. Oncoprotein stability after tumour resection.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, G.; Gullick, W.; Sikora, K.

    1990-01-01

    The means by which oncogenes and their products activate malignant transformation are currently under intense investigation. However, published papers on experiments using human tumour material do not always report in detail their methods of collection or storage of the specimens. In order to assess the stability of oncogene encoded proteins following collection or storage of human tumour biopsies, we have examined the rate of decay of the c-myc, neu and EGF-receptor proteins. Solid tumours, containing amplified copies of each oncogene, were established in nude mice and the stability of the oncogene protein in portions of each tumour, left in phosphate buffered saline at room temperature for varying time intervals, was examined by immunoblotting. Intact EGF-receptor and neu oncoproteins were present even after 24 h under these conditions while the c-myc protein was apparently rapidly degraded after 20 min. These data demonstrate that oncogene products decay at different rates after tumour resection and that collection of human biopsies should take this into account in order to provide the basis for consistent measurements of protein expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2139576

  2. Canine Mammary Mixed Tumours: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dantas Cassali, Geovanni; Cavalheiro Bertagnolli, Angélica; Ferreira, Enio; Araújo Damasceno, Karine; de Oliveira Gamba, Conrado; Bonolo de Campos, Cecília

    2012-01-01

    Mammary mixed tumours are the most frequent neoplasias in female dogs. In humans, mixed tumours are frequently found in the salivary glands and are known as pleomorphic adenomas. In addition to their histomorphologic similarities, mixed tumours and pleomorphic adenomas have the potential to become malignant and give rise to carcinomas in mixed tumours and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenoma, respectively. The factors associated with malignant transformation are still poorly known in the case of canine mixed tumours. However, this form of neoplasia tends to be associated with a better prognosis than other malignant histological types. This paper discusses the main features associated with female canine mammary mixed tumours. PMID:23193497

  3. Tumour-associated eosinophilia: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D; Jorizzo, J; Hutt, M S

    1981-01-01

    In a recent study of cervical carcinoma, 13 cases with a marked eosinophil infiltrate around the tumour were found. The histological appearance of the tumours was distinctive and suggested a specific response, similar to the lymphocyte infiltration in medullary carcinoma of the breast and seminoma. A review of published reports shows that tumour-associated tissue eosinophilia (TATE) and tumour-associated blood eosinophilia (TABE) may be seen in tumours of different histological types from different anatomical sites, and may occur together or separately. Tumours with TATE alone appear to have a better prognosis that those without, while TABE is associated with tumor spread and a poor prognosis. Images PMID:7035499

  4. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  5. [Hormonal dysnatremia].

    PubMed

    Karaca, P; Desailloud, R

    2013-10-01

    Because of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) disorder on production or function we can observe dysnatremia. In the absence of production by posterior pituitary, central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurs with hypernatremia. There are hereditary autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X- linked forms. When ADH is secreted but there is an alteration on his receptor AVPR2, it is a nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in acquired or hereditary form. We can make difference on AVP levels and/or on desmopressine response which is negative in nephrogenic forms. Hyponatremia occurs when there is an excess of ADH production: it is a euvolemic hypoosmolar hyponatremia. The most frequent etiology is SIADH (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH), a diagnostic of exclusion which is made after eliminating corticotropin deficiency and hypothyroidism. In case of brain injury the differential diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome has to be discussed, because its treatment is perfusion of isotonic saline whereas in SIADH, the treatment consists in administration of hypertonic saline if hyponatremia is acute and/or severe. If not, fluid restriction demeclocycline or vaptans (antagonists of V2 receptors) can be used in some European countries. Four types of SIADH exist; 10 % of cases represent not SIADH but SIAD (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis) due to a constitutive activation of vasopressin receptor that produces water excess. c 2013 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. PMID:24356291

  6. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  7. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan.

    PubMed

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  8. Anti-tumour activity of oncolytic Western Reserve vaccinia viruses in canine tumour cell lines, xenografts, and fresh tumour biopsies.

    PubMed

    Autio, K; Knuuttila, A; Kipar, A; Ahonen, M; Parviainen, S; Diaconu, I; Kanerva, A; Hakonen, T; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A

    2014-10-10

    Cancer is one of the most common reasons for death in dogs. One promising approach is oncolytic virotherapy. We assessed the oncolytic effect of genetically modified vaccinia viruses in canine cancer cells, in freshly excised tumour biopsies, and in mice harbouring canine tumour xenografts. Tumour transduction efficacy was assessed using virus expressing luciferase or fluorescent marker genes and oncolysis was quantified by a colorimetric cell viability assay. Oncolytic efficacy in vivo was evaluated in a nude mouse xenograft model. Vaccinia virus was shown to infect most tested canine cancer cell lines and primary surgical tumour tissues. Virus infection significantly reduced tumour growth in the xenograft model. Oncolytic vaccinia virus has antitumour effects against canine cancer cells and experimental tumours and is able to replicate in freshly excised patient tumour tissue. Our results suggest that oncolytic vaccinia virus may offer an effective treatment option for otherwise incurable canine tumours. PMID:25302859

  9. Tailored nanoparticles for tumour therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Drake, Philip; Cho, Hui-Ju; Kao, Chao-Hung; Lee, Kun-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. PMID:22905580

  10. A rare urinary bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Haddad-Lacle, Judella Edwina Maria; Haddad, Charles Joseph; Villas, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 54-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician with low back pain. During his workup, an incidental finding of a bladder mass was diagnosed. He underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumour and the resulting pathology was consistent with extra nodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma). Presentation of MALT lymphoma in the urinary bladder is rare. This malignancy is more commonly found in the stomach. The prognosis for this rare tumour is excellent. Our patient showed no sign of recurrence with transurethral excision and radiation alone. PMID:24835803

  11. Multiple brown tumours from parathyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dagang, Daryl Jade Tardo; Gutierrez, Jerico Baliton; Sandoval, Mark Anthony Santiago; Lantion-Ang, Frances Lina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 29-year-old woman who suffered from severe bilateral inguinal pain and left mandibular mass. CT scan showed innumerable expansile osteolytic bone masses on the iliac wings, femur, ribs and vertebral bodies, diffuse skeletal osteopaenia, calyceal lithiasis on the right kidney and a left thyroid mass. Ionised calcium and intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) were elevated. Parathyroid sestamibi scan showed a hyperfunctioning left inferior parathyroid gland. Biopsy of the left mandibular mass was consistent with brown tumour. The patient underwent parathyroidectomy of the enlarged parathyroid gland. Final histopathology, however, revealed parathyroid carcinoma, 4.7 cm in widest dimension, with capsular and vascular space invasion. The patient underwent repeat surgery, specifically, left thyroid lobectomy, isthmectomy and central node dissection. Intact PTH decreased from 681.3 to 74 pg/mL (normal range: 10-65) 24 hours postoperatively. Follow-up at 6 months showed normal serum calcium levels, size reduction of bone lesions and improvement of quality of life. PMID:27358103

  12. The chronic syndromes after previous treatment of pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Romijn, Johannes A

    2016-09-01

    Ultimately, almost all patients who are appropriately treated for pituitary tumours enter a chronic phase with control or cure of hormonal excess, adequate treatment of pituitary insufficiency and relief of mass effects. This phase is associated with improvement of initial signs and symptoms, but also with the persistent consequences of the initial disease and associated treatments. Pituitary insufficiency is a common denominator in many of these patients, and is associated with a reduction in quality of life, despite adequate endocrine substitution. Hypothalamic dysfunction can be present in patients previously treated for visual impairments caused by large suprasellar adenomas, or craniopharyngiomas. In addition to hypopituitarism, these patients can have multisystem morbidities caused by altered hypothalamic function, including weight gain and disturbed regulation of sleep-wake cycles. Mortality can also be affected. Patients cured of Cushing disease or acromegaly have chronic multisystem morbidities (in the case of Cushing disease, also affecting mortality) caused by irreversible effects of the previous excesses of cortisol in Cushing disease and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 in acromegaly. In addition to early diagnosis and treatment of pituitary tumours, research should focus on the amenability of these chronic post-treatment syndromes to therapeutic intervention, to improve quality of life and clinical outcomes. PMID:27259177

  13. Tumours of the soft (mesenchymal) tissues.

    PubMed

    Weiss, E

    1974-01-01

    This is a classification of tumours of fibrous tissue, fat, muscle, blood and lymph vessels, and mast cells, irrespective of the region of the body in which they arise. Tumours of fibrous tissue are divided into fibroma, fibrosarcoma (including "canine haemangiopericytoma"), other sarcomas, equine sarcoid, and various tumour-like lesions. The histological appearance of the tumours is described and illustrated with photographs. PMID:4371740

  14. Brain tumour mortality in immigrants.

    PubMed

    Neutel, C I; Quinn, A; Brancker, A

    1989-03-01

    All Canadian deaths due to malignant brain tumour for the years 1970-73 were identified and analysed for country of birth. The years 1970-73 were chosen since in later years country of birth was no longer available for each death. The brain tumour population consisted of 1551 male and 1058 female deaths and matched controls were chosen from deaths due to other causes. Americans who died of brain tumour in Canada had a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of 1.0 compared to their fellow Americans in the USA. Italian, German, Dutch and British immigrants had SMR between 1.5 and 2.6 compared to rates in their home countries and between 1.24 and 2.09 when compared to Canadian rates. A series of graphs shows the increased risk for male immigrants quite dramatically, and indicates that for females the increases were less pronounced. Further analysis showed that the excess risk is confined to those who were born in Western Europe while their Canadian-born children experienced the same rates as all Canadians. Based on the limited information available, occupation could not be shown to play a role in establishing risk. An attempt was made to pinpoint the years of immigration which showed the greatest risk. It is concluded that the determination of risk of brain tumour has a strong environmental component. The possibilities for identification of this component are discussed. PMID:2722385

  15. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  16. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  17. Positive correlation of steroid hormones and EGF in canine mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Felisbina L; Pérez-Alenza, Dolores; Silvan, Gema; Peña, Laura; Illera, Juan C

    2009-05-01

    There are no published studies focused on the potential crosstalk between steroid hormones and EGF in canine mammary tumourigenesis. The objective was to investigate the role of EGF in canine mammary tumours (CMT) and the relationship with steroid hormones. Sixty-three CMT (39 malignant including 10 inflammatory mammary carcinomas (IMC); 19 benign and 5 dysplasias), and 13 normal mammary glands from dogs without history of neoplastic disease were analysed. Levels of EGF and steroid hormones [progesterone (P4); 17beta-estradiol (E2); androstenedione (A4) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)], were analysed by EIA in CMT homogenates. Levels of EGF were significantly higher in malignant compared with benign tumours, dysplasias and normal mammary glands (p<0.001). IMC presented the highest EGF levels, with statistical significant difference between IMC and non-IMC cases (p<0.05). Steroid hormone levels were also significantly higher in malignant tumours compared with benign tumours, dysplasias and normal mammary glands (p<0.001). In malignant tumours (non-IMC and IMC), a strong correlation was observed between EGF and: P4 (r=0.452; p=0.003); E2 (r=0.624; p=0.023); A4 (r=0.496; p=0.038); DHEA (r=0.431; p=0.005). These results suggest that EGF is implicated in canine mammary tumourigenesis. The positive correlation observed, opens an interesting perspective of interaction that should be further investigated. PMID:19429455

  18. Sclerosing stromal tumour of the ovary presenting as precocious puberty: a rare neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Jai Kumar; Afroz, Nishat; Maheshwari, Veena; Naim, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old Indian girl presented with symptoms of excessive development of breasts, early menarche, growth of pubic hairs, accelerated growth and abdominal distension. On clinical examination, a large right abdominopelvic mass was palpable. MRI revealed a large, heterogeneous, solid and cystic tumour in the right adnexal region, suggestive of an ovarian neoplasm. The hormonal profile showed markedly elevated oestradiol and low follicle-stimulating hormone levels. Clinical diagnosis of precocious puberty with right ovarian mass was concluded. Right-sided salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Histopathology showed features consistent with sclerosing stromal tumour of the ovary. Postoperatively, signs and symptoms of precocity gradually regressed and her serum oestradiol level came down to normal. This is the first reported case from India. PMID:24686794

  19. Animal models of tumour-associated epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kirschstein, Timo; Köhling, Rüdiger

    2016-02-15

    Brain tumours cause a sizeable proportion of epilepsies in adulthood, and actually can be etiologically responsible also for childhood epilepsies. Conversely, seizures are often first clinical signs of a brain tumour. Nevertheless, several issues of brain-tumour associated seizures and epilepsies are far from understood, or clarified regarding clinical consensus. These include both the specific mechanisms of epileptogenesis related to different tumour types, the possible relationship between malignancy and seizure emergence, the interaction between tumour mass and surrounding neuronal networks, and - not least - the best treatment options depending on different tumour types. To investigate these issues, experimental models of tumour-induced epilepsies are necessary. This review concentrates on the description of currently used models, focusing on methodological aspects. It highlights advantages and shortcomings of these models, and identifies future experimental challenges. PMID:26092434

  20. Comparative immunohistochemical study of stellate cells in normal canine and equine adenohypophyses and in pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Méndez, A; Martín de las Mulas, J; Bautista, M J; Chacón, F; Millán, Y; Fondevila, D; Pumarola, M

    1998-01-01

    The presence and distribution of S100 protein (alpha and beta subunits), cytokeratin polypeptides, glial fibrillary acidic protein, neurofilaments, vimentin, neuron specific enolase, synaptophysin, HLA class II DR antigen, and pituitary hormones (prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone and human chorionic gonadotrophin) in stellate cells were studied immunohistochemically in four normal canine pituitary glands, five canine pituitary adenomas, two canine pituitary carcinomas and two equine pituitary adenomas (with surrounding normal glandular tissue). Stellate cells of the pars distalis and pars intermedia of canine and equine adenohypophyses showed a strong reaction with antibodies against S100 protein subunits alpha and beta. They also reacted with antibody against high and low molecular weight cytokeratins, but not with those against other intermediate filament proteins, neuroendocrine markers, the HLA-class II DR antigen or the pituitary hormones. Other populations of cells expressing both subunits of the S100 protein were polygonal cells of the pars distalis of the adenohypophysis (horse) and marginal epithelial cells of the pars intermedia of the adenohypophysis (dog and horse). Some pituitary tumours had S100-immunoreactive cells with a distribution of alpha and beta subunits that differed between the two species. Some canine tumours (one adenoma and one carcinoma) expressed only the alpha subunit, but both of the equine adenomas expressed alpha and beta protein subunits. Some of the S100-immunoreactive tumour cells reacted with RCK-102 (cytokeratins 5+8) antibody in the dog but not in the horse. The results suggested that canine and equine stellate cells of the adenohypophysis are more closely related to epithelial than to glial cells, as is the case in cattle, sheep and goats but not human beings or mice. No subpopulation of cells of bone marrow origin could be identified among canine stellate cells, as they lack MHC class II antigen. The results also

  1. Hormones and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  2. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  3. Hormones and Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Hormones and Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, is a main cause of ... tobacco, alcohol, and certain medications play a part. Hormones made in the kidneys and in blood vessels ...

  4. ADH (Antidiuretic Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Vasopressin; AVP Formal name: Antidiuretic Hormone; Arginine Vasopressin Related tests: Osmolality , BUN , Creatinine , Sodium , ... should know? How is it used? The antidiuretic hormone (ADH) test is used to help detect, diagnose, ...

  5. Menopause and Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones Menopause--Medicines to Help You Links to other ...

  6. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb babies ...

  7. Novel hormone "receptors".

    PubMed

    Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry

    2008-02-01

    Our concepts of hormone receptors have, until recently, been narrowly defined. In the last few years, an increasing number of reports identify novel proteins, such as enzymes, acting as receptors. In this review we cover the novel receptors for the hormones atrial naturetic hormone, enterostatin, hepcidin, thyroid hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and the vitamin D metabolites 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and 24,25(OH)(2)D(3). PMID:17546587

  8. Haemangioleiomyomatous tumour of the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Soorae, A S; Bharucha, H

    1980-01-01

    A case of haemangioleiomyomatous tumour of the lung, occurring as a peripheral, solitary nodule in an asymptomatic 54-year-old man is presented. The tumour was well-demarcated and microscopically it was characterised by the presence of vascular spaces with endothelial, pericytic, and, predominantly, smooth muscle proliferation. Islands of cartilage and slit-like spaces lined by bronchial epithelium make this a hamartomatous lesion of a quite distinctive and unusual variety, which does not fit any of the well-recognised patterns of hamartomas previously described. The long-term prognosis after limited excision is considered to be favourable. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7358861

  9. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    The endocrine system is made up of organs and tissues that produce hormones. Hormones are natural chemicals produced in one ... hormones that control the other structures in the endocrine system. The amount of these regulating hormones stays about ...

  10. Hypoxia-mediated tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Binley, K; Askham, Z; Martin, L; Spearman, H; Day, D; Kingsman, S; Naylor, S

    2003-04-01

    Hypoxia is a common physiological feature of tumours. It activates a signalling cascade that culminates in the stabilization of the HIF-1 transcription factor and activation of genes that possess a hypoxia response element (HRE). We have used an optimized hypoxia responsive promoter (OBHRE) to investigate hypoxia-targeted gene expression in vivo in the context of an adenovirus vector. The OBHRE promoter showed limited activity in the liver or spleen such that expression was 1000-fold lower than that driven by the strong CMV/IE promoter. However, in the context of the tumour microenvironment, the OBHRE promoter achieved expression levels comparable to that of the CMV/IE promoter. Next, we showed that an adenovirus expressing the human cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6) regulated by the OBHRE promoter delays tumour growth in response to the prodrug cyclophosphamide (CPA). Finally, we exploited the hepatotropism of adenovirus to investigate whether the OBHRE promoter could mitigate the hepatotoxicity of a recombinant adenovirus expressing thymidine kinase (TK) in the context of the prodrug ganciclovir (GCV). High-dose Ad.CMVTK/GCV treatment caused significant liver necrosis whereas the same dose of Ad.HRETK was well tolerated. These in vivo data demonstrate that hypoxia-targeted gene expression via the OBHRE promoter can be used to increase the therapeutic window of cytotoxic cancer gene therapy. PMID:12646859

  11. Progestin-mediated activation of MAPK and AKT in nuclear progesterone receptor negative breast epithelial cells: The role of membrane progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Monica; Lerma-Ortiz, Alejandra; Hooks, Grace M; Ashley, Amanda K; Ashley, Ryan L

    2016-10-10

    Progesterone (P4), a steroid produced during estrous cycles and gestation for maintenance of pregnancy, also plays key roles in breast development to allow lactation post-parturition. Progestins (P4 and related steroids) are also implicated in breast cancer etiology. Hormone replacement therapy containing both estrogen and progestins increases breast cancer incidence while estrogen hormone therapy lowers breast cancer risk. P4 signaling via nuclear P4 receptors (PRs) has been extensively studied in breast cancer, however, progestin signaling via non-classical membrane bound progestin receptors (MPRs and PGRMC1) remains unclear. Moreover, P4 metabolites and synthetic progestins may bind membrane progestin receptors. We hypothesized that PR-negative breast epithelial cells express non-classical progestin receptors, which activate intracellular signaling pathways differently depending on nature of progestin. Therefore, our objectives for the current study were to determine expression of MPRs and PGRMC1 in two PR-negative non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cell lines, assess progestin-mediated signaling and biological functions. We determined five MPR isoforms and PGRMC1 were present in MCF10A cells and all progestin receptors but MPRβ in MCF12A cells. MCF10A and MCF12A cells were treated with P4, select P4 metabolites (5αP and 3αHP), medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), or a specific MPR-Agonist (MPR-Ag) and phosphorylation of ERK, p38, JNK, and AKT was characterized following treatment. To our knowledge this is the first report of ERK and JNK activation in MCF10A and MCF12A cells with P4, P4 metabolites, MPA, and MPR-Ag. Activation of ERK and JNK in cells treated with MPR-Ag implicates MPRs may serve as the receptors responsible for their activation. In contrast, p38 activation varied with cell type and with progestin treatment. P4 and MPA promoted AKT phosphorylation in the MCF12A cell line only whereas no activation was observed in MCF10A cells. Interestingly

  12. Was sind hormone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlson, P.

    1982-01-01

    Historically, the meaning of the term hormone has changed during the last decades. Morphological studies of secreting cells lead Feyrter to the concept of paracrine action of some hormones. While endocrine regulators are blood-borne, paracrine messengers reach their target cells through the diffusion in the intracellular space. Though it is rather difficult to draw a line between true hormones and hormone-like substances, valid definitions for endocrine and paracrine regulatory systems can be given. The term ‘hormonal control’ should be restricted to endocrine systems. For effectors acting by paracrine mechanisms, the term paramone is proposed in this article.

  13. Hormonal therapies in acne.

    PubMed

    Shaw, James C

    2002-07-01

    Hormones, in particular androgen hormones, are the main cause of acne in men, women, children and adults, in both normal states and endocrine disorders. Therefore, the use of hormonal therapies in acne is rational in concept and gratifying in practice. Although non-hormonal therapies enjoy wide usage and continue to be developed, there is a solid place for hormonal approaches in women with acne, especially adult women with persistent acne. This review covers the physiological basis for hormonal influence in acne, the treatments that are in use today and those that show promise for the future. The main treatments to be discussed are oral contraceptives androgen receptor blockers like spironolactone and flutamide, inhibitors of the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase and topical hormonal treatments. PMID:12083987

  14. Fertility sparing treatment in borderline ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Rosa Maria; Vazquez-Vicente, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours are low malignant potential tumours. They represent 10–15% of all epithelial ovarian malignancies. Patients with this type of tumour are younger at the time of diagnosis than patients with invasive ovarian cancer. Most of them are diagnosed in the early stages and have an excellent prognosis. It has been quite clearly established that the majority of borderline ovarian tumours should be managed with surgery alone. Because a high proportion of women with this malignancy are young and the prognosis is excellent, the preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of these tumours. In this systemic review of the literature, we have evaluated in-depth oncological safety and reproductive outcomes in women with borderline ovarian tumours treated with fertility-sparing surgery, reviewing the indications, benefits, and disadvantages of each type of conservative surgery, as well as new alternative options to surgery to preserve fertility. PMID:25729420

  15. Fertility sparing treatment in borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Rosa Maria; Vazquez-Vicente, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours are low malignant potential tumours. They represent 10-15% of all epithelial ovarian malignancies. Patients with this type of tumour are younger at the time of diagnosis than patients with invasive ovarian cancer. Most of them are diagnosed in the early stages and have an excellent prognosis. It has been quite clearly established that the majority of borderline ovarian tumours should be managed with surgery alone. Because a high proportion of women with this malignancy are young and the prognosis is excellent, the preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of these tumours. In this systemic review of the literature, we have evaluated in-depth oncological safety and reproductive outcomes in women with borderline ovarian tumours treated with fertility-sparing surgery, reviewing the indications, benefits, and disadvantages of each type of conservative surgery, as well as new alternative options to surgery to preserve fertility. PMID:25729420

  16. Arsenic Induces Functional Re-Expression of Estrogen Receptor α by Demethylation of DNA in Estrogen Receptor-Negative Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongxia; Jiang, Fei; Wang, Yubang; Hu, Chunyan; Qi, Hong; Zhong, Caiyun; Wang, Xinru; Li, Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a marker predictive for response of breast cancers to endocrine therapy. About 30% of breast cancers, however, are hormone- independent because of lack of ERα expression. New strategies are needed for re-expression of ERα and sensitization of ER-negative breast cancer cells to selective ER modulators. The present report shows that arsenic trioxide induces reactivated ERα, providing a target for therapy with ER antagonists. Exposure of ER-negative breast cancer cells to arsenic trioxide leads to re-expression of ERα mRNA and functional ERα protein in in vitro and in vivo. Luciferase reporter gene assays and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)- 2-(4-sulfophenyl)- 2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assays show that, upon exposure to arsenic trioxide, formerly unresponsive, ER-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells become responsive to ER antagonists, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 182,780. Furthermore, methylation- specific PCR and bisulfite-sequencing PCR assays show that arsenic trioxide induces partial demethylation of the ERα promoter. A methyl donor, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), reduces the degree of arsenic trioxide-induced re-expression of ERα and demethylation. Moreover, Western blot and ChIP assays show that arsenic trioxide represses expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3a along with partial dissociation of DNMT1 from the ERα promoter. Thus, arsenic trioxide exhibits a previously undefined function which induces re-expression ERα in ER-negative breast cancer cells through demethylation of the ERα promoter. These findings could provide important information regarding the application of therapeutic agents targeting epigenetic changes in breast cancers and potential implication of arsenic trioxide as a new drug for the treatment of ER–negative human breast cancer. PMID:22558281

  17. The Er/Ki-67 Proportion in Breast Tumours - An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Rai, M K

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast tumours are classified as benign, proliferative and invasive tumours. Estrogen hormone influences the proliferative activity and progression of the tumour. Estrogen Receptor (ER) status and proliferative index (Ki 67) are important histopathological factors in the development and prognosis of these tumours. Aim The present study was aimed to evaluate the variations in ER and Ki-67 expression in three broad categories of breast lesions namely benign breast disease, proliferative breast disease and malignant breast disease. Materials and Methods ER% and Ki-67% was evaluated on the histopathological tissues of 15 patients each of benign, proliferative and invasive breast tumours. The ER+/ Ki-67± ratio was calculated and the variation of expression between the three categories was analyzed using student’s t-test. Pearson’s coefficient of correlation was used to correlate ER and Ki-67 positivity within each category. Results The mean ER+/Ki-67+ in benign, proliferative and invasive tumours was 0.81, 0.87 and 1.42 respectively. A statistically significant difference in ER+/Ki-67+ proportions was observed between proliferative breast disease category and malignant breast disease category and also between benign breast disease category and malignant breast disease category (p<0.05). However, no significant difference was observed in benign breast disease category and proliferative breast disease category (p>0.05). A significant correlation was observed in proliferative breast disease and malignant breast disease categories. However, no significant correlation was observed in benign breast disease category Conclusion ER+/Ki-67+ ratio is an important determinant of the invasive breast cancer and can be used to differentiate invasive cancers from benign and proliferative breast tumours. PMID:27190810

  18. Malignant Leydig cell tumour of the testis.

    PubMed

    Powari, Manish; Kakkar, Nandita; Singh, S K; Rai, R S; Jogai, Sanjay

    2002-01-01

    A case of malignant Leydig cell tumour is presented. It is a rare primary malignant tumour of the testis and occurs exclusively in adults. The present case is of interest because it occurred at the young age of 25 years which is rare. Histologically it showed almost all features which suggest malignancy and also had metastases to the lungs and liver. The clinical details and pathology of this tumour are discussed. PMID:11803271

  19. Tumours of the liver and biliary system

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarkov, V.; Mackey, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    In this histological classification of liver and gall bladder tumours the tumour types largely correspond to those found in man. The most common tumours in this group are liver cell adenoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and cholangiocarcinoma. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:1086149

  20. Tumours of the upper alimentary tract

    PubMed Central

    Head, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the oropharynx of domestic animals are common in most parts of the world, but squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alimentary tract shows differences in prevalence in different geographical areas and occurs at different sites in the various species. Oral tumours of the melanogenic system are more common in dogs than in man. The following main histological categories, which broadly correspond to those used in the classification of tumours of man, are described: papilloma; squamous cell carcinoma; salivary gland tumours; malignant melanoma; tumours of soft (mesenchymal) tissues; tumours of the facial bones; tumours of haematopoietic and related tissues; and odontogenic tumours and jaw cysts. Papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, fibroma, and fibrosarcoma account for about 80% of the tumours that occur in the upper alimentary tract of domestic animals. ImagesFig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 37Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 1 PMID:1086147

  1. Tumour angiogenesis-Origin of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Krishna Priya, S; Nagare, R P; Sneha, V S; Sidhanth, C; Bindhya, S; Manasa, P; Ganesan, T S

    2016-08-15

    The conventional view of tumour vascularization is that tumours acquire their blood supply from neighbouring normal stroma. Additional methods of tumour vascularization such as intussusceptive angiogenesis, vasculogenic mimicry, vessel co-option and vasculogenesis have been demonstrated to occur. However, the origin of the endothelial cells and pericytes in the tumour vasculature is not fully understood. Their origin from malignant cells has been shown indirectly in lymphoma and neuroblastoma by immuno-FISH experiments. It is now evident that tumours arise from a small population of cells called cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour initiating cells. Recent data suggest that a proportion of tumour endothelial cells arise from cancer stem cells in glioblastoma. This was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells showed identical genetic changes to those identified in tumour cells. However, another report contradicted these results from the earlier studies in glioblastoma and had shown that CSCs give rise to pericytes and not endothelial cells. The main thrust of this review is the critical analysis of the conflicting data from different studies and the remaining questions in this field of research. The mechanism by which this phenomenon occurs is also discussed in detail. The transdifferentiation of CSCs to endothelial cells/pericytes has many implications in the progression and metastasis of the tumours and hence it would be a novel target for antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26934471

  2. Mortality, neoplasia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in patients treated with human pituitary growth hormone in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, C R; Preece, M A; Milner, R D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the cause of death and incidence of neoplasia in patients treated with human pituitary growth hormone. DESIGN--A long term cohort study established to receive details of death certification and tumour registrations through the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys and NHS central register. PATIENTS--All patients (1246 male, 662 female) treated for short stature with pituitary growth hormone under the Medical Research Council working party and health services human growth hormone committee. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Death or development of neoplasia. RESULTS--110 patients died (68 male, 42 female; aged 0.9-57 years) from 1972 to 1990. Fifty three death were from neoplasia responsible for growth hormone deficiency (27 craniopharyngioma, 24 other intracranial tumour, two leukaemia); two from histiocytosis X; and 13 from pituitary insufficiency. Six patients died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, six of other neurological disorders, and eight of acute infection. Other deaths were apparently unrelated to growth hormone deficiency or its treatment. Seventeen tumours (in 16 patients) were identified during or after growth hormone treatment. Four were in patients with previous intracranial neoplasia and two were after cranial irradiation. Thirteen were intracranial, the others being Hodgkin's lymphoma, osteosarcoma, carcinoma of colon, and basal cell carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS--Recurrence or progression of intracranial tumours and potentially avoidable metabolic consequences of hypopituitarism were the main causes of death. Growth hormone treatment probably did not contribute to new tumour development. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease after pituitary growth hormone treatment continues to occur in the United Kingdom. This cohort must remain under long term review. PMID:2025705

  3. Tumour promotion versus tumour suppression in chronic hepatic iron overload.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Steven A; Brown, Kyle E

    2015-06-01

    Although iron-catalysed oxidative damage is presumed to be a major mechanism of injury leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in hemochromatosis, these events have been difficult to recapitulate in an animal model. In this study, we evaluated regulators of hepatocarcinogenesis in a rodent model of chronic iron overload. Sprague-Dawley rats were iron loaded with iron dextran over 6 months. Livers were harvested and analysed for markers of oxidative stress, as well as the following proteins: p53, murine double minute 2, the Shc proteins p66, p52, p46; β-catenin, CHOP, C/EBPα and Yes-associated protein. In this model, iron loading is associated with hepatocyte proliferation, and indices of oxidative damage are mildly increased in tandem with augmented antioxidant defenses. Alterations potentially favouring carcinogenesis included a modest but significant decrease in p53 levels and increases in p52, p46 and β-catenin levels compared with control livers. Countering these factors, the iron-loaded livers demonstrated a significant decrease in CHOP, which has recently been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as a reciprocal increase in C/EBPα and decrease in Yes-associated protein. Our results suggest that chronic iron overload elicits both tumour suppressive as well as tumour-promoting mechanisms in rodent liver. PMID:26059599

  4. Human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Strobl, J S; Thomas, M J

    1994-03-01

    The study of human growth hormone is a little more than 100 years old. Growth hormone, first identified for its dramatic effect on longitudinal growth, is now known to exert generalized effects on protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional roles for growth hormone in human physiology are likely to be discovered in the areas of sleep research and reproduction. Furthermore, there is some indication that growth hormone also may be involved in the regulation of immune function, mental well-being, and the aging process. Recombinant DNA technology has provided an abundant and safe, albeit expensive, supply of human growth hormone for human use, but the pharmacological properties of growth hormone are poor. Most growth hormone-deficient individuals exhibit a secretory defect rather than a primary defect in growth hormone production, however, and advances in our understanding of the neuroendocrine regulation of growth hormone secretion have established the basis for the use of drugs to stimulate release of endogenously synthesized growth hormone. This promises to be an important area for future drug development. PMID:8190748

  5. [Pancreatic tumour in a child].

    PubMed

    Schouenborg Schultz, Thea; Thyssen Vestergaard, Esben

    2014-07-28

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in children and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) has a prevalence of 8.4% in childhood. In 90-95% of RAPs no organic disease is identified. Thus, it is important that the few of somatic origin are diagnosed. We describe a case concerning a 12-year-old girl, diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas. The symptoms were RAP and postprandial vomiting. The purpose of this article is to increase the knowledge of "alarm findings" indicating an organic disease in children with RAP. PMID:25292323

  6. Expression of membrane transporters and metabolic enzymes involved in estrone-3-sulphate disposition in human breast tumour tissues.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Nilasha; Miller, Naomi; Allen, Christine; Bendayan, Reina

    2014-06-01

    Two-thirds of newly diagnosed hormone-dependent (HR?) breast cancers are detected in post-menopausal patients where estrone-3-sulphate (E3S) is the predominant source for tumour estradiol. Understanding intra-tumoral fate of E3S would facilitate in the identification of novel molecular targets for HR? post-menopausal breast cancer patients. Hence this study investigates the clinical expression of (i) organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), (ii) multidrug resistance protein (MRP-1), breast cancer resistance proteins (BCRP), and (iii) sulphatase (STS), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD-1), involved in E3S uptake, efflux and metabolism, respectively. Fluorescent and brightfield images of stained tumour sections (n = 40) were acquired at 4× and 20× magnification, respectively. Marker densities were measured as the total area of positive signal divided by the surface area of the tumour section analysed and was reported as % area (ImageJ software). Tumour, stroma and non-tumour tissue areas were also quantified (Inform software), and the ratio of optical intensity per histologic area was reported as % area/tumour, % area/stroma and % area/non-tumour. Functional role of OATPs and STS was further investigated in HR? (MCF-7, T47-D, ZR-75) and HR-(MDA-MB-231) cells by transport studies conducted in the presence or absence of specific inhibitors. Amongst all the transporters and enzymes, OATPs and STS have significantly (p < 0.0001) higher expression in HR? tumour sections with highest target signals obtained from the tumour regions of the tissues. Specific OATP-mediated E3S uptake and STS-mediated metabolism were also observed in all HR? breast cancer cells. These observations suggest the potential of OATPs as novel molecular targets for HR? breast cancers. PMID:24831777

  7. Hormonal therapy for acne.

    PubMed

    George, Rosalyn; Clarke, Shari; Thiboutot, Diane

    2008-09-01

    Acne affects more than 40 million people, of which more than half are women older than 25 years of age. These women frequently fail traditional therapy and have high relapse rates even after isotretinoin. Recent advances in research have helped to delineate the important role hormones play in the pathogenesis of acne. Androgens such as dihydrotestosterone and testosterone, the adrenal precursor dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, estrogens, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factors may all contribute to the development of acne. Hormonal therapy remains an important part of the arsenal of acne treatments available to the clinician. Women dealing with acne, even those without increased serum androgens, may benefit from hormonal treatments. The mainstays of hormonal therapy include oral contraceptives and antiandrogens such as spironolactone, cyproterone acetate, or flutamide. In this article, we discuss the effects of hormones on the pathogenesis of acne, evaluation of women with suspected endocrine abnormalities, and the myriad of treatment options available. PMID:18786497

  8. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  9. Electrochemotherapy on liver tumours in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, L. H.; Orlowski, S.; An, D.; Bindoula, G.; Dzodic, R.; Ardouin, P.; Bognel, C.; Belehradek, J.; Munck, J. N.; Mir, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is a new therapeutic approach combining the effects of a low-permeant cytotoxic drug, bleomycin (BLM), administered i.v. and cell-permeabilizing electric pulses (EPs) locally delivered to tumours. The transient permeabilization of the cell membrane by the EPs allows free access of BLM to its intracellular targets, largely enhancing BLM's cytotoxic effects. ECT efficacy has been proved so far on transplanted subcutaneous murine tumours and on subcutaneous metastases in humans. Here, we present the first study of the effects of ECT on tumours transplanted to livers in rabbits. We used a recently developed EP applicator consisting of an array of parallel and equidistant needles to be inserted in tissues. Effects of EPs alone or of ECT were assessed by histological analysis, tumour growth rates and survival of the treated animals. A transient blood hypoperfusion was seen in the electropulsed areas, with or without BLM, related to EP-dependent vasoconstriction but this had no major effects on cell survival. Long-term effects depended on the presence of BLM at the time of EP delivery. Almost complete tumour necrosis was observed after ECT, resulting from both BLM direct cytotoxic effects on electropermeabilized tumour cells and indirect effects on the tumour vessels. A large reduction in tumour growth rate and significantly longer survival times were scored in comparison with control rabbits. Moreover, ECT of liver tumours was well tolerated and devoid of systemic side-effects. When ECT was associated with a local interleukin 2-based immunotherapy, increased local anti-tumour effectiveness as well as a large decrease in the number of metastases were observed. Thus, ECT could become a novel treatment modality for liver tumours and other solid internal malignancies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9649121

  10. Transillumination imaging of intraocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Kjersem, Bård; Krohn, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss a recently described modification of a standard photo slit lamp system for ocular transillumination, with special emphasis on the light transmission through the eye wall and the photographic technique. Transillumination photography was carried out with the Haag-Streit Photo-Slit Lamp BX 900 (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland). After having released the background lighting optic fibre cable from its holder, the patient was positioned at the slit lamp, and the fibre tip was gently pressed against the sclera or the cornea of the patient's eye. During about 1/1000 of a second, the eye was illuminated by the flash and the scleral shadow of the tumour was exposed to the camera sensor. The images were of good diagnostic quality, making it easy to outline the tumours and to evaluate the involvement of intraocular structures. None of the examined patients experienced discomfort or negative side effects. The method is recommended in cases where photographic transillumination documentation of intraocular pathologies is considered important. PMID:23641762

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea in pituitary tumours1

    PubMed Central

    Cole, I E; Keene, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    Three cases of CSF rhinorrhoea due to pituitary tumours are reported and the literature reviewed. The treatment of choice appears to be trans-sphenoidal exploration of the pituitary fossa with insertion of a free muscle graft followed by radiotherapy. The probability of the tumour being a prolactin-secreting adenoma is discussed. PMID:7017123

  12. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  13. Peculiarities of hyperlipidaemia in tumour patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dilman, V. M.; Berstein, L. M.; Ostroumova, M. N.; Tsyrlina, Y. V.; Golubev, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    The study group included 684 cases: 258 patients with breast carcinoma, 113 males with lung cancer, 42 patients with rectal tumours, 42 patients with stomach tumours, 59 patients with fibroadenomatosis, and 170 healthy subjects of varying age (male and female). A relatively high blood triglyceride level was found in patients with breast, lung, rectal (females), and stomach (female) tumours. The blood concentration of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in patients with breast, lung, and stomach (female) tumours was relatively low. The elimination of tumour (breast carcinoma) did not lead to significant changes in lipid metabolism. There was no correlation between degree of lipidaemia and stage of tumour progression except in the cases of rectal cancer. Preliminary results are presented on the tentative classification of hyperlipoproteinaemia in tumour patients, using the lipid concentration threshold values advocated by Carlson et al. (1977); an increased frequency of Type IV hyperlipoproteinaemia proved to be the most characteristic feature of tumour patients. The results are discussed in terms of the concept of the importance of lipid metabolic disturbances, primarily those due to ageing, in the genesis of the syndrome of "cancerophilia" (predisposition to cancer). PMID:7248149

  14. Classification of odontogenic tumours. A historical review.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Hans Peter; Reichart, Peter A

    2006-10-01

    Using the term odontome for any tumour arising from the dental formative tissues, Broca suggested a classification of odontogenic tumours (OTs) in 1869. From 1888 to 1914, Bland-Sutton and Gabell, James and Payne modified tumour terminology, while maintaining Broca's odontome concept. Thoma and Goldman's classification (1946) divided the OTs into tumours of ectodermal, mesodermal and mixed origin and abolished the general term odontome. The Pindborg and Clausen classification (1958) based on the idea that the reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions were also operating in the pathogenesis of OTs. In 1966, WHO established a Collaborating Centre for the Histological Classification of Odontogenic Tumours and Allied Lesions (including jaw cysts) headed by Dr Jens Pindborg. In 1971, the first authoritative WHO guide to the classification of OTs and cysts appeared followed in 1992 by a second edition. In 2002, Philipsen and Reichart produced a revision of the 1992-edition and in 2003, the editors of the WHO Blue Book series: 'WHO Classification of Tumours' decided to produce a volume on the Head and Neck Tumours including a chapter on Odontogenic Tumours and Bone Related Lesions. In July of 2005 this volume was published by IARC, Lyon. PMID:16968232

