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Sample records for hospital maternity records

  1. Recording of Neonatal Seizures in Birth Certificates, Maternal Interviews, and Hospital Discharge Abstracts in a Cerebral Palsy Case-Control Study in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Lenski, Madeleine; Copeland, Glenn; Kinsman, Stephen L; Francis, Matthew; Kirby, Russell S; Paneth, Nigel

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the recording of neonatal seizures in birth certificates, hospital discharge abstracts, and maternal interviews in 372 children, 198 of them with cerebral palsy, born in Michigan hospitals from 1993 to 2010. In birth certificates, we examined checkbox items "seizures" or "seizure or serious neurologic dysfunction"; in hospital discharge abstracts ICD-9-CM codes 779.0, 345.X, and 780.3; and in maternal interviews a history of seizures or convulsions on day 1 of life recalled 2-16 years later. In 27 neonates, 38 neonatal seizures were recorded in 1 or more sources, 17 in discharge abstracts, 20 in maternal interviews, but just 1 on a birth certificate. The kappa coefficient (κ) between interviews and discharge abstracts was moderate (κ = 0.55), and substantial (κ = 0.63) if mothers noted use of antiepileptics. Agreement was higher (κ = 0.71 vs κ = 0.29) in term births than in preterm births. Birth certificates significantly underreported neonatal seizures. PMID:26668053

  2. Maternity records in Edinburgh and Aberdeen in 1936: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, A M; Ayaz, E; Sherlock, L; Shenkin, S D

    2015-03-01

    Historians have long used maternity records to understand the evolution of maternity services. More recently, epidemiologists have become interested in obstetric hospital records as a source of data (e.g. birth weight, social class), to study the influence of early life on future health and disease: life course epidemiology. Edinburgh and Aberdeen are unusual in holding detailed records from several maternity institutions. The records of 1936 are of particular interest because all children born in this year and at school in Scotland at age 11 sat a cognitive ability test, the Scottish Mental Survey 1947. This study aims to describe the maternity services in Edinburgh and Aberdeen in 1936, between the First and Second World Wars. Understanding the richness of data in birth records, the manner in which they were recorded, and the context of the institutions in their community is essential for interpreting life course epidemiology studies. PMID:25874836

  3. Influence of the support offered to breastfeeding by maternity hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Passanha, Adriana; Benício, Maria Helena D’Aquino; Venâncio, Sônia Isoyama; dos Reis, Márcia Cristina Guerreiro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether the support offered by maternity hospitals is associated with higher prevalences of exclusive and predominant breastfeeding. METHODS This is a cross-sectional study including a representative sample of 916 infants less than six months who were born in maternity hospitals, in Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, 2011. The maternity hospitals were evaluated in relation to their fulfillment of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Data were collected regarding breastfeeding patterns, the birth hospital and other characteristics. The individualized effect of the study factor on exclusive and predominant breastfeeding was analyzed using Poisson multiple regression with robust variance. RESULTS Predominant breastfeeding tended to be more prevalent when the number of fulfilled steps was higher (p of linear trend = 0.057). The step related to not offering artificial teats or pacifiers to breastfed infants and that related to encouraging the establishment of breastfeeding support groups were associated, respectively, to a higher prevalence of exclusive (PR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.04;1.54) and predominant breastfeeding (PR = 1.55; 95%CI 1.01;2.39), after an adjustment was performed for confounding variables. CONCLUSIONS We observed a positive association between support offered by maternity hospitals and prevalences of exclusive and predominant breastfeeding. These results can be useful to other locations with similar characteristics (cities with hospitals that fulfill the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding) to provide incentive to breastfeeding, by means of promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding in maternity hospitals. PMID:26759966

  4. Informal patient payments in maternity hospitals in Kiev, Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Stepurko, Tetiana; Pavlova, Milena; Levenets, Olena; Gryga, Irena; Groot, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Maternity care in Ukraine is a government priority. However, it has not undergone substantial changes since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Similar to the entire health care sector in Ukraine, maternity care suffers from inefficient funding, which results in low quality and poor access to services. The objective of this paper is to explore the practice of informal payments for maternity care in Ukraine, specifically in cases of childbirth in Kiev maternity hospitals. The paper provides an ethnographic study on the consumers' and providers' experiences with informal payments. The results suggest that informal payments for childbirth are an established practice in Kiev maternity hospitals. The bargaining process between the pregnant woman (incl. her partner) and the obstetrician is an important part of the predelivery arrangement, including the informal payment. To deal with informal payments in Kiev maternity hospitals, there is a need for the following: (i) regulation of the "quasi-official" patient payments at the health care facility level; and (ii) improvement of professional ethics through staff training. These strategies should be coupled with improved governance of the health care sector in general, and maternity care in particular in order to attain international quality standards and adequate access to facilities. PMID:23239082

  5. Erratum: maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This erratum corrects article: "Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report." The Pan African Medical Journal. 2015;21:16. doi:10.11604/pamj.2015.21.16.3912[This corrects the article on p. 16 in vol. 21, PMID: 26401210.]. PMID:26816561

  6. Factors for change in maternal and perinatal audit systems in Dar es Salaam hospitals, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Effective maternal and perinatal audits are associated with improved quality of care and reduction of severe adverse outcome. Although audits at the level of care were formally introduced in Tanzania around 25 years ago, little information is available about their existence, performance, and practical barriers to their implementation. This study assessed the structure, process and impacts of maternal and perinatal death audit systems in clinical practice and presents a detailed account on how they could be improved. Methods A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in eight major hospitals in Dar es Salaam in January 2009. An in-depth interview guide was used for 29 health managers and members of the audit committees to investigate the existence, structure, process and outcome of such audits in clinical practice. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview 30 health care providers in the maternity wards to assess their awareness, attitude and practice towards audit systems. The 2007 institutional pregnancy outcome records were reviewed. Results Overall hospital based maternal mortality ratio was 218/100,000 live births (range: 0 - 385) and perinatal mortality rate was 44/1000 births (range: 17 - 147). Maternal and perinatal audit systems existed only in 4 and 3 hospitals respectively, and key decision makers did not take part in audit committees. Sixty percent of care providers were not aware of even a single action which had ever been implemented in their hospitals because of audit recommendations. There were neither records of the key decision points, action plan, nor regular analysis of the audit reports in any of the facilities where such audit systems existed. Conclusions Maternal and perinatal audit systems in these institutions are poorly established in structure and process; and are less effective to improve the quality of care. Fundamental changes are urgently needed for successful audit systems in these institutions. PMID

  7. Association of Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy with Infant Hospitalization and Mortality Due to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Michael J.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal smoking is associated with infant respiratory infections and with increased risk of low birthweight (LBW) infants and preterm birth. This study assesses the association of maternal smoking during pregnancy with both respiratory and non-respiratory infectious disease (ID) morbidity and mortality in infants. Methods We conducted two retrospective case-control analyses of infants born in Washington State from 1987–2004 using linked birth certificate, death certificate, and hospital discharge records. One assessed morbidity—infants hospitalized due to ID within one year of birth (47,404 cases/48,233 controls). The second assessed mortality—infants who died within one year due to ID (627 cases/2,730 controls). Results Maternal smoking was associated with both hospitalization (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.52; 95%CI: 1.46, 1.58) and mortality (AOR=1.51; 95%CI: 1.17, 1.96) due to any ID. In subgroup analyses, maternal smoking was associated with hospitalization due to a broad range of ID including both respiratory (AOR=1.69; 95%CI: 1.63, 1.76) and non-respiratory ID (AOR=1.27; 95%CI: 1.20, 1.34). Further stratification by birthweight and gestational age did not appreciably change these estimates. In contrast, there was no association of maternal smoking with ID infant mortality when only LBW infants were considered. Conclusions Maternal smoking was associated with a broad range of both respiratory and non-respiratory ID outcomes. Despite attenuation of the mortality association among LBW infants, ID hospitalization was found to be independent of both birthweight and gestational age. These findings suggest that full-term infants of normal weight whose mothers smoked may suffer an increased risk of serious ID morbidity and mortality. PMID:22929173

  8. Maternal mortality in a district hospital in West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Gun, K M

    1970-06-01

    To ascertain the causes of high maternal mortality in West Bengal, the author examined maternal mortality between 1964-68. It was intended that measures to improve the situation in rural areas could be suggested. Women in labor often arrive at the hospital very late and few antenatal care facilities are available in rural areas. High risk cases often are delivered at home, a situation which often results in fetal complications. Maternal deaths have declined, but not dramatically. Of the 24,265 deliveries at the Burdwan district hospital, there were 333 maternal deaths for an incidence of 13.7/1000, along with another 42 cases where death was due to pregnancy-associated causes. In contrast, the maternal mortality rate in a district hospital in Calcutta was 4/1000 in 1968. Eclampsia accounted for 42.34% (141) of maternal deaths making it the major cause of death. In Calcutta this cause of death is receding gradually but in the districts it still accounts for a heavy loss of life (an incidence of 1 in 38). Adequate antenatal care would reduce this high mortality. 2 factors which have contributed to the high mortality are the hours lost in transporting a patient from a rural area and inadequate hospital staff. Postpartum hemorrhage and/or retained placenta was responsible for 39 deaths and none of the cases admitted from outside had received antenatal care. A shortage of blood was also a contributory factor. Severe anemia was responsible for 34 deaths and abortions resulted in another 29 deaths (16 because of severe sepsis; 13 due to hemorrhage or shock). An emergency service would help reduce the number of deaths but at present such a service does not even exist in the urban areas. Ruptured uterus resulted in 29 deaths and obstructed labor in 27 deaths. Placenta previa brought about 14 deaths and the remaining 20 deaths were due to such causes as accidental hemorrhage (10), hydatidiform mole (4), puerperal sepsis (3), ectopic pregnancy (2), and uterine inversion (1

  9. Maternal satisfaction with organized perinatal care in Serbian public hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the experiences and expectations of women across the continuum of antenatal, perinatal, and postnatal care is important to assess the quality of maternal care and to determine problematic areas which could be improved. The objective of this study was to identify the factors associated with maternal satisfaction with hospital-based perinatal care in Serbia. Methods Our survey was conducted from January 2009 to January 2010 using a 28-item, self-administered questionnaire. The sample consisted of 50% of women who expected childbirths during the study period from all 76 public institutions with obstetric departments in Serbia. The following three composite outcome variables were constructed: satisfaction with technical and professional aspects of care; communication and interpersonal aspects of care; and environmental factors. Results We analyzed 34,431 completed questionnaires (84.2% of the study sample). The highest and lowest average satisfaction scores (4.43 and 3.25, respectively) referred to the overall participation of midwives during delivery and the quality of food served in the hospital, respectively. Younger mothers and multiparas were less concerned with the environmental conditions (OR = 0.55, p = 0.006; OR = 1.82, p = 0.004). Final model indicated that mothers informed of patients’ rights, pregnancy and delivery through the Maternal Counseling Service were more likely to be satisfied with all three outcome variables. The highest value of the Pearson’s coefficient of correlation was between the overall satisfaction score and satisfaction with communication and interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusions Our study illuminated the importance of interpersonal aspects of care and education for maternal satisfaction. Improvement of the environmental conditions in hospitals, the WHO program, Baby-friendly Hospital, and above all providing all pregnant women with antenatal education, are recommendations which would

  10. Information for managers in hospitals: representing maternity unit statistics graphically.

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, A; Mugford, M; Stilwell, J A

    1987-01-01

    Staff who organise and run maternity units contribute many statistics to their health authority but do not find it easy to obtain information about their unit from these statistics. Data that are collected routinely, however, can be used to provide each unit with a graphical profile of its activity and resources. The method described here was derived from the personality profiles used by psychologists and allows staff in one unit to assess the outcome, activity, and use of resources in their unit in relation to similar units, to explain some of the differences when these occur, or to highlight potential problems. Examples are taken from a study of maternity units in the West Midlands. It is concluded that the technique can indicate potential problems and usefully be adopted by those who monitor maternity care in districts or hospitals. PMID:3105784

  11. Self-efficacy as a mediator between maternal depression and child hospitalizations in low-income urban families.

    PubMed

    Holland, Margaret L; Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Kitzman, Harriet; Chaudron, Linda; Szilagyi, Peter G; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the role of maternal self-efficacy as a potential mediator between maternal depression and child hospitalizations in low-income families. We analyzed data from 432 mother-child pairs who were part of the control-group for the Nurse-Family Partnership trial in Memphis, TN. Low-income urban, mostly minority women were interviewed 12 and 24 months after their first child's birth and their child's medical records were collected from birth to 24 months. We fit linear and ordered logistic regression models to test for mediation. We also tested non-linear relationships between the dependent variable (child hospitalization) and covariates (depressive symptoms and self-efficacy). Elevated depressive symptoms (OR: 1.70; 90% CI: 1.05, 2.74) and lower maternal self-efficacy (OR: 0.674; 90% CI: 0.469, 0.970) were each associated with increased child hospitalizations. When both maternal self-efficacy and depressive symptoms were included in a single model, the depressive symptoms coefficient decreased significantly (OR decreased by 0.13, P = 0.069), supporting the hypothesis that self-efficacy serves as a mediator. A non-linear, inverse-U shaped relationship between maternal self-efficacy and child hospitalizations was supported: lower compared to higher self-efficacy was associated with more child hospitalizations (P = 0.039), but very low self-efficacy was associated with fewer hospitalizations than low self-efficacy (P = 0.028). In this study, maternal self-efficacy appears to be a mediator between maternal depression and child hospitalizations. Further research is needed to determine if interventions specifically targeting self-efficacy in depressed mothers might decrease child hospitalizations. PMID:20706866

  12. Maternal Clinical Diagnoses and Hospital Variation in the Risk of Cesarean Delivery: Analyses of a National US Hospital Discharge Database

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Arcaya, Mariana C.; Subramanian, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States, where 1.3 million cesarean sections occur annually, and rates vary widely by hospital. Identifying sources of variation in cesarean use is crucial to improving the consistency and quality of obstetric care. We used hospital discharge records to examine the extent to which variability in the likelihood of cesarean section across US hospitals was attributable to individual women's clinical diagnoses. Methods and Findings Using data from the 2009 and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project—a 20% sample of US hospitals—we analyzed data for 1,475,457 births in 1,373 hospitals. We fitted multilevel logistic regression models (patients nested in hospitals). The outcome was cesarean (versus vaginal) delivery. Covariates included diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, hypertension in pregnancy, hemorrhage during pregnancy or placental complications, fetal distress, and fetal disproportion or obstructed labor; maternal age, race/ethnicity, and insurance status; and hospital size and location/teaching status. The cesarean section prevalence was 22.0% (95% confidence interval 22.0% to 22.1%) among women with no prior cesareans. In unadjusted models, the between-hospital variation in the individual risk of primary cesarean section was 0.14 (95% credible interval 0.12 to 0.15). The difference in the probability of having a cesarean delivery between hospitals was 25 percentage points. Hospital variability did not decrease after adjusting for patient diagnoses, socio-demographics, and hospital characteristics (0.16 [95% credible interval 0.14 to 0.18]). A limitation is that these data, while nationally representative, did not contain information on parity or gestational age. Conclusions Variability across hospitals in the individual risk of cesarean section is not decreased by accounting for differences in maternal diagnoses. These findings highlight

  13. ‘Because of Poverty brought into Hospital: . . .’A Casenote-Based Analysis of the Changing Role of the Edinburgh Royal Maternity Hospital, 1850-1912

    PubMed Central

    Nuttall, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although the shift from a social to a medical function which occurred in nineteenth-century general hospitals has been explored, the occurrence of such a change in maternity hospitals has not been considered. Recent analyses of such institutions have examined particular aspects only, and thus give a somewhat static picture. This paper uses analysis of patient records (themselves an under-exploited resource) to explore the changing function of the Edinburgh Royal Maternity Hospital from a provider of shelter during childbirth to the destitute to a source of skilled medical care. It concludes that, although the Hospital had adopted the outward features of a medical institution by 1890, its casebooks suggest that its purpose only truly changed in the early twentieth century, and thus can perhaps be more appropriately linked with national anxiety regarding the health of babies and their mothers. PMID:18605328

  14. Records and record-keeping for the hospital compounding pharmacist.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2007-01-01

    The United States Pharmacopeial Convention, Inc., is recognized by federal law and by most state boards of pharmacy as the official group for setting the standards for pharmaceuticals and pharmacy practice, including compounding. The standards of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 795 require that a pharmacy maintain records on a compounded preparation, including the formulation record, and a Material Safety Data Sheets file. The American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists' guidelines require that hospital pharmacy departments maintain at least four sets of records in the compounding area: (1) compounding formulas and procedures, (2) compounding logs of all compounded preparations, including batch records and sample batch labels, (3) equipment maintenance records, and (4) a record of ingredients purchased, including cerificates of analysis and Material Saftey Data Sheets. Hospital compounding records may be inspected by any of several outside organizations, including state boards of pharmacy, third-party payers, the Joint Commission on Accreditaion of Healthcare Organizations, the Drug Enforcement Agency, and attorneys. With the existing standards and guidelines in place and the importance of documentation unquestionable, a record of pharmacy activites should be maintained in a compounding pharmacy so that preparations can be replicated consistently, the history of each ingredient traced, equipment maintenance and calibration verified, and compounding procedures evaluated easily. PMID:23974620

  15. Neonatal respiratory distress in Omdurman Maternity Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Selma MA; Nasr, Abdelhaleem

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal respiratory distress (NRD) is a common neonatal problem, which is responsible for high morbidity and mortality. There are few published studies in developing countries addressing neonatal respiratory distress. There is no previously published study in Sudan on this problem. The objective of the study is to determine the frequency, different causes, immediate outcome. It was a prospective, descriptive, cross sectional hospital-based study which was carried out in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of Omdurman Maternity Hospital, between February-March 2013. The study enrolled all Sudanese newborns from 0-28 days including normal, low and high birth weight of different gestational ages admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and diagnosed as neonatal respiratory distress. The frequency of NRD was calculated, the causes and immediate outcome were determined. Results showed that the frequency rate of NRD was (4.83%) among the total number of hospital (2071) live births during the period of the study. The commonest causes were transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN) in 28% of cases, sepsis in 24% of cases and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) in 15% of cases. The outcome of NRD was: cure in 56% of cases, death in 36% of cases, and patients discharged with complications in 8% of cases. In conclusion, the study confirmed the importance of NRD with a frequency rate of 4.83%, morbidity of 8% and mortality of 36% of cases. The causes and immediate outcome were determined and discussed. Some recommendations were suggested in order to reduce its frequency, morbidity and mortality. PMID:27493392

  16. Quality of Care: A Review of Maternal Deaths in a Regional Hospital in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adusi-Poku, Yaw; Antwil, Edward; Osei-Kwakye, Kingsley; Tetteh, Chris; Detoh, Eric Kwame; Antwi, Phyllis

    2015-09-01

    The government of Ghana and key stakeholders have put into place several interventions aimed at reducing maternal deaths. At the institutional level, the conduct of maternal deaths audit has been instituted. This also contributes to reducing maternal deaths as shortcomings that may have contributed to such deaths could be identified to inform best practice and forestall such occurrences in the future. The objective of this study was to review the quality of maternal care in a regional hospital. A review of maternal deaths using Quality of Care Evaluation Form adapted from the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) Maternal Death Audit Evaluation Committee was used. About fifty-five percent, 18 (55%) of cases were deemed to have received adequate documentation, senior clinicians were involved in 26(85%) of cases. Poor documentation, non-involvement of senior clinicians in the management of cases, laboratory related issues particularly in relation to blood and blood products as well as promptness of care and adequacy of intensive care facilities and specialists in the hospital were contributory factors to maternal deaths . These are common themes contributing to maternal deaths in developing countries which need to be urgently tackled. Maternal death review with emphasis on quality of care, coupled with facility gap assessment, is a useful tool to address the adequacy of emergency obstetric care services to prevent further maternal deaths. PMID:26897915

