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Sample records for hospice medical guideline

  1. Costs and implications of discarded medication in hospice.

    PubMed

    Speer, Nathan D; Dioso, Jhanina; Casner, Paul R

    2013-08-01

    Symptom control for hospice patients frequently involves the use of pharmacologic agents for control of pain, dyspnea, and anxiety. Other troubling symptoms that will often require pharmacologic agents include nausea, vomiting, constipation, and delirium. While the Medicare requirement for hospice is a prognosis of six months or less, accurately predicting prognosis is very difficult. Because of this, medications for symptom control will often have to be prescribed and refilled without knowing exactly how much the hospice patient may require. The objective of the current study was to determine the amount of medication discarded at death. Additionally we wanted to estimate the cost related to discarded medication. We reviewed the records of 296 patients over a three-year period in a community hospice to characterize the medications that were discarded at death. Seventeen patients were not eligible for evaluation because of lack of complete information, leaving 279 study subjects. Cost calculations were used using a website cost calculator (HealthTrans.com). Fifty-six percent of the decedents were female and the majority were Hispanic (62%). The five most common diagnoses were cancer (36%); dementia (22%); and COPD, CVA, and congestive heart failure (CHF) (8%). The median length of stay in hospice was 16 days. The most frequent medication unused at the time of death was morphine solution followed by lorazepam. The cost of discarded morphine including tablets as well as solution totaled over $6,000 for the study period. The next highest medication cost was lorazepam for both solution and tablets, which came to over $1,600. The total estimated cost for all medications for the study period amounted to $14,980. The results of this study indicate that hospice patients have variable amounts of discarded medication at the time of death and that the cost involved of these unused medications can be significant. Hospice organizations should investigate creative ways to reduce

  2. Medicare Hospice Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medic are covers You can get a one-time only hospice consultation with a hospice medical director or hospice doctor to discuss your care options and management of your pain and symptoms. You can get ...

  3. Improving Diabetes Care for Hospice Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei J; Jacobson, Margaret A; Johnston, C Bree

    2016-07-01

    Although type 2 diabetes guidelines recommend less aggressive glycemic control for patients with limited life expectancy, many hospice patients continue their glucose-lowering medications, resulting in an increased risk of hypoglycemia. Three common reasons for overly tight glycemic control in hospice patients include (1) discussions about reducing or stopping chronic medications are uncomfortable; (2) many patients and families believe that mild hyperglycemia can cause symptoms; and (3) until 2014, Healthcare Information and Data Information Set (HEDIS) quality indicators for glycemic control included hospice patients. To address these issues, we recommend (1) providers discuss with patients and families upon hospice enrollment that diabetes medications can be reduced or discontinued as their life-limiting disease progresses; (2) keeping blood glucose levels between 200 and 300 mg/dL; and (3) educate providers that HEDIS measures now exclude hospice patients. Implementing these recommendations should decrease the risk of hypoglycemia in hospice patients and improve their quality of life. PMID:25852204

  4. Hospice and palliative medicine: curriculum evaluation and learner assessment in medical education.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra; Ross, Jeanette S

    2012-01-01

    Major efforts have been pursued to improve palliative care education for physicians at all levels of their training. Such changes include the incorporation of palliative care curriculum and guidelines, an established process for competency-based evaluation and certification, faculty development, innovative educational experiences, the improvement of textbooks, and the establishment of accredited palliative medicine fellowships. Hospice and palliative medicine (HPM) has been clearly defined as a subspecialty and a crucial area of medical education. As innovative curricular approaches have become available to educate medical and other interprofessional trainees, this article aims to describe different models and methods applied in curriculum evaluation, tailoring such approaches to the field of palliative medicine. A stepwise process of curriculum development and evaluation is described, focusing on available curriculum evaluation competency-based tools for each level of learners. As HPM evolves and its educational programs grow, curriculum evaluation will provides invaluable feedback to institutions and programs in many ways. PMID:22268408

  5. Exploring Factors that Influence Informal Caregiving in Medication Management for Home Hospice Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Rebecca; Halpern, Leslie; Pickard, A. Simon; Schrauf, Robert; Witt, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore factors that influence how informal caregivers manage medications as part of caring for hospice patients. Methods : Semistructured, open-ended interviews were conducted with 23 informal caregivers and 22 hospice providers from 4 hospice programs in the Chicago metropolitan areas. Qualitative analysis was conducted consistent with the grounded theory approach. Results : In general, informal caregivers and hospice providers identified similar key factors that facilitated or impeded caregivers' process in managing medications. Caregivers' life experience and self-confidence were considered assets that facilitated medication management. Limitations impeding the process included caregivers' negative emotional states, cognitive and physical impairments, low literacy, other competing responsibilities, as well as patients' negative emotional states and complex medication needs. Furthermore, the social context of medication management emerged as a salient theme: caregivers' good interpersonal relations with patients facilitated medication management, whereas poor communication/relations among caregivers within a support network impeded the process. While both study groups discussed the positive attributes of good caregiver–patient relations and support from multiple caregivers, hospice providers were cautious about the potential adverse influence of close relations with patients on caregivers' decision making about medications and discussed poor communication/relations among informal and privately hired caregivers that often resulted from family conflicts and/or a lack of long-standing leadership. Conclusion Our findings suggest additional intervention points, beyond knowledge and skill building, that could be addressed to support caregivers in executing medication responsibilities at home for hospice patients. PMID:20836633

  6. Selling hospice.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Americans are increasingly turning to hospice services to provide them with medical care, pain management, and emotional support at the end of life. The increase in the rates of hospice utilization is explained by a number of factors including a "hospice movement" dating to the 1970s which emphasized hospice as a tool to promote dignity for the terminally ill; coverage of hospice services by Medicare beginning in 1983; and, the market for hospice services provision, sustained almost entirely by governmental reimbursement. On the one hand, the growing acceptance of hospice may be seen as a sign of trends giving substance to the death-with-dignity movement and the growing strength of end-of-life decision-makers and planners who integrate medical, community, family and spiritual networks. On the other hand, the precise relationship between the death-with-dignity and commercial processes driving hospice utilization rates are not well understood. On May 2, 2013, the U.S. Government intervened in a lawsuit brought by former hospice employees alleging that behind Vitas Innovative Hospice Care, the largest for-profit hospice service provider in the United States, lie an intricate web of incentives for patient intake nurses, physicians and marketers which not only drove hospice patients to use more expensive (and medically unnecessary) crisis care services, but influenced patient and family decisions as to whether or not to discontinue curative treatment. The corporate, investment, and regulatory history behind Vitas provides an important insight into the market realities behind Americans' embrace of hospice care and the risks to patient autonomy and health that accompany the commercialization of this ethically and morally complex health care service. PMID:25565612

  7. Being a hospice volunteer influenced medical students' comfort with dying and death: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stecho, Will; Khalaf, Roy; Prendergast, Patrick; Geerlinks, Ashley; Lingard, Lorelei; Schulz, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Being comfortable with death and communicating with patients near the end of life are important attributes in palliative care. We developed a hospice volunteer program to teach these attitudes and skills to preclinical medical students. Using a mixed-methods approach, validated surveys measured participants' and non-participants fear of death and communication apprehension regarding dying. Journals and focus groups examined participants' subjective experiences as their patient relationships evolved. Survey scores were significantly lower for participant hospice volunteers, indicating lower levels of death anxiety and communication apprehension regarding dying. An explanatory framework, using journals and focus groups, captured participants' sense of development over time into three categories: challenges, learning, and growth. This pilot project provides insight into the medical students' experiential learning as they participate in our hospice volunteer program. PMID:23098013

  8. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Hospice Care What is Hospice Care? When is Hospice Care ... Family Counseling and Support Services What is Hospice Care? Hospice programs are available to help terminally ill ...

  9. Hospice care

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care - hospice; End-of-life care - hospice; Dying - hospice; Cancer - hospice ... Hospice care helps people with illnesses that cannot be cured and who are nearing death. The goal is to ...

  10. Guideline 5: Selection of Medications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal on Mental Retardation, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The fifth in seven sets of guidelines based on the consensus of experts in the treatment of psychiatric and behavioral problems in mental retardation (MR) focuses on selection of medications. Guidelines cover selection of medications for psychiatric disorders, selection of medications for target symptoms, and preferred medications within different…

  11. Guidelines for Medical Office Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Molly F.; Daughtry, Miriam

    The manual provides guidelines for the development and implementation of programs for medical office assistants. A procedural outline for the development of two curricula have been included: one for a one-year (four quarters) program offering a diploma in medical assisting; and the other for a two-year (six quarters) program leading to an…

  12. Guidelines for Medication Administration in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines present standards for administering medication in Maryland schools, both prescribed and over-the-counter medications. In general, medication during school hours is discouraged unless necessary. The guidelines recommend that, whenever possible, children administer their own medication under appropriate supervision. Specifically,…

  13. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... term inpatient or respite care related to the terminal diagnosis. You can stop hospice at any time. ... http: / / www. hospicefoundation. org/ uploads/ hic_ fs_ hospice. pdf Additional Resource for Veterans: VA Guide to Long ...

  14. Hospice care

    MedlinePlus

    Hospice care helps people with illnesses that cannot be cured and who are nearing death. The goal ... give comfort and peace instead of a cure. Hospice care provides: Support for the patient and the ...

  15. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... provide more information about hospice. National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization 1–800–658–8898 (helpline) 1–877– ... http://www.caringinfo.org The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s Caring Connections website offers information and publications ...

  16. Psychological Consultation in an HMO Hospice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Warren

    Hospice care differs from traditional medical care in that it aims to optimize the quality of the patient's remaining life rather than to maximize its duration. The Hayward Hospice project, begun in November of 1977 as a pilot project to evaluate whether hospice quality care could be provided within manageable costs and thus be included as a…

  17. Cholinesterase Inhibitor and N-Methyl-D-Aspartic Acid Receptor Antagonist Use in Older Adults with End-Stage Dementia: A Survey of Hospice Medical Directors

    PubMed Central

    Ellner, Lynn; Lau, Denys T.; Maxwell, Terri L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Cholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists are Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. As dementia progresses to the end stage and patients become hospice-eligible, clinicians consider whether or not to continue these therapies without the benefit of scientific evidence. We sought to describe hospice medical directors practice patterns and experiences in the use and discontinuation of cholinesterase inhibitors and NMDA receptor antagonists in hospice patients that meet the Medicare hospice criteria for dementia. Study Design Mail survey of hospice medical directors from a random sample from the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Results Of the 413 eligible participants, 152 completed surveys were returned, yielding a response rate of 37%. Of the respondents, 75% and 33% reported that at least 20% of their patients were taking a cholinesterase inhibitor or memantine, respectively, at the time of hospice admission. The majority of respondents do not consider these therapies effective in persons with end-stage dementia, however, a subset believe that these medications improved patient outcomes including stabilization of cognition (22%), decrease in challenging behaviors (28%), and maintenance of patient function (22%) as well as caregiver outcomes namely reduced caregiver burden (20%) and improved caregiver quality of life (20%). While 80% of respondents recommended discontinuing these therapies to families at the time of hospice enrollment, 72% of respondents reported that families experienced difficulty stopping these therapies. A subset of respondents observed accelerated cognitive (30%) and functional decline (26%) or emergence of challenging behaviors (32%) with medication discontinuation. Conclusions The findings from this survey indicate that cholinesterase inhibitors and/or NMDA receptor antagonists are prescribed for a

  18. 42 CFR 418.25 - Admission to hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admission to hospice care. 418.25 Section 418.25... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.25 Admission to hospice care. (a) The hospice admits a patient only on the recommendation of the medical...

  19. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... support. The goal of the care is to help people who are dying have peace, comfort, and dignity. The caregivers try to control pain and other symptoms so a person can remain as alert and comfortable as possible. Hospice programs also provide services to support a patient's family. Usually, a hospice ...

  20. [Influence of clinical guidelines on medical practitioners].

    PubMed

    Arii, Shigeki

    2007-09-01

    Evidenced-based clinical guidelines for diagnosing and treating hepatocellular carcinoma patients were published in 2005, which were edited by the executive members of the Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan (Chief Editor, Professor Masatosi Makuuchi, MD). This article presents the results of two surveys investigating the validity and usefulness of those guidelines. The author's opinions regarding the evaluation of the guidelines and guideline-based clinical practice are also presented. The surveys revealed that the guidelines are well known and thought to be useful by medical practitioners. The guidelines had changed the therapeutic strategy of 20% of experts in the field. However, 43% of experts and 30% of nonexperts believed that the guidelines restricted their medical discretion. Additionally, the percentage of physicians who felt that medical malpractice suits would increase exceeded those who did not. However, the guidelines do not provide clear recommendations in about 45% of diagnostic and therapeutic points because of a lack of evidence. The recommendations on these points in the guidelines require the commonsense discretion of physicians. The guidelines should be followed based on an understanding of biology and medicine, and not based on dogmatism. PMID:17907456

  1. The grief experience of prison inmate hospice volunteer caregivers.

    PubMed

    Supiano, Katherine P; Cloyes, Kristin G; Berry, Patricia H

    2014-01-01

    Correctional institutions are obligated to provide end-of-life care to a population with complex medical needs. Prison hospices are increasingly being formed to address this demand. Few empirical studies have examined the impact of caring for dying inmates on the hospice inmate volunteers, who, in several prison health care systems, provide direct care. In this study, experiences of the inmate hospice volunteers with death were investigated to illuminate their grief processes. Understanding the bereavement needs of hospice volunteers and how prison hospice volunteers navigate grief and remain committed to providing excellent hospice care can inform the grief processes and practices of hospice care professionals. PMID:24628143

  2. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, social workers, spiritual counselors, home health aides, bereavement counselors and volunteers. The hospice team helps patients ... patient's family doctor Expert management of physical symptoms Bereavement and support groups for families What is bereavement ...

  3. Development of a Clinical Protocol for Home Hospice Care for Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-geol

    2005-01-01

    As the Korean government's recognition of the importance of hospice service grows, the government has initiated a variety of hospice services in Korea. Each hospice organization has shown a significant difference in its health care delivery methods, constitution and care content. Developing a clinical protocol is essential for establishing standardized hospice services. A preliminary protocol was drawn up by examining the records of terminal patients (n=541) in a home hospice organization while elucidating the health problems as well as classifying them through the Home Health Care Classification (HHCC), and by reviewing the relevant nursing interventions and medical treatments in the literature concerning the clinical protocols. Korea's leading hospice specialty groups participated in four rounds of content validity verification processes in order to establish a protocol. A guideline was developed through a team approach, integrating the opinions of doctors, nurses, ministers, volunteers, patients' families, nutritionists and pharmacists. Eighteen health problems and a total of 223 interventions (173 major treatments and nursing interventions, and 50 optional interventions) were included in the final clinical protocol. This study is expected to contribute to the overall qualitative improvement of home hospice care and the subsequent shortening of documentation time. Evaluation tools and a regulatory feedback system need to be developed in order to maintain consistent evaluation procedures based on the continuous promotion and use of the protocol. PMID:15744800

  4. Hospice Enrollment, Local Hospice Utilization Patterns, and Rehospitalization in Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Timothy R.; Smith, Maureen A.; Bartels, Christie M.; Campbell, Toby C.; Yu, Menggang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rehospitalizations are prevalent and associated with decreased quality of life. Although hospice has been advocated to reduce rehospitalizations, it is not known how area-level hospice utilization patterns affect rehospitalization risk. Objectives: The study objective was to examine the association between hospice enrollment, local hospice utilization patterns, and 30-day rehospitalization in Medicare patients. Methods: With a retrospective cohort design, 1,997,506 hospitalizations were assessed between 2005 and 2009 from a 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Local hospice utilization was defined using tertiles representing the percentage of all deaths occurring in hospice within each Hospital Service Area (HSA). Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the relationship between 30-day rehospitalization, hospice enrollment, and local hospice utilization, adjusting for patient sociodemographics, medical history, and hospital characteristics. Results: Rates of patients dying in hospice were 27% in the lowest hospice utilization tertile, 41% in the middle tertile, and 53% in the highest tertile. Patients enrolled in hospice had lower rates of 30-day rehospitalization than those not enrolled (2.2% versus 18.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.118–0.131). Patients residing in areas of low hospice utilization were at greater rehospitalization risk than those residing in areas of high utilization (19.1% versus 17.5%; HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.04–1.06), which persisted beyond that accounted for by individual hospice enrollment. Conclusions: Area-level hospice utilization is inversely proportional to rehospitalization rates. This relationship is not fully explained by direct hospice enrollment, and may reflect a spillover effect of the benefits of hospice extending to nonenrollees. PMID:25879990

  5. Symposium: Hospices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mental Retardation, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Concepts and practices associated with the hospice movement are described as a threat to persons with mental retardation. Three responses and a rejoinder discuss issues of equality of treatment, legal consent, definition of "quality of life," government legislation, public and private funding, and human service patterns. (JW)

  6. Characterizing Hospice Services in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Maureen A.; Seplaki, Christopher; Biagtan, Mark; DuPreez, Amanda; Cleary, James

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although caregivers desire specific information about hospice programs, there is little descriptive information available. We characterized agencies that provide formal or informal hospice care in the United States according to four types of services considered important by caregivers: medications and treatments; rehabilitative care;…

  7. Medical guidelines for space passengers--II.

    PubMed

    Rayman, Russell B; Antuñano, Melchor J; Garber, Mitchell A; Hastings, John D; Illig, Petra A; Jordan, Jon L; Landry, Roger F; McMeekin, Robert R; Northrup, Susan E; Ruehle, Charles; Saenger, Arleen; Schneider, Victor S

    2002-11-01

    It now appears likely that commercial entities will carry paying passengers on suborbital spaceflights in this decade. The stresses of spaceflight, the effects of microgravity, and the limited capability for medical care onboard make it advisable to develop a system of medical clearance for such space tourists. The Aerospace Medical Association, therefore, organized a Space Passenger Task Force whose first report on medical guidelines was published in 2001. That report consisted of a list of conditions that would disqualify potential passengers for relatively long orbital flights. The Task Force reconvened in 2002 to focus on less stringent medical screening appropriate for short duration suborbital flights. It was assumed that such commercial flights would involve: 1) small spacecraft carrying 4-6 passengers; 2) a cabin maintained at sea-level "shirt-sleeve" condition; 3) maximum accelerations of 2.0-4.5 G; 4) about 30 min in microgravity. The Task Force addressed specific medical problems, including space motion sickness, pregnancy, and medical conditions involving the risk of sudden incapacitation. The Task Force concluded that a medical history should be taken from potential passengers with individualized follow-up that focuses on areas of concern. PMID:12433241

  8. Safety climate and use of personal protective equipment and safety medical devices among home care and hospice nurses.

    PubMed

    Leiss, Jack K

    2014-01-01

    Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and safety medical devices is mandated for healthcare workers to reduce the risk of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) from exposure to patients' blood. Research has shown that a strong safety climate may promote increased use of PPE. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the association between safety climate and use of PPE among homecare/hospice nurses in North Carolina. To this end, a mail survey was conducted in 2006. The response rate, adjusted on the assumption that the proportion of eligible nurses from among those who did not return the questionnaire or could not be contacted was similar to the proportion among those who did return the questionnaire, was 69% (n=833 eligibles). The percentage of nurses who used the specified PPE was two to three times greater among nurses who had a strong safety climate. Safety climate was only weakly associated with using safety devices. These results suggest that improving safety climate may be a powerful tool for increasing use of PPE. PMID:25055845

  9. Medical volunteers: guidelines for success and safety.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Eddie L.; Cole-Hoover, Gwendolyn; Berry, Paula K.; Hoover, Evan T.; Harris, Betsy; Rageh, Deman; Weaver, W. Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Many African Americans from a variety of medical specialties are interested in satisfying a life-long dream of visiting Africa by volunteering their services to faith-based and private volunteer organizations doing missionary work on the continent. While this can be an extremely rewarding experience in which measurable good can be accomplished, this path can also be strewn with many obstacles that will affect both the success of the mission and the personal well-being of the volunteer. The American Medical Team for Africa is a nonprofit, tax-exempt, volunteer organization that has been doing medical missionary work in Africa since 1993. This manuscript is a compilation of this 10-year experience that has established some very useful guidelines for insuring a successful and safe mission if you are fortunate enough to have this opportunity. PMID:15719877

  10. The costs of a pediatric hospice program.

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, S O; Mitchell, B; Landsverk, J; Laparan, L

    1993-01-01

    The recent literature on economic issues of hospice care leaves several questions unanswered. The most important issue concerns how this type of care can be made financially attractive to patients and families for whom it is a medical option. A major study of a home-based pediatric hospice program permitted a more careful analysis than was previously feasible of the charges for hospice care and how those charges are paid. Data on provider utilization and duration in the program were obtained retrospectively on 177 patients. Costs of incidental expenditures and indirect costs were obtained prospectively from the families of 27 patients. A cost model was developed which is general enough to be used by other hospitals that might contemplate establishing a similar hospice program. Our findings are that insurance coverage, especially for publicly funded patients, is likely to be a major impediment for families deciding whether or not to use a hospice program at home. PMID:8434095

  11. Predictors of live hospice discharge: data from the National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS).

    PubMed

    Kutner, Jean S; Blake, Marcia; Meyer, Sue A

    2002-01-01

    In the context of the current regulatory environment, patients may be discharged from hospice if their condition stabilizes or improves over time and the certifying physician is unable to provide a conscientious recertification of the six-month prognosis. Little is known about the characteristics or outcomes of patients who are determined by physicians to no longer be eligible for hospice care. This retrospective study was designed to characterize the rates and predictors of live hospice discharge using data from the 1996 and 1998. National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS). We compare records of live hospice discharge with hospice discharges due to death from the discharge patient files of the 1996 and the 1998 NHHCS. Of the 807,733 patients in the combined 1996 and 1998 NHHCS discharge patient file who met study inclusion criteria, 761,858 (94 percent) were deceased and 45,875 (6 percent) were discharged alive. Those who were discharged alive were more likely to be female, have received hospice care for more than 60 days, and to have had a noncancer diagnosis, particularly advanced cardiopulmonary or neurologic disease. Mean age and total number of assistive medical devices used did not differ significantly between patients who were discharged alive and those who died in hospice care. Factors most associated with live hospice discharge, using bivariate analyses, were length of service greater than 60 days (OR, 6.60; 95 percent CI, 6.47-6.73), cardiopulmonary diagnosis (OR, 3.24; 95 percent CI, 3.19-3.30), and neurologic diagnosis (OR, 2.73; 95 percent CI, 2.67-2.79). Multivariate logistic regression identified length of service greater than 60 days, cardiopulmonary diagnosis, neurologic diagnosis, female gender, worse functional status, and living in an institutional setting as being independently associated with live hospice discharge. We found that patients who were discharged alive from hospice care were more likely to have longer lengths of service

  12. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 240 - Medical Standards Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical Standards Guidelines F Appendix F to Part.... F Appendix F to Part 240—Medical Standards Guidelines (1) The purpose of this appendix is to provide... chart, may be further evaluated as determined by the railroad's medical examiner....

  13. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 240 - Medical Standards Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical Standards Guidelines F Appendix F to Part.... F Appendix F to Part 240—Medical Standards Guidelines (1) The purpose of this appendix is to provide... chart, may be further evaluated as determined by the railroad's medical examiner....

  14. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 242 - Medical Standards Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... likely occur if the examinee's medical condition has improved in some way or if technology has advanced... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical Standards Guidelines D Appendix D to Part... Appendix D to Part 242—Medical Standards Guidelines (1) The purpose of this appendix is to provide...

  15. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 240 - Medical Standards Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical Standards Guidelines F Appendix F to Part.... F Appendix F to Part 240—Medical Standards Guidelines (1) The purpose of this appendix is to provide... chart, may be further evaluated as determined by the railroad's medical examiner....

  16. American Hospice Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... AHF worked to improve access to quality hospice care through public education, professional training, and consumer advocacy. Our vision was that hospice would be an integral part of our society, culture, and belief systems. ...

  17. Hospice: Morality and Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines hospice concepts and proposals to identify moral problems presented. Particular attention is given to the relationship between the hospice concept's alleged humanitarianism and emphasis on cost-efficiency. Suggests that cost emphasis raises serious questions about the meaning of hospice concepts. (JAC)

  18. 42 CFR 418.205 - Special requirements for hospice pre-election evaluation and counseling services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... (ii) The physician furnishing these services must be an employee or medical director of the hospice billing for this service. (iii) The services cannot be furnished by hospice personnel other than employed... employee of the hospice. (iv) If the beneficiary's attending physician is also the medical director or...

  19. 42 CFR 418.205 - Special requirements for hospice pre-election evaluation and counseling services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... (ii) The physician furnishing these services must be an employee or medical director of the hospice billing for this service. (iii) The services cannot be furnished by hospice personnel other than employed... employee of the hospice. (iv) If the beneficiary's attending physician is also the medical director or...

  20. Characteristics of Hospice Patients Utilizing Hospice Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyusuk; Burke, Sloane C.

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing popularity of a hospice inpatient/residential facility (HIRF) among hospice patients and their family members, examining who uses HIRFs has been of increasing importance. Using the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS), we found that about 14% of hospice patients received care in a HIRF in 2007. Characteristics of patients associated with HIRF use largely match the industry norm for a general inpatient level of care, and include: having no caregiver, or having an incapable caregiver; having imminent death; and being directly admitted to a hospice after discharge from a hospital. Given a recent stricter enforcement of reimbursement rules, however, we call for close monitoring of any change in the number of HIRF beds—particularly in rural and low-income urban areas. PMID:23264662

  1. Hospice: enhancing the quality of life.

    PubMed

    Lamers, W M

    1990-05-01

    Hospice care is directed at the relief of the physical, social and psychologic symptoms that often accompany advanced, incurable illness. In recent years, an increasing number of physicians has come to recognize the necessity for hospice care in the treatment of some patients with cancer, HIV infection, and a number of other (as yet) incurable illnesses. Hospice care is designed to improve the quality of life through the use of medications and treatments directed at the relief of symptoms secondary to the underlying disease and its treatment. Hospice makes use of a wide range of physical, social and psychological therapies to relieve symptoms and to provide support and information for the patient's family and caregivers. PMID:2143397

  2. Guidelines for Reporting Medical Research: A Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Mathilde; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2016-01-01

    As a response to a low quality of reporting of medical research, guidelines for several different types of study design have been developed to secure accurate reporting and transparency for reviewers and readers from the scientific community. Herein, we review and discuss the six most widely accepted and used guidelines: PRISMA, CONSORT, STROBE, MOOSE, STARD, and SPIRIT. It is concluded that the implementation of these guidelines has led to only a moderate improvement in the quality of the reporting of medical research. There is still much work to be done to achieve accurate and transparent reporting of medical research findings. PMID:27382637

  3. Guidelines for Reporting Medical Research: A Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Mathilde; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2016-01-01

    As a response to a low quality of reporting of medical research, guidelines for several different types of study design have been developed to secure accurate reporting and transparency for reviewers and readers from the scientific community. Herein, we review and discuss the six most widely accepted and used guidelines: PRISMA, CONSORT, STROBE, MOOSE, STARD, and SPIRIT. It is concluded that the implementation of these guidelines has led to only a moderate improvement in the quality of the reporting of medical research. There is still much work to be done to achieve accurate and transparent reporting of medical research findings.

  4. Controlling Asthma New Guidelines. New Medications. New Action Plans.

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New Guidelines. New Medications. New Action Plans. People everywhere and in every age ... I am putting the finishing touches on my new studio album that we hope to have out ...

  5. Hospice: Rehabilitation in Reverse

    PubMed Central

    Jeyaraman, Senthilkumar; Kathiresan, Ganesan; Gopalsamy, Kavitha

    2010-01-01

    Hospice care is about quality of life at a time when a person has an illness for which curative measures are no longer possible, and for which a physician has determined the patient has a life expectancy of about six months or less, a hospice program can support the process of death and dying in a compassionate way. A growing trend is to utilize physical therapy more frequently in hospice. Physical therapy has several vital roles in hospice care as follows: maximizing functional ability and comfort to enhance quality of life; assuring patient and care giver safety; helping people redesign their lives and life goals; providing support around physical, emotional and spiritual issues at the end of life. The purpose of this review is to provide 1) a description of hospice care, 2) an explanation of the roles of physical therapists in hospice care. PMID:21217999

  6. Hospice Care in the United States: The Process Begins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Robert W.

    1982-01-01

    The hospice concept represents a return to humanistic medicine, to care within the patient's community, for family-centered care, and the view of the patient as a person. Medical, governmental, and educational institutions have recognized the profound urgency for the advocacy of the hospice concept. (Author)

  7. Overcoming the Obstacles in Promoting Hospice Palliative Care--Sharing Experiences of the Taiwan Changhua Christian Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hospice palliative care for terminal patients is necessary, yet challenges are on the way worldwide. This study demonstrated that hospice palliative care has been quickly developed in Taiwan due to the support of the National Health Insurance system, the promotion by civil societies and religious groups, patient's legal right for DNR, easier access to pain killers through medical prescription, and well-planned hospice staff training programs. This paper introduces how hospice consultation is provided by a comprehensive hospice palliative team at Changhua Christian Hospital to establish trust and cooperation with the medical team, and to improve hospice-palliative care referral and utilization rates. PMID:26867341

  8. 78 FR 27823 - Medicare Program; FY 2014 Hospice Wage Index and Payment Rate Update; Hospice Quality Reporting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... Hospice Wage Index final rule (74 FR 39384) finalized a 10 percent reduced BNAF for FY 2010 as the first... Conditions of Participation final rule (73 FR 32088), palliative care is an approach that ``optimizes quality... Hospice Conditions of Participation final rule (73 FR 32088), we stated ``the medical director...

  9. 78 FR 48233 - Medicare Program; FY 2014 Hospice Wage Index and Payment Rate Update; Hospice Quality Reporting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... Calendar Year DME Durable Medical Equipment FEHC Family Evaluation of Hospice Care FR Federal Register FY... described in section IV.C.3. The August 6, 2009 FY 2010 Hospice Wage Index final rule (74 FR 39384... Conditions of Participation final rule (73 FR 32088), palliative care is an approach that ``optimizes...

  10. [Update on current care guidelines: Self-medication, Current Care Guideline].

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Self-medication should always be temporary. Self-medication can be used to relief or treat many symptoms and conditions. In general self-medication is safe when used properly. However all medicines may cause adverse events or have interactions with other drugs. It is important to consider all used drugs and other self-medication products when new drugs are added to the medication list. Persons using the drugs as well as health care personnel should be aware of benefits and harms of drugs.The guideline has recommendations for 10 symptoms that are typically treated with self-medication. PMID:27483629

  11. Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... a medical director, a home health aide, a social worker, a spiritual care coordinator, a volunteer and your attending physician, if he or she remains involved in your care. Other team members may include a music therapist, physical therapist, speech therapist or occupational therapist. ...

  12. Executing Medical Guidelines on the Web: Towards Next Generation Healthcare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüello, M.; Des, J.; Fernandez-Prieto, M. J.; Perez, R.; Paniagua, H.

    There is still a lack of full integration between current Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and medical guidelines that encapsulate evidence-based medicine. Thus, general practitioners (GPs) and specialised physicians still have to read document-based medical guidelines and decide among various options for managing common non-life-threatening conditions where the selection of the most appropriate therapeutic option for each individual patient can be a difficult task. This paper presents a simulation framework and computational test-bed, called V.A.F. Framework, for supporting simulations of clinical situations that boosted the integration between Health Level Seven (HL7) and Semantic Web technologies (OWL, SWRL, and OWL-S) to achieve content layer interoperability between online clinical cases and medical guidelines, and therefore, it proves that higher integration between EHRs and evidence-based medicine can be accomplished which could lead to a next generation of healthcare systems that provide more support to physicians and increase patients' safety.

  13. Hospice care in Calgary

    PubMed Central

    Spice, Ronald; Lau, Monica; Perez, Grace; Turley, Nathan; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore Calgary family physicians’ knowledge about hospices, their attitudes toward the referral process, and their understanding of barriers to referral for hospice care. Design Surveys were mailed to 400 randomly selected participants. The survey contained 18 questions related to hospice care, physician experience, attitudes, and perceived barriers to making a hospice referral. Setting Calgary, Alta. Participants Family physicians. Main outcome measures Survey responses were analyzed quantitatively using the 2 goodness-of-fit test, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and logistic regression analyses to examine univariate associations. Qualitative analysis of open-ended questions was done by content analysis and thematic coding. Results In total, 104 surveys were mailed back. Family physicians agreed that palliative care in a hospice setting can greatly improve quality of life for patients, but only 2 of 6 knowledge questions about hospice care were answered correctly by most. Family physicians with special areas of interest or subspecialties were more likely to feel well-informed about hospice referrals (P = .017), indicated a higher comfort level discussing hospice and palliative care (P = .030), and were less likely to defer discussing it with patients (P = .023). Physicians with a special interest in palliative medicine were more likely to correctly answer the knowledge questions (P < .034) and to be familiar with the referral process (P < .001), patient eligibility (P < .001), and the palliative home care program (P = .003). Qualitative analysis revealed support for palliative home care and consultation services but concerns about caregiver coping and family issues. Concerns about disengagement of family physicians and uncertainty about the referral process are obstacles to referral. Conclusion While Calgary family physicians are appreciative of hospice care, there are knowledge gaps. It is important to engage family physicians in the referral

  14. Using GEM-encoded guidelines to generate medical logic modules.

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, A.; Shiffman, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Among the most effective strategies for changing the process and outcomes of clinical care are those that make use of computer-mediated decision support. A variety of representation models that facilitate computer-based implementation of medical knowledge have been published, including the Guideline Elements Model (GEM) and the Arden Syntax for Medical Logic Modules (MLMs). We describe an XML-based application that facilitates automated generation of partially populated MLMs from GEM-encoded guidelines. These MLMs can be further edited and shared among Arden-compliant information systems to provide decision support. Our work required three steps: (a) Knowledge extraction from published guideline documents using GEM, (b) Mapping GEM elements to the MLM slots, and (c) XSL transformation of the GEM-encoded guideline. Processing of a sample guideline generated 15 MLMs, each corresponding to a conditional or imperative element in the GEM structure. Mechanisms for linking various MLMs are necessary to represent the complexity of logic typical of a guideline. PMID:11825147

  15. [Guidelines on medically assisted reproduction: legal issues and professional liability].

    PubMed

    Molinelli, A; Motroni Gherardi, S M; Picchioni, D M; Ventura, F

    2007-08-01

    The authors analyze the legal and medico-legal issues deriving from the recent Law No. 40 of February 19, 2004 concerning the Medically Assisted Reproduction. In particular, they analyze the contrasting points between the dispositions of Law No. 40/2004 and those of Law No. 194/1978 on the voluntary interruption of pregnancy, and they analyze the guidelines about the procedures and the techniques of the Medically Assisted Reproduction, issued by the Ministry of Health with D.M. of July 21, 2004. The Guidelines, as well as some sentences of several courts, lead to some reflections also about the consent and the professional liability, in particular considering the various moments of the medical action, from the first interview to the carrying out of the assisted reproduction techniques. PMID:17923834

  16. Making the Transition to Hospice: Exploring Hospice Professionals' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, Deborah P.; Rinfrette, Elaine S.

    2009-01-01

    Hospice care is available for 6 months before death but the length of use varies widely, suggesting that there are different perspectives on the appropriate timing for this transition. This qualitative study explored hospice professionals' views on the appropriate timing for and communication about hospice. Ethnography of team meetings informed…

  17. Osteoporosis guideline implementation in family medicine using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Janet; Karampatos, Sarah; Ioannidis, George; Adachi, Jonathan; Thabane, Lehana; Nash, Lynn; Mehan, Upe; Kozak, Joseph; Feldman, Sid; Hirsch, Steve; Jovaisas, Algis V.; Cheung, Angela; Lohfeld, Lynne; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify family physicians’ learning needs related to osteoporosis care; determine family physicians’ preferred modes of learning; and identify barriers to using electronic medical records (EMRs) to implement osteoporosis guidelines in practice. Design Web-based survey. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians. Main outcome measures Quantitative and qualitative data about learning needs related to osteoporosis diagnosis and management; preferred mode of learning about guidelines; and barriers to using EMRs to implement guidelines. Results Of the 12 332 family physicians invited to participate in the survey, 8.5% and 7.0% provided partial or fully completed surveys, respectively. More than 80% of respondents agreed that the priority areas for education were as follows: selecting laboratory tests for secondary osteoporosis and interpreting the test results; interpreting bone mineral density results; determining appropriate circumstances for ordering anterior-posterior lumbar spine x-ray scans; and understanding duration, types, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy. Qualitative analysis revealed that managing moderate-risk patients was a learning need. Continuing medical education was the preferred mode of learning. Approximately 80% of respondents agreed that the scarcity of EMR tools to aid in guideline implementation was a barrier to using guidelines, and 50% of respondents agreed that if EMR-embedded tools were available, time would limit their ability to use them. Conclusion This survey identified key diagnostic- and treatment-related topics in osteoporosis care that should be the focus of future continuing professional development for family physicians. Developers of EMR tools, physicians, and researchers aiming to implement guidelines to improve osteoporosis care should consider the potential barriers indicated in this study.

  18. Navigating the waters of pharmacy regulations in hospice care. Facing a common scenario: why can it be so difficult to obtain emergency medications?

    PubMed

    Greene, Richard

    2005-05-01

    Imagine a common scenario that faces many hospice clinicians: It is 1 a.m., and the sister of your newest patient just called the on-call service to alert your hospice that the patient is in excruciating pain. In fact, the patient's pain is so bad that she is asking whether she should take her to the nearest hospital emergency room. You anticipated this pain, of course, but the patient did not have moderate or severe pain to this point, and the physician wouldn't agree to provide a small supply of morphine to have on hand. PMID:15966151

  19. Hospice Care in America

    MedlinePlus

    ... iii 4. Survey of Team Attitudes and Relationships (STAR)  iv ( www. nhpco. org/ star) • Job satisfaction (hospice-specific) • Salary ranges • Provider-level ... to national estimates and peer groups. iv The STAR national summary report is available for purchase by ...

  20. Medical guidelines for space passengers. Aerospace Medical Association Task Force on Space Travel.

    PubMed

    2001-10-01

    In the foreseeable future, private companies will manufacture space vehicles with a capacity of transporting tourists into low Earth orbit. Because of the stresses of spaceflight, the effects of microgravity, and limited medical care capability, a system of medical clearance is highly recommended for these space tourists. It is our purpose to establish guidelines for use by private businesses, medical providers, and those planning on being a space tourist. Consequently, a Task Force was organized by the Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) for the purpose of facilitating safety of passengers, fellow passengers, crew, and flight operations. The guidelines are meant to serve only as a template with the full expectation that exceptions might be made with appropriate rationale. PMID:11601561

  1. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 2, Practice Facilitation.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, practice facilitation, which is a common strategy in primary care to help practices develop capacity and infrastructure to support their ability to improve patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe practice facilitation, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report practice facilitation efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of practice facilitation. PMID:26954003

  2. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 3, Educational Meetings.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, educational meetings, which is a common intervention in health professions' education. An educational meeting is an opportunity for clinicians to assemble to discuss and apply important information relevant to patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe proper educational meeting terminology and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and to build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report educational meeting efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of educational meetings. PMID:26954004

  3. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 4, Interprofessional Education.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Reeves, Scott; Sargeant, Joan; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, interprofessional education (IPE), which is a common intervention in health professions education. IPE is an opportunity for individuals of multiple professions to interact to learn together, to break down professional silos, and to achieve interprofessional learning outcomes in the service of high-value patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe IPE, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and to build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report IPE efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of IPE. PMID:26954005

  4. 78 FR 17679 - Implementation of the Updated American Veterinary Medical Association Guidelines for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Association Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013 Edition SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health... the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013... updated Guidelines. DATES: Public concerns regarding the updated AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia...

  5. Hospice in Assisted Living: Promoting Good Quality Care at End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Juliana C.; Miller, Lois; Volpin, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe good quality care at the end of life (EOL) for hospice-enrolled residents in assisted living facilities (ALFs). Design and Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was used to obtain detailed descriptions of EOL care provided by ALF medication aides, caregivers, nurses, and hospice nurses in…

  6. Characteristics of hospice patients utilizing hospice inpatient/residential facilities.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyusuk; Burke, Sloane C

    2013-11-01

    Given the increasing popularity of a hospice inpatient/residential facility (HIRF) among hospice patients and their family members, examining who uses HIRFs has been of increasing importance. Using the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS), we found that about 14% of the hospice patients received care in an HIRF in 2007. Characteristics of patients associated with HIRF use largely match the industry norm for a general inpatient level of care and include having no caregiver or having an incapable caregiver; having imminent death; and being directly admitted to a hospice after discharge from a hospital. Given a recent stricter enforcement of reimbursement rules, however, we call for close monitoring of any change in the number of HIRF beds--particularly in rural and low-income urban areas. PMID:23264662

  7. Documenting the impact of hospice.

    PubMed

    Merriman, M P

    1999-01-01

    Hospice care has had an impact at many levels--on individual patients and families, on the health care industry, and on society. However, no comprehensive body of evidence has been generated that documents the impact of hospice care in terms that are meaningful to competitors, referral sources, and consumers. In part, this is because of the many challenges for evaluating hospice care. This paper describes recent efforts in the documentation of the value of hospice which have focused on outcomes measurement by individual providers rather than on large scale studies. Several groups are working to develop reliable measurement tools, to support standardized measurement in large numbers of hospices, and to collect information for benchmarking and comparison. Measurement of the impact of hospice care will set standards for other providers of end-of-life care and will document the expertise and knowledge of hospice professionals. Once established as centers of excellence in care of the dying, hospices will be well positioned for whatever delivery models may evolve for end-of-life care. PMID:10839010

  8. The Appleton Consensus: suggested international guidelines for decisions to forgo medical treatment.

    PubMed

    1989-03-13

    Thirty-three physicians, bioethicists, and medical economists from ten different countries met at Lawrence University, Appleton, Wisconsin, to create The Appleton Consensus: International Guidelines for Decisions to Forgo Medical Treatment. The guidelines deal with four specific decision-making circumstances. 1. Five guidelines were created for decisions involving competent patients or patients who executed an advance directive before becoming incompetent, and those guidelines fell into three categories. 2. Thirteen guidelines were created for decisions involving patients who were once competent, but are not now competent, who have not executed an advance directive. 3. Seven guidelines were created for decisions involving patients who are not now and never have been competent, for whom "no substituted judgment" can be rendered. 4. Eleven guidelines were created for decisions involving the scarcity of medical resources, which exists in all communities. Five concepts were identified as being critical in the establishment of priorities given the reality of scarce health resources. PMID:2929046

  9. Rehospitalization of Older Adults Discharged to Home Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Goldenheim, Anna; Oates, Daniel; Parker, Victoria; Russell, Matthew; Winter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acute hospital readmission of older adults receiving hospice care is not aligned with hospice goals. Objective: To identify factors associated with 30-day readmission among older adults newly discharged to hospice. Design/Subjects: Medical record review of 59 patients, 19 readmitted within 30 days and 40 randomly selected controls not readmitted, from 206 patients newly discharged to home hospice care between February 1, 2005 and January 31, 2010. Measures/Analysis: Information was collected about hospital course, end-of-life planning, and posthospitalization follow-up. We calculated bivariate associations and developed a Cox Proportional Hazards model examining the relation between index admission characteristics and readmission. Results: Patients' mean age was 79.7±8.4; 74.6% were female; 52.5% were black. Among those readmitted, 25% had received a palliative care consultation, compared to 47.1% of those not readmitted (p=0.06). Patients without a participating decision-maker involved in their hospice decision had 3.5 times the risk of readmission within 30 days, compared to those with (hazard ratio [HR] 3.53, confidence interval [CI] 0.97, 12.82). Patients who had one or more telephone contacts with their primary care physician (PCP) during week 1 after discharge had 2.4 times the readmission risk within 30 days, compared to patients with no such contacts during this period (HR 2.35, CI 0.9, 6.1). Conclusions: Readmission within 30 days of initial discharge to hospice is associated with several measures of care and care planning. Further study of these measures may identify opportunities for interventions to improve the hospital-to-hospice transition and to decrease hospital readmissions. PMID:24708490

  10. Discussions with Physicians about Hospice among Patients with Metastatic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huskamp, Haiden A.; Keating, Nancy L.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Earle, Craig C.; Teno, Joan M.; Virnig, Beth A.; Kahn, Katherine L.; He, Yulei; Ayanian, John Z.

    2009-01-01

    Context Many terminally-ill patients enroll in hospice only in the final days before death or not at all. Discussing hospice with a provider could increase awareness of hospice and possibly result in earlier use. Methods We used data on 1517 patients diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer from a multi-regional study. We estimated logistic regression models for the probability that a patient discussed hospice with a physician or other health-care provider before an interview 4−7 months after diagnosis as reported by either the patient or surrogate or documented in the medical record. Results Half (53%) of patients had discussed hospice with a provider. Patients who were black, Hispanic, non-English speaking, married or living with a partner, Medicaid beneficiaries, or had received chemotherapy were less likely to have discussed hospice. Only 53% of individuals who died within two months after the interview had discussed hospice, and rates were lower among those who lived longer. Patients who reported that they expected to live less than two years had much higher rates of discussion than those expecting to live longer. Patients reporting the most severe pain or dyspnea were no more likely to have discussed hospice than those reporting less severe or no symptoms. A third of patients who reported discussing do-not-resuscitate (DNR) preferences with a doctor had also discussed hospice. Conclusions Many patients diagnosed with metastatic lung cancer had not discussed hospice with a provider within 4−7 months of diagnosis. Increased communication with physicians could address patients’ lack of awareness about hospice and misunderstandings about prognosis. PMID:19468089

  11. Use of medical informatics to implement and develop clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Owens, D K

    1998-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines have enormous potential to improve the quality of and accountability in health care. Making the most of this potential should become easier as guideline developers integrate guidelines within information systems and electronic medical records. A major barrier to such integration is the lack of computing infrastructure in many clinical settings. To successfully implement guidelines in information systems, developers must create more specific recommendations than those that have been required for traditional guidelines. Using reusable software components to create guidelines can make the development of protocols faster and less expensive. In addition, using decision models to produce guidelines enables developers to structure guideline problems systematically, to prioritize information acquisition, to develop site-specific guidelines, and to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the explicit incorporation of patient preferences into guideline recommendations. Ongoing research provides a foundation for the use of guideline development tools that can help developers tailor guidelines appropriately to their practice settings. This article explores how medical informatics can help clinicians find, use, and create practice guidelines. Images Figure 2. PMID:9549415

  12. Combining Task Execution and Background Knowledge for the Verification of Medical Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommersom, Arjen; Groot, Perry; Lucas, Peter; Balser, Michael; Schmitt, Jonathan

    The use of a medical guideline can be seen as the execution of computational tasks, sequentially or in parallel, in the face of patient data. It has been shown that many of such guidelines can be represented as a 'network of tasks', i.e., as a number of steps that have a specific function or goal. To investigate the quality of such guidelines we propose a formalization of criteria for good practice medicine a guideline should comply to. We use this theory in conjunction with medical background knowledge to verify the quality of a guideline dealing with diabetes mellitus type 2 using the interactive theorem prover KIV. Verification using task execution and background knowledge is a novel approach to quality checking of medical guidelines.