  15. Strain elastography features of epidermoid tumours in superficial soft tissue: differences from other benign soft-tissue tumours and malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Park, H J; Lee, S M; Kim, W T; Lee, S; Ahn, K S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated ultrasonographic features of superficial epidermoid tumour with a focus on strain elastography (SE) features that will help in the differential diagnosis of epidermoid tumour from other benign and malignant soft-tissue tumours. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated ultrasonographic and SE data of 103 surgically confirmed superficial soft-tissue tumours and tumour-like lesions: 29 cases of epidermoid tumour, 46 cases of other benign tumours and 28 cases of malignant tumour. SE and B-mode imaging were performed at the same time. SE characteristics were assigned into four grades (1–4) according to their elasticity. Interobserver agreement for the four SE scores between the two radiologists was analysed using kappa statistics. We classified each SE finding as a hard lesion (SE Score 3–4) or soft lesion (SE Score 1–2) and compared these findings using the χ2 test to identify whether a significant difference in mass hardness existed among epidermoid tumour, other benign tumour and malignant tumour. Results: Overall interobserver agreement according to the four SE scores was moderate (κ = 0.540), and overall agreement for the hardness [soft (Score 1–2) or hard (Score 3–4)] was almost perfect (κ = 0.825). Malignant tumours showed higher SE scores (3–4, hard nature) than did epidermoid tumour or other benign soft-tissue tumours. There were no differences in SE score between epidermoid tumour and other benign tumours. Conclusion: Superficial epidermoid tumour exhibits a softer nature than does malignant tumour but does not have a different SE pattern from other benign tumours. Advances in knowledge: SE features of epidermoid tumour might be helpful in differentiating from other benign and malignant tumours. PMID:25827206

  16. Characterization of twenty-five ovarian tumour cell lines that phenocopy primary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Tan A.; Sousa, Aurea D.; Jones, Michelle A.; Harrell, J. Chuck; Agoston, Elin S.; Krohn, Marit; Selfors, Laura M.; Liu, Wenbin; Chen, Ken; Yong, Mao; Buchwald, Peter; Wang, Bin; Hale, Katherine S.; Cohick, Evan; Sergent, Petra; Witt, Abigail; Kozhekbaeva, Zhanna; Gao, Sizhen; Agoston, Agoston T.; Merritt, Melissa A.; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R.; Crum, Christopher P.; Brugge, Joan S.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available human tumour cell line panels consist of a small number of lines in each lineage that generally fail to retain the phenotype of the original patient tumour. Here we develop a cell culture medium that enables us to routinely establish cell lines from diverse subtypes of human ovarian cancers with >95% efficiency. Importantly, the 25 new ovarian tumour cell lines described here retain the genomic landscape, histopathology and molecular features of the original tumours. Furthermore, the molecular profile and drug response of these cell lines correlate with distinct groups of primary tumours with different outcomes. Thus, tumour cell lines derived using this methodology represent a significantly improved platform to study human tumour pathophysiology and response to therapy. PMID:26080861

  17. Characterization of twenty-five ovarian tumour cell lines that phenocopy primary tumours.

    PubMed

    Ince, Tan A; Sousa, Aurea D; Jones, Michelle A; Harrell, J Chuck; Agoston, Elin S; Krohn, Marit; Selfors, Laura M; Liu, Wenbin; Chen, Ken; Yong, Mao; Buchwald, Peter; Wang, Bin; Hale, Katherine S; Cohick, Evan; Sergent, Petra; Witt, Abigail; Kozhekbaeva, Zhanna; Gao, Sizhen; Agoston, Agoston T; Merritt, Melissa A; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R; Crum, Christopher P; Brugge, Joan S; Mills, Gordon B

    2015-01-01

    Currently available human tumour cell line panels consist of a small number of lines in each lineage that generally fail to retain the phenotype of the original patient tumour. Here we develop a cell culture medium that enables us to routinely establish cell lines from diverse subtypes of human ovarian cancers with >95% efficiency. Importantly, the 25 new ovarian tumour cell lines described here retain the genomic landscape, histopathology and molecular features of the original tumours. Furthermore, the molecular profile and drug response of these cell lines correlate with distinct groups of primary tumours with different outcomes. Thus, tumour cell lines derived using this methodology represent a significantly improved platform to study human tumour pathophysiology and response to therapy. PMID:26080861

  18. Myoepithelial cells in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, Raquel; Millán, Yolanda; Guil-Luna, Silvia; Reymundo, Carlos; Espinosa de Los Monteros, Antonio; Martín de Las Mulas, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms of female dogs. Compared to mammary tumours of humans and cats, myoepithelial (ME) cell involvement is common in canine mammary tumours (CMT) of any subtype. Since ME cell involvement in CMT influences both histogenetic tumour classification and prognosis, correct identification of ME cells is important. This review describes immunohistochemical methods for identification of canine mammary ME cells used in vivo. In addition, phenotypic and genotypic methods to isolate ME cells for in vitro studies to analyse tumour-suppressor protein production and gene expression are discussed. The contribution of ME cells to both histogenetic classifications and the prognosis of CMT is compared with other species and the potential use of ME cells as a method to identify carcinoma in situ is discussed. PMID:26639832

  19. Transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihua; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Feng; Li, Weiwu; Lu, Honghai; Liu, Sikuan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Binghui

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the efficacy and safety of transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour (TURD-Bt). Methods: In total, 56 patients with bladder tumour were treated by TURD-Bt. The results in these patients were compared with 32 patients treated by current transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TUR-Bt). Patients with or without disease progressive factors were respectively compared between the 2 groups. The factors included recurrent tumour, multiple tumours, tumour ≥3 cm in diameter, clinical stage T2, histological grade 3, adenocarcinoma, and ureteral obstruction or hydronephrosis. Results: Follow-up time was 48.55 ± 23.74 months in TURD-Bt group and 56.28 ± 17.61 months in the TUR-Bt group (p > 0.05). In patients without progressive factors, no tumour recurrence was found and overall survival was 14 (100%) in the TURD-Bt group; 3 (37.50%) patients had recurrence and overall survival was 5 (62.5%) in the TUR-Bt group. In patients with progressive factors, 8 (19.05%) patients had tumour recurrence, overall survival was 32 (76.19%) and cancer death was 3 (7.14%) in TURD-Bt group; 18 (75.00%) patients had tumour recurrence (p < 0.05), overall survival was 12 (50.00%) (p < 0.01) and cancer death was 8 (33.33%) (p < 0.05) in TUR-Bt group. No significant complication was found in TURD-Bt group. Conclusion: This study suggests that complete resection and degeneration of bladder tumour can be expected by TURD-Bt. The surgical procedure is safe and efficacious, and could be predictable and controllable before and during surgery. We would conclude that for bladder cancers without lymph node metastasis and distal metastasis, TURD-Bt could be performed to replace radical TUR-Bt and preserve the bladder. PMID:24475002

  20. Ovarian down Regulation by GnRF Vaccination Decreases Reproductive Tract Tumour Size in Female White and Greater One-Horned Rhinoceroses

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Robert; Schwarzenberger, Franz; Göritz, Frank; Oh, Serena; Fernandes, Teresa; Bernardino, Rui; Leclerc, Antoine; Greunz, Eva; Mathew, Abraham; Forsyth, Sarah; Saragusty, Joseph; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive tract tumours, specifically leiomyoma, are commonly found in female rhinoceroses. Similar to humans, tumour growth in rhinoceroses is thought to be sex hormone dependent. Tumours can form and expand from the onset of ovarian activity at puberty until the cessation of sex-steroid influences at senescence. Extensive tumour growth results in infertility. The aim of this study was to down regulate reproductive function of tumour-diseased and infertile females to stop further tumour growth using a Gonadotropin releasing factor (GnRF) vaccine. Four infertile southern white (Ceratotherium simum simum) and three Greater one-horned rhinoceroses (rhinoceros unicornis) with active ovaries and 2.7 ± 0.9 and 14.0 ± 1.5 reproductive tract tumours respectively were vaccinated against GnRF (Improvac®, Zoetis, Germany) at 0, 4 and 16 weeks and re-boostered every 6–8 months thereafter. After GnRF vaccination ovarian and luteal activity was suppressed in all treated females. Three months after vaccination the size of the ovaries, the number of follicles and the size of the largest follicle were significantly reduced (P<0.03). Reproductive tract tumours decreased significantly in diameter (Greater-one horned rhino: P<0.0001; white rhino: P<0.01), presumably as a result of reduced sex-steroid influence. The calculated tumour volumes were reduced by 50.8 ± 10.9% in Greater one-horned and 48.6 ± 12.9% in white rhinoceroses. In conclusion, GnRF vaccine effectively down regulated reproductive function and decreased the size of reproductive tract tumours in female rhinoceros. Our work is the first to use down regulation of reproductive function as a symptomatic treatment against benign reproductive tumour disease in a wildlife species. Nonetheless, full reversibility and rhinoceros fertility following GnRF vaccination warrants further evaluation. PMID:27403662

  1. Ovarian down Regulation by GnRF Vaccination Decreases Reproductive Tract Tumour Size in Female White and Greater One-Horned Rhinoceroses.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Robert; Schwarzenberger, Franz; Göritz, Frank; Oh, Serena; Fernandes, Teresa; Bernardino, Rui; Leclerc, Antoine; Greunz, Eva; Mathew, Abraham; Forsyth, Sarah; Saragusty, Joseph; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive tract tumours, specifically leiomyoma, are commonly found in female rhinoceroses. Similar to humans, tumour growth in rhinoceroses is thought to be sex hormone dependent. Tumours can form and expand from the onset of ovarian activity at puberty until the cessation of sex-steroid influences at senescence. Extensive tumour growth results in infertility. The aim of this study was to down regulate reproductive function of tumour-diseased and infertile females to stop further tumour growth using a Gonadotropin releasing factor (GnRF) vaccine. Four infertile southern white (Ceratotherium simum simum) and three Greater one-horned rhinoceroses (rhinoceros unicornis) with active ovaries and 2.7 ± 0.9 and 14.0 ± 1.5 reproductive tract tumours respectively were vaccinated against GnRF (Improvac®, Zoetis, Germany) at 0, 4 and 16 weeks and re-boostered every 6-8 months thereafter. After GnRF vaccination ovarian and luteal activity was suppressed in all treated females. Three months after vaccination the size of the ovaries, the number of follicles and the size of the largest follicle were significantly reduced (P<0.03). Reproductive tract tumours decreased significantly in diameter (Greater-one horned rhino: P<0.0001; white rhino: P<0.01), presumably as a result of reduced sex-steroid influence. The calculated tumour volumes were reduced by 50.8 ± 10.9% in Greater one-horned and 48.6 ± 12.9% in white rhinoceroses. In conclusion, GnRF vaccine effectively down regulated reproductive function and decreased the size of reproductive tract tumours in female rhinoceros. Our work is the first to use down regulation of reproductive function as a symptomatic treatment against benign reproductive tumour disease in a wildlife species. Nonetheless, full reversibility and rhinoceros fertility following GnRF vaccination warrants further evaluation. PMID:27403662

  2. Hormone resistant prostatic adenocarcinoma. An evaluation of prognostic factors in pre- and post-treatment specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Berner, A.; Nesland, J. M.; Waehre, H.; Silde, J.; Fosså, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    Pre- and post-treatment specimens from 47 patients with hormone resistant prostatic carcinoma were compared with each other regarding histological grade and immunoreactivity for p53 protein, neuron specific enolase and c-erbB-2 protein. Significantly more specimens expressed a high malignancy grade when the tumour had become hormone resistant than at the time of initial diagnosis (Gleason P: < 0.0001, WHO P:0.0003). p53 protein immunoreactivity increased significantly with disease progression (P:0.006), while tissue PSA immunoreactivity was reduced in post-treatment specimens (P:0.011). p53 protein expression did not correlate with histological grade or PSA expression and seems to be an independent parameter which participates late in the neoplastic transformation. Thirty-two percent of the tumours were neuron specific enolase positive, but this parameter did not correlate with development of hormone resistance. c-erbB-2 protein reactivity was not recognised. Images Figure 1 PMID:7688548

  3. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... medicines you take. These include: Birth control pills Hormone therapy Testosterone DHEA (a supplement) If you are ...

  4. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 30 • Have used combination hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin) for more than five years • Have a mother, ... know that estrogen (the major female hormone) and progestin (a synthetic form of progesterone, another female hormone) ...

  5. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing ... helps slow the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. ...

  6. Melatonin potentiates the anti-tumour effect of pravastatin in rat mammary gland carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Orendáš, Peter; Kubatka, Peter; Bojková, Bianka; Kassayová, Monika; Kajo, Karol; Výbohová, Desanka; Kružliak, Peter; Péč, Martin; Adamkov, Marián; Kapinová, Andrea; Adamicová, Katarína; Sadloňová, Vladimíra; Chmelová, Martina; Stollárová, Nadežda

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in the field of cancer research have suggested a possible role for statins in the reduction of risk in certain malignancies. The purpose of these studies was to examine the chemopreventive effects of pravastatin alone and in combination with pineal hormone melatonin in the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis model. Pravastatin was given orally (1 00 mg/kg) and melatonin was added to the water (20 μg/ml). Chemoprevention began seven days prior to carcinogen administration and subsequently continued for 15 weeks until autopsy. At autopsy, mammary tumours were removed and prepared for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. Parameters of experimental carcinogenesis, mechanism of action (biomarkers of apoptosis, angiogenesis and proliferation) and side effects after long-term treatment in animals were assessed. Pravastatin alone suppressed tumour frequency by 20.5% and average tumour volume by 15% compared with controls. Combined administration of the drugs decreased tumour frequency by 69% and lengthened tumour latency by nine days compared with control animals. The ration between high and low grade carcinomas was apparently reduced in both treated groups. The analysis of carcinoma cells showed significant expression increase in caspase-3 and caspase-7 after pravastatin treatment; however, combined treatment even more pronounced increase in the expression of both caspases. Regarding VEGFR-2 expression, a small effect in carcinomas of both treated groups was found. In plasma metabolism evaluation, pravastatin alone significantly decreased levels of glucose and triacylglycerols. Our results suggest a mild anti-neoplastic effect of pravastatin in this rat mammary gland carcinoma model. Statins co-administered with other suitable drug (e.g. melatonin) should be further evaluated for tumour-preventive properties. PMID:25270735

  7. Endogenous pacemaker activity of rat tumour somatotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Renata; Robert, Christophe; Cannon, Robert; Vigues, Stephan; Arnoux, Annie; Kordon, Claude; Hammond, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Cells derived from a rat pituitary tumour (GC cell line) that continuously release growth hormone behave as endogenous pacemakers. In simultaneous patch clamp recordings and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) imaging, they displayed rhythmic action potentials (44.7 ± 2.7 mV, 178 ± 40 ms, 0.30 ± 0.04 Hz) and concomitant [Ca2+]i transients (374 ± 57 nM, 1.0 ± 0.2 s, 0.27 ± 0.03 Hz). Action potentials and [Ca2+]i transients were reversibly blocked by removal of external Ca2+, addition of nifedipine (1 μM) or Ni2+ (40 μM), but were insensitive to TTX (1 μM). An L-type Ca2+ current activated at -33.6 ± 0.4 mV (holding potential (Vh), −40 mV), peaked at -1.8 ± 1.3 mV, was reduced by nifedipine and enhanced by S-(+)-SDZ 202 791. A T/R-type Ca2+ current activated at -41.7 ± 2.7 mV (Vh, -80 or -60 mV), peaked at -9.2 ± 3.0 mV, was reduced by low concentrations of Ni2+ (40 μM) or Cd2+ (10 μM) and was toxin resistant. Parallel experiments revealed the expression of the class E calcium channel α1-subunit mRNA. The K+ channel blockers TEA (25 mM) and charybdotoxin (10–100 nM) enhanced spike amplitude and/or duration. Apamin (100 nM) also strongly reduced the after-spike hyperpolarization. The outward K+ tail current evoked by a depolarizing step that mimicked an action potential reversed at −69.8 ± 0.3 mV, presented two components, lasted 2–3 s and was totally blocked by Cd2+ (400 μM). The slow pacemaker depolarization (3.5 ± 0.4 s) that separated consecutive spikes corresponded to a 2- to 3-fold increase in membrane resistance, was strongly Na+ sensitive but TTX insensitive. Computer simulations showed that pacemaker activity can be reproduced by a minimum of six currents: an L-type Ca2+ current underlies the rising phase of action potentials that are repolarized by a delayed rectifier and Ca2+-activated K+ currents. In between spikes, the decay of Ca2+-activated K+ currents and a persistent inward cationic current depolarize the membrane

  8. [34 epibulbar malignant tumours (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schwartzenberg, T; Vancea, P P; Dobrescu, G

    1979-02-01

    Based on a study of 34 cases, the authors make therapeutical and diagnostical references concerning the epibulbar malignant tumours. These were met with a frequency of 10% of the total amount of the malignant tumours of the visual apparatus. The most frequent setting were at the level of the bulbar conjunctiva and of the sclero-corneal limb, especially in front of the opening of the palpebral slit and in the temporal area. The histological examination of the tumours pointed out the following morphological types; epitheliomas (61%), especially spino-cellular, malignant melanomas (32%) and sarcomas (6%). The therapeutical attitude was the surgical one -- the accurate extirpation -- in the limited tumours, followed by radiotherapy when neoplasic lesions were found at the limit of section. In the invaded tumours, the exenteration of the orbit was performed followed by radiotherapy. On the terms of such a therapeutical conduct, the distant prognosis proved to be dependent on two factors: a. The early diagnosis, that is the stage of the therapeutical action. It is insisted upon the importance of the signs of malignization of some benign tumors: papillomas or naevi. b. The nature and origin of the tumour: the secondary tumours are more severe from the beginning. PMID:444115

  9. The Laser Treatment of Experimental Malignant Tumours

    PubMed Central

    McGuff, Paul E.; Deterling, Ralph A.; Gottlieb, Leonard S.; Fahimi, H. Dariush; Bushnell, David; Roeber, Fred

    1964-01-01

    Some of the results of experiments performed during the past two years to assess effects of laser energy on experimental malignant tumours are reviewed. Twenty types of malignant tumours (most in the cheek pouch and 11 of human origin) were treated in over 700 Syrian hamsters. Results of laser treatment of malignant melanomas and thyroidal carcinomas are presented. A human patient with malignant melanoma treated by laser energy is described. Investigation of thermal effect revealed that the laser-treated tumour remained warm for about one minute, while the cautery-treated tumour cooled to normal temperature in five seconds. Direct action of laser on superficial tumours is possible; deeper lesions must be exposed surgically. Laser energy has a selective effect on certain malignant tumours, resulting in their progressive regression and ultimate dissolution. All hamsters with implanted malignant melanomas and carcinomas of human origin, after completion of a course of laser treatment, showed no gross or histologic evidence of tumour up to the date of last observation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2aFig. 2bFig. 2cFig. 2dFig. 2eFig. 2fFig. 3Fig. 4aFig. 4bFig. 4cFig. 4dFig. 4eFig. 4fFig. 4gFig. 6 PMID:14229757

  10. Phase congruency map driven brain tumour segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilágyi, Tünde; Brady, Michael; Berényi, Ervin

    2015-03-01

    Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) systems are already of proven value in healthcare, especially for surgical planning, nevertheless much remains to be done. Gliomas are the most common brain tumours (70%) in adults, with a survival time of just 2-3 months if detected at WHO grades III or higher. Such tumours are extremely variable, necessitating multi-modal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). The use of Gadolinium-based contrast agents is only relevant at later stages of the disease where it highlights the enhancing rim of the tumour. Currently, there is no single accepted method that can be used as a reference. There are three main challenges with such images: to decide whether there is tumour present and is so localize it; to construct a mask that separates healthy and diseased tissue; and to differentiate between the tumour core and the surrounding oedema. This paper presents two contributions. First, we develop tumour seed selection based on multiscale multi-modal texture feature vectors. Second, we develop a method based on a local phase congruency based feature map to drive level-set segmentation. The segmentations achieved with our method are more accurate than previously presented methods, particularly for challenging low grade tumours.

  11. Malignant sweat gland tumours: an update.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, José C; Calonje, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous adnexal tumours can be a diagnostic challenge for the pathologist. This is particularly true in the case of tumours with sweat gland differentiation, due to a large number of rare entities, a multiplicity of names to designate the same neoplasms and consequent lack of consensus regarding their classification and nomenclature. In the traditional view, sweat gland tumours were divided into eccrine and apocrine. However, this has been challenged in recent years, and in fact many of these tumours may have both eccrine and apocrine variants. Some display more complex features and defy classification, due to the presence of other lines of differentiation, namely follicular and/or sebaceous (in the case of apocrine tumours, due to the close embryological relationship between apocrine glands, hair follicles and sebaceous glands). The present paper reviews and updates the basic concepts regarding the following malignant sweat gland tumours: apocrine carcinoma, porocarcinoma, hidradenocarcinoma, spiradenocarcinoma, cylindrocarcinoma, microcystic adnexal carcinoma and related entities, squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma, digital papillary adenocarcinoma, primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma, endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma and primary cutaneous signet ring cell carcinoma. Particular emphasis is put in recent findings that may have implications in the diagnosis and management of these tumours. PMID:26114606

  12. Telomerase activity in 144 brain tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Sano, T.; Asai, A.; Mishima, K.; Fujimaki, T.; Kirino, T.

    1998-01-01

    Unlimited proliferation in immortalized cells is believed to be highly dependent on the activity of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein that synthesizes telomeric repeats onto chromosome ends. Using a polymerase chain reaction-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay, we analysed telomerase activity in 99 benign and 45 malignant brain tumours. The TRAP assay results were quantitated by normalizing the telomerase activity of each specimen to that of human glioma cell line T98G to obtain the relative telomerase activity. Telomerase activity was also assessed visually from the autoradiograms as being positive or negative. One hundred and sixteen tumours with negative telomerase activity had null relative telomerase activity, whereas 28 tumours with positive telomerase activity had relative telomerase activities of 12-84.3% (mean 0% vs 36.1 +/- 19.3%, P < 0.0001). Thus, quantification of telomerase activity confirmed the results of the visual evaluation of telomerase activity on autoradiograms. Based on the assessment, malignant brain tumours had a higher positive rate of telomerase activity than benign tumours (57.8% vs 2.0%, P < 0.001). These data indicate that positive telomerase activity is strongly associated with malignant brain tumours and is rather rare in benign tumours, such as neurinomas or meningiomas. Images Figure 2 PMID:9635839

  13. Appendiceal tumour--retrospective clinicopathological analysis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Norman O'Neil; Chopra, Pradeep; Pande, Girish

    2004-01-01

    Appendiceal tumours are rare and often discovered unexpectedly in an acute situation in which decision-making is difficult. We report the spectrum of appendiuar tumours seen in our institution over a period of more than 10 years, and discuss the clinicopathological behaviour, investigations, surgical procedures and outcomes in these patients. We have also reviewed the literature with regard to appendiceal tumours. Appendicular tumours were identified from the database of 1646 appendictomies (18% in children) performed in single centre and case notes were reviewed. Clinical presentation, investigations, histopathology, surgical procedures and outcome were analysed. Twelve patients with appendiceal tumours were identified (0.72%): 8 carcinoid, 2 mucinous (mucocele) and 2 adenocarcinoma. All the patients with a carcinoid tumour presented with features suggestive of acute appendicitis and were diagnosed postoperatively following appendicectomy and formal histology. No further surgical intervention was required as these lesions were less than 1cm away from the base of the appendix. One of the patient with mucinous cystadenoma presented acutely and underwent an appendicectomy; in the other patient with chronic pain, apreoperative MRI suggested the diagnosis leading to a planned hemicolectomy as the lesion was close to the base of the appendix. While one of the patient with an adenocarcinoma localized to the appendix did well following a right hemicolectomy, the other patient with disseminated disease succumbed within a year. Carcinoid tumours are the commonest appendiceal tumours, which present often as acute appendicitis. While appendicectomy would be adequate in most of these patients, in patients with a cystadenoma close to the base of the appendix or in case of a carcinoma, a right hemicolectomy is the appropriate option. While the prognosis is good in patients with carcinoid tumour and cystadenoma, it remains dismal in patients with disseminated malignant disease

  14. Primary Axillary Porocarcinoma: A Rare Cutaneous Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Valarmathi, K.; Lilly, Mary; Satish, Selvi; Mishra, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma, a rare cutaneous malignant tumour accounts for a fraction of sweat gland tumours. This tumour is found to originate from the intraepithelial parts of the sweat glands. It commonly involves the lower extremities in elderly patients and carries an aggressive behaviour. Cutaneous and visceral metastasis can occur and hence prompt treatment is mandatory. Surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment modality. We hereby present a case of eccrine porocarcinoma in a 50-year-old male in the right axillary region presenting as a verrucous lesion. PMID:27042472

  15. Photodynamic therapy and anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic photosensitizers and harmless visible light in combination with oxygen to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that kill malignant cells by apoptosis and/or necrosis, shut down the tumour microvasculature and stimulate the host immune system. In contrast to surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy that are mostly immunosuppressive, PDT causes acute inflammation, expression of heat-shock proteins, invasion and infiltration of the tumour by leukocytes, and might increase the presentation of tumour-derived antigens to T cells. PMID:16794636

  16. Primary Axillary Porocarcinoma: A Rare Cutaneous Tumour.

    PubMed

    Devi, Nalli R Sumitra; Valarmathi, K; Lilly, Mary; Satish, Selvi; Mishra, Nidhi

    2016-02-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma, a rare cutaneous malignant tumour accounts for a fraction of sweat gland tumours. This tumour is found to originate from the intraepithelial parts of the sweat glands. It commonly involves the lower extremities in elderly patients and carries an aggressive behaviour. Cutaneous and visceral metastasis can occur and hence prompt treatment is mandatory. Surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment modality. We hereby present a case of eccrine porocarcinoma in a 50-year-old male in the right axillary region presenting as a verrucous lesion. PMID:27042472

  17. The prophylaxis of nonindustrial urothelial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mount, Balfour M.

    1973-01-01

    Present knowledge concerning carcinogenesis and the natural history of urothelial tumours precludes firm conclusions relative to nonindustrial prophylaxis. However, a number of measures are consistent with current data and may be instituted for those patients with a demonstrated propensity to urothelial tumours. Their acceptability is based on the lack of associated toxicity for the patient. These measures include the elimination of significant infection, cigarettes, artificial sweeteners, analgesic abuse and coffee, the administration of vitamins C and B6, and in selected cases, the use of thiotepa. It is emphasized that the merit of these steps in altering the natural history of urothelial tumours is uncertain. PMID:4197537

  18. Clinical and prognostic implications of serum and tissue prolactin levels in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, F L; Pérez-Alenza, M D; González Gil, A; Silvan, G; Peña, L; Illera, J C

    2014-10-25

    The biological implications of serum and tissue prolactin levels in canine mammary tumours (CMT) have been previously described although the influence of this hormone on inflammatory mammary carcinomas as well as its value as prognostic indicator remains to be properly clarified. Prolactin determinations were carried out by enzyme immunoassay in tumour tissue and serum of 39 female dogs with spontaneous CMT and in normal mammary gland and serum of 10 controls. Prolactin levels were higher in the case of CMT compared to controls (P<0.05). In malignant CMT, higher levels of tissue prolactin were associated with the occurrence of tumour relapse and/or distant metastasis (P<0.05). Inflammatory mammary carcinomas presented the highest values for tissue prolactin concentrations with concentrations significantly higher than other malignant non-inflammatory mammary carcinoma tumours (P<0.05). The high levels of prolactin found in cases with poor clinical prognoses, including inflammatory mammary carcinoma, open the possibility of being able to better stratify clinical cases in malignant CMT with a view to tailoring treatment appropriately. PMID:25096592

  19. Growth Hormone Promotes Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banziger-Tobler, Nadja Erika; Halin, Cornelia; Kajiya, Kentaro; Detmar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined using comparative transcriptional profiling studies of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, growth hormone receptor was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. Growth hormone induced in vitro proliferation, sprouting, tube formation, and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells, and the mitogenic effect was independent of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 or -3 activation. Growth hormone also inhibited serum starvation-induced lymphatic endothelial cell apoptosis. No major alterations of lymphatic vessels were detected in the normal skin of bovine growth hormone-transgenic mice. However, transgenic delivery of growth hormone accelerated lymphatic vessel ingrowth into the granulation tissue of full-thickness skin wounds, and intradermal delivery of growth hormone resulted in enlargement and enhanced proliferation of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in wild-type mice. These results identify growth hormone as a novel lymphangiogenic factor. PMID:18583315

  20. Thyroid Hormone and Cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Anthony Martin; Ojamaa, Kaie

    2016-01-01

    The heart is a major target of thyroid hormones, with maintenance of euthyroid hormone balance critical for proper function. In particular, chronic low thyroid function can eventually lead to dilated heart failure with impaired coronary blood flow. New evidence also suggests that heart diseases trigger a reduction in cardiac tissue thyroid hormone levels, a condition that may not be detectible using serum hormone assays. Many animal and clinical studies have demonstrated a high prevalence of low thyroid function in heart diseases with worse outcomes from this condition. Animal and human studies have also demonstrated many benefits from thyroid hormone treatment of heart diseases, particularly heart failure. Nonetheless, this potential treatment has not yet translated to patients due to a number of important concerns. The most serious concern involves the potential of accidental overdose leading to increased arrhythmias and sudden death. Several important clinical studies, which actually used excessive doses of thyroid hormone analogs, have played a major role in convincing the medical community that thyroid hormones are simply too dangerous to be considered for treatment in cardiac patients. Nonetheless, this issue has not gone away due primarily to overwhelmingly positive evidence for treatment benefits and a new understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying those benefits. This review will first discuss the clinical evidence for the use of thyroid hormones as a cardioprotective agent and then provide an overview of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying beneficial changes from thyroid hormone treatment of heart diseases. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1199-1219, 2016. PMID:27347890

  1. Brown tumour of the mandible in primary hyperparathyroidism; a case report.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J; Sealey, C

    2015-09-01

    We present an uncommon diagnosis in a 34-year-old female with a non-healing extraction socket. Incisional biopsy revealed multi-nucleated giant cells suggestive of central giant cell granuloma (CGCG). The computed tomography (CT) report made incidental note of a parathyroid mass. The parathyroid hormone (PTH) level was checked and found to be abnormally high. A diagnosis of brown tumour of the mandible was made. The patient was referred to a head and neck surgeon and the parathyroid mass was removed. The mandibular lesion was managed conservatively and continues to regress post-normalisation of PTH levels. The inclusion of the parathyroid region on the CT scan in this case was fortuitous. There are a range of pathologies containing multinucleated giant cells that can arise from the maxillofacial region; PTH level should, nevertheless, be checked in all such jaw lesions. This allows the clinician to exclude brown tumour from the diagnostic sieve. PMID:26502600

  2. [Clinical types of thoracic cancer. Mediastinal tumours].

    PubMed

    Lemarié, E

    2006-11-01

    Mediastinal germ cell tumours (teratomas, seminomas, and non-seminomatous malignant germ cell tumours) are a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms. The standard treatment of mediastinal non-seminomatous malignant germ cell tumours is four cycles of chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of the residual mass. Small localized mediastinal seminomas may be treated with primary resection followed by radiotherapy. In patients with locally advanced disease, the preferred treatment is systemic chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of any residual disease. Thymomas can be locally invasive and associated with parathymic syndromes. Complete surgical excision is attempted in most cases of thymoma. Radiation therapy is usually recommended for invasive or incompletely excised tumours. Invasive thymoma is chemosensitive. PMID:17268355

  3. A rare solitary fibrous tumour of kidney.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Tilak Bahadur; Nepal, Umesh

    2013-01-01

    A solitary fibrous tumour is an unusual spindle cell neoplasm. It frequently arises from the serosal surface of pleural cavity but has recently been described in diverse extrapleural sites. Urogenital localization is rare and only 36 cases of solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney have been described on published report. We report a case of a large solitary fibrous tumour clinically and radiologically thought to be renal cell carcinoma arising in the kidney of a 30 year old female. The radical nephrectomy was performed. The tumour was a well- circumscribed, solid mass attached to the renal pelvis without necrosis and haemorrhage. Histopathologically, a spindle cell neoplasia with alternating hypo and hypercellular areas, storiform, fascicular and hemangipericytoma like growth pattern and less cellular dense collagen deposits were observed. Immunohistochemical studies revealed reactivity for CD34, CD99 and Bcl-2 protein. PMID:24362666

  4. Dentigerous Cyst Associated with Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya; Talasila, Sunil; Babu, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT), a tumour composed of odontogenic epithelium, is an uncommon tumour of odontogenic origin that accounts for only 2.2- 7.1% of all odontogenic tumours. Very few cases of AOT associated with Dentigerous cyst (DC) have been reported till date, most cases are in females and have a striking tendency to occur in the anterior maxilla. The present case is that of a 14-year-old female who revealed a large radiolucent lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted canine located in the left maxillary anterior region. The microscopic examination revealed the presence of AOT in the fibrous capsule of a DC. In this paper, we describe the importance of grossing, sectioning and complete examination of the slide to diagnose such hybrid lesions. PMID:26155575

  5. Primary malignant tumours of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Nix, G A; Wilson, J H; Dees, J

    1985-04-01

    The clinical and radiological findings in 19 patients with primary duodenal malignancy are described. Weight loss, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting were the main symptoms. Diagnosis was made by endoscopy or ERCP (71%) or by barium studies (68%). In retrospect the tumour was visible in 97% of the studies. Tumour growth was longitudinal, circular or spiral, the inner curvature being involved over a greater length than the outer curvature. Exophytic tumour growth, involvement of the papilla of Vater, malignant spikes, transient, non-constant tumour image, skip lesions and ulceration were often seen. Mean survival time was 18 months from start of symptoms in 10 inoperable patients, and 24 months in 9 patients undergoing resection. PMID:2986213

  6. Chemotherapy sensitivity testing in human tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, H G; Billington, R W

    1981-01-01

    We have attempted to establish in vitro growth in a consecutive series of 245 malignant tumours submitted for routine histopathology. Initially, three disaggregation procedures were used: mechanical separation, digestion by trypsin, and digestion by collagenase. The resulting cell fractions had varying success rates in establishing growth. Abundant epithelial cell growth was achieved in monolayer culture in 63 tumours, and the sensitivity of the cells to cytotoxic agents was tested. There was no indiscriminate cytotoxic effect, and each tumour type varied in its sensitivity from one patient's lesion to another. While testing of all solid tumours is not possible with present-day techniques, we believe that the employment of in vitro sensitivity testing as a routine procedure may be possible in the future if a suitable system giving correlation between in vitro and in vivo sensitivity can be developed. Images PMID:7240421

  7. The International Histological Classification of Tumours*

    PubMed Central

    Sobin, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    This article reviews the development of the WHO project on the histological classification of tumours, which has included the establishment of several collaborating centres and has involved more than 300 pathologists in over 50 countries. The project has resulted in the publication, over the last 14 years, of 25 volumes in the first series of the International Histological Classification of Tumours (IHCT), each giving a classification of tumours specific to a certain site. The classifications are based primarily on the microscopic characteristics of the tumours and are concerned with morphologically identifiable cell types and histological patterns as seen by means of light microscopy and conventional staining techniques. The article also describes the relationship between IHCT and other classification and coding systems and assesses possible future developments that may result from new approaches to diagnosis. PMID:6978190

  8. Imaging tumour hypoxia with positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, I N; Manavaki, R; Blower, P J; West, C; Williams, K J; Harris, A L; Domarkas, J; Lord, S; Baldry, C; Gilbert, F J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia, a hallmark of most solid tumours, is a negative prognostic factor due to its association with an aggressive tumour phenotype and therapeutic resistance. Given its prominent role in oncology, accurate detection of hypoxia is important, as it impacts on prognosis and could influence treatment planning. A variety of approaches have been explored over the years for detecting and monitoring changes in hypoxia in tumours, including biological markers and noninvasive imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the preferred method for imaging tumour hypoxia due to its high specificity and sensitivity to probe physiological processes in vivo, as well as the ability to provide information about intracellular oxygenation levels. This review provides an overview of imaging hypoxia with PET, with an emphasis on the advantages and limitations of the currently available hypoxia radiotracers. PMID:25514380

  9. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: • Pharmaceutical products. These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy (a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  10. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: Pharmaceutical products . These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy(a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  11. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to closely replicate normal thyroid functioning. Pure, synthetic thyroxine (T4) works in the same way as ... needing thyroid hormone replacement (see Hypothyroidism brochure ). Pure synthetic thyroxine (T4), taken once daily by mouth, successfully ...

  12. Growth hormone stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of the body to produce GH. ... killing medicine (antiseptic). The first sample is drawn early in the morning. Medicine is given through the ...

  13. Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Endocrine System » Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  14. Autoimmunity against thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Sakata, S

    1994-01-01

    The presence of thyroid hormone autoantibodies (THAA) is a common phenomenon. More than 270 cases have been reported by the end of 1993 involving not only thyroidal but also nonthyroidal disorders. Clinically, THAA in a patient's serum produces variation in thyroid hormone metabolism and, in particular, may interfere with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) results of total or free thyroid hormone measurements, which can cause unusually high or low values of the hormones depending on the B/F separation method used. This in vitro interference can give clinicians confusing information about the patient's thyroid state. As a result, the patient may receive inappropriate treatment from physicians who are unaware of this disorder. The presence of THAA has been reported not only in humans but also in dogs, chickens, and rats. In this review article, clinical features of THAA and the mechanism of autoantibody production are discussed. PMID:7535535

  15. Vaginal bleeding - hormonal

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken just before the period starts Women over age 40 and older may have the option to receive cyclic progestin or cyclic hormone therapy. A health care provider may recommend iron supplements for women with anemia. If you want ...