  17. Maternal mortality in a subdivisional hospital of eastern Himalayan region.

    PubMed

    Ray, A

    1992-05-01

    This study was conducted in a subdivisional hospital of eastern Himalayan region among 5,273 pregnant women over a period of 8 years. There were 29 deaths, the maternal mortality rate was 55 per 10,000. Septic abortion was encountered in 4 among them. Direct obstetric cause was responsible in 72.41% of cases and indirect cause in 27.59% cases. Sepsis, both puerperal and postabortal resulted in 24.14% followed by postpartum haemorrhage in 20.69%. Two of these cases were associated with inversion of the uterus. Preeclampsia caused 10.34% and eclampsia 6.9% of the deaths. Among the indirect causes severe anaemia and pulmonary tuberculosis accounted for 10.34% and 6.9% respectively. Infective hepatitis was the cause in 6.9% cases. Only 17% of the cases were booked and the rest were unbooked. Majority of the cases (62.07%) belonged to the age group of 20-30 years. Primigravida constituted 41.38% of the cases. PMID:1517613

  18. Trends in Maternal Mortality Ratio in a Tertiary Referral Hospital and the Effects of Various Maternity Schemes on It

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harpreet; Kaur, Sharanjit; Singh, Sukhwinderjit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the trend in maternal mortality ratio in a tertiary care centre and the effect of various maternity schemes on it. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of all maternal deaths occurring in the Guru Gobind Singh Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India was done from Jan 2010 to Dec 2012. Every maternal death was scrutinized from various aspects like direct cause of death, age, locality, antenatal care and gestational age. Results: The total number of deliveries has risen from 957 in 2010 to 1063 in 2012 at the same time the maternal mortality ratio has increased from 835.94 in 2010 to 2054.55 per one live birth in 2012. Haemorrhage (24.12%) and sepsis (18.9%) were the most common causes of death followed closely by pregnancy induced hypertension including eclampsia (15.5%). Anemia (12.06%) contributed to the most common indirect cause of death. Conclusion: Implementation of the various maternity schemes has had no significant impact on the profile of dying mothers. There is a need to stress the importance of good antenatal care in reducing Maternal Mortality Ratio. PMID:26175763

  19. Maternity patients' access to their electronic medical records: use and perspectives of a patient portal.

    PubMed

    Megan Forster, Megan; Dennison, Kerrie; Callen, Joanne; Andrew, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2015-01-01

    Patients have been able to access clinical information from their paper-based health records for a number of years. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) access to this information can now be achieved online using a secure electronic patient portal. The purpose of this study was to investigate maternity patients' use and perceptions of a patient portal developed at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. A web-based patient portal, one of the first developed and deployed in Australia, was introduced on 26 June 2012. The portal was designed for maternity patients booked at Mater Mothers' Hospital, as an alternative to the paper-based Pregnancy Health Record. Through the portal, maternity patients are able to complete their hospital registration form online and obtain current health information about their pregnancy (via their EMR), as well as access a variety of support tools to use during their pregnancy such as tailored public health advice. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was employed. Usage statistics were extracted from the system for a one year period (1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013). Patients' perceptions of the portal were obtained using an online survey, accessible by maternity patients for two weeks in February 2013 (n=80). Descriptive statistics were employed to analyse the data. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 10,892 maternity patients were offered a patient portal account and access to their EMR. Of those 6,518 created one (60%; 6,518/10,892) and 3,104 went on to request access to their EMR (48%; 3,104/6,518). Of these, 1,751 had their access application granted by 30 June 2013. The majority of maternity patients submitted registration forms online via the patient portal (56.7%). Patients could view their EMR multiple times: there were 671 views of the EMR, 2,781 views of appointment schedules and 135 birth preferences submitted via the EMR. Eighty survey responses were received from EMR account holders, (response

  20. Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report.

    PubMed

    Tebeu, Pierre-Marie; Pierre-Marie, Tebeu; Halle-Ekane, Gregory; Gregory, Halle-Ekane; Da Itambi, Maxwell; Maxwell, Da Itambi; Enow Mbu, Robinson; Robinson, Enow Mbu; Mawamba, Yvette; Yvette, Mawamba; Fomulu, Joseph Nelson; Nelson, Fomulu Joseph

    2015-01-01

    More than 550,000 women die yearly from pregnancy-related causes. Fifty percent (50%) of the world estimate of maternal deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa alone. There is insufficient information on the risk factors of maternal mortality in Cameroon. This study aimed at establishing causes and risk factors of maternal mortality. This was a case-control study from 1st January, 2006 to 31st December, 2010 after National Ethical Committee Approval. Cases were maternal deaths; controls were women who delivered normally. Maternal deaths were obtained from the delivery room registers and in-patient registers. Controls for each case were two normal deliveries following identified maternal deaths on the same day. Variables considered were socio-demographic and reproductive health characteristics. Epi Info 3.5.1 was used for analysis. The mean MMR was 287.5/100,000 live births. Causes of deaths were: postpartum hemorrhage (229.2%), unsafe abortion (25%), ectopic pregnancy (12.5%), hypertension in pregnancy (8.3%), malaria (8.3%), anemia (8.3%), heart disease (4.2%), and pneumonia (4.2%), and placenta praevia (4.2%). Ages ranged from 18 to 41 years, with a mean of 27.7 ± 5.14 years. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal death (OR=78.33; CI: (8.66- 1802.51)). The mean MMR from 2006 to 2010 was 287.5/100,000 live births. Most of the causes of maternal deaths were preventable. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal mortality. Key words: Maternal mortality, causes, risk factors, Cameroon. PMID:26401210

  1. Maternal mortality in a teaching hospital in southern India. A 13-year study.

    PubMed

    Rao, K B

    1975-10-01

    During the 13 years 1960-1972, in a teaching hospital that serves a predominantly rural and semiurban population in southern India, there were 74,384 deliveries and 1245 maternal deaths, a maternal mortality rate of 16.7 per 1000 births. Direct obstetric factors caused 854 (65.5%) of these deaths. The leading indirect or associated causes of maternal deaths were anemia, cerebrovascular accidents, and infectious hepatitis. During the past 13 years, monthly maternal mortality meetings have helped to reduce the incidence of avoidable factors in maternal deaths among patients from the city but not among those brought from the surrounding countryside. The important causes of maternal deaths in this developing country, and their prevention, are individually discussed. PMID:1080844

  2. Evaluation of maternal and neonatal hospital care: quality index of completeness

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Ana Lúcia Andrade; Mendes, Antonio da Cruz Gouveia; Miranda, Gabriella Morais Duarte; de Sá, Domicio Aurélio; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Lyra, Tereza Maciel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Develop an index to evaluate the maternal and neonatal hospital care of the Brazilian Unified Health System. METHODS This descriptive cross-sectional study of national scope was based on the structure-process-outcome framework proposed by Donabedian and on comprehensive health care. Data from the Hospital Information System and the National Registry of Health Establishments were used. The maternal and neonatal network of Brazilian Unified Health System consisted of 3,400 hospitals that performed at least 12 deliveries in 2009 or whose number of deliveries represented 10.0% or more of the total admissions in 2009. Relevance and reliability were defined as criteria for the selection of variables. Simple and composite indicators and the index of completeness were constructed and evaluated, and the distribution of maternal and neonatal hospital care was assessed in different regions of the country. RESULTS A total of 40 variables were selected, from which 27 single indicators, five composite indicators, and the index of completeness of care were built. Composite indicators were constructed by grouping simple indicators and included the following variables: hospital size, level of complexity, delivery care practice, recommended hospital practice, and epidemiological practice. The index of completeness of care grouped the five variables and classified them in ascending order, thereby yielding five levels of completeness of maternal and neonatal hospital care: very low, low, intermediate, high, and very high. The hospital network was predominantly of small size and low complexity, with inadequate child delivery care and poor development of recommended and epidemiological practices. The index showed that more than 80.0% hospitals had a low index of completeness of care and that most qualified heath care services were concentrated in the more developed regions of the country. CONCLUSIONS The index of completeness proved to be of great value for monitoring the

  3. Are urban safety-net hospitals losing low-risk Medicaid maternity patients?

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, D J; Hadley, J; Freeman, V G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine data on Medicaid and self-pay/charity maternity cases to address four questions: (1) Did safety-net hospitals' share of Medicaid patients decline while their shares of self-pay/charity-care patients increased from 1991 to 1994? (2) Did Medicaid patients' propensity to use safety-net hospitals decline during 1991-94? (3) Did self-pay/charity patients' propensity to use safety-net hospitals increase during 1991-94? (4) Did the change in Medicaid patients' use of safety-net hospitals differ for low- and high-risk patients? STUDY DESIGN: We use hospital discharge data to estimate logistic regression models of hospital choice for low-risk and high-risk Medicaid and self-pay/charity maternity patients for 25 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in five states for the years 1991 and 1994. We define low-risk patients as discharges without comorbidities and high-risk patients as discharges with comorbidities that may substantially increase hospital costs, length of stay, or morbidity. The five states are California, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York. The MSAs in the analysis are those with at least one safety-net hospital and a population of 500,000 or more. This study also uses data from the 1990 Census and AHA Annual Survey of Hospitals. The regression analysis estimates the change between 1991 and 1994 in the relative odds of a Medicaid or self-pay/charity patient using a safety-net hospital. We explore whether this change in the relative odds is related to the risk status of the patient. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The findings suggest that competition for Medicaid patients increased from 1991 to 1994. Over time, safety-net hospitals lost low-risk maternity Medicaid patients while services to high-risk maternity Medicaid patients and self-pay/charity maternity patients remained concentrated in safety-net hospitals. IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY: Safety-net hospitals use Medicaid patient revenues and public subsidies that are based on Medicaid

  4. Shallow medication extraction from hospital patient records.

    PubMed

    Boytcheva, Svetla

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for shallow Information Extraction (IE) from the free text zones of hospital Patient Records (PRs) in Bulgarian language in the Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in medication (PSIP) project. We extract automatically information about drug names, dosage, modes and frequency and assign the corresponding ATC code to each medication event. Using various modules for rule-based text analysis, our IE components in PSIP perform a significant amount of symbolic computations. We try to address negative statements, elliptical constructions, typical conjunctive phrases, and simple inferences concerning temporal constraints and finally aim at the assignment of the drug ACT code to the extracted medication events, which additionally complicates the extraction algorithm. The prototype of the system was used for experiments with a training corpus containing 1,300 PRs and the evaluation results are obtained using a test corpus containing 6,200 PRs. The extraction accuracy (f-score) for drug names is 98.42% and for dose 93.85%. PMID:21685617

  5. The Relationship Between Self-Rated Health and Hospital Records.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Torben Heien

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates whether self-rated health (SRH) covaries with individual hospital records. By linking the Danish Longitudinal Survey on Ageing with individual hospital records covering all hospital admissions from 1995 to 2006, I show that SRH is correlated to historical, current, and future hospital records. I use both measures separately to control for health in a regression of mortality on wealth. Using only historical and current hospitalization controls for health yields the common result that SRH is a stronger predictor of mortality than objective health measures. The addition of future hospitalizations as controls shows that the estimated gradient on wealth is similar to one in which SRH is the control. The results suggest that with a sufficiently long time series of individual records, objective health measures can predict mortality to the same extent as global self-rated measures. PMID:25702929

  6. Maternal Infection Requiring Hospitalization during Pregnancy and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atladottir, Hjordis O.; Thorsen, Poul; Ostergaard, Lars; Schendel, Diana E.; Lemcke, Sanne; Abdallah, Morsi; Parner, Erik T.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal infection has been suggested to cause deficiencies in fetal neurodevelopment. In this study we included all children born in Denmark from 1980, through 2005. Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and maternal infection were obtained through nationwide registers. Data was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards…

  7. Community hospital successfully implements eRecord and CPOE.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Debra M; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Diamond, Joel N; Fera, William; McCormick, Donna L

    2006-01-01

    Despite media attention on converting the nation's paper-based medical record systems to electronic systems, few hospitals, and even fewer community hospitals, have done so. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center St. Margaret has converted to a comprehensive electronic health record system, known as eRecord, in a short time. The authors describe key factors that were critical to the success of the conversion, along with positive results on quality of care. PMID:17108749

  8. Wide Variation Found In Hospital Facility Costs For Maternity Stays Involving Low-Risk Childbirth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Gariepy, Aileen; Lundsberg, Lisbet S; Sheth, Sangini S; Pettker, Christian M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Illuzzi, Jessica L

    2015-07-01

    Childbirth is the leading cause of hospital admission in the United States, yet there has been little research on variation in hospital costs associated with childbirth. Using data from the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we characterized the variation in estimated facility costs of hospitalizations for low-risk childbirth across US hospitals. We found that the average estimated facility cost per maternity stay ranged from $1,189 to $11,986 (median: $4,215), with a 2.2-fold difference between the 10th and 90th percentiles. Estimated facility costs were higher at hospitals with higher rates of cesarean delivery or serious maternal morbidity. Hospitals having government or nonprofit ownership; being a rural hospital; and having relatively low volumes of childbirths, low proportions of childbirths covered by Medicaid, and long stays also had significantly higher costs. The large variation in estimated facility cost for low-risk childbirths among hospitals suggests that hospital practices might be an important contributor to variation in cost and that there may be opportunities for cost reduction. The safe reduction of cesarean deliveries, increasing the coordination of care, and emphasizing value of care through new payment and delivery systems reforms may help reduce hospital costs and cost variation associated with childbirth in the United States. PMID:26153317

  9. Comparison of maternal and fetal outcomes of IVF and spontaneously conceived twin pregnancies: three year experience of a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Göçmen, Ahmet; Güven, Şirin; Bağci, Simge; Çekmez, Yasemin; Şanlıkan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare maternal and fetal outcomes of spontaneously conceived and in-vitro fertilization (IVF) twin pregnancies that were admitted to our obstetric clinic and delivered between January 1, 2011 to November 1, 2014. Material method: A total of 84 twin pregnancies were enrolled for the study and divided into two groups: group 1 as IVF (n = 19) and group 2 as spontaneously conceived (n = 65) twin pregnancies. Data of neonatal various morbidities needs neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), sepsis, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and maternal morbidities such as preeclampsia, eclampsia, postpartum bleeding, gestational diabetes mellitus(GDM) were collected by hospital records. Results: There were no statistical difference between two groups regarding hypertension related to pregnancy, intrauterine growth retardation, Apgar scores, NICU needs, birth weight and height (P > 0.05). The rate of premature rupture of membranes, maternal age, antenatal anemia and premature birth were detected higher in IVF group when compared with the other group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although twin pregnancies, regardless of conception method are high risk pregnancies in terms of obstetric and perinatal outcomes, premature rupture of membranes, maternal age, antenatal anemia and premature birth risks are higher in IVF twin pregnancies. PMID:26131238

  10. Major Placenta Previa: Rate, Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes Experience at a Tertiary Maternity Hospital, Sohag, Egypt: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Salah Roshdy; Aitallah, Abdusaeed; Abdelghafar, Hazem M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Major degree placenta is a serious health issue and is associated with high fetal-maternal morbidity and mortality. Literature from developing countries is scant. Aim To determine the prevalence and maternal and neonatal outcomes among women with major placenta previa (PP). Materials and Methods A prospective descriptive study of 52 singleton pregnancies with PP was evaluated in this study. The study was conducted at Sohag University Hospital, Egypt from January through June 2014. Outcome measures, including the prevalence of PP, maternal and neonatal outcomes, and case-fatality rate. Results The total number of deliveries performed during the study period was 3841, of them, 52 cases were placenta previa. Thus, the prevalence of PP was 1.3%. The mean of previous cesarean scars was 2.2±1.4. Of women with PP, 26.4% (n=14) had placenta accreta. In total, 15.1% (n=8) of women underwent an obstetric hysterectomy. From the total no. of babies, 13.2% (n=7) were delivered fresh stillborn babies. Of the surviving babies (n=45), 20% (n=9) required admission to NICU. The frequencies of bowel and bladder injuries were 3.8% (n=2) and 13.2% (n=7) respectively. There was no maternal death in this study. Conclusion The rate of PP is comparable to previous studies, however, the rate of placenta accreta is high. Also, there are high rates of neonatal mortality and intraoperative complications which can be explained by accreta. The study highlights the need to revise maternity and child health services. PMID:26674539

  11. Association between Short Maternal Height and Low Birth Weight: a Hospital-based Study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Anthropometry measurements, such as height and weight, have recently been used to predict poorer birth outcomes. However, the relationship between maternal height and birth outcomes remains unclear. We examined the effect of shorter maternal height on low birth weight (LBW) among 17,150 pairs of Japanese mothers and newborns. Data for this analysis were collected from newborns who were delivered at a large hospital in Japan. Maternal height was the exposure variable, and LBW and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit were the outcome variables. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations. The shortest maternal height quartile (131.0–151.9 cm) was related to LBW (OR 1.91 [95% CI 1.64, 2.22]). The groups with the second (152.0–157.9 cm) and the third shortest maternal height quartiles (158.0–160.9 cm) were also related to LBW. A P trend with one quartile change also showed a significant relationship. The relationship between maternal height and NICU admission disappeared when the statistical model was adjusted for LBW. A newborn’s small size was one factor in the relationship between shorter maternal height and NICU admission. In developed countries, shorter mothers provide a useful prenatal target to anticipate and plan for LBW newborns and NICU admission. PMID:26955234

  12. [The Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified National Health System: a performance evaluation for auditing maternal near miss].

    PubMed

    Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Mendes-Silva, Wallace; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Reichenheim, Michael E; Lobato, Gustavo

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the performance of the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SIH-SUS) in identifying cases of maternal near miss in a hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2008. Cases were identified by reviewing medical records of pregnant and postpartum women admitted to the hospital. The search for potential near miss events in the SIH-SUS database relied on a list of procedures and codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) that were consistent with this diagnosis. The patient chart review identified 27 cases, while 70 potential occurrences of near miss were detected in the SIH-SUS database. However, only 5 of 70 were "true cases" of near miss according to the chart review, which corresponds to a sensitivity of 18.5% (95%CI: 6.3-38.1), specificity of 94.3% (95%CI: 92.8-95.6), area under the ROC of 0.56 (95%CI: 0.48-0.63), and positive predictive value of 10.1% (IC95%: 4.7-20.3). These findings suggest that SIH-SUS does not appear appropriate for monitoring maternal near miss. PMID:23843001

  13. Maternal mortality at government maternity hospital. Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh (a review of 431 cases).

    PubMed

    Durgamba, K K; Qureshi, S

    1970-01-01

    This reviews 431 maternal deaths over 3 periods of 3-4 years each from January 1958 to December 1968. Trends in mortality are noted. A steady decline was noted. Associated diseases increased maternal mortality but age and parity had no significant influence. 47% of the deaths were intrapartum, 35% postpartum, and 18% antenatal. Major causes were hemorrhage, preeclampsia, eclampsia, sepsis, and anemia, in that order. Deaths due to infection diminished markedly during the period. 58.2% of the deaths were considered avoidable. Delay by patient or doctor and lack of facilities in rural areas were principle avoidable factors. Extension of obstetrical service to villages, emergency mobile squads, and periodic review of mortality statistics are recommended. PMID:12304876

  14. Observations from a maternal and infant hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan--2003.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer L; McCarthy, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Afghanistan is believed to have one of the highest infant and maternal mortality rates in the world. As a result of decades of war and civil unrest, Afghan women and children suffer from poor access to health services, harsh living conditions, and insufficient food and micronutrient security. To address the disproportionately high infant and maternal mortality rates in Afghanistan, the US Department of Health and Human Services pledged support to establish a maternal health facility and training center. Rabia Balkhi Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan, was selected because this hospital admits approximately 36,000 patients and delivers more than 14,000 babies annually. This article reports the initial observations at Rabia Balkhi Hospital and describes factors that influenced women's access, the quality of care, and the evaluation health care services. This observational investigation examined areas of obstetric, laboratory and pharmacy, and ancillary services. The investigators concluded that profound changes were needed in the hospital's health care delivery system to make the hospital a safe and effective health care facility for Afghan women and children and an appropriate facility in which to establish an Afghan provider training program for updating obstetric skills and knowledge. PMID:15973254

  15. [Maternal mortality at the Hospital Center of Libreville (1984-1987)].