  13. 42 CFR 418.309 - Hospice cap amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospice cap amount. 418.309 Section 418.309 Public...) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Payment for Hospice Care § 418.309 Hospice cap amount. The hospice cap amount... until October 31 of the following year. (b) Each hospice's cap amount is calculated by the...

  14. Continuum of care comes full circle. Adding hospice care allows a Denver system to better meet patient needs.

    PubMed

    Rockers, T H; Hoagland, B

    1994-09-01

    In November 1993 Hospice of Peace, a home hospice program in Denver, was reorganized under a new joint sponsorship of Provenant Health Partners and Catholic Charities and Community Services. Home hospice completes Provenant's continuum of healthcare. Based on the campus of Provenant Senior Life Center, Hospice of Peace employs multidisciplinary professionals who care for patients and their family care givers in their homes. Each hospice team works with a patient's physician and comes from a pool of primary care nurses, certified nurse assistants, social workers, counselors, pastoral care counselors, and specially trained volunteers and bereavement counselors. Respect for human life at all stages is the ethic behind the organizations' hospice efforts. Even at life's end, when aggressive medical treatment is no longer appropriate, healthcare professionals can enhance patients' quality of life and provide bereavement support to their loved ones. Just as Catholic healthcare addresses the spiritual component of healing, so it addresses the spiritual component of dying. PMID:10136079

  15. Treating asthma by the guidelines: developing a medication management information system for use in primary care.

    PubMed

    Twiggs, Joan E; Fifield, J; Jackson, E; Cushman, R; Apter, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and assess an automated asthma medication management information system (MMIS) that provides patient-specific evaluative guidance based on 1997 NAEPP clinical consensus guidelines. MMIS was developed and implemented in primary care settings within a pediatric asthma disease management program. MMIS infrastructure featured a centralized database with Internet access. MMIS collects detailed patient asthma medication data, evaluates pharmacotherapy relative to practitioner-reported disease severity, symptom control and model of guideline-recommended severity-appropriate medications and produces a patient-specific "curbside consult" feedback report. A system algorithm translates actual detailed medication data into actual severity-specific medication-class combinations. A table-driven computer program compares actual medication-class combinations to a guideline-based medication-class combinations model. Methodology determines whether the patient was prescribed a "severity-appropriate" amount or an amount "more" or "less" medication than indicated for patient's reported severity. Feedback messages comment on comparison. Missing data, unrecognized amounts of controller medication or unrecognized medication combinations create error cases. Post hoc review analyzed error cases to determine prevalence of non-guideline medicating practices among these practitioners. Proportion of valid and error cases across two clinical visits before and after post hoc clinical review were measured, as well as proportion of severity-appropriate, out-of-severity and non-guideline medications. MMIS produced a valid feedback report for 83% of patient visits. Missing data accounted for 60% of error cases. Practitioners used severity-appropriate medications for 60% of cases. When non-severity-appropriate medications were used they tended to be "too much" rather than "too little" (22%, 5%), suggesting appropriate use of guideline-recommended "step

  16. Relationships between Social Work Involvement and Hospice Outcomes: Results of the National Hospice Social Work Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Dona J.; Raymer, Mary

    2004-01-01

    In a struggle to balance fiscal realities with hospice philosophy, some hospices have attempted to cut costs by reducing social work involvement. This cross-sectional survey of 66 hospices found, however, increased social work involvement was significantly associated with lower hospice costs. Additional benefits included better team functioning,…

  17. The Need for Quality Hospice Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert N.

    1979-01-01

    There has been little comment in the hospice literature about the special problems of the elderly. Promotes the continued refinement of hospice concepts and practices in relation to both disease and age. (Author/CMG)

  18. National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strategic Planning for Hospice Hospice Policy and Advocacy Healthcare Reform and Innovation Inspirational Address Booking Policies Contact NHPCO ... Webinar Registration MP4 Recordings Pay for CE/CME Online Learning E-OL Courses Interdisciplinary Team Palliative Care ...

  19. The need for increased access to pediatric hospice and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brian W

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric hospice and palliative care continue to be an underutilized model of care. There is much confusion over the differences between hospice and palliative care. Nurses and physicians continue to need specialized training regarding end-of-life care and the pediatric population. Children and their families may needlessly be suffering during the dying process. Many barriers exist that prevent its use among medical professionals. This article discusses some of these barriers and strategies to reduce them. Recent changes in health care law will allow both curative and hospice care to be provided at the same time. PMID:21841410

  20. Guidelines for Curriculum Development for Undergraduate Medical Education in the Prevention of Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Lung Diseases.

    These guidelines for developing an undergraduate medical education curriculum in pulmonary disease prevention emphasize not only the most current scientific practice but also the active application of cognitive and behavioral skills related to patient education. Chapter 1 introduces the guidelines and the issues and trends in preventative…

  1. Children Assisted by Medical Technology in Educational Settings: Guidelines for Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynie, Marilynn; And Others

    The guidelines are written to assist school systems in establishing an environment for the safe and well-adapted functioning of children with chronic illness, physically disabling conditions, and medical dependency. The guidelines provide a basic structure for operations and suggested procedures intended to help schools and families as they…

  2. Procedural Manual and Guidelines for Derivation of Data on Funding Medical School Program Resources. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agro, Gerlandino; Rosenthal, Joseph

    The manual is the result of several years' effort toward developing a methodology to depict program resources-funding. The guidelines were developed based on a 1975 feasibility study and tested in seven medical colleges. It is hoped that the guidelines will be useful in analyzing the fiscal mechanisms for funding of the individual resources…

  3. Essentials of hospice: what every Oklahoma physician needs to know, Part I.

    PubMed

    Winn, Peter; Salinas, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Every physician, regardless of specialty, must advocate and facilitate patient access to comprehensive palliative and hospice care as their patients enter the last phase of life due to advanced disease or a terminal condition. Accordingly, physicians must become familiar with both the general and the disease-specific eligibility guidelines for hospice, the different levels of hospice care, physician re-imbursement for hospice patient care, and become knowledgeable in advance healthcare planning. The latter includes an understanding of Oklahoma's DNR law and the Advance Directive for Health Care (Living Will) law. Physician proficiency in the palliation of pain and non-pain symptoms that occur in patients at end-of-life is critical to alleviate patient suffering and to ensure the patient's peaceful dying. PMID:15732883

  4. Essentials of hospice: what every Oklahoma physician needs to know, Part II.

    PubMed

    Winn, Peter; Salinas, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Every physician, regardless of specialty, must advocate and facilitate patient access to comprehensive palliative and hospice care as their patients enter the last phase of life due to advanced disease or a terminal condition. Accordingly, physicians must become familiar with both the general and the disease-specific eligibility guidelines for hospice, the different levels of hospice care, physician re-imbursement for hospice patient care, and become knowledgeable in advance health care planning. The latter includes an understanding of Oklahoma's DNR law and the Advance Directive for Health Care (Living Will) law. Physician proficiency in the palliation of pain and non-pain symptoms that occur in patients at end-of-life is critical to alleviate patient suffering and to ensure the patient's peaceful dying. PMID:15729991

  5. Profile of an Effective Hospice Team Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basile, Joseph L.; Stone, Donald B.

    1987-01-01

    Examined competencies that hospice practitioners and experts in the field would agree upon as necessary attributes to being an effective hospice team member. Results indicated strong positive agreement between the rankings of the practitioners on emotional and interpersonal characteristics needed by hospice personnel to effectively function with…

  6. NATIONAL HOME AND HOSPICE CARE SURVEY (NHHCS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Home and Hospice Care Survey is a continuing series of surveys of home and hospice care agencies in the United States. Information was collected about agencies that provide home and hospice care and about their current patients and discharges. The NHHCS is based on a...

  7. The Appleton Consensus: suggested international guidelines for decisions to forego medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Stanley, J M

    1989-09-01

    Thirty-three physicians, bioethicists, and medical economists from ten different countries met at Lawrence University, Appleton, Wisconsin, to create The Appleton Consensus: International Guidelines for Decisions to Forego Medical Treatment. The guidelines deal with four specific decision-making circumstances: 1. Five guidelines were created for decisions involving competent patients or patients who have executed an advance directive before becoming incompetent, and those guidelines fell into three categories. 2. Thirteen guidelines were created for decisions involving patients who were once competent, but are not now competent, who have not executed an advance directive. 3. Seven guidelines were created for decisions involving patients who are not now and never have been competent, for whom 'no substituted judgement' can be rendered. 4. Eleven guidelines were created for decisions involving the scarcity of medical resources, which exists in all communities. Five concepts were identified as being critical in the establishment of priorities, given the reality of scarce health resources (1). The term 'physician' is used in the American sense, synonymous with 'medical practitioner'. PMID:2677379

  8. On euthanasia, resistance, and redemption: the moralities and politics of a hospice.

    PubMed

    Broom, Alex

    2012-02-01

    Euthanasia/assisted dying, the desire to hasten death, and religious supportive care at the end of life are controversial issues that have been heavily debated within the academic and medical communities. Little research has been done on hospice patients' views, despite hospices being political spaces, espousing a range of perspectives on assisted dying, religiosity, and "good deaths." In this article I document the presence, articulation, and significance of these issues as perceived and experienced by 20 hospice inpatients in the last 4 weeks of their lives. Key themes to emerge included polarization in desire for hastened death and assisted dying in the hospice; the hospice as a morally bound space situated within particular notions of "dying well"; and the divisive character of religion as part of formalized hospice care. Theoretically, the participants' perspectives on euthanasia/assisted dying and religiosity in the hospice provide a means of unpacking and revealing the moral economy of modern dying practices and the institutional governance and production of "timely deaths." PMID:21908705

  9. Guidelines for providing medical care to Southeast Asian refugees.

    PubMed

    Hoang, G N; Erickson, R V

    1982-08-13

    Almost 500,000 Southeast Asian refugees have arrived in the United States since 1975. While these refugees have not presented substantial public health problems, they have important personal health problems frequently requiring medical attention. Medical care providers in this country need to be aware of disease patterns and prevalence among these refugees. As well, they need to be aware of the cultural and religious backgrounds and previous medical practices of this refugee population, particularly as these practice influence the refugees' ability to obtain and maintain medical services provided in this country. Historical, cultural, religious, ethical, and medical information is provided to help US health care facilities develop culturally appropriate medical care services for Southeast Asian refugees. PMID:7097923

  10. Evaluating transformational leadership skills of hospice executives.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    Health care is a rapidly changing environment requiring a high level of leadership skills by executive level personnel. The hospice industry is experiencing the same rapid changes; however, the changes have been experienced over the brief span of 25 years. Highly skilled hospice executives are a necessity for the growth and long-term survival of hospice care. This descriptive study was conducted to evaluate the leadership skills of hospice executives. The study population consisted of hospice executives who were members of the state hospice organization in Ohio and/or licensed by the state (88 hospice providers). Three questionnaires were utilized for collecting data. These questionnaires collected data on transformational leadership skills of participants, participants' personal demographics, and their employer's organizational demographics. Forty-seven hospice executives responded (53%). Key findings reported were high levels of transformational leadership skills (mean, 3.39), increased use of laissez-faire skills with years of hospice experience (P = .57), and positive reward being a frequent leadership technique utilized (mean, 3.29). In addition, this was the first study of leadership skills of hospice executives and the first formal collection of personal demographic data about hospice executives. PMID:17060280

  11. Children and Youth Assisted by Medical Technology in Educational Settings: Guidelines for Care. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Stephanie, Ed.; Haynie, Marilynn, Ed.; Bierle, Timaree, Ed.; Caldwell, Terry Heintz, Ed.; Palfrey, Judith S., Ed.

    This manual is intended to provide specific guidelines for meeting the needs of students who are assisted by medical technology in the educational setting. The manual is divided into two sections: Section 1 discusses principles and issues concerned with applying medical technology in schools, and Section 2 details the various procedures and…

  12. The Hospice: An Integrated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodine, George E.; Sobotor, William

    This extensive bibliography of books and articles provides an interdisciplinary overview of present day terminal care and the hospice alternative. Designed to aid in the development and implementation of terminal care programs stressing palliative and supportive services for both patients and their families, the bibliography includes abstracts of…

  13. Psychological contracts of hospice nurses.

    PubMed

    Jones, Audrey Elizabeth; Sambrook, Sally

    2010-12-01

    Psychological contracts have been described as individuals' beliefs regarding the obligations, expectations, and contributions that exist between them and their employer. They can be influenced by the organization's culture and philosophy, through human resources policies, and through the employee's personality and characteristics. Owing to the recent economic crisis, hospices in the UK are currently in a transitional phase and are being expected to demonstrate efficiencies that might be more in line with a business model than a health-care environment. This may conflict with the philosophical views of hospice nurses. To support nurses through this transition, it might be helpful to understand the antecedents of hospice nurses' behaviour and how they construct their psychological contracts. Failure to offer adequate support might lead to negative outcomes such as a desire to leave the organisation, poorer quality work, or disruptive behaviour. This study used a modified grounded theory approach involving in-depth interviews to explore the context and content of the psychological contracts of hospice nurses in the UK. Four main themes emerged: the types of psychological contracts formed, how the contracts are formed, their contents, and the breaches and potential violations the nurses perceive. PMID:21240104

  14. Nonverbal Communication in Hospice Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Marvin D.

    Hospice care (health care for the terminally ill that emphasizes emotional support for the patient and family) is essential to ease emotional, psychological, and social pain, and can be a factor in addressing spiritual and physical pain. Yet to ease the pain of final illness, therapeutic communication must extend beyond words. Physical contact--in…

  15. Communication Aspects of Hospice Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Marvin D.

    No theories of communication can minimize the crisis of dying. But those who study commmunication can suggest ways of offering comfort and dignity to the dying person. Many of these ways go beyond words, for death cannot be addressed with verbal cliches. The theoretical work from which a communication scholar draws can help hospice volunteers and…

  16. Palliative Care, Hospice, and Advance Care Planning: Views of People Living with HIV and Other Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Jacquelyn; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Webel, Allison; Daly, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) who survive to older adulthood risk developing multiple chronic medical conditions. Health policymakers recognize the role of early palliative care and advance care planning in improving health quality for at-risk populations, but misperceptions about palliative care, hospice, and advance care planning are common. Before testing a program of early palliative care for PLWH and other chronic conditions, we conducted focus groups to elicit perceptions of palliative care, hospice, and advance care planning in our target population. Overall, participants were unfamiliar with the term palliative care, confused concepts of palliative care and hospice, and/or associated hospice care with dying. Participants misunderstood advance care planning, but valued communication about health care preferences. Accepting palliative care was contingent on distinguishing it from hospice and historical memories of HIV and dying. Provision of high-quality, comprehensive care will require changing public perceptions and individuals' views in this high-risk population. PMID:27053406

  17. Recommendations and guidelines for safe medical laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Thomas H.

    1996-12-01

    The better understanding of generation of by-products during laser application allows a rough risk assessment, which in turn results in a number of recommendations and guidelines. The main attention is directed to smoke evacuation systems in connection with sufficient room ventilation, both being obligatory for any invasive laser therapy. Minimal requirements and optimal use of such units are discussed and practical examples are presented. The important role of personal protection measures is pointed out. These measures are not new and more or less practiced in the past. However, they have been justified now in detail by the comprehensive investigations during the STILMED project.

  18. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the treatment of acute pain in remote environments: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Scaife, Courtney L; Weber, David C; Windsor, Jeremy S; Wheeler, Albert R; Smith, William R; Wedmore, Ian; McIntosh, Scott E; Lieberman, James R

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of pain in austere environments. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence as defined by criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Remote Environments published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(1):41-49. PMID:25498266

  19. Heart Failure: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Medical Treatment Guidelines, and Nursing Management.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Chad; Bush, Nathania

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a debilitating chronic disease and is expected to increase in upcoming years due to demographic changes. Nurses in all settings have an essential role in supporting patients in managing this disease. This article describes the pathophysiology of HF, diagnosis, medical management, and nursing interventions. It is crucial for nurses to understand the pathophysiology of HF and the importance that nursing actions have on enhancing medical management to alleviate symptoms and to deter the advancement of the pathophysiologic state. Such an understanding can ultimately reduce morbidity and mortality and optimize quality of life in patients with HF. PMID:26596665

  20. Motivations of German Hospice Volunteers: How Do They Compare to Nonhospice Volunteers and US Hospice Volunteers?

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Eva-Maria; Lang, Frieder R

    2016-03-01

    We examined reasons of volunteering for hospice and nonhospice organizations in a study with 125 volunteers (22-93 years) from the United States and Germany. Motives of US and German hospice volunteers revealed similarities and few differences. Hospice volunteers are involved because they seek to help others, seek new learning experiences, seek social contacts, or seek personal growth. The US hospice volunteers reported motives related to altruistic concerns, enhancement, and social influence as more influential, while German hospice volunteers rated career expectations as being more important. Comparison of German hospice with nonhospice volunteers revealed stronger differences: German hospice volunteers scored higher on altruistic motives, while German nonhospice volunteers yielded higher scores on self-serving motives. Findings contribute to improved understanding of volunteering motivation and of activating or retaining hospice volunteers. PMID:25422517

  1. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of lightning injuries: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Engeln, Anna; Johnson, Eric L; McIntosh, Scott E; Zafren, Ken; Islas, Arthur A; McStay, Christopher; Smith, William R; Cushing, Tracy

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and prevention of lightning injuries. These guidelines include a review of the epidemiology of lightning and recommendations for the prevention of lightning strikes, along with treatment recommendations organized by organ system. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Lightning Injuries published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2012;23(3):260-269. PMID:25498265

  2. Progeria: Medical Aspects, Psychosocial Perspectives, and Intervention Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses progeria (or Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome), a rare childhood disorder that invariably results in death during adolescence. Describes the major medical aspects of progeria, and discusses the psychosocial implications of the disorder with particular emphasis on grief-triggered reactions. Presents an overview of psychosocial intervention…

  3. Guidelines for Effective Teleconference Presentations in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raszkowski, Robert R.; Chute, Alan G.

    Designing teleconference programs for the physician learner puts unique demands on the teleconferencing medium. Typically, physicians expect a 1-hour lecture presentation with high information density. To effectively present the medical content material in an audio medium, strategies which structure and organize the content material are necessary.…

  4. The routinization of hospice: charisma and bureaucratization.

    PubMed

    James, N; Field, D

    1992-06-01

    In 25 years the number of hospices in Britain has multiplied from under 15 in 1965 to over 430 in 1991. During this period, often working out with the mainstream health system, the hospices actively sought to transform terminal care. More recently a process of diversification and legitimation has meant that hospices have become increasingly subject to mainstream influence. Using Weber's concept of charisma we examine the development of the hospice movement during this period of expansion. We suggest there are a number of factors leading to the routinization of hospice care including the ways in which it was sponsored and developed at the local level, and pressures toward bureaucratization and professionalization. We make links with recent developments in the health services. Finally we consider whether it is possible for the hospice movement to sustain its founding ideals. PMID:1529374

  5. [Good medical practice for drugs. Definition, guidelines, references, field of action and applications].

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Proper use of drugs can be defined as the use of the right product, in a correct dosage, during an adequate length of time, for a given patient and provided he has no serious side effects.It is virtually impossible, with such a number of drugs, such a number of clinical situations to prescribe adequately without using references or guidelines. References may lead to a unique choice, when the diagnosis is certain and the drug to be given is unique. With a good initial and continuous medical education, doctors can take easily this type of decision. The Summary of Products Characteristics (SPC) helps them; by sticking to this fundamental reference, prescription might be more precise and safe. In a lot of clinical situations the choice between a large numbers of therapeutic strategies necessitates use of a guideline based on scientific knowledge. Finally, a given therapeutic strategy can be as effective as and considerably less expensive than another. In such cases, payers can drive doctors to the prescription of the less expensive strategy.Some difficulties are common to all references and guidelines: 1. A lot of clinical situations are not covered by guidelines. 2. Guidelines should be updated each time there is a modification of knowledge: it is extremely difficult to do. 3. A great number of guidelines exist, issued by scientific community, health authorities or the payers. Sometime you can find a proposition in a guideline and the reverse in another guideline. It could be confusing. 4. Guidelines should be evaluated rigorously to know if they fulfil their goals. 5. Some of those guidelines simply cannot help doctors. They are too complex or do not take into account practical situations.We have made an inventory of those various guidelines and their weaknesses and we propose some solutions to increase their utility. We propose an analysis of the situation and some solutions to improve the quality and the relevance of the guidelines: to create groups of coordination

  6. Hospice-Where Peace and Turmoil Coexist.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that a hospice is much more than just a place providing supportive care for the terminally ill. This narrative describes Neha, a young mother who found her solace in the hospice and spent her last days there by choice. It reinforces the fact that the hospice is truly a philosophy of care where powerful and contrasting emotions do coexist. PMID:26862661

  7. Guidelines for expert witness testimony in medical malpractice litigation. Committee on Medical Liability. American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    2002-05-01

    The interests of the public and the medical profession are best served when scientifically sound and unbiased expert witness testimony is readily available to plaintiffs and defendants in medical negligence suits. As members of the physician community, as patient advocates, and as private citizens, pediatricians have ethical and professional obligations to assist in the administration of justice, particularly in matters concerning potential medical malpractice. The American Academy of Pediatrics believes that the adoption of the recommendations outlined in this statement will improve the quality of medical expert witness testimony in such proceedings and thereby increase the probability of achieving equitable outcomes. Strategies to enforce ethical guidelines should be monitored for efficacy before offering policy recommendations on disciplining physicians for providing biased, false, or unscientific medical expert witness testimony. PMID:11986466

  8. Death representation of caregivers in hospice.

    PubMed

    Andruccioli, Jessica; Russo, Maria Maffia; Bruschi, Angela; Pedrabissi, Luigi; Sarti, Donatella; Monterubbianesi, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Sabina; Rocconi, Sabina; Raffaeli, William

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we investigated caregiver's death representation in hospice. The results presented here are a further analysis of the data collected in our previous study, concerning the evaluation of the caregiver in hospice. The data analysis of 24 caregivers of patients hospitalized in Rimini Hospice (Italy) underlined that caregivers avoiding death representation of the patient admitted to hospice had fewer protective factors (52.3%) and more risk factors (47.7%) than caregivers nonavoiding (66.5% and 33.5%, respectively). Caregivers avoiding death representation, moreover, experienced a greater distress (58%) than those nonavoiding (42%). PMID:22241459

  9. Adherence to Venous Thromboprophylaxis Guidelines for Medical and Surgical Inpatients of Teaching Hospitals, Shiraz-Iran

    PubMed Central

    Manoucheri, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) exerts a considerable burden on the health care systems. Although many practice guidelines have been developed regarding prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism, there is a large gap between the recommendations and the medical practice in health care centers. In this study, we tried to assess adherence of the medical team to guidelines for venous thromboprophylaxis in medical and surgical wards of teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, a total number of 500 patients were recruited among hospitalized patients in neurosurgery, orthopedics, general surgery, internal medicine, and obstetrics & gynecology departments and surgical and medical intensive care units. Afterwards, adherence to thromboprophylaxis guidelines was assessed by comparing the medical records of patients with proper indications extracted from the American College of Chest Physicians Guidelines for VTE prophylaxis (ACCP, 9th edition). In other words, for each patient a comparison between proper indications of receiving thromboprophylaxis and the regimen used in practice was made. Results: Out of 472 patients assessed with respect to the appropriateness of the administered prophylaxis, 212 (45.1%) had received proper type of thromboprophylaxis with regard to ACCP guidelines. Orthopedic surgical wards showed the highest rate of appropriateness while neurosurgical wards showed the lowest rate of adherence (76% vs. 1.8%). The overall rate of inappropriateness was 54.9% (260 patients). Inappropriateness was divided into 3 categories: 1) patients had absolute indications to receive thromboprophylaxis but were not provided with any type of prophylaxis in practice (171 patients, 36.2% of total), 2) in presence of absolute indications, incorrect type of prophylaxis was administered (52 patients, 11% of total), 3) in absence of indications for thromboprophylaxis

  10. Creative ritual in a hospice.

    PubMed

    Roche, J

    1994-12-01

    St. Peter's Hospice, Albany, NY, is dedicated to meeting the emotional needs of patients, families, and staff. Creative ritual, hospice leaders have found, is a powerful tool that can: Provide an "arena" for healing, affirmation, reconciliation, and celebration Serve as a reminder of the sacred Evoke heartfelt emotion Effect renewal and inspiration Offer an opportunity to cleanse the soul of grief, anger, frustration, or guilt Provide tangible experiences of bonding and interdependence Prevent staff burnout St. Peter's staff show a good deal of imagination and variety in creating rituals. Possible themes include patients' birthdays or wedding anniversaries, religious celebrations, national holidays, and changes of seasons. A lighted candle, bouquet of flowers, or incense burner may be used to give the ritual a focus. Music is often played to help set the tone. Rituals involve a major shift in consciousness. They often allow participants to express feelings it would otherwise be difficult for them to put into words. At St. Peter's, participants may begin to communicate by sharing favorite prayers, poems, photos, or works of art. Or they may make music--the hospice provides the instruments--or pass around a Native American "talking stick." Such methods facilitate the bonding of patients and their families. Particularly important are those rituals which allow patients and estranged family members to reconcile. Others enable patients to acknowledge God-given gifts. Still other rituals are held for staff members, who thereby deal with the anger and sadness their work inevitably brings. For all at St. Peter's Hospice ritual is a source of healing, affirmation, renewal, inspiration, and grace. PMID:10138592

  11. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the treatment of acute pain in remote environments.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Scaife, Courtney L; Weber, David C; Windsor, Jeremy S; Wheeler, Albert R; Smith, William; Wedmore, Ian; McIntosh, Scott E; Lieberman, James R

    2014-03-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of pain in austere environments. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence as defined by criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:24462332

  12. Updated Guidelines for the Medical Assessment and Care of Children Who May Have Been Sexually Abused.

    PubMed

    Adams, Joyce A; Kellogg, Nancy D; Farst, Karen J; Harper, Nancy S; Palusci, Vincent J; Frasier, Lori D; Levitt, Carolyn J; Shapiro, Robert A; Moles, Rebecca L; Starling, Suzanne P

    2016-04-01

    The medical evaluation is an important part of the clinical and legal process when child sexual abuse is suspected. Practitioners who examine children need to be up to date on current recommendations regarding when, how, and by whom these evaluations should be conducted, as well as how the medical findings should be interpreted. A previously published article on guidelines for medical care for sexually abused children has been widely used by physicians, nurses, and nurse practitioners to inform practice guidelines in this field. Since 2007, when the article was published, new research has suggested changes in some of the guidelines and in the table that lists medical and laboratory findings in children evaluated for suspected sexual abuse and suggests how these findings should be interpreted with respect to sexual abuse. A group of specialists in child abuse pediatrics met in person and via online communication from 2011 through 2014 to review published research as well as recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics and to reach consensus on if and how the guidelines and approach to interpretation table should be updated. The revisions are based, when possible, on data from well-designed, unbiased studies published in high-ranking, peer-reviewed, scientific journals that were reviewed and vetted by the authors. When such studies were not available, recommendations were based on expert consensus. PMID:26220352

  13. 20 CFR 404.1569 - Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2. 404.1569 Section 404.1569 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational...

  14. 20 CFR 404.1569 - Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2. 404.1569 Section 404.1569 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational...

  15. 20 CFR 404.1569 - Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2. 404.1569 Section 404.1569 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1569 - Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2. 404.1569 Section 404.1569 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1569 - Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2. 404.1569 Section 404.1569 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational...

  18. Korean Medication Algorithm for Bipolar Disorder 2014: comparisons with other treatment guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Jeong Goo; Kim, Moon-Doo; Sohn, Inki; Shim, Se-Hoon; Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Jon, Duk-In; Seo, Jeong Seok; Shin, Young-Chul; Min, Kyung Joon; Yoon, Bo-Hyun; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-01-01

    Our goal was to compare the recommendations of the Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder 2014 (KMAP-BP 2014) with other recently published guidelines for the treatment of bipolar disorder. We reviewed a total of four recently published global treatment guidelines and compared each treatment recommendation of the KMAP-BP 2014 with those in other guidelines. For the initial treatment of mania, there were no significant differences across treatment guidelines. All recommended mood stabilizer (MS) or atypical antipsychotic (AAP) monotherapy or the combination of an MS with an AAP as a first-line treatment strategy for mania. However, the KMAP-BP 2014 did not prefer monotherapy with MS or AAP for dysphoric/psychotic mania. Aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, and risperidone were the first-line AAPs in nearly all of the phases of bipolar disorder across the guidelines. Most guidelines advocated newer AAPs as first-line treatment options in all phases, and lamotrigine in depressive and maintenance phases. Lithium and valproic acid were commonly used as MSs in all phases of bipolar disorder. As research evidence accumulated over time, recommendations of newer AAPs – such as asenapine, paliperidone, lurasidone, and long-acting injectable risperidone – became prominent. This comparison identifies that the treatment recommendations of the KMAP-BP 2014 are similar to those of other treatment guidelines and reflect current changes in prescription patterns for bipolar disorder based on accumulated research data. Further studies are needed to address several issues identified in our review. PMID:26170669

  19. Regulating and Paying for Hospice and Palliative Care: Reflections on the Medicare Hospice Benefit.

    PubMed

    Mor, Vincent; Teno, Joan M

    2016-08-01

    Hospice began as a social movement outside of mainstream medicine with the goal of helping those dying alone and in unbearable pain in health care institutions. The National Hospice Study, undertaken to test whether hospice improved dying cancer patients' quality of life while saving Medicare money, found hospice care achieved comparable outcomes to traditional cancer care and was less costly as long as hospice lengths of stay were not too long. In 1982, before study results were final, Congress created a Medicare hospice benefit under a capitated per diem payment system restricting further treatment. In 1986 the benefit was extended to beneficiaries living in nursing homes. This change resulted in longer average lengths of stay, explosive growth in the number of hospices, particularly of the for-profit variety, and increases in total Medicare expenditures on hospice care. An increasingly high proportion of beneficiaries receive hospice care. However, over 30 percent are served fewer than seven days before they die, while very long stays are also increasingly common. These and other factors raise quality concerns about hospice being disconnected from the rest of the health care system. We offer suggestions regarding how hospice could be better integrated into the broader health care delivery system. PMID:27127256

  20. Genealogical data in population medical genetics: Field guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Poletta, Fernando A.; Orioli, Ieda M.; Castilla, Eduardo E.

    2014-01-01

    This is a guide for fieldwork in Population Medical Genetics research projects. Data collection, handling, and analysis from large pedigrees require the use of specific tools and methods not widely familiar to human geneticists, unfortunately leading to ineffective graphic pedigrees. Initially, the objective of the pedigree must be decided, and the available information sources need to be identified and validated. Data collection and recording by the tabulated method is advocated, and the involved techniques are presented. Genealogical and personal information are the two main components of pedigree data. While the latter is unique to each investigation project, the former is solely represented by gametic links between persons. The triad of a given pedigree member and its two parents constitutes the building unit of a genealogy. Likewise, three ID numbers representing those three elements of the triad is the record field required for any pedigree analysis. Pedigree construction, as well as pedigree and population data analysis, varies according to the pre-established objectives, the existing information, and the available resources. PMID:24764752

  1. Soliciting an Herbal Medicine and Supplement Use History at Hospice Admission

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Karen; Jackson, Steve; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Reconciling medication use and performing drug utilization review on admission of a patient into hospice care are essential in order to safely prescribe medications and to prevent possible adverse drug events and drug–drug interactions. As part of this process, fully assessing herbal medicine and supplement use in hospice patients is crucial, as patients in hospice may be likely to use these medications and may be more vulnerable to their potential adverse effects. Objective Our purpose was to identify herbals, vitamins, and supplements that should be routinely assessed on every hospice admission because of their higher likelihood of use or higher risk of adverse effects or drug interactions. Methods Experts in the fields of palliative medicine, pharmacy, and alternative medicine were asked to complete a Web-based survey on 37 herbals, vitamins, supplements, and natural products, rating likelihood of use, potential for harm, and recommendation to include it on the final list on a scale of 1 to 5 (least to most likely to agree). Results Twenty experts participated in the survey. Using a cutoff of 3.75 for inclusion of a medication on the final list, 12 herbal medicines were identified that should be routinely and specifically assessed on hospice admission. Conclusions Although assessing all herbal medicine use is ideal, thorough detection of herbals may be challenging. The list of herbals and supplements identified by this survey could be a useful tool for medication reconciliation in hospice and could aid in identifying potentially harmful medication use at the end of life. PMID:20557233

  2. Telemonitoring in heart failure patients with clinical decision support to optimize medication doses based on guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kropf, Martin; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Hayn, Dieter; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Schreier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology guidelines for heart failure management are based on strong evidence that adherence to optimal medication is beneficial for heart failure patients. Telemonitoring with integrated clinical decision support enables physicians to adapt medication dose based on up to date vital parameters and reduces the number of hospital visits needed solely for up-titration of heart failure medication. Although keeping track of weight and blood pressure changes is recommended during unstable phases, e.g. post-discharge and during up-titration of medication, guidelines are rather vague regarding telehealth aspects. In this paper, we focus on the evaluation of a clinical decision support system for adaption of heart failure medication and for detecting early deteriorations through monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate and weight changes. This clinical decision support system is currently used in INTENSE-HF, a large scale telemonitoring trial with heart failure patients. The aim of this paper was to apply the decision support algorithm to an existing telemonitoring dataset, to assess the ability of the decision support concept to adhere to the guidelines and to discuss its limitations and potential improvements. PMID:25570663

  3. Using features of Arden Syntax with object-oriented medical data models for guideline modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, M.; Ogunyemi, O.; Tu, S.; Boxwala, A. A.; Zeng, Q.; Greenes, R. A.; Shortliffe, E. H.

    2001-01-01

    Computer-interpretable guidelines (CIGs) can deliver patient-specific decision support at the point of care. CIGs base their recommendations on eligibility and decision criteria that relate medical concepts to patient data. CIG models use expression languages for specifying these criteria, and define models for medical data to which the expressions can refer. In developing version 3 of the GuideLine Interchange Format (GLIF3), we used existing standards as the medical data model and expression language. We investigated the object-oriented HL7 Reference Information Model (RIM) as a default data model. We developed an expression language, called GEL, based on Arden Syntax's logic grammar. Together with other GLIF constructs, GEL reconciles incompatibilities between the data models of Arden Syntax and the HL7 RIM. These incompatibilities include Arden's lack of support for complex data types and time intervals, and the mismatch between Arden's single primary time and multiple time attributes of the HL7 RIM. PMID:11825243

  4. Guidelines in the Register of the Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany – A Quality Improvement Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Nothacker, M. J.; Muche-Borowski, C.; Kopp, I. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) is the umbrella organization of medical scientific societies in Germany. The development of guidelines goes back to an initiative of the medical scientific societies and is coordinated by the AWMF. Rules for the inclusion of guidelines in the AWMF Guideline Register have been defined including how guidelines are classified. S1 guidelines are based only on recommendations by experts, whereas S2 guidelines require a structured consensus process or a systematic literature review. S3 guidelines include both elements. In addition to compulsory disclosure of any potential conflict of interest, transparent handling of potential conflicts of interest is an important confidence-building measure. For years, the trend has been to develop higher order (S2/S3) guidelines, and the German Society for Gynecology and Obstetrics (DGGG) has been no exception to the trend. In addition to its responsibility for specific S2 and S3 guidelines, the DGGG is also involved in numerous other interdisciplinary guidelines. When developing a guideline, it is essential to define the guidelineʼs scope, identify aspects which require improvement and agree on the goals. Target groups affected by the guidelines should be involved if they are interested. Different formats (long and short versions, practical instructions, conventional or electronic decision aids, patient versions) are useful to disseminate the guideline. The guideline can be adapted to local circumstances to encourage implementation of its recommendations. Implementation can be measured using quality indicators. Feedback from practitioners is important as this highlights areas which require improvement. The medical scientific societies in Germany can look back on almost two decades of work spent on developing guidelines, most of it done by unpaid voluntary contributors, making this a very successful quality initiative. PMID:25061235

  5. 75 FR 67905 - National Hospice Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-28082 Filed 11-3-10... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8594 of October 29, 2010 National Hospice Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation During National Hospice Month, we recognize the dignity...

  6. Home Economists and Hospice: A Needed Combination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Marilyn D.

    1983-01-01

    Hospice is a family-centered concept of care which needs home economists from all subject-matter areas in volunteer or paid professional roles. In turn, home economists can grow personally as well as professionally through their involvement with hospice. (Author)

  7. The Hospice Concept: Health Occupation 305.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schobel, Deborah A.

    A description is provided of "The Hospice Concept," an elective course offered as part of a two-year college health occupations curriculum. The course is designed to further the students understanding of the multiple facets of death and dying and to prepare them to be hospice volunteers. Following a course description and a glossary of terms,…

  8. Developing an ethical guideline for clinical teaching in Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Akram; Yeketaz, Habibeh; Asghari, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Clinical education is an essential part of medical trainees’ education process, and curriculum planners agree that it should be based on ethical standards and principles in the medical field. Nevertheless, no explained and codified criteria have been developed for ethics in clinical teaching. This study was aimed to develop an ethical guideline for medical students and teachers as the first and most important step in respecting patients' rights in educational centers. The initial draft included the codes of ethics in clinical education and was developed based on library studies. Subsequently, it was improved through a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and focus group sessions with medical students, patients, and medical teachers in educational hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The improved draft was reviewed and validated by a medical expert panel to prepare the final draft. The codes derived from this study included patients’ choices and rights in purely educational procedures, and special considerations for a) obtaining informed consent for educational procedures; b) performing procedures on deceased persons, patients under anesthesia and those lacking decision making capacity; c) educational visual recordings of the patients; and d) safety monitoring in clinical education. The guideline developed in this study incorporates codes of ethics into clinical training. Therefore, in addition to providing efficient education, the interests of patients and their rights are respected, and the ethical sensitivity of learners in primacy of patients’ best interests will be preserved and enhanced. PMID:26839679

  9. Guideline report. Medical ultrasound imaging: progress and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Burns, M

    1989-01-01

    Utilization of medical ultrasound has expanded rapidly during the past several years. In 1988, sales of ultrasound equipment will approach $600 million, which is higher than any other individual imaging modality, including the most capital intensive, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and cath lab angiography. This growth would have been difficult to predict previously, since ultrasound appeared to be a relatively mature imaging modality not too long ago. There are several reasons for this growth. Technological developments have been quite rapid; ultrasound has become easier to use, image quality has improved dramatically, and diagnostic accuracy has been enhanced. There has been a proliferation of new equipment at all ends of the price spectrum, allowing the user a wide choice in instrument performance, multi-function capabilities, and automated features to increase patient throughput. The DRG environment and the prospect for more pre-admission tests have also been a stimulus. Hospital buying activity has expanded, and many more ultrasound exams are now being conducted on an outpatient basis. Sales to freestanding imaging centers and individual physicians have similarly increased. The hospital user is willing to pay a large premium for advanced technical performance and is prepared to retire or replace older technology in less than three years. This replacement cycle is much shorter than the four to five year period which existed prior to 1985. By comparison, some of the more traditional imaging areas, such as radiology, have replacement rates of eight to ten years. The reason for early replacement is obvious. Ultrasound exams in hospitals generate revenues at a rate that justifies the purchase of the most advanced equipment. It also improves the referral rate and positions the hospital as a high quality provider. Even with low utilization rates, an ultrasound instrument can normally pay for itself in less than one year of regular

  10. The Effect of Hospice on Hospitalizations of Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.; Friedman, Bruce; Caprio, Thomas V.; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hospice enrollment is known to reduce risk of hospitalizations for nursing home residents who use it. We examined whether residing in facilities with a higher hospice penetration: 1) reduces hospitalization risk for non-hospice residents; and 2) decreases hospice-enrolled residents’ hospitalization risk relative to hospice-enrolled residents in facilities with a lower hospice penetration. Method Medicare Beneficiary File, Inpatient and Hospice Claims, Minimum Data Set Version 2.0, Provider of Services File and Area Resource File. Retrospective analysis of long-stay nursing home residents who died during 2005-2007. Overall, 505,851 non-hospice (67.66%) and 241,790 hospice-enrolled (32.34%) residents in 14,030 facilities nationwide were included. We fit models predicting the probability of hospitalization conditional on hospice penetration and resident and facility characteristics. We used instrumental variable method to address the potential endogeneity between hospice penetration and hospitalization. Distance between each nursing home and the closest hospice was the instrumental variable. Main Findings In the last 30 days of life, 37.63% of non-hospice and 23.18% of hospice residents were hospitalized. Every 10% increase in hospice penetration leads to a reduction in hospitalization risk of 5.1% for non-hospice residents and 4.8% for hospice-enrolled residents. Principal Conclusions Higher facility-level hospice penetration reduces hospitalization risk for both non-hospice and hospice-enrolled residents. The findings shed light on nursing home end-of-life care delivery, collaboration among providers and cost benefit analysis of hospice care. PMID:25304181

  11. The Hospice Farewell: Ideological Perspectives of Its Professional Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaldi, Anoel; Kearl, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    Questioned 48 hospice experts to elicit group judgments about hospice ideology, control over one's own death trajectory, and hospice's relevance for older individuals. Although high rate of consensus was obtained on many issues, little evidence of coherent ideology could be detected linking notions of hospice origins, issues of patient control,…

  12. 42 CFR 417.531 - Hospice care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospice care services. 417.531 Section 417.531... PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.531 Hospice care services. (a) If a Medicare enrollee of... receive hospice care services, payment for these services is made to the hospice that furnishes...

  13. Considerations on the Improved Integration of Medical Guidelines into Routine Clinical Practice – a Review and Concept Proposal

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, M. W.; Schlieter, H.; Richter, P.; Wesselmann, S.