  16. Intramuscular Hibernoma: A Rare Tumour in Buttock

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Reena; Kushwaha, Anil KU; Agrawal, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernomas are benign tumours of brown fat that does not recur after complete excision. These tumours are found most often in adults and most commonly in thigh. Four morphologic variants of hibernoma are identified: typical, myxoid, spindle cell, and lipoma-like. The most common histologic type is typical variant. In this report, we present the clinical, morphological features and discuss the differential diagnosis of a typical variant of intramuscular hibernoma. PMID:26266129

  17. Antenatally detected solid tumour of kidney

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Shasanka Shekhar; Mandelia, Ankur; Gupta, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Congenital renal tumours are rare and usually benign. Polyhydramnios is the most common mode of presentation. Although most cases have been diagnosed postnatally, with advances in imaging technology, an increasing number of cases are being detected on antenatal scans. We describe a case of solid tumour of kidney detected in the second trimester of pregnancy and managed by surgery in the postnatal period. PMID:24526198

  18. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach. PMID:19776004

  19. Epithelial odontogenic tumours in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Walsh, K M; Denholm, L J; Cooper, B J

    1987-09-01

    Epithelial odontogenic tumours are uncommon, poorly understood and often difficult to diagnose, oral neoplasms. Dental organ pre-ameloblasts and basal lamina induce development of mesenchymal cells into odontoblasts, which produce dentin and induce pre-ameloblasts to mature into secretory ameloblasts. These reciprocal sequential inductive interactions between dental epithelium and mesenchyme form the basis for classifying epithelial odontogenic tumours. There are three tumours classified as non-inductive: ameloblastoma characterized by cords and islands of stellate reticulum with peripheral palisades of polarized columnar cells, adenomatoid ameloblastoma which has acini, rosettes and ducts of polarized columnar cells and stellate reticulum and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour which contains foci of Congo-red-positive material surrounded by pleomorphic polygonal epithelial cells. There are five tumours in which induction of mesenchymal tissue is evident: ameloblastic fibroma with characteristics of ameloblastoma plus proliferation of closely associated pulp-like mesenchyme; dentinoma consisting of masses of dentin, often with minimal cellular component; ameloblastic odontoma which contains palisaded epithelium and stellate reticulum as in ameloblastoma, as well as foci of dentin and/or enamel; complex odontoma which is a disorderly array of dentin, enamel, ameloblastic epithelium and odontoblasts; and compound odontoma containing denticles with well-organized tooth morphology. This paper reviews the embryogenesis of teeth and describes six types of epithelial odontogenic tumours in 13 animals. The literature concerning these tumours in nearly 250 animals is reviewed. The most commonly reported tumour is ameloblastoma and the species in which all types are most commonly reported is the dog. PMID:3316314

  20. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  1. Investigation of the local expression of the relaxin system in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Lamp, O; Honscha, K U; Jakob, J; Lamp, J; Schweizer, S; Reischauer, A; Gottschalk, J; Hahn, A; Ebert, M; Rothemund, S; Blaschzik, S; Einspanier, A

    2009-07-01

    While mammary tumours are the main reasons of death in bitches, early detection of tumours and metastases is crucial for survival of affected dogs. Invasiveness and angiogenesis, which are important processes of tumour growth and spreading, require connective tissue remodelling. This process is dominantly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), which are well known to be positively regulated by relaxin (RLX) in various tissues, including human breast cancer. So far, the presence of RLX and its receptor RXFP-1 as well as their linkage with MMP in canine mammary tumours (CMT) is completely unknown. In the first part of the present study, concentrations of RLX, oestradiol and progesterone from plasma samples of bitches with CMT were compared with clinical and survival data to investigate the predictive value of these hormones. In the second part, the expressions of RLX, RXFP-1 and MMP-2, -9 and -13 were examined by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 31 CMT samples. Finally, relationships of systemic plasma RLX or locally expressed RLX with expression of MMP in CMT were analyzed for the first time. Comparison of hormone concentrations in 93 bitches in terms of benign or malignant nature of the CMT, lung metastases, recidivation and 12-month survival discovered no significances. The expressions of RLX, RXFP-1 and MMP were independent from plasma RLX, but expressions of local RLX and RXFP-1 showed a strong correlation (p = 0.00004, r = 0.671) as well as RXFP-1 and MMP-2 (p = 0.009, r = 0.463), indicating a possible significant role of the locally produced RLX in CMT pathogenesis as an inducer of connective tissue remodelling. PMID:19754574

  2. Soft Tissue Tumours of the Retroperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Van Roggen, J. Frans Graadt

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. This review summarizes the more prevalent soft tissue tumours arising in the retroperitoneum and highlights some recent fundamental and diagnostic developments relevant to mesenchymal tumours. Discussion. The retroperitoneum is an underestimated site for benign and malignant neoplastic disease, and represents the second most common site of origin of primary malignant soft tissue tumours (sarcomas) after the deep tissues of the lower extremity. In contrast to the predominance of benign soft tissue lesions over malignant sarcomas elsewhere, retroperitoneal mesenchymal lesions are far more likely to be malignant. The differential diagnosis is primarily with the more common lymphoproliferative and parenchymatous epithelial lesions arising in this area, and with metastatic disease from known or unknown primary sites elsewhere.The most prevalent mesenchymal tumours at this site are of a lipomatous, myogenic or neural nature.Their generally late clinical presentation and poorly accessible location provides numerous clinical challenges; optimal radiological imaging and a properly performed biopsy are essential cogs in the management route. Histopathological diagnosis may be complicated, but has been aided by developments in the fields of immunohistochemistry and tumour (cyto)genetics. Despite significant advances in oncological management protocols, the prognosis remains generally less favourable than for similar tumours at more accessible sites. PMID:18521430

  3. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  4. Solitary fibrous tumour of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Mohtarrudin, N; Nor Hanipah, Z; Mohd Dusa, N

    2016-04-01

    Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare tumours characterized by patternless spindle cells with haemangiopericytoma-like vascular spaces. Previously the tumours have been classified as haemangiopericytoma, an entity that is now considered obsolete. We report a case of extrapleural SFT arising in the soft tissue of the chest wall. The patient was a 31-year-old Malay lady presenting with a mobile swelling of the right chest wall for more than five years. During excision the tumour was noted to be well-circumscribed and yellowish in colour, giving an impression of lipoma. Microscopically, the tumour had patternless architecture, characterized by hypocellular and hypercellular areas. It was composed of uniform, spindle-shaped cells displaying oval nuclei, inconspicuous nucleoli, pale cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. The mitotic count was 2 per 10 HPF. Branching, medium-sized thin-walled blood vessels in a haemangiopericytomatous growth pattern, some with hyalinised wall were identified. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to CD99 and CD34 and were non-immunoreactive to Desmin, Smooth Muscle Actin, S100 protein and EMA. We elucidate the challenges in diagnosing this tumour in this unusual location. PMID:27126667

  5. Estrogen stimulated migration and invasion of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells involves an ezrin-dependent crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptor 30 and estrogen receptor beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kewen; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Yaxing; You, Xinchao; Li, Ping; Wang, Tinghuai

    2016-07-01

    Estrogen mediates important cellular activities in estrogen receptor negative (ER-) breast cancer cells via membrane associated G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). However, the biological role and mechanism of estrogen action on cell motility and invasion in this aggressive kind of tumors remains poorly understood. We showed here that treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) in ER-negative cancer cells resulted in ezrin-dependent cytoskeleton rearrangement and elicited a stimulatory effect on cell migration and invasion. Mechanistically, E2 induced ezrin activation was mediated by distinct mechanisms in different cell contexts. In SK-BR-3 cells with a high GPR30/ERβ ratio, silencing of GPR30 was able to abolish E2 induced ERK1/2, AKT phosphorylation and ezrin activation, whereas in MDA-MB-231 cells with low GPR30/ERβ ratio, E2 stimulated ezrin activation was mediated by the ERβ/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Importantly, we showed that activation of GPR30 signaling significantly prevents ERβ activation induced ezrin phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion, indicating an antagonist effect between GPR30 and ERβ signaling in MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings highlight the important interplay between different estrogen receptors in estrogen induced cell motility and invasiveness in ER-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:26850467

  6. Osteosarcoma Associated With Diamond-Blackfan Anaemia: A Case of a Child Receiving Growth Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Deborah; Haddo, Omar; Pringle, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Diamond–Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is a rare pure congenital red cell aplasia, usually presenting in infancy or early childhood. The literature suggests a predisposition to haemopoietic malignancy but in addition solid tumours have been reported, with five cases of osteosarcoma described. Patient: A sixth case of a 12-year-old girl with DBA who developed an osteosarcoma of the distal femur is presented. Results: She was treated with methotrexate followed by tumour excision and distal femoral replacement. The patient is currently alive with multiple pulmonary metastases. Discussion: We discuss the association between the administration of growth hormone and future development of malignancy in patients with DBA. PMID:18521394

  7. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  8. Tumour macrophages as potential targets of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells communicate with the cells of their microenvironment via a series of molecular and cellular interactions to aid their progression to a malignant state and ultimately their metastatic spread. Of the cells in the microenvironment with a key role in cancer development, tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) are among the most notable. Tumour cells release a range of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors to attract macrophages, and these in turn release numerous factors (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9 and EGF) that are implicated in invasion-promoting processes such as tumour cell growth, flicking of the angiogenic switch and immunosuppression. TAM density has been shown to correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer, suggesting that these cells may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, there are currently no agents that specifically target TAM's available for clinical use. Bisphosphonates (BPs), such as zoledronic acid, are anti-resorptive agents approved for treatment of skeletal complication associated with metastatic breast cancer and prostate cancer. These agents act on osteoclasts, key cells in the bone microenvironment, to inhibit bone resorption. Over the past 30 years this has led to a great reduction in skeletal-related events (SRE's) in patients with advanced cancer and improved the morbidity associated with cancer-induced bone disease. However, there is now a growing body of evidence, both from in vitro and in vivo models, showing that zoledronic acid can also target tumour cells to increase apoptotic cell death and decrease proliferation, migration and invasion, and that this effect is significantly enhanced in combination with chemotherapy agents. Whether macrophages in the peripheral tumour microenvironment are exposed to sufficient levels of bisphosphonate to be affected is currently unknown. Macrophages belong to the same cell lineage as osteoclasts, the major target of BPs, and are highly phagocytic cells shown to be sensitive to

  9. Management of electrolyte and fluid disorders after brain surgery for pituitary/suprasellar tumours.

    PubMed

    Edate, Sujata; Albanese, Assunta

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances in salt and water balances are relatively common in children after brain surgeries for suprasellar and pituitary tumours, presenting diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Although hypernatraemia associated with central diabetes insipidus is commonly encountered, it is hyponatraemia (HN) that poses more of a diagnostic dilemma. The main differential diagnoses causing HN are the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, marked by inappropriate retention of water, and cerebral salt wasting, characterized by polyuria and natriuresis. Diagnosis and management can be even more difficult when these conditions precede or coexist with each other. These diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas are discussed in detail in this review. PMID:25677941

  10. Assessment of the hormonal milieu.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, Susan E; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2011-01-01

    The hormonal milieu has been hypothesized to play a role in a range of human diseases, and therefore has been a topic of much epidemiologic investigation. Hormones of particular interest include: sex steroids; growth hormones; insulin-like growth factors; stress hormones, such as cortisol; and hormones produced by the adipose tissue, termed adipokines. Depending on the hormone, levels may be measured in plasma or serum, urine, saliva, tissue, or by assessing genetic variation in the hormone or hormone metabolizing genes. Sample collection, processing, and storage requirements vary according to the type of sample collected (e.g. blood or urine) and the hormone of interest. Laboratory analysis of hormones is frequently complex, and the technology used to conduct the assays is constantly evolving. For example, direct or indirect radioimmunoassay, bioassay or mass spectrometry can be used to measure sex steroids, each having advantages and disadvantages. Careful attention to laboratory issues, including close collaboration with laboratory colleagues and ongoing quality control assessments, is critical. Whether a single hormone measurement, as is frequently collected in epidemiologic studies, is sufficient to characterize the hormonal environment of interest (e.g. long-term adult hormone exposure) is also an important issue. While the assessment of hormones in epidemiologic studies is complex, these efforts have, and will continue to, add importantly to our knowledge of the role of hormones in human health. PMID:22997864

  11. Targeted NF1 cancer therapeutics with multiple modes of action: small molecule hormone-like agents resembling the natural anticancer metabolite, 2-methoxyoestradiol

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu-chi; Upadhyayula, Ravi; Cevallos, Stephanie; Messick, Ryan J; Hsia, Tammy; Leese, Mathew P; Jewett, Douglas M; Ferrer-Torres, Daysha; Roth, Therese M; Dohle, Wolfgang; Potter, Barry V L; Barald, Kate F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both the number and size of tumours in NF1 patients increase in response to the rise in steroid hormones seen at puberty and during pregnancy. The size of tumours decreases after delivery, suggesting that hormone-targeting therapy might provide a viable new NF1 treatment approach. Our earlier studies demonstrated that human NF1 tumour cell lines either went through apoptosis or ceased growth in the presence of 2-methoxyoestradiol (2ME2), a naturally occurring anticancer metabolite of 17-β estradiol. Previous reports of treatment with sulfamoylated steroidal and non-steroidal derivatives of 2ME2 showed promising reductions in tumour burden in hormone-responsive cancers other than NF1. Here we present the first studies indicating that 2ME2 derivatives could also provide an avenue for treating NF1, for which few treatment options are available. Methods: STX3451, (2-(3-Bromo-4,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-7-methoxy-6-sulfamoyloxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline), a non-steroidal sulphamate analogue of 2ME2, was tested in dose-dependent studies of malignant and benign NF1 human tumour cell lines and cell lines with variable controlled neurofibromin expression. The mechanisms of action of STX3451 were also analysed. Results: We found that STX3451-induced apoptosis in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) cell lines, even in the presence of elevated oestrogen and progesterone. It inhibits both PI3 kinase and mTOR signalling pathways. It disrupts actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeletal structures in cell lines derived from human MPNSTs and in cells derived from benign plexiform neurofibromas. STX3451 selectively kills MPNST-derived cells, but also halts growth of other tumour-derived NF1 cell lines. Conclusion: STX3451 provides a new approach for inducing cell death and lowering tumour burden in NF1 and other hormone-responsive cancers with limited treatment options. PMID:26461061

  12. Tumour-initiating stem-like cells in human prostate cancer exhibit increased NF-κB signalling

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Studer, Lorenz; Gerald, William; Socci, Nicholas D.; Scher, Howard I.

    2011-01-01

    Androgen depletion is a key strategy for treating human prostate cancer, but the presence of hormone-independent cells escaping treatment remains a major therapeutic challenge. Here, we identify a minor subset of stem-like human prostate tumour-initiating cells (TICs) that do not express prostate cancer markers, such as androgen receptor or prostate specific antigen. These TICs possess stem cell characteristics and multipotency as demonstrated by in vitro sphere-formation and in vivo tumour-initiation, respectively. The cells represent an undifferentiated subtype of basal cells and can be purified from prostate tumours based on coexpression of the human pluripotent stem cell marker TRA-1-60 with CD151 and CD166. Such triple-marker-positive TICs recapitulate the original parent tumour heterogeneity in serial xeno-transplantations indicating a tumour cell hierarchy in human prostate cancer development. These TICs exhibit increased nuclear factor-κB activity. These findings are important in understanding the molecular basis of human prostate cancer. PMID:21245843

  13. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination.

  14. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    PubMed Central

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination. PMID:26861829

  15. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Thusyanth; Bakhshinyan, David; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs), are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools. PMID:26064134

  16. Tumour resistance to cisplatin: a modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, L.; Bezak, E.; Olver, I.; van Doorn, T.

    2005-01-01

    Although chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of haematological tumours, in many common solid tumours the success has been limited. Some of the reasons for the limitations are: the timing of drug delivery, resistance to the drug, repopulation between cycles of chemotherapy and the lack of complete understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a specific agent. Cisplatin is among the most effective cytotoxic agents used in head and neck cancer treatments. When modelling cisplatin as a single agent, the properties of cisplatin only have to be taken into account, reducing the number of assumptions that are considered in the generalized chemotherapy models. The aim of the present paper is to model the biological effect of cisplatin and to simulate the consequence of cisplatin resistance on tumour control. The 'treated' tumour is a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, previously grown by computer-based Monte Carlo techniques. The model maintained the biological constitution of a tumour through the generation of stem cells, proliferating cells and non-proliferating cells. Cell kinetic parameters (mean cell cycle time, cell loss factor, thymidine labelling index) were also consistent with the literature. A sensitivity study on the contribution of various mechanisms leading to drug resistance is undertaken. To quantify the extent of drug resistance, the cisplatin resistance factor (CRF) is defined as the ratio between the number of surviving cells of the resistant population and the number of surviving cells of the sensitive population, determined after the same treatment time. It is shown that there is a supra-linear dependence of CRF on the percentage of cisplatin-DNA adducts formed, and a sigmoid-like dependence between CRF and the percentage of cells killed in resistant tumours. Drug resistance is shown to be a cumulative process which eventually can overcome tumour regression leading to treatment failure.

  17. Tumours and dysplasias of the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, J. F.; Misdorp, W.

    1974-01-01

    As mammary tumours occur frequently in the dog and cat but rarely in other domestic animals, only the tumours of these two species are classified. The epithelial tumours are termed “complex” when they consist of cells resembling both secretory and myoepithelial cells: these tumours are biologically less malignant than tumours of the “simple” type in which only one of these kinds of cell is present. The carcinomas are subdivided into adenocarcinoma, solid carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma. The term “carcinosarcoma or malignant mixed tumour” was used only when there were cells morphologically resembling not only one or both of the epithelial components but also connective tissue cells with their products of differentiation. The benign tumours are classed as adenoma, papilloma, fibroadenoma, or benign soft tissue tumour. The dysplasias are described under the following headings: cyst, adenosis, regular typical epithelial proliferation in ducts and lobules (epitheliosis), duct ectasia, fibrosclerosis, and lobular hyperplasia. ImagesFig. 41Fig. 42Fig. 43Fig. 44Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 45Fig. 46Fig. 47Fig. 48Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36 PMID:4371737

  18. Cystic lesions accompanying extra-axial tumours.

    PubMed

    Lohle, P N; Wurzer, H A; Seelen, P J; Kingma, L M; Go, K G

    1999-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of cyst formation in extra-axial tumours in the central nervous system (CNS). Cyst fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma were analysed in eight patients with nine peritumoral cysts: four with meningiomas, two with intracranial and two spinal intradural schwannomas. Measuring concentrations of various proteins [albumin, immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, alpha 2-macroglobulin and IgM] in cyst fluid, CSF and blood plasma provides insight into the state of the semipermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Peritumoral cysts accompanying intra-axial brain tumours are the end result of disruption of the BBB and oedema formation. Unlike intra-axial tumours which lie embedded within nervous tissue, extra-axial tumours tend to be separated from nervous tissue by arachnoid and pia mater. High concentrations of proteins were measured in the cyst fluid, approaching blood plasma levels, suggesting a local barrier disruption, and passage across the arachnoid, pia mater and cortical/medullary layer into the CNS parenchyma, leaving the protein concentrations of CSF practically unchanged. We confirmed that very high concentrations of protein are to be found in tumour cysts, plasma proteins forming almost 90% of the total protein in the cyst. We review current hypotheses on the pathogenesis of cysts accompanying neoplasms, particularly meningiomas and schwannomas, and conclude that the majority of proteins in cyst fluid in extra-axial, intradural meningiomas and schwannomas are plasma proteins. This provides a strong argument for pathogenesis of extra-axial intradural tumour cysts in favour of leakage of plasma proteins out of the tumour vessels into the nervous tissue. PMID:9987761

  19. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite.

    PubMed

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-07-29

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably constitutes another point at which intervention may promote efficient digestion and nutrient uptake. In recent decades, gut hormones have come to occupy a central place in the complex neuroendocrine interactions that underlie the regulation of energy balance. Many gut peptides have been shown to influence energy intake. The most well studied in this regard are cholecystokinin (CCK), pancreatic polypeptide, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin and ghrelin. With the exception of ghrelin, these hormones act to increase satiety and decrease food intake. The mechanisms by which gut hormones modify feeding are the subject of ongoing investigation. Local effects such as the inhibition of gastric emptying might contribute to the decrease in energy intake. Activation of mechanoreceptors as a result of gastric distension may inhibit further food intake via neural reflex arcs. Circulating gut hormones have also been shown to act directly on neurons in hypothalamic and brainstem centres of appetite control. The median eminence and area postrema are characterized by a deficiency of the blood-brain barrier. Some investigators argue that this renders neighbouring structures, such as the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius in the brainstem, susceptible to influence by circulating factors. Extensive reciprocal connections exist between these areas and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and other energy-regulating centres of the

  20. Naturally occurring tumours in the basal metazoan Hydra.

    PubMed

    Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Klimovich, Alexander; Anokhin, Boris; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Hamm, Mailin J; Lange, Christina; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2014-01-01

    The molecular nature of tumours is well studied in vertebrates, although their evolutionary origin remains unknown. In particular, there is no evidence for naturally occurring tumours in pre-bilaterian animals, such as sponges and cnidarians. This is somewhat surprising given that recent computational studies have predicted that most metazoans might be prone to develop tumours. Here we provide first evidence for naturally occurring tumours in two species of Hydra. Histological, cellular and molecular data reveal that these tumours are transplantable and might originate by differentiation arrest of female gametes. Growth of tumour cells is independent from the cellular environment. Tumour-bearing polyps have significantly reduced fitness. In addition, Hydra tumours show a greatly altered transcriptome that mimics expression shifts in vertebrate cancers. Therefore, this study shows that spontaneous tumours have deep evolutionary roots and that early branching animals may be informative in revealing the fundamental mechanisms of tumorigenesis. PMID:24957317

  1. Thyroid hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Olateju, Tolulope O; Vanderpump, Mark P J

    2006-11-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited syndrome of reduced end-organ responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Patients with RTH have elevated serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations and normal or slightly elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level. Despite a variable clinical presentation, the common characteristic clinical features are goitre but an absence of the usual symptoms and metabolic consequences of thyroid hormone excess. Patients with RTH can be classified on clinical grounds alone into either generalized resistance (GRTH), pituitary resistance (PRTH) or combined. Mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta gene are responsible for RTH and 122 different mutations have now been identified belonging to 300 families. With the exception of one family found to have complete deletion of the TRbeta gene, all others have been demonstrated to have minor alterations at the DNA level. The differential diagnosis includes a TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma and the presence of endogenous antibodies directed against thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Failure to differentiate RTH from primary thyrotoxicosis has resulted in the inappropriate treatment of nearly one-third of patients. Although occasionally desirable, no specific treatment is available for RTH; however, the diagnosis allows appropriate genetic counselling. PMID:17132274

  2. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  3. [Hormones and hair growth].

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-06-01

    With respect to the relationship between hormones and hair growth, the role of androgens for androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and hirsutism is best acknowledged. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that intervene in androgen metabolism have been successfully developed for treatment of these conditions. Clinical observations of hair conditions involving hormones beyond the androgen horizon have determined their role in regulation of hair growth: estrogens, prolactin, thyroid hormone, cortisone, growth hormone (GH), and melatonin. Primary GH resistance is characterized by thin hair, while acromegaly may cause hypertrichosis. Hyperprolactinemia may cause hair loss and hirsutism. Partial synchronization of the hair cycle in anagen during late pregnancy points to an estrogen effect, while aromatase inhibitors cause hair loss. Hair loss in a causal relationship to thyroid disorders is well documented. In contrast to AGA, senescent alopecia affects the hair in a diffuse manner. The question arises, whether the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between the age-related reduction of circulating hormones and organ function also applies to hair and the aging of hair. PMID:20502852

  4. Tumour-specific CD4 T cells eradicate melanoma via indirect recognition of tumour-derived antigen.

    PubMed

    Shklovskaya, Elena; Terry, Alexandra M; Guy, Thomas V; Buckley, Adrian; Bolton, Holly A; Zhu, Erhua; Holst, Jeff; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in tumour immunity has been increasingly recognised, with recent reports describing robust CD4 T cell-dependent tumour control in mice whose immune-regulatory mechanisms have been disturbed by irradiation, chemotherapy, immunomodulatory therapy and/or constitutive immunodeficiency. Tumour control in such models has been attributed in large part to direct Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II-dependent CD4 T cell killing of tumour cells. To test whether CD4 T cells can eradicate tumours without directly killing tumour cells, we developed an animal model in which tumour-derived antigen could be presented to T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD4 T cells by host but not tumour MHC class II molecules. In I-E(+) mice bearing I-E(null) tumours, naive I-E-restricted CD4 T cells proliferated locally in tumour-draining lymph nodes after recognising tumour-derived antigen on migratory dendritic cells. In lymphopaenic but not immunosufficient hosts, CD4 T cells differentiated into polarised T helper type 1 (Th1) cells expressing interferon gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-2 but little IL-17, and cleared established tumours. Tumour clearance was enhanced by higher TCR affinity for tumour antigen-MHC class II and was critically dependent on IFNγ, as demonstrated by early tumour escape in animals treated with an IFNγ blocking antibody. Thus, CD4 T cells and IFNγ can control tumour growth without direct T-cell killing of tumour cells, and without requiring additional adaptive immune cells such as CD8 T cells and B cells. Our results support a role for effective CD4 T cell-dependent tumour immunity against MHC class II-negative tumours. PMID:26837456

  5. Targeting ALCAM in the cryo-treated tumour microenvironment successfully induces systemic anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Fuwa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Cryoablative treatment has been widely used for treating cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacies are still controversial. The molecular mechanisms of the cryo-induced immune responses, particularly underlying the ineffectiveness, remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified a new molecular mechanism involved in the cryo failure. We used cryo-ineffective metastatic tumour models that murine melanoma B16-F10 cells were subcutaneously and intravenously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. When the subcutaneous tumours were treated cryoablation on day 7 after tumour implantation, cells expressing activated leucocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) were significantly expanded not only locally in the treated tumours but also systemically in spleen and bone marrow of the mice. The cryo-induced ALCAM(+) cells including CD45(-) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells significantly suppressed interferon γ production and cytotoxicity of tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells via ALCAM expressed in these cells. This suggests that systemic expansion of the ALCAM(+) cells negatively switches host-immune directivity to the tumour-supportive mode. Intratumoural injection with anti-ALCAM blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) following the cryo treatment systemically induced tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher cytotoxic activities, resulting in suppression of tumour growth and metastasis in the cryo-resistant tumour models. These suggest that expansion of ALCAM(+) cells is a determinant of limiting the cryo efficacy. Further combination with an immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-CTLA4 mAb optimized the anti-tumour efficacy of the dual-combination therapy. Targeting ALCAM may be a promising strategy for overcoming the cryo ineffectiveness leading to the better practical use of cryoablation in clinical treatment of cancer. PMID:27208904

  6. Tumour-like inflammatory abdominal conditions in children.

    PubMed

    Latawiec-Mazurkiewicz, I; Juszkiewicz, P; Pacanowski, J; Kwas, A; Rybkiewicz, M; Rudnicki, J; Walecka, A; Musiał, S

    2005-02-01

    The presence of a tumour, poor general condition, features of anaemia, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rates and imaging suggesting malignancy were the common features in 4 different tumour-like abdominal conditions that are extremely rare in childhood. These conditions included: extensive retroperitoneal tumour with rib involvement that turned out to be an inflammatory lesion caused by Actinomyces in a 12-year-old girl; multi-loculated tumour of the mesentery/ovary caused by mesenteric lymphadenopathy in the course of a Salmonella enteritidis infection in a 2.5-year-old girl; tumour of the VII - VIII hepatic segments that turned out to be the focus of granuloma in the course of lambliasis in a 5.5-year-old boy with a history of purulent neck lymphadenopathy and a final suspicion of immunocompromise; and a multi-loculated tumour of the small pelvis and inguinal area that turned out to be an abscess of the iliopsoas muscle in a 16-year-old boy. Apart from the imaging, the lesions required cytological examination of the material harvested by fine-needle biopsies (liver tumour) or histopathological investigations (retroperitoneal tumour, mesenteric/ovarian tumour, liver tumour and--on second surgery--the pelvic tumour) and/or bacteriological examination (all cases), serological examination (liver tumour and mesenteric/ovarian tumour), protozoal investigation (liver tumour), and measurement of AFP levels (mesenteric/ovarian tumour). Surgical treatment (retroperitoneal tumour, mesenteric/ovarian tumour and tumour of the small pelvis) and guided antibiotic therapy (all cases including 15 weeks of antibiotics in the first case) allowed complete recovery in 3 patients (actinomycosis, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, abscess of the iliopsoas muscle). Antibiotic and antiprotozoal therapy cured the granulomatous hepatitis; however this patient tended to develop severe right-sided pleural/pulmonary changes (the child was referred for further diagnosis with suspicion of

  7. Tumour scanning with indium-111 dihaematoporphyrin ether.

    PubMed Central

    Quastel, M. R.; Richter, A. M.; Levy, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Photofrin II (dihaematoporphyrin ether/ester, DHE) was labelled with indium-111 and its biodistribution in tumour bearing mice compared with that of 111In chloride. The uptake and clearance of 111In labelled DHE differed markedly from that of indium-111 chloride in that the former was not taken up by the tissues as much as the latter. Scintillation scanning with a gamma-camera showed marked uptake of both 111In agents at the site of the tumour, but a much lower tissue background (excluding the abdominal organs) for the mice given 111In DHE. Tumour:muscle ratios of dissected tissues were 2-3 times higher in 111In DHE treated animals as compared to the uptake of 111In chloride. There was a distinct difference in the pattern of distribution of the two 111In preparations in the tissues. The major accumulation of 111In chloride was in the kidneys, whereas the highest uptake of 111In DHE was in the liver, the organ in which unlabelled porphyrins accumulate. Extraction and testing of materials from tumours of 111In DHE treated animals indicated that most of the tumour extractable 111In had remained associated with the porphyrin in vivo up to 4 days after injection. Images Figure 1 PMID:2147858

  8. Tumour suppressor genes in chemotherapeutic drug response

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Dulcie; Visser-Grieve, Stacy; Yang, Xiaolong

    2012-01-01

    Since cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, there is an urgent need to find better treatments. Currently, the use of chemotherapeutics remains the predominant option for cancer therapy. However, one of the major obstacles for successful cancer therapy using these chemotherapeutics is that patients often do not respond or eventually develop resistance after initial treatment. Therefore identification of genes involved in chemotherapeutic response is critical for predicting tumour response and treating drug-resistant cancer patients. A group of genes commonly lost or inactivated are tumour suppressor genes, which can promote the initiation and progression of cancer through regulation of various biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell death and cell migration/invasion. Recently, mounting evidence suggests that these tumour suppressor genes also play a very important role in the response of cancers to a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs. In the present review, we will provide a comprehensive overview on how major tumour suppressor genes [Rb (retinoblastoma), p53 family, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, BRCA1 (breast-cancer susceptibility gene 1), PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10), Hippo pathway, etc.] are involved in chemotherapeutic drug response and discuss their applications in predicting the clinical outcome of chemotherapy for cancer patients. We also propose that tumour suppressor genes are critical chemotherapeutic targets for the successful treatment of drug-resistant cancer patients in future applications. PMID:22762204

  9. Chest wall tumour following iodized talc pleurodesis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, John W.; Bennett, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Jackson, J. W., and Bennett, M. H. (1973).Thorax, 28, 788-793. Chest wall tumour following iodized talc pleurodesis. A man of 37 had an iodized talc pleurodesis carried out for recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax. There was no history of industrial exposure to asbestos. Two years later he presented with pain in the right chest and radiographs at that time showed some localized pleural thickening at the site of the thoracoscopy cannulation for introduction of talc. A provisional diagnosis of talc granuloma, chemical abscess or tumour was made and exploratory thoracotomy revealed a tumour involving the chest wall, lung, and pleura which, on histological examination, showed adenocarcinoma of varying degrees of differentiation and in some parts also presenting a more squamoid appearance. Numerous doubly refractile talc particles were intimately associated with the tumour and fibrous tissue. Shortly after excision the patient developed evidence of systemic dissemination of the disease and died four months later. The possibility of this tumour being induced by the talc is discussed. A brief review is made of the various forms of talc used in surgery over the past 40 years and attention is drawn to the significance of the proportion of asbestos mineral which is present in talc as mined in various parts of the world. We do not consider that this is a case of mesothelioma of the pleura. Images PMID:4787992

  10. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy. PMID:26849037

  11. Giant malignant phyllodes tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan; Savasere, Thejas; Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Babu, Rajashekhara; Shivaswamy, Sadashivaiah

    2014-01-01

    The term phyllodes tumour includes lesions ranging from completely benign tumours to malignant sarcomas. Clinically phyllodes tumours are smooth, rounded, and usually painless multinodular lesions indistinguishable from fibroadenomas. Percentage of phyllodes tumour classified as malignant ranges from 23% to 50%. We report a case of second largest phyllodes tumour in a 35-year-old lady who presented with swelling of right breast since 6 months, initially small in size, that progressed gradually to present size. Examination revealed mass in the right breast measuring 36×32 cms with lobulated firm surface and weighing 10 kgs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was reported as borderline phyllodes; however core biopsy examination showed biphasic neoplasm with malignant stromal component. Simple mastectomy was done and specimen was sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the core biopsy report. Postoperatively the patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient is on follow-up for a year and has not shown any evidence of metastasis or recurrence. PMID:25548696

  12. Effects of Hypothyroidism and Progesterone on Mammary Tumours Induced by 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jabara, Anne G.; Maritz, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Hypothyroidism, alone or combined with progesterone, significantly decreased 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) mammary tumorigenesis relative to controls. However, the decrease was less in the progesterone-treated group, and statistical analysis showed that progesterone enhanced tumorigenesis to the same extent in hypothyroid animals as in the controls. Most tumours in hypothyroid progesterone-treated rats were adenocarcinomata; in the absence of the hormone most tumours were benign. However, the difference between the tumour types in the 2 groups was not statistically significant. The morphological changes observed in the endocrine glands, genital tracts and non-neoplastic mammary tissue, considered in relation to previously reported data, suggest that hypothyroidism reduced the tumour yield mainly by secondarily inhibiting somatotrophin production and secretion, although the effect of decreased food intake could not be excluded completely. The higher tumour yield in the hypothyroid progesterone-treated rats may have been due to higher circulating levels of prolactin in this group compared with those in the hypothyroid group which received no hormone. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4738218

  13. Growth hormone in vascular pathology: neovascularization and expression of receptors is associated with cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, D T; Singal, P K; Al-Banaw, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular tumours are common lesions of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, but also occur in many other tissues and internal organs. The well-differentiated tumours consist of irregular anastomosing, blood-filled vascular channels that are lined by variably atypical endothelial cells. The less differentiated tumours may show solid strands and sheets, resembling carcinoma or lymphoma. Several growth factors, including basic fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factors and vascular endothelial growth factor, play a role in tumour angiogenesis. Growth hormone (GH) is mitogenic for a variety of vascular tissue cells, including smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells and exerts its regulatory functions in controlling metabolism, balanced growth and differentiated cell expression by acting on specific membrane-bound receptors, which trigger a phosphorylation cascade resulting in the modulation of numerous signalling pathways and of gene expression. Essential to the initiation of a cellular response to GH, the presence of receptors for this hormone may predict the adaptation of tumour cells resulting from GH exposure. To address the site/mode of action through which GH exerts its effects, a well characterized monoclonal antibody, obtained by hybridoma technology from Balb/c mice immunized with purified rabbit and rat liver GH-receptor (GHR) and directed against the hormone binding site of the receptor, was applied, using the ABC technique to determine GHR expression in a panel of vascular tumours. The GHR was cloned from a rabbit liver cDNA library with the aid of an oligonucleotide probe based on a 19 residue tryptic peptide sequence derived from 5900 fold purified rabbit liver receptor. A total of 64 benign and malignant vascular tumours were obtained from different human organ sites, including the chest wall, skin, axillary contents, duodenum, female breast, abdomen, stomach, colon, lymph node, bladder, body flank and neck regions. The tumours

  14. Clinical and biological significance of aneuploidy in human tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, M L; Hedley, D W; Taylor, I W

    1984-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a well recognised feature of human tumours, but the investigation of its biological and clinical significance has been hampered by technological constraints. Quantitative DNA analysis reflects the total chromosomal content of tumour cells and can now be determined rapidly and reliably using flow cytometry; this has resulted in renewed interest in its potential clinical applications. This article reviews the accumulating evidence that tumour ploidy reflects the biological behaviour of a large number of tumour types and that diploid tumours in particular have a relatively good prognosis. The measurement of tumour ploidy is likely to become a valuable adjunct to the clinical and histopathological assessment of cancers. PMID:6381555

  15. Anaesthetic management of left main bronchial glomus tumour

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Mathangi; Sharma, Rammurti; Pawar, Harshwardhan Singh; Hasnain, Shahbaz

    2016-01-01

    Glomus tumours involving bronchus are rare. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for this tumour, with excellent prognosis. The nature and location of tumour pose a significant challenge for perioperative anaesthetic management. However, there is a paucity of case reports on anaesthetic risks involved in case of a bronchial glomus tumour. We present a case of glomus tumour involving left main stem bronchus, subjected to bronchial sleeve resection. The various anaesthetic implications of this tumour type and airway management with right double lumen tube are discussed. PMID:27141112

  16. Prognostic Value of Tumor-Associated Macrophages According to Histologic Locations and Hormone Receptor Status in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Jae Moon; Jang, Min Hye; Kim, Dong Il; Seo, An Na; Park, So Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are involved in tumor progression by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor cell invasion, migration and angiogenesis. However, in breast cancer, the clinical relevance of the TAM infiltration according to distinct histologic locations (intratumoral vs. stromal) and hormone receptor status is unclear. We investigated the significance of the levels of TAM infiltration in distinct histologic locations in invasive breast cancer. We also examined the relationship of the TAM levels with the clinicopathologic features of tumors, expression of EMT markers, and clinical outcomes. Finally, we analyzed the prognostic value of TAM levels according to hormone receptor status. High levels of infiltration of intratumoral, stromal and total TAMs were associated with high histologic grade, p53 overexpression, high Ki-67 proliferation index and negative hormone receptor status. Infiltration of TAMs was also correlated with overexpression of vimentin, smooth muscle actin and alteration of β-catenin. Overall, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAMs was associated with poor disease-free survival, and was found to be an independent prognostic factor. In subgroup analyses by hormone receptor status, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAM was an independent prognostic factor in the hormone receptor-positive subgroup, but not in the hormone-receptor negative subgroup. Our findings suggest that intratumoral TAMs play an important role in tumor progression in breast cancer, especially in the hormone receptor-positive group, and the level of TAM infiltration may be used as a prognostic factor and even a therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25884955

  17. NADH-Cytochrome b5 Reductase 3 Promotes Colonization and Metastasis Formation and Is a Prognostic Marker of Disease-Free and Overall Survival in Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lund, Rikke R; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Caterino, Tina Di; Terp, Mikkel G; Nissen, Jeanette; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Jensen, Ole N; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-11-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of cancer-related deaths and remains the most significant challenge to management of the disease. Metastases are established through a complex multistep process involving intracellular signaling pathways. To gain insight to proteins central to specific steps in metastasis formation, we used a metastasis cell line model that allows investigation of extravasation and colonization of circulating cancer cells to lungs in mice. Using stable isotopic labeling by amino acids in cell culture and subcellular fractionation, the nuclear, cytosol, and mitochondria proteomes were analyzed by LC-MS/MS, identifying a number of proteins that exhibited altered expression in isogenic metastatic versus nonmetastatic cancer cell lines, including NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3), l-lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), Niemann-pick c1 protein (NPC1), and nucleolar RNA helicase 2 (NRH2). The altered expression levels were validated at the protein and transcriptional levels, and analysis of breast cancer biopsies from two cohorts of patients demonstrated a significant correlation between high CYB5R3 expression and poor disease-free and overall survival in patients with estrogen receptor-negative tumors (DFS: p = .02, OS: p = .04). CYB5R3 gene knock-down using siRNA in metastasizing cells led to significantly decreased tumor burden in lungs when injected intravenously in immunodeficient mice. The cellular effects of CYB5R3 knock-down showed signaling alterations associated with extravasation, TGFβ and HIFα pathways, and apoptosis. The decreased apoptosis of CYB5R3 knock-down metastatic cancer cell lines was confirmed in functional assays. Our study reveals a central role of CYB5R3 in extravasation/colonization of cancer cells and demonstrates the ability of our quantitative, comparative proteomic approach to identify key proteins of specific important biological processes that may also prove useful as potential biomarkers of clinical relevance. MS data are

  18. The perivascular niche regulates breast tumour dormancy.

    PubMed

    Ghajar, Cyrus M; Peinado, Héctor; Mori, Hidetoshi; Matei, Irina R; Evason, Kimberley J; Brazier, Hélène; Almeida, Dena; Koller, Antonius; Hajjar, Katherine A; Stainier, Didier Y R; Chen, Emily I; Lyden, David; Bissell, Mina J

    2013-07-01

    In a significant fraction of breast cancer patients, distant metastases emerge after years or even decades of latency. How disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) are kept dormant, and what wakes them up, are fundamental problems in tumour biology. To address these questions, we used metastasis assays in mice and showed that dormant DTCs reside on microvasculature of lung, bone marrow and brain. We then engineered organotypic microvascular niches to determine whether endothelial cells directly influence breast cancer cell (BCC) growth. These models demonstrated that endothelial-derived thrombospondin-1 induces sustained BCC quiescence. This suppressive cue was lost in sprouting neovasculature; time-lapse analysis showed that sprouting vessels not only permit, but accelerate BCC outgrowth. We confirmed this surprising result in dormancy models and in zebrafish, and identified active TGF-β1 and periostin as tumour-promoting factors derived from endothelial tip cells. Our work reveals that stable microvasculature constitutes a dormant niche, whereas sprouting neovasculature sparks micrometastatic outgrowth. PMID:23728425

  19. Viscoelastic properties of human bladder tumours.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S C; Lawless, B M; Shepherd, D E T; Espino, D M; Bicknell, G R; Bryan, R T

    2016-08-01

    The urinary bladder is an organ which facilitates the storage and release of urine. The bladder can develop tumours and bladder cancer is a common malignancy throughout the world. There is a consensus that there are differences in the mechanical properties of normal and malignant tissues. However, the viscoelastic properties of human bladder tumours at the macro-scale have not been previously studied. This study investigated the viscoelastic properties of ten bladder tumours, which were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis at frequencies up to 30Hz. The storage modulus ranged between 0.052MPa and 0.085MPa while the loss modulus ranged between 0.019MPa and 0.043MPa. Both storage and loss moduli showed frequency dependent behaviour and the storage modulus was higher than the loss modulus for every frequency tested. Viscoelastic properties may be useful for the development of surgical trainers, surgical devices, computational models and diagnostic equipment. PMID:27082128

  20. Unusual presentation of a scrotal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debashis; Parr, Nijel J

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old man had a wide excision of the right-sided scrotal cancer in the neck of the scrotum. On dissection it became apparent that the tumour had developed a blood supply from the right spermatic cord. Histology revealed G2T2 squamous cell carcinoma. A biopsy from an abnormal skin area from the opposite groin reported chronic folliculitis. He underwent an ultrasound scanning of the groin and fine-needle aspiration, which did not show any suspicious features. Follow-up CT of the abdomen and pelvis after 6 weeks did not show any evidence of intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy. Another CT has been arranged within the next 3 months to confirm that the spread of the tumour does not follow the pattern of a testicular tumour. PMID:24879734

  1. Post-treatment imaging of liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Kurtaran, Amir; Schindl, Martin; Gruenberger, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In the past few years, great improvements have been made to achieve local tumour control of primary liver malignancies and liver metastases. For hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) and tumour ablation techniques, including percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RF), and laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) have been developed. For colorectal liver metastases, surgery is still the standard technique in localised disease, although percutaneous RF ablation has gained considerable acceptance. In patients with widespread disease, chemotherapy with new drugs offers improved survival. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the modalities of choice to evaluate treatment response. The present review demonstrates imaging findings of complete and incomplete tumour control after intervention as well as the imaging spectrum of complications. Imaging guidelines according to the World Health Organization and Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) for assessment of chemotherapy response are presented. PMID:17921098

  2. Tumour Angiogenesis and Angiogenic Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Lalita; Puri, Naveen; Satpute, Pranali; Sharma, Vandana

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process depending on the coordination of many regulators and there by activating angiogenic switch. Recent advances in understanding of angiogenic mechanism have lead to the development of several anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic agents that use the strategy of regulation of angiogenic switch. Antiangiogenic therapy is a form of treatment not cure for cancer and represents a highly effective strategy for destroying tumour because vascular supply is the fundamental requirement for growth of tumour. Because of the quiescent nature of normal adult vasculature, angiogenic inhibitors are expected to confer a degree of specificity when compared to nonspecific modalities of chemo and radiotherapy, so it has the advantage of less toxicities, does not induce drug resistance and deliver a relatively non toxic, long term treatment of tumour. PMID:26266204

  3. High frequency of tumours in Mulibrey nanism.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Niklas; Karlberg, Susann; Karikoski, Riitta; Mikkola, Sakari; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Jalanko, Hannu

    2009-06-01

    Mulibrey nanism (MUL) is a monogenic disorder with prenatal-onset growth failure, typical clinical characteristics, cardiopathy and tendency for a metabolic syndrome. It is caused by recessive mutations in the TRIM37 gene encoding for the peroxisomal TRIM37 protein with ubiquitin-ligase activity. In this work, the frequency and pathology of malignant and benign tumours were analysed in a national cohort of 89 Finnish MUL patients aged 0.7-76 years. The subjects had a clinical and radiological evaluation, and histological and immunohistocemical analyses on specimens obtained from biopsy, surgery or autopsy, were performed. The results show that the MUL patients have disturbed architecture with ectopic tissues and a high frequency of both benign and malignant tumours detectable in several internal organs. A total of 210 tumorous lesions were detected in 66/89 patients (74%). Fifteen malignancies occurred in 13 patients (15%), seven of them in the kidney (five Wilms' tumours), three in the thyroid gland, two gynaecological cancers, one gastrointestinal carcinoid tumour, one neuropituitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and one case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Tumours detected by radiology in the liver and other organs mainly comprised strongly dilated blood vessels (peliosis), vascularized cysts and nodular lesions. The lesions showed strong expression of the endothelial cell markers CD34 and CD31 as well as the myocyte marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). Our findings show that MUL is associated with frequent malignant tumours and benign adenomatous and vascular lesions, as well as disturbed organ development. PMID:19334051

  4. Anti-tumour strategies aiming to target tumour-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Mo, Chunfen; Wang, Yongsheng; Wei, Dandan; Xiao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a predominant population of inflammatory cells that present in solid tumours. TAMs are mostly characterized as alternatively activated M2-like macrophages and are known to orchestrate nearly all stages of tumour progression. Experimental investigations indicate that TAMs contribute to drug-resistance and radio-protective effects, and clinical evidence shows that an elevated number of TAMs and their M2 profile are correlated with therapy failure and poor prognosis in cancer patients. Recently, many studies on TAM-targeted strategies have made significant progress and some pilot works have achieved encouraging results. Among these, connections between some anti-tumour drugs and their influence on TAMs have been suggested. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in TAM-targeted strategies for tumour therapy. Based on the proposed mechanisms, those strategies are grouped into four categories: (i) inhibiting macrophage recruitment; (ii) suppressing TAM survival; (iii) enhancing M1-like tumoricidal activity of TAMs; (iv) blocking M2-like tumour-promoting activity of TAMs. It is desired that further attention be drawn to this research field and more effort be made to promote TAM-targeted tumour therapy. PMID:23113570

  5. Sertoliform cystadenoma: a rare benign tumour of the rete testis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Sertoliform cystadenoma of the rete testis represents an uncommon benign tumour. They appear in patients from 26 to 62 years of age. We describe a case of a 66-year-old man with a tumour in the area of the epididymal head. The tumour markers were not increased. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour an inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The cut surface of this tumour was of grey/white color and showed small cysts. The tumour consisted of two compartments. The epithelial like tumour cells showed a sertoliform growth pattern and cystic dilatations. In between the tumour cells repeatedly actin expressing sclerotic areas could be recognized as the second tumour component. Proliferative activity was not increased. Immunohistochemically the tumour cells were positiv for inhibin, S-100, and CD 99. Alpha feto protein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) and placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) as well as synaptophysin, epithelial membrane antigene (EMA), and BCL-2 were not expressed. As far as we know this is the sixth reported case of this tumour. Because of the benign nature of this tumour the correct diagnosis is important for the intra- and postoperative management. Here we present a case of this rare tumour and discuss potential differential diagnosis. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1956026143857335 PMID:23406299

  6. From Bittner to Barr: a viral, diet and hormone breast cancer aetiology hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S; Tran, Dinh; Rawlinson, William D

    2001-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the human homologue of the mouse mammary tumour virus (HHMMTV) and other viruses, such as human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), act as cofactors with diet, oestrogens and other hormones in the initiation and promotion of some types of breast cancer in genetically susceptible women. It is further hypothesized that diet influences the risk of breast cancer, through its influence on oestrogen metabolism and that of other hormones, in combination with genetic and infectious agents. PMID:11250750

  7. Sertoli cell tumour in an Amur tiger.

    PubMed

    Scudamore, C L; Meredith, A L

    2001-01-01

    The histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a malignant Sertoli cell tumour in a 17-year-old Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) are described. Histological examination of the primary lesion in the right testis and metastatic lesions throughout the internal organs showed a variable cellular pattern with an admixture of tubular structures divided by fine stroma filled with fusiform to stellate cells, and sheets of polygonal cells with abundant vacuolated cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical techniques demonstrated strong positive staining for neuron-specific enolase and variable positive staining for vimentin in neoplastic cells, supporting a diagnosis of a tumour of Sertoli cell origin. PMID:11428192

  8. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  9. Thoracic Wall Reconstruction in Advanced Breast Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Daigeler, A.; Harati, K.; Goertz, O.; Hirsch, T.; Behr, B.; Lehnhardt, M.; Kolbenschlag, J.