    PubMed

    Picaud, A; Nlome-Nze, R A; Faye, A; Ogowet Igumu, N

    1989-01-01

    Maternal mortality at the University Hospital of Libreville was 152.5 for every 100,000 live births. There were 48 maternal deaths out of 31,799 deliveries carried out between 1984 and 1987. The principal causes were: haemorrhage in 45.8%, infections in 20.8%, intercurrent diseases in 20.8%, vasculo-renal syndromes in 10.4% and thromboses in 2%. The main differences between this country and developed countries were the large number of haemorrhages and the rarity of thrombosis. Poor prognostic factors were SS sickle-cell disease in 10.4% of the cases who died and in deaths due to anaemias, of which 25% were due to haemorrhage connected with the afterbirth. Complications occurring in the 1st trimester of pregnancy caused nearly a third of all maternal deaths. Complications of abortion occurred in 16.6% and of extra-uterine pregnancies in 14.6%. If the maternal mortality rate is to be reduced it is important to have a proper blood bank. The risks of caesarean section are ten times greater than of vaginal delivery, although it is a good way out for difficult situations. The indications for the operation have to be carefully considered. Comparing the statistics reported from Cotonou, the University Hospital in Libreville has a lower incidence of maternal mortality but it is too high and requires real progress to be made. PMID:2778279

  16. Applicability of initial optimal maternal and fetal electrocardiogram combination vectors to subsequent recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hua-Wen; Huang, Xiao-Lin; Zhao, Ying; Si, Jun-Feng; Liu, Tie-Bing; Liu, Hong-Xing

    2014-11-01

    A series of experiments are conducted to confirm whether the vectors calculated for an early section of a continuous non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) recording can be directly applied to subsequent sections in order to reduce the computation required for real-time monitoring. Our results suggest that it is generally feasible to apply the initial optimal maternal and fetal ECG combination vectors to extract the fECG and maternal ECG in subsequent recorded sections.

  17. Maternal mortality -- aetiological factors: analytic study from a teaching hospital of Punjab.

    PubMed

    Sarin, A R; Singla, P; Kaur, H

    1992-01-01

    A review of maternal deaths at Rajendra Hospital, Punjab, from January 1978 to December 1991 yielded important data for the planning of maternal health services in this area of India, During the 14 year study period, there were 33,160 births and 339 deaths, for a maternal mortality rate of 1002/100,000 live births. Women who had received no prenatal care accounted for 47.4% of deliveries but 92.8% of maternal deaths. In addition, a disproportionate number of deaths involved rural women (74.6%) and poor women (76.4%). 57.8% of maternal deaths involved women 21-30 years of age; 37.1% occurred among primigravidas. Direct obstetrical causes were considered the etiologic factor in 83.1% of these deaths. Primary among these causes were sepsis (37.1%), obstetric hemorrhage (26.2%), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (21.4%), and obstructed labor (15.3%). 30.6% of deaths occurred during pregnancy, 50.3% during labor, and 19.1% in the postpartum period. Indirect obstetrical causes, notably severe anemia and anesthesia complications, were implicated in 15.3% of the maternal deaths. Critical analysis of the maternal deaths in this series suggested that 89.6% were totally preventable, 9.6% were probably preventable, and only 0.8% were not avoidable. Factors that would reduce the high rate of maternal mortality in this region include more widespread use of prenatal care, training of traditional birth attendants in asepsis, referral of high-risk pregnancies, and improved transportation in rural areas. PMID:12288813

  18. A Retrospective Audit of Clinically Significant Maternal Bacteraemia in a Specialist Maternity Hospital from 2001 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Richard John; Fonseca-Kelly, Zara; Eogan, Maeve

    2015-01-01

    Maternal sepsis is a significant problem in obstetrics, with almost one in four maternal deaths related to severe sepsis. We carried out a retrospective review of clinically significant bacteraemia in obstetric patients attending Rotunda Hospital over 14 years. From 2001 to 2014, there were 252 clinically significant positive blood culture episodes in obstetric patients. There were 112,361 live births >500 g during the study period giving an overall rate of 2.24 clinically significant positive maternal blood culture episodes per 1000 live births >500 g. The median rate over the 14 years was 2.12 episodes per 1000 live births >500 g, with an interquartile range of 1.74–2.43 per 1000 live births >500 g. There was no discernable increasing or decreasing trend over the 14 years. E. coli was the most commonly isolated organism (n = 92/252, 37%), followed by group B Streptococcus (n = 64/252, 25%), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 28/252, 11%), and anaerobes (n = 11/252, 4%). These top four organisms represented three-quarters of all positive blood culture episodes (n = 195/252, 77.3%). Of note, there were only five cases of listeriosis, representing a rate of 4.4 cases per 100,000 live births >500 g. The rate of invasive group A streptococcal infection was also very low at 5.3 cases per 100,000 live births >500 g. PMID:26494975

  19. Dental status of pregnant women attending a Brisbane maternity hospital.

    PubMed

    Jago, J D; Chapman, P J; Aitken, J F; McEniery, T M

    1984-12-01

    A sample of 314 consecutive women attending for their first antenatal visit at a public hospital were examined according to the WHO survey procedure. The women's age ranged from 16 to 42 yr with a mean of 23.5 yr. Only 3% were edentulous in both jaws, but 13% had some form of denture. A quarter had pocketing in at least one sextant and only 16% were free of gingivitis. The average number of DMF teeth was 15.8, comprising 2.7 decayed, 4.5 missing and 8.6 filled teeth; 70% had teeth needing restoration and 10% had at least one tooth needing extraction. There were significant relationships between DMF score and age (positive) and between number of teeth needing restoration and age, educational level, and the woman's own perception of her dental health (all inverse). Some form of dental attention was needed by 86% of the women; 12% had conditions needing immediate attention. By comparison with a 1971 study of pregnant women in Brisbane, there has been a marked decline in DMFT score (from 19.1 to 15.8). PMID:6597062

  20. [Hospital readmission after postpartum discharge of term newborns in two maternity wards in Stockholm and Marseille].

    PubMed

    Boubred, F; Herlenius, E; Andres, V; des Robert, C; Marchini, G

    2016-03-01

    The consequences of early postpartum discharge (EPPD, within 2days after birth) on newborn health remain debated. Early discharge has been associated with increased neonatal morbidity. However, neonatal re-hospitalization can be prevented by careful follow-up during the 1st week after birth. We compared the early neonatal hospitalization of term newborns over 2years in two hospitals: Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm (n=7300births), which allowed early discharge from 6h after birth with specific neonatal follow-up, and Marseille University Hospital (AP-HM) (n=4385) where postpartum discharge was more conventional after 72h. During the study period, the EPPD rate was 41% vs. 2% in Stockholm and Marseille, respectively (P<0.001). Hospital readmission was comparable (5.6‰ vs. 7‰, P=0.2). The leading cause associated with hospitalization was icterus in Stockholm (76% vs. 26%, P<0.001) and feeding difficulties in Marseille (17% vs. 48%, P<0.001). In conclusion, close neonatal follow-up during the 1st week of life associated with restricted maternal and neonatal eligibility criteria for EPPD are required to prevent early neonatal re-hospitalization. PMID:26899902

  1. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care, an alternative strategy to reduce maternal mortality: experience of Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Bangoura, Ismael Fatou; Hu, Jian; Gong, Xun; Wang, Xuanxuan; Wei, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiang; Fang, Pengqian

    2012-04-01

    The burden of maternal mortality (MM) and morbidity is especially high in Asia. However, China has made significant progress in reducing MM over the past two decades, and hence maternal death rate has declined considerably in last decade. To analyze availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) received by women at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China, this study retrospectively analyzed various pregnancy-related complications at the hospital from 2000 to 2009. Two baseline periods of equal length were used for the comparison of variables. A total of 11 223 obstetric complications leading to MM were identified on a total of 15 730 hospitalizations, either 71.35% of all activities. No maternal death was recorded. Mean age of women was 29.31 years with a wide range of 14-52 years. About 96.26% of women had higher levels of schooling, university degrees and above and received the education of secondary school or college. About 3.74% received primary education at period two (P2) from 2005 to 2009, which was significantly higher than that of period one (P1) from 2000 to 2004 (P<0.05) (OR: 0.586; 95% CI: 0.442 to 0.776). About 65.69% were employed as skilled or professional workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). About 34.31% were unskilled workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). Caesarean section was performed for 9,930 women (88.48%) and the percentage of the procedure increased significantly from 19.25% at P1 to 69.23% at P2 (P<0.05). We were led to conclude that, despite the progress, significant gaps in the performance of maternal health services between rural and urban areas remain. However, MM reduction can be achieved in China. Priorities must include, but not limited to the following: secondary healthcare development, health policy and management, strengthening primary healthcare services. PMID:22528213

  2. Nutritional anemia in pregnancy: a study at the maternity hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Tee E Siong; Kandiah, M; Ali, J; Kandiah, V; Zahari, M R; Kuladevan, R; Hamzah, Z

    1984-06-01

    The study presents recent data on the prevalence and pattern of nutritional anemia in the Maternity Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. A total of 309 pregnant women in their 3rd trimester, of Malay, Chinese and Indian origin from the lower socio-economic strata were randomly selected for the study. Hematological indices (including Hb, PCV, MCHC, and TRBC), serum iron, transferrin saturation and ferritin, serum folate as well as protein and albumin were determined. Based on Hb and PCV values, 30-40% of the women could be considered anemic; approximately 50% of them presented with unsatisfactory serum iron, transferrin saturation and ferritin values; 60.9% had low serum folate levels; and about 30% may be considered to be of poor protein nutriture. Anemia in the study population was seen to be related mostly to iron and to a lesser extent, folate deficiency. Hematological, iron, folate and protein status was observed to be the poorest amongst the Indian women, better in the Malay group and generally the best amongst the Chinese women. Birth records of 169 of these women revealed that all of them had live births. Nearly all the infants were delivered by normal vaginal delivery (NVD). The mean gestational age was 38.6 weeks. One of the infants had a birth weight of 2.0 kg; incidence of low birth weight, 2.5 kg, was 8.3%. Although there was a trend of deteriorating hematological, iron and protein status of women from the 0, 1-3 and 4 parity groups, these differences were not statistically significant. PMID:12267519

  3. Case Study: Clinical Governance as an Approach to Improve Maternal and Newborn Health in 22 Hospitals in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Amelia, Dwirani; Suhowatsky, Stephanie; Baharuddin, Mohammad; Tholandi, Maya; Hyre, Anne; Sethi, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Clinical governance is a concept used to improve management, accountability and the provision of quality healthcare. An approach to strengthen clinical governance as a means to improve the quality of maternal and newborn care in Indonesia was developed by the Expanding Maternal and Neonatal Survival (EMAS) Program. This case study presents findings and lessons learned from EMAS program experience in 22 hospitals where peer-to-peer mentoring supported staff in strengthening clinical governance from 2012-2015. Efforts resulted in improved hospital preparedness and significantly increased the odds of facility-level coverage for three evidence-based maternal and newborn healthcare interventions. PMID:26860759

  4. Public versus private hospital maternity length of stay: a gamma mixture modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H; Xiao, J; Codde, J P; Ng, A S K

    2002-02-01

    Application of a gamma mixture model to obstetrical diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) revealed heterogeneity of maternity length of stay (LOS). The proportion of long-stay subgroups identified, which can account for 30% of admissions, varied between DRGs. The burden of long-stay patients borne was estimated to be much higher in private hospitals than public hospitals for normal delivery, but vice versa for Caesarean section. Such differences highlights the impact of DRG-based casemix funding on inpatient LOS and have significant implications for health insurance companies to integrate casemix funding across the public and private sectors. The analysis also benefits hospital administrators and managers to budget expenditures accordingly. PMID:11854995

  5. Maternal mortality and its relationship to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the trends in maternal mortality ratio over 5 years at JIPMER Hospital and to find out the proportion of maternal deaths in relation to emergency admissions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of maternal deaths from 2008 to 2012 with respect to type of admission, referral and ICU care and cause of death according to WHO classification of maternal deaths. Results: Of the 104 maternal deaths 90% were emergency admissions and 59% of them were referrals. Thirty two percent of them died within 24 hours of admission. Forty four percent could be admitted to ICU and few patients could not get ICU bed. The trend in cause of death was increasing proportion of indirect causes from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion: The trend in MMR was increasing proportion of indirect deaths. Ninety percent of maternal deaths were emergency admissions with complications requiring ICU care. Hence comprehensive EmOC facilities should incorporate Obstetric ICU care. PMID:27512460

  6. Poor standards of care in small, private hospitals in Maharashtra, India: implications for public-private partnerships for maternity care.

    PubMed

    Bhate-Deosthali, Padma; Khatri, Ritu; Wagle, Suchitra

    2011-05-01

    The private health sector in India is generally unregulated. Maharashtra is among the few states which require registration of private hospitals. This paper reports on a study of standards of care in small, private hospitals (less than 30 beds) in Maharashtra state, India, with a focus on maternity care, based on interviews with the hospitals' owners or senior staff, and observation. In the absence of reliable information on the number of private hospitals in the state, a physical listing was carried out in 11 districts and an estimate drawn up; 10% of hospitals found in each location were included in the study sample. We found poor standards of care in many cases, and few or no qualified nurses or a duty medical officer in attendance. Of the 261 hospitals visited, 146 provided maternity services yet 137 did not have a qualified midwife, and though most claimed they provided emergency care, including caesarean section, only three had a blood bank and eight had an ambulance. Government plans to promote public-private partnerships with such hospitals, including for maternity services, create concern, given our findings. The need to enforce existing regulations and collect information on health outcomes and quality of care before the state involves these hospitals further in provision of maternity care is called for. PMID:21555084

  7. Major clonal lineages in impetigo Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Růžičková, Vladislava; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Machová, Ivana; Kostýlková, Karla; Doškař, Jiří

    2012-11-01

    One hundred and twenty-seven exfoliative toxin-producing (ET-positive) strains of Staphylococcus aureus collected in 23 Czech and one Slovak maternity hospitals from 1998 to 2011 were genotypically characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling, spa gene polymorphism analysis, and ETA-converting prophage carriage, which resulted in the identification of 21 genotypes grouped into 4 clonal complexes (CC). Ninety-one isolates carried the eta gene alone whilst 12 isolates harboured only the etb gene. Two new, to date not defined, spa types (t6644 and t6645) and 2 novel sequence types (ST2194 and ST2195) were identified in the set of strains under study. The predominant CC121 occurred in 13 Czech hospitals. CC15, CC9, and ST88 (CC88) exclusively included eta gene-positive strains while the strains belonging to ST121 harboured the eta and/or etb genes. This study highlights not only significant genomic diversity among impetigo strains and the distribution of major genotypes disseminated in the Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals, but also reveals their impact in epidermolytic infections. PMID:22664376

  8. Is baby-friendly breastfeeding support in maternity hospitals associated with breastfeeding satisfaction among Japanese mothers?

    PubMed

    Hongo, Hiroko; Nanishi, Keiko; Shibanuma, Akira; Jimba, Masamine

    2015-06-01

    While the World Health Organization's Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative has increased breastfeeding duration and exclusivity, a survey found that only 8.5 % of maternity hospitals in 31 developed countries could be designated baby-friendly. Baby-friendly breastfeeding support is sometimes criticized as mother unfriendly. This study examined whether baby-friendly breastfeeding support was associated with breastfeeding satisfaction, duration, and exclusivity among Japanese mothers. In this cross-sectional study, 601 breastfeeding Japanese mothers completed questionnaires at their infants' 4-month health checkups at two wards in Yokohama, Japan; 363 were included in the analysis. Baby-friendly breastfeeding support was measured based on the WHO's "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding." We measured satisfaction using two subscales of the Japanese version of the Maternal Breastfeeding Evaluation Scale. The association of baby-friendly support with maternal satisfaction was assessed using multiple linear regression, while the prevalence ratios (PRs) for breastfeeding were estimated using Poisson regression. Mothers were stratified by prepartum exclusive breastfeeding intention (yes, n = 256; no, n = 107). Mothers who experienced early skin-to-skin contact with their infants were more likely to report breastfeeding satisfaction than those who did not. Among mothers without exclusive breastfeeding intention, those who were encouraged to feed on demand were more likely to be breastfeeding without formula at 1 month (PR 2.66 [95 % CI 1.32, 5.36]) and to perceive breastfeeding as beneficial for their baby (regression coefficient = 3.14 [95 % CI 0.11, 6.17]) than those who were not so encouraged. Breastfeeding satisfaction was a useful measure of breastfeeding outcome. Early skin-to-skin contact and encouragement to feed on demand in the hospital facilitate breastfeeding satisfaction. PMID:25366103

  9. Investment in home-based maternal, newborn and child health records improves immunization coverage in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Osaki, K; Hattori, T; Kosen, Soewarta; Singgih, Budihardja

    2009-08-01

    Indonesia Demographic and Health Surveys show that the ownership of home-based immunization records among children aged 12-23 months increased from 30.8% in 1997 and 30.7% in 2002-3 to 37% in 2007. In 2002-3, 70.9% of children who owned records had received all vaccines by the time of the survey, whereas 42.9% of children who did not own records had been fully immunized. An Indonesian ministerial decree of 2004 stated that the Maternal and Child Health Handbook (MCH handbook) was to be the only home-based record of maternal, newborn and child health. The increased immunization coverage seen would be a reflection of MCH handbook implementation, through raising awareness of immunization among community and health personnel and children's parents or guardians and allowing more accurate measurement of immunization coverage. PMID:19375141

  10. Lessons premier hospitals learned about implementing electronic health records.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Susan D; Figlioli, Keith

    2010-04-01

    Implementing health information technology (IT) is a major strategic objective for providers. To pinpoint considerations that tie to success, the Premier health care alliance surveyed hospitals to develop an electronic health record best-practices library. Compiled from diverse health care organizations, the library outlines considerations to support "meaningful use" in the areas of computerized physician order entry, medication management, clinical documentation, reporting of measures, privacy, information exchange, management of populations' health, and personal health records. Best practices also uncovered strategies for securing executive leadership, culture change, communication, and support for clinicians. This paper summarizes lessons from the library, providing recommendations to speed up health IT implementation. PMID:20368596

  11. Incidence of maternal near miss in hospital childbirth and postpartum: data from the Birth in Brazil study.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Schilithz, Arthur Orlando Corrêa; Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; Brum, Ione Rodrigues; Martins, Alaerte Leandro; Theme Filha, Mariza Miranda; Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira da; Carmo Leal, Maria do