    2016-01-01

    Medical guidelines have become established as the standard for the comprehensive synopsis of all available information (scientific trials, expert opinion) on diagnosis and treatment recommendations. The transfer of guidelines to clinical practice and subsequent monitoring has however proven difficult. In particular the potential interaction between guideline developers and guideline users has not been fully utilised. This review article analyses the status quo and existing methodological and technical information solutions supporting the guideline life cycle. It is shown that there are numerous innovative developments that in isolation do not provide comprehensive support. The vision of the “Living Guidelines 2.0” is therefore presented. This outlines the merging of guideline development and implementation on the basis of clinical pathways and guideline-based quality control, and building on this, the generation of information for guideline development and research. PMID:27134291

  14. A cost comparison of hospice care in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Elman, Lauren B; Stanley, Lisa; Gibbons, Patricia; McCluskey, Leo

    2006-01-01

    The authors compare the cost of hospice care provided to 25 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and 159 lung cancer patients by the Wissahickon Hospice of the University of Pennsylvania. The mean length of stay was 86.7 days for ALS patients and 35.0 days for patients with lung cancer (P = .011). The mean per patient cost was 5622.93 dollars for the ALS patients and 2658.91 dollars for patients with lung cancer (P = .057) The average operating margin excluding administrative costs was 5293.04 dollars for ALS patients and 2126.74 dollars for patients with lung cancer (P = .008). The longer length of stay (LOS) accounts for this difference. Longer LOS can be accomplished by close clinical monitoring of ALS patients for the development of life threatening respiratory and/or nutritional compromise and by liberalizing the present hospice admission guidelines. PMID:17060281

  15. Sustainability of professionals’ adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ament, Stephanie M C; de Groot, Jeanny J A; Maessen, José M C; Dirksen, Carmen D; van der Weijden, Trudy; Kleijnen, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate (1) the state of the art in sustainability research and (2) the outcomes of professionals’ adherence to guideline recommendations in medical practice. Design Systematic review. Data sources Searches were conducted until August 2015 in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Guidelines International Network (GIN) library. A snowball strategy, in which reference sections of other reviews and of included papers were searched, was used to identify additional papers. Eligibility criteria Studies needed to be focused on sustainability and on professionals’ adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care. Studies had to include at least 2 measurements: 1 before (PRE) or immediately after implementation (EARLY POST) and 1 measurement longer than 1 year after active implementation (LATE POST). Results The search retrieved 4219 items, of which 14 studies met the inclusion criteria, involving 18 sustainability evaluations. The mean timeframe between the end of active implementation and the sustainability evaluation was 2.6 years (minimum 1.5–maximum 7.0). The studies were heterogeneous with respect to their methodology. Sustainability was considered to be successful if performance in terms of professionals’ adherence was fully maintained in the late postimplementation phase. Long-term sustainability of professionals’ adherence was reported in 7 out of 18 evaluations, adherence was not sustained in 6 evaluations, 4 evaluations showed mixed sustainability results and in 1 evaluation it was unclear whether the professional adherence was sustained. Conclusions (2) Professionals’ adherence to a clinical practice guideline in medical care decreased after more than 1 year after implementation in about half of the cases. (1) Owing to the limited number of studies, the absence of a uniform definition, the high risk of bias, and the mixed results of studies, no firm conclusion about the

  16. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Opacic, Matthew; Freer, Luanne; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Cochran, Amalia; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; McDevitt, Marion; Imray, Christopher H; Johnson, Eric L; Dow, Jennifer; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite. We present a review of pertinent pathophysiology. We then discuss primary and secondary prevention measures and therapeutic management. Recommendations are made regarding each treatment and its role in management. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality according to methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2011;22(2):156-166. PMID:25498262

  17. Not fit for purpose: the ethical guidelines of the Indian Council of Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Satalkar, Priya; Shaw, David

    2015-04-01

    In 2006, the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) published its 'Ethical guidelines for Biomedical Research on human participants'. The intention was to translate international ethical standards into locally and culturally appropriate norms and values to help biomedical researchers in India to conduct ethical research and thereby safeguard the interest of human subjects. Unfortunately, it is apparent that the guideline is not fit for purpose. In addition to problems with the structure and clarity of the guidelines, there are several serious omissions and contradictions in the recommendations. In this paper, we take a close look at the two key chapters and highlight some of the striking flaws in this important document. We conclude that ethics committees and national authorities should not lose sight of international ethical standards while incorporating local reality and cultural and social values, as focusing too much on the local context could compromise the safety of human subjects in biomedical research, particularly in India. PMID:25897444

  18. Hospice family members’ perceptions and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L.; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the fact that more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had two research questions; 1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared to family members of community dwelling hospice patients? 2) What are family members’ perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? Methods This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family member of hospice patients residing in the community. Results Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n=176) with family members of community dwelling hospice patients (n=267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. Conclusion These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for

  19. Informal hospice caregiver pain management concerns: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Marjorie; Demiris, George; Nguyen, Huong; Oliver, Debra P; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background Informal, unpaid, family caregivers provide much hospice care in the United States. These caregivers suffer physically, psychologically, emotionally, and socially from the burden of caring. The most often identified area of caregiver burden is the management of end-of-life pain. However, little empirical evidence exists of effective interventions to help caregivers manage end-of-life pain, and issues surrounding caregiver pain management remain vague and undefined. Understanding these concerns will inform the design of effective caregiver interventions. Aim The purpose of this study was to describe and organize caregiver pain management challenges faced by home hospice caregivers of cancer patients. Design A content analysis of secondary data, namely, recordings of caregiver interviews, was conducted to describe pain management issues. These interviews were part of a larger clinical trial. Setting/participants Multiple sessions with 29 informal caregivers, of patients dying of cancer, were audio-recorded. Subjects were purposively selected from two hospice programs in the Northwestern United States. Caregivers of noncancer patients were excluded from the study sample. Results A framework of six major themes with subordinate subthemes was developed through a literature review and peer review. The framework was used to organize the content of 87 caregiver interviews. The six major themes identified in the analysis included Caregiver-Centric Issues, Caregiver Medication Skills and Knowledge Issues, End-of-Life Symptom Knowledge Issues, Communication and Teamwork Issues, Organizational Skill Issues, and Patient-Centric Issues. Conclusion This analysis clearly articulated and classified caregiver issues surrounding pain management. Future hospice research may benefit from the use of this analysis and framework in the development of tools to alleviate this major cause of caregiver burden. PMID:23612959

  20. Perspective of patients, patients’ families, and healthcare providers towards designing and delivering hospice care services in a middle income Country

    PubMed Central

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Aghaei, Mir Hossein; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Asgarlo, Zoleikha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In view of the recent surge in chronic disease rates and elderly population in the developing countries, there is an urgent felt need for palliative and hospice care services. The present study investigates the views and attitudes of patients and their families, physicians, nurses, healthcare administrators, and insurers regarding designing and delivering hospice care service in a middle income country. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study, the required data was collected using semi structured interviews and was analyzed using thematic analysis. Totally 65 participants from hospitals and Tabriz University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively to achieve data saturation. Results: Analyzing the data, five main themes (barriers, facilitators, strategies, attitudes, and service provider) were extracted. Barriers included financial issues, cultural-religious beliefs, patient and family-related obstacles, and barriers related to healthcare system. Facilitators included family-related issues, cultural-religious beliefs, as well as facilitators associated with patients, healthcare status, and benefits of hospice service. Most participants (79%) had positive attitude towards hospice care service. Participant suggested 10 ways to design and deliver effective and efficient hospice care service. They thought the presence of physicians, nurses, and psychologists and other specialists and clergy were necessary in the hospice care team. Conclusion: Due to lack of experience in hospice care in developing countries, research for identifying probable barriers and appropriate management for reducing unsuccessfulness in designing and delivering hospice care service seems necessary. Input from the facilitators and their suggested solutions can be useful in planning the policy for hospice care system. PMID:26600704

  1. Multilevel Modeling and Policy Development: Guidelines and Applications to Medical Travel

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garzon, Eduardo; Zhukovsky, Peter; Haller, Elisa; Plakolm, Sara; Fink, David; Petrova, Dafina; Mahalingam, Vaishali; Menezes, Igor G.; Ruggeri, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Medical travel has expanded rapidly in recent years, resulting in new markets and increased access to medical care. Whereas several studies investigated the motives of individuals seeking healthcare abroad, the conventional analytical approach is limited by substantial caveats. Classical techniques as found in the literature cannot provide sufficient insight due to the nested nature of data generated. The application of adequate analytical techniques, specifically multilevel modeling, is scarce to non-existent in the context of medical travel. This study introduces the guidelines for application of multilevel techniques in public health research by presenting an application of multilevel modeling in analyzing the decision-making patterns of potential medical travelers. Benefits and potential limitations are discussed. PMID:27252672

  2. Multilevel Modeling and Policy Development: Guidelines and Applications to Medical Travel.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garzon, Eduardo; Zhukovsky, Peter; Haller, Elisa; Plakolm, Sara; Fink, David; Petrova, Dafina; Mahalingam, Vaishali; Menezes, Igor G; Ruggeri, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Medical travel has expanded rapidly in recent years, resulting in new markets and increased access to medical care. Whereas several studies investigated the motives of individuals seeking healthcare abroad, the conventional analytical approach is limited by substantial caveats. Classical techniques as found in the literature cannot provide sufficient insight due to the nested nature of data generated. The application of adequate analytical techniques, specifically multilevel modeling, is scarce to non-existent in the context of medical travel. This study introduces the guidelines for application of multilevel techniques in public health research by presenting an application of multilevel modeling in analyzing the decision-making patterns of potential medical travelers. Benefits and potential limitations are discussed. PMID:27252672

  3. A guideline for the use of variable rate intravenous insulin infusion in medical inpatients.

    PubMed

    George, S; Dale, J; Stanisstreet, D

    2015-06-01

    The present paper summarizes the key recommendations in a recent publication produced by the Joint British Diabetes Societies for Inpatient Care on the use of variable rate i.v. insulin infusion in 'medical' inpatients. The full guideline is available at http://www.diabetologists-abcd.org.uk/JBDS/JBDS_IP_VRIII.pdf and is designed to be a practical guide that can used by any healthcare professional who manages medical inpatients with hyperglycaemia. Its main aim is to allow variable rate i.v. insulin infusion to be used safely, effectively and efficiently for this specific group of inpatients. PMID:25980646

  4. Spatial practices and the home as hospice.

    PubMed

    McGann, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The modern hospice movement emerged in the late 1960s largely as a reaction to the way in which death and dying were dealt with in the hospital building. From the early development of the hospice movement, setting was considered to be very important. Hospice buildings were more residential and "homely" than their hospital counterparts. However, with the widespread development of "hospice home-care" programmes in the 1980s, this emphasis on place and setting changed, and along with it the meaning of the term "hospice" has changed. The current claim of the hospice movement is that "hospice" is a philosophy of care not a building or place.Home is now widely considered to be the best place to die, a place of familiar surroundings and the company of family and friends. The modern preference to die at home relies on traditional models of home, family and community. Dying at home was at one time commonplace and envisioned within the design of the home, and caring was a normal expectation of key family members. In modern society, however, dying is generally not a considered function within the design brief of the home and families may be unable, through economic, geographical or other reasons, to be carers. Thus, for some, home may not be the best place to die and family may not be the best carer. As a result, many people, despite their preference for home, still end up dying in the hospital building. This paper discusses the spatial issues surrounding the concept of home as hospice and questions the universal suitability of the contemporary home as a hospice. PMID:23393541

  5. Primary thromboprophylaxis for hospice inpatients: who needs it?

    PubMed

    Gillon, Suzie; Noble, Simon; Ward, Jason; Lodge, Keri-Michele; Nunn, Anne; Koon, Sim; Johnson, Miriam J

    2011-10-01

    Primary thromboprophylaxis (PTP) is a Department of Health priority in England. The NICE guidelines agree that PTP is inappropriate in the dying patient, but should be considered for those with reversible pathology. In the light of continued variation and uncertainty in UK hospice practice, we assessed PTP prescribing in three hospices. Case notes were reviewed from consecutive patients admitted before (300 patients) and after (350 patients) implementation of the Pan Birmingham Cancer Network (PBCN) venous thromboembolism prophylaxis (VTE) prevention guidelines. Just under half (43%; 40%) of patients had a contraindication to anticoagulation and PTP. Whilst just under a tenth (8.6%; 8.7%) in each group had a temporary increased risk of VTE, considerably fewer (3.6%; 6.3%) had a temporary increased risk of VTE without contraindication to PTP. Patients receiving PTP increased slightly from 1% to 3.6% and documentation of PTP decisions increased from 5% to 81%. Whilst the PBCN VTE tool is a useful tool to tailor an approach for this complex patient group, many questions remain. Clinical trials that include patients with advanced disease with relevant outcome measures are needed to help inform the clinicians who care for them. PMID:21310773

  6. Attitudes Toward Use of Benzodiazepines among U.S. Hospice Clinicians: Survey and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kamell, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Benzodiazepines are commonly used in inpatient hospices internationally. U.S. hospice clinician views toward benzodiazepines are unknown. Objectives: Study objectives were (1) to assess inpatient hospice clinician attitudes towards the benefits of benzodiazepines for various indications and (2) to compare these attitudes to current clinical recommendations and literature. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed to hospices with inpatient units nationwide. Results were analyzed, then compared to current clinical guidelines. Literature review was performed. U.S. hospice physicians and nurses were the study subjects. Participants were asked to indicate their level of agreement regarding benefit from benzodiazepines for various end-of-life symptoms and to answer questions regarding benzodiazepines in delirium. Results: Of 143 surveys returned, 128 surveys were completed. For anxiety, 80% of participants agreed that benzodiazepines were beneficial for restlessness, dyspnea 77%, insomnia 68%, dying process 65%, agitation 57%, nausea 54%, hyperactive delirium 42%, and severe pain 38%. Nurses found benzodiazepines beneficial for more indications than physicians. Over 50% reported benzodiazepines on their order sets for agitation, insomnia, acute anxiety, chronic anxiety, chronic panic, restlessness, seizures, and withdrawal. Among physicians, 39% believe that benzodiazepines are overused within their own hospice. A literature review found very limited evidence of overall benefit from benzodiazepines for the symptoms listed above. In addition, this revealed significant evidence for risks and harms from benzodiazepines, particularly in patients at risk for delirium. Conclusions: Benzodiazepines are viewed favorably by most hospice nurses and many hospice physicians for various indications, despite little supportive clinical evidence along with significant potential for harm. PMID:27002463

  7. Time to follow guidelines, protocols, and structured procedures in medical care and time to leap out

    PubMed Central

    Kobo-Greenhut, Ayala; Notea, Amos; Ruach, Meir; Onn, Erez; Hasin, Yehunatan

    2014-01-01

    Present medical practice encourages management according to written guidelines, protocols, and structured procedures (GPPs). Daily medical practice includes instances in which “leaping” from one patient management routine to another is a must. We define “frozen patient management”, when patient management leaping was required but was not performed. Frozen patient management may cause significant damage to patient safety and health and the treatment quality. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of GPP-guided medical practice and gives an explanation of the problem of frozen patient management in light of quality engineering, control engineering, and learning processes. Our analysis of frozen patient management is based on consideration of medical care as a process. By considering medical care processes as a closed-loop control process, it is possible to explain why, when an indication for deviation from the expected occurs, it does not necessarily attract the medical teams’ attention, thereby preventing the realization that leaping to an alternative patient management is needed. We suggest that working according to GPPs intensifies the frozen patient management problem since working according to GPPs relates to “exploitation learning behavior”, while leaping to new patient management relates to “exploration learning behavior”. We indicate practice routines to be incorporated into GPP-guided medical care, to reduce frozen patient management. PMID:25473321

  8. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... medical charges associated with non-VA outpatient care, provided under 38 CFR 17.52 or 17.120. 75 FR 78901.... See 75 FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care he pricing methodology adopted by... amended Sec. 17.56. See 75 FR 7218 (Feb. 18, 2010); 75 FR 78901. We need not repeat them here. Indeed,...

  9. The Relationship between National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Weight Guidelines and Concurrent Medical Costs in a Manufacturing Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Feifei; Schultz, Alyssa B.; Musich, Shirley; McDonald, Tim; Hirschland, David; Edington, Dee W.

    2003-01-01

    Explored the relationship between the 1998 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) weight guidelines and concurrent medical costs among 177,971 employees, retirees, and adult dependents from a nationwide manufacturing corporation. Results indicated that the six weight groups defined by the NHLBI guidelines were consistent with concurrent…

  10. Reciprocal Suffering: Caregiver Concerns During Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Burt, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Context For many hospice caregivers, the constancy and difficulty of caregiving impact their physical quality of life and cause depression, psychological distress, guilt, loneliness, and restrictions on social activities. Objectives Deviating from traditional unidimensional research on hospice caregivers, this study explored the transactional nature of reciprocal suffering by examining caregiver concerns through four dimensions: physical, psychological, social, and spiritual. Methods Researchers analyzed audiotapes of intervention discussions between hospice caregivers and research social workers. Results Results indicated that of the 125 pain talk utterances, the majority referenced psychological concern (49%), followed by physical (28%), social (22%), and spiritual (2%). Reflections on concerns revealed a global perspective of caregiving, which highlighted the patient’s needs juxtaposed to the caregiver’s recognized limitations. Conclusion By examining the reciprocal nature of suffering for caregivers, this study reinforced the need for assessing caregivers in hospice care, with specific emphasis on the importance of providing caregiver education on pain management. PMID:21146356

  11. American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Involved Communities Advanced Lung Disease Forum Psychiatry, Psychology, Mental Health Forum Social Work Forum SIG Instructions ... HPM Lecture Series Research Scholars Mentoring Scholarship About History Position Statements Access to Palliative Care and Hospice ...

  12. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs.

    PubMed

    Looney, Andrea L; Bohling, Mark W; Bushby, Philip A; Howe, Lisa M; Griffin, Brenda; Levy, Julie K; Eddlestone, Susan M; Weedon, James R; Appel, Leslie D; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Ferguson, Nancy J; Sweeney, David J; Tyson, Kathy A; Voors, Adriana H; White, Sara C; Wilford, Christine L; Farrell, Kelly A; Jefferson, Ellen P; Moyer, Michael R; Newbury, Sandra P; Saxton, Melissa A; Scarlett, Janet M

    2008-07-01

    As efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned dogs and cats have increased, greater attention has been focused on spay-neuter programs throughout the United States. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of programs have been developed to increase delivery of spay-neuter services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, feral cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to ensure a consistent level of care, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. The guidelines consist of recommendations for preoperative care (eg, patient transport and housing, patient selection, client communication, record keeping, and medical considerations), anesthetic management (eg, equipment, monitoring, perioperative considerations, anesthetic protocols, and emergency preparedness), surgical care (eg, operating-area environment; surgical-pack preparation; patient preparation; surgeon preparation; surgical procedures for pediatric, juvenile, and adult patients; and identification of neutered animals), and postoperative care (eg, analgesia, recovery, and release). These guidelines are based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, microbiology, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs. PMID:18593314

  13. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-12-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mmol/L that occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited and often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):228-240. PMID:25498260

  14. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians' 2016 Veterinary Medical Care Guidelines for Spay-Neuter Programs.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Brenda; Bushby, Philip A; McCobb, Emily; White, Sara C; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Appel, Leslie D; Makolinski, Kathleen V; Wilford, Christine L; Bohling, Mark W; Eddlestone, Susan M; Farrell, Kelly A; Ferguson, Nancy; Harrison, Kelly; Howe, Lisa M; Isaza, Natalie M; Levy, Julie K; Looney, Andrea; Moyer, Michael R; Robertson, Sheilah Ann; Tyson, Kathy

    2016-07-15

    As community efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned cats and dogs have increased, many veterinarians have increasingly focused their clinical efforts on the provision of spay-neuter services. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of spay-neuter programs have been developed to increase delivery of services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, community cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to promote consistent, high-quality care across the broad range of these programs, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. These guidelines consist of recommendations for general patient care and clinical procedures, preoperative care, anesthetic management, surgical procedures, postoperative care, and operations management. They were based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, infection control, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs regardless of location, facility, or type of program. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians envisions that these guidelines will be used by the profession to maintain consistent veterinary medical care in all settings where spay-neuter services are provided and to promote these services as a means of reducing sheltering and euthanasia of cats and dogs. PMID:27379593

  15. Development of an accommodative smartphone app for medical guidelines in pediatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Schmucker, Michael; Heid, Jörn; Haag, Martin

    2014-01-01

    One of the outcomes of a training concept for physicians and nurses concerning pediatric emergencies at the Heidelberg University Hospital was that the work and procedures in childhood emergencies could be simplified by replacing the existing paper-based guidelines with a smartphone app. Since the project funds for this were already used up, a group of students from the master program "Medical Informatics" of Heidelberg and Heilbronn Universities took over the development of the app. Particular attention was given to the need for compatibility with the variety of devices (device size and screen resolution) and platform independence. The guidelines themselves were scripted in HTML5, JavaScript and CSS (responsive web design); managed by a container programmed in Sencha Touch. Even though the app is not yet available in the App-Store due to the limited timeframe, the students gained a great deal of valuable experience in developing platform independent software for mobile devices. PMID:24825689

  16. Guide for Hospices. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, David J.; Mortenson, Lee E.

    This monograph, the first in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to assist hospice directors, educators, and other administrative staff members to understand the focus of the proposed training and its applicability to their…

  17. Medical guidelines, physician density, and quality of care: evidence from German SHARE data.

    PubMed

    Jürges, Hendrik; Pohl, Vincent

    2012-10-01

    We use German SHARE data to study the relationship between district general practitioner density and the quality of preventive care provided to older adults. We measure physician quality of care as the degree of adherence to medical guidelines (for the management of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the prevention of falls) as reported by patients. Contrary to theoretical expectations, we find only weak and insignificant effects of physician density on quality of care. Our results shed doubt on the notion that increasing physician supply will increase the quality of care provided in Germany's present health care system. PMID:22203268

  18. From hospice to hospital: short-term follow-up study of hospice patient outcomes in a US acute care hospital surveillance system

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Elizabeth Barnett; Wieten, Sarah; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In the USA, there is little systematic evidence about the real-world trajectories of patient medical care after hospice enrolment. The objective of this study was to analyse predictors of the length of stay for hospice patients who were admitted to hospital in a retrospective analysis of the mandatorily reported hospital discharge data. Setting All acute-care hospitals in Florida during 1 January 2010 to 30 June 2012. Participants All patients with source of admission coded as ‘hospice’ (n=2674). Primary outcome measures The length of stay and discharge status: (1) died in hospital; (2) discharged back to hospice; (3) discharged to another healthcare facility; and (4) discharged home. Results Patients were elderly (median age=81) with a high burden of disease. Almost half died (46%), while the majority of survivors were discharged to hospice (80% of survivors, 44% of total). A minority went to a healthcare facility (5.6%) or to home (5.2%). Only 9.2% received any procedure. Respiratory services were received by 29.4% and 16.8% were admitted to the intensive care unit. The median length of stay was 1 day for those who died. In an adjusted survival model, discharge to a healthcare facility resulted in a 74% longer hospital stay compared with discharge to hospice (event time ratio (ETR)=1.74, 95% CI 1.54 to 1.97 p<0.0001), with 61% longer hospital stays among patients discharged home (ETR=1.61, 95% CI 1.39 to 1.86 p<0.0001). Total financial charges for all patients exceeded $25 million; 10% of patients who appeared to exit hospice incurred 32% of the charges. Conclusions Our results raise significant questions about the ethics and pragmatics of end-of-life medical care, and the intentions and scope of hospices in the USA. Future studies should incorporate prospective linkage of subjective patient-centred data and objective healthcare encounter data. PMID:25052170

  19. Healthcare and Guidelines: A Population-Based Survey of Recorded Medical Problems and Health Surveillance for People with Down syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maatta, Tuomo; Maatta, Joonas; Tervo-Maatta, Tuula; Taanila, Anja; Kaski, Markus; Iivanainen, Matti

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medical problems are described in a population of persons with Down syndrome. Health surveillance is compared to the recommendations of national guidelines. Method: Case records from the specialised and primary healthcare and disability services were analysed. Results: A wide spectrum of age-specific medical and surgical problems was…

  20. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for treatment of exercise-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brad L; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Hoffman, Martin D; Rogers, Ian R; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2013-09-01

    Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) typically occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity, and is defined by a serum or plasma sodium concentration below the normal reference range of 135 mEq/L. It is also reported to occur in individual physical activities or during organized endurance events conducted in austere environments in which medical care is limited or often not available, and patient evacuation to definitive care is often greatly delayed. Rapid recognition and appropriate treatment are essential in the severe form to ensure a positive outcome. Failure in this regard is a recognized cause of event-related fatality. In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for EAH in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel. The panel was charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of EAH. Recommendations are made regarding the situations when sodium concentration can be assessed in the field and when these values are not known. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. PMID:23590928

  1. Acute Uterine Bleeding Unrelated to Pregnancy: A Southern California Permanente Medical Group Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Malcolm G

    2013-01-01

    Acute uterine bleeding unrelated to pregnancy has been defined as bleeding “sufficient in volume as to, in the opinion of the treating clinician, require urgent or emergent intervention.” The Southern California Permanente Medical Group updated its guidelines for the management of this condition on the basis of the best available evidence, as identified in a systematic review of the available literature. Given the paucity of studies evaluating this condition, the guidelines, by necessity, include recommendations largely based on opinion or other sources such as case series that are, in general, categorized as low-quality evidence. Medical interventions with single or combined gonadal steroidal agents administered parenterally or orally show promise, but more high-quality studies are needed to better define the appropriate drugs, dose, and administrative scheduling. There is also some evidence that intrauterine tamponade may be useful in at least selected cases. Special attention must be paid to both diagnosing and treating inherited disorders of hemostasis, such as von Willebrand disease, that may otherwise be underdiagnosed in both adolescent and adult women. PMID:24355890

  2. Barriers to Hospice Use among African Americans: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Karla T.; Bickel-Swenson, Denise; Stephens, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    The present review was undertaken to explore recent evidence in the professional literature pertaining to use of hospice services by African Americans. The article addresses the research methods that have been used to study African American hospice use, obstacles to African American participation in hospice that have been identified, and…

  3. 42 CFR 418.24 - Election of hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Election of hospice care. 418.24 Section 418.24... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.24 Election of hospice care. (a) Filing an election statement. An individual who meets the eligibility requirement...

  4. 42 CFR 418.24 - Election of hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Election of hospice care. 418.24 Section 418.24... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.24 Election of hospice care. (a) Filing an election statement. An individual who meets the...

  5. 42 CFR 418.24 - Election of hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Election of hospice care. 418.24 Section 418.24... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.24 Election of hospice care. (a) Filing an election statement. An individual who meets the eligibility requirement...

  6. 42 CFR 418.30 - Change of the designated hospice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Change of the designated hospice. 418.30 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.30 Change of the designated hospice. (a) An individual or representative may change, once in each election...

  7. A Comparative Study of Terminally Ill Hospice and Hospital Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labus, Janet G.; Dambrot, Faye H.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated differences between 28 hospice and 28 hospital patients who died. Comparison found that hospice patients were younger, had more people living in the home, and had shorter disease history. Age, number of people living in the home, and primary cancer site significantly discriminated between hospice and hospital patients and predicted…

  8. 42 CFR 417.585 - Special rules: Hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules: Hospice care. 417.585 Section 417... PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Risk Basis § 417.585 Special rules: Hospice care. (a) No payment is made to an HMO or CMP on behalf of a Medicare enrollee who has elected hospice care under § 418.24 of...

  9. The Hospice Concept of Care: A Family Centered Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Marilyn

    This description of the Cedar Valley Hospice program emphasizes palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families. The history of the hospice movement is outlined along with a description of the Cedar Valley program and the results of a 1980 program evaluation. The appendices contain a statement of the hospice goals and…

  10. The Grief Group: A University and Hospice Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Daniel; Fry, Michele

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a joint effort of a community hospice and a university counseling center to provide a campus grief group for university students led by a hospice counselor and a counseling center clinical psychologist. Hospice provided a curriculum outlining topics and activities for each of the group's six meetings. Notices announcing…

  11. Hospice Education Program for Nurses. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HCS, Inc., Potomac, MD.

    This publication contains a curriculum to prepare nurses for delivery of hospice care for the terminally ill. It provides training manuals for both participant and facilitator in a preservice or inservice Hospice Education Program. Each manual (participant and facilitator) includes nine modules: (1) Hospice Care Concept; (2) Communication Skills;…

  12. Oncology Social Workers' Attitudes toward Hospice Care and Referral Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Janet E.

    2004-01-01

    Members of the Association of Oncology Social Workers completed a survey, which included the Hospice Philosophy Scale (HPS) assessing the likelihood of the worker referring a terminally ill patient to hospice, background and experience, and demographics. The respondents held overwhelmingly favorable attitudes toward hospice philosophy and care,…

  13. Role-play for medical students learning about communication: Guidelines for maximising benefits

    PubMed Central

    Nestel, Debra; Tierney, Tanya

    2007-01-01

    Background Role-play is widely used as an educational method for learning about communication in medical education. Although educational theory provides a sound rationale for using this form of simulation, there is little published evidence for its effectiveness. Students' prior experiences of role-play may influence the way in which they engage in this method. This paper explores students' experiences with the aim of producing guidelines for maximising the benefits of role-play within this learning context. Methods First-year undergraduate medical students participated in a role-play session as part of their communication programme. Before and after the session, students completed questionnaires. In the pre-session questionnaire, students were asked about their experiences of role-play and asked to identify helpful and unhelpful elements. Immediately after the session, students answered similar questions in relation to the role-play activity they had just completed. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative data and qualitative data was thematically analysed. Results 284 students completed evaluation forms. Although 63 (22.2%) had prior unhelpful experiences, most students (n = 274; 96.5%) found this experience helpful. Summary findings were that students reported the key aspects of helpful role-play were opportunities for observation, rehearsal and discussion, realistic roles and alignment of roles with other aspects of the curriculum. Unhelpful aspects were those that evoked strong negative emotional responses and factors that contributed to a lack of realism. Conclusion Role-play was valued by students in the acquisition of communication skills even though some had prior unhelpful experiences. Guidelines for effective role-play include adequate preparation, alignment of roles and tasks with level of practice, structured feedback guidelines and acknowledgment of the importance of social interactions for learning. PMID:17335561

  14. Smartphone Application of Primary Care Guidelines used in Education of Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, Uta-Maria; Weckbecker, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: The guidelines of the German College of General Practitioners and Family Physicians (DEGAM) on frequent and important reasons for encounter in Primary Care play a central role in the teaching of Family Medicine. They were edited by the authors into an app for mobile phones, making them available at all times to General Practitioners and medical students. This study examines the issue: how useful do students consider this application within their learning process in Family Medicine? Method: The short versions of the 15 DEGAM guidelines were processed as a web app (for all smartphone software systems) including offline utilisation, and offered to students in the Family Medicine course, during clinical attachments in General Practice, on elective compulsory courses or for their final year rotation in General Practice. The evaluation was made with a structured survey using the feedback function of the Moodle learning management system [http://www.elearning-allgemeinmedizin.de] with Likert scales and free-text comments. Results: Feedback for evaluation came from 14 (25%) of the student testers from the Family Medicine course (9), the clinical attachment in General Practice (1), the final year rotation in General Practice (1) and elective compulsory courses (4). Students rated the app as an additional benefit to the printed/pdf-form. They use it frequently and successfully during waiting periods and before, during, or after lectures. In addition to general interest and a desire to become acquainted with the guidelines and to learn, the app is consulted with regard to general (theoretical) questions, rather than in connection with contact with patients. Interest in and knowledge of the guidelines is stimulated by the app, and on the whole the application can be said to be well suited to the needs of this user group. Discussion: The students evaluated the guidelines app positively: as a modern way of familiarising them with the guidelines and

  15. Applying Established Guidelines to Team-Based Learning Programs in Medical Schools: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Deborah M.; Mellis, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Team-based learning (TBL), a structured form of small-group learning, has gained popularity in medical education in recent years. A growing number of medical schools have adopted TBL in a variety of combinations and permutations across a diversity of settings, learners, and content areas. The authors conducted this systematic review to establish the extent, design, and practice of TBL programs within medical schools to inform curriculum planners and education designers. Method The authors searched the MEDLINE, PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and ERIC databases for articles on TBL in undergraduate medical education published between 2002 and 2012. They selected and reviewed articles that included original research on TBL programs and assessed the articles according to the seven core TBL design elements (team formation, readiness assurance, immediate feedback, sequencing of in-class problem solving, the four S’s [significant problem, same problem, specific choice, and simultaneous reporting], incentive structure, and peer review) described in established guidelines. Results The authors identified 20 articles that satisfied the inclusion criteria. They found significant variability across the articles in terms of the application of the seven core design elements and the depth with which they were described. The majority of the articles, however, reported that TBL provided a positive learning experience for students. Conclusions In the future, faculty should adhere to a standardized TBL framework to better understand the impact and relative merits of each feature of their program. PMID:24556770

  16. Treatment of acute diarrhoea: update of guidelines based on a critical interuniversity assessment of medications and current practices.

    PubMed

    Urbain, D; Belaiche, J; De Vos, M; Fiasse, R; Hiele, M; Huijghebaert, S; Jacobs, F; Malonne, H; Speelman, P; Van Gompel, A; Van Gossum, A; Van Wijngaerden, E

    2003-01-01

    Further to a thorough analysis of the problem of acute diarrhoea and the therapeutic options, recommendations were defined following a multidisciplinary approach. These guidelines take into account the reality of frequent self-medication. They further differ as a function of age (children, primarily treated by ORS and for whom self-medication is not advised versus adults who can self-medicate), symptoms (uncomplicated diarrhoea versus dysentery) and location where the diarrhoea is contracted (at home or when travelling). PMID:14618952

  17. Assessment of hospice nurses' technique in the use of inhalers and nebulizers.

    PubMed

    Scarpaci, Laura T; Tsoukleris, Mona G; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2007-06-01

    Dyspnea, a common distressing end-of-life symptom, is treated with oral (i.e., opioids and anxiolytics) and inhaled medications (anti-inflammatory and bronchodilator agents). Health care providers and patients have demonstrated an inability to use inhaler devices correctly, which can lead to suboptimal drug delivery and poor symptom relief. Hospice nurses are the primary health care providers educating patients, making it critical that they convey accurate device technique. This study assessed hospice nurses' ability to demonstrate proper inhaler device technique and their knowledge of agents used to treat dyspnea. Forty-seven nurses participated. Participants completed a written questionnaire, which gathered demographic data, as well as information regarding previous training with an inhaler device, administration, pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, patient assessment, and nursing technique. Additionally, each nurse demonstrated the use of a metered dose inhaler, spacer, dry powder inhaler, and a nebulizer, while being observed by a pharmacist trained in the use of inhalers. A standardized evaluation form was used to ensure consistency between evaluators and subjects. Percentage of steps completed correctly by the study participants ranged from 34.9% with the dry powder inhaler to 67.6% with the metered dose inhaler. Years of experience, presence of hospice certification, personal use of inhaler, and nursing comfort level significantly impacted ability to use inhalation devices. This study demonstrated the existence of knowledge gaps regarding patient assessment, pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of inhaled medications, and inhalation device technique among hospice nurses. Formal education of hospice practitioners regarding inhaled medications and inhalation delivery devices is needed. PMID:17592978

  18. Predicting patient survival before and after hospice enrollment.

    PubMed

    Christakis, N A

    1998-01-01

    Despite the apparent advantages of hospice care, several barriers exist in terms of patient referral. Physicians' prognoses play a large role in determining when hospice care should begin. Predicting patient survival is a subjective decision dependent on several factors that vary before and after hospice enrollment. Currently, the stay of patients in hospice is very short; this can be attributed to late referral by physicians. Additional research on physician behavior and prognostication could help optimize the use of hospice as a valuable health care resource, thereby improving end of life care for terminally ill patients. PMID:9644394

  19. Hospice benefits and phase I cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Byock, Ira; Miles, Steven H

    2003-02-18

    Medicare denies hospice coverage to patients with terminal illnesses who enroll as participants in phase I studies, which assess the toxicity and dosing of potential treatments for incurable diseases. Federal regulations require patients to forgo curative therapies, and they interpret phase I agents as treatment for the terminal condition for which hospice care was elected. Thus, by enrolling as a participant in a phase I trial, a patient otherwise eligible for hospice is rendered ineligible. Private insurers have similar provisions for children and adults younger than 65 years of age. Such exclusions are not defensible on ethical or clinical grounds. Policymakers, insurers, and institutional review boards all have a role in resolving this problem. PMID:12585832

  20. Ethical dilemmas faced by hospice social workers.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Mary Kate; Washington, Karla T; Koenig, Terry L

    2014-10-01

    Ethical decision making is critically important in hospice social work. Through in-depth interviews, researchers explored ethical dilemmas faced by 14 hospice social workers and the processes they used to move toward resolution. The dilemmas were integrated into a framework focused on the sources of ethical conflict: the client system, the agency, and the profession. Processes involved in resolving ethical dilemmas included consulting with other professionals, weighing the pros and cons of options, and bringing about desired outcomes. Findings suggest that hospice teams should be provided with opportunities to meaningfully discuss ethical decision making. Further, the involvement of social workers in administrative leadership is recommended to increase the likelihood that discipline-specific perspectives are incorporated into formal policies and procedures that shape practice in ethically complex situations. PMID:25397348

  1. Guest at hospice: time for consideration.

    PubMed

    Warrén Stomberg, Margareta

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on daily life situation of terminally ill guests residing at a hospice. In the study, interviews were conducted with 9 such guests. Data were analyzed using a method similar to content analysis. Categories emerged that were related to aspects regarded as external and internal essentials for the well-being of the individual at the hospice. These essentials were as follows: encouragement from the staff, the alleviation of pain, a pleasant and calm atmosphere at the hospice, the significance of visits from relatives, the regret of not being able to take care of oneself, and time to reconcile to one's life. These results not only show the need for close community with both family and staff but also the need for privacy to reflect on life. PMID:19244475

  2. Straddling the fence: ICU nurses advocating for hospice care.

    PubMed

    Borowske, Deborah

    2012-03-01

    A key factor in nurses' experiencing moral distress is their feeling of powerlessness to initiate discussions about code status, EOL issues, or patients' preferences. Moreover, nurses encounter physicians who give patients and their families a false picture of recovery or, worse, block EOL discussions from occurring. Since its release in 1995, the landmark study of almost 10,000 patients in the Study to Understand Prognoses and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatments (SUPPORT) reported a widespread gap with physicians' discussions in honest prognosis and EOL issues. Since the SUPPORT report, other studies have validated patients' and their families' preference for realistic discussions of disease trajectory and life expectancy. Unfortunately, the phenomenon of physicians failing to discuss bad news or terminal disease trajectory persists. Moreover, with a burgeoning geriatric population, coupled with advances in medical treatments, a growing segment of chronically ill patients are admitted to the ICU. With these communication shortcomings, it becomes an essential element of practice for the ICU nurse to initiate discussions about healthcare goals, preferences, and choices. The ICU nurse must be integral in fostering those discussions, particularly in cases where the family asks if hospice should be considered. Nurses have a long history of patient advocacy, with both the American Nurses Association and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses stating that nurses have a duty to educate and promote dialogue about patients' preferences, goals, and EOL issues. With these tenets in the forefront, the ICU nurse is an integral member of the healthcare team, working with patients and their families to distinguish between what can be done and what should be done. Too often, hospice is thought of as a last resort. Rather, it is a model of care that centers on the belief that each of us has the right to die pain free and with dignity, and that our families

  3. Towards iconic language for patient records, drug monographs, guidelines and medical search engines.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Duclos, Catherine; Hamek, Saliha; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Kerdelhué, Gaetan; Darmoni, Stefan; Favre, Madeleine; Falcoff, Hector; Simon, Christian; Pereira, Suzanne; Serrot, Elisabeth; Mitouard, Thierry; Hardouin, Etienne; Kergosien, Yannick; Venot, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Practicing physicians have limited time for consulting medical knowledge and records. We have previously shown that using icons instead of text to present drug monographs may allow contraindications and adverse effects to be identified more rapidly and more accurately. These findings were based on the use of an iconic language designed for drug knowledge, providing icons for many medical concepts, including diseases, antecedents, drug classes and tests. In this paper, we describe a new project aimed at extending this iconic language, and exploring the possible applications of these icons in medicine. Based on evaluators' comments, focus groups of physicians and opinions of academic, industrial and associative partners, we propose iconic applications related to patient records, for example summarizing patient conditions, searching for specific clinical documents and helping to code structured data. Other applications involve the presentation of clinical practice guidelines and improving the interface of medical search engines. These new applications could use the same iconic language that was designed for drug knowledge, with a few additional items that respect the logic of the language. PMID:20841669

  4. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zafren, Ken; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; Danzl, Daniel F; Brugger, Hermann; Sagalyn, Emily B; Walpoth, Beat; Weiss, Eric A; Auerbach, Paul S; McIntosh, Scott E; Némethy, Mária; McDevitt, Marion; Dow, Jennifer; Schoene, Robert B; Rodway, George W; Hackett, Peter H; Bennett, Brad L; Grissom, Colin K

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the out-of-hospital evaluation and treatment of victims of accidental hypothermia. The guidelines present the main diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and provide recommendations for the management of hypothermic patients. The panel graded the recommendations based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between benefits and risks/burdens according the criteria published by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested general approaches to the evaluation and treatment of accidental hypothermia that incorporate specific recommendations. PMID:25443771

  5. Hospice and palliative care: an expert interview with Louis W. Sullivan, MD. Interview by Perry G. Fine.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Louis W

    2006-01-01

    At the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization's 6th Clinical Team Conference on Hospice and Palliative Care, held April 21-23, 2005, in Atlanta, Georgia, Perry G. Fine, MD, Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and Vice President of Medical Affairs for the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization interviewed Louis W. Sullivan, MD, former Secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services and currently President Emeritus of Morehouse School of Medicine, Chair of the Sullivan Commission-a commission to increase diversity among health professionals, Chair of the National Health Museum, Cochair of the President's Commission on HIV/AIDS, and Chair of the President's Commission on Black Colleges and Universities, as well as Chair of Medical Education for South African Blacks. Dr. Fine and Dr. Sullivan discussed the importance of hospice and palliative care, along with some of the practical issues facing clinicians who wish to use the hospice care system. PMID:16687353

  6. Operational and financial performance of newly established hospices.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J; Thompson, Jon M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the financial and operating performance of newly established, free- standing hospices relative to existing, freestanding hospices. A nonparametric median test was used to compare the median values of operating and financial performance measures between newly established hospices and existing hospices. Operating and financial data were measured for the 2 groups using cost report data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The authors sampled 44 new, freestanding hospices and selected 312 freestanding existing hospices and analyzed their data over 2 years from 2002 to 2003. The study found that 91% of these new hospices were owned by for-profit organizations and were located in the southern region of the United States. New hospices served fewer patients; however, they had a longer length of stay compared to existing hospices. They offered fewer imaging services and radiation therapy services. New hospices generated significantly higher revenue but incurred significantly higher expenses. The results suggest that longer lengths of stay allow these newer hospices to increase revenue and improve overall profitability. PMID:17060288

  7. Hospice quality improvement programs: an initial examination.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, C N

    1998-05-01

    Recognizing that little is known about use of quality improvement (QI) processes to enhance care of the dying, 11 large hospices exchanged information about their QI programs. These hospices reported monitoring from 3 to 50 outcomes measured by various indicators and methods. Agencies that related QI to their organization's mission, goals, and strategic plan were more likely to have dedicated QI staff; a more intense, comprehensive, and participatory QI program; and more QI projects resulting in performance enhancement. Both accomplishments and difficulties were identified in several areas, including establishing benchmarks, involving staff, and using computer technology to manage and analyze QI data. PMID:10179273

  8. Consensus guidelines of ECCO/ESPGHAN on the medical management of pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ruemmele, F M; Veres, G; Kolho, K L; Griffiths, A; Levine, A; Escher, J C; Amil Dias, J; Barabino, A; Braegger, C P; Bronsky, J; Buderus, S; Martín-de-Carpi, J; De Ridder, L; Fagerberg, U L; Hugot, J P; Kierkus, J; Kolacek, S; Koletzko, S; Lionetti, P; Miele, E; Navas López, V M; Paerregaard, A; Russell, R K; Serban, D E; Shaoul, R; Van Rheenen, P; Veereman, G; Weiss, B; Wilson, D; Dignass, A; Eliakim, A; Winter, H; Turner, D

    2014-10-01

    Children and adolescents with Crohn's disease (CD) present often with a more complicated disease course compared to adult patients. In addition, the potential impact of CD on growth, pubertal and emotional development of patients underlines the need for a specific management strategy of pediatric-onset CD. To develop the first evidenced based and consensus driven guidelines for pediatric-onset CD an expert panel of 33 IBD specialists was formed after an open call within the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation and the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterolog, Hepatology and Nutrition. The aim was to base on a thorough review of existing evidence a state of the art guidance on the medical treatment and long term management of children and adolescents with CD, with individualized treatment algorithms based on a benefit-risk analysis according to different clinical scenarios. In children and adolescents who did not have finished their growth, exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is the induction therapy of first choice due to its excellent safety profile, preferable over corticosteroids, which are equipotential to induce remission. The majority of patients with pediatric-onset CD require immunomodulator based maintenance therapy. The experts discuss several factors potentially predictive for poor disease outcome (such as severe perianal fistulizing disease, severe stricturing/penetrating disease, severe growth retardation, panenteric disease, persistent severe disease despite adequate induction therapy), which may incite to an anti-TNF-based top down approach. These guidelines are intended to give practical (whenever possible evidence-based) answers to (pediatric) gastroenterologists who take care of children and adolescents with CD; they are not meant to be a rule or legal standard, since many different clinical scenario exist requiring treatment strategies not covered by or different from these guidelines. PMID:24909831

  9. A comprehensive process of content validation of curriculum consensus guidelines for a medical specialty.

    PubMed

    Cumyn, Annabelle; Harris, Ilene B

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we outline an innovative and comprehensive approach to the development by consensus of curriculum content guidelines for a medical specialty. We initially delineated the content domain by triangulation of sources, validated a curriculum blueprint by both quantitative and qualitative methodology, and finally reached consensus on content by Delphi methodology. Development of curricular objectives is an important step in curriculum development. Content definition or "blueprinting" refers to the systematic definition of content from a specified domain for the purpose of creating test items with validity evidence. Content definition can be achieved in a number of ways and we demonstrate how the concepts of content definition or validation can be transferred beyond assessment, to other steps in curriculum development and instructional design. Validity in Education refers to the multiple sources of evidence to support the use or interpretation of different aspects of a curriculum. In this approach, there are multiple sources of content-related validity evidence which, when accumulated, give credibility and strength to curriculum consensus guidelines. PMID:22489987

  10. Step-by-step mark-up of medical guideline documents.

    PubMed

    Svátek, Vojtech; Růzicka, Marek

    2003-07-01

    Approaches to formalization of medical guidelines can be divided into model-centric and document-centric. While model-centric approaches dominate in the development of clinical decision support applications, document-centric, mark-up-based formalization is suitable for application tasks requiring the 'literal' content of the document to be transferred into the formal model. Examples of such tasks are logical verification of the document or compliance analysis of health records. The quality and efficiency of document-centric formalization can be improved using a decomposition of the whole process into several explicit steps. We present a methodology and software tool supporting the step-by-step formalization process. The knowledge elements can be marked up in the source text, refined to a tree structure with increasing level of detail, rearranged into an XML knowledge base, and, finally, exported into the operational representation. User-definable transformation rules enable to automate a large part of the process. The approach is being tested in the domain of cardiology. For parts of the WHO/ISH Guidelines for Hypertension, the process has been carried out through all the stages, to the form of executable application, generated automatically from the XML knowledge base. PMID:12909185

  11. The Meaning of Parenteral Hydration to Family Caregivers and Patients with Advanced Cancer Receiving Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marlene Z; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Burbach, Beth E.; de Rosa, Allison; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Context In the U.S., patients with advanced cancer who are dehydrated or have decreased oral intake virtually always receive parenteral hydration in acute care facilities but rarely in the hospice setting. Objectives To describe the meaning of hydration for terminally ill cancer patients in home hospice care and for their primary caregivers. Methods Phenomenological interviews were conducted at two time points with 85 patients and 84 caregivers enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial examining the efficacy of parenteral hydration in patients with advanced cancer receiving hospice care in the southern U.S. Transcripts were analyzed hermeneutically by the interdisciplinary research team until consensus on the theme labels was reached. Results Patients and their family caregivers both saw hydration as meaning hope and comfort. Hope was the view that hydration might prolong a life of dignity and enhance quality of life by reducing symptoms such as fatigue and increasing patients’ alertness. Patients and caregivers also described hydration as improving patients’ comfort by reducing pain, enhancing the effectiveness of pain medication, and nourishing the body, mind and spirit. Conclusion These findings differ from traditional hospice beliefs that dehydration enhances patient comfort given that patients and their families in the study viewed fluids as enhancing comfort, dignity and quality of life. Discussion with patients and families about their preferences for hydration may help tailor care plans to meet specific patient needs. PMID:22459230

  12. The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics Policy Statement No. 6.1: Recommended Guidelines on National Registration Schemes for Medical Physicists.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Stelios; Isidoro, Jorge; Pesznyak, Csilla; Bumbure, Lada; Cremers, Florian; Schmidt, Werner F O

    2016-01-01

    This EFOMP Policy Statement is an update of Policy Statement No. 6 first published in 1994. The present version takes into account the European Union Parliament and Council Directive 2013/55/EU that amends Directive 2005/36/EU on the recognition of professional qualifications and the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM laying down the basic safety standards for protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation. The European Commission Radiation Protection Report No. 174, Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert and the EFOMP Policy Statement No. 12.1, Recommendations on Medical Physics Education and Training in Europe 2014, are also taken into consideration. The EFOMP National Member Organisations are encouraged to update their Medical Physics registration schemes where these exist or to develop registration schemes taking into account the present version of this EFOMP Policy Statement (Policy Statement No. 6.1"Recommended Guidelines on National Registration Schemes for Medical Physicists"). PMID:26851162

  13. Awareness and enforcement of guidelines for publishing industry-sponsored medical research among publication professionals: the Global Publication Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Elizabeth; Woolley, Karen; Adshead, Viv; Cairns, Angela; Fullam, Josh; Gonzalez, John; Grant, Tom; Tortell, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To gather information about current practices and implementation of publication guidelines among publication professionals working in or for the pharmaceutical industry. Design/setting Web-based survey publicised via email and social media to members of the International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) and other organisations from November 2012 to February 2013. Participants 469 individuals involved in publishing industry-sponsored research in peer-reviewed journals, mainly working in pharmaceutical or device companies (‘industry’, n=144), communication agencies (‘agency’, n=238), contract research organisations (CRO, n=15) or as freelancers (n=34). Most respondents (78%) had worked on medical publications for ≥5 years and 62% had a PhD/MD. Results Over 90% of industry, agency and CRO respondents routinely refer to Good Publication Practice (GPP2) and the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors’ Uniform Requirements. Most respondents (78% industry, 79% agency) received mandatory training on ethical publication practices. Over 90% of respondents’ companies had publication guidelines or policies and required medical writing support to be acknowledged in publications (96% industry, 99% agency). Many industry respondents used publication management tools to monitor compliance with company guidelines and about half (46%) stated that their company had formal publication audits. Fewer agencies audited adherence to guidelines but 20% of agency respondents reported audits of employees and 6% audits of freelancers. Of concern, 37% of agency respondents reported requests from authors or sponsors that they believed were unethical, although 93% of these requests were withdrawn after respondents explained the need for compliance with guidelines. Most respondents’ departments (63% industry, 58% agency, 60% CRO) had been involved in publishing studies with negative or inconclusive results. Conclusions Within this sample

  14. New Zealand needs guidelines for the safe and responsible inclusion of pregnant women in medical research.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a crucial window of time that influences long-term population health. As a matter of justice, pregnant woman are entitled to high quality, evidenced-based care. As a matter of population health, we need to better understand foetal development, particularly the impact of lifestyle, stress, chronic conditions and clinical treatment during pregnancy. Pregnancy continues to be dominated by the precautionary principle, advocating for the routine exclusion of pregnant women from medical research, particularly intervention studies, on the grounds of foetal vulnerability. But this stance simply shifts the risk into the community. Due to a lack of evidence-based data, many pregnant women are refused medically important drugs, are subject to dangerous delays in getting drugs, or are prescribed drugs that are thought 'safe', despite evidence of possible teratogenicity. I argue that New Zealand needs to shift to a default position of inclusion of pregnant women in research; and to develop guidelines to facilitate their safe and responsible inclusion. The uniqueness of pregnancy gives rise to specific questions regarding research ethics. These questions warrant focused debate and the answers cannot simply be deduced from the general principles of research ethics we currently have in New Zealand. PMID:27362600

  15. The Hospice: Advocate for the Dying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anspaugh, David J.

    1978-01-01

    The hospice philosophy seeks to meet the needs of dying patients and their families. These needs include: effective control of pain; to be loved and to alleviate loneliness; to retain dignity and maintain control of as many aspects of life as possible; and to help the family be supportive and adapt to their inevitable loss. (JMF)

  16. Hospice Decision Making: Diagnosis Makes a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, Deborah P.; Meeker, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the process of decision making about hospice enrollment and identified factors that influence the timing of that decision. Methods: This study employed an exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional design and was conducted using qualitative methods. In-depth in-person semistructured interviews were conducted with 36…

  17. Volunteers: The Life-Line of Hospice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patchner, Michael A.; Finn, Mark B.