    2014-01-01

    In advanced mammary tumours, extensive resections, sometimes involving sections of the thoracic wall, are often necessary. Plastic surgery reconstruction procedures offer sufficient opportunities to cover even large thoracic wall defects. Pedicled flaps from the torso but also free flap-plasties enable, through secure defect closure, the removal of large, ulcerated, painful or bleeding tumours with moderate donor site morbidity. The impact of thoracic wall resection on the respiratory mechanism can be easily compensated for and patientsʼ quality of life in the palliative stage of disease can often be improved. PMID:24976636

  10. Extracutaneous glomus tumour of the trachea

    PubMed Central

    Łochowski, Mariusz Piotr; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Kozak, Józef

    2015-01-01

    A 38-year-old man presenting expiratory stridor and high-grade dyspnoea was admitted to hospital in Lodz in February 2013. Chest radiographs and computed tomography scans showed a solid lesion in the upper part of the trachea occluding 85% of the airway lumen. A segmental resection of the trachea with a subsequent end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Histopathology showed an extracutaneous glomus tumour. There were no postoperative complications. Tracheal resection is the primary curative method in cases of this rare tumour. PMID:26702289

  11. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  12. Seasonal variation in the secretion of mammotrophic hormones in normal women and women with previous breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Holdaway, I M; Mason, B H; Gibbs, E E; Rajasoorya, C; Lethaby, A; Hopkins, K D; Evans, M C; Lim, T; Schooler, B

    1997-01-01

    Hormones such as melatonin whose serum concentrations vary seasonally have been previously implicated in the growth of breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to identify possible seasonal variation in a range of mammotrophic hormones which could exert a chronobiologic influence in women with breast tumours. Fifteen premenopausal women with a history of previous breast cancer (BC subjects) and 10 control women underwent 2-hourly serum sampling for 24 h at both summer and winter solstice for measurement of melatonin, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), cortisol, prolactin and thyrotrophin (TSH). Hormone secretion at the different seasons was compared by measuring the area under the 24 h serum hormone concentration x time curves and by time series analysis of summer-to-winter differences in hormone concentration. Control women had significantly higher GH and IGF-I levels in summer compared to winter and significantly higher cortisol secretion in winter than summer. In contrast, BC women had no significant seasonal difference in IGF-I concentrations and had a reversal of the normal seasonal pattern of melatonin secretion, although seasonal changes in GH production were similar to controls. Prolactin and TSH showed no significant summer/winter variation in either group. Thus, seasonal variations in hormone secretion seen in normal women were, with exception of GH, absent or reversed in women with a previous history of breast cancer. As a result these individuals may be exposed to an asynchronous hormonal stimulus which could influence tumour growth. These changes could reflect a constitutional abnormality in BC women or may have been induced by the previous breast tumour. PMID:9116314

  13. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  14. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  15. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  16. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    ... that produce hormones are controlled by other hormones. Aging also changes this process. For example, an endocrine ... produce the same amount at a slower rate. AGING CHANGES The hypothalamus is located in the brain. ...

  17. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C.; Bogner, Paul N.; Evans, Sharon S.; Skitzki, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  18. Systematic pan-cancer analysis of tumour purity

    PubMed Central

    Aran, Dvir; Sirota, Marina; Butte, Atul J.

    2015-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment is the non-cancerous cells present in and around a tumour, including mainly immune cells, but also fibroblasts and cells that comprise supporting blood vessels. These non-cancerous components of the tumour may play an important role in cancer biology. They also have a strong influence on the genomic analysis of tumour samples, and may alter the biological interpretation of results. Here we present a systematic analysis using different measurement modalities of tumour purity in >10,000 samples across 21 cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas. Patients are stratified according to clinical features in an attempt to detect clinical differences driven by purity levels. We demonstrate the confounding effect of tumour purity on correlating and clustering tumours with transcriptomics data. Finally, using a differential expression method that accounts for tumour purity, we find an immunotherapy gene signature in several cancer types that is not detected by traditional differential expression analyses. PMID:26634437

  19. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Daniel T; Muhitch, Jason B; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C; Bogner, Paul N; Evans, Sharon S; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  20. Brain tumour cells interconnect to a functional and resistant network.

    PubMed

    Osswald, Matthias; Jung, Erik; Sahm, Felix; Solecki, Gergely; Venkataramani, Varun; Blaes, Jonas; Weil, Sophie; Horstmann, Heinz; Wiestler, Benedikt; Syed, Mustafa; Huang, Lulu; Ratliff, Miriam; Karimian Jazi, Kianush; Kurz, Felix T; Schmenger, Torsten; Lemke, Dieter; Gömmel, Miriam; Pauli, Martin; Liao, Yunxiang; Häring, Peter; Pusch, Stefan; Herl, Verena; Steinhäuser, Christian; Krunic, Damir; Jarahian, Mostafa; Miletic, Hrvoje; Berghoff, Anna S; Griesbeck, Oliver; Kalamakis, Georgios; Garaschuk, Olga; Preusser, Matthias; Weiss, Samuel; Liu, Haikun; Heiland, Sabine; Platten, Michael; Huber, Peter E; Kuner, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Winkler, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytic brain tumours, including glioblastomas, are incurable neoplasms characterized by diffusely infiltrative growth. Here we show that many tumour cells in astrocytomas extend ultra-long membrane protrusions, and use these distinct tumour microtubes as routes for brain invasion, proliferation, and to interconnect over long distances. The resulting network allows multicellular communication through microtube-associated gap junctions. When damage to the network occurred, tumour microtubes were used for repair. Moreover, the microtube-connected astrocytoma cells, but not those remaining unconnected throughout tumour progression, were protected from cell death inflicted by radiotherapy. The neuronal growth-associated protein 43 was important for microtube formation and function, and drove microtube-dependent tumour cell invasion, proliferation, interconnection, and radioresistance. Oligodendroglial brain tumours were deficient in this mechanism. In summary, astrocytomas can develop functional multicellular network structures. Disconnection of astrocytoma cells by targeting their tumour microtubes emerges as a new principle to reduce the treatment resistance of this disease. PMID:26536111

  1. The human tumour cloning assay in the management of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, C.; Jakesz, R.; Wrba, F.; Havelec, L.; Haas, O.; Spona, J.; Holzner, H.; Kolb, R.; Moser, K.

    1985-01-01

    A tumour cloning system was used to cultivate breast cancer specimens. Fifty-six percent of 87 samples were adequate for evaluation, showing clonal growth in about one third (35%). Effusions yielded significantly better growth than solid specimens, the median colony numbers being 64 and 18 respectively. An attempt was made to examine whether there was any association between parameters accepted as prognostic factors for breast cancer and clonal growth in vitro. No correlation was found between preoperative tumour burden, histopathologic grading, menopausal status or overall survival and clonal growth in vitro, whereas we observed an inverse trend between progesterone receptor content of the tumours and their growth potential (P less than 0.01). In those few cases where in vitro and in vivo data could be compared, a high accuracy of the predicted sensitivities was found with respect to chemotherapy, but not in relation to hormonal treatment. A statistically significant higher overall chemosensitivity was associated with the absence of oestrogen receptors (P less than 0.01). PMID:4027163

  2. Cytological study on the anterior pituitary of senile untreated beagle bitches with spontaneous mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Attia, M A

    1982-05-01

    Pituitaries were obtained from senile untreated Beagle bitches of comparable age (7-9 years) and genital status. The animals were divided into three groups; one was normal (without mammary lesions), one had benign tumours and one had mammary adenocarcinomas. PRL-, STH-, ACTH- and gonadotrophin-producing cells are studied and counted in serial paraffin sections stained with histochemical techniques. The animals with mammary malignancy displayed a marked increase in the relative number of PRL and ACTH cells with morphological signs of higher secretory activity in most cells, compared with that in normal bitches or bitches with benign tumours. STH cells in bitches with adenocarcinomas were reduced in number; however the secretory activity in these animals was the same as that observed in the normal bitches. In the animals with benign mammary tumours, STH cells showed morphological indication of higher secretory activity than in the other groups. PRL and ACTH cells were slightly increased in number and had slightly higher activity than that in normal bitches. These findings may suggest a role for hypophyseal hormones in mammary neoplasias. PMID:6287969

  3. Tumour-derived PTH-related protein triggers adipose tissue browning and cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Kir, Serkan; White, James P; Kleiner, Sandra; Kazak, Lawrence; Cohen, Paul; Baracos, Vickie E; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2014-09-01

    Cachexia is a wasting disorder of adipose and skeletal muscle tissues that leads to profound weight loss and frailty. About half of all cancer patients suffer from cachexia, which impairs quality of life, limits cancer therapy and decreases survival. One key characteristic of cachexia is higher resting energy expenditure levels than in healthy individuals, which has been linked to greater thermogenesis by brown fat. How tumours induce brown fat activity is unknown. Here, using a Lewis lung carcinoma model of cancer cachexia, we show that tumour-derived parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has an important role in wasting, through driving the expression of genes involved in thermogenesis in adipose tissues. Neutralization of PTHrP in tumour-bearing mice blocked adipose tissue browning and the loss of muscle mass and strength. Our results demonstrate that PTHrP mediates energy wasting in fat tissues and contributes to the broader aspects of cancer cachexia. Thus, neutralization of PTHrP might hold promise for ameliorating cancer cachexia and improving patient survival. PMID:25043053

  4. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  5. [Hormonal contraception in autoimmpne diseases].

    PubMed

    Matyszkiewicz, Anna; Jach, Robert; Rajtar-Ciosek, Agnieszka; Basta, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The onset and the course of autoimmune diseases is influenced among other factors by the sex hormones. Hormonal contraception might affect the course of the autoimmune disease. The paper summarises the manner of save application of hormonal contraception in patients with autoimmune disease. PMID:27526427

  6. Reproductive hormones in the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low detections of reproductive hormones, at the part per trillion concentrations, are frequently measured in surface and subsurface waters. These exogenous hormones are a concern because they can bind strongly to hormone receptors in animals and induce an endocrine response or disruption. Human heal...

  7. Bioidentical Hormones for Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Variation on a Theme

    PubMed Central

    Bythrow, Jenna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progesterone creams and natural or bioidentical compounded estrogen preparations are being promoted to consumers as safe alternatives to conventional menopausal hormone therapy and as health-promoting tonics. No reliable data support these claims. SAFETY Natural hormones, including estradiol, estriol, estrone, and progesterone, can be expected to have the same adverse event profile as conventional menopausal hormone regimens. SALIVARY HORMONE TESTS Salivary tests may be used to persuade asymptomatic consumers to use hormones (or symptomatic patients to use higher doses than those needed to mitigate symptoms), a practice that can be expected to result in adverse events. PMID:17549577

  8. Pedunculated islet-cell tumour of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Britt, R P

    1966-05-01

    An unusual islet-cell tumour found at necropsy in a patient who had died from a myocardial infarction is described. Of particular interest were the pedunculated nature and large size of the tumour. The clinical features of the case are considered. Four islet-cell tumours in the duodenum have previously been reported and it seems probable that such tumours arise in heterotopic pancreas. PMID:4287114

  9. Büschke-Lowenstein tumour in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Garozzo, G; Nuciforo, G; Rocchi, C M; Bonanno, N M; Sampugnaro, E G; Piccione, S; Di Stefano, A; Acquaviva, G; Barberi, A L; Panella, M

    2003-11-10

    During pregnancy a localised human papillomavirus (HPV) lesion may, in rare cases, develop into a Büschke-Lowenstein tumour. The choice of treatment is crucial as standard systemic treatment is teratogenic. We performed laser CO2 microsurgery because it has a low incidence of complications. PMID:14557019

  10. Vagal Schwannoma: A Rare Parapharyngeal Tumour.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Panduranga M; Dosemane, Deviprasad; Sreedharan, Suja S; Majeed, Nazeem A; Shenoy, Vijendra S

    2016-04-01

    Among the parapharyngeal tumours, salivary gland tumours are the commonest, followed by schwannomas, which are slow growing benign tumours. Half of the parapharyngeal schwannomas originate from the vagus. Complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice. We hereby present two cases of parapharyngeal schwannomas, one which had presented as an intraoral mass and the other as a swelling in the neck. The first case, a 57-year-old female patient complained of a slowly increasing swelling in the left side of the throat since 3 months, associated with pain and dysphagia. In the Contrast Enhanced CT scan of the neck, a well-defined cystic lesion with central enhancing solid components (4cm X 4.5cm X 3cm) was seen in the left parapharyngeal region. The second case, a 39-year-old male patient complained of a painless, gradually increasing swelling below the lobule of the right ear since one month. Examination revealed a solitary, nontender, firm and mobile swelling of 2cm X 2cm below the lobule of the right ear. In Contrast Enhanced CT scan of the neck, an enhancing lesion was seen involving the right parapharyngeal space, post-styloid compartment. Both the patients underwent trans-cervical surgical excision. Vagal nerve schwannoma is rare. The majority of the cases present with a slow growing neck swelling without neurological deficit. Complete surgical excision of the tumour is important to prevent recurrence. PMID:27190844

  11. Karyotypic abnormalities in tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Bardi, G.; Johansson, B.; Pandis, N.; Mandahl, N.; Bak-Jensen, E.; Andrén-Sandberg, A.; Mitelman, F.; Heim, S.

    1993-01-01

    Short-term cultures from 20 pancreatic tumours, three endocrine and 17 exocrine, were cytogenetically analysed. All three endocrine tumours had a normal chromosome complement. Clonal chromosome aberrations were detected in 13 of the 17 exocrine tumours: simple karyotypic changes were found in five carcinomas and numerous numerical and/or structural changes in eight. When the present findings and those previously reported by our group were viewed in conjunction, the most common numerical imbalances among the 22 karyotypically abnormal pancreatic carcinomas thus available for evaluation turned out to be, in order of falling frequency, -18, -Y, +20, +7, +11 and -12. Imbalances brought about by structural changes most frequently affected chromosomes 1 (losses in 1p but especially gains of 1q), 8 (in particular 8q gains but also 8p losses), and 17 (mostly 17q gain but also loss of 17p). Chromosomal bands 1p32, 1q10, 6q21, 7p22, 8p21, 8q11, 14p11, 15q10-11, and 17q11 were the most common breakpoint sites affected by the structural rearrangements. Abnormal karyotypes were detected more frequently in poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinomas than in moderately and well differentiated tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494707

  12. Analysis of nanoparticle delivery to tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Stefan; Tavares, Anthony J.; Dai, Qin; Ohta, Seiichi; Audet, Julie; Dvorak, Harold F.; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-05-01

    Targeting nanoparticles to malignant tissues for improved diagnosis and therapy is a popular concept. However, after surveying the literature from the past 10 years, only 0.7% (median) of the administered nanoparticle dose is found to be delivered to a solid tumour. This has negative consequences on the translation of nanotechnology for human use with respect to manufacturing, cost, toxicity, and imaging and therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we conduct a multivariate analysis on the compiled data to reveal the contributions of nanoparticle physicochemical parameters, tumour models and cancer types on the low delivery efficiency. We explore the potential causes of the poor delivery efficiency from the perspectives of tumour biology (intercellular versus transcellular transport, enhanced permeability and retention effect, and physicochemical-dependent nanoparticle transport through the tumour stroma) as well as competing organs (mononuclear phagocytic and renal systems) and present a 30-year research strategy to overcome this fundamental limitation. Solving the nanoparticle delivery problem will accelerate the clinical translation of nanomedicine.

  13. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it. PMID:27097837

  14. Canine oral mucosal mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J W; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L; Berlato, D; Murphy, S; Grant, I A

    2016-03-01

    Mast cell tumours (MCTs) are the most common cutaneous tumours of dogs, however rarely they can arise from the oral mucosa. This subset of MCT is reported to demonstrate a more aggressive clinical course than those tumours on the haired skin and the authors hypothesised that dogs with oral, mucosal MCT would have a high incidence of local lymph node metastasis at presentation and that this would be a negative prognostic factor. An additional hypothesis was that mitotic index (MI) would be prognostic. This retrospective study examines 33 dogs with MCTs arising from the oral mucosa. The results suggest that oral mucosal MCTs in the dog have a high incidence of lymph node metastasis at diagnosis (55%) which results in a poor prognosis. MI and nodal metastasis is highly prognostic. Loco-regional progression is common in these patients and dogs with adequate local control of their tumour had an improved outcome. Despite a more aggressive clinical course, treatment can result in protracted survivals, even when metastasis is present. PMID:24215587

  15. Solitary fibrous tumour of the cheek: An unusual presentation of a rare soft tissue tumour

    PubMed Central

    Jones, JL; Jones, AV; Drage, NA; Bhatia, S; Hourihan, MD

    2014-01-01

    This case report discusses the unusual presentation and ultrasound features of a solitary fibrous tumour of the face. Solitary fibrous tumour is an uncommon form of soft tissue tumour which, although seen predominantly within the lung pleura, can occur throughout the body in sites such as the peritoneum, mediastinum and head and neck. Ultrasound is an excellent imaging modality in the assessment of soft tissue masses in the head and neck. The ultrasound features demonstrated by this example of solitary fibrous tumour are reviewed. This report also highlights that ultrasound alone is ultimately limited in reaching a definitive diagnosis. The roles of other investigations such as ultrasound-guided biopsy and cross-sectional imaging are discussed.

  16. Neuropsychological Differences between Survivors of Supratentorial and Infratentorial Brain Tumours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, S. K.; Mullins, W. A.; O'Neil, S. H.; Wilson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between brain tumour location and core areas of cognitive and behavioural functioning for paediatric brain tumour survivors. The extant literature both supports and refutes an association between paediatric brain tumour location and neurocognitive outcomes. We examined…

  17. Anti - tumour activity of an ayurvedic oil preparation.

    PubMed

    Panikar, K R; Bhanumathy, P; Raghunath, P N

    1986-10-01

    An ayurvedic oil preparation containing flowers of ixora coccinea and cortus sativum was subjected to an animal experimentation to find out how far it is efficient in preventing the development of Dalton's lymphoma as solid tumour. The oil was applied after injecting the cells and we found it could retard the development of tumour and arrest further development of already formed tumour. PMID:22557556

  18. ANTI – TUMOUR ACTIVITY OF AN AYURVEDIC OIL PREPARATION

    PubMed Central

    Panikar, K. R.; Bhanumathy, P.; Raghunath, P. N.

    1986-01-01

    An ayurvedic oil preparation containing flowers of ixora coccinea and cortus sativum was subjected to an animal experimentation to find out how far it is efficient in preventing the development of Dalton's lymphoma as solid tumour. The oil was applied after injecting the cells and we found it could retard the development of tumour and arrest further development of already formed tumour. PMID:22557556

  19. Fractionated Radiotherapy with 3 x 8 Gy Induces Systemic Anti-Tumour Responses and Abscopal Tumour Inhibition without Modulating the Humoral Anti-Tumour Response

    PubMed Central

    Habets, Thomas H. P. M.; Oth, Tammy; Houben, Ans W.; Huijskens, Mirelle J. A. J.; Senden-Gijsbers, Birgit L. M. G.; Schnijderberg, Melanie C. A.; Brans, Boudewijn; Dubois, Ludwig J.; Lambin, Philippe; De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Germeraad, Wilfred T. V.; Tilanus, Marcel G. J.; Mottaghy, Felix M.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that fractionated radiotherapy (RT) can result in distant non-irradiated (abscopal) tumour regression. Although preclinical studies indicate the importance of T cells in this infrequent phenomenon, these studies do not preclude that other immune mechanisms exhibit an addition role in the abscopal effect. We therefore addressed the question whether in addition to T cell mediated responses also humoral anti-tumour responses are modulated after fractionated RT and whether systemic dendritic cell (DC) stimulation can enhance tumour-specific antibody production. We selected the 67NR mammary carcinoma model since this tumour showed spontaneous antibody production in all tumour-bearing mice. Fractionated RT to the primary tumour was associated with a survival benefit and a delayed growth of a non-irradiated (contralateral) secondary tumour. Notably, fractionated RT did not affect anti-tumour antibody titers and the composition of the immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Likewise, we demonstrated that treatment of tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with DC stimulating growth factor Flt3-L did neither modulate the magnitude nor the composition of the humoral immune response. Finally, we evaluated the immune infiltrate and Ig isotype content of the tumour tissue using flow cytometry and found no differences between treatment groups that were indicative for local antibody production. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the 67NR mammary carcinoma in Balb/C mice is associated with a pre-existing antibody response. And, we show that in tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with abscopal tumour regression such pre-existing antibody responses are not altered upon fractionated RT and/or DC stimulation with Flt3-L. Our research indicates that evaluating the humoral immune response in the setting of abscopal tumour regression is not invariably associated with therapeutic effects. PMID:27427766

  20. Tumour cell-derived Wnt7a recruits and activates fibroblasts to promote tumour aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Avgustinova, Alexandra; Iravani, Marjan; Robertson, David; Fearns, Antony; Gao, Qiong; Klingbeil, Pamela; Hanby, Andrew M.; Speirs, Valerie; Sahai, Erik; Calvo, Fernando; Isacke, Clare M.

    2016-01-01

    Stromal fibroblast recruitment to tumours and activation to a cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) phenotype has been implicated in promoting primary tumour growth and progression to metastatic disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the tumour:fibroblast crosstalk that drive the intertumoural stromal heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Using in vivo models we identify Wnt7a as a key factor secreted exclusively by aggressive breast tumour cells, which induces CAF conversion. Functionally, this results in extracellular matrix remodelling to create a permissive environment for tumour cell invasion and promotion of distant metastasis. Mechanistically, Wnt7a-mediated fibroblast activation is not dependent on classical Wnt signalling. Instead, we demonstrate that Wnt7a potentiates TGFβ receptor signalling both in 3D in vitro and in vivo models, thus highlighting the interaction between two of the key signalling pathways in development and disease. Importantly, in clinical breast cancer cohorts, tumour cell Wnt7a expression correlates with a desmoplastic, poor-prognosis stroma and poor patient outcome. PMID:26777421

  1. Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid hormone is one of the most potent stimulators of growth and metabolic rate, the potential to use thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology has never been subject to rigorous investigation. A number of investigators have demonstrated intriguing therapeutic potential for topical thyroid hormone. Topical T3 has accelerated wound healing and hair growth in rodents. Topical T4 has been used to treat xerosis in humans. It is clear that the use of thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology may be of large consequence and merits further study. This is a review of the literature regarding thyroid hormone action on skin along with skin manifestations of thyroid disease. The paper is intended to provide a context for recent findings of direct thyroid hormone action on cutaneous cells in vitro and in vivo which may portend the use of thyroid hormone to promote wound healing. PMID:23577275

  2. Addition of vasopressin synthetic analogue [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard chemotherapy enhances tumour growth inhibition and impairs metastatic spread in aggressive breast tumour models.

    PubMed

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Pastrian, Maria B; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP is a novel 2nd generation vasopressin analogue with robust antitumour activity against metastatic breast cancer. We recently reported that, by acting on vasopressin V2r membrane receptor present in tumour cells and microvascular endothelium, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis and metastatic progression of the disease without overt toxicity. Despite chemotherapy remaining as a primary therapeutic option for aggressive breast cancer, its use is limited by low selectivity and associated adverse effects. In this regard, we evaluated potential combinational benefits by adding [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard-of-care chemotherapy. In vitro, combination of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with sub-IC50 concentrations of paclitaxel or carmustine resulted in a cooperative inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in comparison to single-agent therapy. In vivo antitumour efficacy of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition to chemotherapy was first evaluated using the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with i.v. injections of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice weekly) in combination with weekly cycles of paclitaxel (10 mg/kg i.p.). After 6 weeks of treatment, combination regimen resulted in greater tumour growth inhibition compared to monotherapy. [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition was also associated with reduction of local aggressiveness, and impairment of tumour invasion and infiltration of the skin. Benefits of combined therapy were confirmed in the hormone-independent and metastatic F3II breast cancer model by combining [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with carmustine (25 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP plus cytotoxic agents severely impaired colony forming ability of tumour cells and inhibited breast cancer metastasis to lung. The present study shows that [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP may complement conventional chemotherapy by modulating metastatic progression and early stages of microtumour establishment, and thus supports further preclinical testing of

  3. Treatment of spontaneous tumours by temporary local ligation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Frederick M.; Kaplan, Martin M.; Meranze, David R.; Gradess, Morton

    1960-01-01

    Previous work in some human cases and in laboratory animals has indicated that temporary local ligation of spontaneous tumours has a selective destructive effect on these tumours, with only temporary inflammation resulting in normal tissues. In the experiments described in this paper, 49 spontaneous accessible tumours in dogs were treated by this method, with periods of ligation of from 4 to 11 hours. Success, as measured by selective necrosis of tumour tissue as compared with normal tissue, was achieved in 29 out of 41 benign tumours, including lipomas, angiomas, adenomas and mixed mammary tumours. Treatment failures were encountered in two cases each of papillomas and fibromas, six mixed mammary tumours and two testicular tumours. Total necrosis of tumour cells occurred in all eight malignant tumours encountered in this series. The outstanding feature was the specific destruction of tumour tissue by a bodily process without participation of any outside agent. Emphasis was placed on an adequate inflammatory response following temporary anoxia, although a precise definition of this inflammation could not be offered. Post-ligation bacterial multiplication, which may be expected to occur in necrotic tumour tissue, is considered to be a secondary effect rather than a possible primary cause of regression and disappearance of the tumour. If ligation treatment can be shown to be successful for a particular type of tumour, it may be possible to apply it to human patients for the treatment of areas not amenable to surgery. The results reported here warrant new experimental approaches to the study of neoplasms at the cellular level to define more precisely the anoxic and inflammatory processes involved in the selective lethal effect on tumour tissues; and the authors suggest that trials should be undertaken of combinations of chemotherapy or irradiation with ligation to reduce ligation time and extend the possible benefits. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7

  4. Hormonal control of implantation.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    In mammals, implantation represents a key step of pregnancy and its progression conditions not only the success of pregnancy but health of the offspring. Implantation requires a complex and specific uterine tissue, the endometrium, whose biological functions are tightly regulated by numerous signals, including steroids and polypeptide hormones. Endometrial tissue is endowed with dynamic properties that associate its ability to control the developmental trajectory of the embryo (driver property) and its ability to react to embryos displaying distinct capacities to develop to term (sensor property). Since dynamical properties of the endometrium can be affected by pre- and post-conceptional environment, determining how maternal hormonal signals and their biological actions are affected by environmental factors (e.g. nutrition, stress, infections) is mandatory to reduce or even to prevent their detrimental effects on endometrial physiology in order to preserve the optimal functionality of this tissue. PMID:27172870

  5. Hormones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pratap; Magon, Navneet

    2012-01-01

    The endocrinology of human pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes that result from physiological alterations at the boundary between mother and fetus. Progesterone and oestrogen have a great role along with other hormones. The controversies of use of progestogen and others are discussed in this chapter. Progesterone has been shown to stimulate the secretion of Th2 and reduces the secretion of Th1 cytokines which maintains pregnancy. Supportive care in early pregnancy is associated with a significant beneficial effect on pregnancy outcome. Prophylactic hormonal supplementation can be recommended for all assisted reproduction techniques cycles. Preterm labor can be prevented by the use of progestogen. The route of administration plays an important role in the drug's safety and efficacy profile in different trimesters of pregnancy. Thyroid disorders have a great impact on pregnancy outcome and needs to be monitored and treated accordingly. Method of locating review: Pubmed, scopus PMID:23661874

  6. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  7. Reproductive senescence, fertility and reproductive tumour profile in ageing female Han Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mitchard, Terri L; Klein, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    A study using vehicle administration in 104 female rats investigated reproductive aging in Han Wistar rats as a useful tool to interprete carcinogenicity studies where hormonal patterns are perturbated. From 16 weeks of age oestrous cycles were monitored every 6 weeks to investigate reproductive ageing. A subset of 20 females was used to assess fertility at 21 months of age. The animals were necropsied after 106-107 weeks on study and female reproductive organs, mammary glands and pituitary glands were examined for hyperplasias and/or tumours. The majority of rats had regular oestrous cycles up to 6 months of age. After this age, there was a rapid decline in the number of rats with regular oestrous cycles and an increase in irregular cycles and cycles in persistent di-oestrus with an occasional pro-oestrus. By the end of the study, the majority of animals were acyclic and the few remaining cyclic animals had irregular cycles. In the fertility assessment, 19/20 animals mated but only four animals became pregnant. These pregnant animals had normal numbers of corpora lutea of pregnancy but had high pre-implantation losses and could not sustain a viable pregnancy. 65 animals (62.5%) showed adenomas and/or pituitary hyperplasia in the pituitary gland at necropsy. The pituitary tumours were likely to be prolactin secreting that give rise to pseudopregnancy and mammary tumours, demonstrated by the fact that 43/65 (66%) of the affected animals had histopathological signs of these conditions. Multiple corpora lutea were found in 61% of all animals at time of termination. Only one uterine tumour was seen in this study probably due to lack of persistent oestrus seen in these animals. PMID:26655996

  8. Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumour: Correlation of Histopathology with Clinicopathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ghazala; Ansari, Hena A.; Sherwani, Rana K.; Rahman, Khaliqur; Akhtar, Nishat

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian steroid cell tumours (not otherwise specified) are rare neoplasms of the ovary and are classified under lipid cell tumours. Their diagnosis can be considered as one of exclusion. Histopathologically, the tumour should carefully be evaluated for microscopic features of malignancy, but it is essential for the clinician and the pathologist to remember that in these tumours, pathologically benign histomorphology does not exclude the possibility of clinically malignant behaviour. Our case study focuses on the comparative findings in a postmenopausal female diagnosed with an ovarian steroid tumour (not otherwise specified). A careful correlation between clinical and surgical evaluation and microscopic analysis is necessary, as is a regular followup. PMID:21436872

  9. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of tyrosinase expressing tumours in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Jathoul, Amit; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Lythgoe, Mark; Pedley, R. Barbara; Pule, Martin; Beard, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Two human tumour cell lines (K562, 293T) were stably transfected to achieve the genetic expression of tyrosinase, which is involved in the production of the pigment eumelanin. The cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice to form tumour xenografts, which were imaged over a period of up to 26 days using an all-optical photoacoustic imaging system. 3D photoacoustic images of the tumours and the surrounding vasculature were acquired at excitation wavelengths ranging from 600nm to 770nm. The images showed tumour growth and continued tyrosinase expression over the full 26 day duration of the study. These findings were confirmed by histological analysis of excised tumour samples.

  10. Cancer Cell Death-Inducing Radiotherapy: Impact on Local Tumour Control, Tumour Cell Proliferation and Induction of Systemic Anti-tumour Immunity.

    PubMed

    Frey, Benjamin; Derer, Anja; Scheithauer, Heike; Wunderlich, Roland; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) predominantly is aimed to induce DNA damage in tumour cells that results in reduction of their clonogenicity and finally in tumour cell death. Adaptation of RT with higher single doses has become necessary and led to a more detailed view on what kind of tumour cell death is induced and which immunological consequences result from it. RT is capable of rendering tumour cells immunogenic by modifying the tumour cell phenotype and the microenvironment. Danger signals are released as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. This results in maturation of dendritic cells and priming of cytotoxic T cells as well as in activation of natural killer cells. However, RT on the other hand can also result in immune suppressive events including apoptosis induction and foster tumour cell proliferation. That's why RT is nowadays increasingly combined with selected immunotherapies. PMID:27558821

  11. A Rare Case of Concomitant Maxilla and Mandible Brown Tumours, Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, Parathyroid Adenoma, and Osteitis Fibrosa Cystica

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Thaís Borguezan; Bologna, Sheyla Batista; Witzel, Andréa Lusvarghi; Nico, Marcello Menta Simonsen; Lourenço, Silvia Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The brown tumour of hyperparathyroidism is a result of a metabolic disorder caused by primary hyperparathyroidism. Report. We described a case of a 37-year-old female patient presenting bimaxillary intraoral lesions and swelling in the neck. Incisional biopsy of the oral lesion was performed and histopathological examination revealed a central giant cell lesion composed by intense haemorrhagic exudate, abundant presence of giant cells, and areas with hemosiderin pigment. The patient also presented high levels of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone, hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue, bilateral parenchymal nephropathy, and densitometry lower than expected, showing an advanced stage of osteitis fibrosa cystica. Synchronous parathyroid adenoma and papillary thyroid carcinoma were confirmed by imaging exams and histopathologically. Conclusion. The composition of all the clinical, pathological, and imaging findings led to the final diagnosis of brown tumour of hyperparathyroidism. The occurrence of parathyroid adenoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma, and brown tumours of hyperparathyroidism in their late stage (osteitis fibrosa cystica) associated with oral brown tumours involving the mandible and maxilla is extremely rare. PMID:26881146

  12. Computed tomography predictors of hepatocellular carcinoma tumour necrosis after chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Mary K; Dorn, David P; Zarzour, Jessica; Smith, J Kevin; Redden, David T; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed Kamel Abdel; Gray, Stephen H; Eckhoff, Devin E; DuBay, Derek A

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiographical features associated with a favourable response to trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) are poorly defined for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods From 2008 to 2012, all first TACE interventions for HCC performed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) were retrospectively reviewed. Only patients with a pre-TACE and a post-TACE computed tomography (CT) scan were included in the analyses (n = 115). HCC tumour response to TACE was quantified via the the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) criteria. Univariate and multivariable analyses were constructed. Results The index HCC tumours experienced a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis in 59/115 (51%) of patients after the first TACE intervention. On univariate analysis, smaller tumour size, peripheral tumour location and arterial enhancement were associated with a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis, whereas, only smaller tumour size [odds ratio (OR) 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48, 0.81] and peripheral location (OR 6.91; 95% CI 1.75, 27.29) were significant on multivariable analysis. There was a trend towards improved survival in the patients that experienced a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis (P = 0.08). Conclusions Peripherally located smaller HCC tumours are most likely to experience a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis after TACE. Surprisingly, arterial-phase enhancement and portal venous-phase washout were not significantly predictive of TACE-induced tumour necrosis. The TACE response was not statistically associated with improved survival. PMID:23980917

  13. Incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in Valparaiso, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Juan; Martinez, René; Niklander, Sven; Marshall, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in the province of Valparaíso, Chile. Material and Methods Retrospective review of salivary gland tumours diagnosed between the years 2000 and 2011 from four local pathology services. Information on demographics and histopathology were retrieved from the medical records. Results The study sample consisted of 279 salivary gland tumours. Prevalence and incidence rates per 100.000 persons were 15.4 and 2.51, respectively. Most of the neoplasms corresponded to benign tumours (70.3%). The most affected gland was the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common benign tumour (53.8%) and mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most common malignant tumour (7.2%). Conclusions Salivary gland tumours are uncommon neoplasms that usually arise in the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma were the most common benign and malignant tumours reported in this series. Key words:Salivary gland tumours, benign tumours, malignant tumours, salivary glands neoplasms, cancer, neoplasia. PMID:26034925

  14. Enhancement of T cell recruitment and infiltration into tumours

    PubMed Central

    Oelkrug, C; Ramage, J M

    2014-01-01

    Studies have documented that cancer patients with tumours which are highly infiltrated with cytotoxic T lymphocytes show enhanced survival rates. The ultimate goal of cancer immunotherapy is to elicit high-avidity tumour-specific T cells to migrate and kill malignant tumours. Novel antibody therapies such as ipilumimab (a cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 blocking antibody) show enhanced T cell infiltration into the tumour tissue and increased survival. More conventional therapies such as chemotherapy or anti-angiogenic therapy and recent therapies with oncolytic viruses have been shown to alter the tumour microenvironment and thereby lead to enhanced T cell infiltration. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the migration of high-avidity tumour-specific T cells into tumours will support and provide solutions for the optimization of therapeutic options in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24828133

  15. Primary Malignant Neuroendocrine Tumour of Pleura: First Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anirban; Pratap, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic tumours of pleura are the most common malignant tumours causing malignant pleural effusion. Lungs are the most common primary sites. Primary pleural tumours are rarely seen and diffuse malignant mesothelioma is the most common malignant tumour of pleura. Primary malignant neuroendocrine tumour of pleura is not reported in the literature. Here, we report a rare case of primary malignant neuroendocrine tumour of pleura in a fifty-two-year-old, nonsmoker female who presented with right-sided pleural effusion and ipsilateral, dull aching chest pain. Clinical presentations of inflammatory lesions like tuberculous pleuritis and benign and malignant neoplasms of pleura are indistinguishable; hence, fluid cytology, pleural biopsy, and immunohistochemistry are necessary for exact tissue diagnosis of the tumours, which is mandatory for correct treatment and prognostic assessment. PMID:27034865

  16. Tumours and cancers in Graeco-Roman times.

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2001-04-01

    In Graeco-Roman times all tumours (Greek: onkoi, abnormal swellings) were considered to be of inflammatory origin, the result of unfavourable humoural fluxes, and caused by an extravascular outpouring of fluid into tissue spaces. The neoplastic nature of tumours is a more recent concept, barely two centuries old. In Hippocratic literature tumours were mainly classified as karkinômata, phumata, and oidêmata. Phumata included a large variety of tumours, inflammatory and neoplastic in origin, and mostly benign (in modern terms), while oidêmata were soft, painless tumours and even included generalised oedema (dropsy). Although all categories possibly included occasional cancers, the vast majority of what appears to have been malignant tumours were called karkinoi karkinômata (Latin: cancrum/carcinoma). There was, however, no recognition of benign and malignant, primary and secondary tumours, in the modern sense. PMID:11402909

  17. Effects of nandrolone decanoate on the toxicity and anti-tumour action of CCNU and FU in murine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Bibby, M. C.; Double, J. A.; Mughal, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Pre-treatment with the anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate (ND) increases the LD50 of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) and 5-Fluorouracil (FU) in NMRI mice. Administration of ND did not affect the anti-tumour action of CCNU against a transplantable mouse adenocarcinoma of the colon (MAC 13) or the anti-tumour action of FU against MAC 26. In both tumour lines ND had no significant effect on tumour growth. These data suggest that an increase in the anti-tumour selectivity of these agents may be produced by pre-treatment with ND. PMID:7295514

  18. A mitotic cause of Whipple's triad: non-islet cell tumour hypoglycaemia in incurable low-grade malignancy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Angela S; Twigg, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    A 74-year-old man with known metastatic haemangiopericytoma presented with neuroglycopaenic symptoms of confusion and light-headedness secondary to recurrent episodes of fasting hypoglycaemia, which resolved with oral carbohydrate intake. Investigations for hypoglycaemia revealed it to be non-insulin mediated, and subsequently due to a rare paraneoplastic phenomenon termed as non-islet cell tumour hypoglycaemia caused by tumoural overproduction of high molecular weight insulin-like growth factor-II. Despite his underlying malignancy being incurable, directed multimodality treatment involving regular oral carbohydrate intake, glucocorticoid therapy and recombinant human growth hormone was effective in relieving symptoms of hypoglycaemia. We discuss the importance of a systematic diagnostic approach to hypoglycaemia fulfilling Whipple's triad, as specific therapies can be invaluable to improving quality of life. PMID:25948850

  19. LKB1, the multitasking tumour suppressor kinase

    PubMed Central

    Marignani, P A

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the lkb1 gene are found in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), with loss of heterozygosity or somatic mutations at the lkb1 locus, suggesting the gene product, the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, may function as a tumour suppressor. Patients with PJS are at a greater risk of developing cancers of epithelial tissue origin. It is widely accepted that the presence of hamartomatous polyps in PJS does not in itself lead to the development of malignancy. The signalling mechanisms that lead to these PJS related malignancies are not well understood. However, it is evident from the recent literature that LKB1 is a multitasking kinase, with unlimited potential in orchestrating cell activity. Thus far, LKB1 has been found to play a role in chromatin remodelling, cell cycle arrest, Wnt signalling, cell polarity, and energy metabolism, all of which may require the tumour suppressor function of this kinase and/or its catalytic activity. PMID:15623475

  20. Improved tumour response by laser light treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graschew, Georgi; Smith, Janice; Rakowsky, Stefan; Roelofs, Theo A.; Schlag, Peter M.; Stein, Ulrike

    2008-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious barrier to the efficacy of clinical treatment of human cancers with chemotherapeutic drugs. This barrier might be reduced and eventually overcome by the simultaneous application of two or more treatment modalities. This study reports on the synergetic effect of combined application of laser light and cytostatic drugs to induce an improved tumour response in MDR cancer cells. The MDR breast cancer cell line MaTu/ADR, resistant to the drug adriamycin (ADR), was treated with a combination of ADR (125-1000 ng/ml) and laser light (488 nm with a total light dose between 6-18 J/cm2). This combined treatment leads to an additional reduction of the cell vitality by a factor of 2-3 as compared to treatment with ADR alone, suggesting that combined application of laser light and other treatment modalities might constitute a promising strategy for improvements in the tumour response.