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated data on the incidence of maternal near miss identified on World Health Organization (WHO) criteria from the Birth in Brazil survey. The study was conducted between February 2011 and October 2012. The results presented are estimates for the study population (2,337,476 births), based on a sample of 23,894 women interviewed. The results showed an incidence of maternal near miss of 10.21 per 1,000 live births and a near-miss-to-mortality ratio of 30.8 maternal near miss to every maternal death. Maternal near miss was identified most prevalently by clinical criteria, at incidence of 5.2 per 1,000 live births. Maternal near miss was associated with maternal age 35 or more years (RR=1.6; 95%CI: 1.1-2.5), a history of previous cesarean delivery (RR=1.9; 95%CI: 1.1-3.4) and high-risk pregnancy (RR=4.5; 95%CI: 2.8-7.0). incidence of maternal near miss was also higher at hospitals in capital cities (RR=2.2; 95%CI: 1.3-3.8) and those belonging to Brazil's national health service, the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) (RR=3.2; 95%CI: 1.6-6.6). Improved quality of childbirth care services can help reduce maternal mortality in Brazil. PMID:25167176

  12. [Microflora formation in the newborn in maternity hospitals and neonatal abnormality units].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Kyrf, M V; Beĭkin, Ia B; Kuznetsova, L S; Turintseva, E G; Usova, O P; Chernykh, N G; Iagafarova, I S

    2007-10-01

    The basic sources of pyoseptic infection pathogens are infected and colonized neonatal infants in maternity hospitals. Microbiological monitoring revealed the specific features of biocenosis formation in the newborn in the "Mother and Baby" units, resuscitative departments (RD), intensive care units, and neonatal abnormality departments (NAD). Irrespective of the conditions of hospital stay, methicillin-resistant S. epidermis (MRSE) and Enterococcus faecium were prevalent in the neonatal microbial landscape. Colonization with the normal flora in the newborn actively treated with antibiotics is difficult in RD, at the same time there is a significant infection with the mycotic flora. Broad-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiela pneumonia strains have received wide acceptance in NAD. PMID:18154133

  13. Association between Hospital Birth Volume and Maternal Morbidity among Low-Risk Pregnancies in Rural, Urban, and Teaching Hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Thao, Viengneesee; Hung, Peiyin; Tilden, Ellen; Caughey, Aaron B; Snowden, Jonathan M

    2016-05-01

    Objectives This study aims to examine the relationship between hospital birth volume and multiple maternal morbidities among low-risk pregnancies in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals, and urban teaching hospitals, using a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Study Design Using the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 607 hospitals, we identified 508,146 obstetric deliveries meeting low-risk criteria and compared outcomes across hospital volume categories. Outcomes include postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), chorioamnionitis, endometritis, blood transfusion, severe perineal laceration, and wound infection. Results Hospital birth volume was more consistently related to PPH than to other maternal outcomes. Lowest-volume rural (< 200 births) and non-teaching (< 650 births) hospitals had 80% higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.56-2.08) and 39% higher odds (AOR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.26-1.53) of PPH respectively, than those in corresponding high-volume hospitals. However, in urban teaching hospitals, delivering in a lower-volume hospital was associated with 14% lower odds of PPH (AOR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.80-0.93). Deliveries in rural hospitals had 31% higher odds of PPH than urban teaching hospitals (AOR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.13-1.53). Conclusions Low birth volume was a risk factor for PPH in both rural and urban non-teaching hospitals, but not in urban teaching hospitals, where higher volume was associated with greater odds of PPH. PMID:26731180

  14. Causes of Trauma in Pregnant Women Referred to Shabih-Khani Maternity Hospital in Kashan

    PubMed Central

    Mesdaghinia, Elaheh; Sooky, Zahra; Mesdaghinia, Azam

    2012-01-01

    Background Trauma occurs in 7% of pregnancies and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the mother and fetus. Objectives The present study was conducted in Kashan in 2009–2010 to evaluate the causes of trauma in pregnancy. Patients and Methods This descriptive study analyzed data from 32 pregnant women with trauma who were referred to the maternity hospital from 2009 to 2010. Data included age, gestational age, mother’s occupation, cause of trauma, maternal-fetal complications, gravidity, and parity. The diagnosis of maternal and fetal complications was based on clinical examinations by a gynecologist and results of blood tests, urine analysis tests, and sonography. Data were analyzed as frequency distributions. Results the causes of trauma included falling (9 cases (28.1%)), abdominal trauma (8 cases ( 25%)), spousal feud (3 cases (9.4%)), motorcycle accident (2 cases (6.25%)), car accident (2 cases (6.25%)), falling from a motorcycle (2 cases (6.25%)), falling or fainting resulting in head trauma (1 case (3.1%)), pain from crossing over a bump in the car (1 cases (3.1%)), and unspecified causes (4 cases (12.55%)). The causes of traumas occurred between 5 and 40 weeks of gestation. In 17.2% of the cases, trauma occurred prior to 20 weeks of gestation. However, there was no significant relationship between the cause of trauma and maternal age or gestational age. Vaginal bleeding and retroplacental clots were reported in 2 (6.25%) cases and 1 (3.1%) case, respectively. Conclusions Nearly half of the women presenting with trauma had experienced spousal feud or domestic violence; therefore, it is necessary to recognize spousal abuse and provide adequate support to traumatized pregnant women. PMID:24719837

  15. Fetal outcome in emergency versus elective cesarean sections at Souissi Maternity Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Benzouina, Soukayna; Boubkraoui, Mohamed El-mahdi; Mrabet, Mustapha; Chahid, Naima; Kharbach, Aicha; El-hassani, Amine; Barkat, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perinatal mortality rates have come down in cesarean sections, but fetal morbidity is still high in comparison to vaginal delivery and the complications are more commonly seen in emergency than in elective cesarean sections. The objective of the study was to compare the fetal outcome and the indications in elective versus emergency cesarean section performed in a tertiary maternity hospital. Methods This comparative cross-sectional prospective study of all the cases undergoing elective and emergency cesarean section for any indication at Souissi maternity hospital of Rabat, Morocco, was carried from January 1, to February 28, 2014. Data were analyzed with emphasis on fetal outcome and cesarean sections indications. Mothers who had definite antenatal complications that would adversely affect fetal outcome were excluded from the study. Results There was 588 (17.83%) cesarean sections among 3297 births of which emergency cesarean section accounted for 446 (75.85%) and elective cesarean section for 142 cases (24.15%). Of the various factors analyzed in relation to the two types of cesarean sections, statistically significant associations were found between emergency cesarean section and younger mothers (P < 0.001), maternal illiteracy (P = 0.049), primiparity (P = 0.005), insufficient prenatal care (P < 0.001), referral from other institution for pregnancy complications or delivery (P < 0.001), cesarean section performed under general anesthesia (P < 0.001), lower birth weight (P < 0.016), neonatal morbidity and early mortality (P < 0.001), and admission in neonatal intensive care unit (P = 0.024). The commonest indication of emergency cesarean section was fetal distress (30.49%), while the most frequent indication in elective cesarean section was previous cesarean delivery (47.18%). Conclusion The overall fetal complications rate was higher in emergency cesarean section than in elective cesarean section. Early recognition and referral of mothers who are

  16. Establishing a National Maternal Morbidity Outcome Indicator in England: A Population-Based Study Using Routine Hospital Data

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Manisha; Kurinczuk, Jennnifer J.; Knight, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As maternal deaths become rarer, monitoring near-miss or severe maternal morbidity becomes important as a tool to measure changes in care quality. Many calls have been made to use routinely available hospital administration data to monitor the quality of maternity care. We investigated 1) the feasibility of developing an English Maternal Morbidity Outcome Indicator (EMMOI) by reproducing an Australian indicator using routinely available hospital data, 2) the impact of modifications to the indicator to address potential data quality issues, 3) the reliability of the indicator. Methods We used data from 6,389,066 women giving birth in England from April 2003 to March 2013 available in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database of the Health and Social care Information centre (HSCIC). A composite indicator, EMMOI, was generated from the diagnoses and procedure codes. Rates of individual morbid events included in the EMMOI were compared with the rates in the UK reported by population-based studies. Results EMMOI included 26 morbid events (17 diagnosis and 9 procedures). Selection of the individual morbid events was guided by the Australian indicator and published literature for conditions associated with maternal morbidity and mortality in the UK, but was mainly driven by the quality of the routine hospital data. Comparing the rates of individual morbid events of the indicator with figures from population-based studies showed that the possibility of false positive and false negative cases cannot be ruled out. Conclusion While routine English hospital data can be used to generate a composite indicator to monitor trends in maternal morbidity during childbirth, the quality and reliability of this monitoring indicator depends on the quality of the hospital data, which is currently inadequate. PMID:27054761

  17. Complications of childbirth and maternal deaths in Kinshasa hospitals: testimonies from women and their families

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality in Kinshasa is high despite near universal availability of antenatal care and hospital delivery. Possible explanations are poor-quality care and by delays in the uptake of care. There is, however, little information on the circumstances surrounding maternal deaths. This study describes and compares the circumstances of survivors and non survivors of severe obstetric complications. Method Semi structured interviews with 208 women who survived their obstetric complication and with the families of 110 women who died were conducted at home by three experienced nurses under the supervision of EK. All the cases were identified from twelve referral hospitals in Kinshasa after admission for a serious acute obstetric complication. Transcriptions of interviews were analysed with N-Vivo 2.0 and some categories were exported to SPSS 14.0 for further quantitative analysis. Results Testimonies showed that despite attendance at antenatal care, some women were not aware of or minimized danger signs and did not seek appropriate care. Cost was a problem; 5 deceased and 4 surviving women tried to avoid an expensive caesarean section by delivering in a health centre, although they knew the risk. The majority of surviving mothers (for whom the length of stay was known) had the caesarean section on the day of admission while only about a third of those who died did so. Ten women died before the required caesarean section or blood transfusion could take place because they did not bring the money in time. Negligence and lack of staff competence contributed to the poor quality of care. Interviews revealed that patients and their families were aware of the problem, but often powerless to do anything about it. Conclusion Our findings suggest that women with serious obstetric complications have a greater chance of survival in Kinshasa if they have cash, go directly to a functioning referral hospital and have some leverage when dealing with health care staff PMID

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS and other important predictors of maternal mortality in Mulago Hospital Complex Kampala Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Women with severe maternal morbidity are at high risk of dying. Quality and prompt management and sometimes luck have been suggested to reduce on the risk of dying. The objective of the study was to identify the direct and indirect causes of severe maternal morbidity, predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to maternal mortality in Mulago hospital, Kampala, Uganda. Methods This was a longitudinal follow up study at the Mulago hospital's Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Participants were 499 with severe maternal morbidity admitted in Mulago hospital between 15th November 2001 and 30th November 2002 were identified, recruited and followed up until discharge or death. Potential prognostic factors were HIV status and CD4 cell counts, socio demographic characteristics, medical and gynaecological history, past and present obstetric history and intra- partum and postnatal care. Results Severe pre eclampsia/eclampsia, obstructed labour and ruptured uterus, severe post partum haemorrhage, severe abruptio and placenta praevia, puerperal sepsis, post abortal sepsis and severe anaemia were the causes for the hospitalization of 499 mothers. The mortality incidence rate was 8% (n = 39), maternal mortality ratio of 7815/100,000 live births and the ratio of severe maternal morbidity to mortality was 12.8:1. The independent predictors of maternal mortality were HIV/AIDS (OR 5.1 95% CI 2-12.8), non attendance of antenatal care (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.3-9.2), non use of oxytocics (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-9.7), lack of essential drugs (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.1-11.3) and non availability of blood for transfusion (OR 53.7, 95% CI (15.7-183.9) and delivery of amale baby (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.6-10.1). Conclusion The predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to mortalitywere: residing far from hospital, low socio economic status, non attendance of antenatal care, poor intrapartum care, and HIV/AIDS. There is need to improve on the referral system, economic

  19. Hospital financial position and the adoption of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Gregory O; Shen, Jay J; Moseley, Charles B

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between financial position and adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) in 2442 acute care hospitals. The study was cross-sectional and utilized a general linear mixed model with the multinomial distribution specification for data analysis. We verified the results by also running a multinomial logistic regression model. To measure our variables, we used data from (1) the 2007 American Hospital Association (AHA) electronic health record implementation survey, (2) the 2006 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Cost Reports, and (3) the 2006 AHA Annual Survey containing organizational and operational data. Our dependent variable was an ordinal variable with three levels used to indicate the extent of EHR adoption by hospitals. Our independent variables were five financial ratios: (1) net days revenue in accounts receivable, (2) total margin, (3) the equity multiplier, (4) total asset turnover, and (5) the ratio of total payroll to total expenses. For control variables, we used (1) bed size, (2) ownership type, (3) teaching affiliation, (4) system membership, (5) network participation, (6) fulltime equivalent nurses per adjusted average daily census, (7) average daily census per staffed bed, (8) Medicare patients percentage, (9) Medicaid patients percentage, (10) capitation-based reimbursement, and (11) nonconcentrated market. Only liquidity was significant and positively associated with EHR adoption. Asset turnover ratio was significant but, unexpectedly, was negatively associated with EHR adoption. However, many control variables, most notably bed size, showed significant positive associations with EHR adoption. Thus, it seems that hospitals adopt EHRs as a strategic move to better align themselves with their environment. PMID:21991681

  20. Maternal metabolic risk factors for autism spectrum disorder-An analysis of electronic medical records and linked birth data.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Natalia; Anixt, Julia; Manning, Patty; Ping-I Lin, Daniel; Marsolo, Keith A; Bowers, Katherine

    2016-08-01

    Past studies have suggested that conditions experienced by women during pregnancy (e.g. obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)) may be associated with having a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our objective was to compare mothers who had a child diagnosed with ASD to mothers of children with a non-ASD developmental disorder (DD) or without any reported DD (controls). To accomplish the objective we collected medical record data from patients who resided in the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center's (CCHMC) primary catchment area and linked those data to data from birth certificates (to identify risk factors). Two comparison groups were analyzed; one with DD; and the other, controls without a reported ASD or DD. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses evaluated differences. Differences were greater comparing mothers of ASD to controls than comparing ASD to DD. Maternal obesity and GDM were associated with a statistically significant approximately 1.5-fold increased odds of having a child with an ASD. For mothers with both GDM and obesity, the association was twofold for having a child with ASD compared with controls. Maternal obesity and GDM might be associated with an increased risk of ASD in the offspring; however, no difference in risk of ASD according to BMI and GDM was seen when comparing to DD. Autism Res 2016, 9: 829-837,. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26824581

  1. Maternal and fetal outcome in pre-eclampsia in a secondary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Aabidha, Parveen M.; Cherian, Anne G.; Paul, Emmanuel; Helan, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are one of the common causes for perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Pre-eclampsia is a condition which typically occurs after 20 weeks of gestation and has high blood pressure as the main contributing factor. The aim was to study the effects of pre-eclampsia on the mother and the fetus in rural South Indian population. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted in a secondary level hospital in rural South India. A total of 1900 antenatal women were screened for pre-eclampsia during the period August 2010 to July 2011 to study the effects on the mother and fetus. Results: Of the 1900 women screened 93 were detected with pre-eclampsia in the study. Among these, 46.23% were primigravida, 30.1% belonged to socio-economic class 4 and 48.8% were among those with BMI 26–30. The incidence of severe pre-eclampsia was higher in the unregistered women. The most common maternal complication was antepartum hemorrhage (13.9%) and the most common neonatal complication was prematurity (23.65%). Conclusions: Treating anemia and improving socioeconomic status will improve maternal and neonatal outcome in pre-eclampsia. Antenatal care and educating women on significance of symptoms will markedly improve perinatal morbidity and mortality. Prematurity, growth restriction and low birth weight are neonatal complications to be anticipated and dealt with when the mother has pre-eclampsia. A good neonatal intensive care unit will help improve neonatal outcomes. PMID:25949977

  2. Assessment of client satisfaction in labor and delivery services at a maternity referral hospital in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Melese, Tadele; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Bisetegne, Daniel; Habte, Dereje

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients perception about service quality shapes their confidence with regard to use of the available health care facility. This study is aimed to assess the client`s satisfaction in a maternal health care setting. Methods This is an institution based cross sectional descriptive study. A total of 423 postpartum women were interviewed. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical package. Results The proportion of mothers who are completely satisfied with health care ranges between 2.4 to 21%. Pain control was the poorest source of satisfaction with 82% reporting dissatisfaction. Provider's communication with clients yielded complete satisfaction rates ranging between 0.7 to 26%. Inadequate information about the drug prescribed and explanation of procedures to be done to the client were found to be major causes of dissatisfaction. The complete satisfaction rate with environmental factor of the hospital was between 3.3 to 40.2%. Age of the client, educational status, income of the client and client's address away from Addis Ababa were found to be the predictors of client satisfaction. Provider's attitude and communication, as well as longer duration of stay in the ward were independent predictors of client satisfaction. Conclusion Pain management, client privacy and client provider communication need to be addressed to ensure the satisfaction of maternity clients. The clients need to be involved in the management of their own health problems. PMID:25018826

  3. FURTHER MAPPING OF THE NATALITY CHRONOME IN TODA CITY (JAPAN) MATERNITY HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    YAMANAKA, T.; CORNÉLISSEN, G.; KAZUMA, M.; KAZUMA, N.; MURAKAMI, S.; OTSUKA, K.; SIEGELOVÁ, J.; DUŠEK, J.; SOSÍKOVÁ, M.; HALBERG, F.