    1988-01-01

    Survey of 68 hospice volunteers found volunteers to be relatively young, well-educated, in good health, motivated by religious beliefs and personal experience, and prepared for jobs after training and some on-the-job experience. Volunteers were most satisfied when working in direct contact with patients and families and in the hospital.…

  18. Successful Interprofessional Collaboration on the Hospice Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Dona J.; Sontag, Mary-Ann

    2001-01-01

    Despite the holistic approach inherent in the hospice philosophy, social work may be viewed as ancillary to medicine. Social work, in turn, may lack sensitivity about other professions' expertise and values and therefore be unprepared to collaborate across cultural boundaries between professions. This article outlines the barriers and proposes…

  19. Utilization of Pets in a Hospice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Kathleen; Kukowski, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The therapeutic use of animals with specific populations has gained increased attention and interest. Pet placement in special settings such as prisons, mental institutions and hospices have shown beneficial results. Development of a pet visitation program requires specific planning and organization. (JD)

  20. Characteristics of Hospice Patients and their Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, David M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes selected characteristics of 146 terminal patients enrolled in a home-based hospice program and similar characteristics of the patients' primary caregivers. Examines relationships between the characteristics of patients and caregivers and relationships between these characteristics and the rate at which various services were utilized.…

  1. A VNA-Organized Hospice Volunteer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorang, Edith S.

    1981-01-01

    Factors contributing to the success of a hospice volunteer program, organized by a visiting nurse association, include patient involvement in defining agency expectations of a volunteer, careful selection of candidates, a well-planned training program, contractual agreements, and record-keeping. (CT)

  2. How are the Experiences and Needs of Families of Individuals with Mental Illness Reflected in Medical Education Guidelines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riebschleger, Joanne; Scheid, Jeanette; Luz, Clare; Mickus, Maureen; Liszewski, Christine; Eaton, Monaca

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This descriptive study explored the extent that medical education curriculum guidelines contained content about the experiences and needs of family members of people with serious mental illness. Methods: Key family-focused-literature themes about the experiences and needs of families of individuals with mental illness were drawn from a…

  3. A Survey of Hospices Use of Complementary Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Running, Alice; Shreffler-Grant, Jean; Andrews, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    As people live longer with chronic illnesses, the need for hospice services will increase. Complementary therapies have been shown to increase ease, relieve pain, and improve quality of life; all relevant for people with chronic illness at the end of their lives. The first aim of this study was to identify complementary therapy services available to, and provided for, clients receiving hospice care in Nevada and Montana. The second aim was to identify differences in those therapies for urban and rural hospice clients. Using a descriptive survey design, data were collected from surveys sent to all hospice administrators in Nevada and Montana (N=54). A 50% (n=27) response rate was obtained. Most (70.4%, n=19) of the participating hospices offered complementary therapy; slightly more than half (52.9%, n=9) provided the services for less than 25% of their clients. No significant differences were found between rural and urban hospices. PMID:19756253

  4. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Standard: Medical director contract. (1) A hospice may contract with either of the following— (i) A self... objective medical findings; (4) Current medication and treatment orders; and (5) Information about...

  5. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Standard: Medical director contract. (1) A hospice may contract with either of the following— (i) A self... objective medical findings; (4) Current medication and treatment orders; and (5) Information about...

  6. Estimating goodwill: an application of Pine's procedures for hospices.

    PubMed

    Doka, Kenneth J; Pine, Vanderlynn

    2004-01-01

    Hospice care is a philosophy as well as a business. As a business, especially in the current healthcare environment, it is subject to many of the same forces that affect other businesses, such as acquisitions, sales, and mergers. Yet, estimating the value of a hospice is problematic, since its most valued asset (the reputation and goodwill that it has generated within the communities it serves) is intangible. This article explores the problem of assessing the value of a hospice, applying Pine's model for estimating goodwill in funeral service as a useful approach for hospices. The article offers assumptions for assessment and examples of suggested approaches. PMID:15315192

  7. Hospice in a zoologic medicine setting.

    PubMed

    Jessup, David A; Scott, Cheryl A

    2011-06-01

    Forty years ago, Dr. Elizabeth Kubler-Ross in her landmark book On death and dying observed "maybe at the end of our days, when we have worked and given, enjoyed ourselves and suffered, we are going back to the stage that we started out with and the circle of life is closed." Just as human life expectancy has steadily increased over the last 4 or 5 decades, animal life expectancy has increased, including that of zoologic species. With this has come a need for humans to openly and frankly deal with end-of-life issues for themselves and for their animals, including those in zoos. By necessity, zoos have been dealing with problems such as aggressive pain management and triage, and efforts to incorporate end-of-life care into zoologic medicine. But these efforts have yet to include formal acknowledgment that they are a basic form of hospice. Hospice for humans, and now for companion animals, includes much more than pain relief and geriatric care. This article reviews the concepts and basic practices of hospice and the closely related field of palliative care, their relatively recent application to companion animal care, potential applications to zoologic medicine, and the ways this could provide opportunities for personal growth of zoo visitors and staff, including veterinary staff. PMID:22946395

  8. Predictors of Intention to Refer to Pediatric Palliative or Hospice Care.

    PubMed

    Conner, Norma E; Uddin, Nizam

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to determine whether nurse characteristics, level of comfort with care of the dying, and spirituality predict intention to refer and timing of referral to pediatric palliative/hospice care. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use served as the framework for this study. Data were collected from 105 pediatric nurses recruited from 7 patient units of one pediatric hospital. Regression analysis revealed several nurse factors (practice unit, years of experience, age, race/ethnicity) that predicted intent to refer and timing of referral to pediatric palliative/hospice care. The relationship between nurse characteristics and intent to refer was specific to certain medical conditions (HIV, extreme prematurity, brain injuries). Healthcare providers can use these findings to improve care for children with life-limiting illnesses. PMID:26150677

  9. Commentary: IDSA guidelines for improving the teaching of preclinical medical microbiology and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Southwick, Frederick; Katona, Peter; Kauffman, Carol; Monroe, Sara; Pirofski, Liise-anne; del Rio, Carlos; Gallis, Harry; Dismukes, William

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical microbiology and infectious diseases courses too often primarily depend on PowerPoint lectures and notes, combined with multiple-choice tests, as their primary teaching tools. This strategy sets low expectations for students, encouraging short-term memory and discouraging understanding and long-term memory. These methods also fail to stimulate active participation, collaborative learning, and two-way communication with the professor, and they do not respect the students' diverse talents and ways of learning. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Preclinical Curriculum Committee proposes a new approach that emphasizes active learning and understanding and that addresses all of these failures. It consists of five components: (1) "Just-in-time" teaching that requires students to e-mail the answers to two general questions as well as any areas of misunderstanding to the instructor several hours before each lecture, (2) peer instruction or large-group sessions consisting of student teams of four who electronically answer a conceptual question before each major section of the lecture, (3) teaching from edited textbooks and Internet sources, (4) small-group discussions that emphasize pathogenesis and differential diagnosis, and (5) essay questions that encourage and test understanding in addition to recognition. A national consensus on factual content is proposed, with the goals of reducing information overload and minimizing requirements for excessive memorization. These strategies promise to enhance learning and rekindle interest in the field of infectious diseases. Other subspecialty organizations should create similar teaching guidelines that will encourage future medical students to bring a richer understanding of clinical and basic science to the bedside. PMID:20042815

  10. Pharmacovigilance in hospice/palliative care: net effect of gabapentin for neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Christine; Quinn, Stephen J; Agar, Meera; Chye, Richard; Clark, Katherine; Doogue, Matthew; Fazekas, Belinda; Lee, Jessica; Lovell, Melanie R; Rowett, Debra; Spruyt, Odette; Currow, David C

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospice/palliative care patients may differ from better studied populations, and data from other populations cannot necessarily be extrapolated into hospice/palliative care clinical practice. Pharmacovigilance studies provide opportunities to understand the harms and benefits of medications in routine practice. Gabapentin, a γ-amino butyric acid analogue antiepileptic drug, is commonly prescribed for neuropathic pain in hospice/palliative care. Most of the evidence however relates to non-malignant, chronic pain syndromes (diabetic neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, central pain syndromes, fibromyalgia). The aim of this study was to quantify the immediate and short-term clinical benefits and harms of gabapentin in routine hospice/palliative care practice. Design Multisite, prospective, consecutive cohort. Population 127 patients, 114 of whom had cancer, who started gabapentin for neuropathic pain as part of routine clinical care. Settings 42 centres from seven countries. Data were collected at three time points—at baseline, at day 7 (and at any time; immediate and short-term harms) and at day 21 (clinical benefits). Results At day 21, the average dose of gabapentin for those still using it (n=68) was 653 mg/24 h (range 0–1800 mg) and 54 (42%) reported benefits, of whom 7 (6%) experienced complete pain resolution. Harms were reported in 39/127 (30%) patients at day 7, the most frequent of which were cognitive disturbance, somnolence, nausea and dizziness. Ten patients had their medication ceased due to harms. The presence of significant comorbidities, higher dose and increasing age increased the likelihood of harm. Conclusions Overall, 42% of people experienced benefit at a level that resulted in continued use at 21 days. PMID:25324335

  11. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A; Edmonson, H; Felmlee, J; Pooley, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  12. [Safe reprocessing of medical devices with a view of the entire process chain. Recommendations of the VDI 5700 guidelines].

    PubMed

    Kraft, M; Wille, F; Attenberger, J; Müller, U

    2014-12-01

    The reprocessing of medical devices for low pathogen or sterile use is in itself potentially risky even though the aim of reprocessing is the avoidance of hygienic or technically functional risks. The methodological principles of risk management for medical devices are described in the standard DIN EN ISO 14971. The recommendations of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infectious Disease Prevention (Kommission für Krankenhaushygiene und Infektionsprävention KRINKO) of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (Bundesinstituts für Arzneimittel und Medizinprodukte BfArM) "hygiene requirements for the reprocessing of medical devices" clarify numerous reprocessing-specific risks and are structured with reference to the different steps of reprocessing. The aim was a practical combination of the normative risk management methodology with the process-oriented KRINKO/BfArM recommendations, which has provided an interdisciplinary group of experts moderated by the Association of German Engineers (VDI). The main contents of the VDI 5700 guidelines on "hazards associated with the reprocessing--risk management in the reprocessing of medical devices--measures for risk control" and the process of the development of these guidelines is described. PMID:25348217

  13. Antibiotic Policies and Utilization in Oregon Hospice Programs.

    PubMed

    Novak, Rachel L; Noble, Brie N; Fromme, Erik K; Tice, Michael O; McGregor, Jessina C; Furuno, Jon P

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are frequently used in hospice care, despite limited data on safety and effectiveness in this patient population. We surveyed Oregon hospice programs on antibiotic policies and prescribing practices. Among 39 responding hospice programs, the median reported proportion of current census using antibiotics was 10% (interquartile range = 3.5%-20.0%). Approximately 31% of responding hospice programs had policies for antibiotic initiation, 17% of hospice programs had policies for antibiotic discontinuation, and 95% of hospice programs had policies for managing drug interactions. Diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, and yeast infections were the most frequently reported antibiotic-associated adverse events, occurring "sometimes" or "often" among 62%, 47%, and 62% of respondents, respectively. In conclusion, less than a third of participating hospice programs reported having a policy for antibiotic initiation and even less frequently a policy for discontinuation. More data are needed on the risks and benefits of antibiotic use in hospice care to inform these policies and optimize outcomes in this vulnerable patient population. PMID:26268730

  14. Examining Variables Related to Successful Collaboration on the Hospice Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker-Oliver, Debra; Bronstein, Laura R.; Kurzejeski, Lori

    2005-01-01

    Although social work participation on interdisciplinary teams is long-standing, little research has been done to examine its effectiveness. This study used the Index of Interdisciplinary Collaboration to explore relationships between selected variables and teamwork in the hospice setting. The findings indicate that hospice social workers report a…

  15. Creating Decent Prisons: A Serendipitous Finding about Prison Hospice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Kevin N.; Bronstein, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Limited research has been conducted on the creation or impact of "decent" prisons, institutions where prisoners are treated with care and respect. This study set out to explore organizational factors associated with locating hospice programs into prison settings. Yet, the research produced unexpected findings about the contribution of hospice to…

  16. Mental Health Training and the Hospice Community: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Charles A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summarizes a national survey of the hospice community. Results indicated that the hospice community is attempting to meet the mental health training needs of its paid staff members and volunteers. However, more than half expressed a need for further training and a more systematic and comprehensive curriculum. (Author)

  17. The Rural Hospice: Integrating Formal and Informal Helping Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Lowell; Cook, Alicia S.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the implementation of the hospice philosophy in rural areas and provides a model of how formal helping systems and natural helping networks can work together effectively. Suggests the emergence of the hospice can reorient social workers to the basic concepts of helping. (Author/JAC)

  18. The Administrative Role in Hospice Planning and Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallady, Susan A.

    1982-01-01

    Addresses the specific advantages to new hospices of incorporating administrative resource people in the planning and organization phases of their programs. Describes organizational structure and the role of the interdisciplinary team. An annotated bibliography summarizes hospice adminstrative resources and research. (Author/JAC)

  19. The Viability of Pediatric Hospices: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dottie C.

    1982-01-01

    Identifies the special characteristics needed by hospices caring for terminally ill children, based on a feasibility study for a pediatric hospital. Concludes that the needs of terminally ill children and their families are not being met currently and that the hospice is as appropriate for children as for adults. (Author)

  20. 42 CFR 418.28 - Revoking the election of hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revoking the election of hospice care. 418.28... Revoking the election of hospice care. (a) An individual or representative may revoke the individual's election of hospice care at any time during an election period. (b) To revoke the election of hospice...

  1. 42 CFR 418.308 - Limitation on the amount of hospice payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on the amount of hospice payments. 418... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Payment for Hospice Care § 418.308 Limitation on the amount of hospice payments. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section,...

  2. 42 CFR 418.312 - Data submission requirements under the hospice quality reporting program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... with CMS-approved vendors to collect the CAHPS® Hospice Survey data on their behalf and submit the data to the Hospice CAHPS® Data Center. (e) If the hospice's total, annual, unique, survey-eligible... exempt from the CAHPS® Hospice Survey reporting requirements in the current calendar year. In order...

  3. Effectively training the hospice and palliative medicine physician workforce for improved end-of-life health care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    The widening gap between the demand for palliative care services and the supply of trained palliative care professionals has resulted in considerable end-of-life distress for patients. Without formal training in palliative medicine and end-of-life symptom management, physicians in the United States are less equipped to competently address seriously ill and dying patients' medical, emotional, and spiritual needs. Recent attempts within graduate medical education training deliberately seek to prepare a critical mass of physicians as the new hospice and palliative medicine workforce in the United States. In addition, healthcare reform proposals may re-define the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) post-graduate training over the next five years and the Hospice Medicare Benefit altogether. Healthcare policy options include steady changes at multiple levels of medical training -namely, medical school curriculum mandates, requiring all graduate physician residency training to foster patient-centered communication skills and discussions about advanced directives, and instituting palliative medicine proficiency Continuing Medical Education (CME) requirements for all states' medical licensing boards. Attracting qualified physicians to serve patients at the end of life, innovative medical school loan repayment programs and scholarships will also foster excellence in the field of hospice and palliative medicine. Correcting our current paucity of formal training in palliative medicine better utilizes hospice and restores patients' dignity at the end of life. PMID:22174315

  4. Hospice nurses' emotional challenges in their encounters with the dying.

    PubMed

    Ingebretsen, Lina Paola; Sagbakken, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' emotional challenges when caring for the dying in hospices. The study has a qualitative design, and knowledge was developed through a dialectical exchange between theory and data. Ten individual in-depth interviews were conducted with nurses recruited from two hospices in Denmark. Although all of the nurses said that they experienced emotional challenges or felt emotionally touched during their work, the study found a variety of opinions related to the extent to which their emotional reactions should be revealed in their role as a hospice professional. The participants described their emotional challenges as being simultaneously draining and enriching experiences leading to personal and professional growth and development. The study may contribute to increased awareness of emotional challenges for hospice nurses, which involve continuous reflection and balancing between meeting the dying as a human being and meeting the dying as a hospice professional. PMID:27258584

  5. Hospice nurses’ emotional challenges in their encounters with the dying

    PubMed Central

    Ingebretsen, Lina Paola; Sagbakken, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nurses’ emotional challenges when caring for the dying in hospices. The study has a qualitative design, and knowledge was developed through a dialectical exchange between theory and data. Ten individual in-depth interviews were conducted with nurses recruited from two hospices in Denmark. Although all of the nurses said that they experienced emotional challenges or felt emotionally touched during their work, the study found a variety of opinions related to the extent to which their emotional reactions should be revealed in their role as a hospice professional. The participants described their emotional challenges as being simultaneously draining and enriching experiences leading to personal and professional growth and development. The study may contribute to increased awareness of emotional challenges for hospice nurses, which involve continuous reflection and balancing between meeting the dying as a human being and meeting the dying as a hospice professional. PMID:27258584

  6. Low Stroke Rate of Carotid Stenosis Under the Guideline-Oriented Medical Treatment Compared With Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimitoshi; Fujiyoshi, Kazuhiro; Hoshi, Keika; Noda, Chiharu; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Ako, Junya; Kumabe, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Medical treatment for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS) has advanced recently. The outcomes of medical treatment and surgical treatment were evaluated to clarify the optimal treatment for ACAS.Patients with ACAS of ≥ 50% luminal narrowing underwent serial follow-up carotid artery ultrasonography for one year or more at the Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention between November 2006 and October 2013. The incidence of cardiovascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction, cardiovascular death) was examined in 64 patients (medical treatment group), and in 47 patients (surgical group) who underwent surgical treatment (carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting) during this same period at the Department of Neurosurgery.Annual cardiovascular event rate was 0.91% (2/219 person-year) in the group of guideline-oriented medical treatment with an annual check-up for disease management and 5.6% (6/107 person-year) in the surgical group (log-rank P = 0.027; HR in the medical treatment group, 0.19 [medical treatment/surgical]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.028 to 0.87). Annual stroke event rate was 0.46% (1/219 person-year) in the medical treatment group and 4.7% (5/107 personyear) in the surgical group (log-rank P = 0.016; HR in the medical treatment group, 0.11 [medical treatment/surgical]; 95% CI, 0.0057 to 0.70). Multivariate logistic analysis showed that the surgical group was an independent variable associated with cardiovascular events (P = 0.049).Annual cardiovascular and stroke event rates were low in patients receiving medical treatment for ACAS and better than surgical treatment. The present study shows that medical treatment is an important option for ACAS. PMID:26673440

  7. How medical doctors and students should use Social Media: a review of the main guidelines for proposing practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Miguel Angel; Leis, Angela; Mayer, Alex; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Social Media has grown exponentially and in the last few years there has been an increasing use amongst medical doctors and students. There is intense debate about the complexities of ensuring medical professionalism in the digital age and especially on using open and massive online services. The objectives of this paper are: first, to gather the main recommendations on using Social Media platforms and websites by medical doctors and students, which are proposed by several international organizations, institutions and universities of reference and second, to propose a set of practical recommendations, based on the comparison of the statements and items of the guidelines, in order to find agreements and differences among them and select the most common and practical items stated. A Decalogue of good practices has been drawn up, pointing out the most important aspects that should be considered, highlighting the relevance of maintaining professional behavior in these environments, taking into account the advantages and drawbacks when using them. PMID:22874313

  8. A national survey of health professionals and volunteers working in voluntary hospice services in the UK. I. Attitudes to current issues affecting hospices and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Addington-Hall, Julia M; Karlsen, Saffron

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports results from a national survey in 1999 of voluntary hospice services in the UK. It focuses on volunteer and staff views of the purposes of hospice care, and on current debates within palliative care. Twenty-five hospice services, stratified by region, services provided (inpatient care, day care and/or home care) and number of beds were randomly sampled from amongst 175 voluntary hospices in the UK. Nineteen participated. Seventy per cent of a random sample of professional and voluntary staff within these hospices returned a postal questionnaire. Both volunteers and professionals considered care of the whole person, pain and symptom control, quality of life and dying peacefully to be important aspects of hospice care. Most doctors chose care of the whole person as the most important aspect, and they were more likely to choose this option than other staff. Hospice volunteers were less positive than hospice staff (particularly doctors and nurses) in their attitudes to extending hospice care to noncancer patients (where many volunteers held no strong view), to restricting care to patients with specialist palliative care needs, and less negative about euthanasia. These findings illustrate the importance of including hospice volunteers and the general public, as well as hospice staff, in debates about the future of hospice and palliative care in the UK. Further research is needed into lay and professional views of the role of hospices and palliative care services. PMID:15690867

  9. [Continuing hospice care of cancer--a three-year experience].

    PubMed

    Lai, Y L; Young, A; Lai, E Y; Yeh, C Y; Chiou, J F; Chang, K H; Chung, C H; Hsieh, A L

    1994-09-01

    The hospice at Mackay Memorial Hospital was established in February 1990. A group of team workers including physicians, nurses, social workers and the clergy were involved in this holistic care program for terminal cancer patients. Four hundred and seventy-nine patients were eligible for the program up to February 1993. Regarding duration of stay, 62.5% of patients resided for 14 days. Those surviving under 90 days constituted 75.5% of patients. Fifty-one point eight percent of patients died in the hospice and 18.2% died at home soon after being discharged from the hospice. Pain is the most common symptom among the patients. Treatment strategies vary according to the three-step-ladder protocol designed by WHO. Total pain relief was achieved in 80% of patients. Opportune private talking and family conferences formed the basis of the "peer model". Through this model, treatment decisions including physical, psychosocial and spiritual issues were made. Before the peer model, only 36 (10.3%) patients agreed with the idea of hospice care, while 257 (73.6%) patients agreed after the model was established. Awareness of dying was evident in 412 (86%) patients. Two hundred and eighty (68%) patients became aware of the prospect of death through guessing, while the other 132 (32%) patients were informed by medical staff. Problems encountered by the team workers included 1) needs in education and training, 2) psychological pressure, 3) management of loss and grief, 4) needs in supportive system and 5) troubles caused by families' lying to patients. The team workers were satisfied with the quality of care in 38.4% of patients and fairly satisfied with 30.7% of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7536505

  10. Patient experience key in hospice refurb.

    PubMed

    Beach, Matt

    2015-03-01

    A major design and build scheme which has seen the inpatient unit at St. Luke's Hospice in Sheffield extended and refurbished to provide a more comfortable and homely environment, and bring the facilities up to the best 21st century standards, has benefited significantly from both high quality architecture and stakeholder commitment. The result, reports Matt Beach, associate at scheme architects, Race Cottam Associates, is an even better and 'more personal'environment for delivery of end-of-life-care at a facility that, as one patient puts it,'has something very rare and special about it'. PMID:26268027

  11. Determining Community Provider Practices in Hospices: The Challenges of Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Bergen-Jackson, Kimberly; Sanders, Sara; Herr, Keela; Fine, Perry G.; Titler, Marita; Forcucci, Chris; Reyes, Jimmy; McNichol, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Documentation is a key factor in supporting consistency and quality of patient care in the hospice setting, however variation among program provider practices, including documentation, were observed during the initial data collection phase of our National Cancer Institute (NCI) funded study, Cancer Pain in Elders: Promoting Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs) in Hospices. The study is a randomized trial to test a multifaceted intervention to promote adoption and maintenance of EBPs for cancer pain management involving 16 Midwestern hospices of varied size and structure. In the face of such variance, and especially in the absence of uniformly adopted outcome measures and documentation standards, quality improvement initiatives in this important and growing healthcare sector will be difficult to manage. This paper provides background on the importance of documentation, quality measures, outcomes of care, and regulatory imperatives in the hospice setting with specific observations from our research study and suggestions for changes in documentation practices. From our observations, we posit the necessity of pertinent outcome measures supported by standardized documentation processes in hospice. Uniformity in key practice indicators and patient outcome measures in documentation systems would advance the movement to improve quality and consistency of care in hospices. Standardization of documentation systems and language would also facilitate the conduct of research in the hospice setting, a population for which advancing knowledge is essential to assure quality care at the end of life. PMID:20419047

  12. The U.S. hospice movement: issues in development.

    PubMed Central

    Osterweis, M; Champagne, D S

    1979-01-01

    A grass-roots hospice care movement is underway in the United States modeled after recently popularized British hospice programs. Hospice care is intended to help the terminally ill maintain a personally acceptable quality of life until death. Attention should be given to ensuring the future viability of this service option by allowing for experimentation with and adaptation of existing models, and by integrating it with the overall health care system. Issues to be considered in integrating hospice care include utilization of existing resources, regional planning, standards and licensure, and reimbursement opportunities. Although hospice care may not have an immediate cost savings impact on the health care system, it could develop this capacity in the future. Such impact would not only assure a stable financial base for hospice care but would also affect bed use generally. Continuing dialogue among providers, consumers, and policy makers of various backgrounds is necessary to the effective and appropriate development of hospice care in the U.S. PMID:434281

  13. Hospice Core Professions' Views on Interdisciplinary Teams: A Qualitative Investigation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Rie; McAllister, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    The hospice interdisciplinary team (IDT) has been recognized as an ideal model for interprofessional collaboration. To address the manner in which interdisciplinary practices are perceived by team members, this study explored profession-based similarities and differences in perceptions among the four core hospice IDT members (physicians, nurses, social workers, and spiritual care providers) as well as experiences on the IDT. Semistructured interviews with 20 hospice professionals, 5 from each profession, were completed. Findings suggested that while hospice professions share some perceptions and experiences about hospice team membership, strengths of and barriers to teamwork, and individual members' contribution to the team, significant profession-based differences exist largely in the area of hospice team membership beyond the core members, type of language and descriptions used, perceptions of causes and effects of barriers to teamwork, and understandings of how team effectiveness is evaluated. Changes at the team-based, organizational, policy, and educational levels are needed to further maximize strengths of individual hospice IDT member and team qualities. PMID:27462950

  14. Family Perspectives on the Hospice Experience in Adult Family Homes

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Karla T.; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Shaunfield, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Growing numbers of terminally ill older adults receive hospice services in adult family homes (AFHs); however, little is known about the provision and receipt of end-of-life care in such environments. This paper reports findings from a qualitative exploration of family members’ perspectives of the hospice experience in AFHs. Analysis of data obtained during interviews of fifteen residents’ family members exposed significant challenges associated with transition to an AFH, highlighted the importance of AFH and hospice staff in family members’ assessment of overall quality of care, and emphasized the critical nature of communication in AFH settings. PMID:21240714

  15. Crossing boundaries: a comprehensive survey of medical licensing laws and guidelines regulating the interstate practice of pathology.

    PubMed

    Hiemenz, Matthew C; Leung, Stanley T; Park, Jason Y

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, recent judicial interpretation of interstate licensure laws has found pathologists guilty of malpractice and, more importantly, the criminal practice of medicine without a license. These judgments against pathologists highlight the need for a timely and comprehensive survey of licensure requirements and laws regulating the interstate practice of pathology. For all 50 states, each state medical practice act and state medical board website was reviewed. In addition, each medical board was directly contacted by electronic mail, telephone, or US registered mail for information regarding specific legislation or guidelines related to the interstate practice of pathology. On the basis of this information, states were grouped according to similarities in legislation and medical board regulations. This comprehensive survey has determined that states define the practice of pathology on the basis of the geographic location of the patient at the time of surgery or phlebotomy. The majority of states (n=32) and the District of Columbia allow for a physician with an out-of-state license to perform limited consultation to a physician with the specific state license. Several states (n=5) prohibit physicians from consultation without a license for the specific state. Overall, these results reveal the heterogeneity of licensure requirements between states. Pathologists who either practice in multiple states, send cases to out-of-state consultants, or serve as consultants themselves should familiarize themselves with the medical licensure laws of the states from which they receive or send cases. PMID:24525516

  16. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. In addition to meeting... residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  17. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. In addition to meeting... residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  18. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR...: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. In addition to meeting the... of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  19. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR... participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID. In addition to meeting... residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/IID must abide by the following additional standards. (a) Standard:...

  20. 42 CFR 418.112 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Hospices that provide hospice care to residents of a SNF/NF or ICF/MR. 418.112 Section 418.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of...

  1. 77 FR 5057 - Draft Guidelines for Coroner/Medical Examiner Media Relations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ...In an effort to obtain comments from interested parties, the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, Scientific Working Group for Medicolegal Death Investigation will make available to the general public a draft document entitled, ``Guidelines for Media Relations: Dissemination of Public Information in Medicolegal Death Investigations.'' The......

  2. Computer-Based Medical Decision Support System based on guidelines, clinical pathways and decision nodes.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    A continuous and dynamic development of medical sciences which is currently taking place all over the world is associated with a considerable increase in the number of scientific reports and papers of importance in enhancing the effectiveness of treatment and quality of medical care. However, it is difficult, or, indeed, impossible, for physicians to regularly follow all recent innovations in medical knowledge and to apply the latest research findings to their daily clinical practice. More and more studies conducted both in Poland and worldwide as well as experience from clinical practice in various countries provide convincing evidence that various systems supporting medical decision-making by physicians or other medical professionals visibly improve the quality of medical care. The use of such systems is already possible and recently has been developing especially dynamically, as the level of knowledge and information and communication technology now permits their effective implementation. Currently, electronic knowledge bases, together with inference procedures, form intelligent medical information systems, which offer many possibilities for the support of medical decision-making, mainly in regard to interactive diagnostic work-up, but also the selection of the most suitable treatment plan (clinical pathway). Regardless of their scale and area of application, these systems are referred to as Computer-Based Medical Decision Support Systems (CBMDSS). PMID:22741924

  3. Medicare program; FY 2015 hospice wage index and payment rate update; hospice quality reporting requirements and process and appeals for Part D payment for drugs for beneficiaries enrolled in hospice. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-22

    This final rule will update the hospice payment rates and the wage index for fiscal year (FY) 2015 and continue the phase-out of the wage index budget neutrality adjustment factor (BNAF). This rule provides an update on hospice payment reform analyses, potential definitions of "terminal illness'' and "related conditions,'' and information on potential processes and appeals for Part D payment for drugs while beneficiaries are under a hospice election. This rule will specify timeframes for filing the notice of election and the notice of termination/revocation; add the attending physician to the hospice election form, and require hospices to document changes to the attending physician; require hospices to complete their hospice aggregate cap determinations within 5 months after the cap year ends, and remit any overpayments; and update the hospice quality reporting program. In addition, this rule will provide guidance on determining hospice eligibility; information on the delay in the implementation of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM); and will further clarify how hospices are to report diagnoses on hospice claims. Finally, the rule will make a technical regulations text change. PMID:25167592

  4. Legal Issues in School Health Services and School Psychology: Guidelines for the Administration of Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur-Mosiewicz, Anna; Pierson, Eric E.; McIntosh, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of psychoactive medications to augment behavioral and psychosocial interventions in schools has significantly increased within the last few decades. Yet, advising, administrating, and supervising the dispensation of medication (including psychostimulants and psychoactive substances) tend to be some of the most risky tasks of school…

  5. The revised guidelines of the Medical Council of India for academic promotions: Need for a rethink.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rakesh; Gogtay, Nithya; Kumar, Rajeev; Sahni, Peush

    2015-01-01

    Note: This editorial is being published simultaneously in the Indian Heart Journal, Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, Indian Journal of Gastroenterology, Indian Journal of Medical Ethics, Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology, Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology, Indian Journal of Pharmacology, Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, Indian Journal of Urology, Indian Pediatrics, International Journal of Health Research & Medicolegal Practice, Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology, Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine, Journal of Clinical and Scientific Research, Journal of Conservative Dentistry, Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Journal of Indian Academy of Forensic Medicine, Journal of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Journal of Postgraduate Medicine, National Journal of Integrated Research in Medicine, and The National Medical Journal of India. It may also be published in forthcoming issues of other journals. This editorial is not endorsed by all members of the Indian Association of Medical Journal Editors (IAMJE). PMID:26985403

  6. The revised guidelines of the Medical Council of India for academic promotions: Need for a rethink

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Rakesh; Gogtay, Nithya; Kumar, Rajeev; Sahni, Peush

    2015-01-01

    Note: This editorial is being published simultaneously in the Indian Heart Journal, Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, Indian Journal of Gastroenterology, Indian Journal of Medical Ethics, Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology, Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology, Indian Journal of Pharmacology, Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, Indian Journal of Urology, Indian Pediatrics, International Journal of Health Research & Medicolegal Practice, Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology, Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine, Journal of Clinical and Scientific Research, Journal of Conservative Dentistry, Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Journal of Indian Academy of Forensic Medicine, Journal of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Journal of Postgraduate Medicine, National Journal of Integrated Research in Medicine, and The National Medical Journal of India. It may also be published in forthcoming issues of other journals. This editorial is not endorsed by all members of the Indian Association of Medical Journal Editors (IAMJE). PMID:26985403

  7. Stress and Burnout: Concerns for the Hospice Volunteer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Hastings, Janice L.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of stress for hospice volunteers are environmental, ideological, and personal. Attention to volunteer stress and burnout involves defining job requirements and responsibilities, frequent communication and feedback, stress management techniques, flexibility in assignments, and opportunities to verbalize emotions. (SK)

  8. 42 CFR 418.302 - Payment procedures for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... individual who has elected hospice care receives general inpatient care in an inpatient facility for pain control or acute or chronic symptom management which cannot be managed in other settings. (c) The...

  9. 42 CFR 418.302 - Payment procedures for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... individual who has elected hospice care receives general inpatient care in an inpatient facility for pain control or acute or chronic symptom management which cannot be managed in other settings. (c) The...

  10. 42 CFR 418.302 - Payment procedures for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... individual who has elected hospice care receives general inpatient care in an inpatient facility for pain control or acute or chronic symptom management which cannot be managed in other settings. (c) The...

  11. 42 CFR 418.302 - Payment procedures for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... individual who has elected hospice care receives general inpatient care in an inpatient facility for pain control or acute or chronic symptom management which cannot be managed in other settings. (c) The...

  12. The benefits of expanded physician assistant practice in hospice and palliative medicine.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Nathan A; Nix, Harvey

    2016-09-01

    Patients with advanced or terminal illness, especially racial and ethnic minorities, would benefit from greater access to hospice and palliative care. Expanding the PA role in these areas would help fill gaps in both access and patients' understanding of what hospice and palliative care can offer. This article describes why hospice and palliative care are needed, what PAs can and do offer hospice and palliative care delivery, and what challenges should be overcome to expand PA practice in hospice and palliative care. The article also reviews the legislative outlook for PA practice in hospice care. PMID:27575903

  13. Hospice clinical experiences for nursing students: living to the fullest.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Sherri; Heller, Rebecca; Troth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Preparing future nurses to provide appropriate care for patients and their families at the end of life can be a formidable challenge for nurse educators. Most nursing schools thread end-of-life concepts throughout the curriculum. Grand Canyon University includes a 40-hour hospice clinical as a component of a home healthcare practicum. Students' weekly written reflections reveal the depth of affective learning that occurs during this experience. Article includes hospice materials and resources. PMID:25585469

  14. Combining information from two data sources with misreporting and incompleteness to assess hospice-use among cancer patients: a multiple imputation approach.

    PubMed

    He, Yulei; Landrum, Mary Beth; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2014-09-20

    Combining information from multiple data sources can enhance estimates of health-related measures by using one source to supply information that is lacking in another, assuming the former has accurate and complete data. However, there is little research conducted on combining methods when each source might be imperfect, for example, subject to measurement errors and/or missing data. In a multisite study of hospice-use by late-stage cancer patients, this variable was available from patients' abstracted medical records, which may be considerably underreported because of incomplete acquisition of these records. Therefore, data for Medicare-eligible patients were supplemented with their Medicare claims that contained information on hospice-use, which may also be subject to underreporting yet to a lesser degree. In addition, both sources suffered from missing data because of unit nonresponse from medical record abstraction and sample undercoverage for Medicare claims. We treat the true hospice-use status from these patients as a latent variable and propose to multiply impute it using information from both data sources, borrowing the strength from each. We characterize the complete-data model as a product of an 'outcome' model for the probability of hospice-use and a 'reporting' model for the probability of underreporting from both sources, adjusting for other covariates. Assuming the reports of hospice-use from both sources are missing at random and the underreporting are conditionally independent, we develop a Bayesian multiple imputation algorithm and conduct multiple imputation analyses of patient hospice-use in demographic and clinical subgroups. The proposed approach yields more sensible results than alternative methods in our example. Our model is also related to dual system estimation in population censuses and dual exposure assessment in epidemiology. PMID:24804628

  15. Combining information from two data sources with misreporting and incompleteness to assess hospice-use among cancer patients: a multiple imputation approach

    PubMed Central

    He, Yulei; Landrum, Mary Beth; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Combining information from multiple data sources can enhance estimates of health-related measures by using one source to supply information that is lacking in another, assuming the former has accurate and complete data. However, there is little research conducted on combining methods when each source might be imperfect, for example, subject to measurement errors and/or missing data. In a multisite study of hospice-use by late-stage cancer patients, this variable was available from patients’ abstracted medical records, which may be considerably underreported because of incomplete acquisition of these records. Therefore, data for Medicare-eligible patients were supplemented with their Medicare claims that contained information on hospice-use, which may also be subject to underreporting yet to a lesser degree. In addition, both sources suffered from missing data because of unit nonresponse from medical record abstraction and sample undercoverage for Medicare claims. We treat the true hospice-use status from these patients as a latent variable and propose to multiply impute it using information from both data sources, borrowing the strength from each. We characterize the complete-data model as a product of an ‘outcome’ model for the probability of hospice-use and a ‘reporting’ model for the probability of underreporting from both sources, adjusting for other covariates. Assuming the reports of hospice-use from both sources are missing at random and the underreporting are conditionally independent, we develop a Bayesian multiple imputation algorithm and conduct multiple imputation analyses of patient hospice-use in demographic and clinical subgroups. The proposed approach yields more sensible results than alternative methods in our example. Our model is also related to dual system estimation in population censuses and dual exposure assessment in epidemiology. PMID:24804628

  16. The Island Hospice model of palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Khumalo, Thembelihle; Maasdorp, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    There has been a substantial increase in cancer detections in Africa over years, and it has also been noted that higher number of individuals are affected by the later stages of cancer that lead to death. When it comes to cancer care, Zimbabwe is no exception with its ongoing palliative care related research, though still in its infancy. The need for advanced and more accessible palliative care to assist the vulnerable has been intensified by this increase in cancer prevalence. Island Hospice, which is a centre of excellence in palliative care has varying elements of the models that it employs to engage those most in need of palliative assistance, especially children and financially-challenged individuals. PMID:27563349

  17. The Island Hospice model of palliative care.

    PubMed

    Khumalo, Thembelihle; Maasdorp, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    There has been a substantial increase in cancer detections in Africa over years, and it has also been noted that higher number of individuals are affected by the later stages of cancer that lead to death. When it comes to cancer care, Zimbabwe is no exception with its ongoing palliative care related research, though still in its infancy. The need for advanced and more accessible palliative care to assist the vulnerable has been intensified by this increase in cancer prevalence. Island Hospice, which is a centre of excellence in palliative care has varying elements of the models that it employs to engage those most in need of palliative assistance, especially children and financially-challenged individuals. PMID:27563349

  18. The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics Policy Statement No. 10.1: Recommended Guidelines on National Schemes for Continuing Professional Development of Medical Physicists.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Stelios; Isidoro, Jorge; Pesznyak, Csilla; Cremers, Florian; Figueira, Rita; van Swol, Christiaan; Evans, Stephen; Torresin, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is vital to the medical physics profession if it is to embrace the pace of change occurring in medical practice. As CPD is the planned acquisition of knowledge, experience and skills required for professional practice throughout one's working life it promotes excellence and protects the profession and public against incompetence. Furthermore, CPD is a recommended prerequisite of registration schemes (Caruana et al. 2014) and is implied in the Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (EU BSS) and the International Basic Safety Standards (BSS). It is to be noted that currently not all national registration schemes require CPD to maintain the registration status necessary to practise medical physics. Such schemes should consider adopting CPD as a prerequisite for renewing registration after a set period of time. This EFOMP Policy Statement, which is an amalgamation and an update of the EFOMP Policy Statements No. 8 and No. 10, presents guidelines for the establishment of national schemes for CPD and activities that should be considered for CPD. PMID:26851163

  19. General guidelines for medically screening mixed population groups potentially exposed to nerve or vesicant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Sidell, F.R.; Leffingwell, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    A number of state and local planners have requested guidance on screening protocols and have expressed interest in sampling body fluids from exposed or potentially exposed individuals as a means of estimating agent dose. These guidelines have been developed to provide a clear statement that could be used by state and local emergency response personnel in the event of a nerve or vesicant agent incident resulting in off-post contamination; maximum protection from harm is the goal. The assumption is that any population group so exposed would be heterogeneous for age, gender, reproductive status, and state of health.

  20. American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) National Practice Guideline for the Use of Medications in the Treatment of Addiction Involving Opioid Use.

    PubMed

    Kampman, Kyle; Jarvis, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control have recently described opioid use and resultant deaths as an epidemic. At this point in time, treating this disease well with medication requires skill and time that are not generally available to primary care doctors in most practice models. Suboptimal treatment has likely contributed to expansion of the epidemic and concerns for unethical practices. At the same time, access to competent treatment is profoundly restricted because few physicians are willing and able to provide it. This "Practice Guideline" was developed to assist in the evaluation and treatment of opioid use disorder, and in the hope that, using this tool, more physicians will be able to provide effective treatment. Although there are existing guidelines for the treatment of opioid use disorder, none have included all of the medications used at present for its treatment. Moreover, few of the existing guidelines address the needs of special populations such as pregnant women, individuals with co-occurring psychiatric disorders, individuals with pain, adolescents, or individuals involved in the criminal justice system. This Practice Guideline was developed using the RAND Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method (RAM) - a process that combines scientific evidence and clinical knowledge to determine the appropriateness of a set of clinical procedures. The RAM is a deliberate approach encompassing review of existing guidelines, literature reviews, appropriateness ratings, necessity reviews, and document development. For this project, American Society of Addiction Medicine selected an independent committee to oversee guideline development and to assist in writing. American Society of Addiction Medicine's Quality Improvement Council oversaw the selection process for the independent development committee. Recommendations included in the guideline encompass a broad range of topics, starting with the initial evaluation of the

  1. The Hospice Environmental Survey (HES): Pilot Test of a New Measurement Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jean H.; Perrill, Norman K.

    1988-01-01

    Describes development of the Hospice Environmental Survey (HES) to measure user's perception of the homelike atmosphere provided by a hospital inpatient unit called Hospice House. Presents the HES instrument, methodology, and pilot study data. (Author/NB)

  2. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C of... - Medical Surveillance Guidelines for Benzene

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... principal effects of benzene exposure addressed in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, appendix A, are pathological... specified in 46 CFR 197.560 is designed to observe, on a regular basis, blood indices for early signs of... required in 46 CFR 197.560. There are special provisions for medical tests in the event of...

  3. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C of... - Medical Surveillance Guidelines for Benzene

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... principal effects of benzene exposure addressed in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, appendix A, are pathological... specified in 46 CFR 197.560 is designed to observe, on a regular basis, blood indices for early signs of... required in 46 CFR 197.560. There are special provisions for medical tests in the event of...

  4. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C of... - Medical Surveillance Guidelines for Benzene

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... principal effects of benzene exposure addressed in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, appendix A, are pathological... specified in 46 CFR 197.560 is designed to observe, on a regular basis, blood indices for early signs of... required in 46 CFR 197.560. There are special provisions for medical tests in the event of...

  5. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C to... - Medical Surveillance Guidelines for Benzene

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... principal effects of benzene exposure addressed in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, appendix A, are pathological... specified in 46 CFR 197.560 is designed to observe, on a regular basis, blood indices for early signs of... required in 46 CFR 197.560. There are special provisions for medical tests in the event of...

  6. 46 CFR Appendix C to Subpart C to... - Medical Surveillance Guidelines for Benzene

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... principal effects of benzene exposure addressed in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, appendix A, are pathological... specified in 46 CFR 197.560 is designed to observe, on a regular basis, blood indices for early signs of... required in 46 CFR 197.560. There are special provisions for medical tests in the event of...

  7. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Part 220 - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... medically determinable impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a... his or her maximum sustained work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work... at the various functional levels (sedentary, light, medium, heavy, and very heavy) as supported...

  8. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Part 220 - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... medically determinable impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a... his or her maximum sustained work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work... at the various functional levels (sedentary, light, medium, heavy, and very heavy) as supported...

  9. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Subpart P of... - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Subpart P of Part 404 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a result of severe medically... work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work) in evaluating the...

  10. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Subpart P of... - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Subpart P of Part 404 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a result of severe medically... work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work) in evaluating the...

  11. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Subpart P of... - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Subpart P of Part 404 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a result of severe medically... work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work) in evaluating the...

  12. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Part 220 - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... medically determinable impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a... his or her maximum sustained work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work... at the various functional levels (sedentary, light, medium, heavy, and very heavy) as supported...

  13. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Subpart P of... - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Subpart P of Part 404 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a result of severe medically... work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work) in evaluating the...

  14. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Subpart P of... - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Subpart P of Part 404 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... impairment(s). 203.00Maximum sustained work capability limited to medium work as a result of severe medically... work capability for sedentary, light, medium, heavy, or very heavy work) in evaluating the...

  15. 20 CFR Appendix 2 to Part 220 - Medical-Vocational Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... severe medically determinable physical or mental impairment(s) is not engaging in substantial gainful... degree to which the individual retains the capacity for sustained performance of the physical-mental... tolerate some physical feature(s) of work settings that occur in certain industries or types of work,...

  16. Medical Individualism or Medical Familism? A Critical Analysis of China's New Guidelines for Informed Consent: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Bian, Lin

    2015-08-01

    Modern Western medical individualism has had a significant impact on health care in China. This essay demonstrates the ways in which such Western-style individualism has been explicitly endorsed in China's 2010 directive: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record. The Norms require that the patient himself, rather than a member of his family, sign each informed consent form. This change in clinical practice indicates a shift toward medical individualism in Chinese healthcare legislation. Such individualism, however, is incompatible with the character of Chinese familism that is deeply rooted in the Chinese ethical tradition. It also contradicts family-based patterns of health care in China. Moreover, the requirement for individual informed consent is incompatible with numerous medical regulations promulgated in the past two decades. This essay argues that while Chinese medical legislation should learn from relevant Western ideas, it should not simply copy such practices by importing medical individualism into Chinese health care. Chinese healthcare policy is properly based on Chinese medical familist resources. PMID:26070661

  17. Massage, Music and Art Therapy in Hospice: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dain, Aleksandra S.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Hurzeler, Rosemary; Aldridge, Melissa D.