  1. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies. PMID:26971847

  2. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumour of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tarplin, Sarah; Osterberg, E Charles; Robinson, Brian D; Herman, Michael P; Rosoff, James S

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman presented with a long history of pelvic pain and urinary urgency. Prior workup by her primary care doctor had been negative. The patient's gynaecologist ultimately referred her to a urologist following an ultrasound that revealed a possible bladder mass. MRI of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a 4 cm soft tissue lesion arising from the bladder. Cystoscopy showed an atypical mass on the anterior bladder wall, and pathological examination of the TURBT (transurethral resection of the bladder tumour) specimen revealed a perivascular epithelioid cell tumour (PEComa) with involvement of the detrusor muscle. The patient underwent a robotically assisted laparoscopic partial cystectomy. Final pathology confirmed a PEComa with negative margins. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and is doing well following surgery. A surveillance cystoscopy at 6 months showed no evidence of recurrence. This case underscores the variability of clinical presentation of PEComas while proposing an appropriate method of surgical management. PMID:25123573

  3. An unusual tumour of the lung.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, L; Abid, N; Makni, S; Bahri, I; Frikha, I; Sellami-Boudawara, T

    2015-03-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old woman with a solitary mast cell tumour of the lung, a rare neoplasm with only three previously-reported cases reported in the literature. Unlike previous cases, the tumour in the present case was bulky, measuring 14 cm in diameter and budding into the segmental bronchus. Histologically, it showed proliferation of typical metachromatic mast cells intermingled with undifferentiated cells with a ratio of 3:1. The neoplastic mast cells stained strongly with tryptase, CD117, CD68 and CD45, CD14 and CD33; whereas the undifferentiated cells lacked all these markers and expressed EMA and cytokeratin. Histological examination of bone marrow and laboratory data were unremarkable. To our knowledge, this is the fourth case of solitary extracutaneous mastocytoma of the lung. The differentiating features of this neoplasm and a review of literature are presented. PMID:26591626

  4. Mutational patterns in oncogenes and tumour suppressors.

    PubMed

    Baeissa, Hanadi M; Benstead-Hume, Graeme; Richardson, Christopher J; Pearl, Frances M G

    2016-06-15

    All cancers depend upon mutations in critical genes, which confer a selective advantage to the tumour cell. Knowledge of these mutations is crucial to understanding the biology of cancer initiation and progression, and to the development of targeted therapeutic strategies. The key to understanding the contribution of a disease-associated mutation to the development and progression of cancer, comes from an understanding of the consequences of that mutation on the function of the affected protein, and the impact on the pathways in which that protein is involved. In this paper we examine the mutation patterns observed in oncogenes and tumour suppressors, and discuss different approaches that have been developed to identify driver mutations within cancers that contribute to the disease progress. We also discuss the MOKCa database where we have developed an automatic pipeline that structurally and functionally annotates all proteins from the human proteome that are mutated in cancer. PMID:27284061

  5. Metabolomics Analysis of Hormone-Responsive and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cell Responses to Paclitaxel Identify Key Metabolic Differences.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Delisha A; Winnike, Jason H; McRitchie, Susan L; Clark, Robert F; Pathmasiri, Wimal W; Sumner, Susan J

    2016-09-01

    To date, no targeted therapies are available to treat triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), while other breast cancer subtypes are responsive to current therapeutic treatment. Metabolomics was conducted to reveal differences in two hormone receptor-negative TNBC cell lines and two hormone receptor-positive Luminal A cell lines. Studies were conducted in the presence and absence of paclitaxel (Taxol). TNBC cell lines had higher levels of amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, nucleotides, and nucleotide sugars and lower levels of proliferation-related metabolites like choline compared with Luminal A cell lines. In the presence of paclitaxel, each cell line showed unique metabolic responses, with some similarities by type. For example, in the Luminal A cell lines, levels of lactate and creatine decreased while certain choline metabolites and myo-inositol increased with paclitaxel. In the TNBC cell lines levels of glutamine, glutamate, and glutathione increased, whereas lysine, proline, and valine decreased in the presence of drug. Profiling secreted inflammatory cytokines in the conditioned media demonstrated a greater response to paclitaxel in the hormone-positive Luminal cells compared with a secretion profile that suggested greater drug resistance in the TNBC cells. The most significant differences distinguishing the cell types based on pathway enrichment analyses were related to amino acid, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism pathways, whereas several biological pathways were differentiated between the cell lines following treatment. PMID:27447733

  6. Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Casey, David G; Lysaght, Joanne; James, Tharappel; Bateman, Andrew; Melcher, Alan A; Todryk, Stephen M

    2003-01-01

    Antigenic cross-reactivity between certain tumours has allowed the development of more widely applicable, major histocompatibility complex-disparate (allogeneic) whole-cell vaccines. This principle should also allow heat shock proteins (hsp) derived from certain tumours (and carrying cross-reactive antigens) to be used as vaccines to generate anti-tumour immunity in a range of cancer patients. Here, hsp70 derived from gp70-antigen+ B16 melanoma generated cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated immune protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with gp70-antigen+ CT26 colorectal tumour cells. Using ovalbumin as a model tumour antigen, it is shown that hsp70 enhances peptide re-presentation by dendritic cells via class I over equimolar whole ovalbumin antigen. However, while transfection of tumour cells with inducible hsp70 increases hsp yield from tumours, it does not enhance antigen recognition via purified hsp70 nor via whole cells or their lysate. PMID:12941147

  7. ABCB1 in children's brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Beth; Kessler, Maya; Sabnis, Durgagauri H; Kerr, Ian D

    2015-10-01

    Tumours of the central nervous system are the most common solid tumour, accounting for a quarter of the 1500 cases of childhood cancer diagnosed each year in the U.K. They are the most common cause of cancer-related death in children. Treatment consists of surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Survival rates have generally increased, but many survivors suffer from radiotherapy-related neurocognitive and endocrine side effects as well as an increased risk of secondary cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy is normally given in combination to circumvent chemoresistance, but several studies have demonstrated it to be ineffective in the absence of radiotherapy. The identification of children with drug-resistant disease at the outset could allow stratification of those that are potentially curable by chemotherapy alone. Ultimately, however, what is required is a means to overcome this drug resistance and restore the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Medulloblastomas and ependymomas account for over 30% of paediatric brain tumours. Advances in neurosurgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy have led to improvements in 5-year overall survival rates. There remain, however, significant numbers of medulloblastoma patients that have intrinsically drug-resistant tumours and/or present with disseminated disease. Local relapse in ependymoma is also common and has an extremely poor prognosis with only 25% of children surviving first relapse. Each of these is consistent with the acquisition of drug and radiotherapy resistance. Since the majority of chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat these patients are transport substrates for ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1) we will address the hypothesis that ABCB1 expression underlies this drug resistance. PMID:26517917

  8. Malignant testicular tumour incidence and mortality trends

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyła-Buciora, Paulina; Więckowska, Barbara; Krzywinska-Wiewiorowska, Małgorzata; Gromadecka-Sutkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In Poland testicular tumours are the most frequent cancer among men aged 20–44 years. Testicular tumour incidence since the 1980s and 1990s has been diversified geographically, with an increased risk of mortality in Wielkopolska Province, which was highlighted at the turn of the 1980s and 1990s. The aim of the study was the comparative analysis of the tendencies in incidence and death rates due to malignant testicular tumours observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province. Material and methods Data from the National Cancer Registry were used for calculations. The incidence/mortality rates among men due to malignant testicular cancer as well as the tendencies in incidence/death ratio observed in Poland and Wielkopolska were established based on regression equation. The analysis was deepened by adopting the multiple linear regression model. A p-value < 0.05 was arbitrarily adopted as the criterion of statistical significance, and for multiple comparisons it was modified according to the Bonferroni adjustment to a value of p < 0.0028. Calculations were performed with the use of PQStat v1.4.8 package. Results The incidence of malignant testicular neoplasms observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province indicated a significant rising tendency. The multiple linear regression model confirmed that the year variable is a strong incidence forecast factor only within the territory of Poland. A corresponding analysis of mortality rates among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province did not show any statistically significant correlations. Conclusions Late diagnosis of Polish patients calls for undertaking appropriate educational activities that would facilitate earlier reporting of the patients, thus increasing their chances for recovery. Introducing preventive examinations in the regions of increased risk of testicular tumour may allow earlier diagnosis. PMID:27095941

  9. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited. PMID:20502750

  10. [Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours of the bladder].

    PubMed

    Dakir, Mohamed; Taha, Abdellatif; Attar, Hicham; Sarf, Ismail; Aboutaib, Rachid; Moussaoui, Ali; Meziane, Fathi

    2004-12-01

    The inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the bladder is a rare benign affection that interests mainly young adults. Its etiopathogeny remains unknown, but its tumoral origin was evocated recently by Griffin (1999), incriminating a chromosomic abnormality involving the ALK gene. We will discuss the etiopathogenic, anatopathological and therapeutical aspects of this lesion for which the diagnosis is histological and the treatment remains conservative with a good prognosis. PMID:15751423

  11. Inflammatory fibroid polyp or Vanek's tumour.

    PubMed

    Paikos, D; Moschos, J; Tzilves, D; Koulaouzidis, A; Kouklakis, G; Patakiouta, F; Kontodimou, K; Tarpagos, A; Katsos, I

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with recurrent episodes of severe, postprandial abdominal pain followed by projectile vomiting. Gastroscopy revealed a large polyp in the prepyloric region. During peristalsis, the polyp was repeatedly 'passing' through the pylorus into the duodenal bulb, hence obstructing the lumen. The polyp was eventually removed in a piecemeal fashion. Histopathologic examination revealed an inflammatory fibroid polyp (known also as Vanek's tumour). A brief review on inflammatory fibroid polyps follows. PMID:17541268

  12. Role of tumour angiogenesis in haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Medinger, Michael; Passweg, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Tumour angiogenesis plays a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of haematological malignancies. Thereby, pro- and anti-angiogenic growth factors and cytokines regulate the angiogenic process. The most important growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its signaling through its receptors 1 and 2, is not only involved in solid tumours, but there is also emerging evidence that tumour progression in haematological malignancies also depends on the induction of new blood vessel formation. The evidence supporting this theory includes the finding of increased bone marrow microvessel density and increased levels of plasma pro-angiogenic cytokines. Leukaemia cells interact with surrounding host cells and extracellular matrix, this crosstalk affecting the most important aspects of the malignant phenotype. The pathophysiology of leukaemia induced angiogenesis involves both direct production of angiogenic cytokines by leukaemia cells and their interaction with bone marrow microenvironment. The inhibition of VEGF signalling by monoclonal antibodies or small molecules (kinase inhibitors) has already been successfully used for the treatment of different cancer entities, and multiple new drugs are being tested. This review summarises recent advances in the basic understanding of the role of angiogenesis in haematological malignancies and the translation of such basic findings into clinical studies. PMID:25375891

  13. Familial syndromes associated with neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Komarowska, Hanna; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours may be associated with familial syndromes. At least eight inherited syndromes predisposing to endocrine neoplasia have been identified. Two of these are considered to be major factors predisposing to benign and malignant endocrine tumours, designated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and type 2 (MEN1 and MEN2). Five other autosomal dominant diseases show more heterogeneous clinical patterns, such as the Carney complex, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and tuberous sclerosis. The molecular and cellular interactions underlying the development of most endocrine cells and related organs represent one of the more complex pathways not yet to be deciphered. Almost all endocrine cells are derived from the endoderm and neuroectoderm. It is suggested that within the first few weeks of human development there are complex interactions between, firstly, the major genes involved in the initiation of progenitor-cell differentiation, secondly, factors secreted by the surrounding mesenchyme, and thirdly, a series of genes controlling cell differentiation, proliferation and migration. Together these represent a formula for the harmonious development of endocrine glands and tissue. PMID:26557756

  14. [Ovarian yolk sac tumour: general review].

    PubMed

    Even, Caroline; Lhommé, Catherine; Duvillard, Pierre; Morice, Philippe; Balleyguier, Corinne; Pautier, Patricia; Troalen, Frédéric; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault

    2011-08-01

    Ovarian yolk sac tumour (OYST) is a very rare malignancy arising most often in young women. Preoperative clinical, biological (alpha-foetoprotein) and radiological findings should help to establish the diagnosis of OYST, in order to propose adequate surgical treatment. The aim of surgery is to remove the primary tumour, to obtain an accurate histological diagnosis and to assess the disease extent. In young women, fertility-sparing surgery should be performed, in order to preserve the possibility of pregnancy later on. Chemotherapy has substantially modified the prognosis of these tumours, and practically all patients will be cured. The overall 5-year survival rate is 94% when patients are treated with BEP chemotherapy. Depending on the clinical situation, two to four cycles of the BEP regimen should be administered after surgery. Identification of prognostic factors may help to propose risk-adapted treatment in order to increase the cure rate in patients with a poor prognosis and to decrease toxicity in patients with a low risk of relapse. Fertility preservation represents a major objective in women treated for OYSTs. PMID:21708513

  15. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis. PMID:26524530

  16. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of retroperitoneal tumours.

    PubMed

    Testini, M; Catalano, G; Macarini, L; Paccione, F

    1996-01-01

    The authors examine the various techniques for diagnosing Retroperitoneal Tumours (RPT) and analyse the results of the surgical treatment performed. Between March 1987 and February 1991, 20 patients with RPT (6 benign and 14 malignant forms) were observed in our Institution. CT and NMR revealed more diagnostic accuracy than other techniques (100%), while NMR had greater accuracy than CT in predictly resectability preoperatively (100% vs. 80.0%, respectively). A total of 26 laparotomies were performed: 20 for primary neoplasms and 6 for recurrent tumours. Exeresis of the mass was performed in 18/20 (90%) patients. Mean follow-up was 57.6 months (84-36). The benign forms had no recurrence. In malignant cases the disease recurred in 58.3% of the cases after an interval varying from 10 to 59 months. Overall mean survival of the 12 patients with malignant tumours subjected to resection was 58.3%. The 1- and 3-year survival rates were 91.7% and 58.3% respectively. Prognosis in malignant RPT is still very poor. PMID:8803715

  17. Cell metabolism, tumour diagnosis and multispectral FLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, A.; Hauser, C.; Lorenz, S.; Mosch, S.; Rotte, S.; Kessler, M.; Kalinina, S.

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence guided diagnosis of tumour tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results are interfering with the outcome. Discrimination between tumour and inflammation could be therefore difficult. Improvement of fluorescence diagnosis through observation of cell metabolism could be the solution, which needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. However, a complex combination of fluorophores give rise to the emission signal. Also in PDD (photodynamic diagnosis) different photosensitizer metabolites contribute to the fluorescence signal. Therefore, the fluorescence decay in many cases does not show a simple monoexponential profile. In those cases a considerable improvement could be achieved when time-resolved and spectral-resolved techniques are simultaneously incorporated. The discussion will focus on the detection of NADH, FAD and 5-ALA induced porphyrins. With respect to NADH and FAD the discrimination between protein bound and free coenzyme was investigated with multispectral FLIM in normal oral keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cells from different origin. The redox ratio, which can be correlated with the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and FAD changed depending on the state of the cells. Most of the investigations were done in monolayer cell cultures. However, in order to get information from a more realistic in vivo situation additionally the chorioallantoismembrane (CAM) of fertilized eggs was used where tumour cells or biopsies were allowed to grow. The results of theses measurements will be discussed as well.

  18. Tumour promoter activity in Malaysian Euphorbiaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Norhanom, A. W.; Yadav, M.

    1995-01-01

    Herbal medication has been practised by the rural Malaysian Malays for a long time. However, the long-term side-effects have never been studied. In the present study, 48 species of Euphorbiaceae were screened for tumour-promoter activity by means of an in vitro assay using a human lymphoblastoid cell line harbouring the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome. Twenty-seven per cent (13 out of 48) of the species tested were found to be positive, and in four species, namely Breynia coronata Hk.f, Codiaeum variegatum (L) Bl, Euphorbia atoto and Exocoecaria agallocha, EBV-inducing activity was observed when the plant extracts were tested at low concentrations of between 0.2 and 1.2 micrograms ml-1 in cell culture. This observation warrants attention from the regular users of these plants because regular use of plants with tumour-promoting activity could well be an aetiological factor for the promotion of tumours among rural Malaysian Malays. PMID:7710943

  19. Clinical tumour markers in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, A; Nikliński, J; Laudański, T; Pluygers, E

    1998-02-01

    Within past few years, the measurement of serological, histochemical and molecular genetic markers has had an increasing influence on clinical decisions about initial treatment and follow-up. This review presents data concerning the most studied and interesting markers in ovarian cancer. CA 125, CA 19.9, TATI, CASA, CEA, TPA, TPS and CYFRA21-1 are now the most widely used serological tumour markers for management of ovarian cancer patients. Ras oncogenes, C-erb2 proto-oncogene, p53 suppressor gene and Bcl-2 oncogene are examples of currently used molecular genetic markers. As histochemical markers-proliferation markers, flow cytometric analysis, thymidine labelling index, Ki-67 nuclear antigen or differentiation markers are nowadays the ones most often determined. Some of these markers might be useful adjuncts for monitoring response to therapy, including early detection of tumour reactivation to allow curative therapy and rapid detection of treatment failure. The study of these markers may also lead to a better understanding of the biological characteristics of ovarian cancer. Numerous tumour markers characterized in this paper have been recognized as promising prognostic factors. The information derived from studies of these markers also represents the most promising avenue towards new treatment strategies; nevertheless to validate these factors, prospective studies of a large patient population are needed. PMID:9511849

  20. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mark, Milica Tesic; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E.; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M.; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D.; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H.; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K.; Healey, John H.; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H.; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brady, Mary S.; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J.; Bissell, Mina J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-01-01

    Ever since Stephen Paget’s 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer’s greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis. PMID:26524530

  1. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins. PMID:19968734

  2. Induction of IL-25 secretion from tumour-associated fibroblasts suppresses mammary tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shu-Yi; Jian, Feng-Yin; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), as a functionally supportive microenvironment, play an essential role in tumour progression. Here we investigate the role of IL-25, an endogenous anticancer factor secreted from TAFs, in suppression of mouse 4T1 mammary tumour metastasis. We show that a synthetic dihydrobenzofuran lignan (Q2-3), the dimerization product of plant caffeic acid methyl ester, suppresses 4T1 metastasis by increasing fibroblastic IL-25 activity. The secretion of IL-25 from treated human or mouse fibroblasts is enhanced in vitro, and this activity confers a strong suppressive effect on growth activity of test carcinoma cells. Subsequent in vivo experiments showed that the anti-metastatic effects of Q2-3 on 4T1 and human MDA-MD-231 tumour cells are additive when employed in combination with the clinically used drug, docetaxel. Altogether, our findings reveal that the release of IL-25 from TAFs may serve as a check point for control of mammary tumour metastasis and that phytochemical Q2-3 can efficiently promote such anticancer activities. PMID:27089063

  3. Induction of IL-25 secretion from tumour-associated fibroblasts suppresses mammary tumour metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shu-Yi; Jian, Feng-Yin; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), as a functionally supportive microenvironment, play an essential role in tumour progression. Here we investigate the role of IL-25, an endogenous anticancer factor secreted from TAFs, in suppression of mouse 4T1 mammary tumour metastasis. We show that a synthetic dihydrobenzofuran lignan (Q2-3), the dimerization product of plant caffeic acid methyl ester, suppresses 4T1 metastasis by increasing fibroblastic IL-25 activity. The secretion of IL-25 from treated human or mouse fibroblasts is enhanced in vitro, and this activity confers a strong suppressive effect on growth activity of test carcinoma cells. Subsequent in vivo experiments showed that the anti-metastatic effects of Q2-3 on 4T1 and human MDA-MD-231 tumour cells are additive when employed in combination with the clinically used drug, docetaxel. Altogether, our findings reveal that the release of IL-25 from TAFs may serve as a check point for control of mammary tumour metastasis and that phytochemical Q2-3 can efficiently promote such anticancer activities. PMID:27089063

  4. Naloxone does not Affect the Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone-Induced Inhibition of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A M; Porter, D W; Lincoln, D W

    1989-06-01

    Abstract Injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (21 pmol) into the third cerebral ventricle of long-term ovariectomized ewes caused a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly when compared with the control responses to saline (50 mul). A notable characteristic of the response was the delayed and sustained nature of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition. In the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone (4 +/- 25 mg iv), the central administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone still produced a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Again, mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly. When naloxone was injected iv, there was a significant rise in mean luteinizing hormone levels as a consequence of an increase in pulse frequency (in four out of five ewes) and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone pulse amplitude. In conclusion, these data suggest that central opioid pathways sensitive to blockade by naloxone are not involved in the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition of luteinizing hormone release. Furthermore, in the long-term ovariectomized ewe, endogenous opioid peptides exert a tonic inhibitory influence on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone/luteinizing hormone secretion. PMID:19210459

  5. Hormonal contraception and lactation.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J J

    1996-12-01

    Hormonal contraceptive measures can be used immediately postpartum if the patient so desires. Progestin-only contraceptives are preferable to estrogen-containing methods if initiated during the first six months after delivery. Progestin only contraceptives do not appear to affect milk volume, composition, or to cause deleterious effects in the infant. Ideally for women who desire a form of contraception in addition to lactation-induced amenorrhea, progestin-only methods should be started at six weeks postpartum if the woman is fully breastfeeding. Since contraception protection is provided by lactation amenorrhea, the six week delay will decrease infant exposure to exogenous hormones and decrease the incidence of irregular postpartum bleeding. Milk volume may decrease with the use of estrogen; however, no detrimental effects have been shown on infant growth or development. For women who are planning to gradually wean their infant, use of COCs may provide an easier transition to bottle-feeding. COCs should be used with caution by women who are not able to obtain supplemental milk. A decrease in milk volume can lead to earlier discontinuation of the hormonal contraceptive in an attempt to increase milk quantity. Supplementation is often needed, and then the woman ovulates again, possibly resulting in an unintended pregnancy. Many women are motivated immediately postpartum to accept contraception. For other women, lack of access to health care may provide barriers in obtaining adequate contraception later. In either case, there are adequate data to show no detriments of starting progestin-only contraceptives within days of delivery. Therefore, the best method for the patient should be employed to ensure adequate contraception while preserving optimal lactation. PMID:9025449

  6. The growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Waters, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Once thought to be present only in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, the GH receptor is now known to be ubiquitously distributed, in accord with the many pleiotropic actions of GH. These include the regulation of metabolism, postnatal growth, cognition, immune, cardiac and renal systems and gut function. GH exerts these actions primarily through alterations in gene expression, initiated by activation of its membrane receptor and the resultant activation of the associated JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) and Src family kinases. Receptor activation involves hormone initiated movements within a receptor homodimer, rather than simple receptor dimerization. We have shown that binding of the hormone realigns the orientation of the two receptors both by relative rotation and by closer apposition just above the cell membrane. This is a consequence of the asymmetric placement of the binding sites on the hormone. Binding results in a conversion of parallel receptor transmembrane domains into a rotated crossover orientation, which produces separation of the lower part of the transmembrane helices. Because the JAK2 is bound to the Box1 motif proximal to the inner membrane, receptor activation results in separation of the two associated JAK2s, and in particular the removal of the inhibitory pseudokinase domain from the kinase domain of the other JAK2 (and vice versa). This brings the two kinase domains into position for trans-activation and initiates tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor cytoplasmic domain and other substrates such as STAT5, the key transcription factor mediating most genomic actions of GH. There are a limited number of genomic actions initiated by the Src kinase family member which also associates with the upper cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, including important immune regulatory actions to dampen exuberant innate immune activation of cells involved in transplant rejection. These findings offer insights for developing specific receptor antagonists which may be

  7. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Cameron N.; Smith, Yvonne E.; Cao, Yuan; Burrows, Allan D.; Cross, Ryan S. N.; Ling, Xiawei; Redvers, Richard P.; Doherty, Judy P.; Eckhardt, Bedrich L.; Natoli, Anthony L.; Restall, Christina M.; Lucas, Erin; Pearson, Helen B.; Deb, Siddhartha; Britt, Kara L.; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Li, Jason; Harmey, Judith H.; Pouliot, Normand; Anderson, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53) tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8) and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36) might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer. PMID:25633981

  8. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Cameron N; Smith, Yvonne E; Cao, Yuan; Burrows, Allan D; Cross, Ryan S N; Ling, Xiawei; Redvers, Richard P; Doherty, Judy P; Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Natoli, Anthony L; Restall, Christina M; Lucas, Erin; Pearson, Helen B; Deb, Siddhartha; Britt, Kara L; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Li, Jason; Harmey, Judith H; Pouliot, Normand; Anderson, Robin L

    2015-03-01

    The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53) tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8) and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36) might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer. PMID:25633981

  9. Thyroid Hormone, Cancer, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Chin, Yu-Tan; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Lai, Husan-Yu; Wang-Peng, Jacqueline; Liu, Leory F; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Davis, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play important roles in regulating normal metabolism, development, and growth. They also stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Their metabolic and developmental effects and growth effects in normal tissues are mediated primarily by nuclear hormone receptors. A cell surface receptor for the hormone on integrin [alpha]vβ3 is the initiation site for effects on tumor cells. Clinical hypothyroidism may retard cancer growth, and hyperthyroidism was recently linked to the prevalence of certain cancers. Local levels of thyroid hormones are controlled through activation and deactivation of iodothyronine deiodinases in different organs. The relative activities of different deiodinases that exist in tissues or organs also affect the progression and development of specific types of cancers. In this review, the effects of thyroid hormone on signaling pathways in breast, brain, liver, thyroid, and colon cancers are discussed. The importance of nuclear thyroid hormone receptor isoforms and of the hormone receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin [alpha]vβ3 as potential cancer risk factors and therapeutic targets are addressed. We analyze the intracellular signaling pathways activated by thyroid hormones in cancer progression in hyperthyroidism or at physiological concentrations in the euthyroid state. Determining how to utilize the deaminated thyroid hormone analog (tetrac), and its nanoparticulate derivative to reduce risks of cancer progression, enhance therapeutic outcomes, and prevent cancer recurrence is also deliberated. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1221-1237, 2016. PMID:27347891

  10. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Androgen deprivation therapy; ADT; Androgen suppression therapy; Combined androgen blockade ... Androgens cause prostate cancer cells to grow. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer lowers the effect level of ...

  11. Local tumour hyperthermia as immunotherapy for metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Local tumour hyperthermia for cancer treatment is currently used either for ablation purposes as an alternative to surgery or less frequently, in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to enhance the effects of those traditional therapies. As it has become apparent that activating the immune system is crucial to successfully treat metastatic cancer, the potential of boosting anti-tumour immunity by heating tumours has become a growing area of cancer research. After reviewing the history of hyperthermia therapy for cancer and introducing methods for inducing local hyperthermia, this review describes different mechanisms by which heating tumours can elicit anti-tumour immune responses, including tumour cell damage, tumour surface molecule changes, heat shock proteins, exosomes, direct effects on immune cells, and changes in the tumour vasculature. We then go over in vivo studies that provide promising results showing that local hyperthermia therapy indeed activates various systemic anti-tumour immune responses that slow growth of untreated tumours. Finally, future research questions that will help bring the use of local hyperthermia as systemic immunotherapy closer to clinical application are discussed. PMID:25430985

  12. Site-specific volumetric analysis of lung tumour motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George A.; Langer, Mark; Shirato, Hiroki

    2010-06-01

    The treatment of lung cancer with radiation therapy is hindered by respiratory motion. Real-time adjustments to compensate for this motion are hampered by mechanical system latencies and imaging-rate restrictions. To better understand tumour motion behaviour for adaptive image-guided radiation therapy of lung cancer, the volume of a tumour's motion space was investigated. Motion data were collected by tracking an implanted fiducial using fluoroscopy at 30 Hz during treatment sessions. A total of 637 treatment fractions from 31 tumours were used in this study. For each fraction, data points collected from three consecutive breathing cycles were used to identify instantaneous tumour location. A convex hull was created over these data points, defining the tumour motion envelope. The study sought a correlation between the tumour location in the lung and the convex hull's volume and shape. It was found that tumours located in the upper apex had smaller motion envelopes (<50 mm3), whereas tumours located near the chest wall or diaphragm had larger envelopes (>70 mm3). Tumours attached to fixed anatomical structures had small motion spaces. Three general shapes described the tumour motion envelopes: 50% of motion envelopes enclosed largely 1D oscillation, 38% enclosed an ellipsoid path, 6% enclosed an arced path and 6% were of hybrid shape. This location-space correlation suggests it may be useful in developing a predictive model, but more work needs to be done to verify it.

  13. Juvenile granulosa cell tumour of the ovary presenting with hyperprolactinaemic amenorrhoea and galactorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Ahmed; Lubina-Solomon, Alexandra; Kew, Fiona M; Webster, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    of an oestrogen-secreting tumour.JGCTs are rare hormonally active ovarian neoplasms mostly secreting steroid hormones.Serum inhibin can be used as a granulosa cell-specific tumour marker.JGCTs have an excellent prognosis in the early stages of the disease. PMID:27047664

  14. Large cell neuroendocrine – Adenocarcinona mixed tumour of colon: Collision tumour with peculiar behaviour. What do we know about these tumours?

    PubMed Central

    Minaya-Bravo, Ana María; Garcia Mahillo, Julio Cesar; Mendoza Moreno, Fernando; Noguelares Fraguas, Fernando; Granell, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mixed glandular-endocrine carcinomas are rare tumours of gastrointestinal tract (MANEC). They are more frequent in stomach and hardly one hundred cases have been described in colon. According to Lewis, they are classified into collision (side by side pattern), composite (intermingled) or amphicrine (neuroendocrine and glandular features inside a same cell). Collision tumours are related to biclonal theory: two simultaneous cancerogenic events. Conversely, multidirectional differentiation from a stem cell is accepted as origin of composite tumours. The aim of this paper is to analyse the behaviour of these tumours, with an especial concern about how these tumours metastasise, and the different theories about carcinogenesis. Presentation of case We report a rare case of collision adenocarcinoma-large cell neuroendocrine tumour of colon that after a three-year period of follow-up has presented a retroperitoneal recurrence that features adenocarcinoma and large cell neuroendocrine components. Discussion After an exhaustive review of the English literature, we found that only two cases of collision tumour of colon with metastases showing glandular and endocrine components have been described up to date, so we report the third case, and the first happening in transverse colon. Conclusion We conclude that not all collision tumours follow the biclonal theory and more studies are needed to clarify the origin of these neoplasms, and consequently, to reach an adequate treatment. PMID:26635955

  15. Hormones in Dairy Foods and Their Impact on Public Health - A Narrative Review Article

    PubMed Central

    MALEKINEJAD, Hassan; REZABAKHSH, Aysa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The presence of hormones in milk and dairy foods was discussed decades ago but rather more concerns attended to that with respect to finding hormones as biomarkers in milk for diseases and pregnancy diagnosis. Moreover, considerable amount of studies demonstrated that existing of hormones in humans and animals milk are essential for infants growing and immunity. During the last couple of years, increasing body of evidence are indicating another property of hormones in dairy products as possible impact on human health including the role of some estrogens and insulin-like growth factor-1 in initiation and provoking of breast, prostate and endometrial tumours. Methods: Data was gathered from the published articles in database such as MEDLINE, science direct, Google scholar and web of science. We put no limitation on date of published date. Moreover, our own published and conducted methods and results also are presented. In this review we concentrated on several aspects of presence of hormones in dairy foods with especial emphasize on cow’s milk as a major source of consuming milk for humans especially for children. Results: The collected data from other researchers and our own data are indicating that the presence of steroid hormones in dairy products could be counted as an important risk factor for various cancers in humans. Conclusion: Our gathered data in this review paper may suggest more sophisticate analytical detection methods for oestrogens determination and also could be considered as a remarkable concern for consumers, producers and public health authorities. PMID:26258087

  16. Preservation of fertility in non-Peutz-Jegher syndrome-associated ovarian sex cord tumour with annular tubules.

    PubMed

    Chatziioannidou, Kyriaki; Botsikas, Diomidis; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Dubuisson, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We report the successful conservative management of a non-Peutz-Jegher syndrome-associated ovarian sex cord tumour with annular tubules in a 32-year-old patient. The patient underwent a unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy by laparoscopy, and conceived spontaneously approximately 6 months after the diagnosis. After a normal term pregnancy, she underwent a contralateral laparoscopic salpingo-oophorectomy with hysterectomy. The patient is now on hormone replacement therapy and, after 30 months of follow-up, continues to present no sign of disease recurrence. PMID:25969483

  17. Canine cutaneous spindle cell tumours with features of peripheral nerve sheath tumours: a histopathological and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Gaitero, L; Añor, S; Fondevila, D; Pumarola, M

    2008-07-01

    In veterinary medicine, the term peripheral nerve sheath tumour is usually restricted to neoplasms that are closely associated with an identified nerve. Thirty-three cases of canine cutaneous tumours previously classified as spindle cell tumours with features resembling peripheral nerve sheath tumours were examined. Two histological patterns were identified: dense areas of spindle shaped cells resembling the Antoni A pattern and less cellular areas with more pleomorphic cells resembling the Antoni B pattern. Immunohistochemically, all tumours uniformly expressed vimentin and 15/33 (45.4%) had scattered and patchy expression of S-100. Laminin expression was found in 25/33 (75.7%) tumours and collagen IV labelling occurred in 14/33 (42.4%). Expression of protein gene product 9.5 was detected in 31/33 (93.9%) of tumours and neuron specific enolase labelling was present in 27/33 (81.8%). Glial fibrillary acidic protein was only expressed within the cytoplasm of some large multinucleated cells in one tumour. These findings suggest that any cutaneous tumour with one of the two histopathological patterns described above should be described as a cutaneous peripheral nerve sheath tumour and that expression of S-100, laminin and collagen IV may be used to define a schwannoma. PMID:18514218

  18. Lysyl oxidase-like-2 promotes tumour angiogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in angiogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zaffryar-Eilot, Shelly; Marshall, Derek; Voloshin, Tali; Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Spangler, Rhyannon; Kessler, Ofra; Ghermazien, Haben; Brekhman, Vera; Suss-Toby, Edith; Adam, Dan; Shaked, Yuval; Smith, Victoria; Neufeld, Gera

    2013-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a secreted enzyme that catalyzes the cross-linking of collagen, plays an essential role in developmental angiogenesis. We found that administration of the LOXL2-neutralizing antibody AB0023 inhibited bFGF-induced angiogenesis in Matrigel plug assays and suppressed recruitment of angiogenesis promoting bone marrow cells. Small hairpin RNA-mediated inhibition of LOXL2 expression or inhibition of LOXL2 using AB0023 reduced the migration and network-forming ability of endothelial cells, suggesting that the inhibition of angiogenesis results from a direct effect on endothelial cells. To examine the effects of AB0023 on tumour angiogenesis, AB0023 was administered to mice bearing tumours derived from SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. AB0023 treatment significantly reduced the microvascular density in these tumours but did not inhibit tumour growth. However, treatment of mice bearing SKOV-3-derived tumours with AB0023 also promoted increased coverage of tumour vessels with pericytes and reduced tumour hypoxia, providing evidence that anti-LOXL2 therapy results in the normalization of tumour blood vessels. In agreement with these data, treatment of mice bearing LLC-derived tumours with AB0023 improved the perfusion of the tumour-associated vessels as determined by ultrasonography. Improved perfusion and normalization of tumour vessels after treatment with anti-angiogenic agents were previously found to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents into tumours and to result in an enhancement of chemotherapeutic efficiency. Indeed, treatment with AB0023 significantly enhanced the anti-tumourigenic effects of taxol. Our results suggest that inhibition of LOXL2 may prove beneficial for the treatment of angiogenic tumours. PMID:23828904

  19. The ratio of maximum percent tumour accumulations of the pretargeting agent and the radiolabelled effector is independent of tumour size.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guozheng; Dou, Shuping; Liang, Minmin; Chen, Xiangji; Rusckowski, Mary; Hnatowich, Donald J

    2009-11-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that the optimal dosage ratio of pretargeting antibody to effector is proportional to their maximum percent tumour accumulations (MPTAs). This study quantitatively describes how both MPTAs and their ratio change with tumour size, to simplify pretargeting optimisation when tumour size varies. The CC49 antibody dosages below saturation of the tumour antigen level were first examined for the LS174T tumour mouse model. Then the MPTAs of the antibody in mice bearing tumours of different sizes were determined, always at antibody dosages below antigen saturation. Historical data from this laboratory were used to collect the MPTAs of the (99m)Tc-cMORF effector for different tumour sizes, always at effector dosages below that required to saturate the MORF in tumour. The MPTAs versus tumour sizes for both the antibody and the effector were fitted non-linearly. The best fit of the antibody MPTA (Y(antibody)) with tumour size (x) in grams was Y(antibody)=19.00 x(-0.65) while that for the effector was Y(effector)=4.51x(-0.66). Thus, even though the MPTAs of both vary with tumour size, the ratio (Y(antibody)/Y(effector)) is a constant at 4.21. In conclusion, the MPTA ratio of the antibody to the effector was found to be constant with tumour size, an observation that will simplify pretargeting optimisation because remeasurement of the optimum dosage ratio for different tumour sizes can be avoided. Theoretical considerations also suggest that this relationship may be universal for alternative antibody/effector pairs and for different target models, but this must be experimentally confirmed. PMID:19811906

  20. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Allison; Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  1. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  2. Tumour-induced osteomalacia: An emergent paraneoplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Guillermo; Varsavsky, Mariela

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes are distant manifestations of some tumours. An uncommon but increasingly reported form is tumour-induced osteomalacia, a hypophosphatemic disorder associated to fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) secretion by tumours. The main biochemical manifestations of this disorder include hypophosphatemia, inappropriately low or normal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, low serum calcitriol levels, increased serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and elevated or normal serum FGF-23 levels. These tumours, usually small, benign, slow growing and difficult to discover, are mainly localized in soft tissues of the limbs. Histologically, phosphaturic mesenchymal tumours of the mixed connective tissue type are most common. Various imaging techniques have been suggested with variable results. Treatment of choice is total surgical resection of the tumour. Medical treatment includes oral phosphorus and calcitriol supplements, octreotide, cinacalcet, and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26718193

  3. Recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells into prostate tumours promotes metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jin Koo; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Wang, Jingcheng; Mishra, Anjali; Joseph, Jeena; Berry, Janice E; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Sun, Hongli; Wang, Jianhua; Jin, Taocong; Zhang, Honglai; Dai, Jinlu; Krebsbach, Paul H; Keller, Evan T; Pienta, Kenneth J; Taichman, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Tumours recruit mesenchymal stem cells to facilitate healing, which induces their conversion into cancer-associated fibroblasts that facilitate metastasis. However, this process is poorly understood on the molecular level. Here we show that CXCL16, a ligand for CXCR6, facilitates mesenchymal stem cell or very small embryonic-like cells recruitment into prostate tumours. CXCR6 signalling stimulates the conversion of mesenchymal stem cells into cancer-associated fibroblasts, which secrete stromal-derived factor-1, also known as CXCL12. CXCL12 expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts then binds to CXCR4 on tumour cells and induces an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, which ultimately promotes metastasis to secondary tumour sites. Our results provide the molecular basis for mesenchymal stem cell recruitment into tumours and how this process leads to tumour metastasis. PMID:23653207

  4. Tumour-associated hypoglycaemia in a murine cachexia model.

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, T. M.; Tisdale, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Animals bearing a cachexia-inducing tumour, the MAC16 adenocarcinoma, showed a progressive decrease in blood glucose levels with increasing weight loss, while animals bearing a histologically similar tumour, the MAC13 adenocarcinoma, showed no change in either body weight or blood glucose levels with growth of the tumour. The effect of the MAC16 tumour on blood glucose levels appeared to be unrelated to food intake, glucose consumption by the tumour, or to the production of increased levels of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA by the tumour cells. The relationship between the induction of cachexia and alteration in blood glucose levels remains unknown. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1358167

  5. Kinase fusions are frequent in Spitz tumours and spitzoid melanomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Thomas; He, Jie; Yelensky, Roman; Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Botton, Thomas; Yeh, Iwei; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Brennan, Kristina; Murali, Rajmohan; Garrido, Maria; Miller, Vincent A.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Berger, Michael F.; Sparatta, Alyssa; Palmedo, Gabriele; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Busam, Klaus J.; Kutzner, Heinz; Cronin, Maureen T.; Stephens, Philip J.; Bastian, Boris C.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzoid neoplasms are a group of melanocytic tumours with distinctive histopathological features. They include benign tumours (Spitz naevi), malignant tumours (spitzoid melanomas) and tumours with borderline histopathological features and uncertain clinical outcome (atypical Spitz tumours). Their genetic underpinnings are poorly understood, and alterations in common melanoma-associated oncogenes are typically absent. Here we show that spitzoid neoplasms harbour kinase fusions of ROS1 (17%), NTRK1 (16%), ALK (10%), BRAF (5%) and RET (3%) in a mutually exclusive pattern. The chimeric proteins are constitutively active, stimulate oncogenic signalling pathways, are tumourigenic and are found in the entire biologic spectrum of spitzoid neoplasms, including 55% of Spitz naevi, 56% of atypical Spitz tumours and 39% of spitzoid melanomas. Kinase inhibitors suppress the oncogenic signalling of the fusion proteins in vitro. In summary, kinase fusions account for the majority of oncogenic aberrations in spitzoid neoplasms and may serve as therapeutic targets for metastatic spitzoid melanomas.