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate any circannual and/or circaseptan variations in birth incidence and birth weight in Toda City (Japan), data on 4,411 consecutive births were obtained from the city’s Maternity Hospital between 1 Jan 1999 and 31 Dec 2001. Data were analysed by cosinor separately for babies with birth weights in given ranges, and separately for boys and girls born at different gestational ages. A circannual rhythm was detected with statistical significance (P=0.047) for birth incidence of all vaginal deliveries, with an acrophase in the fall. A similar result for caesarean sections was of borderline statistical significance. A circaseptan component with a relatively consistent acrophase around midweek was of borderline statistical significance for birth incidence in some of the groups investigated. About-yearly and about-weekly variations were also found to characterize birth weight in some of the groups investigated. PMID:18978949

  4. Becoming Baby-Friendly and Transforming Maternity Care in a Safety-Net Hospital on the Texas-Mexico Border.

    PubMed

    Eganhouse, Deborah J; Gutierrez, Leticia; Cuellar, Lorena; Velasquez, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Nurse leaders used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's survey on Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care, as well as Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative guidelines, to transform maternity care in a safety-net hospital with more than 3,500 births annually. Implementing evidence-based guidelines to support breastfeeding was essential for a vulnerable population characterized by minimal prenatal care and high rates of diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and poverty. Research showing the importance of breastfeeding in protecting against these factors guided extensive changes in our maternity care model. The nursing and medical teams changed long-held practices that separated women from their newborns and observed substantial improvements in breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding rates at discharge. PMID:27520602

  5. Infant and maternal characteristics in neonatal abstinence syndrome--selected hospitals in Florida, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Lind, Jennifer N; Petersen, Emily E; Lederer, Philip A; Phillips-Bell, Ghasi S; Perrine, Cria G; Li, Ruowei; Hudak, Mark; Correia, Jane A; Creanga, Andreea A; Sappenfield, William M; Curran, John; Blackmore, Carina; Watkins, Sharon M; Anjohrin, Suzanne

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a constellation of physiologic and neurobehavioral signs exhibited by newborns exposed to addictive prescription or illicit drugs taken by a mother during pregnancy. The number of hospital discharges of newborns diagnosed with NAS has increased more than 10-fold (from 0.4 to 4.4 discharges per 1,000 live births) in Florida since 1995, far exceeding the three-fold increase observed nationally. In February 2014, the Florida Department of Health requested the assistance of CDC to 1) assess the accuracy and validity of using Florida's hospital inpatient discharge data, linked to birth and infant death certificates, as a means of NAS surveillance and 2) describe the characteristics of infants with NAS and their mothers. This report focuses only on objective two, describing maternal and infant characteristics in the 242 confirmed NAS cases identified in three Florida hospitals during a 2-year period (2010-2011). Infants with NAS experienced serious medical complications, with 97.1% being admitted to an intensive care unit, and had prolonged hospital stays, with a mean duration of 26.1 days. The findings of this investigation underscore the important public health problem of NAS and add to current knowledge on the characteristics of these mothers and infants. Effective June 2014, NAS is now a mandatory reportable condition in Florida. Interventions are also needed to 1) increase the number and use of community resources available to drug-abusing and drug-dependent women of reproductive age, 2) improve drug addiction counseling and rehabilitation referral and documentation policies, and 3) link women to these resources before or earlier in pregnancy. PMID:25742381

  6. Fragmented implementation of maternal and child health home-based records in Vietnam: need for integration

    PubMed Central

    Aiga, Hirotsugu; Nguyen, Vinh Duc; Nguyen, Cuong Dinh; Nguyen, Tho Thi Thi; Nguyen, Lien Thi Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Background Home-based records (HBRs) are globally implemented as the effective tools that encourage pregnant women and mothers to timely and adequately utilise maternal and child health (MCH) services. While availability and utilisation of nationally representative HBRs have been assessed in several earlier studies, the reality of a number of HBRs subnationally implemented in a less coordinated manner has been neither reported nor analysed. Objectives This study is aimed at estimating the prevalence of HBRs for MCH and the level of fragmentation of and overlapping between different HBRs for MCH in Vietnam. The study further attempts to identify health workers’ and mothers’ perceptions towards HBR operations and utilisations. Design A self-administered questionnaire was sent to the provincial health departments of 28 selected provinces. A copy of each HBR available was collected from them. A total of 20 semi-structured interviews with health workers and mothers were conducted at rural communities in four of 28 selected provinces. Results Whereas HBRs developed exclusively for maternal health and exclusively for child health were available in four provinces (14%) and in 28 provinces (100%), respectively, those for both maternal health and child health were available in nine provinces (32%). The mean number of HBRs in 28 provinces (=5.75) indicates over-availability of HBRs. All 119 minimum required items for recording found in three different HBRs under nationwide scale-up were also included in the Maternal and Child Health Handbook being piloted for nationwide scaling-up. Implementation of multiple HBRs is likely to confuse not only health workers by requiring them to record the same data on several HBRs but also mothers about which HBR they should refer to and rely on at home. Conclusions To enable both health workers and pregnant women to focus on only one type of HBR, province-specific HBRs for maternal and/or child health need to be nationally standardised

  7. Relevance of the electronic computer to hospital medical records*

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    During the past 30 years an “information explosion” has completely changed patterns of illness. Unit files of individual patients have become so large that they are increasingly difficult both to store physically and to assimilate mentally. We have reached a communications barriers which poses a major threat to the efficient practice of clinical medicine. At the same time a new kind of machine, the electronic digital computer, which was invented only 26 years ago, has already come to dominate large areas of military, scientific, commercial, and industrial activity. Its supremacy rests on its ability to perform any data procedure automatically and incredibly quickly. Computers are being employed in clinical medicine in hospitals for various purposes. They can act as arithmetic calculators, they can process and analyse output from recording devices, and they can make possible the automation of various machine systems. However, in the field of case records their role is much less well defined, for here the organization of data as a preliminary to computer input is the real stumbling-block. Data banks of retrospective selected clinical information have been in operation in some centres for a number of years. Attempts are now being made to design computerized “total information systems” to replace conventional paper records, and the possibility of automated diagnosis is being seriously discussed. In my view, however, the medical profession is in danger of being dazzled by optimistic claims about the usefulness of computers in case record processing. The solution to the present problems of record storage and handling is very simple, and does not involve computerization. PMID:4898564

  8. High rates of burnout among maternal health staff at a referral hospital in Malawi: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Burnout among maternal healthcare workers in sub-Saharan Africa may have a negative effect on services provided and efforts to mitigate high maternal mortality rates. In Malawi, research on burnout is limited and no empirical research has been conducted specifically among maternal health staff. Therefore, the aims of the study were to examine the prevalence and degree of burnout reported by healthcare workers who provide antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal services in a district referral hospital in Malawi; and, to explore factors that may influence the level of burnout healthcare workers experience. Methods In the current cross-sectional study, levels of burnout among staff working in obstetrics and gynaecology at a referral hospital in Malawi were examined, in addition to individual and job characteristics that may be associated with burnout. Results In terms of the three dimensions of burnout, of the 101 participants, nearly three quarters (72%) reported emotional exhaustion, over one third (43%) reported depersonalization while almost three quarters (74%) experienced reduced personal accomplishment. Conclusions Based on these findings, burnout appears to be common among participating maternal health staff and they experienced more burnout than their colleagues working in other medical settings and countries. Further research is needed to identify factors specific to Malawi that contribute to burnout in order to inform the development of prevention and treatment within the maternal health setting. PMID:21605379

  9. Syphilis serology in pregnancy: an eight-year study (2005-2012) in a large teaching maternity hospital in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    McGettrick, Padraig; Ferguson, Wendy; Jackson, Valerie; Eogan, Maeve; Lawless, Mairead; Ciprike, Vaneta; Varughese, Alan; Coulter-Smith, Sam; Lambert, John S

    2016-03-01

    All cases of positive syphilis serology detected in antenatal and peripartum screening in a large teaching maternity hospital in inner city Dublin, Ireland over an eight-year period (2005-2012 inclusive) were reviewed and included in our study. Demographic, antenatal registration, laboratory (including co-infections), partner serology, treatment and delivery data were recorded in our database. Infant follow-up, treatment and outcome data were also collected. During this period, 194 women had positive syphilis serology, of which 182 completed their pregnancies at the institution. This accounts for 0.28% of the total number of women completing their pregnancies during this time (N = 66038); 79 had no previous diagnosis of infection. There was one case of re-infection during pregnancy. Thirty-two women were co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. There was one case suggestive of congenital syphilis infection. Our study is a comprehensive analysis of the diagnosis, management and clinical outcomes of women testing positive for syphilis infection in pregnancy. It reveals the relatively high prevalence of syphilis infection in the population utilising the maternity services in north inner-city Dublin. It re-enforces the importance of continued active surveillance to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with maternal syphilis infection. It also highlights the importance of strategies such as re-testing high-risk groups and definitive screening of spouse serology. PMID:25829517

  10. Diffusion of Electronic Medical Record Based Public Hospital Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Kim, Seong Min; An, Chang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the adoption behavior of a newly developed Electronic Medical Record (EMR)-based information system (IS) at three public hospitals in Korea with a focus on doctors and nurses. Methods User satisfaction scores from four performance layers were analyzed before and two times after the newly develop system was introduced to evaluate the adoption process of the IS with Rogers' diffusion theory. Results The 'intention to use' scores, the most important indicator for determining whether or not to adopt the IS in Rogers' confirmation stage for doctors, were very high in the third survey (4.21). In addition, the scores for 'reduced medication errors', which is the key indicator for evaluating the success of the IS, increased in the third survey for both doctors and nurses. The factors influencing 'intention to use' with a high odds ratio (>1.5) were the 'frequency of attendance of user training sessions', 'mandatory use of system', 'reduced medication errors', and 'reduced medical record documentation time' for both doctors and nurses. Conclusions These findings show that the new EMR-based IS was well accepted by doctors. Both doctors and nurses also positively considered the effects of the new IS on their clinical environments. PMID:26279954

  11. Early breast-feeding patterns in a Malaysian maternity hospital, 1980-1983.

    PubMed

    Kader, H A

    1984-12-01

    The promotion of commercial infant formulas in hospitals making such formulas freely available to new mothers has been prohibited by a set of rules 1st enforced in Malaysia in 1981. This report studies the influence this development has had on infant feeding patterns among health mothers over 3 different time periods: the period before this code of ethics was enforced in 1980-1981 (29,401 cases); the period immediately after from June to December of 1982 (7,833 cases); and the last phase from January to April of 1983 (4,380 cases). Over the 3 phases of the study, choice of breastfeeding increased consecutively from 4.1% to 10.5% and finally 31.7%. Formula feeding increased also, from 1.5% to 2.0% and 2.4%. While mixed feeding was the most popular choice, its incidence declined from 94.4% in 1981 to 65.9% in 1983. Differences among ethnic groups were not statistically significant in the early studies, while in 1983 the incidence of breastfeeding among Chinese, Indians and Malays was 33.1%, 32.1% and 31.0%, respectively. For maternal age groups studied, the increase in breastfeeding was greater for the at-risk groups (mothers less than 20 years and over 35 years of age). This same trend was seen among parity groups, with at-risk groups being parity 1 and parity 5. When socioeconomic status was compared, all classes showed an increase in breastfeeding, but the largest increase was among the highest socioeconomic class. Although mixed feeding is still favored, there is a definitive trend toward breastfeeding, perhaps partly helped by the introduction of the code of ethics against free formula distribution in hospitals. PMID:12280340

  12. [Birth weight and factors associated with the prenatal period: a cross-sectional study in a maternity hospital of reference].

    PubMed

    Capelli, Jane de Carlos Santana; Pontes, Juliana Silva; Pereira, Silvia Eliza Almeida; Silva, Alexandra Anastácio Monteiro; do Carmo, Cleber Nascimento; Boccolini, Cristiano Siqueira; de Almeida, Maria Fernanda Larcher

    2014-07-01

    This study examined factors related to birth weight in a maternity hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro. It is a descriptive, sectional study conducted in the Herculano Pinheiro Maternity Hospital (HMHP) in Rio de Janeiro between December 2008 and February 2009, with postpartum mothers between 20 and 34 years of age. The chi-square test, the Student's t test and the logistical regression model were applied. 14.6% of the infants had low birth weight (less than 2500 g). There was a negative correlation between birth weight and smoking habits of the mother. The pre-pregnancy weight, maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index and number of pre-natal visit variables were positively associated with birth weight. Multiple regression analysis indicated maternal age as being a risk factor for low birth weight. The conclusion reached is that the marital status situation, where this was perceived as an important variable, as well as the number of prenatal visits, which in group analysis showed no statistical significance, deserve further investigation together with other studies. PMID:25014286

  13. Assessment of maternal risk factors associated with low birth weight neonates at a tertiary hospital, Nanded, Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Domple, Vijay Kishanrao; Doibale, Mohan K.; Nair, Abhilasha; Rajput, Pinkesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To assess the maternal risk factors associated with low birth weight (LBW) neonates at a tertiary hospital, Nanded, Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Nanded city of Maharashtra between January 2014 and July 2014 among 160 cases (LBW-birth weight ≤2499 g) and 160 controls (normal birth weight-birth weight >2499. Data collection was done by using predesigned questionnaire and also related health documents were checked and collected the expected information during the interview after obtaining informed consent from mothers. The data were analyzed by Epi Info 7 Version. Results: The present study found the significant association among gestational age, sex of baby, type of delivery, maternal age, religion, education of mother and husband, occupation of mother and husband, type of family, maternal height, weight gain, hemoglobin level, planned/unplanned delivery, bad obstetric history, interval between pregnancies, previous history of LBW, underlying disease, tobacco chewing, timing of first antenatal care (ANC) visit, total number of ANC visit, and iron and folic acid (IFA) tablets consumption with LBW. No significant association was found among maternal age, residence, caste, consanguinity of marriage, socioeconomic status, gravida, birth order, multiple pregnancy, and smoking with LBW in our study. Conclusion: It was concluded that hemoglobin level, weight gain during pregnancy, gestational age, planned/unplanned delivery, bad obstetric history, and IFA tablets consumption during pregnancy were independent risk factors for LBW. PMID:27185977

  14. Factors affecting the outcome of maternity care. II. Neonatal outcomes and resources beyond the hospital of birth.

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, M; Szczepura, A; Lodwick, A; Stilwell, J

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of data about perinatal mortality and indicators of resources at maternity hospitals in the West Midlands region between 1977 and 1983 showed that paediatric staff ratios were inversely related to in-house mortality rates. In this paper, the outcomes for and resources used by transferred babies are added to those of the hospital of birth for three of the study years--1978, 1980, and 1982. Patterns of transfer differ between units and over time in the region, and a regional neonatal intensive care policy was introduced in 1980. Analysis of the new variables showed that in 1978 paediatric staffing was significantly inversely related to neonatal mortality. In later years, neonatal mortality of births at maternity units is explained entirely by the proportion of low or very low weight births. PMID:3221167

  15. Abdominal computed tomography during pregnancy for suspected appendicitis: a 5-year experience at a maternity hospital.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mahesh K; Garrett, Nan M; Carpenter, Wendy S; Shah, Yogesh P; Roberts, Candace

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in a pregnant patient with right lower quadrant pain in whom there was a clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis. During a 5-year period the clinical records of all pregnant women who underwent imaging examination for clinically suspected appendicitis were reviewed. The imaging findings were correlated with patient management and final outcome. Thirty-nine pregnant patients were referred for imaging, of which 35 underwent initial evaluation with sonography, 23 of these women underwent a computed tomographic examination, and an additional 4 patients were directly imaged with CT without earlier sonographic assessment. Surgery confirmed appendicitis in all 5 patients who were operated on on the basis of findings of appendicitis on a CT scan. Two patients underwent surgery based on an alternate diagnosis suggested preoperatively (tubal torsion = 1, ovarian torsion = 1). All patients with negative findings at CT had an uneventful clinical course. In those patients who were evaluated only with ultrasound, a diagnosis of appendicitis was missed in 5 patients. The sensitivity of CT in the diagnosis of appendicitis in our study group was 100%, compared with a sensitivity of 46.1% for ultrasound. CT provides an accurate diagnosis in patients suspected to have acute appendicitis and is of value in avoiding false negative exploratory laparatomy with its consequent risk of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Although sonography is the preferred initial imaging modality as its lack of ionizing radiation, CT is more accurate in providing a timely diagnosis and its use is justified to reduce maternal mortality and mortality in patients with appendicitis. PMID:20102691

  16. Socioeconomic and physical distance to the maternity hospital as predictors for place of delivery: an observation study from Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Wagle, Rajendra Raj; Sabroe, Svend; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun

    2004-01-01

    Background Although the debate on the safety and women's right of choice to a home delivery vs. hospital delivery continues in the developed countries, an undesirable outcome of home delivery, such as high maternal and perinatal mortality, is documented in developing countries. The objective was to study whether socio-economic factors, distance to maternity hospital, ethnicity, type and size of family, obstetric history and antenatal care received in present pregnancy affected the choice between home and hospital delivery in a developing country. Methods This cross-sectional study was done during June, 2001 to January 2002 in an administratively and geographically well-defined territory with a population of 88,547, stretching from urban to adjacent rural part of Kathmandu and Dhading Districts of Nepal with maximum of 5 hrs of distance from Maternity hospital. There were no intermediate level of private or government hospital or maternity homes in the study area. Interviews were carried out on 308 women who delivered within 45 days of the date of the interview with a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Results A distance of more than one hour to the maternity hospital (OR = 7.9), low amenity score status (OR = 4.4), low education (OR = 2.9), multi-parity (OR = 2.4), and not seeking antenatal care in the present pregnancy (OR = 4.6) were statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of home delivery. Ethnicity, obstetric history, age of mother, ritual observance of menarche, type and size of family and who is head of household were not statistically significantly associated with the place of delivery. Conclusions The socio-economic standing of the household was a stronger predictor of place of delivery compared to ethnicity, the internal family structure such as type and size of family, head of household, or observation of ritual days by the mother of an important event like menarche. The results suggested that mothers, who were in the low

  17. Factors affecting the outcome of maternity care. 1. Relationship between staffing and perinatal deaths at the hospital of birth.

    PubMed Central

    Stilwell, J; Szczepura, A; Mugford, M

    1988-01-01

    This is the first of two papers describing a retrospective study of maternity hospitals in an English health region using data for the years 1977-83. The research was designed to investigate the relationship between resources (such as staff and equipment) and the outcomes of births at maternity units. Considerable variation in medical and nursing staffing levels in the units in the study was observed. Regression analysis suggests that, after taking account of differences in very low weight births at each unit, the level of paediatric staffing at a maternity unit is a significant factor in explaining differences in "in house" mortality. There was no identifiable relationship between staff categories other than paediatricians and the rate of perinatal death at the hospital of delivery. As selective referral and transfers between hospitals may affect the interpretation of these findings, a second paper follows presenting the results of a further analysis that adjusts both resources and outcomes to take account of neonatal transfers. PMID:3221166

  18. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record... PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.61 Condition of participation: Special... stated by the patient and/or others significantly involved. (4) The social service records,...

  19. Prenatal lead exposure and relationship with maternal exposure determinants in a public maternity hospital of La Plata, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Martins, Enrique; Varea, Ana; Apezteguía, María; González, Horacio F; Girardelli, Ana; Caro, Laura Sanchez; Lobisuto, Mario; Delgado, Griselda; Disalvo, Liliana

    2014-03-01

    Prenatal lead exposure is a health hazard that may cause cognitive development impairments and other adverse effects in children. We conducted a cross sectional study analyzing cord blood lead levels (CBLL) of newborns and their relationship with maternal determinants of lead exposure. Mothers answered a questionnaire about socio-demographic, lifestyle habits and environmental characteristics. We used Mann-Whitney's test to compare CBLL geometrical means (GM) corresponding to the presence or absence of each lead exposure determinant, and Chi square test to study the relationship between CBLL and maternal lead exposure determinants. A total of 159 newborns participated in the study. CBLL GM was 2.1 μg/dL; and 25% of the participants had a measurable CBLL (LOQ=3.3 μg/dl). Although the participants had several determinants of lead exposure, we only found a significant relationship with inside household determinants, such as presence of lead piping (p=0.026), unplastered walls (p=0.046) and peeling paint (p=0.048). Our results show that CBLL GM was similar to that reported in several studies conducted around the world. However, 25% of the participants might have some degree of risk for lead poisoning. PMID:24361446

  20. An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Chiurco, Antonella; Montico, Marcella; Brovedani, Pierpaolo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Davanzo, Riccardo

    2015-08-01

    Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II) was preceded (Phase I) by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III). In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth. PMID:26308018

  1. An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiurco, Antonella; Montico, Marcella; Brovedani, Pierpaolo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Davanzo, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II) was preceded (Phase I) by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III). In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth. PMID:26308018

  2. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries. To create a major change in Haiti’s health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic “community care grids” to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis. We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti’s health care system will be among the leaders in that region. PMID:26934625

  3. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries.To create a major change in Haiti's health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic "community care grids" to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis.We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti's health care system will be among the leaders in that region. PMID:26934625

  4. Understanding Afghan healthcare providers: a qualitative study of the culture of care in a Kabul maternity hospital

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, R; van Teijlingen, E; Ryan, K; Holloway, I

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the culture of a Kabul maternity hospital to understand the perspectives of healthcare providers on their roles, experiences, values and motivations and the impact of these determinants on the care of perinatal women and their babies. Design Qualitative ethnographic study. Setting A maternity hospital, Afghanistan. Population Doctors, midwives and care assistants. Methods Six weeks of observation followed by 22 semi-structured interviews and four informal group discussions with staff, two focus group discussions with women and 41 background interviews with Afghan and non-Afghan medical and cultural experts. Main outcome measures The culture of care in an Afghan maternity hospital. Results A large workload, high proportion of complicated cases and poor staff organisation affected the quality of care. Cultural values, social and family pressures influenced the motivation and priorities of healthcare providers. Nepotism and cronyism created inequality in clinical training and support and undermined the authority of management to improve standards of care. Staff without powerful connections were vulnerable in a punitive inequitable environment—fearing humiliation, blame and the loss of employment. Conclusions Suboptimal care put the lives of women and babies at risk and was, in part, the result of conflicting priorities. The underlying motivation of staff appeared to be the socio-economic survival of their own families. The hospital culture closely mirrored the culture and core values of Afghan society. In setting priorities for women's health post-2015 Millennium Development Goals, understanding the context-specific pressures on staff is key to more effective programme interventions and sustainability. PMID:25394518