    2015-01-01

    Context Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provides clinical benefits to hospice patients, including decreased pain and improved quality of life. Yet little is known about the extent to which U.S. hospices employ CAM therapists. Objectives To report the most recent national data regarding the inclusion of art, massage, and music therapists on hospice interdisciplinary teams and how CAM therapist staffing varies by hospice characteristics. Methods A national cross-sectional survey of a random sample of hospices (n=591; 84% response rate) from September 2008 to November 2009. Results Twenty-nine percent of hospices (169 of 591) reported employing an art, massage, or music therapist. Of those hospices, 74% employed a massage therapist, 53% a music therapist, and 22% an art therapist, and 42% expected the therapist to attend interdisciplinary staff meetings, indicating a significant role for these therapists on the patient’s care team. In adjusted analyses, larger hospices compared with smaller hospices had significantly higher odds of employing a CAM therapist (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 6.38, 95% CI 3.40, 11.99) and forprofit hospices had lower odds of employing a CAM therapist compared with nonprofit hospices (AOR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.32, 0.85). Forty-four percent of hospices in the Mountain/Pacific region reported employing a CAM therapist versus 17% in the South Central region. Conclusion Less than one-third of U.S. hospices employ art, massage, or music therapists despite the benefits these services may provide to patients and families. A higher proportion of large hospices, nonprofit hospices and hospices in the Mountain/Pacific region employ CAM therapists, indicating differential access to these important services. PMID:25555445

  18. Treatment of Lower Back Pain-The Gap between Guideline-Based Treatment and Medical Care Reality.

    PubMed

    Werber, Andreas; Schiltenwolf, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that unspecific low back pain is of important impact in general health care, this pain condition is often treated insufficiently. Poor efficiency has led to the necessity of guidelines addressing evidence-based strategies for treatment of lower back pain (LBP). We present some statements of the German medical care reality. Self-responsible action of the patient should be supported while invasive methods in particular should be avoided due to lacking evidence in outcome efficiency. However, it has to be stated that no effective implementation strategy has been established yet. Especially, studies on the economic impact of different implementation strategies are lacking. A lack of awareness of common available guidelines and an uneven distribution of existing knowledge throughout the population can be stated: persons with higher risk suffering from LBP by higher professional demands and lower educational level are not skilled in advised management of LBP. Both diagnostic imaging and invasive treatment methods increased dramatically leading to increased costs and doctor workload without being associated with improved patient functioning, severity of pain or overall health status due to the absence of a functioning primary care gate keeping system for patient selection. Opioids are prescribed on a grand scale and over a long period. Moreover, opioid prescription is not indicated properly, when predominantly persons with psychological distress like somatoform disorders are treated with opioids. PMID:27417632

  19. A New Disability Rating Method according to the Job Using the Korean Academy of Medical Science Disability Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jay-young; Kwon, Young-Jun; Kim, Yongkyu; Rhie, Jeong-Bae; Jeong, In-Chul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a disability rating scale according to job classification using the Korean Academy of Medical Society (KAMS) guidelines. All jobs were categorized based on their level of physical activity and professional skills. The KAMS guidelines were used for the impairment rating. We modified the California Schedule for rating permanent disabilities. The differences were plotted to compare between the impairment rate and the job-adjusted disability rate. The KAMS job-adjusted disability rates were then compared to the McBride and workers' compensation rates. A total of 1,206 occupations were classified into 44 groups. The occupational disability indexes were rated on a scale of 1 to 7. The differences in the McBride disability rates varied inconsistently from 0% to 35%, while the differences in the KAMS disability rates were between 0% and 18%. The KAMS disability rates were slightly higher than the McBride disability rates for the upper extremities, but were lower for the lower extremities and internal organs. This is the first Korean job-adjusted disability rating method. There are several limitations, but its impairment rating is more scientific and reflects the current Korean occupational environment. PMID:23255842

  20. Developing competencies for pediatric hospice and palliative medicine.

    PubMed

    Klick, Jeffrey C; Friebert, Sarah; Hutton, Nancy; Osenga, Kaci; Pituch, Kenneth J; Vesel, Tamara; Weidner, Norbert; Block, Susan D; Morrison, Laura J

    2014-12-01

    In 2006, hospice and palliative medicine (HPM) became an officially recognized subspecialty. This designation helped initiate the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education Outcomes Project in HPM. As part of this process, a group of expert clinician-educators in HPM defined the initial competency-based outcomes for HPM fellows (General HPM Competencies). Concurrently, these experts recognized and acknowledged that additional expertise in pediatric HPM would ensure that the competencies for pediatric HPM were optimally represented. To fill this gap, a group of pediatric HPM experts used a product development method to define specific Pediatric HPM Competencies. This article describes the development process. With the ongoing evolution of HPM, these competencies will evolve. As part of the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education uses milestones as a framework to better define competency-based, measurable outcomes for trainees. Currently, there are no milestones specific to HPM, although the field is designing curricular milestones with multispecialty involvement, including pediatrics. These competencies are the conceptual framework for the pediatric content in the HPM milestones. They are specific to the pediatric HPM subspecialist and should be integrated into the training of pediatric HPM subspecialists. They will serve a foundational role in HPM and should inform a wide range of emerging innovations, including the next evolution of HPM Competencies, development of HPM curricular milestones, and training of adult HPM and other pediatric subspecialists. They may also inform pediatric HPM outcome measures, as well as standards of practice and performance for pediatric HPM interdisciplinary teams. PMID:25404726

  1. 3 CFR 8594 - Proclamation 8594 of October 29, 2010. National Hospice Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provide tailored support to meet the needs of these heroes. The Affordable Care Act signed into law this... receive hospice care before first discontinuing treatments to cure their disease. The Affordable Care Act... Proclamation During National Hospice Month, we recognize the dignity hospice care can provide to patients...

  2. 42 CFR 418.400 - Individual liability for coinsurance for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care. 418.400 Section 418.400 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Coinsurance § 418.400 Individual liability for coinsurance for hospice care. An individual who has filed an election for hospice care...

  3. 42 CFR 418.400 - Individual liability for coinsurance for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care. 418.400 Section 418.400 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Coinsurance § 418.400 Individual liability for coinsurance for hospice care. An individual who has filed an election for hospice care...

  4. Guide for Trainers. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dottie C.; Grady, Kathleen A.

    This monograph, the second in a series of five, provides information for trainers on interdisciplinary team training and humanistic patient care in hospices. Designed to help outside trainers who may be invited by a hospice to conduct its training, the materials help instructors to understand the nature of hospices, to determine whether or not the…

  5. Social Workers' Participation in the Resolution of Ethical Dilemmas in Hospice Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csikai, Ellen L.

    2004-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas are inherent in every health care setting. A sample of hospice social workers with no direct access to a hospice ethics committee (N = 110) was surveyed regarding ethical issues in hospice care, how the issues were managed, and the extent to which social workers participated in resolution of ethical dilemmas. Common issues…

  6. 42 CFR 417.423 - Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. 417.423... Special rules: ESRD and hospice patients. (a) ESRD patients. (1) A Medicare beneficiary who has been... not disenroll the beneficiary except as provided in § 417.460. (b) Hospice patients. A...

  7. 42 CFR 418.402 - Individual liability for services that are not considered hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... considered hospice care. 418.402 Section 418.402 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Coinsurance § 418.402 Individual liability for services that are not considered hospice care. Medicare payment to the...

  8. 42 CFR 418.21 - Duration of hospice care coverage-Election periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duration of hospice care coverage-Election periods... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.21 Duration of hospice care coverage—Election periods. (a) Subject to the conditions set forth...

  9. Interpersonal Communication Instruction in the Non-Traditional Context: Teaching Communication Strategies in a Hospice Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fieweger, Margaret A.

    While many health care delivery systems are criticized for the dehumanizing way they treat patients, hospice care presents a refreshing alternative to health care for the terminally ill. Patients appropriate for hospice care are those with six months or less to live. Interpersonal communication education is an important component of hospice care…

  10. 75 FR 42943 - Medicare Program; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... new OMB standards that included CBSAs. In the FY 2006 hospice wage index final rule (70 FR 45130), we.... Specifically, in the Hospice Wage Index for FY 2010 Final Rule, published on August 6, 2009 (74 FR 39384), we... August 8, 1997 hospice wage index final rule (62 FR 42860), the pre-floor and pre-reclassified...

  11. Hospice management of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy: problems and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hicks, F; Corcoran, G

    1993-12-01

    In Britain, the specialty of palliative medicine continues to develop, encouraging the referral of patients early in the palliative phase of their illness. This had led to an increased number of patients receiving palliative chemotherapy and hospice care concurrently, posing special problems to the professionals involved. In this retrospective study, 52 patients were identified who received chemotherapy and hospice care simultaneously. Case notes were reviewed to reveal problems arising from sharing the duty of care. The poor quality of communication between professionals, perhaps reflecting a limited understanding of the various roles in patient care, we found to cause significant difficulties. The duration and discontinuation of cytotoxic therapy seems to be a particularly difficult matter. Hospice admission often signalled the end of this treatment. In a third of the patients, no decision was taken to stop chemotherapy despite the last dose being an average of just 1 week before death. The value of chemotherapy for patients who are too ill to return home is questioned. Seven patients were diagnosed as suffering from chemotherapy-induced sepsis and neutropenia either by hospice inpatient or home care teams, and were admitted to their acute centres accordingly. Most patients who died during the study period received terminal care in the hospice. Suggestions are made on improving professional education and communication, including the use of a 'chemotherapy card'. PMID:7505105

  12. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges

    PubMed Central

    Memon, M.A.; Shmalberg, J.; Adair, H.S.; Allweiler, S.; Bryan, J.N.; Cantwell, S.; Carr, E.; Chrisman, C.; Egger, C.M.; Greene, S.; Haussler, K.K.; Hershey, B.; Holyoak, G.R.; Johnson, M.; Jeune, S. Le; Looney, A.; McConnico, R.S.; Medina, C.; Morton, A.J.; Munsterman, A.; Nie, G.J.; Park, N.; Parsons-Doherty, M.; Perdrizet, J.A.; Peyton, J.L.; Raditic, D.; Ramirez, H.P.; Saik, J.; Robertson, S.; Sleeper, M.; Dyke, J. Van; Wakshlag, J.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  13. Medical care of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes: current guidelines and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Cyganek, Katarzyna; Klupa, Tomasz; Szopa, Magdalena; Katra, Barbara; Małecki, Maciej T

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of all types of diabetes mellitus is increasing worldwide. Diabetes is a common metabolic complication of pregnancy. For many years, pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes was associated with a particularly poor prognosis, and while this has changed dramatically over the last 2 decades, a lot has yet to be done. The continuous relationship between the maternal glucose level and the prevalence of pregnancy complications is well‑documented. The list of outcomes includes congenital malformations, stillbirths, neonatal mortality, macrosomia, hypoglycemia, and many others. Several new therapeutic and monitoring tools have become available over the recent years, for example, short- and long‑acting insulin analogs, personal pumps, and continuous glucose monitoring systems. Interestingly, pregnancy planning and preconception education proved to be particularly effective in improving glycemic control in type 1 diabetic women and achieving therapeutic goals recommended by clinical guidelines. This resulted in the reduction of some maternal and neonatal pregnancy outcomes reported from various populations, but despite this remarkable progress the prevalence of the most common complication, neonatal macrosomia, is still substantially higher than in the newborns of mothers without diabetes. The likely causes of this phenomenon are short episodes of hyperglycemia, particularly postprandial ones, liberal diet, maternal obesity, and substantial weight gain during pregnancy - these potential reasons should be addressed in clinical practice. In the future, new therapeutic devices, such as close‑loop insulin pumps, may help further improve the prognosis in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. PMID:23344642

  14. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges.

    PubMed

    Memon, M A; Shmalberg, J; Adair, H S; Allweiler, S; Bryan, J N; Cantwell, S; Carr, E; Chrisman, C; Egger, C M; Greene, S; Haussler, K K; Hershey, B; Holyoak, G R; Johnson, M; Jeune, S Le; Looney, A; McConnico, R S; Medina, C; Morton, A J; Munsterman, A; Nie, G J; Park, N; Parsons-Doherty, M; Perdrizet, J A; Peyton, J L; Raditic, D; Ramirez, H P; Saik, J; Robertson, S; Sleeper, M; Dyke, J Van; Wakshlag, J

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  15. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antifungal agents: guidelines from the British Society for Medical Mycology

    PubMed Central

    Ashbee, H. Ruth; Barnes, Rosemary A.; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Gorton, Rebecca; Hope, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The burden of human disease related to medically important fungal pathogens is substantial. An improved understanding of antifungal pharmacology and antifungal pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics has resulted in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) becoming a valuable adjunct to the routine administration of some antifungal agents. TDM may increase the probability of a successful outcome, prevent drug-related toxicity and potentially prevent the emergence of antifungal drug resistance. Much of the evidence that supports TDM is circumstantial. This document reviews the available literature and provides a series of recommendations for TDM of antifungal agents. PMID:24379304

  16. The Developmental Transition from Living with to Dying From Cancer: Hospice Decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Waldrop, Deborah; Meeker, Mary Ann; Kutner, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing utilization of hospice care, older adults with cancer enroll in hospice for shorter periods of time than those with other life-limiting illnesses. How older adults with cancer and their family members consider hospice is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare decision-making in late-stage cancer in people who enrolled in hospice with those who declined. Concepts from the Carroll and Johnson (1990) decision-making framework guided the development of a hospice decision-making model. The study design was exploratory-descriptive, cross-sectional and used a 2-group comparison. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected in the same interview. Open-ended questions were used to explore the illness trajectory and decision-making process. The interrelationships between functional ability, quality of life and social support with hospice decision-making were assessed using the Katz, QLQ-30 and Lubben Social Network Scales. Study participants included 42 older adults with cancer who had been offered hospice enrollment (24 non-hospice and 18 hospice) and 38 caregivers (15 non-hospice and 23 hospice); N=80. The decisional model illustrates that the Recognition of Advanced Cancer and Information and Communication Needs were experienced similarly by both groups. There was interaction between the decisional stages: Formulation of Awareness and Generation of Alternatives that informed the Evaluation of Hospice but these stages were different in the hospice and non-hospice groups. The hospice enrollment decision represents a critical developmental juncture which is accompanied by a transformed identity and substantive cognitive shift. Increased attention to the psychosocial and emotional issues that accompany this transition are important for quality end-of-life care. PMID:26176303

  17. The Developmental Transition From Living With to Dying From Cancer: Hospice Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Deborah; Meeker, Mary Ann; Kutner, Jean S

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing utilization of hospice care, older adults with cancer enroll in hospice for shorter periods of time than those with other life-limiting illnesses. How older adults with cancer and their family members consider hospice is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare decision making in late-stage cancer in people who enrolled in hospice with those who declined. Concepts from the Carroll and Johnson (1990) decision-making framework guided the development of a hospice decision-making model. The study design was exploratory-descriptive, cross-sectional, and used a two-group comparison. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected in the same interview. Open-ended questions were used to explore the illness trajectory and decision-making process. The interrelationships between functional ability, quality of life, and social support with hospice decision making were assessed using the Katz, QLQ-30, and Lubben Social Network Scales. Study participants included 42 older adults with cancer who had been offered hospice enrollment (24 non-hospice and 18 hospice) and 38 caregivers (15 non-hospice and 23 hospice); N = 80. The decisional model illustrates that the recognition of advanced cancer and information and communication needs were experienced similarly by both groups. There was interaction between the decisional stages: formulation of awareness and generation of alternatives that informed the evaluation of hospice but these stages were different in the hospice and non-hospice groups. The hospice enrollment decision represents a critical developmental juncture, which is accompanied by a transformed identity and substantive cognitive shift. Increased attention to the psychosocial and emotional issues that accompany this transition are important for quality end-of-life care. PMID:26176303

  18. Design and usability study of an iconic user interface to ease information retrieval of medical guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Griffon, Nicolas; Kerdelhué, Gaétan; Hamek, Saliha; Hassler, Sylvain; Boog, César; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Duclos, Catherine; Venot, Alain; Darmoni, Stéfan J

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Doc'CISMeF (DC) is a semantic search engine used to find resources in CISMeF-BP, a quality controlled health gateway, which gathers guidelines available on the internet in French. Visualization of Concepts in Medicine (VCM) is an iconic language that may ease information retrieval tasks. This study aimed to describe the creation and evaluation of an interface integrating VCM in DC in order to make this search engine much easier to use. Methods Focus groups were organized to suggest ways to enhance information retrieval tasks using VCM in DC. A VCM interface was created and improved using the ergonomic evaluation approach. 20 physicians were recruited to compare the VCM interface with the non-VCM one. Each evaluator answered two different clinical scenarios in each interface. The ability and time taken to select a relevant resource were recorded and compared. A usability analysis was performed using the System Usability Scale (SUS). Results The VCM interface contains a filter based on icons, and icons describing each resource according to focus group recommendations. Some ergonomic issues were resolved before evaluation. Use of VCM significantly increased the success of information retrieval tasks (OR=11; 95% CI 1.4 to 507). Nonetheless, it took significantly more time to find a relevant resource with VCM interface (101 vs 65 s; p=0.02). SUS revealed ‘good’ usability with an average score of 74/100. Conclusions VCM was successfully implemented in DC as an option. It increased the success rate of information retrieval tasks, despite requiring slightly more time, and was well accepted by end-users. PMID:24650636

  19. Medicare Program; FY 2016 Hospice Wage Index and Payment Rate Update and Hospice Quality Reporting Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    This final rule will update the hospice payment rates and the wage index for fiscal year (FY) 2016 (October 1, 2015 through September 30, 2016), including implementing the last year of the phase-out of the wage index budget neutrality adjustment factor (BNAF). Effective on January 1, 2016, this rule also finalizes our proposals to differentiate payments for routine home care (RHC) based on the beneficiary's length of stay and implement a service intensity add-on (SIA) payment for services provided in the last 7 days of a beneficiary's life, if certain criteria are met. In addition, this rule will implement changes to the aggregate cap calculation mandated by the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014 (IMPACT Act), align the cap accounting year for both the inpatient cap and the hospice aggregate cap with the federal fiscal year starting in FY 2017, make changes to the hospice quality reporting program, clarify a requirement for diagnosis reporting on the hospice claim, and discuss recent hospice payment reform research and analyses. PMID:26248391

  20. An examination of the effect of reimbursement and organizational structure on the allocation of hospice staff time.

    PubMed

    Mor, V; Schwartz, R; Laliberte, L; Hiris, J

    1985-01-01

    The unique needs of the terminally ill patient may require more planning and service coordination than those of the non-terminal patient. The hospice interdisciplinary team was a response to these additional needs. This paper examines the pattern of patient care and administrative activities of paid hospice staff by hospice organizational type and demonstration status in the National Hospice Study. Data gathered over a one year period revealed that demonstration hospices, in which all allowable costs were Medicare reimbursed, spent significantly more time in general and patient related administrative activities than non-demonstration hospices, which operated within existing Medicare cost limits. Staff in demonstration home care-based hospices reported significantly longer home visits than staff in non-demonstration hospices. In both groups, home care-based hospice visits were of longer duration than those home visits conducted by staff of hospital-based hospices. PMID:10300373

  1. In-patient hospice: A qualitative study with Portuguese patients, family and staff.

    PubMed

    Hilário, Ana Patrícia

    2016-05-27

    The present study aims to provide insights on the role of in-patient hospices, which are sometimes described as disconnecting spaces. Researchers complement participant observation with in-depth interviews with 10 hospice patients, 20 family members, and 20 members of hospice staff. The findings suggest that the hospice provides a space where patients could enjoy the company of their loved ones without concerns regarding the dying process. The study reveals that the hospice offers a proper alternative to the home setting even in countries characterized by a strong familialistic culture like Portugal. PMID:26765681

  2. Perceptions About Hospice From a Community-Based Pilot Study: Lessons and Findings

    PubMed Central

    Van Dussen, Daniel; Culler, Krystal L.; Cagle, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Research investigating the knowledge and attitudes of diverse older adults about hospice care and end-of-life issues is needed to expand service utilization. This pilot study explored an urban area’s perceptions and awareness of hospice through local churches. The sample consisted of 148 adults age 43 and older. Although recruitment efforts resulted in a relatively homogenous sample, findings suggest a lack of knowledge about whether hospice is covered by Medicare, Medicaid, or private insurance. Perceptions of the expense of hospice, however, were not associated with knowledge of coverage. Respondents generally agreed that hospice is important and would recommend its services for their family members. PMID:21208898

  3. Designing research with hospice and palliative care populations.

    PubMed

    Wohleber, Ashley M; McKitrick, Daniel S; Davis, Shawn E

    2012-08-01

    Research in palliative care and hospice populations is important for improving quality of care, quality of life, and provider understanding of individuals at the end of life. However, this research involves many potential challenges. This review seeks to inform and assist researchers targeting to design studies targeting hospice and palliative care patients by presenting a thorough review of the published literature. This review covers English-language articles published from 1990 through 2009 listed in the PsycInfo, Medline, or CINAHL research databases under relevant keywords. Articles on pediatric hospice were not included. Issues discussed include study design, informed consent, and recruitment for participants. Synthesized recommendations for researchers in these populations are presented. PMID:22104045

  4. Staff Efficiency Trends Among Pediatric Hospices, 2002-2011.

    PubMed

    Cozad, Melanie J; Lindley, Lisa C; Mixer, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    This study provided the first examination of staff efficiency trends among pediatric hospices. Although pediatric staff efficiency demonstrated large variability from 2002 to 2011, the general trend in efficiency from 2003 to 2010. The decline in efficiency means, on average, pediatric hospices had higher operating expenses and used more capacity, but greater amounts of these greater outputs as measured by visits per patient. The study also highlights the crucial role pediatric hospice nurse managers play in developing effective workforce strategies that allow for responsive changes to workload fluctuations. Due to the associations between efficiency, regulation, and growth, nurse leaders' abilities to develop effective strategies are more imperative than ever to ensure quality end-of-life care for children and their families. PMID:27265950

  5. Family Members' Experience With Hospice in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Gage, L Ashley; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker; Kruse, Robin; Lewis, Alexandra; Demiris, George

    2016-05-01

    Research has documented numerous benefits and challenges associated with receipt of hospice care in nursing homes; however, study of this partnership from the perspective of residents' family members has been limited. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore family members' experience with hospice services received in the nursing home setting. Researchers conducted a secondary data analysis of 175 family member interviews using a thematic analytic approach. Findings highlighted the critical role of communication in supporting residents and their family members. Care coordination, support and oversight, and role confusion also impacted family members' experience of hospice care in the nursing home. Efforts directed at enhancing communication and more clearly articulating the roles of members of the health care team are indicated. PMID:25422516

  6. Pain in Hospice Patients With Dementia: The Informal Caregiver Experience

    PubMed Central

    Tarter, Robin; Demiris, George; Pike, Kenneth; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker

    2016-01-01

    Introduction At the end of life, patients with dementia often experience high levels of pain due to complex interplay of disease processes and numerous barriers to symptom management. In the hospice setting, informal caregivers play an essential role in pain management. This study describes their experience managing pain in hospice patients with dementia. Methods We conducted a qualitative analysis of audio-recorded interviews with informal caregivers of hospice patients with dementia who had chosen pain as the challenge they wanted to work on within a problem-solving therapy intervention. Results The thematic analysis of sessions with 51 caregivers identified 4 themes: difficulty in communicating with patients, lack of consistent guidance from health-care professionals, perceived uncertainty about the etiology of pain, and secondary suffering. Discussion Our findings indicate the possible need for increased support for caregivers, including educational interventions targeting pain etiology and assessment, and improved communication with health-care professionals. PMID:27303062

  7. 20 CFR 416.969 - Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. 416.969 Section 416.969 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. The Dictionary of Occupational Titles...

  8. 20 CFR 416.969 - Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Listing of Medical-Vocational Guidelines in appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. 416.969 Section 416.969 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... appendix 2 of subpart P of part 404 of this chapter. The Dictionary of Occupational Titles...

  9. Venous thromboembolism and cancer: guidelines of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM).

    PubMed

    Mandalà, M; Falanga, A; Piccioli, A; Prandoni, P; Pogliani, E M; Labianca, R; Barni, S

    2006-09-01

    Thromboembolic complications represent one of the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Although several data have been published demonstrating the strong association between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE), there is poor perception, among oncologists, of the level of risk of thrombosis and of relevance of managing VTE in these patients. The Associazione Italiana di Oncologia Medica (AIOM) has provided some recommendations to direct clinical practice according to evidence-based data concerning cancer and VTE. In fact, we conducted an extensive literature review (1996-2005) to produce evidence-based recommendations to improve perceptions of the magnitude of this risk among Italian medical and surgical oncologists and alert on the new approaches to prophylaxis and treatment of VTE in cancer patients. Levels of evidence are given according to a five-point rating system, and similarly for each key recommendation a five-point rating system suggests if the evidence is strong and indicate that the benefits do, or do not, outweigh risks and burden. PMID:16837209

  10. Conflicts and conflict regulation in hospices: nurses' perspectives. Results of a qualitative study in three German hospices.

    PubMed

    Walker, Andreas; Breitsameter, Christof

    2013-11-01

    The present article considers conflicts and conflict regulation in hospices. The authors carried out a qualitative study in three hospices in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, to explore how conflicts arise and how conflict regulation proceeds. Hospice nurses should act according to a set of ethical codes, to mission statements of the institution and to professional standards of care. In practice the subjective interpretations of codes and/or models concerning questions of care are causes of conflicts among nurses, with doctors, patients and family members. The management has two choices to react to these conflicts. It can either tolerate the conflicts, as long as they do not disturb the daily routine. Or it can increase the degree of organisation by integrating the different viewpoints into its own program and/or by restructuring its organisational units. PMID:23264046

  11. Parenteral inotropic therapy in the home: an update for home care and hospice.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Margaret G; Carey, Lawrence

    2013-04-01

    This article provides an evidence-based overview of heart failure (HF), including its pathogenesis, staging, assessment, prognosis, and treatment with intravenous inotropic medications in the home. Inotropic infusions in the home setting require advanced care planning, symptom management, and knowledge about ambulatory pumps and devices. These medications can be safely used throughout the continuum of care as pediatric/adult bridges from transplant to hospice care. Nurses who recognize advanced HF symptomatology and use prognostic/risk-stratification models will be better prepared to facilitate this advanced care planning, thus supporting optimal treatment outcomes. The ultimate goal of care for heart failure therapy in the home is to integrate pharmacotherapeutic knowledge of treatment advances with comfort measures and to provide them to patients concurrently and in a seamless process. PMID:23549250

  12. A needs assessment: Fellowship Directors Forum of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Scott, Judy Opatik; Hughes, Lorraine

    2006-04-01

    The Fellowship Directors Forum, a special interest group of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM) initiated an assessment of the needs of directors of fellowship programs in the emerging specialty of hospice and palliative care. One major finding, which may contribute to understanding the needs of other new disciplines, is that directors come into this role with clinical and teaching experience, but lacking administrative, educational, and management skills perceived as necessary to success. A study team collected data from current and former fellowship directors across the United States using an online survey and telephone interviews. The survey was sent to 60 current and former directors, with a 60% response rate, and 16 randomly selected directors were interviewed. Results showed that directors believe development of an outcome-based standardized curriculum is vitally important to advancement of the field, and that this should be developed collaboratively through the Forum. Although directors were confident of their own clinical and teaching skills, directors identified a lack of adequate training and experience in several management and educational skill areas critical to running a successful fellowship program. The study team made several recommendations: develop models from parts of existing programs that can be incorporated into a standardized curriculum to meet Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements; provide workshops and toolkits for new directors to address the lack of management and educational skills; and establish new communication methods through more or longer forum meetings, a dedicated website, and an online discussion group. PMID:16629556

  13. After-hour home care service provided by a hospice in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tay, M H; Koo, W H; Huang, D T

    2002-03-01

    A home care Hospice programme was set up to provide care to the patients with advanced diseases and their families in Singapore. After office-hour, the service is managed by a doctor on weekdays, with the assistance of a nurse during daytime on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays. The doctor on-call made an average of 3.1 phone calls and 1.3 visits each weekday evening. Over the weekends and public holidays, there were a mean of 16.7 phone calls and 6 visits each day. More than half of the visits (50.3%) were made for certification of death. The commonest symptoms that prompted visits were dyspnoea (20%) and pain (12.2%). The busiest period during weekdays was between 6.00 pm and 11.00 pm, when our doctors did most of their visits. The workload of the hospice home care service is likely to increase and resources such as family health physicians can be explored to help to meet this increasing demand. This can be achieved through the provision of comprehensive training and easy accessibility to medical records which are kept with patients. PMID:14569717

  14. Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: Clinical and practical guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Rosella, Daniele; Papi, Piero; Giardino, Rita; Cicalini, Emauele; Piccoli, Luca; Pompa, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) is a severe adverse drug reaction, consisting of progressive bone destruction in the maxillofacial region of patients. ONJ can be caused by two pharmacological agents: Antiresorptive (including bisphosphonates (BPs) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand inhibitors) and antiangiogenic. MRONJ pathophysiology is not completely elucidated. There are several suggested hypothesis that could explain its unique localization to the jaws: Inflammation or infection, microtrauma, altered bone remodeling or over suppression of bone resorption, angiogenesis inhibition, soft tissue BPs toxicity, peculiar biofilm of the oral cavity, terminal vascularization of the mandible, suppression of immunity, or Vitamin D deficiency. Dental screening and adequate treatment are fundamental to reduce the risk of osteonecrosis in patients under antiresorptive or antiangiogenic therapy, or before initiating the administration. The treatment of MRONJ is generally difficult and the optimal therapy strategy is still to be established. For this reason, prevention is even more important. It is suggested that a multidisciplinary team approach including a dentist, an oncologist, and a maxillofacial surgeon to evaluate and decide the best therapy for the patient. The choice between a conservative treatment and surgery is not easy, and it should be made on a case by case basis. However, the initial approach should be as conservative as possible. The most important goals of treatment for patients with established MRONJ are primarily the control of infection, bone necrosis progression, and pain. The aim of this paper is to represent the current knowledge about MRONJ, its preventive measures and management strategies. PMID:27114946

  15. Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: Clinical and practical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Rosella, Daniele; Papi, Piero; Giardino, Rita; Cicalini, Emauele; Piccoli, Luca; Pompa, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) is a severe adverse drug reaction, consisting of progressive bone destruction in the maxillofacial region of patients. ONJ can be caused by two pharmacological agents: Antiresorptive (including bisphosphonates (BPs) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand inhibitors) and antiangiogenic. MRONJ pathophysiology is not completely elucidated. There are several suggested hypothesis that could explain its unique localization to the jaws: Inflammation or infection, microtrauma, altered bone remodeling or over suppression of bone resorption, angiogenesis inhibition, soft tissue BPs toxicity, peculiar biofilm of the oral cavity, terminal vascularization of the mandible, suppression of immunity, or Vitamin D deficiency. Dental screening and adequate treatment are fundamental to reduce the risk of osteonecrosis in patients under antiresorptive or antiangiogenic therapy, or before initiating the administration. The treatment of MRONJ is generally difficult and the optimal therapy strategy is still to be established. For this reason, prevention is even more important. It is suggested that a multidisciplinary team approach including a dentist, an oncologist, and a maxillofacial surgeon to evaluate and decide the best therapy for the patient. The choice between a conservative treatment and surgery is not easy, and it should be made on a case by case basis. However, the initial approach should be as conservative as possible. The most important goals of treatment for patients with established MRONJ are primarily the control of infection, bone necrosis progression, and pain. The aim of this paper is to represent the current knowledge about MRONJ, its preventive measures and management strategies. PMID:27114946

  16. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the use of epinephrine in outdoor education and wilderness settings: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Flavio G; Lemery, Jay; Johnson, David E

    2014-12-01

    The Epinephrine Roundtable took place on July 27, 2008, during the 25th Annual Meeting of the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) in Snowmass, CO. The WMS convened this roundtable to explore areas of consensus and uncertainty in the field treatment of anaphylaxis. Panelists were selected on the basis of their relevant academic or professional experience. There is a paucity of data that address the treatment of anaphylaxis in the wilderness. Anaphylaxis is a rare disease, with a sudden onset and drastic course that does not lend itself to study in randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, the panel endorsed the following position based on the limited available evidence and review of published articles, as well as expert consensus. The position represents the consensus of the panelists and is endorsed by the WMS. In 2014, the authors reviewed relevant articles published since the Epinephrine Roundtable. The following is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2010;21(4):185-187. PMID:25498258

  17. Art Therapy in Hospice: A Catalyst for Insight and Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safrai, Mary B.

    2013-01-01

    The reach of art therapy in assisting a hospice patient in confronting existential issues at the end of life is illustrated in this article with a case that took place over the course of 22 semiweekly sessions. Painting with an art therapist allowed the patient to shift from a state of anxiety and existential dread to a more accepting, fluid…

  18. 42 CFR 418.26 - Discharge from hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.26 Discharge... stabilize or otherwise change such that the patient cannot continue to be certified as terminally ill. (2... education, or other services before the patient is discharged because he or she is no longer terminally ill....

  19. Telehospice: reasons for slow adoption in home hospice care.

    PubMed

    Whitten, Pamela; Holtz, Bree; Meyer, Emily; Nazione, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    We investigated why hospice nurses were slow to adopt videophones to care for their patients. We used the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model and the organizational readiness for change (ORC) assessment via interviews and focus groups with hospice staff. Twenty-five hospice employees participated. Eighteen (72%) were in clinical positions and seven were in non-clinical positions (28%). Thirty-nine percent of respondents reported no videophone training, despite the fact that every employee had received training. Only four staff members actually used a videophone with patients. The respondents overwhelmingly stated that they had the organizational resources necessary to use the videophone and that it was easy to operate. Despite initial enthusiasm, leaders in the hospice agency did not endorse the videophones for work, nor offer incentives for using the videophones or providing them to patients. It is important to note that videophone technology is not meant to replace face-to-face visits, but to supplement them and to provide an additional tool for the nurses. PMID:19471030

  20. Stress Management Training for Hospice Personnel: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Susan; And Others

    There is very little published research specifically addressing the stress management skills of hospice caregivers. In order to ascertain if breathing exercises, biofeedback training, relaxation exercises, and cognitive therapy would be beneficial, pre- and post-treatment questionnaires and six 30-minute treatment sessions were administered to…

  1. 42 CFR 418.26 - Discharge from hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discharge from hospice care. 418.26 Section 418.26 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...) behavior is disruptive, abusive, or uncooperative to the extent that delivery of care to the patient or...

  2. 42 CFR 422.320 - Special rules for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for hospice care. 422.320 Section 422.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Payments to Medicare Advantage Organizations §...

  3. Methodological Research Priorities in Palliative Care and Hospice Quality Measurement.

    PubMed

    Dy, Sydney Morss; Herr, Keela; Bernacki, Rachelle E; Kamal, Arif H; Walling, Anne M; Ersek, Mary; Norton, Sally A

    2016-02-01

    Quality measurement is a critical tool for improving palliative care and hospice, but significant research is needed to improve the application of quality indicators. We defined methodological priorities for advancing the science of quality measurement in this field based on discussions of the Technical Advisory Panel of the Measuring What Matters consensus project of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association and a subsequent strategy meeting to better clarify research challenges, priorities, and quality measurement implementation strategies. In this article, we describe three key priorities: 1) defining the denominator(s) (or the population of interest) for palliative care quality indicators, 2) developing methods to measure quality from different data sources, and 3) conducting research to advance the development of patient/family-reported indicators. We then apply these concepts to the key quality domain of advance care planning and address relevance to implementation of indicators in improving care. Developing the science of quality measurement in these key areas of palliative care and hospice will facilitate improved quality measurement across all populations with serious illness and care for patients and families. PMID:26596877

  4. Hospice placement reminded me that nursing is about caring.

    PubMed

    Short, Camille

    2011-08-24

    I did not expect to learn much during my two weeks in the day hospice. Indeed, I was unsure what a nurse could do in such an environment. I had a vague impression that there would be arts and crafts, and people passing the time. PMID:27317072

  5. Assessment of Need for a Children's Hospice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Betty

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the development of Canuck Place, North America's first free-standing pediatric hospice of its kind, opened in British Columbia, Canada, in 1995. Discusses the process of assessing the need for Canuck Place. Data from traditional quantitative and less-traditional qualitative sources were used to document and develop an argument in support…

  6. Factors affecting satisfaction among community-based hospice volunteer visitors.

    PubMed

    Chevrier, F; Steuer, R; MacKenzie, J

    1994-01-01

    Trained volunteers are an essential component in the delivery of care to clients and families facing a terminal and/or life-threatening illness. As the need for hospice care increases, so does the need to increase the number of volunteers available for visiting. Hospice of London, which is a community based hospice, proposed that volunteers who felt satisfied would remain with the organization longer, thereby, decreasing the costs associated with training new volunteers and enhancing the ability of the agency to provide high-quality volunteer client matches. Accordingly, a survey was conducted in August 1992 to determine which factors were related to hospice volunteer satisfaction. One hundred and five volunteer were surveyed over the telephone. Results demonstrated a positive correlation between satisfaction and feeling like a team member, receiving feedback from staff, feeling valuable and having the volunteer's expectations match the position. Differences in the factors related to satisfaction were noted when the groups were divided by age and gender. PMID:7893559

  7. At the Eleventh Hour: Psychosocial Dynamics in Short Hospice Stays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, Deborah P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the psychosocial dynamics of short hospice stays (less than 2 weeks) of cancer patients age 65 and older. Design and Methods: In-depth interviews with 59 caregivers of 50 patients were audiotaped, transcribed, and coded by using Atlas ti software. Results: A descriptive typology is presented. A late diagnosis (n = 22…

  8. Hospice Eligibility and Election: Does Policy Prepare Us to Meet the Need?

    PubMed

    Wallace, Cara L

    2015-01-01

    A 7-point policy model is used to examine policy on hospice eligibility and election in the United States. Despite the growth of hospice, many eligible patients continue to lack access due to difficulties experienced by providers in discerning 6-month prognoses among chronically ill patients, the inability of patients to elect hospice alongside curative care, and limited reimbursement for hospice providers. Though the landscape of dying has evolved, with more deaths occurring later in life from chronic illness, Medicare hospice eligibility requirements have historically remained the same. Utilization would increase if hospice agencies were able to provide fewer restrictions by including ongoing treatments such as transfusions, intravenous nutrition, or palliative radiation. Hospices would be more likely to enroll critically ill patients who require some ongoing curative measures if Medicare reimbursement rates were higher, and patients would be more likely to seek hospice earlier if Medicare election policies were altered to allow concurrent care. Participation would also be increased by extending hospice eligibility past the traditional prognosis of 6 months. Though expansion in public spending of hospice care has been met with some opposition, current research suggests that potential savings due to decreased costs in acute care is promising. PMID:26161945

  9. Hospice care in the nursing home setting: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David G; Bramson, Jeffrey S

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. Medicare hospice benefit has expanded considerably into the nursing home (NH) setting in recent years. This literature review focuses on the provision of NH hospice, exploring its growth and the impact of such care on NH residents, cost and efficiency implications for NHs and government, and policy challenges and important areas for future research. Although hospice utilization is relatively modest among NH residents, its increased availability holds great promise. As an alternative to traditional NH care, hospice has been shown to provide high-quality end-of-life care and offer benefits, such as reduced hospitalizations and improved pain management. The provision of NH hospice also has been shown to have positive effects on nonhospice residents, suggesting indirect benefits on NH clinical practices. Importantly, the expansion of hospice in NHs brings challenges, on both clinical and policy dimensions. Research has shown that NH-hospice collaborations require effective communication around residents' changing care needs and that a range of barriers can impede the integration of hospice and NH care. Moreover, the changing case mix of hospice patients, including increased hospice use by individuals with conditions such as dementia, presents challenges to Medicare's hospice payment and eligibility policies. To date, there has been little research comparing hospice costs, service intensity, and quality of care across settings, reflecting the fact that few comparative data have been available to researchers. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services have taken steps toward collecting these data, and further research is needed to shed light on what refinements, if any, are necessary for the Medicare hospice program. PMID:19735904

  10. In the business of dying: questioning the commercialization of hospice.

    PubMed

    Perry, Joshua E; Stone, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    This article critically questions the commercialization of hospice care and the ethical concerns associated with the industry's movement toward "market-driven medicine" at the end of life. For example, the article examines issues raised by an influx of for-profit hospice providers whose business model appears at its core to have an ethical conflict of interest between shareholders doing well and terminal patients dying well. Yet, empirical data analyzing the experience of patients across the hospice industry are limited, and general claims that end-of-life patient care is inferior among for-profit providers or even that their business practices are somehow unseemly when compared to nonprofit providers cannot be substantiated. In fact, non-profit providers are not immune to potentially conflicting concerns regarding financial viability (i.e., "no margin, no mission"). Given the limitations of existing empirical data and contrasting ideological commitments of for-profit versus non-profit providers, the questions raised by this article highlight important areas for reflection and further study. Policymakers and regulators are cautioned to keep ethical concerns in the fore as an increasingly commercialized hospice industry continues to emerge as a dominant component of the U.S. health care system. Both practitioners and researchers are encouraged to expand their efforts to better understand how business practices and commercial interests may compromise the death process of the patient and patient's family--a process premised upon a philosophy and ethical tradition that earlier generations of hospice providers and proponents established as a trusted, end-of-life alternative. PMID:21561517

  11. American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) National Practice Guideline for the Use of Medications in the Treatment of Addiction Involving Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Kampman, Kyle; Jarvis, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control have recently described opioid use and resultant deaths as an epidemic. At this point in time, treating this disease well with medication requires skill and time that are not generally available to primary care doctors in most practice models. Suboptimal treatment has likely contributed to expansion of the epidemic and concerns for unethical practices. At the same time, access to competent treatment is profoundly restricted because few physicians are willing and able to provide it. This “Practice Guideline” was developed to assist in the evaluation and treatment of opioid use disorder, and in the hope that, using this tool, more physicians will be able to provide effective treatment. Although there are existing guidelines for the treatment of opioid use disorder, none have included all of the medications used at present for its treatment. Moreover, few of the existing guidelines address the needs of special populations such as pregnant women, individuals with co-occurring psychiatric disorders, individuals with pain, adolescents, or individuals involved in the criminal justice system. This Practice Guideline was developed using the RAND Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method (RAM) – a process that combines scientific evidence and clinical knowledge to determine the appropriateness of a set of clinical procedures. The RAM is a deliberate approach encompassing review of existing guidelines, literature reviews, appropriateness ratings, necessity reviews, and document development. For this project, American Society of Addiction Medicine selected an independent committee to oversee guideline development and to assist in writing. American Society of Addiction Medicine's Quality Improvement Council oversaw the selection process for the independent development committee. Recommendations included in the guideline encompass a broad range of topics, starting with the initial evaluation of

  12. Geographic access to hospice care for children with cancer in Tennessee, 2009 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Lisa C; Edwards, Sheri L

    2015-12-01

    The geographic interface between the need for and the supply of pediatric hospice may be critical in whether children with cancer access care. This study sought to describe the geographic distribution of pediatric hospice need and supply and identify areas lacking pediatric hospice care in Tennessee over a 3-year time period. Using ArcGIS, a series of maps were created. There was a consistent need for care among children with cancer across the state. Most urban areas were supplied by pediatric hospices, except the Knoxville area. Areas within the state were identified where the supply of pediatric hospice care declined, while the need for hospice care was unchanging. This study has important regulatory implications for clinicians practicing in certificate of need states such as Tennessee. PMID:25028742

  13. Ethical considerations in the treatment of pain in a hospice environment.

    PubMed

    Zylicz, Z

    2000-08-01

    Most people treated in hospices suffer from pain. The hospice environment offers them a place where they may feel safe and get rest before they die. This particular environment was originally created to solve the many problems terminal patients encountered in busy modern hospitals. However, it is clear that solving some problems frequently means creating new ones. For people who are about to complete their life's journey, a hospice is a place of care and autonomy. Previous losses and severe spiritual distress complicate most of the severe pain conditions seen in hospices. In this paper, some specific ethical problems encountered in hospice practice will be discussed. Patients' autonomy with all its advantages and disadvantages will be highlighted. Acceptance of death may result in an active and creative attitude. Although scientific evidence of the processes taking place is still lacking, the modern hospice may be seen as a complementary, main-stream institution contributing to the development of whole medicine. PMID:10900366

  14. Hospice Nurse Communication with Patients with Cancer and their Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F.; Berry, Patricia; Mooney, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Effective communication by hospice nurses enhances symptom management for the patient, reduces family caregiver burden and distress, and potentially improves bereavement adjustment. However, research has not kept pace with the rising use of hospice by patients with cancer and thus we know little about how hospice nurses communicate. Methods The overriding objective of this pilot study was to provide insight into these in-home visits. Hospice nurses audiorecorded their interactions over time with family caregivers and patients with cancer. The communication within these tapes was coded using Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) and analyzed. Results We found that tape recording home hospice nurse visits was feasible. RIAS was suited to capture the general content and process of the home hospice encounter and the coded interactions show the range of topics and emotions that are evident in the dialogue. Implications and future directions for research are discussed. PMID:22339285

  15. Settings of Care within Hospice: New Options and Questions about Dying “At Home”

    PubMed Central

    Lysaght, Susan; Ersek, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Although place of death has been routinely studied in end-of-life (EOL) care, more analysis on place of death within hospice is needed because of the recent, dramatic rise in the number of hospice patients dying in inpatient settings. Using a case study to illustrate the complexity of determinants of place of death within hospice, this article highlights important known factors and elucidate gaps for further research. Individual and system level factors, sociocultural meanings, caregiving and preferences are shown to have important implications. Additionally, the unique components of home hospice, inpatient hospice and transitions between these settings may have a fundamental role in the future of quality EOL care. Further research on determinants of hospice settings of care is essential to the care of older adults at the end of life. PMID:23853526

  16. Same Agency, Different Teams: Perspectives From Home and Inpatient Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Susan Lysaght; Barg, Frances K.; Strumpf, Neville; Ersek, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Tremendous growth in hospice over the past 30 years in the United States has increased the number of terminally ill patients dying at home. Recently, however, more hospice patients are dying at inpatient facilities. To understand the varying perceptions about care in the home and inpatient hospice, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 interdisciplinary team (IDT) members and analyzed the data using the constant comparative method. Core interdisciplinary tasks, including identifying the focus of energy, tailoring family caregiver involvement, acknowledging who is in charge, and knowing both sides differed in the home and inpatient settings. Despite the overarching umbrella of hospice care, home and inpatient hospice settings create different foci for IDT members, burdens and privileges for family caregivers, and control of the care plan. Key differences between home and inpatient hospice processes of care highlight the complexity of patient-centered end-of-life care in the United States. PMID:25294344

  17. Is there congruence in hospice nurses' view of their patients' quality of life and their hospice patients' view of their own quality of life?