  6. [Perioperative management of intracranial tumours: the neurosurgeon's role].

    PubMed

    Polo-Torres, C; Moscote-Salazar, L R; Alvis-Miranda, H R; Villa-Delgado, R

    2013-01-01

    The perioperative management of patients with brain tumours is a challenge for the neurosurgeon and the entire surgical team. The treating physician should consider factors such as the type of tumour, extent of disease, treatment received, the presence of comorbidities and prognosis of the disease itself. The successful execution of all aspects involved in perioperative management in patients with brain tumours will help prolong the life and improve the quality of life of patients. PMID:24008533

  7. Mixed tumour of salivary gland type of the male breast.

    PubMed

    Simha, M R; Doctor, V M; Udwadia, T E

    1992-03-01

    Benign breast tumours with a mixed cartilaginous and epithelial component are distinctly rare as evident from the literature. A case of Mixed Tumour of the breast presenting pre-operatively as a hard mass in a 65 year old male is reported. Histologically, it was composed of a mixture of benign cartilage, myoepithelial cells, tubules and a myxoid stroma in fat. A brief review of cartilage bearing lesions and mixed tumour in the mammary region is discussed. PMID:1328037

  8. Giant Appendiceal Leiomyosarcoma: A Rare and Unusual Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Natalia, Christine; Koh, Cherry E.; Lee, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Appendiceal tumours are uncommon but may be present in 0.9–1.4% of all appendicectomy specimens. While carcinoid tumours and adenocarcinomas comprise the majority of appendiceal tumours, rarely, lymphomas or sarcomas may also present in the appendix. Appendiceal leiomyosarcomas are rare, and to date, only a handful of cases have been reported. The current paper presents a case of giant appendiceal leiomyosarcoma followed by a review of the literature. PMID:22606577

  9. Hormonal control of inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Farsky, Sandra P.

    1993-01-01

    Almost any stage of inflammatory and immunological responses is affected by hormone actions. This provides the basis for the suggestion that hormones act as modulators of the host reaction against trauma and infection. Specific hormone receptors are detected in the reactive structures in inflamed areas and binding of hormone molecules to such receptors results in the generation of signals that influence cell functions relevant for the development of inflammatory responses. Diversity of hormonal functions accounts for recognized pro- and anti-inflammatory effects exerted by these substances. Most hormone systems are capable of influencing inflammatory events. Insulin and glucocorticoids, however, exert direct regulatory effects at concentrations usually found in plasma. Insulin is endowed with facilitatory actions on vascular reactivity to inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell functions. Increased concentrations of circulating glucocorticoids at the early stages of inflammation results in downregulation of inflammatory responses. Oestrogens markedly reduce the response to injury in a variety of experimental models. Glucagon and thyroid hormones exert indirect anti-inflammatory effects mediated by the activity of the adrenal cortex. Accordingly, inflammation is not only merely a local response, but a hormone-controlled process. PMID:18475521

  10. Homeostasis, thymic hormones and aging.

    PubMed

    Goya, R G; Bolognani, F

    1999-01-01

    The thymic-pituitary axis constitutes a bidirectional circuit where the ascending feedback loop is effected by thymic factors of epithelial origin. The aim of the present article is, first, to introduce the idea of an immune-neuroendocrine homeostatic network in higher animals. Next, the relevance of the thymus in this network and the possible role of this gland in the neuroendocrine imbalances associated with aging are discussed. A number of studies are next reviewed which show that the endocrine thymus produces several bioactive molecules, generally called thymic hormones, which in addition to possessing immunoregulatory properties are also active on nervous and endocrine circuits. In particular, the reported activities of thymosin fraction five, thymosin alpha 1 and thymosin beta 4 on beta-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, glucocorticoids, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion in different animal and cell models are reviewed. The known hypophysiotropic actions of other thymic hormones like thymulin, homeostatic thymus hormone and thymus factor are also summarized, and the impact of aging on pituitary responsiveness to thymic hormones is discussed. As a conclusion, it is proposed that in addition to its central role in the regulation of the immune function, the thymus gland may extend its influence to nonimmunologic components of the body, including the neuroendocrine system. The early onset of thymus involution might, therefore, act as a triggering event which would initiate the gradual decline in homeostatic potential that characterizes the aging process. PMID:10202264

  11. Stable transfection of protein kinase C alpha cDNA in hormone-dependent breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tonetti, D A; Chisamore, M J; Grdina, W; Schurz, H; Jordan, V C

    2000-01-01

    An inverse relationship between protein kinase C (PKC) activity and oestrogen receptor (ER) expression in human breast cell lines and tumours has been firmly established over the past 10 years. To determine whether specific alterations in PKC expression accompany hormone-independence, we examined the expression of PKC isozymes in the hormone-independent human breast cancer cell clones MCF-7 5C and T47D:C42 compared with their hormone-dependent counterparts, MCF-7 A4, MCF-7 WS8 and T47D:A18 respectively. Both hormone-independent cell clones exhibit elevated PKCα expression and increased basal AP-1 activity compared with the hormone-dependent cell clones. To determine whether PKCα overexpression is sufficient to mediate the hormone-independent phenotype, we stably transfected an expression plasmid containing PKCα cDNA to the T47D:A18 and MCF-7 A4 cell lines. This is the first report of PKCα transfection in T47D cells. In contrast to MCF-7 cells, T47D has the propensity to lose the ER and more readily forms tamoxifen-stimulated tumours in athymic mice. We find that in T47D:A18/PKCα clones, there is concomitant up-regulation of PKC βI and δ, whereas in the MCF-7 A4/PKCα transfectants PKC ɛ is up-regulated. In T47D:A18, but not in MCF-7 A4, PKCα stable transfection is accompanied by down-regulation of ER function whilst basal AP-1 activity is elevated. Our results suggest PKCα overexpression may play a role in growth signalling during the shift from hormone dependent to hormone-independent breast cancers. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952784

  12. Types of Cancer Treatment: Hormone Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Describes how hormone therapy slows or stops the growth of breast and prostate cancers that use hormones to grow. Includes information about the types of hormone therapy and side effects that may happen.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  14. Immunological hallmarks of stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Turley, Shannon J; Cremasco, Viviana; Astarita, Jillian L

    2015-11-01

    A dynamic and mutualistic interaction between tumour cells and the surrounding stroma promotes the initiation, progression, metastasis and chemoresistance of solid tumours. Far less understood is the relationship between the stroma and tumour-infiltrating leukocytes; however, emerging evidence suggests that the stromal compartment can shape antitumour immunity and responsiveness to immunotherapy. Thus, there is growing interest in elucidating the immunomodulatory roles of the stroma that evolve within the tumour microenvironment. In this Review, we discuss the evidence that stromal determinants interact with leukocytes and influence antitumour immunity, with emphasis on the immunological attributes of stromal cells that may foster their protumorigenic function. PMID:26471778

  15. Hypoxia signalling in cancer and approaches to enforce tumour regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouysségur, Jacques; Dayan, Frédéric; Mazure, Nathalie M.

    2006-05-01

    Tumour cells emerge as a result of genetic alteration of signal circuitries promoting cell growth and survival, whereas their expansion relies on nutrient supply. Oxygen limitation is central in controlling neovascularization, glucose metabolism, survival and tumour spread. This pleiotropic action is orchestrated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which is a master transcriptional factor in nutrient stress signalling. Understanding the role of HIF in intracellular pH (pHi) regulation, metabolism, cell invasion, autophagy and cell death is crucial for developing novel anticancer therapies. There are new approaches to enforce necrotic cell death and tumour regression by targeting tumour metabolism and pHi-control systems.

  16. Malignant Extra Renal Rhabdoid Tumour Presenting as Central Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Amanjit; Agarwal, Ritesh; Das, Ashim

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumours are one of the most aggressive childhood neoplasms associated with high mortality. The commonest age group affected is children less than five years of age. Rhabdoid tumour presenting as an endoluminal tracheal mass leading to central airway obstruction has not been previously reported. We describe the case of a 17-year-old male patient where malignant rhabdoid tumour masqueraded as bronchial asthma leading to a delayed diagnosis of upper airway obstruction by tracheal growth. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of malignant rhabdoid tumour. PMID:25243090

  17. Transseptal fine needle aspiration of a large left atrial tumour.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Wing; Ruygrok, Peter; Sutton, Timothy; Ding, Patricia; van Vliet, Chris; Occleshaw, Christopher; Smith, Warren

    2010-07-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac tumours is often based on images without tissue diagnosis or tissue obtained at surgery. Percutaneous myocardial biopsy via a transvenous approach has been described in literatures but this technique is not feasible with left atrial tumours. We report a patient presenting with heart failure and left atrial tumour. The diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasm was established pre-operatively via successful transseptal fine needle aspiration of cells from a left atrial tumour. We believe this technique worth consideration to aid pre-surgery diagnosis. PMID:19656723

  18. Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumour: Anaplastic Variant with Omental Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Anuradha C.K.; Monappa, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumour (JGCT) of ovary represents a small fraction of all primary ovarian malignancies. It is a subtype of granulosa cell tumour that is almost always found during the first three decades of life. Histologically, it differs from the typical adult type of granulosa cell tumour. It accounts for 5-15% of all granulosa cell tumours, majority being unilateral. Herein, we describe an unusual histopathological variant of JGCT with numerous large cystic spaces, anaplasia and focal syncytiotrophoblast like giant cells. PMID:27042471

  19. A composite malignant tumour of the elderly female breast

    PubMed Central

    Wayte, D. M.; Stewart, J. B.; McKenzie, C. G.

    1970-01-01

    A composite malignant tumour arising in the breast of an elderly woman is described. The cystic tumour containing areas of squamous metaplasia, bone formation, adenocarcinoma, and osteosarcoma was surrounded by the typical changes of mammary dysplasia (fibroadenosis). The classification and acceptance of such tumours is highly debatable. There is no one acceptable classification of breast sarcomas and hence the prognosis of such neoplasms, particularly those containing heterologous tissues, is poorly defined. Evidence is presented in support of such composite tumours as being definite entities which arise from the closely associated epithelial and mesenchymal components of the breast simultaneously. Images PMID:4320045

  20. Combination cancer immunotherapies tailored to the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Mark J; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Ribas, Antoni; Teng, Michele W L

    2016-03-01

    Evidence suggests that cancer immunotherapy will be a major part of the combination treatment plan for many patients with many cancer types in the near future. There are many types of immune processes involving different antitumour and tumour-promoting leucocytes, and tumour cells use many strategies to evade the immune response. The tumour microenvironment can help determine which immune suppressive pathways become activated to restrain antitumour immunity. This includes immune checkpoint receptors on effector T-cells and myeloid cells, and release of inhibitory cytokines and metabolites. Therapeutic approaches that target these pathways, particularly immune-checkpoint receptors, can induce durable antitumour responses in patients with advanced-stage cancers, including melanoma. Nevertheless, many patients do not have a good response to monotherapy approaches and alternative strategies are required to achieve optimal therapeutic benefit. These strategies include eliminating the bulk of tumour cells to provoke tumour-antigen release and antigen-presenting cell (APC) function, using adjuvants to enhance APC function, and using agents that enhance effector-cell activity. In this Review, we discuss the stratification of the tumour microenvironment according to tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and PD-L1 expression in the tumour, and how this stratification enables the design of optimal combination cancer therapies tailored to target different tumour microenvironments. PMID:26598942

  1. Intestine-associated antigens in ovarian tumours: an immunohistological study.

    PubMed

    De Boer, W G; Ma, J; Nayman, J

    1981-07-01

    The presence of 3 intestine-associated antigens, small intestine mucin antigen (SIMA), large intestine mucin antigen (LIMA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was studied in the female genital tract and ovarian tumours by immunofluorescence. These antigens could not be detected in normal ovary, benign cysts of ovary, fallopian tube or endometrium, but both LIMA and CEA were present in endocervical glandular tissue. The antigenic cross-reactivity of endocervical and large bowel mucin may indicate a close embryological relationship between these organs during the cloacogenic stage. The 3 antigens could be demonstrated in mucinous tumours of the ovary but were absent in serous or mesonephroid tumours. In one of the 2 endometroid tumours CEA was the only detectable antigen. These observations confirm the presence of intestinal type of epithelium in cystic mucinous tumours of the ovary and explain the cross-reactivity of mucin of benign tumours of the ovary and mucin from colonic cancer, normal colonic mucosa and gastric mucosa as reported by earlier workers. In the process of malignant transformation the columnar epithelium of ovarian cystadenoma seems to behave in the same way as superficial gastric and gall bladder epithelium by forming inappropriate intestine-associated mucin substances. Our technique may provide a specific means for studies on the histogenesis of female genital tract tumours, particularly ovarian tumours. It can also be used in differentiating between benign and malignant variants of these tumours. PMID:7029434

  2. Hormonal changes during menopause.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzawi, Farook; Palacios, Santiago

    2009-06-20

    Ovarian senescence occurs gradually during the fourth and fifth decades of life, leading to menopause at an average age of about 51 years. This senescence results in a changing hormonal milieu, with decreases in the levels of estrogens and androgens. Similar changes may be induced by surgical menopause (bilateral oophorectomy) or ovarian failure resulting from cancer treatment. The declining levels of estrogens and androgens affect many tissues of the body and can produce a variety of signs and symptoms, including vasomotor symptoms, decreased bone density, changes in mood and energy, loss of pubic hair and changes in the genital tissues, and effects on sexual function. Accurate measurement of testosterone levels in postmenopausal women requires methods that are validated in the lower ranges of testosterone level observed in this population. PMID:19372016

  3. A case of pulmonary tumour thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    McAnearney, Shane; Drain, Maire

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tumour thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a rapidly progressive pulmonary disease that is a fatal complication of malignancy. It manifests clinically as subacute respiratory failure with pulmonary hypertension, progressive right sided heart failure, and sudden death. We describe here a case of PTTM associated with occult metastatic signet ring cell carcinoma of the stomach. Although rare, PTTM needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of dyspnoea of unknown origin, particularly in patients with respiratory failure and also pulmonary hypertension, and in patients were there is no improvement in respiratory symptoms with steroid therapy. PMID:26744641

  4. Diurnal suppression of EGFR signalling by glucocorticoids and implications for tumour progression and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lauriola, Mattia; Enuka, Yehoshua; Zeisel, Amit; D’Uva, Gabriele; Roth, Lee; Sharon-Sevilla, Michal; Lindzen, Moshit; Sharma, Kirti; Nevo, Nava; Feldman, Morris; Carvalho, Silvia; Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Kedmi, Merav; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Chen, Alon; Solmi, Rossella; Wiemann, Stefan; Schmitt, Fernando; Domany, Eytan; Yarden, Yosef

    2014-01-01

    Signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and nuclear receptors for steroid hormones is essential for body homeostasis, but the cross-talk between these receptor families is poorly understood. We observed that glucocorticoids inhibit signalling downstream of EGFR, an RTK. The underlying mechanism entails suppression of EGFR’s positive feedback loops and simultaneous triggering of negative feedback loops that normally restrain EGFR. Our studies in mice reveal that the regulation of EGFR’s feedback loops by glucocorticoids translates to circadian control of EGFR signalling: EGFR signals are suppressed by high glucocorticoids during the active phase (night-time in rodents), while EGFR signals are enhanced during the resting phase. Consistent with this pattern, treatment of animals bearing EGFR-driven tumours with a specific kinase inhibitor was more effective if administered during the resting phase of the day, when glucocorticoids are low. These findings support a circadian clock-based paradigm in cancer therapy. PMID:25278152

  5. Presence of a tumour-inhibiting factor (TIF) in sera from normal but not tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, B S; Chin, D K

    1980-01-01

    Some plasmacytomas produce myeloma proteins with known antibody specificities and the secretion of these proteins by individual tumour cells can be determined using haemolytic plaque assay. After a 3 day culture of mouse plasmacytoma cells in medium containing 10% normal mouse serum, the number of plaques was reduced to less than 10% when compared to that of tumour cells incubated with either foetal calf serum or normal rabbit serum. However, tumour cells incubated with sera from mice bearing TEPC-15, McPC-603, or MOPC-315 plasmacytomas displayed control levels of plaques. The production of plaques paralleled the viability of tumour cells suggesting that the reduction of plaque formation is due to the decreased viable cell number. The tumour-inhibiting activity was recovered from the fraction of apparent molecular weight of 300,000-400,000 after a partial purification using an agarose (A 0.5 M) column. This fraction, however, did not suppress in vitro induction of antibody production. Kinetic experiments using sera obtained sequentially from individual mice receiving either TEPC-15 or MOPC-315 plasmacytomas further indicated that the tumour-inhibiting activity is severely reduced during a 2 week period after tumour inoculation. The inhibition of tumour cells did not appear to be specific since tumour cells of three plasmacytomas (TEPC-15, MOPC-167 and MOPC-315), a mastocytoma (P815) and a lymphoma (EL-4) displayed a similar susceptibility to normal serum. PMID:7002770

  6. MHC class II antigen presentation pathway in murine tumours: tumour evasion from immunosurveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Walter, W; Lingnau, K; Schmitt, E; Loos, M; Maeurer, M J

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative differences in the MHC class II antigen processing and presentation pathway may be instrumental in shaping the CD4+ T cell response directed against tumour cells. Efficient loading of many MHC class II alleles with peptides requires the assistance of H2-M, a heterodimeric MHC class II-like molecule. In contrast to the HLA-DM region in humans, the β-chain locus is duplicated in mouse, with the H2-Mb1 (Mb1β-chain distal to H2-Mb2 (Mb2) and the H2-Ma (Ma) α-chain gene). Here, we show that murine MHC class II and H2-M genes are coordinately regulated in murine tumour cell lines by T helper cell 1 (IFN-γ) and T helper cell 2 (IL-4 or IL-10) cytokines in the presence of the MHC class II-specific transactivator CIITA as determined by mRNA expression and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, Mαβ1 and Mαβ2 heterodimers are differentially expressed in murine tumour cell lines of different histology. Both H2-M isoforms promote equally processing and presentation of native protein antigens to H2-Ad- and H2-Ed-restricted CD4+ T cells. Murine tumour cell lines could be divided into three groups: constitutive MHC class II and CIITA expression; inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression upon IFN-γ-treatment; and lack of constitutive and IFN-γ-inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression. These differences may impact on CD4+ T cell recognition of cancer cells in murine tumour models. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027433

  7. Anti-tumour effect of metformin in canine mammary gland tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Watanabe, M; Tsuboi, M; Sugano, S; Yoshitake, R; Tanaka, Y; Ong, S M; Saito, T; Matsumoto, K; Fujita, N; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2015-08-01

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic drug used in type 2 diabetes. Its pharmacological activity reportedly involves mitochondrial respiratory complex I, and mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors have a strong inhibitory effect on the growth of metastatic canine mammary gland tumour (CMGT) cell lines. It is hypothesised that metformin has selective anti-tumour effects on metastatic CMGT cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of metformin on cell growth, production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in two CMGT clonal cell lines with different metastatic potential. In addition, transcriptome analysis was used to determine cellular processes disrupted by metformin and in vivo anti-tumour effects were examined in a mouse xenograft model. Metformin inhibited CMGT cell growth in vitro, with the metastatic clone (CHMp-5b) displaying greater sensitivity. ATP depletion and ROS elevation were observed to a similar extent in the metastatic and non-metastatic (CHMp-13a) cell lines after metformin exposure. However, subsequent AMPK activation and mTOR pathway inhibition were prominent only in metformin-insensitive non-metastatic cells. Microarray analysis revealed inhibition of cell cycle progression by metformin treatment in CHMp-5b cells, which was further confirmed by Western blotting and cell cycle analysis. Additionally, metformin significantly suppressed tumour growth in xenografted metastatic CMGT cells. In conclusion, metformin exhibited an anti-tumour effect in metastatic CMGT cells through AMPK-independent cell cycle arrest. Its mechanism of action differed in the non-metastatic clone, where AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition were observed. PMID:25981932

  8. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone in human and bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1982-10-01

    Two hypothalamic peptide hormones, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), have been isolated from human milk and bovine colostrum. Acidified methanolic extracts, prepared from human milk, bovine colostrum and rat hypothalami, as well as synthetic LHRH and TRH markers were subjected to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The eluates were tested for the presence of LHRH and TRH by specific radioimmunoassays. It was found that milk extracts contain significant amounts of LHRH (3.9 - 11.8 ng/ml) and TRH (0.16 - 0.34 ng/ml), which comigrate with the corresponding marker hormones and with those of hypothalamic origin. The HPLC-purified LHRH from both human and bovine milk was bioactive in a dose-response manner similar to synthetic LHRH. PMID:6816590

  9. The effects of delays in radiotherapy treatment on tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, R. M.; Beddoe, A. H.; Dale, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    There is often a considerable delay from initial tumour diagnosis to the start of radiotherapy treatment, which may be due to factors such as waiting lists and referral delays. This paper uses widely published models and clinical parameters to calculate the effect of delays in treatment on local tumour control for four different types of tumour - squamous cell carcinoma (head and neck), breast, cervix and prostate. The Poisson model for tumour control probability (TCP), an exponential function for tumour growth and the linear quadratic model of cell kill are used to calculate the change in TCP for delays between diagnosis and treatment of up to 100 days. Typical values of the clinical parameters have been taken from the literature; these include α and β, σα, tumour size at diagnosis, pre-treatment doubling time, delay in onset of accelerated repopulation and doubling time during treatment. It is acknowledged that there are limitations in the reliability of these data for predicting absolute values of tumour control, but models are still useful for predicting how changes in treatment parameters are likely to affect the outcome. It is shown that for fast-growing tumours a delay of 1-2 months can have a significant adverse effect on the outcome, whereas for slow-growing tumours such as Ca prostate a delay of a few months does not significantly reduce the probability of tumour control. These calculations show the importance of ensuring that delays from diagnosis through to treatment are minimized, especially for patients with rapidly proliferating tumours.

  10. Quantification of immunocompetent cells in testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Torres, A; Casanova, J F; Nistal, M; Regadera, J

    1997-01-01

    The immunocompetent cells present in the different histological patterns of 43 testicular germ cell tumours were evaluated. CD3 + and CD45RO + (UCHL1 +) T lymphocytes, CD68 + and MAC 387 + macrophages, CD20 + (L26 +) B lymphocytes, and kappa and lambda + plasma cells were counted. The number of immunocompetent cells per mm2 of tumour tissue, excluding the necrotic areas, was evaluated. Microscopic fields were randomly selected by two observers. In order to guarantee randomization each surface was divided into parts, numbered through a lattice, and some fields were chosen via a random numbers table. This procedure yielded significantly different counts from those obtained on subjective selection. The number of T-lymphocytes and macrophages was higher in seminomas than in the non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumours (P < 0.05) Embryonal carcinomas had more T-lymphocytes than immature teratomas. No significant differences were found among testicular germ cell tumours with regards to the B-lymphocytes, with the exception of the high number of B-lymphocytes in mature teratomas. Kappa + and lambda + plasma cells were few in the testicular germ cell tumours. Randomization in the quantification of immunocompetent cells in testicular germ cell tumours is a good means for evaluation of immune response in all the tumour mass, not only in the areas with the most intense inflammatory cell infiltrate, and permits comparison of testicular germ cell tumours with other malignant tumours. Study of immunocompetent cells in every histological type of testicular germ cell tumour is useful in comparing them with other extra-testicular germ cell tumours. PMID:9023554

  11. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells. PMID:25754106

  12. Solitary fibrous tumour of the supraglottic larynx.

    PubMed

    Grammatica, A; Bolzoni Villaret, A; Ravanelli, M; Nicolai, P

    2016-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare, benign, mesenchymal neoplasm that usually arises in the pleura, but rarely involves other sites outside the serosal space (mediastinum, lung, liver, thyroid gland); larynx involvement is very rare with only sporadic cases reported in the literature. We report a case of SFT in a 41-year-old woman with supraglottic laryngeal invovlement; symptoms included dysphonia and mild odynophagia lasting 2 years, and fibre-optic laryngeal evaluation showed a sub-mucosal mass involving the left supraglottis and medial wall of the pyriform sinus. MRI represents the gold standard tool for differential diagnosis (with schwannoma, paraganglioma and haemangioma) and correct staging, while immunohistochemical and cytomorphologic analysis (bcl-2 and CD34 positivity in 90% of cases) is needed for definitive diagnosis. Surgery is the main treatment (endoscopic and open conservative technique), and its goal is a balance between safe oncological resection and good preservation of laryngeal functions; in this particular case an open laryngeal approach was scheduled due to the size of the tumour. Prognosis is good and in only a few cases (especially in pleural SFT) does the biological behaviour take a malignant course. PMID:27070539

  13. [Preservation of fertility in tumour patients].

    PubMed

    De Geyter, C; De Geyter, M; Wight, E

    2009-01-01

    The success rates of present-day chemotherapy have provoked a rising awareness with regard to the preservation of quality of life among successfully treated patients. Among other factors, quality of life also implies the capacity to procreate. Unfortunately, both in men and women chemotherapy often irreversibly destroys the production of gametes, thereby causing permanent infertility. By its long-standing experience with the cryopreservation of oocytes, zygotes and embryos, reproductive medicine may offer assistance to those patients. Whereas the storage of cryopreserved semen has now become standard in most institutions, the options for the preservation of fertility in women suffering of malignant disease are still limited. Although cryopreservation of non-fertilized oocytes or of pronuclear cells has been established, both the number of oocytes that can be collected within the short time interval between the first detection of the tumour and the initiation of chemotherapy and the modest developmental capacity per frozen/thawed oocyte markedly limit the option of ovarian hyperstimulation and assisted reproduction. Several successful deliveries of healthy infants have now proven the feasibility of ovarian tissue cryopreservation and later orthotopic transplantation after successful tumour therapy. Further refinement of the techniques involved, but also the formation of multidisciplinary networks are expected to offer a solution for young women struck by cancer but striving to survive and to lead a fulfilled life. PMID:19346752

  14. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  15. Clinical studies with tumour necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, D R; Sherman, M L; Frei, E; Kufe, D W

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) cytotoxicity remains unknown. The in vivo antitumour effects of TNF may be related to direct cytotoxicity, immunomodulatory effects or endothelial effects on tumour vasculature. Phase I and early Phase II clinical trials of human recombinant TNF are under way in Japan, the USA, the UK and Germany. The maximum Phase II dose for TNF has not been established. The clinical toxicity of TNF is generally similar to that of other biological agents. Systemic toxicity, including fever, chills, anorexia and nausea, has been seen in most patients treated with TNF and has not been clearly related to dose. Other toxicities have included liver function abnormalities, hypotension, transient neurological changes and haematological abnormalities. Few clinical responses have been reported but organized Phase II testing remains to be completed. Combination trials with interferons have recently been initiated. Phase II efficacy studies of TNF as a single agent and in combination are needed for an assessment of the value of this agent in cancer therapy. PMID:3330011

  16. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-05-27

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  17. The testicular germ cell tumour transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Alagaratnam, S; Lind, G E; Kraggerud, S M; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2011-08-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are characterized by young age of onset and a complex pattern of histological subtypes. Transcriptomic studies have tried to uncover the gene expression patterns underlying this. Here, we present a systematic review of transcriptome studies of TGCTs of adolescents and young adults and identify genes common across the various studies, both for TGCTs in general as well as the histological subtypes, hence elucidating both transcriptional changes associated with malignant transformation and differentiation patterns. A meta-analysis of this type adds power and significance to the genes thus found, where most studies have included only a limited number of samples. Both known (KRAS, MYCN and TPD52) and novel (CCT6A, IGFBP3 and SALL2) cancer genes are implicated in TGC tumorigenesis. Gene expression patterns characteristic to embryonic stem cells are also found deregulated in TGC tumorigenesis. This is reflected in how pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells commonly differentiate into a variety of embryonic and extra-embryonic histological types, each with unique transcriptomes. The embryonal carcinomas in particular are found to overexpress pluripotency genes, while gene signatures for seminomas, teratomas and yolk sac tumours were also identified. This underlines the distinctive transcriptomic programme across histological subtypes, especially striking given that the TGCT genome is largely similar across the same subtypes. PMID:21651573

  18. Anthropogenic selection enhances cancer evolution in Tasmanian devil tumours.

    PubMed

    Ujvari, Beata; Pearse, Anne-Maree; Swift, Kate; Hodson, Pamela; Hua, Bobby; Pyecroft, Stephen; Taylor, Robyn; Hamede, Rodrigo; Jones, Menna; Belov, Katherine; Madsen, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    The Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) provides a unique opportunity to elucidate the long-term effects of natural and anthropogenic selection on cancer evolution. Since first observed in 1996, this transmissible cancer has caused local population declines by >90%. So far, four chromosomal DFTD variants (strains) have been described and karyotypic analyses of 253 tumours showed higher levels of tetraploidy in the oldest strain. We propose that increased ploidy in the oldest strain may have evolved in response to effects of genomic decay observed in asexually reproducing organisms. In this study, we focus on the evolutionary response of DFTD to a disease suppression trial. Tumours collected from devils subjected to the removal programme showed accelerated temporal evolution of tetraploidy compared with tumours from other populations where no increase in tetraploid tumours were observed. As ploidy significantly reduces tumour growth rate, we suggest that the disease suppression trial resulted in selection favouring slower growing tumours mediated by an increased level of tetraploidy. Our study reveals that DFTD has the capacity to rapidly respond to novel selective regimes and that disease eradication may result in novel tumour adaptations, which may further imperil the long-term survival of the world's largest carnivorous marsupial. PMID:24567746

  19. Anthropogenic selection enhances cancer evolution in Tasmanian devil tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ujvari, Beata; Pearse, Anne-Maree; Swift, Kate; Hodson, Pamela; Hua, Bobby; Pyecroft, Stephen; Taylor, Robyn; Hamede, Rodrigo; Jones, Menna; Belov, Katherine; Madsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) provides a unique opportunity to elucidate the long-term effects of natural and anthropogenic selection on cancer evolution. Since first observed in 1996, this transmissible cancer has caused local population declines by >90%. So far, four chromosomal DFTD variants (strains) have been described and karyotypic analyses of 253 tumours showed higher levels of tetraploidy in the oldest strain. We propose that increased ploidy in the oldest strain may have evolved in response to effects of genomic decay observed in asexually reproducing organisms. In this study, we focus on the evolutionary response of DFTD to a disease suppression trial. Tumours collected from devils subjected to the removal programme showed accelerated temporal evolution of tetraploidy compared with tumours from other populations where no increase in tetraploid tumours were observed. As ploidy significantly reduces tumour growth rate, we suggest that the disease suppression trial resulted in selection favouring slower growing tumours mediated by an increased level of tetraploidy. Our study reveals that DFTD has the capacity to rapidly respond to novel selective regimes and that disease eradication may result in novel tumour adaptations, which may further imperil the long-term survival of the world's largest carnivorous marsupial. PMID:24567746

  20. Premitive neuro-ectodermal tumour of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pradeep; Malur, Prakash; Annurshetru, Shivappa

    2015-01-01

    Primitive neuro-ectodermal tumour of the lung is an extremely rare occurrence and we hereby report a case of a neuro-ectodermal tumour of the lung which was proved by immuno-histochemical examination of the resected specimen, and he had a very aggressive pattern of behavior. PMID:26793390

  1. CT imaging findings of a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswarlu, M; Geetha, P; Lakshmi Kavitha, N

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT), also known as a Pindborg tumour, with local aggressive behaviour. CT imaging showed a large expansile bone-forming lesion in the mandible, which showed the exact extent and nature of the lesion. We briefly discuss the imaging features of CEOT and the relevant literature. PMID:22190756

  2. Mouse Models of Brain Metastasis for Unravelling Tumour Progression.

    PubMed

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Sibson, Nicola R

    2016-01-01

    Secondary tumours in the brain account for 40 % of triple negative breast cancer patients, and the percentage may be higher at the time of autopsy. The use of in vivo models allow us to recapitulate the molecular mechanisms potentially used by circulating breast tumour cells to proliferate within the brain.Metastasis is a multistep process that depends on the success of several stages including cell evasion from the primary tumour, distribution and survival within the blood stream and cerebral microvasculature, penetration of the blood-brain barrier and proliferation within the brain microenvironment. Cellular adhesion molecules are key proteins involved in all of the steps in the metastatic process. Our group has developed two different in vivo models to encompass both seeding and colonisation stages of the metastatic process: (1) haematogenous dissemination of tumour cells by direct injection into the left ventricle of the heart, and (2) direct implantation of the tumour cells into the mouse brain.This chapter describes, in detail, the practical implementation of the intracerebral model, which can be used to analyse tumour proliferation within a specific area of the central nervous system and tumour-host cell interactions. We also describe the use of immunohistochemistry techniques to identify, at the molecular scale, tumour-host cell interactions, which may open new windows for brain metastasis therapy. PMID:27325270

  3. Melanosomes foster a tumour niche by activating CAFs.

    PubMed

    García-Silva, Susana; Peinado, Héctor

    2016-08-30

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are important effectors in the formation of tumour-fostering niches. Pigmented melanosomes are now shown to have a relevant role in establishing a tumour niche in primary melanoma by reprogramming dermal fibroblasts into cancer-associated fibroblasts through the transfer of miR-211. PMID:27571736

  4. Cystosarcoma phylloides: heterogeneity in a rare tumour type.

    PubMed

    Bissett, D; Mallon, E; Reed, N S; George, W D; Harnett, A N

    1996-08-01

    Mammary cystosarcoma phylloides is a rare tumour, and clear guidelines for its clinical management are lacking. We present three cases from the Western Infirmary which illustrate the range of behaviour that these tumours can manifest, and discuss some of the clinical problems that they present. PMID:8772074

  5. Colon tumour secretopeptidome: insights into endogenous proteolytic cleavage events in the colon tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Kapp, Eugene A; Ji, Hong; Speed, Terry P; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    The secretopeptidome comprises endogenous peptides derived from proteins secreted into the tumour microenvironment through classical and non-classical secretion. This study characterised the low-Mr (<3kDa) component of the human colon tumour (LIM1215, LIM1863) secretopeptidome, as a first step towards gaining insights into extracellular proteolytic cleavage events in the tumour microenvironment. Based on two biological replicates, this secretopeptidome isolation strategy utilised differential centrifugal ultrafiltration in combination with analytical RP-HPLC and nanoLC-MS/MS. Secreted peptides were identified using a combination of Mascot and post-processing analyses including MSPro re-scoring, extended feature sets and Percolator, resulting in 474 protein identifications from 1228 peptides (≤1% q-value, ≤5% PEP) - a 36% increase in peptide identifications when compared with conventional Mascot (homology ionscore thresholding). In both colon tumour models, 122 identified peptides were derived from 41 cell surface protein ectodomains, 23 peptides (12 proteins) from regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), and 12 peptides (9 proteins) generated from intracellular domain proteolysis. Further analyses using the protease/substrate database MEROPS, (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), revealed 335 (71%) proteins classified as originating from classical/non-classical secretion, or the cell membrane. Of these, peptides were identified from 42 substrates in MEROPS with defined protease cleavage sites, while peptides generated from a further 205 substrates were fragmented by hitherto unknown proteases. A salient finding was the identification of peptides from 88 classical/non-classical secreted substrates in MEROPS, implicated in tumour progression and angiogenesis (FGFBP1, PLXDC2), cell-cell recognition and signalling (DDR1, GPA33), and tumour invasiveness and metastasis (MACC1, SMAGP); the nature of the proteases responsible for these proteolytic events is unknown. To

  6. Regulatory expectations during product development for tumour vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, K; Puri, R K

    2004-01-01

    Among various approaches for the treatment of cancer, tumour vaccines stimulate the host immune response against cancer and produce local inflammation that may result in the regression of existing tumour in the body. Therapeutic tumour vaccines may generally be grouped into cellular vaccines, synthetic peptides, purified or recombinant proteins, and multi-antigen preparations including shed, or secreted antigens or cell lysates. While no tumour vaccines have been licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a large number of products and approaches are being developed and numerous clinical trials are currently ongoing. In this article, we summarize regulatory issues associated with different types of tumour vaccines. The step-wise approach to regulatory requirements including current good manufacturing practices (cGMPs) and characterization of these vaccines at various stages of product development is discussed. PMID:15603183

  7. Xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Subapriya, R; Balachandran, C; Manohar, B Murali; Thangadurai, A; Nagini, S

    2006-09-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms in female dogs. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between different clinical stages with activities of phase I and phase II carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes in canine mammary tumours. The levels of cytochrome P450 and cytochrome b5 and the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), DT-diaphorase (DTD) and NADPH diaphorase in tumour tissues of 25 bitches was estimated. Enhanced levels of cytochrome P450 and b5 and phase II enzyme activities were observed in tumour tissues compared to the corresponding uninvolved adjacent tissues. The magnitude of the changes in phase I and phase II enzyme status was, however, more pronounced in stages I and II compared to stages III and IV. The results suggest that the balance between phase I carcinogen activation and phase II detoxification systems may play an important role in canine mammary tumour development. PMID:16014333

  8. Tumour Markers and Kidney Function: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Rivoli, Laura; Mazza, Giuseppe; Presta, Piera

    2014-01-01

    Tumour markers represent useful tools in diagnosis and clinical management of patients with cancer, because they are easy to use, minimally invasive, and easily measured in either blood or urine. Unfortunately, such an ideal marker, as yet, does not exist. Different pathological states may increase the level of a tumour marker in the absence of any neoplasia. Alternatively, low levels of tumour markers could be also found in the presence of neoplasias. We aimed at reviewing studies currently available in the literature examining the association between tumour markers and different renal impairment conditions. Each tumour marker was found to be differently influenced by these criteria; additionally we revealed in many cases a lack of available published data. PMID:24689048

  9. Metastatic Tumours to the Oral Cavity: Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Astreidis, Ioannis T.; Kontos, Konstantinos I.; Lazaridou, Maria N.; Bourlidou, Eleni T.; Gerasimidou, Domniki K.; Vladika, Natalia P.; Mangoudi, Doxa L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Metastatic tumours to the oral cavity from distant organs are uncommon and represent approximately 1 - 3% of all oral malignancies. Such metastases can occur to the bone or to the oral soft tissues. Almost any malignancy from any site is capable of metastasis to the oral cavity and a wide variety of tumours have been reported to spread to the mouth. Methods Careful examination of the oral cavity and a high degree of clinical suspicion as well as a multidisciplinary approach are suggested. Results In this article we present three patients, a female and two males with metastatic tumours to the oral cavity, who were referred to our Department. The primary tumours were invasive lobular breast carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma respectively. Conclusions Metastases to the oral cavity are quite uncommon among population. They usually present with symptoms similar to odontogenic infections and benign tumours, causing a delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26904182

  10. Argentaffin and argyrophil reactions and serotonin content of endocrine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Wells, C A; Taylor, S M; Cuello, A C

    1985-01-01

    Sixty carcinoid tumours were tested in a retrospective study with an immunoperoxidase technique using a monoclonal antibody against serotonin immunoreactive sites, with argyrophil staining using the Grimelius technique, and with argentaffin staining using the Masson-Fontana technique. A good correlation between all three techniques in the diagnosis of ileal carcinoid tumour was found, but the immunoperoxidase technique showed greater sensitivity than the Masson-Fontana technique and greater specificity than the Grimelius technique in the diagnosis of foregut and hindgut carcinoid tumours. The immunoperoxidase technique with a monoclonal antibody against serotonin immunoreactive sites (YC5/45) is recommended as a sensitive and specific test for carcinoid tumours. The reactions in other endocrine tumours are also included. Images PMID:2578484

  11. PERIVASCULAR EPITHELIOID TUMOURS (PEComas) OF THE GYNAECOLOGICAL TRACT

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Niamh; Soslow, Robert A.; Murali, Rajmohan

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular epithelioid tumour (PEComas) of the gynaecological tract are rare tumours which were first recognised and diagnosed within the last twenty years. They represent a unique diagnostic challenge with regard to their accurate and reproducible distinction from more common entities such as smooth muscle tumours of the uterine corpus. In this review article we trace the development of the concept of the PEComa tumour family, highlight what is known about extra-gynaecological tract PEComa at an immunohistochemical, molecular and therapeutic level and then present a summary of all reported cases of gynaecological tract PEComa to date. In the summary, we highlight rare subtypes of gynaecological tract PEComa, and compare the performances of extant prognostic classification systems for malignancy in these tumours. PMID:25750268

  12. Paratesticular liposarcoma-masquerading as a testicular tumour.

    PubMed

    Vinayagam, Kalaivani; Hosamath, Vijayakumar; Honnappa, Sridhar; Rau, Aarathi Ranga

    2014-02-01

    Paratesticular liposarcomas are rare tumours which account for 12% of all liposarcomas. Probably there are about 186 cases which have been reported till date. They must be differentiated from tumours of testicular origin which have extension to the spermatic cord. We are reporting a case of a 50-year-old male who had presented with a painless swelling in the right hemiscrotum, which was of 20 years' duration. Inititally, a clinical diagnosis of testicular tumour was made; however, CT of the scrotum revealed paratesticular tumour? liposarcoma and testis being normal and displaced postero-inferiorly. Metastatic work-up, which included CT of the abdomen and pelvis, thorax and whole body scan, did not reveal any distant metastasis. Patient underwent high orchidectomy, hemiscrotectomy. Histopathological studies confirmed the diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma (atypical lipomatous tumour of sclerosing type). PMID:24701520

  13. Defining the clonal dynamics leading to mouse skin tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Danés, Adriana; Hannezo, Edouard; Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Liagre, Mélanie; Youssef, Khalil Kass; Simons, Benjamin D; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-08-18

    The changes in cell dynamics after oncogenic mutation that lead to the development of tumours are currently unknown. Here, using skin epidermis as a model, we assessed the effect of oncogenic hedgehog signalling in distinct cell populations and their capacity to induce basal cell carcinoma, the most frequent cancer in humans. We found that only stem cells, and not progenitors, initiated tumour formation upon oncogenic hedgehog signalling. This difference was due to the hierarchical organization of tumour growth in oncogene-targeted stem cells, characterized by an increase in symmetric self-renewing divisions and a higher p53-dependent resistance to apoptosis, leading to rapid clonal expansion and progression into invasive tumours. Our work reveals that the capacity of oncogene-targeted cells to induce tumour formation is dependent not only on their long-term survival and expansion, but also on the specific clonal dynamics of the cancer cell of origin. PMID:27459053

  14. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... both combination and estrogen-alone hormone use made mammography less effective for the early detection of breast ... such as a reduction in the use of mammography, may also have contributed to this decline ( 15 ). ...