  5. Medical record validation of maternal recall of pregnancy and birth events from a twin cohort.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong; Tuvblad, Catherine; Li, Linda; Raine, Adrian; Baker, Laura A

    2013-08-01

    This study aims to assess the validity of maternal recall for several perinatal variables 8-10 years after pregnancy in a twin sample. Retrospective information was collected 8-10 years after the delivery event in a cohort of mothers from the University of Southern California Twin Study (N = 611) and compared with medical records for validity analysis. Recall of most variables showed substantial to perfect agreement (κ = 0.60-1.00), with notable exceptions for specific medical problems during pregnancy (κ ≤ 0.40) and substance use when mothers provided continuous data (e.g., number of cigarettes per day; r ≤ 0.24). With the exception of delivery method, neonatal intensive care unit admission, birth weight, neonatal information, and post-delivery complications were also recalled with low accuracy. For mothers of twins, maternal recall is generally a valid measure for perinatal variables 10 years after pregnancy. However, caution should be taken regarding variables such as substance use, medical problems, birth length, and post-delivery complications. PMID:23725849

  6. Postpartum posttraumatic stress disorder in a fetal high-risk maternity hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Tatiana; Moraes, Claudia Leite de; Reichenheim, Michael E; Azevedo, Gustavo Lobato de; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; Figueira, Ivan Luiz de Vasconcellos

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of postpartum posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a maternity hospital for fetal high-risk pregnancies and to identify vulnerable subgroups. This was a cross-sectional study at a fetal high-risk maternity hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with a sample of 456 women who had given birth at this hospital. The Trauma History Questionnaire and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist were used to screen for lifetime traumatic events and PTSD symptoms, respectively. Overall prevalence of PTSD was 9.4%. Higher PTSD prevalence was associated with three or more births, a newborn with a 1-minute Apgar score of seven or less, history of mental disorder prior to or during the index pregnancy, postpartum depression, physical or psychological intimate partner violence during the pregnancy, a history of unwanted sexual experience, and lifetime exposure to five or more traumas. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of PTSD are essential to improve the mother's quality of life and the infant's health. PMID:26872229

  7. Medico-social and socio-demographic factors associated with maternal mortality at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Makokha, A E

    1991-01-01

    To identify the most significant determinants of maternal mortality in Kenya, a prospective study involving 49,335 deliveries occurring at Kenyatta National Hospital from January 1978-87 was conducted. There were 156 maternal deaths in this series, for a maternal mortality rate of 3.2/1000 deliveries. The 5 most frequent causes of death were abortion (24%), hypertensive disease of pregnancy (13%), sepsis (13%), anemia (10%), and cardiac disease (7%). 24% of women who died were age 19 years or under, 27% were 20-24 years, 23% were 25-29 years, and 11% were 30-34 years. The largest percentage (24%) of deaths involved nulliparous women; 16% were to women of parity 5 and above. 28% of the women who died were single, and single women contributed the majority of deaths from abortion. 66% of the women who died had received no prenatal care. The proportion of avoidable deaths was 19% among clinic attenders compared to 29% among non-attenders. Overall, age, parity, and marital status--traditionally regarded as the key factors associated with maternal mortality--vary in their impact, given the cause of death and medical services received. The assumption that high parity is associated with maternal mortality was not confirmed in this study due to the significant number of deaths from abortion that involved single, nulliparous women. In addition, many women who died were in the optimum age group for childbearing, but were more prone to suffer from anemia, hypertension, ectopic pregnancy, and cardiac disease than women over 30 years old. Overall, 126 deaths were considered avoidable. Contributory factors were slowness of surgical management of emergencies, prolonged confinement of women with cardiac disease, and a lack of emergency supplies of blood and drugs for complicated deliveries. PMID:12316813

  8. Conditions triggering local incident reviews in UK hospital maternity units: A national survey

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Ahmed, Olaa; McClymont, Charlotte; Knight, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In countries, such as the UK, where maternal deaths are rare, reviews of other severe complications of pregnancy and the puerperium can provide an additional perspective to help learn lessons to improve future care. The objective of this survey was to identify the types of incidents which triggered local reviews in the UK, in order to inform national safety reporting guidance. Design A national descriptive survey. Setting UK. Participants Consultant-led maternity units. Main outcome measure Seventy-one per cent of maternity units provided an incident review trigger list. The conditions included were classified by two assessors. Incidents that were listed by at least 5% of maternity units were reported and compared with incidents recommended for review by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). Results The conditions covered were highly variable, although those recommended by the RCOG were most highly represented. The most commonly listed conditions that had not been recommended for review by the RCOG included inadequate staffing levels (70%), cardiac arrest (69%) and maternal sepsis (64%). Conclusions Substantial variation exists in the types of incident listed for review by maternity units in the UK. Importantly, some units are not reviewing cases of severe infective complications even though this is a current major concern. Future guidance concerning local serious incident review processes should include how the list of conditions triggering a review should be managed in the light of changing clinical and safety priorities. PMID:25057407

  9. Characteristics of Hospitals Associated with Complete and Partial Implementation of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Bhounsule, Prajakta; Peterson, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To determine the proportion of hospitals with and without implementation of electronic health records (EHRs). (2) To examine characteristics of hospitals that report implementation of EHRs partially or completely versus those that report no implementation. (3) To identify hospital characteristics associated with nonimplementation to help devise future policy initiatives. Methods This was a retrospective cross-sectional study using the 2012 American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. The outcome variable was the implementation of EHRs completely or partially. Independent variables were hospital characteristics, such as staffing, organization structure, accreditations, ownership, and services and facilities provided at the hospitals. Descriptive frequencies were determined, and multinomial logistic regression was used to determine variables independently associated with complete or partial implementation of EHRs. Results In this study, 12.6 percent of hospitals reported no implementation of EHRs, while 43.9 percent of hospitals implemented EHRs partially and 43.5 percent implemented EHRs completely. Overall characteristics of hospitals with complete and partial implementation were similar. The multinomial regression model revealed a positive association between the number of licensed beds and complete implementation of EHRs. A positive association was found between children's general medical, surgical, and heart hospitals and complete implementation of EHRs. Conversely, psychiatric and rehabilitation hospitals, limited service hospitals, hospitals participating in a network, service hospitals, government nonfederal hospitals, and nongovernment not-for-profit hospitals showed less likelihood of complete implementation of EHRs. Conclusion Study findings suggest a disparity of EHR implementation between larger, for-profit hospitals and smaller, not-for-profit hospitals. Low rates of implementation were observed with psychiatric and

  10. Maternal recall versus medical records of metabolic conditions from the prenatal period: A validation study

    PubMed Central

    Krakowiak, Paula; Walker, Cheryl K.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess validity of maternally-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders, and reliability of BMI measurements during periconception and pregnancy compared with medical records when mothers are interviewed 2-5 years after delivery. To investigate whether reporting accuracy differed by child's case status (autism, delays, typical development). Methods Participants were mothers of 2-5 year old children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders from the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment) Study who had both prenatal/delivery records and telephone interviews. Sensitivity and specificity of self-report in telephone interview was assessed by comparison with medical records; agreement was evaluated by kappa statistics. Deviations in reported BMI were evaluated with Bland-Altman plots and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). Results Mothers of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (autism or developmental delay) reported metabolic conditions slightly more accurately than control mothers. For diabetes, sensitivity ranged from 73% to 87% and specificity was ≥98% across groups. For hypertensive disorders, sensitivity ranged from 57% to 77% and specificity from 93% to 98%. Reliability of BMI was high (CCC=0.930); when grouped into BMI categories, a higher proportion of mothers of delayed children were correctly classified (κwt=0.93) compared with the autism group and controls (κwt=0.85 and κwt=0.84, respectively; P=0.05). Multiparity was associated with higher discrepancies in BMI and misreporting of hypertensive disorders. Conclusions For purposes of etiologic studies, self-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders during periconception and pregnancy show high validity among mothers irrespective of child's case status. Recall of pre-pregnancy BMI is reliable compared with self-reported values in medical records. PMID:25656730

  11. Maternal Recall Versus Medical Records of Metabolic Conditions from the Prenatal Period: A Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, Paula; Walker, Cheryl K; Tancredi, Daniel J; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2015-09-01

    To assess validity of maternally-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders, and reliability of BMI measurements during periconception and pregnancy compared with medical records when mothers are interviewed 2-5 years after delivery. To investigate whether reporting accuracy differed by child's case status (autism, delays, typical development). Participants were mothers of 2-5 year old children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders from the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment) Study who had both prenatal/delivery records and telephone interviews. Sensitivity and specificity of self-report in telephone interview was assessed by comparison with medical records; agreement was evaluated by kappa statistics. Deviations in reported BMI were evaluated with Bland-Altman plots and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). Mothers of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (autism or developmental delay) reported metabolic conditions slightly more accurately than control mothers. For diabetes, sensitivity ranged from 73 to 87% and specificity was ≥98% across groups. For hypertensive disorders, sensitivity ranged from 57 to 77% and specificity from 93 to 98%. Reliability of BMI was high (CCC = 0.930); when grouped into BMI categories, a higher proportion of mothers of delayed children were correctly classified (κ(wt) = 0.93) compared with the autism group and controls (κ(wt) = 0.85 and κ(wt) = 0.84, respectively; P = 0.05). Multiparity was associated with higher discrepancies in BMI and misreporting of hypertensive disorders. For purposes of etiologic studies, self-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders during periconception and pregnancy show high validity among mothers irrespective of child's case status. Recall of pre-pregnancy BMI is reliable compared with self-reported values in medical records. PMID:25656730

  12. Constructing a Population-Based Research Database from Routine Maternal Screening Records: A Resource for Studying Alloimmunization in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Gryfelt, Gunilla; Wikman, Agneta; Reilly, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background Although screening for maternal red blood cell antibodies during pregnancy is a standard procedure, the prevalence and clinical consequences of non-anti-D immunization are poorly understood. The objective was to create a national database of maternal antibody screening results that can be linked with population health registers to create a research resource for investigating these issues. Study Design and Methods Each birth in the Swedish Medical Birth Register was uniquely identified and linked to the text stored in routine maternal antibody screening records in the time window from 9 months prior to 2 weeks after the delivery date. These text records were subjected to a computerized search for specific antibodies using regular expressions. To illustrate the research potential of the resulting database, selected antibody prevalence rates are presented as tables and figures, and the complete data (from more than 60 specific antibodies) presented as online moving graphical displays. Results More than one million (1,191,761) births with valid screening information from 1982–2002 constitute the study population. Computerized coverage of screening increased steadily over time and varied by region as electronic records were adopted. To ensure data quality, we restricted analysis to birth records in areas and years with a sustained coverage of at least 80%, representing 920,903 births from 572,626 mothers in 17 of the 24 counties in Sweden. During the study period, non-anti-D and anti-D antibodies occurred in 76.8/10,000 and 14.1/10,000 pregnancies respectively, with marked differences between specific antibodies over time. Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of creating a nationally representative research database from the routine maternal antibody screening records from an extended calendar period. By linkage with population registers of maternal and child health, such data are a valuable resource for addressing important clinical questions

  13. Incidence and Variation of Discrepancies in Recording Chronic Conditions in Australian Hospital Administrative Data

    PubMed Central

    Assareh, Hassan; Achat, Helen M.; Stubbs, Joanne M.; Guevarra, Veth M.; Hill, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic data routinely collected for hospital admitted patients and used for case-mix adjustment in care provider comparisons and reimbursement are prone to biases. We aim to measure discrepancies, variations and associated factors in recorded chronic morbidities for hospital admitted patients in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Of all admissions between July 2010 and June 2014 in all NSW public and private acute hospitals, admissions with over 24 hours stay and one or more of the chronic conditions of diabetes, smoking, hepatitis, HIV, and hypertension were included. The incidence of a non-recorded chronic condition in an admission occurring after the first admission with a recorded chronic condition (index admission) was considered as a discrepancy. Poisson models were employed to (i) derive adjusted discrepancy incidence rates (IR) and rate ratios (IRR) accounting for patient, admission, comorbidity and hospital characteristics and (ii) quantify variation in rates among hospitals. The discrepancy incidence rate was highest for hypertension (51% of 262,664 admissions), followed by hepatitis (37% of 12,107), smoking (33% of 548,965), HIV (27% of 1500) and diabetes (19% of 228,687). Adjusted rates for all conditions declined over the four-year period; with the sharpest drop of over 80% for diabetes (47.7% in 2010 vs. 7.3% in 2014), and 20% to 55% for the other conditions. Discrepancies were more common in private hospitals and smaller public hospitals. Inter-hospital differences were responsible for 1% (HIV) to 9.4% (smoking) of variation in adjusted discrepancy incidences, with an increasing trend for diabetes and HIV. Chronic conditions are recorded inconsistently in hospital administrative datasets, and hospitals contribute to the discrepancies. Adjustment for patterns and stratification in risk adjustments; and furthermore longitudinal accumulation of clinical data at patient level, refinement of clinical coding systems and standardisation of comorbidity

  14. Incidence and Variation of Discrepancies in Recording Chronic Conditions in Australian Hospital Administrative Data.

    PubMed

    Assareh, Hassan; Achat, Helen M; Stubbs, Joanne M; Guevarra, Veth M; Hill, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic data routinely collected for hospital admitted patients and used for case-mix adjustment in care provider comparisons and reimbursement are prone to biases. We aim to measure discrepancies, variations and associated factors in recorded chronic morbidities for hospital admitted patients in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Of all admissions between July 2010 and June 2014 in all NSW public and private acute hospitals, admissions with over 24 hours stay and one or more of the chronic conditions of diabetes, smoking, hepatitis, HIV, and hypertension were included. The incidence of a non-recorded chronic condition in an admission occurring after the first admission with a recorded chronic condition (index admission) was considered as a discrepancy. Poisson models were employed to (i) derive adjusted discrepancy incidence rates (IR) and rate ratios (IRR) accounting for patient, admission, comorbidity and hospital characteristics and (ii) quantify variation in rates among hospitals. The discrepancy incidence rate was highest for hypertension (51% of 262,664 admissions), followed by hepatitis (37% of 12,107), smoking (33% of 548,965), HIV (27% of 1500) and diabetes (19% of 228,687). Adjusted rates for all conditions declined over the four-year period; with the sharpest drop of over 80% for diabetes (47.7% in 2010 vs. 7.3% in 2014), and 20% to 55% for the other conditions. Discrepancies were more common in private hospitals and smaller public hospitals. Inter-hospital differences were responsible for 1% (HIV) to 9.4% (smoking) of variation in adjusted discrepancy incidences, with an increasing trend for diabetes and HIV. Chronic conditions are recorded inconsistently in hospital administrative datasets, and hospitals contribute to the discrepancies. Adjustment for patterns and stratification in risk adjustments; and furthermore longitudinal accumulation of clinical data at patient level, refinement of clinical coding systems and standardisation of comorbidity

  15. Graphical electrocardiogram waveforms as part of an integrated hospital system's patient record.

    PubMed Central

    Enison, E. J.; Dayhoff, R.; Fletcher, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has an ongoing project to integrate diagnostic images into its existing text-based hospital information system. High-quality images from cardiology, pulmonary medicine, gastroenterology, endoscopy, pathology, radiology, hematology and nuclear medicine can be displayed for clinicians quickly and conveniently on workstations throughout the hospital. As a part of this endeavor, diagnostic-quality computer generated 12-lead electrocardiograms, including both median and rhythm data, can be viewed as a part of the on-line patient record of an integrated hospital information system. Now computer generated graphics can be included in the longitudinal patient record. Incorporating generated graphics and images into a text based patient record is another step towards the next generation of integrated hospital information system with multimedia patient records. PMID:8130498

  16. The development of medical record services in Hong Kong public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fung, V

    1994-12-01

    Medical record service in Hong Kong public hospitals have been developing at different levels. Since 1992, various improvements in medical record services have been carried out in public hospitals, e.g. professional management, record storage, organized medical records, computerization, completion of discharge summaries, and the introduction of a more precise coding system. The aim of the reform is to provide timely, accurate, organized and meaningful clinical information for end-users. Evolving from this reform, work has been started on developing Patient Related Groups and Specialty Clinical Information Systems. PMID:10142476

  17. An audit to review the characteristics and management of placenta praevia at Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Pande, B; Shetty, A

    2014-07-01

    Placenta praevia (PP) is an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity. We reviewed the characteristics and management of PP at the Aberdeen Maternity Hospital (AMH) to evaluate performance. In the years 2009-2011, a total of 60 cases with confirmed PP underwent caesarean section (CS) at the AMH. Two-fifths of cases had previous CS and two-thirds were posterior praevias. Four-fifths were major praevias. Diagnosis was mostly by trans-abdominal scanning (TAS). A little less than two-thirds underwent hospital admission (half of them for antepartum haemorrhage). Most received steroid and ferrous sulphate as appropriate. The majority were delivered at greater than 36 weeks' gestation. There was good support in theatre by senior obstetricians and anaesthetists. Cell salvage was used in theatre. Overall, the outcomes were good. Improvements could be made on documentation of counselling preoperatively and practice of trans-vaginal scans (TVS) to confirm low lying placentae even at the 20-week scan for better diagnosis, as per the RCOG guidelines. PMID:24702527

  18. [Cocooning strategy: Effectiveness of a pertussis vaccination program for parents in the maternity unit of a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Decréquy, A; de Vienne, C; Bellot, A; Guillois, B; Dreyfus, M; Brouard, J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on vaccination coverage of a protocol in which promotion and administration of pertussis vaccine in the maternity ward were proposed upon discharge from a French university hospital. Pertussis is a potentially fatal bacterial respiratory infection, especially in young infants. Since 2004 the High Council of Public Health has recommended vaccinating adults who may become parents. This recommendation is not widely applied in France. The study, organized as a professional practice evaluation (EPP) was conducted by a multidisciplinary team at Caen University Hospital. Thirty couples were included for each period. The primary endpoint was the rate of vaccination coverage for both parents at hospital discharge. Before the information campaign (first period, January 2012), immunization coverage of mothers and fathers was 20% and 13%, respectively. No couple had received a prescription for vaccines. During the second period (June 2013), vaccination coverage was 77% at hospital discharge for mothers and 57% for fathers. Parental immunization coverage against pertussis was multiplied by four to five during the study, which is very encouraging, and it is important to continue this campaign at the region and national levels. PMID:27345559

  19. Afraid of Delivering at the Hospital or Afraid of Delivering at Home: A Qualitative Study of Thai Hmong Families' Decision-Making About Maternity Services.