    PubMed

    Mueller-Marquez, B J

    1993-01-01

    Since the development of the hospice movement in the United States, care of the terminally ill has undergone vital change. This change involves the alternative of home care for the terminally ill. It allows the patients, the primary caregiver, and the rest of the family to be in control of care. As stated by Masters, hospice is unique in that the patient and family controls the environment, and lifestyle, including treatment modalities, more than in any other concept in health care. Hospice was developed to give people with a terminal illness an option to traditional medicine. Hospice is a concept of care that has been established to improve the quality of life of the terminally ill. Therefore, the ultimate goal of hospice care is to enhance the quality of life of patients with terminal illness, mainly cancer. In the hospice setting, the nurse applies a holistic approach when planning and providing primary care. The nurse becomes increasingly more knowledgeable about the problems and strengths of the patient and family to whom he/she is caring for. The nurse must make the transition in her philosophy from cure-to-care in hospice, and symptom control being the nurses' priority in order to enhance the patients quality of life. Curtis and Fernsler explain that hospice care focuses on helping patients to communicate effectively and to share life agendas with their primary caregiver and the hospice nurse. These researchers continue to state that these efforts promote congruence between patient, primary caregiver, and the hospice nurses' view of the patients quality of life.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8398476

  18. Korean Guideline Development for the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment of the Spine: Proposal by the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences Committee

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Baeg; Park, Chan-Woo; Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Youn-Kwan; Sung, Nak-Jung; Ahn, Sang-Ho; Ahn, Jae-Sung; Shin, Hee-Suk; Lee, Bum-Suk; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Jeon, Chang-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The criteria for the evaluation of spinal impairment are diverse, complex, and have no standardized form. This makes it difficult and somewhat troublesome to accurately evaluate spinal impairment patients. A standardized guideline was studied for the evaluation of spinal impairment, based on the American Medical Association (AMA) Guides and the McBride method. This guideline proposal was developed by specialty medical societies under the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences. In this study, the grades of impairment were assessed by dividing patients into three different categories: spinal cord impairment, spinal injury impairment and spinal disorder impairment. The affected regions of the spine are divided into three: the cervical region, the thoracic region, and the lumbosacral region. The grade of impairment was differentially evaluated according to the affected region. The restricted range of motion was excluded in the evaluation spinal impairment because of low objectivity. Even though the new Korean guideline for the evaluation of spinal impairment has been proposed, it should be continuously supplemented and revised. PMID:19503688

  19. Medical Education and the Pharmaceutical Industry: A Review of Ethical Guidelines and Their Implications for Psychiatric Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geppert, Cynthia M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article reviews and summarizes eight ethical guidelines of major professional organizations regarding the pharmaceutical industry's role in the psychiatric education of trainees. Method: The author conducted a literature review of research and guidelines pertaining to the pharmaceutical industry's relationship to trainees, with…

  20. Hospice Use Following Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation in Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Parzynski, Craig S.; Spertus, John A.; Mor, Vincent; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Older recipients of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are at increased risk for short-term mortality in comparison with younger patients. Although hospice use is common among decedents aged >65, its use among older ICD recipients is unknown. Methods and Results— Medicare patients aged >65 matched to data in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry – ICD Registry from January 1, 2006 to March 31, 2010 were eligible for analysis (N=194 969). The proportion of ICD recipients enrolled in hospice, cumulative incidence of hospice admission, and factors associated with time to hospice enrollment were evaluated. Five years after device implantation, 50.9% of patients were either deceased or in hospice. Among decedents, 36.8% received hospice services. The cumulative incidence of hospice enrollment, accounting for the competing risk of death, was 4.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6%–4.8%) within 1 year and 21.3% (95% CI, 20.7%–21.8%) at 5 years. Factors most strongly associated with shorter time to hospice enrollment were older age (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.73–1.81), class IV heart failure (versus class I; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.66–1.94); ejection fraction <20 (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.48–1.67), and greater hospice use among decedents in the patients’ health referral region. Conclusions— More than one-third of older patients dying with ICDs receive hospice care. Five years after implantation, half of older ICD recipients are either dead or in hospice. Hospice providers should be prepared for ICD patients, whose clinical trajectories and broader palliative care needs require greater focus. PMID:27016104

  1. 76 FR 26731 - Medicare Program; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... methodology. In the April 24, 2009 ``Hospice Wage Index For FY 2010'' proposed rule (74 FR 18,912, 18,920-22) and in the July 22, 2010 ``Hospice Wage Index for FY 2011'' notice with comment period (75 FR 42,944... supplies. 42 U.S.C. 1395x(dd)(1); see also 48 FR 56,008, 56,008 (Dec. 16, 1983) (describing hospice...

  2. The association between hospice use and depressive symptoms in surviving spouses

    PubMed Central

    Ornstein, Katherine A.; Aldridge, Melissa D.; Garrido, Melissa M.; Gorges, Rebecca; Meier, Diane E.; Kelley, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Family caregivers of individuals with serious illness are at risk for depressive symptoms and depression. Hospice includes the provision of support services for family caregivers, yet evidence is limited regarding the impact of hospice use on depressive symptoms among surviving caregivers. Objective To determine the association between hospice use and depressive symptoms in surviving spouses. Design We linked data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative longitudinal survey of community dwelling U.S. adults 50 years of age and older to Medicare claims. With propensity score matching on both decedent and spousal characteristics, we compared the spouses of individuals enrolled in hospice prior to death to the spouses of individuals who did not use hospice. Setting National study of decedents and surviving spouses. Participants Propensity score matched sample of 1016 HRS decedents with at least one serious illness and their surviving spouses interviewed 2002–2010. Exposure(s) for observational studies Hospice enrollment for at least 3 days in the year prior to death. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) Spousal depressive symptom scores measured 0–2 years post-death with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), which is scored 0 (no symptoms) to 8 (severe symptoms). Results Of the decedents in the matched sample, 305 (30.0%) used hospice services for >= 3 days in the year prior to death. Of the spouses, 52% had more depressive symptoms over time (mean change = 2.56; S.D = 1.65), with no difference related to hospice use. A minority, (28.2%) of spouses of hospice users had improved CES-D scores, compared to 21.7% of spouses of decedents who did not use hospice (p=0.06). Among the spouses who were the primary caregivers (n-662), 27.3% of spouses of hospice users had improved CES-D scores, compared to 20.7% of spouses of decedents who did not use hospice (p=0.10); in multivariate analysis, the odds ratio for

  3. Hospice care for patients living alone: results of a demonstration program.

    PubMed

    Bly, J L; Kissick, P

    1994-01-01

    The Wissahickon Hospice initiated a demonstration program in 1988 to provide home hospice care to individuals living at home without primary care persons. This paper describes the planning process and admission requirements for the Live Alone Program and the evaluation results for 34 Live Alone patients compared to 105 regular hospice patients. Principal findings were that the hospice was able to maintain patients at home, to provide care safely to patients, and to enable home deaths for patients living alone. Patients living alone tended to require more supportive services than regular patients and to incur higher patient care costs. PMID:7829035

  4. Psychosocial and spiritual care in hospice: differences between nursing, social work, and clergy.

    PubMed

    Reese, D J; Brown, D R

    1997-01-01

    A chart review of the most recent home visits from nursing, social work, and clergy to 37 home hospice patients indicated that all but two psychosocial and spiritual issues examined were addressed by hospice staff on home visits. Spirituality and, secondly, death anxiety were the most frequently discussed variables. Clergy addressed more spiritual issues than the other two professions, and social work addressed more psychosocial issues than the other two professions. These findings underscore the important roles that clergy and social work play on the hospice team, and imply that hospice should make a renewed commitment to psychosocial and spiritual care. PMID:9248405

  5. Influence of hospice use on hospital inpatient mortality: a state-level analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cyril F; Steinberg, Stephanie C

    2006-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that high hospice enrollment is associated with lower Medicare inpatient mortality. The results show that Medicare inpatient mortality in a state can be explained by hospice enrollment and a host of demographic and market environment variables. An increase in hospice population by 100 individuals is associated with a reduction of 28 inpatient deaths, ceteris paribus. The results suggest, among other things, that opportunities exist for greater expansion of hospice capacity in low-use states to reduce deaths in the expensive hospital setting and improve the quality of end-of-life care for terminally ill patients. PMID:16708687

  6. Compounded drugs of value in outpatient hospice and palliative care practice.

    PubMed

    McNulty, John P; Muller, George

    2014-01-01

    A compounded preparation is needed when no commercially manufactured medication is available to adequately address a patient's medical needs. Among the greatest therapeutic challenges faced by both patients and caregivers is the treatment required by individuals who have a terminal condition. It is difficult to find evidence-based studies on the management of end-of-life situations because each patient's medical case is unique. In addition, maintaining a controlled environment for such patients is difficult. End-of-life care is multifaceted; it does not lend itself to "cookbook medicine," and people with a terminal illness are among the most vulnerable patients in need of effective and compassionate care. When those patients suffer in spite of commercially available therapies, the innovation and experience of clinicians and compounding pharmacists can often yield a solution to the most challenging treatment problems. In this article, we discuss some of the most often prescribed compounds used in outpatient hospice and palliative care to treat common conditions (wounds, pain and dyspnea, intractable cough, nausea and vomiting, depression, bladder infections caused by an indwelling catheter, rectal pain). The effectiveness of the preparations we describe is substantiated in the medical literature and by our personal experience, which together encompasses nearly 100 years of clinical practice. The medications described in this report have been shown over time to be effective. Formulations for the preparations presented in this article are provided on the International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding website at www.ijpc.com/webcontent. PMID:25306765

  7. Essential Elements of an Effective Prison Hospice Program.

    PubMed

    Cloyes, Kristin G; Rosenkranz, Susan J; Berry, Patricia H; Supiano, Katherine P; Routt, Meghan; Shannon-Dorcy, Kathleen; Llanque, Sarah M

    2016-05-01

    As the number of prison inmates facing end-stage chronic illness grows, more prisons across the U.S. must address the need for end-of-life care. Many will likely need to develop a plan with potentially limited resources and external support. This case study presents one long-running model of care, the Louisiana State Penitentiary Prison Hospice Program. Based on field observations and in-depth interviews with hospice staff, inmate volunteers and corrections officers, we identify five essential elements that have contributed to the long-term operation of this program: patient-centered care, an inmate volunteer model, safety and security, shared values, and teamwork. We describe key characteristics of each of these elements, discuss how they align with earlier recommendations and research, and show how their integration supports a sustained model of prison end-of-life care. PMID:25735806

  8. Essential Elements of an Effective and Sustainable Prison Hospice Program

    PubMed Central

    Cloyes, Kristin G.; Rosenkranz, Susan J.; Berry, Patricia H.; Supiano, Katherine P.; Routt, Meghan; Shannon-Dorcy, Kathleen; Llanque, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    As the number of prison inmates facing end-stage chronic illness grows, more prisons across the U.S. must address the need for end-of-life care. Many will likely need to develop a plan with potentially limited resources and external support. This case study presents one long-running model of care, the Louisiana State Penitentiary Prison Hospice Program. Based on field observations and in-depth interviews with hospice staff, inmate volunteers and corrections officers, we identify five essential elements that have contributed to the long-term operation of this program: patient-centered care, an inmate volunteer model, safety and security, shared values, and teamwork. We describe key characteristics of each of these elements, discuss how they align with earlier recommendations and research, and show how their integration supports a sustained model of prison end-of-life care. PMID:25735806

  9. Caregivers' experiences seeking hospice care for loved ones with dementia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Laura Foran

    2014-09-01

    As the prevalence of dementia continues to grow, informal caregivers face unique challenges as they approach the end of life, and access to support and palliative care is often limited. I used a phenomenological approach to explore the experiences of caregivers actively seeking formal end-of-life care, in particular hospice care, for a loved one with dementia. In-depth interviews with 11 caregivers about 14 patients revealed five themes, including: setting the stage for heartbreak, reaching the boiling point, getting through the front lines, settling for less, and welcoming death. Nurses must recognize the complex needs of caregivers, educate caregivers on the disease process, and adjust to palliative goals sooner to meet the needs of caregivers. Prevalence of these issues must be further examined through quantitative study to evaluate the need to reconsider current hospice eligibility criteria based on prognosis. PMID:25079503

  10. Qualitative pain classification in hospice and pain therapy unit.

    PubMed

    Raffaeli, William; Andruccioli, Jessica; Florindi, Stefania; Ferioli, Isabella; Monterubbianesi, Maria Cristina; Sarti, Donatella; Castellani, Francesca; Giarelli, Guido

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigated patient's meaning attribution to pain in hospice and pain therapy unit, using a qualitative approach: narrative-based medicine. The data presented here were related to patients (n = 17) hospitalized in Rimini Hospice (Italy). These data were compared to those of patients (n = 21) with noncancer pain (control sample). The interviews were then analyzed according to the technique of thematic narrative analysis. The results of our research identified a differential process in pain processing in relationship to the meaning that the patient attributed to pain. The thematic analysis of the interviews allowed the inductive construction of a specific network of pain dimensions, which were summarized in "the pain chronogram." PMID:22310024

  11. A Review of Barriers to Utilization of the Medicare Hospice Benefits in Urban Populations and Strategies for Enhanced Access

    PubMed Central

    McHenry, Janet; Snow, Daniel; Cassin, Carolyn; Schumacher, Donald; Selwyn, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Disparities in access to health care extend to end-of-life care. Lack of access to hospice mirrors lack of access to health maintenance and primary care. Patients who are served by hospice nationally are disproportionately white and likely to reside in economically stable communities. In many urban low-income communities, less than 5% of decedents receive hospice care in the last 6 months of life. This review focuses on barriers to palliative care and hospice in urban, predominantly low-income communities, including cultural and reimbursement factors and the paucity of hospice providers, outreach projects, and in-patient hospice beds in urban communities. This review will also address some strategies that are being implemented by hospices locally and nationally to overcome demographic barriers to hospice care. PMID:18240022

  12. Dignity Therapy Implementation in a Community-Based Hospice Setting

    PubMed Central

    Montross, Lori; Winters, Kathryn D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Dignity Therapy is a brief, empirically supported, individualized psychotherapy designed to address legacy needs among patients at the end of life. To date, this psychotherapy has not been implemented in a “real-world” community-based hospice setting. This study was designed to offer information about the pragmatic aspects of implementing Dignity Therapy for patients receiving hospice care. Method Twenty-seven patients completed Dignity Therapy as part of a clinical service newly offered at a community-based hospice. Referral and enrollment procedures, as well as the logistics of therapy implementation were monitored. Patients' legacy transcripts were also qualitatively analyzed to measure emergent themes. Results Patients were most commonly referred by social workers, and on average produced Dignity Therapy legacy transcripts approximately 3000 words/8 pages in length. The mean number of sessions spent with patients was 4, equating to an average of 380 minutes of clinician time per patient. Qualitative analyses revealed the most commonly discussed topics among patients were (in rank order): autobiographical information, love, lessons learned in life, defining roles in vocations or hobbies, accomplishments, character traits, unfinished business, hopes and dreams, catalysts, overcoming challenges, and guidance for others. Discussion This was the first study to implement Dignity Therapy in a community sample, with results highlighting the practical aspects of treatment as well as the most common themes discussed by clinical patients in a hospice setting. These findings provide useful data for clinicians or organizational leaders who may consider offering Dignity Therapy in their setting, and offer general insight regarding the legacy topics most frequently discussed by patients near the end of life. PMID:21548823

  13. Barriers to the implementation of the UK HIV testing guidelines in secondary care: how many are medical?

    PubMed

    Warwick, Z

    2010-03-01

    A survey of consultants in Plymouth Teaching Hospital was performed to identify barriers to HIV testing in secondary care. Testing practices were compared with those recommended by the UK HIV testing guidelines and barriers to testing described. PMID:20215628

  14. Trends in the Use of Guideline-Recommended Medications and In-Hospital Mortality of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Xie, Yanming; Shu, Zheng; Yang, Wei; Zhan, Siyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current practice guidelines recommend the routine use of several cardiac medications early in the course of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Our objective was to analyze temporal trends in medication use and in-hospital mortality of AMI patients in a Chinese population. Methods This is a retrospective observational study using electronic medical records from the hospital information system (HIS) of 14 Chinese hospitals. We identified 5599 patients with AMI between 2005 and 2011. Factors associated with medication use and in-hospital mortality were explored by using hierarchical logistic regression. Results The use of several guideline-recommended medications all increased during the study period: statins (57.7%–90.1%), clopidogrel (61.8%–92.3%), β-Blockers (45.4%–65.1%), ACEI/ARB (46.7%–58.7%), aspirin (81.9%–92.9%), and the combinations thereof increased from 24.9% to 42.8% (P<0.001 for all). Multivariate analyses showed statistically significant increases in all these medications. The in-hospital mortality decreased from 15.9% to 5.7% from 2005 to 2011 (P<0.001). After multivariate adjustment, admission year was still a significant factor (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.79–0.96, P = 0.007), the use of aspirin (OR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.46–0.87), clopidogrel (OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.31–0.61), ACEI/ARB (OR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.56–0.94) and statins (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.40–0.73) were associated with a decrease in in-hospital mortality. Patients with older age, cancer and renal insufficiency had higher in-hospital mortality, while they were generally less likely to receive all these medications. Conclusion Use of guideline-recommended medications early in the course of AMI increased between 2005 and 2011 in a Chinese population. During this same time, there was a decrease in in-hospital mortality. PMID:25706944

  15. The impact of volunteering in hospice palliative care.

    PubMed

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of hospice palliative care work on volunteers' lives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 direct-patient care volunteers. More than half of the volunteers became involved in hospice palliative care because of their own experiences with family members and/or friends who have died. Most of the volunteers reported that they were different now or had changed in some way since they have been volunteering (e.g., they had grown in some way, have learned how to keep things in perspective). In addition, most of the volunteers felt that their outlook on life had changed since they started volunteering (e.g., they were more accepting of death, and they learned the importance of living one day at a time). Volunteers reported doing a number of different things to prevent compassion fatigue or burnout (e.g., reading a book, listening to music, talking to others, and taking time off from volunteering). Most of the volunteers said that they would tell anyone who might be thinking of volunteering in hospice palliative care that it is a very rewarding activity and/or that they should try it. Finally, many of the volunteers offered suggestions for doing things differently in their programs. PMID:17895491

  16. Discharge Hospice Referral and Lower 30-Day All-Cause Readmission in Medicare Beneficiaries Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kheirbek, Raya E.; Fletcher, Ross D.; Bakitas, Marie A.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Parvataneni, Sridivya; Bearden, Donna; Bailey, F. Amos; Morgan, Charity J.; Singh, Steven; Blackman, Marc R.; Zile, Michael R.; Patel, Kanan; Ahmed, Momanna B.; Tucker, Rodney O.; Brown, Cynthia J.; Love, Thomas E.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Roseman, Jeffrey M.; Rich, Michael W.; Allman, Richard M.; Ahmed, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause for hospital readmission. Hospice care may help palliate HF symptoms but its association with 30-day all-cause readmission remains unknown. Methods and Results Of the 8032 Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for HF in 106 Alabama hospitals (1998–2001), 182 (2%) received discharge hospice referrals. Of the 7850 patients not receiving hospice referrals, 1608 (20%) died within 6 months post-discharge (the hospice-eligible group). Propensity scores for hospice referral were estimated for each of the 1790 (182+1608) patients and were used to match 179 hospice-referral patients with 179 hospice-eligible patients who were balanced on 28 baseline characteristics (mean age, 79 years, 58% women, 18% African American). Overall, 22% (1742/8032) died in 6 months, of whom 8% (134/1742) received hospice referrals. Among the 358 matched patients, 30-day all-cause readmission occurred in 5% and 41% of hospice-referral and hospice-eligible patients, respectively (hazard ratio {HR} associated with hospice referral, 0.12; 95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.06–0.24). HRs (95% CIs) for 30-day all-cause readmission associated with hospice referral among the 126 patients who died and 232 patients who survived 30-day post-discharge were 0.03 (0.04–0.21) and 0.17 (0.08–0.36), respectively. Although 30-day mortality was higher in the hospice referral group (43% vs. 27%), it was similar at 90 days (64% vs. 67% among hospice-eligible patients). Conclusions A discharge hospice referral was associated with lower 30-day all-cause readmission among hospitalized HF patients. However, most HF patients who died within 6 months of hospital discharge did not receive a discharge hospice referral. PMID:26019151

  17. Evaluation of the Impact of Implementing the Emergency Medical Services Traumatic Brain Injury Guidelines in Arizona: The Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care (EPIC) Study Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Spaite, Daniel W.; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Stolz, Uwe; Sherrill, Duane; Chikani, Vatsal; Barnhart, Bruce; Sotelo, Michael; Gaither, Joshua B.; Viscusi, Chad; Adelson, P. David; Denninghoff, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) exacts a great toll on society. Fortunately, there is growing evidence that the management of TBI in the early minutes after injury may significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. In response, evidence-based prehospital and in-hospital TBI treatment guidelines have been established by authoritative bodies. However, no large studies have yet evaluated the effectiveness of implementing these guidelines in the prehospital setting. This article describes the background, design, implementation, emergency medical services (EMS) treatment protocols, and statistical analysis of a prospective, controlled (before/after), statewide study designed to evaluate the effect of implementing the EMS TBI guidelines—the Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care (EPIC) study (NIH/NINDS R01NS071049, “EPIC”; and 3R01NS071049-S1, “EPIC4Kids”). The specific aim of the study is to test the hypothesis that statewide implementation of the international adult and pediatric EMS TBI guidelines will significantly reduce mortality and improve nonmortality outcomes in patients with moderate or severe TBI. Furthermore, it will specifically evaluate the effect of guideline implementation on outcomes in the subgroup of patients who are intubated in the field. Over the course of the entire study (~9 years), it is estimated that approximately 25,000 patients will be enrolled. PMID:25112451

  18. Interdisciplinary Team Training: Content and Methodology. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dottie C.; Grady, Kathleen A.

    This monograph, the fourth in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to prepare a skilled team of trainers with information about hospices that is relevant to hospice interdisciplinary team training and to document experiences in…

  19. The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on School Health POLICY STATEMENT: Guidelines for the Administration of Medication in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Nursing, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Many children who take medications require them during the school day. This policy statement is designed to guide prescribing physicians as well as school administrators and health staff on the administration of medications to children at school. The statement addresses over-the-counter products, herbal medications, experimental drugs that are…

  20. 42 CFR 418.76 - Condition of participation: Hospice aide and homemaker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the need for respect for the patient, his or her privacy, and his or her property. (ix) Appropriate... Participation: Patient Care Non-Core Services § 418.76 Condition of participation: Hospice aide and homemaker... other hospice staff. (ii) Observation, reporting, and documentation of patient status and the care...

  1. Hospice Use among Urban Black and White U.S. Nursing Home Decedents in 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepore, Michael J.; Miller, Susan C.; Gozalo, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Medicare hospice is a valuable source of quality care at the end of life, but its lower use by racial minority groups is of concern. This study identifies factors associated with hospice use among urban Black and White nursing home (NH) decedents in the United States. Design and Methods: Multiple data sources are combined and multilevel…

  2. Training Program Design. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, David J.; Mortenson, Lee E.

    This monograph, the third in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to describe the steps in designing a training program for a particular hospice and the activities undertaken between the selection of the trainers and the…

  3. Traits of Hospice Nurses Compared with Those Who Work in Traditional Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amenta, Madalon M.

    1984-01-01

    Compared 36 hospice nurses with 35 nurses who were working in traditional settings. Data from a battery of five tests revealed the hospice nurses to be significantly more assertive, imaginative, forthright, free-thinking and independent than their collegues, who scored lower than the norms. (LLL)

  4. Linking Family Life and Health Professionals, Volunteers, and Family Life Students in a Community Hospice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruit, Dorothy

    This paper describes the Portage County, Ohio community hospice program, emphasizing the linkages between family life specialists, health professionals, volunteers, and students. Hospice service is defined as a specialized, home-based program for the management of pain and other symptoms of terminal illness, with the family as the unit of care.…

  5. The Philosophy and Practice of Patient Control in Hospice: The Dynamics of Autonomy versus Paternalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesler, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Based on nearly three years of participant-observation research in hospice settings, factors that interfere with the hospice philosophy of providing patient autonomy include efforts at symptom control, patient residence, patient disease state, and staff limit setting. Discusses examples, implications, and staff attempts at solutions. (JPS)

  6. Impact of Hospice Volunteer Training on Death Anxiety and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayslip, Bert; Walling, Mary L.

    1986-01-01

    Examined effects of hospice volunteer training program on locus of control and death anxiety by comparing 29 hospice volunteers who underwent volunteer training course and 30 controls. Results indicated both groups decreased in generalized conscious death fear, but increased in their conscious fear of others' deaths, although experimental…

  7. Portraits of Caregivers of End-Stage Dementia Patients Receiving Hospice Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Sara; Butcher, Howard K.; Swails, Peggy; Power, James

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how caregivers respond to the end stages of dementia with the assistance from hospice. Data were collected from 27 family caregivers over the course of 10 months, with each caregiver being interviewed up to 4 times during the time that the patient received hospice care. Chart review data were also…

  8. Negotiating Life for the Dying: Hospice and the Strategy of Tactical Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesler, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Participant-observation research was conducted in the home care components of a free-standing inpatient facility associated with several hospice organizations over three years. The data are reported using negotiated order theory as a framework for understanding the hospice movement and its attempts to change the experience of dying. (JPS)

  9. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... November 21, 2011 (76 FR 71920), VA proposed to amend its regulations concerning the billing methodology... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers... services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA...

  10. Hospice Care in Nursing Homes: Does It Contribute to Higher Quality Pain Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayser-Jones, Jeanie S.; Kris, Alison E.; Miaskowski, Christine A.; Lyons, William L.; Paul, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate pain management among 42 hospice and 65 non-hospice residents in two proprietary nursing homes. Design and Methods: In this prospective, anthropological, quantitative, and qualitative study, we used participant observation, event analysis, and chart review to obtain data. The Medication…

  11. 42 CFR 418.110 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inpatient care directly. 418.110 Section 418.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of... management. (i) The hospice must address real or potential threats to the health and safety of the...

  12. 42 CFR 418.110 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inpatient care directly. 418.110 Section 418.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of... management. (i) The hospice must address real or potential threats to the health and safety of the...

  13. 42 CFR 418.76 - Condition of participation: Hospice aide and homemaker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of hospice aide classroom and supervised practical training. (1) Hospice aide training must include classroom and supervised practical training in a practicum laboratory or other setting in which the trainee... nurse, or a licensed practical nurse, who is under the supervision of a registered nurse. Classroom...

  14. 42 CFR 418.76 - Condition of participation: Hospice aide and homemaker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of hospice aide classroom and supervised practical training. (1) Hospice aide training must include classroom and supervised practical training in a practicum laboratory or other setting in which the trainee... nurse, or a licensed practical nurse, who is under the supervision of a registered nurse. Classroom...

  15. 42 CFR 418.76 - Condition of participation: Hospice aide and homemaker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of hospice aide classroom and supervised practical training. (1) Hospice aide training must include classroom and supervised practical training in a practicum laboratory or other setting in which the trainee... nurse, or a licensed practical nurse, who is under the supervision of a registered nurse. Classroom...

  16. French good practice guidelines for medical and occupational surveillance of the low back pain risk among workers exposed to manual handling of loads.

    PubMed

    Petit, Audrey; Fassier, Jean-Baptiste; Rousseau, Sandrine; Mairiaux, Philippe; Roquelaure, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical practice guidelines related to the assessment and management of low back pain (LBP) have been published with varied scopes and methods. This paper summarises the first French occupational guidelines for management of work-related LBP (October 2013). There main originality is to treat all the three stages of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of work-related LBP. The guidelines were written by a multidisciplinary working group of 24 experts, according to the Clinical Practice Guidelines method proposed by French National Health Authority, and reviewed by a multidisciplinary peer review committee of 50 experts. Recommendations were based on a large systematic review of the literature carried out from 1990 to 2012 and rated as strong (Level A), moderate (B), limited (C) or based on expert consensus (D) according to their level of evidence. It is recommended to deliver reassuring and consistent information concerning LBP prognosis (Level B); to perform a clinical examination looking for medical signs of severity related to LBP (Level A), encourage continuation or resumption of physical activity (Level A), identify any changes in working conditions and evaluate the occupational impact of LBP (Level D). In case of persistent/recurrent LBP, assess prognostic factors likely to influence progression to chronic LBP, prolonged disability and delayed return to work (Level A). In case of prolonged/repeated sick leave, evaluate the pain, functional disability and their impact and main risk factors for prolonged work disability (Level A), promote return to work measures and inter professional coordination (Level D). These good practice guidelines are primarily intended for professionals of occupational health but also for treating physicians and paramedical personnel participating in the management of LBP, workers and employers. PMID:26213629

  17. How they cope: a qualitative study of the coping skills of hospice volunteers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mary V

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the coping techniques utilized by hospice volunteers. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 hospice volunteers who had at least 1 year of experience, working as a hospice volunteer with direct patient care. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed utilizing qualitative research methods. The results indicated the volunteers used problem-focused coping (seeking advice from members of the hospice interdisciplinary team), emotion-focused coping (talking with others, going to funerals), meaning making through appraisal (religious beliefs, downward comparison), and physical techniques (walking, deep breathing). The most significant coping mechanism utilized for the volunteer was talking with the volunteer coordinator. Implications for hospice volunteer coordinators are also discussed. PMID:21262760

  18. Values important to terminally ill African American older adults in receiving hospice care.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    While racial disparity in the use of hospice care by older African Americans is widely acknowledged, little is known about the values that they consider as important in receiving health care services along with direct experiences with having these values respected by hospice care providers. Using individual, face-to-face interviews, data were collected directly from 28 African American hospice patients about their experiences in hospice care. Content analysis was used to identify and categorize themes from multiple readings of the qualitative data. Resulting themes included: dying at home, open communications, independent decision-making, autonomy in daily life, unwillingness to be a burden, and relationships. Through the initial assessment, value preferences can be explored and then shared with hospice team members to ensure that services are provided in such a way that their values and preferences are respected. PMID:25494930

  19. Quality improvement in hospice: adding a big job to an already big job?

    PubMed

    Durham, Danielle D; Rokoske, Franziska S; Hanson, Laura C; Cagle, John G; Schenck, Anna P

    2011-01-01

    Hospice organizations are adopting quality measurement and quality improvement (QI) practices to comply with the Medicare Conditions of Participation effective January 31, 2009. However, little is known about organizational best practices or specific needs during implementation. This study identified and described the barriers and facilitators to QI implementation in hospice. Using semistructured interviews with a national sample of key informants (n = 52) concerning facilitators and barriers to QI in hospice, 4 major themes emerged from the data regarding participants' experiences and perceptions: (1) external factors constrain QI implementation; (2) internal factors limit capacity for QI; (3) research on best practices is limited; and (4) traditional QI may not be a good fit for hospice. Though challenging, participants provided recommendations that they believed would facilitate QI in hospice. Categorizing barriers and facilitators as within or outside an organization's control may help organizations assess their capabilities and locate resources to address areas for improvement. PMID:21403176

  20. A team approach to recruitment in hospice research: engaging patients, close people and health professionals.

    PubMed

    L Campbell, Cathy; Bailey, Cara; Armour, Kathy; Perry, Rachel; Orlando, Rosanna; Kinghorn, Philip; Jones, Louise; Coast, Joanna

    2016-07-01

    Research is vital to the future development of hospice care. However, research in hospice settings is very challenging. This paper describes a case study of a successful multidisciplinary research team approach (MDRT) to the recruitment of participants (hospice patients, family members and health professionals) for a study in a hospice setting on the economic evaluation of end-of-life care. A successful recruitment plan includes three key strategies: identifying key members of the MDRT early in the research process; having a clear and constant communication stream; and creating an environment where all team members have a shared commitment to the research, all voices are heard and valued, and everyone contributes to the research aims. An MDRT approach will be helpful to guide the development of successful recruitment plans for academic-community research partnerships in the hospice setting. PMID:27444161

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine utilization in Texas hospices: prevalence, importance, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Olotu, Busuyi S; Brown, Carolyn M; Lawson, Kenneth A; Barner, Jamie C

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence, importance, and challenges of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in Texas hospices. Mail surveys were sent to 369 hospices in Texas, and 110 useful surveys were returned. Results showed that a majority (n = 62, 56.4%) of hospices offer CAM to their clients, with the most popularly offered CAMs being massage, music, and relaxation therapies. Despite the availability of CAM services in most hospices, and that the utilization of CAM has the potential to improve overall quality of life of patients, our results showed that a sizeable proportion of patients in these hospices are not utilizing the provided CAMs. Funding and personnel constraints were substantial obstacles to offering CAM. PMID:23625931

  2. [Threatened preterm delivery managed in a university medical center devoted to high risk pregnancies: assessment of daily practice in relation to international guidelines].

    PubMed

    Johnson, S; Kridelka, F; Nisolle, M; Emonts, P

    2014-12-01

    Premature birth poses a real problem of public health. As the principal cause of foetal ill-health and perinatal mortality, it generates high healthcare costs. By seeking to prevent early labour and to deal with its causes, a good obstetrical practice can reduce its negative impact, both medical and financial, on society. This article describes the results of a study of threatened preterm delivery admissions at the Citadelle hospital in Liege during the year 2012. The findings are compared to international guidelines with a view to identify aspects that could be improved. PMID:25796782

  3. Interdisciplinary perceptions of the social work role in hospice: building upon the classic Kulys and Davis study.

    PubMed

    Reese, Dona J

    2011-01-01

    This national survey found that hospice directors (n = 43) considered social workers most qualified, and most involved, in 12 of 24 interventions considered by social workers to define their role. This is a change from Kulys and Davis' ( 1986 , 1987 ) findings of a more limited social work role in hospice. The results of the current study provide new information about director attitudes, social work involvement, and the impact of efforts to develop the hospice social work field. Social work education should incorporate more end-of-life care content to continue this progress, and hospice social workers should continue to document their effectiveness on the hospice team. PMID:22150181

  4. [Personnel requirements of medical radiation physics in radiotherapy in comparison to the current guidelines "radiation protection in medicine" : Special consideration of intensity-modulated radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Leetz, H-K; Eipper, H H; Gfirtner, H; Schneider, P; Welker, K

    2014-08-01

    In 1994 and 1998 reports on staffing levels in medical radiation physics for radiation therapy were published by the "Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Physik" (DGMP, German Society for Medical Physics). Because of the technical and methodological progress, changes in recommended qualifications of staff and new governmental regulations, it was necessary to establish new staffing levels. The data were derived from a new survey in clinics. Some of the previously established results from the old reports were adapted to the new conditions by conversion.The staffing requirements were normalized to main components as in the earlier reports resulting in a simple method for calculation of staffing levels. The results were compared with the requirements in the "Richtlinie Strahlenschutz in der Medizin" (guidelines on radiation protection in medicine) and showed satisfactory agreement. PMID:24805160

  5. Conflict of interest guidelines for clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Kevat, Dev A S; Loff, Bebe

    2011-10-17

    • Clinical guidelines are being increasingly produced to improve quality of care, but are vulnerable to bias. • Only 15% of guidelines on the National Health and Medical Research Council portal from the most prolific developers have published conflict of interest statements, and fewer detail the processes used to manage conflicts. • Comprehensive disclosure of conflicts is needed to safeguard the integrity of clinical guidelines and the medical profession. • Peak bodies and clinicians should seek to promote an improvement to current poor practice. PMID:22004385

  6. Perspectives of Cardiac Care Unit Nursing Staff about Developing Hospice Services in Iran for Terminally ill Cardiovascular Patients: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Imani, Shahin; Aghaei, Mir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was conducted aiming to determine the points of view of cardiac care units’ nursing staff about designing and providing Hospice services in Iran for cardiovascular patients in the final stages of life. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study, the perspectives of 16 Cardiac Care Unit (CCU) nurses selected purposefully among hospitals of Tabriz-Iran University of Medical Sciences were investigated using semi-structured interviews and were analyzed in content analysis method. Results: 33 themes were finally extracted. Some nurses were for and some were against designing and providing Hospice services in Iran. The main reasons identified for supporting this plan included: Possibility of designing and providing these services consistent with high ethical values of Iranian society; approval of authorities due to increasing the load of chronic diseases and aged population; need of families due to the problems in taking care of patients and life concerns; better pain relief and respectful death; decrease of costs as a result of lower usage of diagnostic-therapeutic services, less use of expensive facilities and drugs, and better usage of hospital beds. Conclusion: Growing load of chronic diseases has made the need for Hospice as a necessary issue in Iran. In order to provide these services, studying the viewpoints of health service providers is inevitable. Therefore using and applying the results of this study in planning and policy making about designing and providing these services in Iran for cardiovascular patients in their final stages of lives could be helpful. PMID:25709187

  7. [Commentary note on the Italian translation of the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences 2002 Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Torlone, Gaetano; Lolas Stepke, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    The new CIOMS International Ethical Guidelines on Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects were published in August 2002. The aim of the present paper was to prepare a reasoned Italian translation of the guidelines. A preliminary version was submitted to a group of bioethicists and scientific research experts. Besides verifying the correctness and the adherence of the Italian version to the original text, a number of problematic terms were analysed. Some uncertainties emerged about the translation of expressions such as "ethical review committee" and "sponsor" and the difficulty to distinguish between "should" and "must". In the present globalisation era the need was apparent for a new approach to produce faithful translations based on a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account specific contexts and local peculiarities, but remains respectful to the original text. PMID:14587229

  8. Assessing short and long-term educational impact of visits to hospice via a combination of qualitative methods.

    PubMed

    Goh, E C L; Hsu, C-Y S

    2014-05-01

    While qualitative methods have gained considerable recognition in medical education research, employing multiple qualitative data sources in assessing long-term educational impact is rare. Utilising in-depth data analysis method to six cross-sectional cohorts (2004-2009) of students' reflection papers (n = 213), this article demonstrates how students experienced subtle but important shifts in their attitudes (including personal, professional and spiritual domains) after making field visits to a hospice centre as part of the Special Needs Dentistry module. For retrospective assessment of learning retention, a pilot focus group was conducted with three junior faculty members who participated in the field visits to a hospice during their own undergraduate training. A subsequent focus group was conducted with graduates of the 2008 (n = 8) cohort using a refined discussion guide arising from the analysis of pilot group results. Graduates were unanimous in stating that the visits had sown 'seeds' in their minds and hearts, seeds which started to grow after they completed dental school and began to practice. This is demonstrative of the long-term positive educational impact of the pedagogical design that entailed a special site visit coupled with post-visit debrief and written reflection. PMID:24521143

  9. Essentials and guidelines for clinical medical physics residency training programs: executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Joann I; Willis, Charles E; Burmeister, Jay W; Clarke, Geoffrey D; Das, Rupak K; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Gerbi, Bruce J; Harkness, Beth A; Patton, James A; Peck, Donald J; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Sandison, George A; White, Sharon L; Wichman, Brian D; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Both, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    There is a clear need for established standards for medical physics residency training. The complexity of techniques in imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology continues to increase with each passing year. It is therefore imperative that training requirements and competencies are routinely reviewed and updated to reflect the changing environment in hospitals and clinics across the country. In 2010, the AAPM Work Group on Periodic Review of Medical Physics Residency Training was formed and charged with updating AAPM Report Number 90. This work group includes AAPM members with extensive experience in clinical, professional, and educational aspects of medical physics. The resulting report, AAPM Report Number 249, concentrates on the clinical and professional knowledge needed to function independently as a practicing medical physicist in the areas of radiation oncology, imaging, and nuclear medicine, and constitutes a revision to AAPM Report Number 90. This manuscript presents an executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249. PMID:24892354

  10. African Americans and Hospice Care: A Culture-Centered Exploration of Enrollment Disparities.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Patrick J; Basu, Ambar

    2016-11-01

    Over the past decade, scholars and practitioners have called for efforts to reduce disparities in the cost and quality of end-of-life care; a key contributor to these disparities is the underuse of hospice care by African American patients. While previous studies have often relied on interviewing minority individuals who may or may not have been terminally ill and of whom few were using hospice care services, this essay draws upon the culture-centered approach to report the findings of a grounded theory analysis of 39 interviews with 26 African American hospice patients (n = 10) and lay caregivers (n = 16). Participants identified several barriers to hospice enrollment and reported how they were able to overcome these barriers by reframing/prioritizing cultural values and practices, creating alternative goals for hospice care, and relying on information obtained outside the formal health system. These findings have implications for understanding hospice experiences, promoting hospice access, and improving end-of-life care. PMID:27007165

  11. A comparison of hospice and hospital care for people who die: views of the surviving spouse.

    PubMed

    Seale, C; Kelly, M

    1997-03-01

    To compare the quality of inpatient care for dying people in St Christopher's Hospice, London and nearby hospitals in 1994 and make comparisons with earlier studies of the same setting, interviews were undertaken with spouses of people who had died from cancer in these settings, matched by age and sex. The subjects comprised 66 people who had died in 1994, 33 of whom had died in the hospice, 33 in local hospitals. The mean age was 70.2, 61% were male. The hospice group were more likely to know that they were dying and less likely to be admitted as emergencies. Treatment for pain, breathlessness and nausea from both sources provided relief in almost all cases. Most information about the illness was given by hospital doctors before hospice care occurred. Where it occurred, communication by hospice staff was judged better than that by hospital doctors. Staff in hospitals were more likely to be judged 'very busy'. Hospice respondents were less likely to want improvements, and more likely to judge the institution as being 'like a family'. Earlier studies had shown a trend for symptom control to have improved in hospitals but for difference in the psychosocial climate to favour the hospice, By 1994, this latter difference was still obtained. We stress the role of hospital staff and general practitioners in helping patients accept a terminal prognosis, so that better-planned care can proceed. The busy public atmosphere of some hospital wards may not be conducive to the good care of dying people. PMID:9156104

  12. Hospice Services for Complicated Grief and Depression: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela R.; Aldridge, Melissa D.; Johnson-Hürzeler, Rosemary; Kaplan, Daniel; Bruce, Martha L.; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe the prevalence of screening for complicated grief (CG) and depression in hospice and access to bereavement therapy and to examine whether screening and access to therapy varied according to hospice organizational characteristics or staff training and involvement. DESIGN Cross-sectional national survey conducted from 2008 to 2009. SETTING United States. PARTICIPANTS Hospices (N = 591). MEASUREMENTS Whether hospices screened for depression or CG at the time of death or provided access to bereavement therapy (individual or group). Organizational characteristics included region, chain status, ownership, and patient volume. Staffing-related variables included training length and meeting attendance requirements. RESULTS Fifty-five percent of hospices provided screening for CG and depression and access to bereavement therapy, 13% provided screening but not access to bereavement therapy, 24% provided access to bereavement therapy but not screening, and 8% neither screened nor provided access to bereavement therapy. Hospices with 100 patients per day or more were significantly more likely to provide screening and access to bereavement therapy. CONCLUSION Hospices appear to have high capacity to provide screening for CG and depression and to deliver group and individual therapy, but data are needed on whether screeners are evidence based and whether therapy addresses CG or depression specifically. Future work could build upon existing infrastructure to ensure use of well-validated screeners and evidence-based therapies. PMID:26456597

  13. Prioritization of future research topics for children's hospice care by its key stakeholders: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, C; Knighting, K; Forbat, L; Kearney, N

    2009-07-01

    The Delphi process, widely used in health research to seek consensus on key issues amongst large stakeholder groups, was adopted to allow families, hospice staff/volunteers and linked professionals to identify and prioritize future research priorities for children's hospice care. In the qualitative Round 1, interviews with families (n = 5), linked professionals (n = 18) and focus groups with hospice staff and volunteers (n = 44) led to the generation of 56 research topics categorised within 14 broad themes. To give a larger number of stakeholders (n = 621) (including families n = 293; hospice staff/volunteers n = 216 and professionals n = 112) the opportunity to rate the importance of each research topic and seek group consensus on the future research priorities for children's hospice care, subsequent Rounds 2 and 3 involved the use of postal questionnaires. Response rates to questionnaires were 44% in Round 2 (274/621) and 83% in Round 3 (204/247). Participants prioritized research topics relating to 1) hospice and respite care needs of young people (aged 16 +), 2) pain and symptom management and 3) bereavement and end-of-life care. There was wide acknowledgement by those took part in the process of the difficulty in rating the topics, and emphasis on the fact that all of the topics raised during the project are of high importance and merit further research. The current salient issues perceived by key stakeholders as being the research priorities for children's hospice care were identified. Addressing these priority topics for research would further contribute to the development of a much needed evidence base in children's hospice and palliative care research and optimise the delivery of children's hospice services that are underpinned by valid and robust research. PMID:19304805

  14. Nurses working 12-hour shifts in the hospice setting.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, L A

    1995-04-01

    A system of 12-hour nursing shifts was adopted at a newly-opened independent hospice. This paper presents the results from an exploratory, descriptive study in which nursing staff reported perceived advantages, disadvantages and satisfaction with the 12-hour shift system. A small sample (n = 11) of both qualified and unqualified nurses working the 12-hour shift completed the questionnaire. A content analysis of the qualitative data produced a number of categories relating to the perceived advantages and disadvantages of the 12-hour shift system in relation to the respondents, to the hospice and to patient and family care. The need for continuing to monitor and evaluate the shift system was demonstrated, particularly in relation to patient and family satisfaction, and the quality of care. It was concluded that examining the advantages and disadvantages of the 12-hour shift system increased awareness of the needs of staff, presented a useful way of identifying and managing potential difficulties within the workplace, and highlighted areas for future research. PMID:7606330

  15. The two-faced angel: do phase I clinical trials have a place in modern hospice?

    PubMed

    Ross, Daniel S

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly, bioethicists have been exploring the possibility of making phase I clinical trials available to hospice patients. Phase I clinical trials are designed to test a drug's safety and dosage, not its effectiveness. Participants in these studies generally do not understand that the purpose of the investigation is not to benefit them, thus challenging the notion of informed consent. But furthermore, the idea that patients believe experimental drugs will help them is contrary to the principles of hospice. Also, the very nature of the research in phase I conflicts with hospice's methods. For these reasons, this paper finds that the two models must remain distinct. PMID:17146915

  16. [Home hospice care at a clinic].