  15. Network Identification of Hormonal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vis, Daniel J.; Westerhuis, Johan A.; Hoefsloot, Huub C. J.; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; van der Greef, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Relations among hormone serum concentrations are complex and depend on various factors, including gender, age, body mass index, diurnal rhythms and secretion stochastics. Therefore, endocrine deviations from healthy homeostasis are not easily detected or understood. A generic method is presented for detecting regulatory relations between hormones. This is demonstrated with a cohort of obese women, who underwent blood sampling at 10 minute intervals for 24-hours. The cohort was treated with bromocriptine in an attempt to clarify how hormone relations change by treatment. The detected regulatory relations are summarized in a network graph and treatment-induced changes in the relations are determined. The proposed method identifies many relations, including well-known ones. Ultimately, the method provides ways to improve the description and understanding of normal hormonal relations and deviations caused by disease or treatment. PMID:24852517

  16. [Hormone therapy through changing times].

    PubMed

    Reuter, Miriam; Fassnacht, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Despite several studies in the last years, only women with menopausal symptoms who desire therapy are treated. There is still no recommendation for menopausale hormone therapy for primary prevention of diseases such as coronary artery disease, osteoporosis or depression. The risk of thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and stroke is elevated especially for elderly women with oral hormone therapy. Benefits may exceed risks in younger, early-menopausal women, for whom hormone therapy may be prescribed more liberally. Systemic hormone therapy is for vasomotor symptoms, local therapy for the genitourinary syndrome of menopause. Choice of formulation depends on the individual risk due to symptoms and favours of the patients. With moderate to high cardiovascular risk profile, a transdermal route of estrogen application - in women with an intact uterus in combination with micronized progesterone - seems to be the best option. PMID:26841174

  17. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... agonists , which are sometimes called LHRH analogs, are synthetic proteins that are structurally similar to LHRH and ... gland to stop producing luteinizing hormone, which prevents testosterone from being produced. Treatment with an LHRH agonist ...

  18. Growth hormone stimulation test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is performed by administering the amino acid arginine in a vein to raise hGH levels. The ... to secrete growth hormone in response to the arginine. Lack of hGH can cause growth retardation in ...

  19. Thyroid Hormone and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism affect the cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism is known to be associated with enhanced atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases. The accelerated atherosclerosis in the hypothyroid state has been traditionally ascribed to atherogenic lipid profile, diastolic hypertension, and impaired endothelial function. However, recent studies indicate that thyroid hormone has direct anti-atherosclerotic effects, such as production of nitric oxide and suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation. These data suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits atherogenesis through direct effects on the vasculature as well as modification of risk factors for atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the basic and clinical studies on the role of thyroid hormone in vascular remodeling. The possible application of thyroid hormone mimetics to the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis is also discussed. PMID:26558400

  20. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base. PMID:27330421

  1. Interfering with stem cell-specific gatekeeper functions controls tumour initiation and malignant progression of skin tumours

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Monika; Reuter, Karen; Brylka, Heike; Kraus, Andreas; Schettina, Peter; Niemann, Catherin

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cancer constitutes a major clinical challenge and molecular mechanisms underlying the process of tumour initiation are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that hair follicle bulge stem cells (SCs) give rise to well-differentiated sebaceous tumours and show that SCs are not only crucial in tumour initiation, but are also involved in tumour plasticity and heterogeneity. Our findings reveal that SC-specific expression of mutant Lef1, which mimics mutations found in human sebaceous tumours, drives sebaceous tumour formation. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that mutant Lef1 abolishes p53 activity in SCs. Intriguingly, mutant Lef1 induces DNA damage and interferes with SC-specific gatekeeper functions normally protecting against accumulations of DNA lesions and cell loss. Thus, normal control of SC proliferation is disrupted by mutant Lef1, thereby allowing uncontrolled propagation of tumour-initiating SCs. Collectively, these findings identify underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumour-initiating events in tissue SCs providing a potential target for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25608467

  2. Anti-tumour immune effect of oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum to CT26 tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingtao; Wang, Chunfeng; Ye, Liping; Yang, Wentao; Huang, Haibin; Meng, Fei; Shi, Shaohua; Ding, Zhuang

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent forms of cancer that shows a high mortality and increasing incidence. There are numerous successful treatment options for CRC, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immunotherapy; however, their side effects and limitations are considerable. Probiotics may be an effective strategy for preventing and inhibiting tumour growth through stimulation of host innate and adaptive immunity. We investigated and compared potential anti-tumour immune responses induced by two isolated Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus plantarum A and Lactobacillus rhamnosus b, by pre-inoculating mice with lactobacilli for 14 days. Subsequently, subcutaneous and orthotopic intestinal tumours were generated in the pre-inoculated mice using CT26 murine adenocarcinoma cells and were assessed for response against the tumour. Our results indicated that oral administration with L. plantarum inhibited CT26 cell growth in BALB/c mice and prolonged the survival time of tumour-bearing mice compared with mice administered L. rhamnosus. L. plantarum produced protective immunity against the challenge with CT26 cells by increasing the effector functions of CD8+ and natural killer (NK) cell infiltration into tumour tissue, up-regulation of IFN-gamma (but not IL-4 or IL-17) production, and promotion of Th1-type CD4+ T differentiation. Consequently, our results suggest that L. plantarum can enhance the anti-tumour immune response and delay tumour formation. PMID:25963256

  3. Ovarian-type epithelial tumours of the testis: immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of two serous borderline tumours of the testis.

    PubMed

    Bürger, Tobias; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Inniger, Reinhard; Hansen, Joachim; Mayer, Peter; Schweyer, Stefan; Radzun, Heinz Joachim; Ströbel, Philipp; Bremmer, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Tumours of ovarian-epithelial type of the testis, including serous borderline tumours, represent very rare entities. They are identical to the surface epithelial tumours of the ovary and have been reported in patients from 14 to 68 years of age. We describe two cases of a 46- and a 39-year old man with incidental findings of intratesticular masses of the left respectively right testis. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour the patients were subjected to inguinal orchiectomy. Histologically, the tumours were identical to their ovarian counterparts: They showed a cystic configuration with a fibrous wall and irregular papillary structures lined by partially multistratified columnar cells and areas of hobnail cells. Furthermore, there was mild cytological atypia with a proliferative activity of below 5% as proved by Ki67 staining; mitoses could not be detected. Immunohistochemically, the tumour cells displayed expression of pan-cytokeratin AE3, progesterone receptor, Wilms' tumour protein (WT1), and PAX8 (Paired box gene 8). Estrogen receptor was expressed in one case. Octamer-binding transcription factor-4 (OCT4), calretinin, thrombomodulin, and D2-40 were not expressed. Mutation testing of BRAF revealed a BRAF V600E mutation in one case, while testing for KRAS mutations proved to be negative in both. The BRAF mutated tumour showed strong cytosolic and membranous positivity for B-Raf also on immunohistochemical analysis. Comparative genomic hybridization of one case could not reveal any chromosomal aberrations. PMID:26197800

  4. Oncolytic virotherapy for advanced liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ju-Fang; Chen, Pei-Jer; Sze, Daniel Y; Reid, Tony; Bartlett, David; Kirn, David H; Liu, Ta-Chiang

    2009-01-01

    Primary and metastatic neoplasms of the liver account for more than a million deaths per year worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective novel therapies for these cancers are urgently needed. Oncolytic virotherapeutics represent a novel class of pharmacophore that holds promise for the treatment of hepatic neoplasms. Cancer-specific replication is followed by oncolysis, virus spreading and infection of adjacent cancer cells. This process is then repeated. Virotherapeutics target multiple genetic pathways involved in carcino-genesis, and demonstrate activity against apoptosis-resistant tumour cells. This platform can also exploit the advantage of multiple intrinsic anti-cancer therapeutic mechanisms, combining direct viral oncolysis with therapeutic transgene expression. Recent advances in pre-clinical and clinical studies are revealing the potential of this unique therapeutic class, in particular for liver cancers. This review summarizes the available data on applying oncolytic virotherapeutics to hepatic neoplasms to date, and discusses the challenges and future directions for virotherapy. PMID:19175689

  5. Retroperitoneal Castleman's disease mimicking soft tissue tumour.

    PubMed

    Pandya, B; Ghosh, S K; Chude, G; Rajmohan, M V; Narang, R

    2007-08-01

    Castleman's disease is a type of non-neoplastic lymphoproliferative disease having lymph nodal hyperplasia. It has two distinct microscopic types: hyaline-vascular type and plasma cell type. Clinically, it may present either as a solitary mass, most commonly in the mediastinum, or as a multicentric form whose features are generalized lymph-adenopathy, splenomegaly and involvement of other organs like the lungs and kidneys. Here we report a case of isolated retroperitoneal Castleman's disease, which presented as a lump in the iliac fossa in a young female. A clinico-radio-logical diagnosis of retroperitoneal soft tissue tumour was made and the patient underwent complete surgical excision. The exact diagnosis was only obtained at histopathology and there is no evidence of recurrence at six months follow-up. PMID:23132970

  6. A practical approach to immunohistochemical diagnosis of ovarian germ cell tumours and sex cord-stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Rabban, Joseph T; Zaloudek, Charles J

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry can be useful in the diagnosis of ovarian germ cell tumours and sex cord-stromal tumours. A wide variety of markers are available, including many that are novel. The aim of this review is to provide a practical approach to the selection and interpretation of these markers, emphasizing an understanding of their sensitivity and specificity in the particular differential diagnosis in question. The main markers discussed include those for malignant germ cell differentiation (SALL4 and placental alkaline phosphatase), dysgerminoma (OCT4, CD117, and D2-40), yolk sac tumour (α-fetoprotein and glypican-3), embryonal carcinoma (OCT4, CD30, and SOX2), sex cord-stromal differentiation (calretinin, inhibin, SF-1, FOXL2) and steroid cell tumours (melan-A). In addition, the limited role of immunohistochemistry in determining the primary site of origin of an ovarian carcinoid tumour is discussed. PMID:23240671

  7. Circulating tumour cells in patients with urothelial tumours: Enrichment and in vitro culture

    PubMed Central

    Kolostova, Katarina; Cegan, Martin; Bobek, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Results of clinical trials have demonstrated that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are frequently detected in patients with urothelial tumours. The monitoring of CTCs has the potential to improve therapeutic management at an early stage and also to identify patients with increased risk of tumour progression or recurrence before the onset of clinically detected metastasis. In this study, we report a new effectively simplified methodology for a separation and in vitro culturing of viable CTCs from peripheral blood. Method: We include patients diagnosed with 3 types of urothelial tumours (prostate cancer, urinary bladder cancer, and kidney cancer). A size-based separation method for viable CTC - enrichment from unclothed peripheral blood has been introduced (MetaCell, Ostrava, Czech Republic). The enriched CTCs fraction was cultured directly on the separation membrane, or transferred from the membrane and cultured on any plastic surface or a microscopic slide. Results: We report a successful application of a CTCs isolation procedure in patients with urothelial cancers. The CTCs captured on the membrane are enriched with a remarkable proliferation potential. This has enabled us to set up in vitro cell cultures from the viable CTCs unaffected by any fixation buffers, antibodies or lysing solutions. Next, the CTCs were cultured in vitro for a minimum of 10 to 14 days to enable further downstream analysis (e.g., immunohistochemistry). Conclusion: We demonstrated an efficient CTCs capture platform, based on a cell size separation principle. Furthermore, we report an ability to culture the enriched cells – a critical requirement for post-isolation cellular analysis. PMID:25408812

  8. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiersinga, W M

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement has been used for more than 100 years in the treatment of hypothyroidism, and there is no doubt about its overall efficacy. Desiccated thyroid contains both thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)); serum T(3) frequently rises to supranormal values in the absorption phase, associated with palpitations. Liothyronine (T(3)) has the same drawback and requires twice-daily administration in view of its short half-life. Synthetic levothyroxine (L-T(4)) has many advantages: in view of its long half-life, once-daily administration suffices, the occasional missing of a tablet causes no harm, and the extrathyroidal conversion of T(4) into T(3) (normally providing 80% of the daily T(3) production rate) remains fully operative, which may have some protective value during illness. Consequently, L-T(4) is nowadays preferred, and its long-term use is not associated with excess mortality. The mean T(4) dose required to normalize serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is 1.6 microg/kg per day, giving rise to serum free T(4) (fT(4)) concentrations that are slightly elevated or in the upper half of the normal reference range. The higher fT(4) values are probably due to the need to generate from T(4) the 20% of the daily T(3) production rate that otherwise is derived from the thyroid gland itself. The daily maintenance dose of T(4) varies widely between 75 and 250 microg. Assessment of the appropriate T(4) dose is by assay of TSH and fT(4), preferably in a blood sample taken before ingestion of the subsequent T(4) tablet. Dose adjustments can be necessary in pregnancy and when medications are used that are known to interfere with the absorption or metabolism of T(4). A new equilibrium is reached after approximately 6 weeks, implying that laboratory tests should not be done earlier. With a stable maintenance dose, an annual check-up usually suffices. Accumulated experience with L-T(4) replacement has identified some areas of concern. First, the

  9. Huge Perineal Tumour: A Rare Presentation of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour of Rectum.

    PubMed

    Nahar, K; Salahuddin, G M; Islam, M R; Islam, M S; Quddus, M A; Islam, M A; Debnath, B C

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is a relatively rare neoplasm of gastrointestinal tract of which Rectal GIST is uncommon. It produces symptoms of per rectal bleeding or change in bowel habit. Recurrences following curative resection are predominantly intraabdominal, hepatic metastasis occurring at a median 20-25 months following the primary surgery. A 42 years old male presented a huge mass in hypogastrium, the size of which was reduced ofter neoadjuvant therapy for period of 1.5 years. He underwent abdominoperineal resection. He developed recurrences in perineum three times and in thigh at short intervals after primary resection. He also developed liver metastasis. He died two and half years after primary diagnosis. Rectal GIST should be included in differential diagnosis of intraabdominal mass and preoperative diagnosis based on histopathological as well as the immunohistochemical feature of the CD(117) and CD(34). Although complete surgical resection with negative tumour margin is the principal curative procedure for primary and non metastatic tumours, further studies are still needed for the determination of the most effective treatment strategy for patients of rectal GIST. PMID:27277373

  10. Somatic CRISPR/Cas9-mediated tumour suppressor disruption enables versatile brain tumour modelling

    PubMed Central

    Zuckermann, Marc; Hovestadt, Volker; Knobbe-Thomsen, Christiane B.; Zapatka, Marc; Northcott, Paul A.; Schramm, Kathrin; Belic, Jelena; Jones, David T. W.; Tschida, Barbara; Moriarity, Branden; Largaespada, David; Roussel, Martine F.; Korshunov, Andrey; Reifenberger, Guido; Pfister, Stefan M.; Lichter, Peter; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Gronych, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In vivo functional investigation of oncogenes using somatic gene transfer has been successfully exploited to validate their role in tumorigenesis. For tumour suppressor genes this has proven more challenging due to technical aspects. To provide a flexible and effective method for investigating somatic loss-of-function alterations and their influence on tumorigenesis, we have established CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic gene disruption, allowing for in vivo targeting of TSGs. Here we demonstrate the utility of this approach by deleting single (Ptch1) or multiple genes (Trp53, Pten, Nf1) in the mouse brain, resulting in the development of medulloblastoma and glioblastoma, respectively. Using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) we characterized the medulloblastoma-driving Ptch1 deletions in detail and show that no off-targets were detected in these tumours. This method provides a fast and convenient system for validating the emerging wealth of novel candidate tumour suppressor genes and the generation of faithful animal models of human cancer. PMID:26067104

  11. An Evolutionary Hybrid Cellular Automaton Model of Solid Tumour Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gerlee, P.; Anderson, A.R.A.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a cellular automaton model of solid tumour growth, in which each cell is equipped with a micro-environment response network. This network is modelled using a feed-forward artificial neural network, that takes environmental variables as an input and from these determines the cellular behaviour as the output. The response of the network is determined by connection weights and thresholds in the network, which are subject to mutations when the cells divide. As both available space and nutrients are limited resources for the tumour this gives rise to clonal evolution where only the fittest cells survive. Using this approach we have investigated the impact of the tissue oxygen concentration on the growth and evolutionary dynamics of the tumour. The results show that the oxygen concentration affects the selection pressure, cell population diversity and morphology of the tumour. A low oxygen concentration in the tissue gives rise to a tumour with a fingered morphology that contains aggressive phenotypes with a small apoptotic potential, while a high oxygen concentration in the tissue gives rise to a tumour with a round morphology containing less evolved phenotypes. The tissue oxygen concentration thus affects the tumour at both the morphological level and on the phenotype level. PMID:17374383

  12. Resected tumours of the sublingual gland: 15 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tung-Tsun; Chou, Yu-Fu; Wen, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Peir-Rong

    2016-07-01

    Sublingual gland tumours are rare, and we have evaluated the clinical features and prognosis of patients treated at a tertiary medical centre in eastern Taiwan. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of nine patients with sublingual gland tumours that were resected from December 1993 to November 2008, four of whom were men and five women. The median (range) age at diagnosis was 52 (39-63) years. Seven had malignant tumours, of which adenoid cystic carcinoma was the most common. All patients with malignant tumours had neck dissections, and four had cervical lymph node metastases. The incidence of lymph node metastases was much higher in patients with advanced primary tumours (T1/2 compared with T3/4: one out of three compared with three out of four). All patients with malignant tumours were given adjuvant radiotherapy. There were no local failures. One patient had regional recurrence in the neck and had a successful further resection. Three patients developed distant metastases, and two died during the follow-up period. Our results suggest that radical resection with postoperative radiotherapy offers adequate local and regional control for malignant sublingual gland tumours. Neck dissection is beneficial, especially for T3/4 disease. PMID:27062437

  13. Oxidative stress parameters in bitches with mammary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Szczubiał, M; Kankofer, M; Łopuszyński, W; Dabrowski, R; Lipko, J

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe some of the oxidative stress parameters in bitches suffering from spontaneously occurring mammary gland tumours. The experiment involved 28 bitches which had mammary gland tumours removed surgically (15 bitches with malignant tumour and 13 with benign tumour) as well as 10 clinically healthy bitches. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were determined in haemolysates of erythrocytes derived from the animals. The concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as well as -SH groups, were determined in blood plasma. GSH-Px activity was significantly higher in the malignant tumour group than in healthy animals. SOD activity was significantly higher in animals with tumours compared with the control group. Activities of both enzymes were higher in animals with malignant tumours than in benign groups, but the differences were not statistically significant. The concentrations of TBARS and -SH groups were similar in all examined groups. The increase of antioxidative enzyme activities in these animals may suggest the activation of antioxidative defence mechanisms in mammary gland carcinogenesis. Moreover, it might indicate the participation of oxidative stress in malignancies. Further experiments involving more animals, with more frequent sample collection and the use of other oxidative stress markers are necessary. PMID:15533114

  14. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase I enhances tumour growth and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kostourou, V; Robinson, S P; Cartwright, J E; Whitley, G St J

    2002-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a prerequisite for tumour progression and is highly regulated by growth factors and cytokines a number of which also stimulate the production of nitric oxide. Asymmetric dimethylarginine is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis. Asymmetric dimethylarginine is metabolised by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase. To study the effect of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase on tumour growth and vascular development, the rat C6 glioma cell line was manipulated to overexpress the rat gene for dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase I. Enhanced expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase I increased nitric oxide synthesis (as indicated by a two-fold increase in the production of cGMP), expression and secretion of vascular endothelial cell growth factor, and induced angiogenesis in vitro. Tumours derived from these cells grew more rapidly in vivo than cells with normal dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase I expression. Immunohistochemical and magnetic resonance imaging measurements were consistent with increased tumour vascular development. Furthermore, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase activity was detected in a series of human tumours. This data demonstrates that dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase plays a pivotal role in tumour growth and the development of the tumour vasculature by regulating the concentration of nitric oxide and altering vascular endothelial cell growth factor production. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 673–680. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600518 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12237779

  15. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours. PMID:26768026

  16. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidase and Lysyl Oxidase-Like Enzymes Has Tumour-Promoting and Tumour-Suppressing Roles in Experimental Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Bergh, Anders; Halin Bergström, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) and LOX-like (LOXL) enzymes are key players in extracellular matrix deposition and maturation. LOX promote tumour progression and metastasis, but it may also have tumour-inhibitory effects. Here we show that orthotopic implantation of rat prostate AT-1 tumour cells increased LOX and LOXLs mRNA expressions in the tumour and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue. Inhibition of LOX enzymes, using Beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), initiated before implantation of AT-1 cells, reduced tumour growth. Conversely, treatment that was started after the tumours were established resulted in unaffected or increased tumour growth. Moreover, treatment with BAPN did not suppress the formation of spontaneous lymph node metastases, or lung tumour burden, when tumour cells were injected intravenously. A temporal decrease in collagen fibre content, which is a target for LOX, was observed in tumours and in the tumour-adjacent prostate tissue. This may explain why early BAPN treatment is more effective in inhibiting tumour growth compared to treatment initiated later. Our data suggest that the enzymatic function of the LOX family is context-dependent, with both tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting properties in prostate cancer. Further investigations are needed to understand the circumstances under which LOX inhibition may be used as a therapeutic target for cancer patients. PMID:26804196

  17. Gelatinase B/MMP-9 in Tumour Pathogenesis and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Antonietta Rosella; Mackay, Andrew Reay

    2014-01-01

    Since its original identification as a leukocyte gelatinase/type V collagenase and tumour type IV collagenase, gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 is now recognised as playing a central role in many aspects of tumour progression. In this review, we relate current concepts concerning the many ways in which gelatinase B/MMP-9 influences tumour biology. Following a brief outline of the gelatinase B/MMP-9 gene and protein, we analyse the role(s) of gelatinase B/MMP-9 in different phases of the tumorigenic process, and compare the importance of gelatinase B/MMP-9 source in the carcinogenic process. What becomes apparent is the importance of inflammatory cell-derived gelatinase B/MMP-9 in tumour promotion, early progression and triggering of the “angiogenic switch”, the integral relationship between inflammatory, stromal and tumour components with respect to gelatinase B/MMP-9 production and activation, and the fundamental role for gelatinase B/MMP-9 in the formation and maintenance of tumour stem cell and metastatic niches. It is also apparent that gelatinase B/MMP-9 plays important tumour suppressing functions, producing endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, promoting inflammatory anti-tumour activity, and inducing apoptosis. The fundamental roles of gelatinase B/MMP-9 in cancer biology underpins the need for specific therapeutic inhibitors of gelatinase B/MMP-9 function, the use of which must take into account and substitute for tumour-suppressing gelatinase B/MMP-9 activity and also limit inhibition of physiological gelatinase B/MMP-9 function. PMID:24473089

  18. Metabolic consequences of methotrexate therapy in tumour-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Rofe, A M; Bourgeois, C S; Washington, J M; Philcox, J C; Coyle, P

    1994-02-01

    The metabolic response of the tumour-bearing host to methotrexate (MTX) therapy was investigated with particular attention to effects resulting from MTX-induced anorexia. Biochemical changes in female Dark Agouti rats bearing mammary adenocarcinomas and treated with MTX (0.5 mg/kg, 2 i.m. injections, 24 h apart) were compared with untreated (CON) tumour-bearing rats, and tumour-bearing rats pair-fed (PF) to the MTX group. MTX treatment halted progression of the tumour (tumour 6% of bodyweight) while the tumour burden doubled in the CON and PF groups. A number of biochemical and haematological changes were specific to MTX treatment and did not result from decreased food intake. MTX treatment was associated with significantly decreased plasma calcium, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase and the total white cell count. Decreases in plasma albumin and total protein concentrations were observed in both MTX and PF rats. Other parameters commonly used to assess renal and liver function were not significantly affected by MTX. MTX reversed the hypoglycaemia, hyperketonaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia induced by tumour-bearing. In contrast, PF rats had an even more pronounced hypoglycaemia and hyperketonaemia than the CON rats. Measurement of glucose uptake in vivo with 2-deoxy[U-14C]-glucose showed that MTX treatment halved the glucose requirement of the tumour (8.2% of bodyweight compared to 12.2% in the control). It is concluded that the potentially adverse effects of MTX treatment on host metabolism are outweighed by the beneficial effects of a reduced metabolic demand resulting from inhibition of tumour progression. PMID:8157287

  19. Localized interleukin-12 delivery for immunotherapy of solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Wei, Louis Z; Xu, Yixin; Nelles, E Megan; Furlonger, Caren; Wang, James C M; Di Grappa, Marco A; Khokha, Rama; Medin, Jeffrey A; Paige, Christopher J

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is the key cytokine in the initiation of a Th1 response and has shown promise as an anti-cancer agent; however, clinical trials involving IL-12 have been unsuccessful due to toxic side-effects. To address this issue, lentiviral vectors were used to transduce tumour cell lines that were injected as an autologous tumour cell vaccine. The focus of the current study was to test the efficacy of this approach in a solid tumour model. SCCVII cells that were transduced to produce IL-12 at different concentrations were then isolated. Subcutaneous injection of parental SCCVII cells results in tumour development, while a mixture of IL-12-producing and non-producing cells results in tumour clearance. Interestingly, when comparing mice injected a mixture of SCCVII and either high IL-12-producing tumour cells or low IL-12-producing tumour cells, we observed that mixtures containing small amounts of high producing cells lead to tumour clearance, whereas mixtures containing large amounts of low producing cells fail to elicit protection, despite the production of equal amounts of total IL-12 in both mixtures. Furthermore, immunizing mice with IL-12-producing cells leads to the establishment of both local and systemic immunity against challenge with SCCVII. Using depletion antibodies, it was shown that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells are crucial for therapy. Lastly, we have established cell clones of other solid tumour cell lines (RM-1, LLC1 and moto1.1) that produce IL-12. Our results show that the delivery of IL-12 by cancer cells is an effective route for immune activation. PMID:24251770

  20. Localized interleukin-12 delivery for immunotherapy of solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Louis Z; Xu, Yixin; E Nelles, Megan; Furlonger, Caren; Wang, James CM; Di Grappa, Marco A; Khokha, Rama; Medin, Jeffrey A; Paige, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is the key cytokine in the initiation of a Th1 response and has shown promise as an anti-cancer agent; however, clinical trials involving IL-12 have been unsuccessful due to toxic side-effects. To address this issue, lentiviral vectors were used to transduce tumour cell lines that were injected as an autologous tumour cell vaccine. The focus of the current study was to test the efficacy of this approach in a solid tumour model. SCCVII cells that were transduced to produce IL-12 at different concentrations were then isolated. Subcutaneous injection of parental SCCVII cells results in tumour development, while a mixture of IL-12-producing and non-producing cells results in tumour clearance. Interestingly, when comparing mice injected a mixture of SCCVII and either high IL-12-producing tumour cells or low IL-12-producing tumour cells, we observed that mixtures containing small amounts of high producing cells lead to tumour clearance, whereas mixtures containing large amounts of low producing cells fail to elicit protection, despite the production of equal amounts of total IL-12 in both mixtures. Furthermore, immunizing mice with IL-12-producing cells leads to the establishment of both local and systemic immunity against challenge with SCCVII. Using depletion antibodies, it was shown that both CD4+ and CD8+ cells are crucial for therapy. Lastly, we have established cell clones of other solid tumour cell lines (RM-1, LLC1 and moto1.1) that produce IL-12. Our results show that the delivery of IL-12 by cancer cells is an effective route for immune activation. PMID:24251770

  1. Growth hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carter-Su, Christin; Schwartz, Jessica; Argetsinger, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Over 20years ago, our laboratory showed that growth hormone (GH) signals through the GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. We showed that GH binding to its membrane-bound receptor enhances binding of JAK2 to the GHR, activates JAK2, and stimulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of both JAK2 and GHR. The activated JAK2/GHR complex recruits a variety of signaling proteins, thereby initiating multiple signaling pathways and cellular responses. These proteins and pathways include: 1) Stat transcription factors implicated in the expression of multiple genes, including the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1; 2) Shc adapter proteins that lead to activation of the grb2-SOS-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1,2 pathway; 3) insulin receptor substrate proteins implicated in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Akt pathway; 4) signal regulatory protein α, a transmembrane scaffold protein that recruits proteins including the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2; and 5) SH2B1, a scaffold protein that can activate JAK2 and enhance GH regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent work has focused on the function of SH2B1. We have shown that SH2B1β is recruited to and phosphorylated by JAK2 in response to GH. SH2B1 localizes to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and focal adhesions; it also cycles through the nucleus. SH2B1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and promotes GH-dependent motility of RAW264.7 macrophages. Mutations in SH2B1 have been found in humans exhibiting severe early-onset childhood obesity and insulin resistance. These mutations impair SH2B1 enhancement of GH-induced macrophage motility. As SH2B1 is expressed ubiquitously and is also recruited to a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, our results raise the possibility that effects of SH2B1 on the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, including neurons, may play a role in regulating body weight. PMID:26421979

  2. Is dehydroepiandrosterone a hormone?

    PubMed

    Labrie, F; Luu-The, V; Bélanger, A; Lin, S-X; Simard, J; Pelletier, G; Labrie, C

    2005-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is not a hormone but it is a very important prohormone secreted in large amounts by the adrenals in humans and other primates, but not in lower species. It is secreted in larger quantities than cortisol and is present in the blood at concentrations only second to cholesterol. All the enzymes required to transform DHEA into androgens and/or estrogens are expressed in a cell-specific manner in a large series of peripheral target tissues, thus permitting all androgen-sensitive and estrogen-sensitive tissues to make locally and control the intracellular levels of sex steroids according to local needs. This new field of endocrinology has been called intracrinology. In women, after menopause, all estrogens and almost all androgens are made locally in peripheral tissues from DHEA which indirectly exerts effects, among others, on bone formation, adiposity, muscle, insulin and glucose metabolism, skin, libido and well-being. In men, where the secretion of androgens by the testicles continues for life, the contribution of DHEA to androgens has been best evaluated in the prostate where about 50% of androgens are made locally from DHEA. Such knowledge has led to the development of combined androgen blockade (CAB), a treatment which adds a pure anti-androgen to medical (GnRH agonist) or surgical castration in order to block the access of the androgens made locally to the androgen receptor. In fact, CAB has been the first treatment demonstrated to prolong life in advanced prostate cancer while recent data indicate that it can permit long-term control and probably cure in at least 90% of cases of localized prostate cancer. The new field of intracrinology or local formation of sex steroids from DHEA in target tissues has permitted major advances in the treatment of the two most frequent cancers, namely breast and prostate cancer, while its potential use as a physiological HRT could well provide a physiological balance of androgens and estrogens, thus

  3. Two unusual tumours in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Eatwell, K

    2004-09-01

    This case report describes the clinical history, diagnosis and treatment of a ferret with a tumour of the right adrenal gland and insulinomas of the pancreas. Histopathology of both lesions confirmed the diagnoses. Clinical signs of the adrenal gland tumour were a swollen vulva, overgrooming, sexual activity and pruritus. The clinical signs suggesting insulinomas were collapse of the ferret, disorientation and ptyalism. A low blood glucose level assisted the diagnosis of insulinomas. This is believed to be the first reported case of concurrent insulinomas and adrenal gland tumour in a ferret in the United Kingdom. PMID:15460204

  4. Intracerebral haemorrhage in primary and metastatic brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Salmaggi, Andrea; Erbetta, Alessandra; Silvani, Antonio; Maderna, Emanuela; Pollo, Bianca

    2008-09-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage may both be a presenting manifestation in unrecognised brain tumour or--more frequently--take place in the disease course of known/suspected brain tumour due to diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, including biopsy, locoregional treatments and anti-angiogenic therapies. Apart from the difficulties inherent to accurate neuroradiological diagnosis in selected cases with small tumour volume, the main clinical problem that neurologists face is represented by decision making in prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism in these patients. These points are briefly discussed and available evidence on the last point is commented on. PMID:18690513

  5. The Tumour Microenvironment after Radiotherapy: Mechanisms of Resistance and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Holly E.; Paget, James T. E.; Khan, Aadil A.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a central part in curing cancer. For decades, most research on improving treatment outcomes has focussed on modulating radiation-induced biological effects on cancer cells. Recently, we have better understood that components within the tumour microenvironment have pivotal roles in determining treatment outcomes. In this Review, we describe vascular, stromal and immunological changes induced in the tumour microenvironment by irradiation and discuss how they may promote radioresistance and tumour recurrence. Subsequently, we highlight how this knowledge is guiding the development of new treatment paradigms in which biologically targeted agents will be combined with radiotherapy. PMID:26105538

  6. The tumour microenvironment after radiotherapy: mechanisms of resistance and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Barker, Holly E; Paget, James T E; Khan, Aadil A; Harrington, Kevin J

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy plays a central part in curing cancer. For decades, most research on improving treatment outcomes has focused on modulating radiation-induced biological effects on cancer cells. Recently, we have better understood that components within the tumour microenvironment have pivotal roles in determining treatment outcomes. In this Review, we describe vascular, stromal and immunological changes that are induced in the tumour microenvironment by irradiation and discuss how these changes may promote radioresistance and tumour recurrence. We also highlight how this knowledge is guiding the development of new treatment paradigms in which biologically targeted agents will be combined with radiotherapy. PMID:26105538

  7. Studying the emergence of invasiveness in tumours using game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basanta, D.; Hatzikirou, H.; Deutsch, A.

    2008-06-01

    Tumour cells have to acquire a number of capabilities if a neoplasm is to become a cancer. One of these key capabilities is increased motility which is needed for invasion of other tissues and metastasis. This paper presents a qualitative mathematical model based on game theory and computer simulations using cellular automata. With this model we study the circumstances under which mutations that confer increased motility to cells can spread through a tumour made of rapidly proliferating cells. The analysis suggests therapies that could help prevent the progression towards malignancy and invasiveness of benign tumours.

  8. Partial pneumoencephalography in following-up pituitary tumours 1

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, William W.; Wilson, Gabriel H.; Rand, Robert W.; Gartland, John P.

    1974-01-01

    The `limited' pneumoencephalogram has been used with excellent success at UCLA for the continuing follow-up of pituitary tumours. It is most useful in following nonsecretory adenomas since tumour regrowth can occur in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms. Total serial pneumoencephalography has not been accepted previously for follow-up of pituitary tumours since there is a significant morbidity. The `limited' pneumoencephalogram of the diseased area drastically reduces the morbidity of the procedure so that the patients are willing to undergo serial studies on an outpatient basis. Images PMID:4844132

  9. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  10. Sympathetic nervous system regulation of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Green, Paige A.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) is known to regulate gene expression in primary tumours and their surrounding microenvironment. Activation of the sympathetic division of the ANS in particular modulates gene expression programs that promote metastasis of solid tumours by stimulating macrophage infiltration, inflammation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and tumour invasion, and by inhibiting cellular immune responses and programmed cell death. Haematological cancers are modulated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of stem cell biology and hematopoietic differentiation programs. In addition to identifying a molecular basis for physiologic stress effects on cancer, these findings have also identified new pharmacologic strategies to inhibit cancer progression in vivo. PMID:26299593

  11. Glutathione and the rate of cellular proliferation determine tumour cell sensitivity to tumour necrosis factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, E; Navarro, J; Mompo, J; Asensi, M; Pellicer, J A; Estrela, J M

    1997-01-01

    Low rates of cellular proliferation are associated with low GSH content and enhanced sensitivity of Ehrlich ascites-tumour (EAT) cells to the cytotoxic effects of recombinant human tumour necrosis factor (rhTNF-alpha). Buthionine sulphoximine, a selective inhibitor of GSH synthesis, inhibited tumour growth and increased rhTNF-alpha cytoxicity in vitro. Administration of sublethal doses (10(6)units/kg per day) of rhTNF-alpha to EAT-bearing mice promoted oxidative stress (as measured by increases in intracellular peroxide levels, O2(-); generation and mitochondrial GSSG) and resulted in a slight reduction (19%) in tumour cell number when controls showed the highest rate of cellular proliferation. ATP (1mmol/kg per day)-induced selective GSH depletion, when combined with rhTNF-alpha administration, afforded a 61% inhibition of tumour growth and resulted in a significant extension of host survival. Administration of N-acetylcysteine (1mmol/kg per day) or GSH ester (5mmol/kg per day) abolished the rhTNF-alpha- and ATP-induced effects on tumour growth by maintaining high GSH levels in the cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity of tumour cells to rhTNF-alpha in vivo depends on their GSH content and their rate of proliferation. PMID:9224645

  12. A Glomus Tumour of the Elbow: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron; Vrettos, Basil; Roche, Stephen; Solomons, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Extradigital glomus tumours are relatively uncommon. We present a case report of a glomus tumour of the elbow and review of the literature with regards to the clinical features, work-up and management of these tumours, to highlight the importance of considering a glomus tumour as part of the differential diagnosis in patient with atypical pain around the elbow.

  13. [Dependence of serum hormones (T, FSH, LH) on morphometric testicular findings after chemo- and radiotherapy in patients with malignant testicular tumors].