    PubMed

    Culhane-Pera, Kathleen A; Sriphetcharawut, Sarinya; Thawsirichuchai, Rasamee; Yangyuenkun, Wirachon; Kunstadter, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Thailand has high rates of maternity services; both antenatal care (ANC) and hospital delivery are widely used by its citizens. A recent Northern Thailand survey showed that Hmong women used maternity services at lower rates. Our objectives were to identify Hmong families' socio-cultural reasons for using and not using maternity services, and suggest ways to improve Hmong women's use of maternity services. In one Hmong village, we classified all 98 pregnancies in the previous 5 years into four categories: no ANC/home birth, ANC/home, no ANC/hospital, ANC/hospital. We conducted life-history case studies of 4 women from each category plus their 12 husbands, and 17 elders. We used grounded theory to guide qualitative analysis. Families not using maternity services considered pregnancy a normal process that only needed traditional home support. In addition, they disliked institutional processes that interfered with cultural birth practices, distrusted discriminatory personnel, and detested invasive, involuntary hospital procedures. Families using services perceived physical needs or potential delivery risks that could benefit from obstetrical assistance not available at home. While they disliked aspects of hospital births, they tolerated these conditions for access to obstetrical care they might need. Families also considered cost, travel distance, and time as structural issues. The families ultimately balanced their fear of delivering at home with their fear of delivering at the hospital. Providing health education about pregnancy risks, and changing healthcare practices to accommodate Hmong people's desires for culturally-appropriate family-centered care, which are consistent with evidence-based obstetrics, might improve Hmong women's use of maternity services. PMID:26138321

  20. Medical Record Clerk Training Program, Course of Study; Student Manual: For Medical Record Personnel in Small Rural Hospitals in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Arlington, VA. Div. of Health Resources.

    The manual provides major topics, objectives, activities and, procedures, references and materials, and assignments for the training program. The topics covered are hospital organization and community role, organization and management of a medical records department, international classification of diseases and operations, medical terminology,…

  1. Record-keeping in a state hospital: a modification of the Weed system.

    PubMed

    Fahrner, B G; Ellis, N C; Stark, S L; Spencer, J A

    1977-12-01

    The Weed problem-oriented medical record has been modified for use in a state psychiatric hospital that has a large proportion of long-term patients and uses an interdisciplinary team approach to treatment. Three new record forms were developed during a pilot study at the hospital: the processed-problem list, the problem card, and the unprocessed-problem list. The modified problem-oriented record system is being used in 28 wards providing both short- and long-term psychiatric care. PMID:304437

  2. Outcome of very low birthweight neonates in a developing country: experience from a large Malaysian maternity hospital.

    PubMed

    Boo, N Y

    1992-02-01

    Between January 1989 to April 1990 (16 months), a prospective observational study was carried out on 329 consecutive very low birthweight (VLBW) less than or equal to 1500 grams) Malaysian neonates born in the Maternity Hospital, Kuala Lumpur before their first discharge from the hospital. The objectives of the study were to determine the common causes of early morbidity and mortality of this group of Malaysian neonates. The study shows that the incidence of Malaysian VLBW neonates was 9.9 per 1000 livebirths (95% confidence intervals 9.0 to 10.8). The mean duration of stay in the hospital was 19.3 days (SD = 21.4). One hundred and ninety-six (59.6 percent) of the VLBW neonates died. They accounted for 60 percent (196/334) of all neonatal deaths in the hospital during the study period. Mortality was significantly higher in neonates of birthweight less than 1000 grams (p less than 0.01) and of gestation of less than 33 weeks (p less than 0.001). The three most common clinical problems were respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (72.6 percent), septicemia (28.0 percent) and intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) (21.9 percent). Death occurred in 71.1 percent of the septicemic patients. The most common causative organisms of septicemia were multiresistant klebsiella (52.3 percent) and multiresistant acinetobacter (14.7 percent). RDS (33.2 percent), septicemia (29.6%) and IVH (17.9 percent) were the three most common causes of death. Improvement in the nursing staff situation and basic neonatal care facilities in this hospital and prevention of premature delivery could help to decrease morbidity and mortality in this group of neonates. PMID:1598605

  3. Evaluation of Maternal Complications in Severe Preeclampsia in a University Hospital in Tirana

    PubMed Central

    Ndoni, Eriseida; Hoxhallari, Redi; Bimbashi, Astrit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia is a hypertensive multisystem disorder of pregnancy that complicates up to 10% of pregnancies worldwide and is one of the leading causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. AIM: To evaluate maternal complications associated with severe preeclampsia. METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study conducted in the UHOG “Koço Gliozheni”, in Tirana. Primary outcomes evaluated: maternal death, eclampsia, stroke, HELLP syndrome, and pulmonary edema. Secondary outcomes: renal failure, admission in ICU, caesarean section, placental abruption, and postpartum hemorrhage. Fisher’s exact test and Chi-squared test were used as statistical methods. RESULTS: In women with severe preeclampsia we found higher rates of complications comparing to the group with preeclampsia. Eclampsia (1.5% vs. 7.1%, P < 0.001), HELLP syndrome (2.4% vs. 11.0%; P < 0.001), stroke (0.5% vs 1.9%, P = 0.105) pulmonary edema (0.25% vs. 1.3%, P = 0.0035), renal failure (0.9% vs. 2.6%, P = 0.107), admission in ICU (19.5% vs. 71.4%, P = 0.007), caesarean section rates (55.5% vs. 77%, P = 0.508), placental abruption (4.3% vs. 7.8%, P = 0.103) and severe postpartum hemorrhage (3.2% vs. 3.9%, P = 0.628). CONCLUSION: Severe preeclampsia is associated with high rates of maternal severe morbidity and early diagnosis and timely intervention can prevent life treating complications. PMID:27275340

  4. A model approach to sharing electronic medical records between and within the state hospitals in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Güler, I; Müldür, S

    2001-11-01

    It has always been a research interest to solve hospital management problems with systematic approach by using modern management tools. Almost all the Hospital Information System (HIS) software packages in Turkey keep track of local transactions in administrative activities and material flow. In state hospitals in Turkey, very little medical information is processed and most of the records are still kept manually and archived on papers. In this paper, a cost-effective, flexible and easy-to-use Hospital Information System model is proposed in order to give better diagnostic and treatment services. It is also demonstrated that this model makes it possible to exchange information between and within the hospitals over Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) network. User needs are taken into consideration during model development and the benefits of model implementation to the hospital administration are stated. According to the model proposed in this paper, only a single health care record number (HCRN) is required for a patient to access all her/his medical records stored in different locations, from any state hospital in Turkey. PMID:11604155

  5. An evaluation of hospital discharge records as a tool for serious work related injury surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Alamgir, H; Koehoorn, M; Ostry, A; Tompa, E; Demers, P

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To identify and describe work related serious injuries among sawmill workers in British Columbia, Canada using hospital discharge records, and compare the agreement and capturing patterns of the work related indicators available in the hospital discharge records. Methods Hospital discharge records were extracted from 1989 to 1998 for a cohort of sawmill workers. Work related injuries were identified from these records using International Classification of Disease (ICD‐9) external cause of injury codes, which have a fifth digit, and sometimes a fourth digit, indicating place of occurrence, and the responsibility of payment schedule, which identifies workers' compensation as being responsible for payment. Results The most frequent causes of work related hospitalisations were falls, machinery related, overexertion, struck against, cutting or piercing, and struck by falling objects. Almost all cases of machinery related, struck by falling object, and caught in or between injuries were found to be work related. Overall, there was good agreement between the two indicators (ICD‐9 code and payment schedule) for identifying work relatedness of injury hospitalisations (kappa = 0.75, p < 0.01). There was better concordance between them for injuries, such as struck against, drowning/suffocation/foreign body, fire/flame/natural/environmental, and explosions/firearms/hot substance/electric current/radiation, and poor concordance for injuries, such as machinery related, struck by falling object, overexertion, cutting or piercing, and caught in or between. Conclusions Hospital discharge records are collected for administrative reasons, and thus are readily available. Depending on the coding reliability and validity, hospital discharge records represent an alternative and independent source of information for serious work related injuries. The study findings support the use of hospital discharge records as a potential surveillance system for such injuries

  6. Serum Retinol Concentrations in Mothers and Newborns at Delivery in a Public Maternity Hospital in Recife, Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Andreto, Luciana Marques; Vieira, Carmina Silva dos Santos; de Arruda, Ilma Kruze Grande; Diniz, Alcides da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Serum retinol concentrations were compared in a consecutive series of 65 mother-newborn pairs at delivery in a public maternity hospital in Recife, Brazil, from January to August 2008 and examined their association with biological, socioeconomic, environmental and obstetrical characteristics. Serum retinol concentrations of the newborns (umbilical cord) and mothers (brachial venipuncture) were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Prevalence of low (<0.70 µmol/L) and inadequate (<1.05 µmol/L) serum retinol concentrations were observed in 23.1% (95% CI 13.9-35.5) and 23.0% (95% CI 13.5-35.8) among newborns and mothers respectively. The serum retinol distribution was lower in male than female infants (-0.4 µmol/L, p=0.01) and, across both sexes, concentrations in paired newborn and mother were correlated (r=0.27, p=0.04). Further, maternal status explains only 7% of the variance in retinol concentrations in newborn's cord plasma. Among mothers delivering in public facilities in Recife, hypovitaminosis may exist. PMID:24847590

  7. Electronic Health Record Adoption In US Hospitals: Progress Continues, But Challenges Persist.

    PubMed

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; DesRoches, Catherine M; Kralovec, Peter; Foster, Gregory; Worzala, Chantal; Charles, Dustin; Searcy, Talisha; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-12-01

    Achieving nationwide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) remains an important policy priority. While EHR adoption has increased steadily since 2010, it is unclear how providers that have not yet adopted will fare now that federal incentives have converted to penalties. We used 2008-14 national data, which includes the most recently available, to examine hospital EHR trends. We found large gains in adoption, with 75 percent of US hospitals now having adopted at least a basic EHR system--up from 59 percent in 2013. However, small and rural hospitals continue to lag behind. Among hospitals without a basic EHR system, the function most often not yet adopted (in 61 percent of hospitals) was physician notes. We also saw large increases in the ability to meet core stage 2 meaningful-use criteria (40.5 percent of hospitals, up from 5.8 percent in 2013); much of this progress resulted from increased ability to meet criteria related to exchange of health information with patients and with other physicians during care transitions. Finally, hospitals most often reported up-front and ongoing costs, physician cooperation, and complexity of meeting meaningful-use criteria as challenges. Our findings suggest that nationwide hospital EHR adoption is in reach but will require attention to small and rural hospitals and strategies to address financial challenges, particularly now that penalties for lack of adoption have begun. PMID:26561387

  8. Hysterectomy use: the correspondence between self-reports and hospital records.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, K M; Madans, J H

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the relationship between hysterectomy use and sociodemographic factors tend to use self-reported data. In the current study, data were collected from a representative sample of US women who have been prospectively followed since 1971. Hysterectomy status was obtained by self-report and from hospital records. Although these two measures of hysterectomy were highly related, more women reported hysterectomy than could be confirmed by hospital records. The two measures showed similar associations between several obstetric and demographic characteristics and hysterectomy status, suggesting that the use of self-reported hysterectomy data does not bias analyses of potentially associated factors. PMID:7943489

  9. Analysis of 572 Cases of Adolescent Pregnancy in Z.H. Maternity Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coskun, Aydin; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared records of 572 adolescents who delivered babies in 1 obstetric service with records of 978 older patients. Found no significant differences between groups regarding spontaneous and operative delivery rates or regarding neonatal risk. Findings support view that obstetric outcomes of adolescents are no worse than outcomes for older…

  10. Cystic Echinococcosis Epidemiology in Spain Based on Hospitalization Records, 1997-2012

    PubMed Central

    Siles-Lucas, Mar; Aparicio, Pilar; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; Gherasim, Alin; Garate, Teresa; Benito, Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a parasitic disease caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. Although present throughout Europe, deficiencies in the official reporting of CE result in under-reporting and misreporting of this disease, which in turn is reflected in the wrong opinion that CE is not an important health problem. By using an alternative data source, this study aimed at describing the clinical and temporal-spatial characteristics of CE hospitalizations in Spain between 1997 and 2012. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a retrospective descriptive study using the Hospitalization Minimum Data Set (CMBD in Spanish). All CMBD’s hospital discharges with echinococcosis diagnosis placed in first diagnostic position were reviewed. Hospitalization rates were computed and clinical characteristics were described. Spatial and temporal distribution of hospital discharges was also assessed. Between 1997 and 2012, 14,010 hospitalizations with diagnosis of CE were recorded, 55% were men and 67% were aged over 45 years. Pediatric hospitalizations occurred during the whole study period. The 95.2% were discharged at home, and only 1.7% were exitus. The average cost was 8,439.11 €. The hospitalization rate per 100,000 per year showed a decreasing trend during the study period. All the autonomous communities registered discharges, even those considered as non-endemic. Maximum rates were reached by Extremadura, Castilla-Leon and Aragon. Comparison of the CMBD data and the official Compulsory Notifiable Diseases (CND) reports from 2005 to 2012 showed that official data were lower than registered hospitalization discharges. Conclusions Hospitalizations distribution was uneven by year and autonomous region. Although CE hospitalization rates have decreased considerably due to the success of control programs, it remains a public health problem due to its severity and economic impact. Therefore, it would be desirable to improve its oversight and

  11. Storage Media Profiles and Health Record Retention Practice Patterns in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rinehart-Thompson, Laurie A

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the health record retention practices among health information management professionals in acute care general hospitals in the United States. A descriptive research design was used, and data were collected using a self-reporting survey. Respondents answered questions about the relationship between researcher-assigned storage media profiles (descriptions of the type or types of media on which facilities maintain health records); retention periods and factors affecting record retention periods; retention of secondary data; vendor usage; and continued reliance on paper in environments where electronic health records exist. Storage media profiles were found to be significantly related to facility operational and research needs and to the convenience of not purging records. These findings have implications for federal policy promoting the implementation of electronic health records by 2014. PMID:18574517

  12. Storage media profiles and health record retention practice patterns in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rinehart-Thompson, Laurie A

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the health record retention practices among health information management professionals in acute care general hospitals in the United States. A descriptive research design was used, and data were collected using a self-reporting survey. Respondents answered questions about the relationship between researcher-assigned storage media profiles (descriptions of the type or types of media on which facilities maintain health records); retention periods and factors affecting record retention periods; retention of secondary data; vendor usage; and continued reliance on paper in environments where electronic health records exist. Storage media profiles were found to be significantly related to facility operational and research needs and to the convenience of not purging records. These findings have implications for federal policy promoting the implementation of electronic health records by 2014. PMID:18574517

  13. A Correlational Analysis: Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Quality of Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Arshia A.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the compulsion to improve the evident paucity in quality of care, especially in critical access hospitals in the United States, policy makers, healthcare providers, and administrators have taken the advise of researchers suggesting the integration of technology in healthcare. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) System composed of multiple…

  14. Hospital Electronic Health Record Adoption and Its Influence on Postoperative Sepsis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fareed, Naleef

    2013-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems could make healthcare delivery safer by providing benefits such as timely access to accurate and complete patient information, advances in diagnosis and coordination of care, and enhancements for monitoring patient vitals. This study explored the nature of EHR adoption in U.S. hospitals and their patient…

  15. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS...

  16. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS...

  17. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR...

  18. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS...

  19. A Study of the Access to the Scholarly Record From a Hospital Health Science Core Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James F., II; Pings, Vern M.

    This study is an effort to determine possible service performance levels in hospital libraries, based on access to the scholarly record of medicine through selected lists of clinical journals and indexing and abstracting journals. Specific emphasis is placed on (1) the citation verification through the use of the index and abstract journals, (2)…

  20. Maternal and Hospital Factors Associated with First-Time Mothers' Breastfeeding Practice: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzu-I; Huang, Shu-Her; Lee, Shoou-Yih D

    2015-01-01

    Continuity of breastfeeding is infrequent and indeterminate. Evidence is lacking regarding factors associated with breastfeeding at different postpartum time points. This prospective study investigated the change in, and correlates of, breastfeeding practices after delivery at a hospital and at 1, 3, and 6 months postpartum among first-time mothers. We followed a cohort of 300 primiparous mothers of Taiwan who gave birth at two hospitals during 2010-2011. Logistic and Cox regression analyses were performed to determine factors that were correlated with breastfeeding practices. In the study sample, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding during the hospital stay was 66%; it declined to 37.5% at 1 month and 30.2% at 3 months postpartum. Only 17.1% of women reported continuing breastfeeding at 6 months. Early initiation of breastfeeding, rooming-in practice, and self-efficacy were significantly related to exclusive breastfeeding during the hospital stay. After discharge, health literacy, knowledge, intention, and self-efficacy were positively and significantly associated with breastfeeding exclusivity. Later initiation (hazard ratio=1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.05, 1.97), shorter intention (hazard ratio=1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.13, 1.68), and self-efficacy (hazard ratio=0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.96, 0.99) were important predictors of breastfeeding cessation within 6 months of delivery. Continuous breastfeeding practice for 6 months is challenging and difficult for new mothers. Results showed that factors related to breastfeeding varied over time after delivery. Interventions seeking to sustain breastfeeding should consider new mothers' needs and barriers at different times. PMID:26110594

  1. Evaluating the Risk of Re-identification of Patients from Hospital Prescription Records

    PubMed Central

    Emam, Khaled El; Dankar, Fida K; Vaillancourt, Régis; Roffey, Tyson; Lysyk, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pharmacies often provide prescription records to private research firms, on the assumption that these records are de-identified (i.e., identifying information has been removed). However, concerns have been expressed about the potential that patients can be re-identified from such records. Recently, a large private research firm requested prescription records from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), as part of a larger effort to develop a database of hospital prescription records across Canada. Objective: To evaluate the ability to re-identify patients from CHEO’S prescription records and to determine ways to appropriately de-identify the data if the risk was too high. Methods: The risk of re-identification was assessed for 18 months’ worth of prescription data. De-identification algorithms were developed to reduce the risk to an acceptable level while maintaining the quality of the data. Results: The probability of patients being re-identified from the original variables and data set requested by the private research firm was deemed quite high. A new de-identified record layout was developed, which had an acceptable level of re-identification risk. The new approach involved replacing the admission and discharge dates with the quarter and year of admission and the length of stay in days, reporting the patient’s age in weeks, and including only the first character of the patient’s postal code. Additional requirements were included in the data-sharing agreement with the private research firm (e.g., audit requirements and a protocol for notification of a breach of privacy). Conclusions: Without a formal analysis of the risk of re-identification, assurances of data anonymity may not be accurate. A formal risk analysis at one hospital produced a clinically relevant data set that also protects patient privacy and allows the hospital pharmacy to explicitly manage the risks of breach of patient privacy. PMID:22478909

  2. Light on maternal mortality in India.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, J C

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the degree and causes of maternal mortality in Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh, India, detailed enquiries were made at the grass roots and the records of health facilities were examined. The number of maternal deaths proved to be much higher than would have been revealed by a perusal of official data alone. Many women in a serious condition died on the way to hospital or soon after arrival because the means of transport were too slow or otherwise unsuitable. Maternal mortality rates varied substantially from place to place, reflecting differing levels of economic development and the presence or absence of primary health centres and subcentres. PMID:2271096

  3. Visualizing collaborative electronic health record usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Matthew B; Lee, Young Ji; Schneider, Daniel H; Skeehan, Connor T; Scholtens, Denise M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To visualize and describe collaborative electronic health record (EHR) usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure. Materials and methods We identified records of patients with heart failure and all associated healthcare provider record usage through queries of the Northwestern Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse. We constructed a network by equating access and updates of a patient’s EHR to a provider-patient interaction. We then considered shared patient record access as the basis for a second network that we termed the provider collaboration network. We calculated network statistics, the modularity of provider interactions, and provider cliques. Results We identified 548 patient records accessed by 5113 healthcare providers in 2012. The provider collaboration network had 1504 nodes and 83 998 edges. We identified 7 major provider collaboration modules. Average clique size was 87.9 providers. We used a graph database to demonstrate an ad hoc query of our provider-patient network. Discussion Our analysis suggests a large number of healthcare providers across a wide variety of professions access records of patients with heart failure during their hospital stay. This shared record access tends to take place not only in a pairwise manner but also among large groups of providers. Conclusion EHRs encode valuable interactions, implicitly or explicitly, between patients and providers. Network analysis provided strong evidence of multidisciplinary record access of patients with heart failure across teams of 100+ providers. Further investigation may lead to clearer understanding of how record access information can be used to strategically guide care coordination for patients hospitalized for heart failure. PMID:25710558

  4. Investment subsidies and the adoption of electronic medical records in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dranove, David; Garthwaite, Craig; Li, Bingyang; Ody, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In February 2009 the U.S. Congress unexpectedly passed the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH). HITECH provides up to $27 billion to promote adoption and appropriate use of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) by hospitals. We measure the extent to which HITECH incentive payments spurred EMR adoption by independent hospitals. Adoption rates for all independent hospitals grew from 48 percent in 2008 to 77 percent by 2011. Absent HITECH incentives, we estimate that the adoption rate would have instead been 67 percent in 2011. When we consider that HITECH funds were available for all hospitals and not just marginal adopters, we estimate that the cost of generating an additional adoption was $48 million. We also estimate that in the absence of HITECH incentives, the 77 percent adoption rate would have been realized by 2013, just 2 years after the date achieved due to HITECH. PMID:26596789

  5. Removal of paper-based health records from Norwegian hospitals: effects on clinical workflow.

    PubMed

    Lium, Jan Tore; Faxvaag, Arild

    2006-01-01

    Several Norwegian hospitals have, plan, or are in the process of removing the paper-based health record from clinical workflow. To assess the impact on usage and satisfaction of electronic health record (EHR) systems, we conducted a survey among physicians, nurses and medical secretaries at selected departments from six Norwegian hospitals. The main feature of the questionnaire is the description of a set of tasks commonly performed at hospitals, and respondents were asked to rate their usage and change of ease compared to previous routines for each tasks. There were 24 tasks for physicians, 19 for nurses and 23 for medical secretaries. In total, 64 physicians, 128 nurses and 57 medical secretaries responded, corresponding to a response rate of 68%, 58% and 84% respectively. Results showed a large degree of use among medical secretaries, while physicians and nurses displayed a more modest degree of use. Possibly suggesting that the EHR systems among clinicians still is considered more of an administrative system. Among the two latter groups, tasks regarding information retrieval were used more extensively than tasks regarding generating and storing information. Also, we observed large differences between hospitals and higher satisfaction with the part of the system handling regular electronic data than scanned document images. Even though the increase in use among clinicians after removing the paper based record were mainly in tasks where respondents had no choice other than use the electronic health record, the attitude towards EHR-systems were mainly positive. Thus, while removing the paper based record has yet to promote new ways of working, we see it as an important step towards the EHR system of tomorrow. Several Norwegian hospitals have shown that it is possible. PMID:17108645

  6. [Two years experience of computerised medical records in a regional hospital].