    PubMed

    Arai, F; Osako, M; Shimoaraiso, Y; Sakamoto, T; Miyashita, T; Yamanouchi, H; Kadokura, K; Yoshida, K; Dozono, F; Mamitsuka, K; Dozono, H

    1999-12-01

    For the people who want to stay at home until their last day, the primary doctor and clinic where they were diagnosed will be the most reliable supports. We have been operating a 19 bed clinic since 1996. In these three years, we have established what we call a "combination palliative care system." A team composed of two doctors, 13 nurses, 3 care aids, a social worker, and a counselor provides home care services as well as outpatient and inpatient care. From April, 1998 to March, 1999, 59 patients died of cancer. Among them, 25 patients died at home. Their primary cancers were lung (7), colon (3), pancreatic (2), breast (2), ovarian (2), brain (1), stomach (1), hepatoma (1), neck (1) and others. First of all, sufficient consultation with patients and family makes this care successful. Through this, the patient can choose his style of care. The whole staff is involved in this care in turn, so that all of us become acquainted with each patient. Home care includes: 1) medical and nursing service available 24 hours a day, 2) activation of social resources for the support of the patient user, 3) constructive cooperation with relevant institutions, 4) relieving the patient's physical and mental suffering, 5) aroma therapy, oil massage, hair cuts and music therapy, and 6) support by volunteers. In this way, as a neighborhood clinic, the combination palliative care system is valuable. PMID:10630230

  17. Underuse of Hospice Care by Medicaid-Insured Patients With Stage IV Lung Cancer in New York and California

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Jennifer W.; Chen, Kun; Boscoe, Francis P.; Gesten, Foster C.; Roohan, Patrick J.; Weeks, Jane C.; Schymura, Maria J.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Medicare patients with advanced cancer have low rates of hospice use. We sought to evaluate hospice use among patients in Medicaid, which insures younger and indigent patients, relative to those in Medicare. Patients and Methods Using linked patient-level data from California (CA) and New York (NY) state cancer registries, state Medicaid programs, NY Medicare, and CA Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare data, we identified 4,797 CA Medicaid patients and 4,001 NY Medicaid patients ages 21 to 64 years, as well as 27,416 CA Medicare patients and 16,496 NY Medicare patients ages ≥ 65 years who were diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer between 2002 and 2006. We evaluated hospice use, timing of enrollment, and location of death (inpatient hospice; long-term care facility or skilled nursing facility; acute care facility; home with hospice; or home without hospice). We used multiple logistic regressions to evaluate clinical and sociodemographic factors associated with hospice use. Results Although 53% (CA) and 44% (NY) of Medicare patients ages ≥ 65 years used hospice, fewer than one third of Medicaid-insured patients ages 21 to 64 years enrolled in hospice after a diagnosis of stage IV lung cancer (CA, 32%; NY, 24%). A minority of Medicaid patient deaths (CA, 19%; NY, 14%) occurred at home with hospice. Most Medicaid patient deaths were either in acute-care facilities (CA, 28%; NY, 36%) or at home without hospice (CA, 39%; NY, 41%). Patient race/ethnicity was not associated with hospice use among Medicaid patients. Conclusion Given low rates of hospice use among Medicaid enrollees and considerable evidence of suffering at the end of life, opportunities to improve palliative care delivery should be prioritized. PMID:23733768

  18. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment. 418.106 Section 418.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of...

  19. [Guideline to prevent claims due to medical malpractice, on how to act when they do occur and how to defend oneself through the courts].

    PubMed

    Bruguera, M; Arimany, J; Bruguera, R; Barberia, E; Ferrer, F; Sala, J; Pujol Robinat, A; Medallo Muñiz, J

    2012-04-01

    Claims due to presumed medical malpractice are increasing in all developed countries and many of them have no basis. To prevent legal complaints, the physicians should know the reasons why complaints are made by their patients and adopt the adequate preventive measures. In the case of a complaint, it is essential to follow the guidelines that allow for adequate legal defense and the action of the physician before the judge that inspires confidence and credibility. The risk of the claims can be reduced with adequate information to the patient, the following of the clinical guidelines, control of the risk factors and adoption of verification lists in each invasive procedure. In case of complication or serious adverse effect, explanations should be given to the patient and family and it should be reported to the facility where one works and to the insurance company. If the physician received a claim, he/she should report it to the insurance compare so that it can name a lawyer responsible for the legal defense who will advise the physician regarding the appearance in court before the judge. PMID:22397887

  20. Improvement of medical care in a cohort of newborns with sickle-cell disease in North Paris: impact of national guidelines.

    PubMed

    Couque, Nathalie; Girard, Delphine; Ducrocq, Rolande; Boizeau, Priscilla; Haouari, Zinedine; Missud, Florence; Holvoet, Laurent; Ithier, Ghislaine; Belloy, Marie; Odièvre, Marie-Héléne; Benemou, Michel; Benhaim, Patricia; Retali, Brigitte; Bensaid, Philippe; Monier, Brigitte; Brousse, Valentine; Amira, Roger; Orzechowski, Christine; Lesprit, Emmanuelle; Mangyanda, Laurent; Garrec, Nathalie; Elion, Jacques; Alberti, Corinne; Baruchel, André; Benkerrou, Malika

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a retrospective study on newborns with sickle-cell disease (SCD), born 1995-2009, followed in a multicentre hospital-based network. We assessed patient outcomes, medical care and compliance with the national guidelines published in December 2005. Data from 1033 patients (742 SS/Sβ°-thalassaemia) with 6776 patient-years of follow-up were analysed (mean age 7·1 ± 3·9 years). SCD-related deaths (n = 13) occurred only in SS-genotype patients at a median age of 23·1 months, mainly due to acute anaemia (n = 5, including 2 acute splenic sequestrations) and infection (n = 3). Treatment non-compliance was associated with a 10-fold higher risk of SCD-related death (P = 0·01). Therapeutic intensification was provided for all stroke patients (n = 12), almost all patients with abnormal transcranial Doppler (TCD) (n = 76) or with >1 acute chest syndrome/lifetime (n = 64) and/or ≥3 severe vaso-occlusive crises/year (n = 100). Only 2/3 of patients with baseline haemoglobin <70 g/l received intensification, mainly for other severity criteria. Overall, hydroxycarbamide was under-prescribed, given to 2/3 of severe vaso-occlusive patients and 1/3 of severely anaemic patients. Nevertheless, introduction of the on-line guidelines was concomitant with an improvement in medical care in the 2006-2009 cohort with a trend towards increased survival at 5 years, from 98·3% to 99·2%, significantly increased TCD coverage (P = 0·004) and earlier initiation of intensification of therapy (P ≤ 0·01). PMID:27062606

  1. Expectation in Life Review: A Term of Spiritual Needs Easily Understood by Chinese Hospice Patients.

    PubMed

    Deng, Di; Deng, Qing; Liu, Xiaofang; Xie, Cong Hua; Wu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Terms such as spirituality and spiritual needs are abstract and difficult to understand. Realization of spirituality of hospice patients was premise in addressing expression of their spiritual needs. This study investigated expectations expressed during life review and tried to prove that the expectation was intelligible term for spiritual needs in Chinese hospice from May 2011 to June 2013. Among the 107 recruited patients, families were the most frequent emotion-expressing recipients, and 133 expectations related to patients' spiritual needs were identified. The emotion-expressing recipients and the patient's expectations were not affected by demographic characteristics. The expectations in life review with hospice patients and their families had the features of spiritual essence. The identified expectation contents could be used to address spiritual needs in hospice care in Chinese. PMID:24963084

  2. Portraits of caregivers of end-stage dementia patients receiving hospice care.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Sara; Butcher, Howard K; Swails, Peggy; Power, James

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how caregivers respond to the end stages of dementia with the assistance from hospice. Data were collected from 27 family caregivers over the course of 10 months, with each caregiver being interviewed up to 4 times during the time that the patient received hospice care. Chart review data were also collected. Four distinct caregiver portraits emerged: (a) disengaged; (b) questioning; (c) all-consumed; and (d) reconciled. Caregivers in each portrait differed in how they responded to the impending death of the care recipient, the disease progression, and hospice care. Recognizing the differences in the ways that caregivers respond to the final stages of the disease will assist hospice and other providers in best meeting the needs of the caregivers. PMID:19565686

  3. Factors Affecting Willingness to Use Hospice in Racially/Ethnically Diverse Older Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Park, Nan Sook; Jang, Yuri; Ko, Jung Eun; Chiriboga, David A

    2016-09-01

    Racial/ethnic minorities tend to underutilize hospice services. Guided by Andersen behavioral health model, the purpose of this study was to explore the predictors of the willingness to use hospice services in racially/ethnically diverse older men and women. Data were drawn from the Survey of Older Floridians: 504 non-Hispanic whites, 360 African Americans, 328 Cuban Americans, and 241 non-Cuban Hispanics. In each group, logistic regression models of the willingness to use hospice were estimated. A greater likelihood of willingness was observed among younger non-Hispanic whites and among African Americans with fewer functional disabilities. In non-Cuban Hispanics, English proficiency increased the willingness by 3.1 times. Findings of the study identified group-specific factors contributing to the willingness to use hospice services and hold implications for tailored intervention programs. PMID:26071499

  4. Seeing is believing - reducing misconceptions about children's hospice care through effective teaching with undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Price, Jayne; Dornan, Jean; Quail, Lorraine

    2013-09-01

    Children's palliative care has evolved in recent years and is now recognised as a distinct area of health and social care practice. Whilst children's hospices are viewed as central to quality care for these children and families, lack of knowledge regarding the exact nature of care they provide exists. Education can go part way to changing attitudes and knowledge about the key contribution of hospices, thus improving future care. Alternative and innovative strategies to stimulate meaningful learning are pivotal to children's nurse education and this paper examines one such innovation adopted with 2nd year children's nursing students. Aiming to help students explore the ethos of children's hospice an educational visit was arranged, followed by an on line discussion. Although some practical challenges were encountered, the visit heightened student awareness moving them from the readily held perception that children's hospices were exclusively for dying children and was viewed by students as more effective than a traditional classroom session. PMID:23111411

  5. Exploring Sensory Experiences and Personalization in an Inpatient Residential Hospice Setting.

    PubMed

    Niedzielski, Oksana K; Rodin, Gary; Emmerson, Debbie; Rutgers, Job; Sellen, Katherine M

    2016-08-01

    Residential hospices are often purpose-built to enhance the experience of patients and families. However, there has been relatively little research on ambient and sensory experiences of patients and families. This study explored the ambient and sensory experience of residents and families in a residential hospice. Hospice users participated in personalizing environments and experiences, adapting and developing rituals, and enjoying the experience (including smells and sounds) of communal spaces and private rooms. Opportunity for developing new rituals, in particular, suggests an environment supportive of sense of control, social support, and positive distractors. The design of an inpatient hospice can offer a platform through which to support the delivery of flexible care practices, providing opportunities for personal expression, shared experiences, and the maintenance or development of rituals. PMID:26809827

  6. The staging of a hospice arts and crafts exhibition in the UK.

    PubMed

    Sarginson, Andrea

    2005-09-01

    The use of arts in hospices is now well established. However, the voluntary nature of much hospice work in England encourages most regular creative activities to be provided by volunteers with minimal financial support. This article looks at how a successful arts and crafts exhibition for a hospice community was staged by a volunteer arts worker, helped by art and design students from the local university. It was not intended that the exhibition should be a research project; however, it became clear that to learn more about arts practice within a hospice environment, it would need to be appraised in some way. The project leader (and author) adopted an approach which reflected on the responses of people involved in the preparation and staging of the exhibition. PMID:16215528

  7. The Influence of Nursing Unit Characteristics on RN Vacancies in Specialized Hospice and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Lisa C; Mixer, Sandra J; Cozad, Melanie J

    2016-07-01

    The nursing shortage is projected to intensify in the United States. Organizations providing specialized hospice and palliative care will be particularly hard hit. The purpose of our study was to examine the influence of the nursing unit on registered nurse (RN) vacancies and test the moderating role of recruitment strategies in perinatal hospices. We estimated the association between the nursing unit and RN vacancies and tested the interaction effects of recruitment strategies (signing bonus and recruitment bonus). Our findings showed that increasing RN unit size and nursing leadership directly affected vacancies and that recruitment bonuses had stronger influence on reducing vacancies than signing bonuses. The findings offer critical insights for hospice administrators in attracting nurses among specialized hospice and palliative care providers. PMID:25747671

  8. The Caring Coalition--An Educational Look at the Hospice Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiemstra, Roger

    1981-01-01

    Describes how one hospice organization is trying, through education, to change the practices, attitudes, and opinions of people such as hospital administrators, nursing home administrators, nurses, social workers, and other professionals who attend to the sick and dying. (CT)

  9. Veterinary hospice and palliative care: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Katherine J

    2016-04-01

    The death of a pet is a universal experience for those who share their lives with animals. In parallel with a rising interest in palliative medicine, hospice care and advance-care planning within human medicine, increasing attention is currently being given to serious illness and death within veterinary medicine. Our ability to prolong life has created the need for thoughtful end of life discourse. Interest in hospice and palliative care for companion animals is on the rise, yet there has been limited scholarly research in these areas to date. This review concludes that veterinary hospice and palliative care is currently hindered by an inadequate amount of scholarly research to guide clinicians. Given a lack of prospective studies in veterinary hospice and palliative care to date, a significant opportunity exists for veterinary teaching institutions to contribute to the literature in an important and growing field. PMID:27056812

  10. Transformational leadership and the hospice R.N. case manager: a new critical pathway.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, C L

    1998-01-01

    This article asserts that in light of changing conditions in the healthcare environment, transformational leadership is the most appropriate leadership style for the hospice registered nurse case manager. The author defines transformational leadership and, tracing from early leadership theories, demonstrates how the transformational-transactional leadership paradigm emerged from preceding leadership theories. The components of transformational leadership--transformational behavior and transformational characteristics--are linked to hospice theory and hospice-specific nursing practices. The expanding role of the hospice R.N. case manager is addressed in light of transformational leadership and culture building. Specific actions are proposed in the arenas of research, education, and community, corporate, and legislative involvement. PMID:9677956

  11. The Terrible Choice: Re-Evaluating Hospice Eligibility Criteria for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casarett, David J.; Fishman, Jessica M.; Lu, Hien L.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Barg, Frances K.; Naylor, Mary D.; Asch, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To be eligible for the Medicare Hospice Benefit, cancer patients with a life expectancy of 6 months or less must give up curative treatment. Our goal was to determine whether willingness to make this choice identifies patients with greater need for hospice services. Patients and Methods Three hundred patients with cancer and 171 family members were recruited from six oncology practices. Respondents completed conjoint interviews in which their perceived need for five hospice services was calculated from the choices they made among combinations of services. Patients' preferences for treatment were measured, and patients were followed for 6 months or until death. Results Thirty-eight patients (13%) said they would not want cancer treatment even if it offered an almost 100% chance of 6-month survival. These patients, who would have been eligible for hospice, did not have greater perceived need for hospice services compared with other patients (n = 262; mean, 1.75 v 1.98; Wilcoxon rank sum test, P = .46), nor did their family members (mean, 1.95 v 2.04; Wilcoxon rank sum test, P = .80). Instead, independent predictors of patients' perceived need for hospice services included African American ethnicity, less social support, worse functional status, and a greater burden of psychological symptoms. For families, predictors included caregiver burden, worse self-reported health, working outside the home, and caring for a patient with worse functional status. Conclusion The requirement that patients forgo life-sustaining treatment does not identify patients with greater perceived need for hospice services. Other characteristics offer a better way to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from hospice. PMID:19114698

  12. Feigning terminal illness to get narcotics: a cautionary tale for hospices.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Faustino; Galante, Mirta

    2012-08-01

    We present the case of a woman who enrolled in the hospice benefit in order to obtain narcotics. We believe this is a cautionary tale for hospices because of our propensity to enroll patients with minimal corroborating information, in order not to delay symptom management. Also we are philosophically predisposed to believe a patient's self-report of pain and other distressing symptoms. PMID:21868431

  13. Policy and the Re-Formation of Hospice: Lessons from the Past for the Future of Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Buck, Joy

    2011-11-01

    During the twentieth-century, dramatic changes in the manner and location of care for the dying resulted in the conception and birth of the modern American hospice movement. Idealistic nurses, clergy, and others concerned about the plight of terminally ill cancer patients launched hospice as a necessary health care reform. As new hospice programs opened across the country, the idealism of the early leaders gave way to more pragmatic issues such as program viability. As hospice was studied and integrated into the health care system, it came to be redefined by the politics of health policy and the health care industry. As a result, there is a disarticulation between the needs of seriously ill persons and their families and the health care that is available to them. Important lessons can be learned from the history of the Medicare hospice benefit to help guide current palliative care policy initiatives. While formalized reimbursement for hospice enhanced organizational sustainability, many critical issues remain. PMID:22184500

  14. Policy and the Re-Formation of Hospice: Lessons from the Past for the Future of Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Joy

    2011-01-01

    During the twentieth-century, dramatic changes in the manner and location of care for the dying resulted in the conception and birth of the modern American hospice movement. Idealistic nurses, clergy, and others concerned about the plight of terminally ill cancer patients launched hospice as a necessary health care reform. As new hospice programs opened across the country, the idealism of the early leaders gave way to more pragmatic issues such as program viability. As hospice was studied and integrated into the health care system, it came to be redefined by the politics of health policy and the health care industry. As a result, there is a disarticulation between the needs of seriously ill persons and their families and the health care that is available to them. Important lessons can be learned from the history of the Medicare hospice benefit to help guide current palliative care policy initiatives. While formalized reimbursement for hospice enhanced organizational sustainability, many critical issues remain. PMID:22184500

  15. Pain Reports by Older Hospice Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers: The Role of Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Haley, William E.; Small, Brent J.; McMillan, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Prior research in nursing homes has shown that cognitive impairment may reduce self-reported pain, but this relation has not been systematically explored among hospice patients. The assessment and treatment of pain is a primary goal of hospice care, and both disease processes and the use of opioid analgesics may lead to cognitive impairment among hospice patients. However, little is known about how cognitive functioning may impact the self-report of pain or the report of care recipient pain by family caregivers. Design and Methods We explored the associations between pain, cognitive functioning, and gender among cancer patients and their family caregivers (N = 176 dyads) during in-home hospice care. This was a cross-sectional, correlational study. Results Contrary to expectation, care recipients with cognitive impairment reported more intense pain than care recipients with intact cognitive functioning. However, cognitive impairment among care recipients had no impact on the pain report of family caregivers. Care recipient cognitive impairment was related to greater discrepancy in the pain reports of caregivers and care recipients. No gender differences in pain intensity report were found. Implications Measurement issues and implications for assessing self-reported pain among hospice cancer patients with impaired cognitive functioning and the report of care recipient pain by family caregivers are discussed. Specifically, hospice staff must educate family caregivers regarding the potential impact of care recipient cognitive impairment on pain reports in order to facilitate accurate pain assessment and management. PMID:12145378

  16. Hospice patients' attitudes regarding spiritual discussions with their doctors.

    PubMed

    Hart, Alton; Kohlwes, R Jeff; Deyo, Rick; Rhodes, Lorna A; Bowen, Deborah J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess hospice patients' attitudes regarding the discussion of spiritual issues with their physicians. We conducted in-depth interviews using open-ended questions on living with illness, spirituality and religion, and physician-patient relationships. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed for dominant themes. The following dominant themes were identified: (1) treating the whole person, (2) treating with sensitivity, (3) favorable attitudes toward religious or spiritual discussions with doctors, and (4) no "preaching." Our findings suggest that patients do not expect physicians to be their primary spiritual advisors; however, physicians should be aware of and comfortable communicating with patients about religious or spiritual issues. More training in this topic may enhance the care physicians provide to patients near the end of life. PMID:12693646

  17. Evaluation of Subcutaneous Phenobarbital Administration in Hospice Patients.

    PubMed

    Hosgood, Jessica Richards; Kimbrel, Jason M; McCrate Protus, Bridget; Grauer, Phyllis A

    2016-04-01

    Phenobarbital is used in hospice and palliative care to treat refractory symptoms. In end-of-life care, Food and Drug Administration approved routes of administration may be unreasonable based on patients' status. In these cases, phenobarbital may be administered subcutaneously for symptom management. However, according to the American Hospital Formulary Service, subcutaneous administration of commercially available injectable phenobarbital is cautioned due to possible skin reactions. This study evaluates the tolerability of phenobarbital administered subcutaneously. Of 69 patients and 774 distinct subcutaneous phenobarbital injections, 2 site reactions were recorded (2.9% of patients; 0.3% of injections). Both were mild, grade 1 reactions. Each patient continued to receive subcutaneous phenobarbital via newly placed ports with no additional reactions. Based on these findings, phenobarbital appears to be well tolerated when administered subcutaneously. PMID:25473092

  18. Nearly half of all Medicare hospice enrollees received care from agencies owned by regional or national chains.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David G; Dalton, Jesse B; Grabowski, David C; Huskamp, Haiden A

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of ownership in the US hospice sector have focused on the growth of for-profit hospice care and on aggregate differences in patient populations and service use patterns between for-profit and not-for-profit agencies. Such comparisons, although useful, do not offer insights about the types of organizations within the hospice sector, including the emergence of multiagency chains. Using Medicare cost report data for the period 2000-11, we tracked the evolution of the US hospice industry. We not only describe the market's composition by profit status but also provide new information about the roles of regional and national chains. Almost half of all Medicare hospice enrollees in 2011 received hospice services from a multiagency chain. A handful of companies play a prominent role, although the presence of smaller for-profit and not-for-profit hospice chains also has grown in recent years. By focusing on the role of the diverse organizations that provide hospice care, our analyses can help inform efforts to monitor and assure quality of care, to assess payment adequacy and options for reform, and to facilitate greater transparency and accountability within the hospice marketplace. PMID:25561641

  19. How should a Catholic hospice respond to patients who choose to voluntarily stop eating and drinking in order to hasten death?

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    The practice of voluntarily stopping eating and drinking (VSED) in order to hasten death poses a unique problem for the Catholic hospice. Hospice staff may be confronted with patients already on their service who decide to pursue this option for ending their lives. Patients not on hospice service who are contemplating VSED are often advised to contact hospice for symptom palliation associated with the process of VSED. Intentionally hastening death not only violates the sanctity of human life and the Ethical and Religious Directives the Catholic hospice is bound to uphold, but it also runs counter to the general philosophy that hospice neither hastens nor postpones death. At the same time, hospice programs have a strong philosophy of nonabandonment of patients. This article will analyze the ethical issues from the perspective of the Catholic tradition and suggest strategies for the Catholic hospice to respond to this group of patients. PMID:25249707

  20. The impact of prison hospice: collaboration among social workers and other professionals in a criminal justice setting that promotes care for the dying.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Laura R; Wright, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on a qualitative national telephone survey with coordinators of 14 prison hospice programs in 11 states. The rationale behind the survey was to learn about interdisciplinary collaboration between social work and criminal justice, using prison hospice as an exemplar of this collaboration. In addition to learning that all prison hospices in the study operate using an interdisciplinary team model and that most report high quality collaboration on the hospice team, the following additional five themes emerged: administrators and wardens are very supportive while correctional staff provides mixed support to team and program; greater collaboration with those outside prison hospice is critical; collaboration through prison hospice has a positive impact on dying prisoners; collaboration through prison hospice has a positive impact on prisoner volunteers; and, collaboration through prison hospice has a positive impact on the entire culture of the prison. PMID:17387096

  1. Better adherence to pre-antiretroviral therapy guidelines after implementing an electronic medical record system in rural Kenyan HIV clinics: a multicenter pre–post study☆

    PubMed Central

    Oluoch, Tom; Kwaro, Daniel; Ssempijja, Victor; Katana, Abraham; Langat, Patrick; Okeyo, Nicky; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; de Keizer, Nicolette

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction The monitoring of pre-antiretroviral therapy (pre-ART) is a key indicator of HIV quality of care. This study investigated the association of an electronic medical record system (EMR) with adherence to pre-ART guidelines in rural HIV clinics in Kenya. Methods A retrospective study was carried out to assess the quality of pre-ART care using three indicators: (1) the performance of a baseline CD4 test, (2) time from enrollment in care to first CD4 test, and (3) time from baseline CD4 to second CD4 test. A comparison of these indicators was made pre and post the introduction of an EMR system in 17 rural HIV clinics. Results A total of 18 523 patients were receiving pre-ART care, of whom 38.8% in the paper group had had at least one CD4 test compared to 53.4% in the EMR group (p < 0.001). The adjusted odds of performing a CD4 test in clinics using an EMR was 1.59 (95% confidence interval 1.49–1.69). The median time from enrolment into HIV care to first CD4 test was 1.40 months (interquartile range (IQR) 0.47–4.87) for paper vs. 0.93 months (IQR 0.43–3.37) for EMR. The median time from baseline to first CD4 follow-up was 7.5 months (IQR 5.97–10.73) for paper and 6.53 months (IQR 5.57–7.87) for EMR. Conclusion The use of the EMR system was associated with better compliance to HIV guidelines for pre-ART care. EMRs have a potential positive impact on quality of care for HIV patients in resource-constrained settings. PMID:25281905

  2. Development and Measurement of Guidelines-Based Quality Indicators of Caesarean Section Care in the Netherlands: A RAND-Modified Delphi Procedure and Retrospective Medical Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Karin; Burggraaf, Henriëtte; Derks, Jan B.; van Dijk, Det; van Dillen, Jeroen; Dirksen, Carmen D.; Duvekot, Johannes J.; Franx, Arie; Hasaart, Tom H. M.; Huisjes, Anjoke J. M.; Kolkman, Diny; Kwee, Anneke; Mol, Ben W.; van Pampus, Mariëlle G.; de Roon-Immerzeel, Alieke; van Roosmalen, Jos J. M.; Roumen, Frans J. M. E.; Smid-Koopman, Ellen; Spaans, Wilbert A.; Visser, Harry; van Wijngaarden, Wim J.; Willekes, Christine; Wouters, Maurice G. A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing discussion on the rising CS rate worldwide. Suboptimal guideline adherence may be an important contributor to this rise. Before improvement of care can be established, optimal CS care in different settings has to be defined. This study aimed to develop and measure quality indicators to determine guideline adherence and identify target groups for improvement of care with direct effect on caesarean section (CS) rates. Method Eighteen obstetricians and midwives participated in an expert panel for systematic CS quality indicator development according to the RAND-modified Delphi method. A multi-center study was performed and medical charts of 1024 women with a CS and a stratified and weighted randomly selected group of 1036 women with a vaginal delivery were analysed. Quality indicator frequency and adherence were scored in 2060 women with a CS or vaginal delivery. Results The expert panel developed 16 indicators on planned CS and 11 indicators on unplanned CS. Indicator adherence was calculated, defined as the number of women in a specific obstetrical situation in which care was performed as recommended in both planned and unplanned CS settings. The most frequently occurring obstetrical situations with low indicator adherence were: 1) suspected fetal distress (frequency 17%, adherence 46%), 2) non-progressive labour (frequency 12%, CS performed too early in over 75%), 3) continuous support during labour (frequency 88%, adherence 37%) and 4) previous CS (frequency 12%), with adequate counselling in 15%. Conclusions We identified four concrete target groups for improvement of obstetrical care, which can be used as a starting point to reduce CS rates worldwide. PMID:26783742

  3. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Medical and surgical management for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Majdy M.; Swiston, John; Nizami, Imran; Al Dalaan, Abdullah; Levy, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the availability of the pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-specific therapy, PAH was a dreadful disease with a very poor prognosis. Better understanding of the complex pathobiology of PAH has led to a major therapeutic evolution. International regulatory agencies have approved many specific drugs with different pharmacologic pathways and routes of administration. In the year 2013, two new drugs with great potentials in managing PAH have been added to the treatment options, macitentan and riociguat. Additional drugs are expected to come in the near future. A substantial body of evidence has confirmed the effectiveness of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-specific therapies in improving the patients’ symptomatic status and slowing down the rate of clinical deterioration. Although the newer modern medications have significantly improved the survival of patients with PAH, it remains a non-curable and fatal disease. Lung transplantation (LT) remains the only therapeutic option for selected patients with advanced disease who continue to deteriorate despite optimal therapy. PMID:25077002

  4. 'Where do I go from here'? A cultural perspective on challenges to the use of hospice services.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; Black, Stella; Teleo-Hope, Linda; Lee, Hyeonjoo; Wang, Zonghua

    2013-09-01

    Do hospice services as shaped by a western perspective adequately fulfil the needs of persons from non-Western cultures? Based on a Western view of palliative care, the vision outlined in the New Zealand Palliative Care Strategy (2001) is to deliver palliative care services, including hospice services, to all patients and their families requiring them in the context of an increasingly pluralistic and multicultural society. It is predicted that over the next two decades the proportion of people identifying as Māori, Pacific and Asian will dramatically increase within New Zealand. Ministry of Health information provided through a GAP analysis identified hospices as facing access-to-care pressures for Māori, Pacific and Asian patients. It is therefore critical to identify the challenges to hospice service access for Māori, Asian and Pacific patients. This project involved qualitative interviews with 37 cancer patients (Māori, Pacific and Asian self-identified ethnicities), whānau/family and bereaved whanua/family, as well as 15 health professionals (e.g. referring GPs, oncologists, allied health professionals) within one District Health Board. Patients and their families included both those who utilised hospice services, as well as those non-users of hospice services identified by a health professional as having palliative care needs. Challenges to hospice service utilisation reported in the findings include a lack of awareness in the communities of available services, as well as continuing misconceptions concerning the nature of hospice services. Language barriers were particularly reported for Asian patients and their families. Issues concerning the ethnic representativeness of the hospice services staff were raised. The findings highlight the importance of patient and family knowledge of hospice care for utilisation of services. This information can be used for future planning to enable hospices to both provide high quality evidence based palliative care

  5. "I'm Not Trying to Be Cured, so There's Not Much He Can Do for Me": Hospice Patients' Constructions of Hospice's Holistic Care Approach in a Biomedical Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebel Pederson, Sarah; Emmers-Sommer, Tara M.

    2012-01-01

    The hospice philosophy was founded on a mission to provide comprehensive and holistic services to individuals at the end of life. Hospice interdisciplinary teams work together to offer therapies such as spiritual services, comfort care, and massage therapy to meet patients' physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual needs. Although the…

  6. Impact of the Type of First Medical Contact within a Guideline-Conform ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Network: A Prospective Observational Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuhr, Kathrin; Baer, Frank; Fehske, Wolfgang; Hoepp, Hans-Wilhelm; Baldus, Stephan; Michels, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aims The impact of type of first medical contact (FMC) in the setting of a guideline conform metropolitan ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) network providing obligatory primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is unclear. Methods and Results 3,312 patients were prospectively included between 2006 and 2012 into a registry accompanying the “Cologne Infarction Model” STEMI network, with 68.4% primarily presenting to emergency medical service (EMS), 17.6% to non-PCI-capable hospitals, and 14.0% to PCI-capable hospitals. Median contact-to-balloon time differed significantly by FMC with 89 minutes (IQR 72–115) for EMS, 107 minutes (IQR 85–148) for non-PCI- and 65 minutes (IQR 48–91) for PCI-capable hospitals (p < 0.001). TIMI-flow grade III and in-hospital mortality were 75.7% and 10.4% in EMS, 70.3% and 8.6% in non-PCI capable hospital and 84.4% and 5.6% in PCI-capable hospital presenters, respectively (p both < 0.01). The association of FMC with in-hospital mortality was not significant after adjustment for baseline characteristics, but risk of TIMI-flow grade < III remained significantly increased in patients presenting to non-PCI capable hospitals. Conclusion Despite differences in treatment delay by type of FMC in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly. The increased risk of TIMI-flow grade < III in patients presenting to non PCI-capable hospitals needs further study. PMID:27258655

  7. Hierarchical and joint site-edge methods for medicare hospice service region boundary analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haijun; Carlin, Bradley P; Banerjee, Sudipto

    2010-06-01

    Hospice service offers a convenient and ethically preferable health-care option for terminally ill patients. However, this option is unavailable to patients in remote areas not served by any hospice system. In this article, we seek to determine the service areas of two particular cancer hospice systems in northeastern Minnesota based only on death counts abstracted from Medicare billing records. The problem is one of spatial boundary analysis, a field that appears statistically underdeveloped for irregular areal (lattice) data, even though most publicly available human health data are of this type. In this article, we suggest a variety of hierarchical models for areal boundary analysis that hierarchically or jointly parameterize both the areas and the edge segments. This leads to conceptually appealing solutions for our data that remain computationally feasible. While our approaches parallel similar developments in statistical image restoration using Markov random fields, important differences arise due to the irregular nature of our lattices, the sparseness and high variability of our data, the existence of important covariate information, and most importantly, our desire for full posterior inference on the boundary. Our results successfully delineate service areas for our two Minnesota hospice systems that sometimes conflict with the hospices' self-reported service areas. We also obtain boundaries for the spatial residuals from our fits, separating regions that differ for reasons yet unaccounted for by our model. PMID:19645704

  8. Hierarchical and Joint Site-Edge Methods for Medicare Hospice Service Region Boundary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Haijun; Carlin, Bradley P.; Banerjee, Sudipto

    2011-01-01

    Summary Hospice service offers a convenient and ethically preferable health care option for terminally ill patients. However, this option is unavailable to patients in remote areas not served by any hospice system. In this paper we seek to determine the service areas of two particular cancer hospice systems in northeastern Minnesota based only on death counts abstracted from Medicare billing records. The problem is one of spatial boundary analysis, a field that appears statistically underdeveloped for irregular areal (lattice) data, even though most publicly available human health data are of this type. In this paper, we suggest a variety of hierarchical models for areal boundary analysis that hierarchically or jointly parameterize both the areas and the edge segments. This leads to conceptually appealing solutions for our data that remain computationally feasible. While our approaches parallel similar developments in statistical image restoration using Markov random fields, important differences arise due to the irregular nature of our lattices, the sparseness and high variability of our data, the existence of important covariate information, and most importantly, our desire for full posterior inference on the boundary. Our results successfully delineate service areas for our two Minnesota hospice systems that sometimes conflict with the hospices' self-reported service areas. We also obtain boundaries for the spatial residuals from our fits, separating regions that differ for reasons yet unaccounted for by our model. PMID:19645704

  9. English language version of the S3-consensus guidelines on chronic pancreatitis: Definition, aetiology, diagnostic examinations, medical, endoscopic and surgical management of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, A; Mayerle, J; Beglinger, C; Büchler, M W; Bufler, P; Dathe, K; Fölsch, U R; Friess, H; Izbicki, J; Kahl, S; Klar, E; Keller, J; Knoefel, W T; Layer, P; Loehr, M; Meier, R; Riemann, J F; Rünzi, M; Schmid, R M; Schreyer, A; Tribl, B; Werner, J; Witt, H; Mössner, J; Lerch, M M

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a disease of the pancreas in which recurrent inflammatory episodes result in replacement of pancreatic parenchyma by fibrous connective tissue. This fibrotic reorganization of the pancreas leads to a progressive exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, characteristic complications arise, such as pseudocysts, pancreatic duct obstructions, duodenal obstruction, vascular complications, obstruction of the bile ducts, malnutrition and pain syndrome. Pain presents as the main symptom of patients with chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic carcinoma. Chronic pancreatitis significantly reduces the quality of life and the life expectancy of affected patients. These guidelines were researched and compiled by 74 representatives from 11 learned societies and their intention is to serve evidence-based professional training as well as continuing education. On this basis they shall improve the medical care of affected patients in both the inpatient and outpatient sector. Chronic pancreatitis requires an adequate diagnostic workup and systematic management, given its severity, frequency, chronicity, and negative impact on the quality of life and life expectancy. PMID:26666283

  10. Factor Analysis Influencing Postoperative Hospital Stay and Medical Costs for Patients with Definite, Suspected, or Unmatched Diagnosis of Acute Cholecystitis according to the Tokyo Guidelines 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaki, Aoi; Takahashi, Koji; Fujii, Takehiro; Kumamoto, Koji; Fujii, Koji; Matsumoto, Eiichi; Miyahara, Shigeki; Kusuta, Tsukasa; Azumi, Yoshinori; Isaji, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To identify significant independent preoperative factors influencing postoperative hospital stay (PHS) and medical costs (MC) in 171 patients who underwent cholecystectomy for benign gallbladder diseases and had definite, suspected, or unmatched acute cholecystitis (AC) diagnosis according to the Tokyo Guidelines 2013 (TG13). Methods. The 171 patients were classified according to the combination of diagnostic criteria including local signs of inflammation (A), systemic signs of inflammation (B), and imaging findings (C): A+ B+ C (definite diagnosis, n = 84), A+ B (suspected diagnosis, n = 25), (A or B) + C (n = 10), A (n = 41), and B (n = 11). Results. The A+ B + C and (A or B) + C groups had equivalent PHS and MC, suggesting that imaging findings were essential for AC diagnosis. PHS and MC were significantly increased in the order of severity grades based on TG13. Performance status (PS), white blood cell count, and severity grade were identified as preoperative factors influencing PHS by multivariate analysis, and significant independent preoperative factors influencing MC were age, PS, preoperative biliary drainage, hospital stay before surgery, albumin, and severity grade. Conclusion. PS and severity grade significantly influenced prolonged PHS and increased MC. PMID:27239193

  11. Humanistic Patient Care Training: Content and Methodology. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Kathleen A.; Wilson, Dottie C.

    This monograph, the fifth in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to provide a skilled group trainer with the hospice-specific insights necessary to conduct training in humanistic patient care. Chapter 1 covers training program…

  12. Referral and Timing of Referral to Hospice Care in Nursing Homes: The Significant Role of Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Lisa C.; Miller, Susan C.; Martin, Edward W.; Nanda, Aman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Given concerns about end-of-life care for many nursing home (NH) residents, this study sought to understand factors influencing hospice referral or nonreferral as well as timing of referral. Design and Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews with personnel from seven participating NHs and two hospices. We interviewed NH directors…

  13. Racial Differences in Hospice Use and In-Hospital Death among Medicare and Medicaid Dual-Eligible Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwak, Jung; Haley, William E.; Chiriboga, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the role of race in predicting the likelihood of using hospice and dying in a hospital among dual-eligible (Medicare and Medicaid) nursing home residents. Design and Methods: This follow-back cohort study examined factors associated with hospice use and in-hospital death among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White…

  14. Problems Associated with Coordination and Role Definitions in Health Care Teams: A Hospice Program Evaluation and Intervention Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berteotti, Carol R.; And Others

    Using an evaluation of a hospital-based hospice as a case study, this paper analyzes problematic issues surrounding health care teams (HCTs) in light of findings revealed in the literature concerning HCT structures and processes. The factors of coordination and role definitions in HCTs and their manifestations in a particular hospice HCT in terms…

  15. The experiences of Batswana families regarding hospice care of AIDS patients in the Bophirima district, North West province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Makhele, M F; Mulaudzi, F M

    2012-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic put significant strain on healthcare services in the country. Hospitals were no longer coping with the escalating number of AIDS patients. This resulted in the early discharge of patients, with some patients, too ill to be nursed at home, being sent to hospices for continued care. The Batswana had mixed feelings about hospice care, because their beliefs on patient care are based on the ubuntu philosophy, which emphasises the principle of caring for one another. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of Batswana families regarding hospice care for patients in the Thlabane township in the province of the North West as well as to make recommendations to policy-makers to ensure that hospices are accepted by community members and utilised effectively. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive research design was applied. Purposive sampling was applied to select study participants with whom in-depth unstructured interviews were conducted. A qualitative data analysis was done by categorising, ordering, and summarising the data, and describing the findings. The findings indicated that families of patients in hospice care experienced such care as foreign to their culture. These families also experienced stigmatisation, firstly owing to the stigma associated with AIDS and secondly because they opted for hospice care. However, they also observed the high quality of care provided by the hospice and understood its benefits for AIDS patients. The study concluded that hospice care relieved families of terminally ill AIDS patients of the burden of care and enabled them to keep on working and earning a living. Recommendations to policy-makers included enhancing hospice care and ensuring the provisioning of culturally safe hospice care. PMID:23237045

  16. Assessing governance theory and practice in health-care organizations: a survey of UK hospices.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Naomi; Benson, Lawrence; Boyd, Alan; Girling, Jeff

    2012-05-01

    This paper sets out a theoretical framework for analyzing board governance, and describes an empirical study of corporate governance practices in a subset of non-profit organizations (hospices in the UK). It examines how practices in hospice governance compare with what is known about effective board working. We found that key strengths of hospice boards included a strong focus on the mission and the finances of the organizations, and common weaknesses included a lack of involvement in strategic matters and a lack of confidence, and some nervousness about challenging the organization on the quality of clinical care. Finally, the paper offers suggestions for theoretical development particularly in relation to board governance in non-profit organizations. It develops an engagement theory for boards which comprises a triadic proposition of high challenge, high support and strong grip. PMID:22673698

  17. The 2014 hypertension guidelines: processing the information.

    PubMed

    Gelatic, Randee

    2014-11-01

    Recent guidelines on hypertension management offer conflicting recommendations. This article describes the JNC 8 and ASH/ISH guidelines and the four medications recommended for controlling BP in various patient populations. PMID:25343431

  18. Assessment of levels of hospice care coverage offered to commercial managed care plan members in California: implications for the California Health Insurance Exchange.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyusuk; Jahng, Joelle; Petrosyan, Syuzanna; Kim, Soo In; Yim, Victoria

    2015-06-01

    The implementation of the Affordable Care Act that provides for the expansion of affordable insurance to uninsured individuals and small businesses, coupled with the provision of mandated hospice coverage, is expected to increase the enrollment of the terminally ill younger population in hospice care. We surveyed health insurance companies that offer managed care plans in the 2014 California health insurance exchange and large hospice agencies that provided hospice care to privately insured patients in 2011. Compared with Medicare and Medicaid hospice benefits, hospice benefits for privately insured patients, particularly those enrolled in managed care plans, varied widely. Mandating hospice care alone may not be sufficient to ensure that individuals enrolled in different managed care plans receive the same level of coverage. PMID:24619923

  19. Assessment of Levels of Hospice Care Coverage Offered to Commercial Managed Care Plan Members in California: Implications for the California Health Insurance Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyusuk; Jahng, Joelle; Petrosyan, Syuzanna; Yim, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of the Affordable Care Act that provides for the expansion of affordable insurance to uninsured individuals and small businesses, coupled with the provision of mandated hospice coverage, is expected to increase the enrollment of the terminally ill younger population in hospice care. We surveyed health insurance companies that offer managed care plans in the 2014 California Health Insurance Exchange and large hospice agencies that provided hospice care to privately insured patients in 2011. Compared with Medicare and Medicaid Hospice Benefits, hospice benefits for privately insured patients, particularly those enrolled in managed care plans, varied widely. Mandating hospice care alone may not be sufficient to ensure that individuals enrolled in different managed care plans receive the same level of coverage. PMID:24619923

  20. Standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants: a joint consensus recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Richards, Sue; Aziz, Nazneen; Bale, Sherri; Bick, David; Das, Soma; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Grody, Wayne W; Hegde, Madhuri; Lyon, Elaine; Spector, Elaine; Voelkerding, Karl; Rehm, Heidi L

    2015-05-01

    The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) previously developed guidance for the interpretation of sequence variants.(1) In the past decade, sequencing technology has evolved rapidly with the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing. By adopting and leveraging next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are now performing an ever-increasing catalogue of genetic testing spanning genotyping, single genes, gene panels, exomes, genomes, transcriptomes, and epigenetic assays for genetic disorders. By virtue of increased complexity, this shift in genetic testing has been accompanied by new challenges in sequence interpretation. In this context the ACMG convened a workgroup in 2013 comprising representatives from the ACMG, the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), and the College of American Pathologists to revisit and revise the standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants. The group consisted of clinical laboratory directors and clinicians. This report represents expert opinion of the workgroup with input from ACMG, AMP, and College of American Pathologists stakeholders. These recommendations primarily apply to the breadth of genetic tests used in clinical laboratories, including genotyping, single genes, panels, exomes, and genomes. This report recommends the use of specific standard terminology-"pathogenic," "likely pathogenic," "uncertain significance," "likely benign," and "benign"-to describe variants identified in genes that cause Mendelian disorders. Moreover, this recommendation describes a process for classifying variants into these five categories based on criteria using typical types of variant evidence (e.g., population data, computational data, functional data, segregation data). Because of the increased complexity of analysis and interpretation of clinical genetic testing described in this report, the ACMG strongly recommends that clinical molecular genetic testing should be performed in a

  1. Guideline-Directed Medication Use in Patients With Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction in India: American College of Cardiology's PINNACLE India Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Wei, Jessica; Hira, Ravi S; Kalra, Ankur; Shore, Supriya; Kerkar, Prafulla G; Kumar, Ganesh; Risch, Samantha; Vicera, Veronique; Oetgen, William J; Deswal, Anita; Turakhia, Mintu P; Glusenkamp, Nathan; Virani, Salim S

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the use of guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT) in outpatients with heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF; ≤40%) in India. Our objective was to understand the use of GDMT in outpatients with HFrEF in India. The Practice Innovation And Clinical Excellence (PINNACLE) India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP) is a registry for cardiovascular quality improvement in India supported by the American College of Cardiology Foundation. Between January 2008 and September 2014, we evaluated documentation of use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and β-blockers, or both, among outpatients with HFrEF seeking care in 10 centers enrolled in the PIQIP registry. Among 75 639 patients in the PIQIP registry, 34 995 had EF reported, and 15 870 had an EF ≤40%. The mean age was 56 years; 23% were female. Hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and myocardial infarction were present in 37%, 23%, 27%, and 17%, respectively. Use of ACEIs/ARBs, β-blockers, and both were documented in 33.5%, 34.9%, and 29.6% of patients, respectively. The documentation of GDMT was higher in men, in patients age ≥65 years, and in those with presence of hypertension, diabetes, or coronary artery disease. Documentation of GDMT gradually increased over the study period. Among patients enrolled in the PIQIP registry, about two-thirds of patients with EF ≤40% did not have documented receipt of GDMT. This study is an initial step toward improving adherence to GDMT in India and highlights the feasibility of examining quality of care in HFrEF in a resource-limited setting. PMID:26880649

  2. Adherence To JNC-VII and WHO-ISH guidelines of antihypertensive medications prescribed to hypertensive patients with co-morbid conditions.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Nitin; Ganguly, Barna

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims at comparing the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive drugs in essential hypertension with specific co-morbid conditions with JNC-VII and WHO-ISH guidelines. Adult patients of both sex, who were attending medicine OPD of Shri Krishna Hospital, Karamsad, Gujarat since last 6 months and being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patients with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were included in the study. Adherence to JNC-VII guideline and WHO-ISH guidelines with respect to prescribing antihypertensive drugs in patients with diabetes mellitus were found to be 97% and 40.81% respectively, while it was found to be 72.27% to both the guidelines in patients with IHD. Similarly in cases of hypertension with CHF, adherence to prescribing antihypertensive were found to be 93.62% and 38.30% respectively, whereas for CKD patients, adherence to both guidelines was found to be same i.e. 33.33%. There is need of following such authentic guidelines in managing hypertension like chronic disease since these guidelines are based on various clinical trials and successful attainment of target BP in patients will be much easier by implementing them. PMID:26571984

  3. Needs and experiences of non-English-speaking hospice patients and families in an English-speaking country.

    PubMed

    McGrath, P; Vun, M; McLeod, L

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that, in practice, hospice care is predominantly accessed by white, middle-class patients, who live in stable home environments with available caregivers and other supports. The present challenge for researchers, administrators, and clinicians is to identify populations of terminally ill patients most in need of hospice care and to direct services to these patients. As a contribution to the development of this area, this paper presents the findings from a recent Australian hospice study that examines the needs and experiences of families from non-English-speaking backgrounds. The findings indicate that it is as important to focus on similarities as it is to highlight differences. PMID:11565183

  4. Patterns and Meanings of Prayer in Hospice Caregivers: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Susanne; Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Examined role of prayer in personal and professional lives of caregivers to dying. Background questionnaires were completed by 78 counselors, doctors, nurses, and volunteers associated with hospice programs. Interviews were conducted with 24 of these subjects. Most caregivers described themselves as very religious; typical caregiver made frequent…

  5. 76 FR 26805 - Medicare Program; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... continue with successive 15 percent reductions from FY 2013 through FY 2016. This proposed rule would.... In the August 11, 2004 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) final rule (69 FR 48916, 49026... standards that included CBSAs. In the FY 2006 hospice wage index final rule (70 FR 45130), we implemented...