    PubMed

    Barth, V; Schönfelder, M

    1990-01-01

    Correlations which exist between morphometric parameters of remaining testicular tissue, on the one hand, and serum hormones on the other (testosterone = T, follicle-stimulating hormone = FSH, luteinising hormone = LH), depending on therapeutic action taken on patients for malignant testicular tumours, seem to suggest that decline in epithelial thickness together with increase in wall thickness leads to rise in FSH. No unambiguous relations, on the other hand, were found to exist between testosterone or luteotrophic hormone and morphometric findings. Hence, FSH seems to characterise the severity of damage to germ epithelium and thus the degree of impairment to spermatogenesis. FSH may be accepted as a criterion for fertility disorders in sexually active men. PMID:2122615

  14. Growth Hormone and Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, S; Guarneri, F

    2016-08-01

    Great interest has recently been focused on a paper reporting characteristic deposits of amyloid-β protein associated with Alzheimer's disease in brains of adults who died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. As they had contracted such disease after treatment with prion-contaminated human growth hormone extracted from cadaver-derived pituitaries, the authors have suggested that interhuman transmission of Alzheimer's disease had occurred. Our previous research led us to find that amyloid-forming peptides share amino acid sequence homology, summarized by a motif. Here, we probed the amino acid sequence of human growth hormone for such a motif, and found that 2 segments fit the motif and are potentially amyloid-forming. This finding was confirmed by Aggrescan, another well-known software for the prediction of amyloidogenic peptides. Our results, taken together with data from the literature that are missing in the aforementioned paper and associated commentaries, minimize the contagious nature of the iatrogenically-acquired coexistence of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Alzheimer's disease. In particular, the above mentioned paper misses literature data on intratumoral amyloidosis in growth hormone- and prolactin-secreting adenomas, tumors relatively frequent in adults, which are often silent. It cannot be excluded that some pituitaries used to extract growth hormone contained clinically silent microadenomas, a fraction of which containing amyloid deposits, and patients might had received a fraction of growth hormone (with or without prolactin) that already was an amyloid seed. The intrinsic amyloidogenicity of growth hormone, in the presence of contaminating prion protein (and perhaps prolactin as well) and amyloid-β contained in some cadavers' pituitaries, may have led to the observed co-occurring of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27214308

  15. Effects of oestrogen on microRNA expression in hormone-responsive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Lorenzo; Ravo, Maria; Nassa, Giovanni; Tarallo, Roberta; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Giurato, Giorgio; Cirillo, Francesca; Stellato, Claudia; Silvestro, Silvana; Cantarella, Concita; Rizzo, Francesca; Cimino, Daniela; Friard, Olivier; Biglia, Nicoletta; De Bortoli, Michele; Cicatiello, Luigi; Nola, Ernesto; Weisz, Alessandro

    2012-06-01

    Oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates oestrogen effects in hormone-responsive cells. Following oestrogenic activation, ERα directly regulates the transcription of target genes via DNA binding. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small noncoding RNAs that function as negative regulators of protein-coding gene expression. They are found aberrantly expressed or mutated in cancer, suggesting their crucial role as either oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes. Here, we analysed changes in miRNA expression in response to oestrogen in hormone-responsive breast cancer MCF-7 and ZR-75.1 cells by microarray-mediated expression profiling. This led to the identification of 172 miRNAs up- or down-regulated by ERα in response to 17β-oestradiol, of which 52 are similarly regulated by the hormone in the two cell models investigated. To identify mechanisms by which ERα exerts its effects on oestrogen-responsive miRNA genes, the oestrogen-dependent miRNA expression profiles were integrated with global in vivo ERα binding site mapping in the genome by ChIP-Seq. In addition, data from miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles obtained under identical experimental conditions were compared to identify relevant miRNA target transcripts. Results show that miRNAs modulated by ERα represent a novel genomic pathway to impact oestrogen-dependent processes that affect hormone-responsive breast cancer cell behaviour. MiRNome analysis in tumour tissues from breast cancer patients confirmed a strong association between expression of these small RNAs and clinical outcome of the disease, although this appears to involve only marginally the oestrogen-regulated miRNAs identified in this study. PMID:22274890

  16. Tumour biology: Herceptin acts as an anti-angiogenic cocktail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Yotaro; Xu, Lei; di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2002-03-01

    Malignant tumours secrete factors that enable them to commandeer their own blood supply (angiogenesis), and blocking the action of these factors can inhibit tumour growth. But because tumours may become resistant to treatments that target individual angiogenic factors by switching over to other angiogenic molecules, a cocktail of multiple anti-angiogenic agents should be more effective. Here we show that herceptin, a monoclonal antibody against the cell-surface receptor HER2 (for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2; ref. 4), induces normalization and regression of the vasculature in an experimental human breast tumour that overexpresses HER2 in mice, and that it works by modulating the effects of different pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. As a single agent that acts against multiple targets, herceptin, or drugs like it, may offer a simple alternative to combination anti-angiogenic treatments.

  17. Patella dislocation following distal femoral replacement after bone tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Toru; Kanda, Shotaro; Maeda, Akinori; Endo, Minoru; Saita, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old girl with patella dislocation following distal femur replacement for a malignant tumour. We performed a medial plication and lateral release procedure to treat her persistent patellar dislocation after distal femur replacement following malignant tumour resection. This treatment improved the patient's gait ability dramatically. A distal femur reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) system for tumour resection is a frequently performed procedure. The reported incidence of patella dislocation following distal femur reconstruction with a TKA is 2.3%. However, treatment procedures for patella dislocation following a distal femur replacement after malignant tumour resection have not been studied extensively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first English case report about patella dislocation following distal femoral replacement focusing on surgical treatment. Our experience suggests that treatment for patella dislocation following distal femur reconstruction with a TKA should be considered positively. PMID:25073529

  18. Benign Multicystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma: A Rare Tumour of the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Soundappan; Khajanchi, Monty; Vaja, Tejas; Jajoo, Bhushan; Dey, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma: a rare tumor of the abdomen, is a diagnostic dilemma. This report emphasizes the importance of diagnostic laparoscopy in the diagnosis of the tumour. PMID:25866695

  19. Augmenting drug–carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, Francois; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphael; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjorkoy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; et al

    2016-04-13

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug–carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug–carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug’s hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, wemore » applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug’s compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Lastly, our results help elucidate nanomedicines’ in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery.« less

  20. In vivo longitudinal photoacoustic imaging of subcutaneous tumours in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Pedley, Barbara; Beard, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography can provide high resolution 3D images of vascular networks, making it well suited to characterising the development of tumour vasculature and its response to treatment. In this study, photoacoustic images to depths of up to 9 mm were obtained using an all optical ultrasound detection scheme. Two type of colorectal tumours (LS174T and SW1222) implanted subcutaneously in a mouse were studied. 3D photoacoustic images were obtained in vivo revealing the different vascular architectures of each tumour type and their evolution over a period of several days. The results suggest that photoacoustic imaging could play a role in providing essential pre-clinical information on tumour pathophysiology and eliciting the biological mechanisms underlying anti-angiogenic therapies and other treatments.

  1. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  2. Mathematical modelling of the Warburg effect in tumour cords.

    PubMed

    Astanin, Sergey; Preziosi, Luigi

    2009-06-21

    The model proposed here links together two approaches to describe tumours: a continuous medium to describe the movement and the mechanical properties of the tissue, and a population dynamics approach to represent internal genetic inhomogeneity and instability of the tumour. In this way one can build models which cover several stages of tumour progression. In this paper we focus on describing transition from aerobic to purely glycolytic metabolism (the Warburg effect) in tumour cords. From the mathematical point of view this model leads to a free boundary problem where domains in contact are characterized by different sets of equations. Accurate stitching of the solution was possible with a modified ghost fluid method. Growth and death of the cells and uptake of the nutrients are related through ATP production and energy costs of the cellular processes. In the framework of the bi-population model this allowed to keep the number of model parameters relatively small. PMID:19232360

  3. Inferring mutational timing and reconstructing tumour evolutionary histories.

    PubMed

    Turajlic, Samra; McGranahan, Nicholas; Swanton, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Cancer evolution can be considered within a Darwinian framework. Both micro and macro-evolutionary theories can be applied to understand tumour progression and treatment failure. Owing to cancers' complexity and heterogeneity the rules of tumour evolution, such as the role of selection, remain incompletely understood. The timing of mutational events during tumour evolution presents diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic opportunities. Here we review the current sampling and computational approaches for inferring mutational timing and the evidence from next generation sequencing-informed data on mutational timing across all tumour types. We discuss how this knowledge can be used to illuminate the genes and pathways that drive cancer initiation and relapse; and to support drug development and clinical trial design. PMID:25827356

  4. Functional properties of ion channels and transporters in tumour vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Munaron, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization is crucial for solid tumour growth and invasion, providing metabolic support and sustaining metastatic dissemination. It is now accepted that ion channels and transporters play a significant role in driving the cancer growth at all stages. They may represent novel therapeutic, diagnostic and prognostic targets for anti-cancer therapies. On the other hand, although the expression and role of ion channels and transporters in the vascular endothelium is well recognized and subject of recent reviews, only recently has their involvement in tumour vascularization been recognized. Here, we review the current literature on ion channels and transporters directly involved in the angiogenic process. Particular interest will be focused on tumour angiogenesis in vivo as well as in the different steps that drive this process in vitro, such as endothelial cell proliferation, migration, adhesion and tubulogenesis. Moreover, we compare the ‘transportome’ system of tumour vascular network with the physiological one. PMID:24493751

  5. Augmenting drug-carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, François; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; Fayad, Zahi A; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J M

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug-carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug-carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug's hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, we applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug's compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Our results help elucidate nanomedicines' in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery. PMID:27071376

  6. Augmenting drug–carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, François; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; Fayad, Zahi A.; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug–carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug–carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug's hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, we applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug's compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Our results help elucidate nanomedicines' in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery. PMID:27071376

  7. Natural cytotoxicity of haemopoietic cell populations against murine lymphoid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, R. C.; Grail, D.; Warner, N. L.

    1978-01-01

    Homozygous nude and normal mice of 3 strains, BALB/c, CBA and C57BL, were used as sources of nucleated haemopoietic "natural killer" (NK) cells. These killer cells could lyse a wide range of syngeneic and allogeneic lymphoid tumour cell lines in vitro, and it was found that cell suspensions from nude mice were always significantly more active than those from normal mice, and that the most active effector population was a polymorph-enriched peritoneal-exudate cell suspension. Eosinophils did not appear to be involved in the phenomenon, and mononuclear peritoneal-exudate cell suspensions were actually highly inhibitory. Three non-lymphoid tumours, a carcinoma, a fibrosarcoma and a mastocytoma, were totally resistant to in vitro lysis. Although all susceptible tumour cell lines were C-type virus-associated, not all of these tumours were killed by all strain sources of spleen cells, indicating a specificity of killing. PMID:656308

  8. Review of photon and proton radiotherapy for skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Piero; Vavassori, Andrea; Deantonio, Letizia; Ferrara, Eleonora; Krengli, Marco; Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    An extremely large variety of benign and malignant tumours occur at skull base; these tumour lesions are in the proximity to structures deputed to relevant physiologic functions, limiting extensive surgical approaches to this body district. Most recent progresses of surgery and radiotherapy have allowed to improve local control with acceptable rates of side effects. Various photon radiotherapy techniques are employed, including 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and brachytherapy that is manly limited to the treatment of primary or recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Proton beam radiotherapy is also extensively used thanks to its physical characteristics. Our review, focusing in particular on meningioma, chordoma, and chondrosarcoma, suggests that proton therapy plays a major role in the treatment of malignant tumours whereas photon therapy still plays a relevant role in the treatment of benign tumour lesions. PMID:27330419

  9. Augmenting drug-carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, François; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; Fayad, Zahi A.; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug-carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug-carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug's hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, we applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug's compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Our results help elucidate nanomedicines' in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery.

  10. Tumours with cancer stem cells: A PDE model.

    PubMed

    Fasano, A; Mancini, A; Primicerio, M

    2016-02-01

    The role of cancer stem cells (CSC) in tumour growth has received increasing attention in the recent literature. Here we stem from an integro-differential system describing the evolution of a population of CSC and of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells formulated and studied in a previous paper, and we investigate an approximation in which the system reduces to a pair of nonlinear coupled parabolic equation. We prove that the new system is well posed and we examine some general properties. Numerical simulations show more on the qualitative behaviour of the solutions, concerning in particular the so-called tumour paradox, according to which an increase of the mortality rate of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells results asymptotically in a faster growth. PMID:26719124

  11. Semi-automatic cone beam CT segmentation of in vivo pre-clinical subcutaneous tumours provides an efficient non-invasive alternative for tumour volume measurements

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, N P; Tang, J; Skalina, K; Quinn, TJ; Basu, I; Guha, C

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of using cone beam CT (CBCT) scans obtained in radiation studies using the small-animal radiation research platform to perform semi-automatic tumour segmentation of pre-clinical tumour volumes. Methods: Volume measurements were evaluated for different anatomical tumour sites, the flank, thigh and dorsum of the hind foot, for a variety of tumour cell lines. The estimated tumour volumes from CBCT and manual calliper measurements using different volume equations were compared with the “gold standard”, measured by weighing the tumours following euthanasia and tumour resection. The correlation between tumour volumes estimated with the different methods, compared with the gold standard, was estimated by the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, root-mean-square deviation and the coefficient of determination. Results: The semi-automatic CBCT volume segmentation performed favourably compared with manual calliper measures for flank tumours ≤2 cm3 and thigh tumours ≤1 cm3. For tumours >2 cm3 or foot tumours, the CBCT method was not able to accurately segment the tumour volumes and manual calliper measures were superior. Conclusion: We demonstrated that tumour volumes of flank and thigh tumours, obtained as a part of radiation studies using image-guided small-animal irradiators, can be estimated more efficiently and accurately using semi-automatic segmentation from CBCT scans. Advances in knowledge: This is the first study evaluating tumour volume assessment of pre-clinical subcutaneous tumours in different anatomical sites using on-board CBCT imaging. We also compared the accuracy of the CBCT method to manual calliper measures, using various volume calculation equations. PMID:25823502

  12. Advances in male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Antonietta; Gava, Giulia; Berra, Marta; Meriggiola Maria, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  13. Advances in male hormonal contraception

    PubMed Central

    Antonietta, Costantino; Giulia, Gava; Marta, Berra; Cristina, Meriggiola Maria

    2014-01-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  14. Genetics of growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mullis, Primus E

    2007-03-01

    When a child is not following the normal, predicted growth curve, an evaluation for underlying illness and central nervous system abnormalities is required and appropriate consideration should be given to genetic defects causing growth hormone (GH) deficiency. This article focuses on the GH gene, the various gene alterations, and their possible impact on the pituitary gland. Transcription factors regulating pituitary gland development may cause multiple pituitary hormone deficiency but may present initially as GH deficiency. The role of two most important transcription factors, POU1F1 (Pit-1) and PROP 1, is discussed. PMID:17336732

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 40 dogs with histologically confirmed intracranial tumours.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, Sergio; Pumarola, Marti; Gaitero, Lluís; Zamora, Angels; Añor, Sònia

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 40 dogs with histologically confirmed primary and secondary intracranial tumours were reviewed. Forty-one tumours were diagnosed by means of MR imaging (MRI). MRI findings allowed diagnosis of a neoplastic lesion in 37/41 cases. Based on MRI features, differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions was possible in 24/27 (89%) primary brain tumours and in 13/14 (92%) secondary brain tumours. Diagnosis of tumour type based on MRI features was correct in 19/27 (70%) primary tumours and in 13/14 secondary tumours. The results of this study show that MRI is a good diagnostic imaging modality to detect neoplastic lesions and to diagnose tumour type in dogs. However, as some neoplasms show equivocal MRI features the technique has limitations in the detection of some intracranial tumours and in predicting tumour type. PMID:19914851

  16. Gating and tracking, 4D in thoracic tumours.

    PubMed

    Verellen, D; Depuydt, T; Gevaert, T; Linthout, N; Tournel, K; Duchateau, M; Reynders, T; Storme, G; De Ridder, M

    2010-10-01

    The limited ability to control for a tumour's location compromises the accuracy with which radiation can be delivered to tumour-bearing tissue. The resultant requirement for larger treatment volumes to accommodate target uncertainty restricts the radiation dose because more surrounding normal tissue is exposed. With image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), these volumes can be optimized and tumouricidal doses may be delivered, achieving maximum tumour control with minimal complications. Moreover, with the ability of high precision dose delivery and real-time knowledge of the target volume location, IGRT has initiated the exploration of new indications in radiotherapy such as hypofractionated radiotherapy (or stereotactic body radiotherapy), deliberate inhomogeneous dose distributions coping with tumour heterogeneity (dose painting by numbers and biologically conformal radiation therapy), and adaptive radiotherapy. In short: "individualized radiotherapy". Tumour motion management, especially for thoracic tumours, is a particular problem in this context both for the delineation of tumours and organs at risk as well as during the actual treatment delivery. The latter will be covered in this paper with some examples based on the experience of the UZ Brussel. With the introduction of the NOVALIS system (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany) in 2000 and consecutive prototypes of the ExacTrac IGRT system, gradually a hypofractionation treatment protocol was introduced for the treatment of lung tumours and liver metastases evolving from motion-encompassing techniques towards respiratory-gated radiation therapy with audio-visual feedback and most recently dynamic tracking using the VERO system (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany). This evolution will be used to illustrate the recent developments in this particular field of research. PMID:20673737

  17. Biting injuries and transmission of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease.

    PubMed

    Hamede, Rodrigo K; McCallum, Hamish; Jones, Menna

    2013-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil is threatened with extinction by devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), a unique infectious cancer in which the tumour cells themselves, which derive from a single long-dead host devil, are the infective agent and the tumour is an infectious parasitic cell line. Transmission is thought to occur via direct inoculation of tumour cells when susceptible and infected individuals bite each other or by fomitic transfer of tumour cells. The nature of transmission and the extent to which biting behaviour and devil ecology is associated with infection risk remains unclear. Until our recent study in north-west Tasmania showed reduced population and individual impacts, DFTD had caused massive population declines in all populations monitored. In this paper, we investigate seasonal patterns of injuries resulting from bites between individuals, DFTD infection status and tumour location in two populations to determine whether the number of bites predicts the acquisition of DFTD and to explore the possibility that the reduced impacts of DFTD in north-west Tasmania are attributed to reduced bite rates. Devils with fewer bites were more likely to develop DFTD and primary tumours occurred predominantly inside the oral cavity. These results are not consistent with transmission occurring from the biter to the bitten animal but suggest that dominant individuals delivering bites, possibly by biting the tumours of other devils, are at higher risk of acquiring infection than submissive individuals receiving bites. Bite rates, which were higher during autumn and winter, did not differ between sites, suggesting that the reduced population impacts in north-west Tasmania cannot be explained by lower bite rates. Our study emphasizes the importance of longitudinal studies of individually marked animals for understanding the ecology and transmission dynamics of infectious diseases and parasites in wild populations. PMID:22943286

  18. Engineered affinity proteins for tumour-targeting applications.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Ståhl, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Targeting of tumour-associated antigens is an expanding treatment modality in clinical oncology as an alternative to, or in combination with, conventional treatments, such as chemotherapy, external-radiation therapy and surgery. Targeting of antigens that are unique or more highly expressed in tumours than in normal tissues can be used to increase the specificity and reduce the cytotoxic effect on normal tissues. Several targeting agents have been studied for clinical use, where monoclonal antibodies have been the ones most widely used. More than 20 monoclonal antibodies are approved for therapy today and the largest field is oncology. Advances in genetic engineering and in vitro selection technology has enabled the feasible high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies, antibody derivatives [e.g. scFvs, Fab molecules, dAbs (single-domain antibodies), diabodies and minibodies] and more recently also non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins. Several of these affinity proteins have been investigated for both in vivo diagnostics and therapy. Affinity proteins in tumour-targeted therapy can affect tumour progression by altering signal transduction or by delivering a payload of toxin, drug or radionuclide. The ErbB receptor family has been extensively studied as biomarkers in tumour targeting, primarily for therapy using monoclonal antibodies. Two receptors in the ErbB family, EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and HER2 (epidermal growth factor receptor 2), are overexpressed in various malignancies and associated with poor patient prognosis and are therefore interesting targets for solid tumours. In the present review, strategies are described for tumour targeting of solid tumours using affinity proteins to deliver radionuclides, either for molecular imaging or radiotherapy. Antibodies, antibody derivatives and non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins are discussed with a certain focus on the affibody (Affibody) molecule. PMID:19341363

  19. Mixed odontogenic tumour with dentinoid and ghost cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Patil, Shruthi; Zingade, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastomas do not generally show evidence of induction, however, rare cases associated with odontome have been reported and are referred to as odontoameloblastomas. We report an unusual case of an ameloblastoma with features of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, showing evidence of induction of dentinoid by tumour cells--but without concomitant formation of enamel--and with features of ghost cells. The lesion occurred on the left side of the maxilla in a 31-year-old woman. PMID:26698201

  20. Image-Guided Predictions of Liposome Transport in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Shawn

    Due to the ability to preferentially accumulate and deliver drug payloads to solid tumours, liposomes have emerged as an exciting therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. Unfortunately, the initial excitement was dampened by limited clinical results, where only negligible increases in patient survival following liposome therapy have been observed. What are the reasons for the limited clinical efficacy? Is the nanoparticle formulation optimal? Is the enhanced permeability and retention effect overstated? What are the barriers limiting the delivery of drugs to cancer cells? What is the optimal dosing and treatment schedule? Addressing these questions requires developing quantitative tools to understand the behaviour of liposomes in vivo, such as pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, intra-tumoural accumulation, and drug release. Central to each of these questions is the concept of transport - the collection of biophysical processes responsible for the delivery of molecules to tissues. Understanding transport means understanding the crucial links between the spatio-temporal accumulation of liposomes, the physicochemical properties of liposomes, and properties of the tumour microenvironment. In this thesis, a biophysical mathematical transport model is developed that when used in combination with non-invasive imaging methods can predict liposome transport in solid tumours. The mathematical transport framework is validated in its ability to predict the bulk and intra-tumoural accumulation of liposomes based on biophysical transport properties of solid tumours. Furthermore, novel imaging methods are developed and used to elucidate the crucial links between transport barriers and spatial heterogeneity in liposome accumulation. Finally, methods are presented to integrate quantitative imaging and mathematical modelling such that an accurate prediction of liposome transport in solid tumours is possible. In summary, this thesis presents and validates an image-guided mathematical

  1. Clinicopathological Profile of Childhood Primary Abdominal Tumours in Kashmir.

    PubMed

    Khan, Parwez Sajad; Akhter, Zahida; Majeed, Showkat; Wani, Mohd Yousuf; Hayat, Humera

    2015-12-01

    Primary abdominal tumours attract considerable notice because of their serious prognosis, high cost of treatment and the emotional and psychological trauma. Abdominal tumours can present with pain, vomiting, constipation or less commonly intestinal obstruction. The presentation of cancer in children mimic those of childhood conditions like infections particularly viral infections, urinary tract infections, gastro-oesophageal reflux, malnutrition, constipation, lymphadnenitis, glomerulonephritis and congenital urinary tract anomalies. PMID:26730026

  2. Enhanced immune recognition of cryptic glycan markers in human tumours

    PubMed Central

    Newsom-Davis, Thomas E; Wang, Denong; Steinman, Lawrence; Chen, Paul F-T; Wang, Lai-Xi; Simon, A Katharina; Screaton, Gavin R

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal glycosylation is one of the hallmarks of the cancer cell and is associated with tumour invasion and metastasis. The development of tumour associated carbohydrate antigen (TACA) vaccines has been problematic due to poor immunogenicity. However when appropriate targets can be identified, passive immunisation with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against TACAs have been shown to have anti-tumour activity. Fas ligand (FasL) is a transmembrane protein which induces apoptosis in cells expressing its receptor, Fas. When grafted into mice, FasL-expressing tumour cells break immunological tolerance to self-antigens and induce antibody mediated tumour immunity. Here, five IgM mAbs were produced from mice vaccinated with FasL-expressing B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. They recognise various syngeneic and allogeneic murine tumour cell lines. One mAb, TM10, recognises a range of human tumour cell lines including melanoma, prostate and ovarian cancer. It does not bind to untransformed cells. The epitopes recognised by all the mAbs were carbohydrates expressed on proteins. Using carbohydrate microarrays, the antigenic targets of TM10 were found to be high-mannose core structures of N-linked glycans. In normal cells high mannose clusters are hidden by extensive saccharide branching but they become exposed in cancer cells as a result of abnormal glycosylation pathways. Vaccination with FasL-expressing tumours therefore enables the immune system to break tolerance to self-antigens, allowing identification of novel TACAs that can form the basis of future humoral anti-cancer therapy. PMID:19223535

  3. Tumour stroma-derived lipocalin-2 promotes breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ören, Bilge; Urosevic, Jelena; Mertens, Christina; Mora, Javier; Guiu, Marc; Gomis, Roger R; Weigert, Andreas; Schmid, Tobias; Grein, Stephan; Brüne, Bernhard; Jung, Michaela

    2016-07-01

    Tumour cell-secreted factors skew infiltrating immune cells towards a tumour-supporting phenotype, expressing pro-tumourigenic mediators. However, the influence of lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) on the metastatic cascade in the tumour micro-environment is still not clearly defined. Here, we explored the role of stroma-derived, especially macrophage-released, Lcn2 in breast cancer progression. Knockdown studies and neutralizing antibody approaches showed that Lcn2 contributes to the early events of metastasis in vitro. The release of Lcn2 from macrophages induced an epithelial-mesenchymal transition programme in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and enhanced local migration as well as invasion into the extracellular matrix, using a three-dimensioanl (3D) spheroid model. Moreover, a global Lcn2 deficiency attenuated breast cancer metastasis in both the MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model and a xenograft model inoculating MCF-7 cells pretreated with supernatants from wild-type and Lcn2-knockdown macrophages. To dissect the role of stroma-derived Lcn2, we employed an orthotopic mammary tumour mouse model. Implantation of wild-type PyMT tumour cells into Lcn2-deficient mice left primary mammary tumour formation unaltered, but specifically reduced tumour cell dissemination into the lung. We conclude that stroma-secreted Lcn2 promotes metastasis in vitro and in vivo, thereby contributing to tumour progression. Our study highlights the tumourigenic potential of stroma-released Lcn2 and suggests Lcn2 as a putative therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27038000

  4. The early days of spinal tumour surgery.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2011-12-01

    In numerous examples in this series of essays on 'The Early Days of ...' there is argument and debate about who should be given the credit for introducing a particular major advance in treatment. However, in the story of the management of tumours involving the spinal cord, there is no doubt at all about priority; the surgeon was Victor Horsley and the date was June 1887! The patient was a Captain Gilbey, a business man and a retired Army officer. In 1884, shortly after his wife's death following a road traffic accident, he developed severe upper thoracic back pain. He was seen over succeeding months and years by numbers of specialists, whose diagnoses ranged from an aneurysm to neurasthenia, and whose treatments included advice to take a long sea voyage, to have Turkish baths and to take the cure at the medicinal baths at Aix-la-Chapelle. His various medical advisors thought his condition to be functional, even though he was gradually losing sensation and movement in his legs and trunk, was having considerable difficulty in passing his urine and was now requiring morphia for the pain. PMID:22263323

  5. Tumour spectrum in the FAMMM syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, H. T.; Fusaro, R. M.; Pester, J.; Oosterhuis, J. A.; Went, L. N.; Rumke, P.; Neering, H.; Lynch, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    The Familial Atypical Multiple Mole-Melanoma Syndrome (FAMMM) is characterized by an autosomal dominantly inherited susceptibility to multiple atypical naevi. Patients with this hereditary phenotype show a strong susceptibility to cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). Our investigation of an extended Dutch kindred showing the FAMMM phenotype revealed a proband with bilateral intraocular malignant melanoma (IOM) and multiple CMM. The family revealed an array of tumours which included carcinoma of the lung, skin, larynx, and breast in addition to CMM and IOM, which were transmitted vertically through 3 generations. There was male-to-male transmission, and the number of affected males and females was about the same, which was consistent with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Thus the FAMMM syndrome not only indicates a potential for CMM, but a susceptibility to other systemic cancers as well. These observations, though limited to a single kindred, merit a painstaking evaluation of cancer of all anatomical sites in other kindreds showing the FAMMM syndrome. Such studies could yield clues to cancer aetiology, pathogenesis, and control. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7295511

  6. Multicentre results of stereotactic body radiotherapy for secondary liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Betul; Ibarra, Rafael; Snyder, Laura; Yao, Min; Fabien, Jeffrey; Milano, Michael T; Katz, Alan W; Goodman, Karyn; Stephans, Kevin; El-Gazzaz, Galal; Aucejo, Federico; Miller, Charles; Fung, John; Lo, Simon; Machtay, Mitchell; Sanabria, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical resection is the standard treatment for liver metastases, although for the majority of patients this is not possible. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an alternative local-regional therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of SBRT for secondary liver tumours from a combined multicentre database. Methods Variables from patients treated with SBRT from four Academic Medical Centres were entered into a common database. Local tumour control and 1-year survival rates were calculated. Results In total, 153 patients (91 women) 59 ± 8.4 years old with 363 metastatic liver lesions were treated with SBRT. The underlying primary tumour arose from gastrointestinal (GI), retroperitoneal and from extra-abdominal primaries in 56%, 8% and 36% of patients, respectively. Metastases, with a gross tumour volume (GTV) of 138.5 ± 126.8 cm3, were treated with a total radiation dose of 37.5 ± 8.2 Gy in 5 ± 3 fractions. The 1-year overall survival was 51% with an overall local control rate of 62% at a mean follow-up of 25.2 ± 5.9 months. A complete tumour response was observed in 32% of patients. Grade 3–5 adverse events were noted in 3% of patients. Conclusion Secondary liver tumours treated with SBRT had a high rate of local control with a low incidence of adverse events. PMID:23458468

  7. Bacterial-mediated DNA delivery to tumour associated phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, W L; Murphy, C T; Cronin, M; Wirth, T; Tangney, M

    2014-12-28

    Phagocytic cells including macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils are now recognised as playing a negative role in many disease settings including cancer. In particular, macrophages are known to play a pathophysiological role in multiple diseases and present a valid and ubiquitous therapeutic target. The technology to target these phagocytic cells in situ, both selectively and efficiently, is required in order to translate novel therapeutic modalities into clinical reality. We present a novel delivery strategy using non-pathogenic bacteria to effect gene delivery specifically to tumour-associated phagocytic cells. Non-invasive bacteria lack the ability to actively enter host cells, except for phagocytic cells. We exploit this natural property to effect 'passive transfection' of tumour-associated phagocytic cells following direct administration of transgene-loaded bacteria to tumour regions. Using an in vitro-differentiated human monocyte cell line and two in vivo mouse models (an ovarian cancer ascites and a solid colon tumour model) proof of delivery is demonstrated with bacteria carrying reporter constructs. The results confirm that the delivery strategy is specific for phagocytic cells and that the bacterial vector itself recruits more phagocytic cells to the tumour. While proof of delivery to phagocytic cells is demonstrated in vivo for solid and ascites tumour models, this strategy may be applied to other settings, including non-cancer related disease. PMID:25466954

  8. Altered oxidant-antioxidant profile in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Balachandran, C; Manohar, B Murali; Nagini, S

    2005-05-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms in female dogs. Oxidative stress arising due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species, coupled with altered antioxidant capacities has been implicated in the pathogenesis of all types of cancers. However, the extent of lipid peroxidation and the status of antioxidants in canine mammary tumours have not been investigated. The present study was designed to evaluate the oxidant-antioxidant profile in canine mammary tumours. Lipid peroxidation as evidenced by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, and conjugated dienes, as well as the status of the antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and vitamin C, in tumour tissues of 25 bitches was estimated. Lipid peroxidation in tumour tissues was enhanced compared to the corresponding adjacent uninvolved tissues. This was accompanied by significant elevation in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. This study suggests that upregulation of antioxidants induced by lipid peroxidation confers a selective growth advantage to tumour cells over their adjacent normal counterparts. PMID:15751580

  9. Early recognition and management of brain tumours in children.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Eleanor Katie; Cannon, Anna; Zaborowski, Krzysztof; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-08-31

    Brain tumours comprise over one quarter of all childhood cancers in the UK and are the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in children. The presentation of brain tumours can vary substantially in children. The presenting symptoms are often similar to less serious conditions, and are often managed as such initially. Therefore, it can be difficult to diagnose brain tumours in children. An early diagnosis is usually associated with more effective treatment and improved health outcomes. The diagnostic interval between first presentation to a health professional and diagnosis for brain tumours in children has been shown to be three times longer in the UK than in other developed countries. As a result, the HeadSmart campaign launched a symptom card in 2011 to increase awareness of brain tumours in children among the general population and healthcare professionals, with the aim of reducing the diagnostic interval to 5 weeks. Nurses have an essential role in early recognition of brain tumours in children, and in providing care and support to the child and their family following a diagnosis. PMID:27577312

  10. An update on irreversible electroporation of liver tumours.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Enoch S L; Chung, Max W Y; Wong, Keedon; Wong, Clement Y K; So, Enoch C T; Chan, Albert C Y

    2014-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of irreversible electroporation for ablation of liver tumour in humans. DATA SOURCES. The PubMed and MEDLINE databases were systematically searched. STUDY SELECTION. Clinical research published in English in the last 10 years until October 2013 that address clinical issues related to irreversible electroporation of human liver tumours were selected. "Liver tumor", "local ablative therapy", and "irreversible electroporation" were used as the search terms. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS. The data extracted for this review was analysed by the authors, with a focus on the clinical efficacy and the safety of irreversible electroporation. The complete response rates look promising, ranging from 72% to 100%, except in one study in a subgroup of liver tumours in which the complete response rate was only 50% that was likely due to the inclusion of larger-size tumours. In one study, the local recurrence rate at 12 months was approximately 40%. As for the safety of irreversible electroporation, there were only a few reported complications (cardiac arrhythmia, pneumothorax, and electrolyte disturbance) that were mostly transient and not serious. There was no reported mortality related to the use of irreversible electroporation. CONCLUSION. Irreversible electroporation is a potentially effective liver tumour ablative therapy that gives rise to only mild and transient side-effects. Further studies with better patient selection criteria and longer follow-up are needed to clarify its role as a first-line liver tumour treatment modality. PMID:24914075

  11. Expression of cytokeratins in the epithelium of canine odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Murphy, B; Nemec, A; Vapniarsky, N; Naydan, D K; Verstraete, F J M

    2011-11-01

    Odontogenic tumours are considered to be relatively rare; however, several histologically distinct types have been identified in dogs. The more common canine odontogenic tumours are peripheral odontogenic fibroma and canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma. The expression of cytokeratins (CKs) has been established for the human dental germ and odontogenic tumours. The aim of the present study was to describe the immunohistochemical expression of a panel of CKs in the epithelium of the canine dental germ, normal gingiva and odontogenic tumours arising in this species. Samples from 20 odontogenic tumours, 12 tooth germs and three normal gingival tissues were obtained. Each sample was stained with haematoxylin and eosin and subjected to immunohistochemistry for CK expression. The typical expression pattern of CKs in the odontogenic epithelium and gingiva of dogs was CK14 and CK5/6. CKs 7, 8, 18 and 20 were generally absent from the canine dental germ, gingiva and odontogenic tumours. Dogs and man therefore exhibit similar CK expression in the odontogenic epithelium. PMID:21511272

  12. Adaptation to statins restricts human tumour growth in Nude mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Statins have long been used as anti-hypercholesterolemia drugs, but numerous lines of evidence suggest that they may also bear anti-tumour potential. We have recently demonstrated that it was possible to isolate cancer cells adapted to growth in the continuous presence of lovastatin. These cells grew more slowly than the statin-sensitive cells of origin. In the present study, we compared the ability of both statin-sensitive and statin-resistant cells to give rise to tumours in Nude mice. Methods HGT-1 human gastric cancer cells and L50 statin-resistant derivatives were injected subcutaneously into Nude mice and tumour growth was recorded. At the end of the experiment, tumours were recovered and marker proteins were analyzed by western blotting, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results L50 tumours grew more slowly, showed a strong decrease in cyclin B1, over-expressed collagen IV, and had reduced laminin 332, VEGF and CD34 levels, which, collectively, may have restricted cell division, cell adhesion and neoangiogenesis. Conclusions Taken together, these results showed that statin-resistant cells developed into smaller tumours than statin-sensitive cells. This may be reflective of the cancer restricting activity of statins in humans, as suggested from several retrospective studies with subjects undergoing statin therapy for several years. PMID:22107808

  13. Emotional and personality changes following brain tumour resection.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lisanne M; Drummond, Katharine J; Andrewes, David G

    2016-07-01

    Psychological distress has a high prevalence in brain tumour patients, and understanding the emotional and personality changes that may follow neurosurgery is important for clinical management of these patients. We aimed to characterise these emotional and personality changes using subjective, observer-rated and clinical measures. We examined subjective changes in emotional experience and observer-rated changes to personality disturbances following neurosurgery for brain tumours (n=44), compared to a control group that had undergone spinal surgery (n=26). Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a Subjective Emotional Change Questionnaire. Observers who knew the patients well also completed the Iowa Rating Scale of Personality Change. Compared to controls, patients with tumours reported significantly more changes to their subjective experience of emotions following neurosurgery, particularly anger, disgust and sadness. For the observer-ratings, tumour patients were described as having significant changes in the personality disturbances of irritability, impulsivity, moodiness, inflexibility, and being easily overwhelmed. Anxiety and depression were not significantly different between groups. Neurosurgical resection of a brain tumour is a major life event that changes patients' subjective experiences of different emotions, and leads to observer-rated changes in personality. In this study, these changes were not accompanied by increases in anxiety or depression. We conclude with a discussion of biological and psychosocial mechanisms that can impact emotional functioning and personality in patients with brain tumours. PMID:26898575

  14. ‘Primary extrarenal Wilms’ tumour’: rare presentation of a common paediatric tumour

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Vandana; Verma, Amit Kumar; Batra, Vineeta; Puri, Sunil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Wilms’ tumour (nephroblastoma), the most common abdominal malignancy of childhood, occurs primarily as a malignant renal tumour. Extrarenal Wilms’ tumour is rare with occasional reports from the Indian subcontinent. The various locations of extrarenal Wilms’ tumour include retroperitoneum, uterus, skin and thorax. In this report we will discuss the imaging features highlighting the imaging differential diagnosis in a case of retroperitoneal (extrarenal) primary Wilms’ tumour. PMID:24907205

  15. The radiological features of phylloides tumour of the breast with clinico-pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Page, J E; Williams, J E

    1991-07-01

    The mammograms of 13 patients with phylloides tumour of the breast are reviewed and the results correlated with clinical and histological features. Three patients had recurrent tumours. There is a strong association between phylloides tumour and fibroadenoma. Many of the tumours are radiologically indistinguishable from fibroadenomata and it is not possible to predict tumour behaviour on the basis of clinical and radiological features alone. PMID:1651822

  16. Assays of drug sensitivity for cells from human tumours: in vitro and in vivo tests on a xenografted tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, A. E.; Peckham, M. J.; Steel, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    A human tumour which grows as a xenograft in immune-suppressed mice and forms colonies in vitro has been used to test the correlation between 2 methods of exposure of human tumour cells to chemotherapeutic agents. In vivo exposure to drugs was achieved by injection of tumour-bearing mice with each of 8 cytotoxic agents. For the in vitro exposure, cell suspensions were incubated for 1 h with the same series of drugs. The survival of tumour clonogenic cells was assayed in vitro after either treatment or dose-response curves were obtained. The 8 drugs were ranked according to their in vivo effect at doses equitoxic to mice, and according to their in vitro effect at concentrations designed to approximate to levels of drugs in human plasma. The ranks for in vivo and in vitro exposure correlated well. PMID:475962

  17. The role of ultrasonographic findings to predict molecular subtype, histologic grade, and hormone receptor status of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Çelebi, Filiz; Pilancı, Kezban Nur; Ordu, Çetin; Ağacayak, Filiz; Alço, Gül; İlgün, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Erdoğan, Zeynep; Özmen, Vahit

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The correlation between imaging findings and pathologic characteristics of tumors may provide information for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The aim of this study is to determine whether ultrasound features of breast cancer are associated with molecular subtype, histologic grade, and hormone receptor status, as well as assess the predictive value of these features. METHODS A total of 201 consecutive invasive breast cancer patients were reviewed from the database according to the Breast Imaging and Reporting Data System (BI-RADS). Tumor margins were classified as circumscribed and noncircumscribed. Noncircumscribed group was divided into indistinct, spiculated, angular, and microlobulated. The posterior acoustic features were divided into four categories: shadowing, enhancement, no change, and mixed pattern. RESULTS Tumors with posterior shadowing were more likely to be of nontriple negative subtype (odds ratio [OR], 7.42; 95% CI, 2.10–24.99; P = 0.002), low histologic grade (grade 1 or 2 vs. grade 3: OR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.34–4.35; P = 0.003) and having at least one positive receptor (OR, 3.36; 95% CI, 1.55–7.26; P = 0.002). Tumors with circumscribed margins were more often triple-negative subtype (OR, 6.72; 95% CI, 2.56–17.65; P < 0.001), high grade (grade 3 vs. grade 1 or 2: OR, 5.42; 95% CI, 2.66–11.00; P < 0.001) and hormone receptor negative (OR, 4.87; 95% CI, 2.37–9.99; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Sonographic features are strongly associated with molecular subtype, histologic grade, and hormone receptor status of the tumor. These findings may separate triple-negative breast cancer from other molecular subtypes. PMID:26359880

  18. Hormone May Be Linked to Teenage Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159014.html Hormone May Be Linked to Teenage Obesity Researchers suspect ... may have lower levels of a weight-regulating hormone than normal-weight teens, a new study says. " ...

  19. Hormone May Be Linked to Teenage Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159014.html Hormone May Be Linked to Teenage Obesity Researchers suspect low levels of spexin might play ... reduced levels of this hormone in adults with obesity. Overall, our findings suggest spexin may play a ...

  20. Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003691.htm Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test To use the sharing features on ... page, please enable JavaScript. The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-RP) test measures the level of a ...