  6. Live Discharge from Hospice and the Grief Experience of Dementia Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Wladkowski, Stephanie P

    2016-01-01

    When an individual has dementia, family members are involved in many care transitions in their roles as caregivers. One such transition is the 'live' discharge from hospice services. This occurs when an individual no longer meets eligibility criteria. This can be difficult for caregivers who have been anticipating an end to understand in the context of their grief process. This qualitative study (N = 24) explored the experience of caregivers of adults with dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, who experienced a 'live' discharge from hospice. Specifically, the experience of grief is examined. Results from this study highlight the complexity of caring for someone with a terminal disease and the grief experience in end-of-life care as caregivers struggle to understand the individual's terminal prognosis as temporary. This is further complicated for caregivers who must resume caregiving responsibilities or assume a new caregiving role after experiencing a loss of hospice services. Finally, hospice social workers are well positioned to offer emotional and other concrete support to caregivers who experience a 'live' discharge. PMID:27143573

  7. Transcultural comparison of hospital and hospice as caring environments for dying patients.

    PubMed

    Gates, M F

    1991-01-01

    Leininger's nursing Theory of Cultural Care Diversity and Universality provided the framework for this comparative study of two environments for persons who are dying; namely a hospital oncology unit and a free-standing hospice unit. Analysis of data from ethnographic and ethnonursing research methods including unstructured interviews, observation-participation, and field journal materials yielded contrasts with two settings. The presence of a caring atmosphere/ambience was apparent in both the hospital and hospice. Universal patterns common to both were: caring beliefs and practices of staff; identification of each setting as "community" or "home"; and multiple symbolic uses of humor and food. Diversities included hierarchical organizational structure and cure orientation in the hospital; interdisciplinary collaboration and care orientation in hospice; more pronounced use of touch as a caring modality; and greater evidence of symbolism and ritual related to death and dying in hospice. Adoption of the cultural care modes of accommodation, repatterning, and maintenance are suggested in promoting a caring atmosphere wherever dying patients are served. PMID:2043293

  8. 42 CFR 418.76 - Condition of participation: Hospice aide and homemaker services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... service furnished. (iii) Reading and recording temperature, pulse, and respiration. (iv) Basic infection... furnishing Medicaid personal care aide-only services under a Medicaid personal care benefit. An individual... personal care benefit may be used to the extent that the hospice would routinely use the services of...

  9. [Hospice palliative care is a universal value and the essence of nursing].

    PubMed

    Chao, Co-Shi Chantal

    2015-04-01

    This article uses four examples to illustrate the recent rise of hospice palliative care as a universal value. These examples include the story of Dame Cecily Saunders, the pioneer of the palliative care movement in the U.K.; the national healthcare plan currently promoted by United States' President Obama; a survey on the topic of quality of death in 40 countries conducted by the Lien Foundation (Singapore); and the story of the Hospice Movement in Taiwan. This article further describes how hospice palliative care has changed the healthcare culture and presents the World Health Organization's definition of palliative care and the implications of this definition. Additionally, this article identifies the common palliative-care mistakes that have been made by the general public and by healthcare workers. Healthcare professionals must acquire essential relevant knowledge and skills in order to ensure that hospice palliative care addresses the needs of terminally ill patients adequately. Finally, the author describes a novel approach to instilling proper palliative-care concepts and practices that is entitled Life, Peace, Care, and Honor (LPCH or the "3344" concept). PMID:25854942

  10. Breaking Down Barriers: Hospice Palliative Care as a Human Right in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Shannon; Heckman, George; Naus, Peter J.; Marston, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    The need to attend to terminally ill persons and provide improved quality of living and dying should be a national priority in Canada. Hospice palliative care (HPC), a person-centered approach that addresses the needs of the whole person, improves the quality of living and dying of persons facing a life-threatening illness. To ensure Canadians are…

  11. Preparation for Oncology Settings: What Hospice Social Workers Say They Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Bronstein, Laura R.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the influence of formal academic training, informal on-the-job training, and related professional and personal experiences of hospice social workers on preparation for their work. Findings suggest that social workers view both the generalist or core courses as well as specialist and elective courses as important preparation.…

  12. 42 CFR 418.110 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inpatient care directly. 418.110 Section 418.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation... address real or potential threats to the health and safety of the patients, others, and property. (ii)...

  13. Affirming the Connection: Comparative Findings on Communication Issues from Hospice Patients and Hematology Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Pam

    2004-01-01

    The following discussion presents comparative findings from hospice patients and hematology survivors on the topic of talking about dying to significant others within their network of family and friends. The insights have been gathered from an Australian research program that is exploring the notion of spirituality in relation to serious illness.…

  14. 76 FR 28195 - Medicare Program; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ...; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2012 Correction In proposed rule document 2011-10689 appearing on pages... Wage Index for Rural Areas Wage CBSA code Nonurban area index 1 Alabama 0.8000 2 Alaska 1.3073 3... rural areas of Massachusetts, so the wage index value used is the average of the contiguous Counties....

  15. 76 FR 44010 - Medicare Program; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2012; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... (76 FR 26731) was incorrectly titled as ``Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2012''. We note that the.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-10694 of May 9, 2011 (76 FR 26731), there were... FR Doc. 2011-10694 of May 9, 2011 (76 FR 26731), make the following corrections: 1. On page 26731,...

  16. 77 FR 44242 - Medicare Program; Hospice Wage Index for Fiscal Year 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... wage index final rule (70 FR 45130), we implemented a 1-year transition policy using a 50/50 blend of... index. In the August 8, 1997 Federal Register (62 FR 42860), we published a final rule implementing a... the BNAF. The FY 2010 Hospice Wage Index final rule (74 FR 39384) finalized a provision for a...

  17. CMA Infobase: clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2008-01-01

    The CMA Infobase is a free Web-based resource that contains evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. The database is maintained by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) and is available on its Web site. The CMA Infobase currently contains 1,200-plus clinical practice guidelines either developed or endorsed by an authoritative health care organization located in Canada. It is an alternative source of free clinical practice guidelines to the National Guideline Clearinghouse. This column will cover the basics of CMA Infobase, including searching, special features, and available resources which complement the database. PMID:19042721

  18. Race, treatment preferences, and hospice enrollment. Eligibility criteria may exclude patients with the greatest needs for care

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Jessica; O'Dwyer, Peter; Lu, Hien L.; Henderson, Hope; Asch, David A.; Casarett, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The requirement that patients give up curative treatment makes hospice enrollment unappealing for some patients, and may particularly limit use among African American patients. Objectives To determine whether African-American patients with cancer are more likely than white patients are to have preferences for cancer treatment that exclude them from hospice, and whether they are less likely to want specific hospice services. Methods 283 patients receiving treatment for cancer at six oncology clinics within the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Network completed conjoint interviews measuring their perceived need for five hospice services and their preferences for continuing cancer treatment. Patients were followed for six months or until death. Results African American patients had stronger preferences for continuing their cancer treatments on a 7-point scale even after adjusting for age, sex, finances, education, ECOG performance status, quality of life, and physical and psychological symptom burden (adjusted means 4.75 vs. 3.96; β coefficient 0.82; 95% confidence interval 0.22-1.41; p=0.007). African-American patients also had greater perceived needs for hospice services after adjusting for these characteristics (adjusted means 2.31 vs. 1.83) (β coefficient 0.51; 95% confidence interval 0.11-0.92; p=0.01). However, this effect disappeared after adjusting for household finances. Conclusions Hospice eligibility criteria may exclude African-American patients disproportionately despite greater perceived needs for hospice services in this population. The mechanisms driving this health disparity likely include both cultural differences and economic characteristics, and consideration should be given to redesigning hospice eligibility criteria. PMID:19107761

  19. Paying the Price at the End of Life: A Consideration of Factors that Affect the Profitability of Hospice

    PubMed Central

    Ettner, Susan L.; Lorenz, Karl A.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate factors that affect the financial performance of hospice. Methods Using the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development 2003 survey, we evaluated the organizational attributes, clinical care, and financial performance of 185 operational hospices. As outcomes, we evaluated revenues, costs, and profits per patient and per patient–day, the intensity and skill mix of care, and the provision of charitable and special palliative services. We evaluated regression-adjusted differences by profit status controlling for other organizational features and aggregate patient characteristics. Results Hospices reported median revenue of $6865 per patient and $138 per patient–day (for-profit-not-for profit [FP-NFP] difference −$20, p = 0.045), median cost of $6737 per patient, and $135 per patient–day (FP-NFP difference −$55, p = 0.002), and median pretax profit of $334 per patient and $6 per patient–day (FP-NFP difference $34, p = 0.026). Patients received a median of 29.9 total visits by all providers per patient (FP-NFP difference 8.8 visits, p = 0.010), but there was no difference in total visits per patient–day. A median of 50.8% of all nursing visits were registered nurse (RN) visits (FP-NFP difference −14.1%, p < 0.001). Few hospices provided charity care, and only 4% of hospices reported expenditures on chemotherapy and only 9% on radiation therapy. Conclusions Overall hospice profitability is low. Length of stay is strongly associated with financial performance, and greater FP profitability is related to lower costs. FP hospices also provide less RN care as a proportion of nursing care. Few hospices provide charitable care or special costly services. The relationship of service patterns to patient quality needs to be examined. PMID:18788962

  20. Guidelines for timely initiation of chemotherapy: a proposed framework for access to medical oncology and haematology cancer clinics and chemotherapy services.

    PubMed

    Alexander, M; Beattie-Manning, R; Blum, R; Byrne, J; Hornby, C; Kearny, C; Love, N; McGlashan, J; McKiernan, S; Milar, J L; Murray, D; Opat, S; Parente, P; Thomas, J; Tweddle, N; Underhill, C; Whitfield, K; Kirsa, S; Rischin, D

    2016-08-01

    These guidelines, informed by the best available evidence and consensus expert opinion, provide a framework to guide the timely initiation of chemotherapy for treating cancer. They sit at the intersection of patient experience, state-of-the-art disease management and rational efficient service provision for these patients at a system level. Internationally, cancer waiting times are routinely measured and publicly reported. In Australia, there are existing policies and guidelines relating to the timeliness of cancer care for surgery and radiation therapy; however, until now, equivalent guidance for chemotherapy was lacking. Timeliness of care should be informed, where available, by evidence for improved patient outcomes. Independent of this, it should be recognised that shorter waiting periods are likely to reduce patient anxiety. While these guidelines were developed as part of a proposed framework for consideration by the Victorian Department of Health, they are clinically relevant to national and international cancer services. They are intended to be used by clinical and administrative staff within cancer services. Adoption of these guidelines, which are for the timely triage, review and treatment of cancer patients receiving systemic chemotherapy, aims to ensure that patients receive care within a timeframe that will maximise health outcomes, and that access to care is consistent and equitable across cancer services. Local monitoring of performance against this guideline will enable cancer service providers to manage proactively future service demand. PMID:27553996

  1. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society: EEG Guidelines Introduction.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Tammy N; Acharya, Jayant N; Halford, Jonathan J; Kuratani, John D; Sinha, Saurabh R; Stecker, Mark M; Tatum, William O; Drislane, Frank W

    2016-08-01

    This revision to the EEG Guidelines is an update incorporating current EEG technology and practice. "Standards of practice in clinical electroencephalography" (previously Guideline 4) has been removed. It is currently undergoing revision through collaboration among multiple medical societies and will become part of "Qualifications and Responsibilities of Personnel Performing and Interpreting Clinical Neurophysiology Procedures." The remaining guidelines are reordered and renumbered. PMID:27482792

  2. First Medicare Demonstration of Concurrent Provision of Curative and Hospice Services for End-of-Life Care.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Krista L; Connor, Stephen R

    2016-08-01

    Hospice developed in the United States in the 1970s as a way to address unmet needs for end-of-life care: support for pain and symptom management provided in the location and manner that the patient and family prefer. In Europe and Australia, hospice is available from the time of diagnosis of an advanced life-limiting illness onward, but in the United States, the Medicare hospice benefit restricts eligibility for these services to patients who no longer receive curative treatment. We provide background and analysis of the first Medicare hospice demonstration in 35 years that will test the concurrent provision of curative and hospice services for terminally ill individuals with a life expectancy of six months or less. This demonstration is a harbinger of potential policy changes to hospice and palliative care in the United States that could reduce barriers to end-of-life care that aligns with patient and family preferences as the demand for care increases with an aging population. PMID:27310352

  3. Interactional communication challenges in end-of-life care: dialectical tensions and management strategies experienced by home hospice nurses.

    PubMed

    Gilstrap, Cristina M; White, Zachary M

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the dialectical tensions experienced by home hospice nurses in interactions with patients, families, and health care providers. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with 24 home hospice nurses from a mid-size for-profit hospice organization serving approximately 230 patients on an annual basis. Interviews revealed hospice nurses experience both interpersonal and organizational dialectics during hospice interactions: authoritative-nonauthoritative, revelation-concealment, independence-collaboration, and quality of care-business of care. Dialectics often resulted as a by-product of (a) responding to expectations and care choices of patients and families particular to the emotionally charged home context, (b) obtaining authorization from health care providers who are not members of the interdisciplinary team, and (c) pressures associated with providing quality patient care while fulfilling organizational role requirements. The praxis strategies used to negotiate tensions included segmentation, balance, recalibration, and spiraling inversion. Specifically, nurses employed strategies such as ascertaining family/patient acceptance, using persuasive tactics when communicating with external health care providers, relying on effective time management, and working off the clock to provide more in-person care. Although functional for patients and hospice organizations, nurses who continually rely on these strategies may experience job stress when their interpersonal commitments repeatedly conflict with organizational role demands. PMID:24991918

  4. The Colorado State University Pet Hospice program: end-of-life care for pets and their families.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Gail A; Long, Christie C; Carlsten, Kelly S; Kennedy, Katie C; Shaw, Jane R

    2008-01-01

    While the concept of hospice care for humans has existed for decades and is an integral part of the dying process, providing hospice care for companion animals is a new and growing service. Veterinarians and pet-owners have recently recognized that there is a need and a demand to care for pets with terminal illnesses. The Colorado State University Pet Hospice program meets those needs through supporting pets, their owners, and veterinarians, and educating professional veterinary students in end-of-life care. Developed in 2003, Pet Hospice is a student-run program that trains veterinary students in animal hospice care, and matches them with the family and veterinarian of a terminally ill pet in the community. Since its inception, 101 veterinary student volunteers have been trained and provided support to 68 families. Continued expansion of the client base, enlargement of the network of veterinarians and volunteers, and positive program evaluations reflect the strong impact of Pet Hospice and its support from veterinary students, veterinarians, and the community. PMID:19228904

  5. Findings from a nursing scholarship study tour to inform a proposal for a day hospice model in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Swetenham, Kate

    2014-02-01

    South Australia releases national and international travel scholarships every year to the nursing and midwifery workforce to enable them to undertake observational site visits to inform the development of service models that can be introduced into care practices back in South Australia. Ten sites across New Zealand, Canada, and the UK agreed to host a site visit as part of a scholarship to look at day hospice (DH) programmes. The author undertook an observational study that included participation in DH programmes and discussions with staff and patients. There were many similarities across the three countries, in particular in the structure of the programmes, the staff makeup, and the support of the volunteer workforce. Two distinct models were observed: social and medical. Each has its value and both need to be incorporated to ensure services and participants have their needs met. Based on the site visits and other research, the author devised a proposal for South Australia to commence with a time-limited sessional group DH programme with a focus on maintenance of function for participants coupled with caregiver education and information provision. PMID:24577215

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for the surgical treatment of rectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO).

    PubMed

    Xynos, Evaghelos; Tekkis, Paris; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Vini, Louiza; Chrysou, Evangelia; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Triantopoulou, Charina; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Karachaliou, Niki; Ziras, Nikolaos; Zoras, Odysseas; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer management, accurate staging by magnetic resonance imaging, neo-adjuvant treatment with the use of radiotherapy, and total mesorectal excision have resulted in remarkable improvement in the oncological outcomes. However, there is substantial discrepancy in the therapeutic approach and failure to adhere to international guidelines among different Greek-Cypriot hospitals. The present guidelines aim to aid the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, considering both the local special characteristics of our healthcare system and the international relevant agreements (ESMO, EURECCA). Following background discussion and online communication sessions for feedback among the members of an executive team, a consensus rectal cancer management was obtained. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology voting system on two rounds to achieve further consensus by invited multidisciplinary international experts on colorectal cancer. Statements were considered of high, moderate or low consensus if they were voted by ≥80%, 60-80%, or <60%, respectively; those obtaining a low consensus level after both voting rounds were rejected. One hundred and two statements were developed and voted by 100 experts. The mean rate of abstention per statement was 12.5% (range: 2-45%). In the end of the process, all statements achieved a high consensus. Guidelines and algorithms of diagnosis and treatment were proposed. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized. PMID:27064746

  7. Clinical practice guidelines for the surgical treatment of rectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO)

    PubMed Central

    Xynos, Evaghelos; Tekkis, Paris; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Vini, Louiza; Chrysou, Evangelia; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Triantopoulou, Charina; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Karachaliou, Niki; Ziras, Nikolaos; Zoras, Odysseas; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer management, accurate staging by magnetic resonance imaging, neo-adjuvant treatment with the use of radiotherapy, and total mesorectal excision have resulted in remarkable improvement in the oncological outcomes. However, there is substantial discrepancy in the therapeutic approach and failure to adhere to international guidelines among different Greek-Cypriot hospitals. The present guidelines aim to aid the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, considering both the local special characteristics of our healthcare system and the international relevant agreements (ESMO, EURECCA). Following background discussion and online communication sessions for feedback among the members of an executive team, a consensus rectal cancer management was obtained. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology voting system on two rounds to achieve further consensus by invited multidisciplinary international experts on colorectal cancer. Statements were considered of high, moderate or low consensus if they were voted by ≥80%, 60-80%, or <60%, respectively; those obtaining a low consensus level after both voting rounds were rejected. One hundred and two statements were developed and voted by 100 experts. The mean rate of abstention per statement was 12.5% (range: 2-45%). In the end of the process, all statements achieved a high consensus. Guidelines and algorithms of diagnosis and treatment were proposed. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized. PMID:27064746

  8. Revisiting perceptions of quality of hospice care: managing for the ultimate referral.

    PubMed

    Churchman, Richard; York, Grady S; Woodard, Beth; Wainright, Charles; Rau-Foster, Mary

    2014-08-01

    Hospice services provided in the final months of life are delivered through complex interpersonal relationships between caregivers, patients, and families. Often, service value and quality are defined by these interpersonal interactions. This understanding provides hospice leaders with an enormous opportunity to create processes that provide the optimal level of care during the last months of life. The authors argue that the ultimate referral is attained when a family member observes the care of a loved one, and the family member conveys a desire to receive the same quality of services their loved one received at that facility. The point of this article is to provide evidence that supports the methods to ultimately enhance the patient's and family's experience and increase the potential for the ultimate referral. PMID:23928074

  9. Views of hospice and palliative care among younger and older sexually diverse women.

    PubMed

    June, Andrea; Segal, Daniel L; Klebe, Kelli; Watts, Linda K

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore end-of-life health care attitudes among younger and older sexually diverse women. Self-identified lesbian and heterosexual older women as well as lesbian and heterosexual middle-aged women were recruited. Results indicated that lesbian women held significantly more positive beliefs about hospice services and the role of alternative medicines in health care. No differences among sexual orientation were found for comfort discussing pain management but heterosexual women reported a significantly greater desire for life-sustaining treatments in the event of an incurable disease and severe life-limiting conditions (eg, feeding tube, life support, no brain response). Additionally, as expected, older women in this study held more positive beliefs about hospice and more comfort discussing pain management than middle-aged women. PMID:22144659

  10. Gendered Processes in Hospice Palliative Home Care for Seniors With Cancer and Their Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Nisha; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; McWilliam, Carol; Stajduhar, Kelli

    2016-06-01

    There has been limited investigation into the processes that shape gender (in)equities in hospice palliative home care. As part of a larger critical ethnographic study, we examined how and why gender relations occur in this context. Using a critical feminist lens, we conducted in-depth interviews with clients living with terminal cancer, their family caregivers and primary nurses; observations of agency home visits; and review of institutional documents. A gender-based analysis revealed that gender enactments of Regulating Gender Relations were legitimized through ideological processes of Normalizing Gender Relations and Equalizing Gender Relations (Re)produced through institutional discourses of individualism and egalitarianism, these gendered processes both advantaged and disadvantaged men and women in hospice palliative home care. Findings suggest that to promote equity, health care providers and policy makers must attend to gender as a prevalent social determinant of health and health care. Implications for policy, practice, education, and research are discussed. PMID:26489710

  11. Caregiver evaluation in hospice: application of a semi-structured interview.

    PubMed

    Andruccioli, Jessica; Russo, Maria Maffia; Bruschi, Angela; Pedrabissi, Luigi; Sarti, Donatella; Monterubbianesi, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Sabina; Rocconi, Sabina; Raffaeli, William

    2011-09-01

    In this study we report the results of construction and administration of a semi-structured interview for the evaluation of caregivers in hospice. The results presented here are related to interviews (n = 25) that were administered at Rimini Hospice. According to the interview coding system, it was possible to identify thematic areas of the interviews where the caregiver's distress was mainly concentrated. As concerning the care burden, greater distress was detected in areas relating to the change in the rhythm of life (38%) and in social network (26%); whereas, as concerning the psychological burden, a greater distress was detected in the area related to the caregiver role (51%). In conclusion, a singular element identified as a source of distress in, our study, is that of social network. PMID:21190946

  12. What Is the Essence of Spiritual Care? A Danish Hospice Perspective.

    PubMed

    Steenfeldt, Vibeke Ostergaard

    2016-01-01

    This study explored patients', relatives', and healthcare professionals' experience of life and caring practice in two Danish hospice settings. Using a phenomenological approach, four caring themes emerged from data analysis: recognized as an individual human being; caring as doing and being; caring for the whole body; and spaces of caring. Spiritual care was understood as providing whole-body experiences, respecting the patient, and involving the other person. PMID:27299946

  13. Hospice and palliative care development in India: a multimethod review of services and experiences.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Elizabeth; Selman, Lucy; Wright, Michael; Clark, David

    2008-06-01

    Palliative care has been developing in India since the mid-1980s, but there is a dearth of evidence about service provision on which to base national policy and practice. The aim of this study was to assess the current state of palliative care in India, mapping the existence of services state by state, and documenting the perspectives and experiences of those involved. A multimethod review was used, which included synthesis of evidence from published and grey literature, ethnographic field visits, qualitative interviews with 87 individuals from 12 states, and collation of existing public health data. The review identified 138 hospice and palliative care services in 16 states and union territories. These are mostly concentrated in large cities, with the exception of Kerala, where they are much more widespread. Nongovernmental organizations, public and private hospitals, and hospices are the predominant sources of provision. We were unable to identify palliative care services in 19 states/union territories. Development of services is uneven, with greater provision evident in the south than the north, but for the majority of states, coverage is poor. Barriers to the development of palliative care include: poverty, population density, geography, opioid availability, workforce development, and limited national palliative care policy. Successful models exist for the development of affordable, sustainable community-based palliative care services. These have arisen from adapting Western models of hospice and palliative care for implementation in the Indian cultural context. Further work is required to ensure that the growing interest in hospice and palliative care in India is used to increase the momentum of progress. PMID:18395401

  14. 42 CFR 418.110 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. A copy of the code is available for inspection at the CMS... incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. A copy of the code is available... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Hospices that...

  15. Creatively caring: effects of arts-based encounters on hospice caregivers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Repar, Patricia Ann; Reid, Steve

    2014-05-01

    International literature and experience suggest that arts-based encounters can be effective in reducing stress and burnout in health care workers. Are these principles universal? Are they as applicable and effective in resource-constrained situations in Africa as in other parts of the world? We describe the impact of creative and arts-based encounters on a group of hospice caregivers at South Coast Hospice in KwaZulu Natal. An experienced facilitator built a caring and trusting relationship with the participants over a three month period through a variety of means, including a singing and songwriting intervention specifically designed to empower and give voice to the hospice caregivers, most of whom were Zulu women. We documented the process through several rounds of interviews, extensive field notes, and audio recordings. This article is a reflection on the experience and draws from the interviews, correspondence among researchers, field notes, and a performance piece written by the facilitator one year after completion of the study. We found that the songwriting and other creative activities of the engagement provided affirmation and acknowledgment of the caregivers as well as an opportunity to release stress, grief, and pain. They experienced changes in terms of hope and freedom both for themselves and their patients. The conceptual themes that emerged from the interviews with the caregivers were interpreted in terms of their inherent cultural assets, a release of agency, a sense of revelation, and transformation. The expressive arts can have a significantly beneficial effect on hospice workers and their patients, and clinical engagement can be enhanced through creative encounters, even in resource-constrained situations. If such creative processes were to be promoted among a wider group of health workers, daily routine work in health care could be not just a repetition of well-rehearsed utilitarian rituals but rather a series of creative and transformative

  16. AAHA senior care guidelines for dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Mark; Kuehn, Ned F; Landsberg, Gary; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Marks, Steven L; Schaedler, Jean M; Tuzio, Helen

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a working framework for enhancing the well-being of senior pet dogs and cats. Approaches to screening the medical status of senior pets are described in detail, with particular emphasis on establishing baseline data in healthy animals, the testing of clinically ill animals, and assessing senior pets prior to anesthesia and surgery. The management of pain and distress and the application of hospice and palliative care are addressed. Advice on ways to approach euthanasia and dealing with end-of-life issues is also provided. PMID:15767650

  17. Predicting hospice appropriateness for patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Marsh, G W; Prochoda, K P; Pritchett, E; Vojir, C P

    2000-11-01

    The appropriateness of admitting individuals to hospice services is determined by assessing the individual's 6-month survival prognosis. Clinical parameters that guide clinicians in assessing prognosis, however, are not well defined in cases of dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT) when compared to other illnesses. The Alzheimer's-Hospice Placement Evaluation Scale (AHOPE) was developed to assess the 6-month prognosis of individuals with late-stage DAT. The purposes of this study were to estimate the reliability and predictive validity of AHOPE and to test additional demographic and clinical indicators to determine their added contribution to predicting 6-month survival and hospice appropriateness. Data were collected on 112 long-term care residents with DAT at enrollment and 6 months following enrollment. Initial reliability and predictive validity of AHOPE were supported. Other demographic and clinical indicators were not predictors of 6-month survival. Although additional research is indicated, nurses can use AHOPE to enhance clinical observation and decision making for implementing appropriate care strategies for patients with end-stage DAT and their families. PMID:11078784

  18. Professional and educational needs of hospice and palliative care social workers.

    PubMed

    Weisenfluh, Sherri M; Csikai, Ellen L

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade much growth has occurred in the numbers of patients and families served by hospices and palliative care services. Thus, not surprisingly, these services have also been subject to increasing regulation by governmental and accrediting entities. In order to stay up-to-date in this ever-changing environment and to continue to provide effective interventions, social workers must stay engaged in the professional community and continuing education. In this quantitative study, 1,169 practicing hospice and palliative care social workers provided information about their practice activities and agency characteristics, professional affiliations and certification, and ongoing educational needs. About one-half of respondents carried a caseload of 21-50 and were most engaged in communicating the psychosocial needs of the patient and family to other members of the team and assessing for grief and bereavement issues. The most important educational needs pertained to the psychological and social needs of patients and families and psychosocial interventions. Most were members of professional organizations and three-quarters were members of NASW. Although many were aware of the joint NASW-NHPCO social work hospice specialty certification, few held this certification yet. The results of this survey can be utilized in the design of continuing education programs and advocacy for programmatic and policy change within agencies and the industry. PMID:23438645

  19. 'Hospice' versus 'hospital' care--re-evaluation after 10 years as seen by surviving spouses.

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, C. M.; Parkes, J.

    1984-01-01

    This study compares terminal cancer care in 1967-69 with care in 1977-79 as evaluated by surviving spouses of patients who died in St Christopher's Hospice and other local hospitals. Patients and their surviving spouses reported less personal distress in both settings in 1977-79 than in 1967-69 and the patients were also thought to have suffered less pain. These differences were found before, during and, in surviving spouses, after the period of terminal care. They were confirmed in subsamples of 30-34 patients matched for age, sex, socio-economic status and duration of terminal period. Improvements may be attributable to the training in terminal care provided by staff of the Hospice since 1967 and augmented in its Study Centre which was opened in 1973. Although pain and distress in the patient is no longer a major problem in either setting, spouses in 1977-79 remain less anxious at St Christopher's Hospice than at other hospitals; they play a larger part in the care of the patient and are in closer contact with staff before and after bereavement. PMID:6709542

  20. The changing demographics of inpatient hospice death: Population-based cross-sectional study in England, 1993–2012

    PubMed Central

    Sleeman, Katherine E; Davies, Joanna M; Verne, Julia; Gao, Wei; Higginson, Irene J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies in the United Kingdom and elsewhere have suggested inequality of hospice provision with respect to factors such as age, diagnosis and socio-economic position. How this has changed over time is unknown. Aim: To describe the factors associated with inpatient hospice death in England and examine how these have changed over time. Design: Population-based study. Multivariable Poisson regression compared 1998–2002, 2003–2007 and 2008–2012, with 1993–1997. Explanatory variables included individual factors (age, gender, marital status, underlying cause of death) and area-based measures of deprivation. Setting: Adults aged 25 years and over who died in inpatient hospice units in England between 1993 and 2002 (n = 446,615). Results: The annual number of hospice deaths increased from 17,440 in 1993 to 26,032 in 2012, accounting for 3.4% of all deaths in 1993 and 6.0% in 2012. A total of 50.6% of hospice decedents were men; the mean age was 69.9 (standard deviation: 12.4) years. The likelihood of hospice decedents being in the oldest age group (>85 years) increased over time (proportion ratio: 1.43, 95% confidence interval: 1.39 to 1.48 for 2008–2012 compared to 1993–1997). Just 5.2% of all hospice decedents had non-cancer diagnoses, though the likelihood of non-cancer conditions increased over time (proportion ratio: 1.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.37 to 1.46 for 2008–2012 compared to 1993–1997). The likelihood of hospice decedents being resident in the least deprived quintile increased over time (proportion ratio: 1.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.22 to 1.29 for 2008–2012 compared to 1993–1997). Conclusion: The increase in non-cancer conditions among hospice decedents is encouraging although absolute numbers remain very small. Deprivation trends are concerning and require further exploration. PMID:25991729

  1. The Power of Advance Care Planning in Promoting Hospice and Out-of-Hospital Death in a Dialysis Unit

    PubMed Central

    Weaner, Barbara B.; Long, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite mortality rates that exceed those of most cancers, hospice remains underutilized in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis and nearly half of all dialysis patients die in the hospital. Objective: To review the impact of advance care planning on withdrawal from dialysis, use of hospice, and location of death. Design: Retrospective review. Setting: A rural outpatient dialysis unit. Participants: Former dialysis patients who died over a 5-year period. Exposure: Advance care planning, the use of physician orders for life-sustaining therapy program (POLST). Main Outcome and Measure: Use of hospice among patients withdrawing from dialysis, location of death. Results: Advance care planning was associated with a low incidence of in-hospital death and among those who withdrew, a high use of hospice. Conclusions and Relevance: Comprehensive and systematic advance care planning among patients with ESRD on dialysis promotes greater hospice utilization and may facilitate the chance that death will occur out of hospital. PMID:25006866

  2. When Hospice Fails: The Limits of Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Barbara J.

    1994-01-01

    Examines feasibility of palliative approach for all patients, showing reasonable people may refuse even the most exemplary care for themselves or an incompetent relative. Medical realities and alleviation of pointless suffering necessitate that policymakers consider other options, including "active" euthanasia, consistent with patient autonomy and…

  3. COASTAL GUIDELINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:Developed to support effluent guidelines for the coastal subcategory of the oil and gas extraction industry. Data were used to develop environmental impacts, potential regulatory limits, and the cost of regulation.
    Legislation/Enabling Authority:...

  4. Supporting tools for guideline development and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Quaglini, S; Dazzi, L; Gatti, L; Stefanelli, M; Fassino, C; Tondini, C

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for representing clinical practice guidelines and facilitating their introduction into the medical routine. Since this methodology can be exploited in a www environment, it can represent the basis for sharing clinical guidelines both between different institutions and between human and software agents cooperating within a clinical context. In addition, the proposed guideline formalization is intended to deal with patient and organization preferences. This goal is achieved by augmenting the guideline with decision analytic models and by linking the guideline with an organizational model of the clinical setting. The designed framework allows guideline development, tailoring and implementation, real-time access to the guideline prescriptions and guideline validation. PMID:9779886

  5. The Use of Videophones for Patient and Family Participation in Hospice Interdisciplinary Team Meetings: A Promising Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Porock, Davina

    2009-01-01

    Inclusion of patients and caregivers in decisions related to the delivery of care is inherent in the hospice philosophy. Telemedicine technologies offer a potential solution to the challenges presented by the geographic distance between team meetings and the home environment. While inclusion requires additional coordination by the hospice team, it also offers an important opportunity to improve communication between the team and the patient and family. A modified conceptual model based on two previous frameworks is outlined to support patient and family involvement in hospice team meetings. Further research is suggested to determine the structural feasibility of patient and family involvement via videophone as well as the structural and procedural changes resulting from this inclusion. Finally, clinical outcomes and family evaluation of the inclusion experience need to be thoroughly researched before final conclusions may be reached. PMID:19832889

  6. Guidelines for safe work practices in human and animal medical diagnostic laboratories. Recommendations of a CDC-convened, Biosafety Blue Ribbon Panel.

    PubMed

    Miller, J Michael; Astles, Rex; Baszler, Timothy; Chapin, Kimberle; Carey, Roberta; Garcia, Lynne; Gray, Larry; Larone, Davise; Pentella, Michael; Pollock, Anne; Shapiro, Daniel S; Weirich, Elizabeth; Wiedbrauk, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of injuries and occupational infections in U.S. laboratories has been a concern for many years. CDC and the National Institutes of Health addressed the topic in their publication Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, now in its 5th edition (BMBL-5). BMBL-5, however, was not designed to address the day-to-day operations of diagnostic laboratories in human and animal medicine. In 2008, CDC convened a Blue Ribbon Panel of laboratory representatives from a variety of agencies, laboratory organizations, and facilities to review laboratory biosafety in diagnostic laboratories. The members of this panel recommended that biosafety guidelines be developed to address the unique operational needs of the diagnostic laboratory community and that they be science based and made available broadly. These guidelines promote a culture of safety and include recommendations that supplement BMBL-5 by addressing the unique needs of the diagnostic laboratory. They are not requirements but recommendations that represent current science and sound judgment that can foster a safe working environment for all laboratorians. Throughout these guidelines, quality laboratory science is reinforced by a common-sense approach to biosafety in day-to-day activities. Because many of the same diagnostic techniques are used in human and animal diagnostic laboratories, the text is presented with this in mind. All functions of the human and animal diagnostic laboratory--microbiology, chemistry, hematology, and pathology with autopsy and necropsy guidance--are addressed. A specific section for veterinary diagnostic laboratories addresses the veterinary issues not shared by other human laboratory departments. Recommendations for all laboratories include use of Class IIA2 biological safety cabinets that are inspected annually; frequent hand washing; use of appropriate disinfectants, including 1:10 dilutions of household bleach; dependence on risk assessments for many activities

  7. Coordinating locally 'owned' treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Collier, J; Picton, C; Littlejohns, P

    1994-01-01

    South West Thames Regional Health Authority established and commissioned a regional guidelines unit to coordinate the introduction of a set of treatment guidelines on the management of common medical emergencies into all the acute intaking National Health Service (NHS) hospitals throughout the region. All hospitals were offered a set of template guidelines to be used at their discretion for producing their own customised equivalent. They were also offered full typing and production facilities, together with printing costs if publication was achieved by a target deadline (1 August 1993). In 11 of the 14 NHS hospitals guidelines were available to hospital staff by the target deadline, and one set was produced for a non-NHS hospital. In two hospitals the target date was not met, and one other declined to take part. As part of the project the unit assessed the extent to which the published guidelines were adapted to meet the requirements of each individual hospital. The template offered guidelines on 34 topic titles. No hospital used all core titles of the original template; titles were omitted or replaced in some, and added in others. Where the original guideline titles were used, there was almost always some customisation--changes in sentence structure, names or contact numbers, alterations in drugs and doses or the addition or omission of entire sections. By using an established resource, sets of customised, locally determined treatment guidelines were introduced with relative ease into most of the acute hospitals in a UK health region. PMID:7884707

  8. Radiology Preparedness in Ebola Virus Disease: Guidelines and Challenges for Disinfection of Medical Imaging Equipment for the Protection of Staff and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmore, Tara N.; Folio, Les R.; Bluemke, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The overlap of early Ebola virus disease (EVD) symptoms (eg, fever, headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea, emesis, and fatigue) with symptoms of other more common travel-related diseases (eg, malaria, typhoid fever, pneumonia, and meningococcemia) may result in delayed diagnosis of EVD before isolation of infected patients. Radiology departments should consider policies for and approaches to decontamination of expensive and potentially easily damaged radiology equipment. In addition, the protection of radiology personnel must be considered during the work-up phase of undiagnosed EVD patients presenting to emergency departments. The purpose of this article is to consider the effect of EVD on radiology departments and imaging equipment, with particular consideration of guidelines currently available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that may be applicable to radiology. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:25654616

  9. Off-label prescriptions in Italian hospices: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Toscani, Franco; Di Giulio, Paola; Campi, Rita; Pellerin, Ivanoe; De Luca, Anna; Casale, Giuseppe

    2009-09-01

    Off-label prescription is part of routine care in palliative medicine, but no information is available about the situation in Italy. A cross-sectional observational survey was undertaken on all 66 Italian palliative care freestanding inpatient units to describe off-label prescriptions. Data were collected on 507 patients. Each prescribed drug was matched with Italian Marketing Authorization indications: 159 drugs off-label (4.5% of all prescribed drugs) for the stated indication were given to 128 patients (25.2%), and drugs unlicensed for subcutaneous injection were given to 147 patients (85.4% of all subcutaneous prescriptions, excluding insulin and heparin). The off-label prescriptions were subsequently evaluated by referring to the Italian National Pharmaceutical Formulary (INPF) and the British Palliative Care Formulary (PCF2). Although drugs are frequently prescribed off-label in inpatient palliative care units in Italy, this strategy was not always backed by clinical evidence, and in some cases, official/authoritative sources, such as INPF and PCF2 did not support it. Clinical trials and/or agreed international guidelines are needed to support the off-label use of the most widely prescribed drugs in palliation. PMID:19564095

  10. The impact of advance care planning of place of death, a hospice retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Julian; Pring, Andy; Rich, Alison; Malik, Tariq; Verne, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is limited evidence of the impact of advance care planning (ACP) on outcomes. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on deaths of all patients known to a hospice in a 2.5-year period to see if use of ACP affected actual place of death, hospital use and cost of hospital care in the last year. Results 969 patients were included. 550 (57%) people completed ACP. 414 (75%) achieved their choice of place of death. For those who chose home, 34 (11.3%) died in hospital; a care home 2 (1.7%) died in hospital; a hospice 14 (11.2%) died in hospital and 6 (86%) who chose to die in hospital did so. 112 (26.5%) of people without ACP died in hospital. Mean number of days in hospital in the last year of life was 18.1 in the ACP group and 26.5 in the non-ACP group(p<0.001). Mean cost of hospital treatment during the last year of life for those who died in hospital was £11,299, those dying outside of hospital £7,730 (p<0.001). Mean number of emergency admissions for those who died in hospital was 2.2 and who died elsewhere was 1.7 (p<0.001). Conclusions ACP can be used routinely in a hospice setting. Those who used ACP spent less time in hospital in their last year. ACP is associated with a reduction in the number of days in hospital in the last year of life with less hospital costs, supporting the assumptions made in the End of Life Care Strategy 2008. PMID:23626905

  11. Reflections on the history of occupational stress in hospice/palliative care.

    PubMed

    Vachon, M L

    1999-01-01

    The concept of hospice and palliative care emerged a quarter of a century ago out of recognition of the unmet needs of dying persons and the social issues of the 1960s and 1970s. The issues of the day included the sexual revolution; a questioning of social values; an increased awareness of death resulting from the murder of the Kennedy brothers and Martin Luther King and daily television exposure to deaths in the Vietnam War, feminism, consumerism, reclaiming a more humanized role in the birth process, and hence in the process of death. The history of the hospice movement and the stress experienced by staff is traced from the early developmental days through to the present. Initially there was sometimes a struggle to integrate the concepts of relief of physical symptoms with meeting the psychosocial and emotional needs of patients and families, caregivers were expected to sacrifice much of their personal life for work, emotional intensity was high and supports were developed to ease some of the stress experienced by caregivers. From the early days team stress and burnout have been issues of concern. In the 1980s issues involved establishing funding sources, dealing with the new crisis of AIDS, and dealing with the gap between the ideal and the real. In the 1990s the economic climate has escalated some of the tensions that have always existed as hospice attempts to position itself within mainstream care with diminishing fiscal resources. These are issues that confront us as we move into the next century. PMID:10839014

  12. FDA Advise-ERR: Mefloquine-Not the Same as Malarone; Zoster Vaccine Is Not for the Immunosuppressed; TXA Mistaken as Tenecteplase; Guidelines for Adult IV Push Medications.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2015-11-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:27621501

  13. Sedation at the end of life: a hospice's decision-making practices in the UK.

    PubMed

    Dean, Antonia; Miller, Barbara; Woodwork, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    The administration of sedative drugs at the end of life raises both clinical and ethical challenges. This article details the evolution of sedation decision-making practices at a 14-bedded UK hospice over the course of 5 years through an initial review and two follow-up audits. Key areas, such as documented consideration of hydration status and discussion with family members, have been improved following the implementation of a checklist of decision-making prompts, demonstrating how practice can be improved and sustained over time. PMID:25350213

  14. Hospice disease types which indicate a greater need for bereavement counseling.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brian W

    2010-05-01

    This article attempts to find a correlation between certain disease types and increased needs for bereavement services for survivors. Data were examined from those requesting increased bereavement services from a hospice provider in Kentucky, over a 2-year span. The survivors were then matched with the disease type of their loved one to see whether there was a connection between the two. Although limited in its scope and focus, the study revealed that patients surviving Alzheimer disease, lung cancer, and renal failure consistently (at least 50% of the time) required increased bereavement services after the death of their loved one. Other disease types indicated more erratic patterns for increased grief services. PMID:19837970

  15. Care of critically ill surgical patients using the 80-hour Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education work-week guidelines: a survey of current strategies.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Chad R; Axelrad, Alex; Alexander, James B; Dellinger, R Phillip; Ross, Steven E

    2006-06-01

    As a result of the recently mandated work-hour restrictions, it has become more difficult to provide 24-hour intensive care unit (ICU) in-house coverage by the general surgical residents. To assess the current state of providing appropriate continuous care to surgical critical care patients during the era of resident work-hour constraints, a national survey was conducted by the Association of Program Directors of Surgery. The results revealed that 37 per cent of programs surveyed have residents other than general surgery housestaff providing cross-coverage and writing orders for surgical ICU patients. Residents in emergency medicine, anesthesia, family medicine, otorhinolaryngology, obstetrics/gynecology, internal medicine, urology, and orthopedic surgery have provided this cross-coverage. Some found it necessary to use physician extenders (i.e., nurse practitioners or physician assistants), thereby decreasing the burden of surgical housestaff coverage. The results indicated that 30 per cent use physician extenders to help cover the ICU during daytime hours and 11 per cent used them during nighttime hours. In addition, 24 per cent used a "night-float" system in an attempt to maintain continuous care, yet still adhere to the mandated guidelines. In conclusion, our survey found multiple strategies, including the use of physician extenders, a "night-float" system, and the use of nongeneral surgical residents in an attempt to provide continuous coverage for surgical ICU patients. The overall outcome of these new strategies still needs to be assessed before any beneficial results can be demonstrated. PMID:16808201

  16. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miller, G

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields. PMID:3434538

  17. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  18. A Comprehensive Project to Develop a Complete Curriculum in the Area of Medical Records Technician, Including Guidelines for the Development of a Two-Year Collegiate Curriculum for Medical Record Technicians. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Robert L.

    The objectives of the project were to determine the quantitative need of medical record technicians, to develop a curriculum, and to explore hospitals to be used for clinical experience. Five hundred and three hospitals assumed to be representative of the 7,127 listed by the American Hospital Association responded to a questionnaire. Projected…

  19. [Key ethic discussions in hospice/palliative care].

    PubMed

    Jusić, Anica

    2008-12-01

    The goal of palliative care is to provide the best possible quality of life for patients and their families in the process of dying as well as before, during the course of illness. Emphasis is on the role of team approach in every aspect of patient care. The moral principles of sacredness of life and the right of personal autonomy may occasionally come in conflict. The basic principle of the respect of life prohibits killing, which has been accepted in one way or another by all societies - for the reasons of survival. Similar to this, modern morality supports the principle of respecting autonomy and self-management based on informed, conscious personality of an individual. Still, if the needs of another person appear to be more important or desirable than reaching certain individual goals, then the right of an individual regarding autonomy may be legitimately limited. Decisions on not applying or terminating certain procedures must be based on thorough discussion and consideration of the nature and expected result of treatment. If the patient is not competent, then the discussion should involve a team providing care for the patient and a representative of the patient. When the physician and the team can clearly see that unfavorable effects of treatment will outweigh therapeutic benefits, then, according to medical ethics of the respecting beneficiary, the team is not obliged to provide that form of treatment. Except for palliative care, there is no medical treatment that is always obligatory. A physician that does not accept the patient's request to be killed does not limit the patient's autonomy. Autonomy is self-management and capability of the patient to kill him/herself is not limited by the physician's refusal to do so. Even in those cases when patients for various reasons say that death will be a relief, it does not mean that the physician is obliged to terminate life. The superior obligation of physicians is to alleviate pain. If euthanasia would be legal

  20. An implementation framework for GEM encoded guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Gershkovich, P.; Shiffman, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Access to timely decision support information is critical for delivery of high-quality medical care. Transformation of clinical knowledge that is originally expressed in the form of a guideline to a computable format is one of the main obstacles to the integration of knowledge sharing functionality into computerized clinical systems. The Guideline Element Model (GEM) provides a methodology for such a transformation. Although the model has been used to store heterogeneous guideline knowledge, it is important to demonstrate that GEM markup facilitates guideline implementation. This report demonstrates the feasibility of implementation of GEM-encoded guideline recommendations using Apache Group s Cocoon Web Publishing Framework. We further demonstrate how XML-based programming allows for maintaining the separation of guideline content from processing logic and from presentation format. Finally, we analyze whether the guideline authors original intent has been sufficiently captured and conveyed to the end user. PMID:11825181