    PubMed

    Vigal Brey, Guillermo; Trelles Martín, Angel

    2012-10-01

    The introduction of computerised medical records in public hospitals is, without a doubt, one of the biggest changes made in patient health care in the last few years. It is a gradual process and is not exempt from difficulties, but it will surely set a challenge in the way information is handled in health care. Taking this path, in November 2008, the computer program SELENE, from the multinational company Siemens, was purchased in the centre were we carry out our surgical activities. The introduction of this program was preceded by an intensive training course for all the workers in the hospital. At the start, it was decided that the computer application would come into operation throughout the entire hospital, replacing the handwritten records. There were difficult days during its gradual introduction, but the computerised medical record has been well accepted by the great majority of the workers at the centre. After the initial stage of becoming accustomed, design problems started to be seen in the application, as well as their possible solutions. Currently, the use of the SELENE program has led to fluid health care within the hospital, although there are problems which can be resolved with adequate funding. PMID:21955838

  7. Racial/ethnic disparities in maternal morbidities: a statewide study of labor and delivery hospitalizations in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Cabacungan, Erwin T; Ngui, Emmanuel M; McGinley, Emily L

    2012-10-01

    We examined racial/ethnic disparities in maternal morbidities (MM) and the number of MM during labor and delivery among hospital discharges in Wisconsin. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of hospital discharge data for 206,428 pregnant women aged 13-53 years using 2005-2007 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Dataset (HCUP-SID) for Wisconsin. After adjustments for covariates, MM (preterm labor, antepartum and postpartum hemorrhage, hypertension in pregnancy, gestational diabetes, membrane-related disorders, infections and 3rd and 4th perineal lacerations) were examined using logistic regression models, and number of MM (0, 1, 2, >2 MM) were examined using multivariable ordered logistic regressions with partial proportional odds models. African-Americans had significantly higher likelihood of infections (OR = 1.74; 95% CI 1.60-1.89), preterm labor (OR = 1.42; 1.33-1.50), antepartum hemorrhage (OR = 1.63; 1.44-1.83), and hypertension complicating pregnancy (OR = 1.39; 1.31-1.48) compared to Whites. Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans had significantly higher likelihood of infections, postpartum hemorrhage, and gestational diabetes than Whites. Major perineal lacerations were significantly higher among Asian/Pacific Islanders (OR = 1.53; 1.34-1.75). All minority racial/ethnic groups, except Asians, had significantly higher likelihood of having 0 versus 1, 2 or >2 MM, 0 or 1 versus 2 or >2 MM, and 0, 1 or 2 versus >2 MM than white women. Findings show significant racial/ethnic disparities in MM, and suggest the need for better screening, management, and timely referral of these conditions, particularly among racial/ethnic women. Disparities in MM may be contributing to the high infant mortality and adverse birth outcomes among different racial/ethnic groups in Wisconsin. PMID:22105738

  8. Patient-Held Maternal and/or Child Health Records: Meeting the Information Needs of Patients and Healthcare Providers in Developing Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kathleen E.; Fuller, Sherrilynne

    2011-01-01

    Though improvements in infant and maternal mortality rates have occurred over time, women and children still die every hour from preventable causes. Various regional, social and economic factors are involved in the ability of women and children to receive adequate care and prevention services. Patient-held maternal and/or child health records have been used for a number of years in many countries to help track health risks, vaccinations and other preventative health measures performed. Though these records are primarily designed to record patient histories and healthcare information and guide healthcare workers providing care, because the records are patient-held, they also allow families a greater ability to track their own health and prevention strategies. A literature search was performed to answer these questions: (1) What are maternal information needs regarding pregnancy, post-natal and infant healthcare, especially in developing countries? (2) What is known about maternal information seeking behavior in developing countries? (3) What is the history and current state of maternal and/or child patient-held healthcare records, do they provide for the information needs of the healthcare provider and what are the effects and outcomes of patient-held records in general and for maternal and/or child health in particular? Specific information needs of pregnant women and mothers are rarely studied. The small numbers of maternal information behavior results available indicate that mothers, in general, prefer to receive health information directly from their healthcare provider as opposed to from other sources (written, etc.) Overall, in developing countries, patient-held maternal and/or child healthcare records have a mostly positive effect for both patient and care provider. Mothers and children with records tend to have better outcomes in healthcare and preventative measures. Further research into the information behaviors of pregnant women and mothers to determine

  9. Validity of a hospital-based obstetric register using medical records as reference

    PubMed Central

    Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Johansen, Nanna Roed; Rørbye, Christina; Weber, Tom; Due, Pernille; Koushede, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Background Data from hospital-based registers and medical records offer valuable sources of information for clinical and epidemiological research purposes. However, conducting high-quality epidemiological research requires valid and complete data sources. Objective To assess completeness and validity of a hospital-based clinical register – the Obstetric Database – using a national register and medical records as references. Methods We assessed completeness of a hospital-based clinical register – the Obstetric Database – by linking data from all women registered in the Obstetric Database as having given birth in 2013 to the National Patient Register with coverage of all births in 2013. Validity of eleven selected indicators from the Obstetric Database was assessed using medical records as a golden standard. Using a random sample of 250 medical records, we calculated proportion of agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for each indicator. Two assessors independently reviewed medical records and inter-rater reliability was calculated as proportion of agreement and Cohen’s κ coefficient. Results We found 100% completeness of the Obstetric Database when compared to the Danish National Patient Register. Except for one delivery all 6,717 deliveries were present in both registers. Proportion of agreement between the Obstetric Database and medical records ranged from 91.1% to 99.6% for the eleven indicators. The validity measures ranged from 0.70 to 1.00 indicating high validity of the Obstetric Database. κ coefficients from the inter-rater reliability ranged from 0.71 to 1.00. Conclusion Completeness and validity of the Obstetric Database were found acceptable when using the National Patient Register and medical records as golden standards. The Obstetric Database therefore offers a valuable source for examining clinical, administrative, and research questions. PMID:26648757

  10. A detailed description and assessment of outcomes of patients with hospital recorded QTc prolongation.

    PubMed

    Laksman, Zachary; Momciu, Bogdan; Seong, You Won; Burrows, Patricia; Conacher, Susan; Manlucu, Jaimie; Leong-Sit, Peter; Gula, Lorne J; Skanes, Allan C; Yee, Raymond; Klein, George J; Krahn, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in many clinical settings and is a common finding in hospitalized patients. The causes and outcomes of patients with extreme QTc interval prolongation during a hospital admission are poorly described. The aim of this study was to prospectively identify patients with automated readings of QTc intervals >550 ms at 1 academic tertiary hospital. One hundred seventy-two patients with dramatic QTc interval prolongation (574 ± 53 ms) were identified (mean age 67.6 ± 15.1 years, 48% women). Most patients had underlying heart disease (60%), predominantly ischemic cardiomyopathy (43%). At lease 1 credible and presumed reversible cause associated with QTc interval prolongation was identified in 98% of patients. The most common culprits were QTc interval-prolonging medications, which were deemed most responsible in 48% of patients, with 25% of these patients taking ≥2 offending drugs. Two patients were diagnosed with congenital long-QT syndrome. Patients with electrocardiograms available before and after hospital admission demonstrated significantly lower preadmission and postdischarge QTc intervals compared with the QTc intervals recorded in the hospital. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality was high in the study population (29%), with only 4% of patients experiencing arrhythmic deaths, all of which were attributed to secondary causes. PMID:25665761

  11. Epidemiology of Leishmaniasis in Spain Based on Hospitalization Records (1997–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Walter, Stefan; Alvar, Jorge; de Miguel, Angel Gil

    2011-01-01

    All the records from the Spanish information system for hospital data of patients diagnosed with leishmaniasis during a 12-year period (1997–2008) were studied. The 2,028 individuals were hospitalized because of leishmaniasis, as indicated by the principal diagnostic code. The average hospitalization rate was 0.41/100,000 inhabitants. One-third of them were co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The incidence of hospitalization in the adult population with leishmaniasis co-infected with HIV increased with age, peaked at 35–39 years of age and subsequently declined. In the pediatric population, all leishmaniasis cases occurred in HIV-negative children. Incidence of hospitalizations was highest in Madrid and in the Mediterranean coast. The cost per inpatient hospital care was $9,601 corresponding to an annual direct cost of more than $1.5 million for inpatient care alone. The economical burden of leishmaniasis is not neglectable and in the 12-year study period it represented more than $19 million. PMID:22049034

  12. [The prevalence of intestinal parasites in children brought to the Kars Maternal and Children's Hospital with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms].

    PubMed

    Arslan, Mükremin Ozkan; Sari, Bariş; Kulu, Bahar; Mor, Neriman

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in 2-6 year-old children who were brought to Kars Maternal and Children's Hospital with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms during March-June 2007. Fecal samples were taken from children and brought to the parasitology laboratory of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine to be examined for intestinal parasites. Fecal samples were examined by centrifugal formalin ether, zinc-sulphate floatation, and modified acid fast techniques. Lugol solution was used during microscopic examination and suspected samples were also examined by the Giemsa dye technique. The prevalence of intestinal parasites in children was found to be 36.2% (50/138). Protozoan and helminth parasites were found to be 34.1% (47/138) and 2.9% (4/138) in the fecal samples examined, respectively. Giardia intestinalis (10.9%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (10.1%), Entamoeba coli (8%), Blastocystis hominis (6.5%), Endolimax nana (4.3%), Chilomastix mesnili (1.4%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1.4%), Entamoeba hartmanni (0.7%), Cyclospora cayetanensis (0.7%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.7%) and Hymenolepis nana (0.7%) were identified from the feces of children of Kars and vicinity. No Cryptosporidium spp. was detected. PMID:18985583

  13. Avoidability of hospital deaths and association with hospital-wide mortality ratios: retrospective case record review and regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zipfel, Rebecca; Neuburger, Jenny; Hutchings, Andrew; Darzi, Ara; Black, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the proportion of avoidable deaths (due to acts of omission and commission) in acute hospital trusts in England and to determine the association with the trust’s hospital-wide standardised mortality ratio assessed using the two commonly used methods - the hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) and the summary hospital level mortality indicator (SHMI). Design Retrospective case record review of deaths. Setting 34 English acute hospital trusts (10 in 2009 and 24 in 2012/13) randomly selected from across the spectrum of HSMR. Main outcome measures Avoidable death, defined as those with at least a 50% probability of avoidability in view of trained medical reviewers. Association of avoidable death proportion with the HSMR and the SHMI assessed using regression coefficients, to estimate the increase in avoidable death proportion for a one standard deviation increase in standardised mortality ratio. Participants 100 randomly selected hospital deaths from each trust. Results The proportion of avoidable deaths was 3.6% (95% confidence interval 3.0% to 4.3%). It was lower in 2012/13 (3.0%, 2.4% to 3.7%) than in 2009 (5.2%, 3.8% to 6.6%). This difference is subject to several factors, including reviewers’ greater awareness in 2012/13 of orders not to resuscitate, patients being perceived as sicker on admission, minor differences in review form questions, and cultural changes that might have discouraged reviewers from criticising other clinicians. There was a small but statistically non-significant association between HSMR and the proportion of avoidable deaths (regression coefficient 0.3, 95% confidence interval −0.2 to 0.7). The regression coefficient was similar for both time periods (0.1 and 0.3). This implies that a difference in HSMR of between 105 and 115 would be associated with an increase of only 0.3% (95% confidence interval −0.2% to 0.7%) in the proportion of avoidable deaths. A similar weak non-significant association was

  14. Assessing Reliability of Medical Record Reviews for the Detection of Hospital Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Ock, Minsu; Lee, Sang-il; Jo, Min-Woo; Lee, Jin Yong; Kim, Seon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability and intra-rater reliability of medical record review for the detection of hospital adverse events. Methods: We conducted two stages retrospective medical records review of a random sample of 96 patients from one acute-care general hospital. The first stage was an explicit patient record review by two nurses to detect the presence of 41 screening criteria (SC). The second stage was an implicit structured review by two physicians to identify the occurrence of adverse events from the positive cases on the SC. The inter-rater reliability of two nurses and that of two physicians were assessed. The intra-rater reliability was also evaluated by using test-retest method at approximately two weeks later. Results: In 84.2% of the patient medical records, the nurses agreed as to the necessity for the second stage review (kappa, 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54 to 0.83). In 93.0% of the patient medical records screened by nurses, the physicians agreed about the absence or presence of adverse events (kappa, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.97). When assessing intra-rater reliability, the kappa indices of two nurses were 0.54 (95% CI, 0.31 to 0.77) and 0.67 (95% CI, 0.47 to 0.87), whereas those of two physicians were 0.87 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.00) and 0.37 (95% CI, -0.16 to 0.89). Conclusions: In this study, the medical record review for detecting adverse events showed intermediate to good level of inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Well organized training program for reviewers and clearly defining SC are required to get more reliable results in the hospital adverse event study. PMID:26429290

  15. A New Model for the Organizational Structure of Medical Record Departments in Hospitals in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddasi, Hamid; Hosseini, Azamossadat; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2006-01-01

    The organizational structure of medical record departments in Iran is not appropriate for the efficient management of healthcare information. In addition, there is no strong information management division to provide comprehensive information management services in hospitals in Iran. Therefore, a suggested model was designed based on four main axes: 1) specifications of a Health Information Management Division, 2) specifications of a Healthcare Information Management Department, 3) the functions of the Healthcare Information Management Department, and 4) the units of the Healthcare Information Management Department. The validity of the model was determined through use of the Delphi technique. The results of the validation process show that the majority of experts agree with the model and consider it to be appropriate and applicable for hospitals in Iran. The model is therefore recommended for hospitals in Iran. PMID:18066362

  16. A new model for the organizational structure of medical record departments in hospitals in Iran.

    PubMed

    Moghaddasi, Hamid; Hosseini, Azamossadat; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2006-01-01

    The organizational structure of medical record departments in Iran is not appropriate for the efficient management of healthcare information. In addition, there is no strong information management division to provide comprehensive information management services in hospitals in Iran. Therefore, a suggested model was designed based on four main axes: 1) specifications of a Health Information Management Division, 2) specifications of a Healthcare Information Management Department, 3) the functions of the Healthcare Information Management Department, and 4) the units of the Healthcare Information Management Department. The validity of the model was determined through use of the Delphi technique. The results of the validation process show that the majority of experts agree with the model and consider it to be appropriate and applicable for hospitals in Iran. The model is therefore recommended for hospitals in Iran. PMID:18066362

  17. The influence of institutional pressures on hospital electronic health record presence.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Naleef; Bazzoli, Gloria J; Farnsworth Mick, Stephen S; Harless, David W

    2015-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) are a promising form of health information technology that could help US hospitals improve on their quality of care and costs. During the study period explored (2005-2009), high expectations for EHR diffused across institutional stakeholders in the healthcare environment, which may have pressured hospitals to have EHR capabilities even in the presence of weak technical rationale for the technology. Using an extensive set of organizational theory-specific predictors, this study explored whether five factors - cause, constituents, content, context, and control - that reflect the nature of institutional pressures for EHR capabilities motivated hospitals to comply with these pressures. Using information from several national data bases, an ordered probit regression model was estimated. The resulting predicted probabilities of EHR capabilities from the empirical model's estimates were used to test the study's five hypotheses, of which three were supported. When the underlying cause, dependence on constituents, or influence of control were high and potential countervailing forces were low, hospitals were more likely to employ strategic responses that were compliant with the institutional pressures for EHR capabilities. In light of these pressures, hospitals may have acquiesced, by having comprehensive EHR capabilities, or compromised, by having intermediate EHR capabilities, in order to maintain legitimacy in their environment. The study underscores the importance of our assessment for theory and policy development, and provides suggestions for future research. PMID:25840047

  18. Underreporting of Driver Alcohol Involvement in United States Police and Hospital Records: Capture-Recapture Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.; Gibson, Rekaya; Zaloshnja, Eduard; Blincoe, Lawrence J.; Kindelberger, John; Strashny, Alexander; Thomas, Andrea; Ho, Shiu; Bauer, Michael; Sperry, Sarah; Peng, Justin; Singleton, Mike; Smith, Tracy J.; Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes what portion of US nonfatal crashes are alcohol-involved and how well police and hospitals detect involvement. A capture recapture model estimated alcohol involvement from levels detected by police and hospitals and the extent of detection overlap. We analyzed 550,933 Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System driver records from 2006–2008 police crash report censuses probabilistically linked to hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) discharge censuses for CT, KY (admissions only), MD, NE, NY, SC, and UT. We computed national estimates from NHTSA’s General Estimates System. Nationally an estimated 7.5% of drivers in nonfatal crashes and 12.9% of nonfatal crashes were alcohol-involved. (Crashes often involve multiple drivers but rarely are two alcohol-involved.) Police correctly identified an estimated 32% of alcohol-involved drivers in non-fatal crashes including 48% in injury crashes. Excluding KY, police in the six states reported 47% of alcohol involvement for cases treated in EDs and released and 39% for admitted cases. In contrast, hospitals reported 28% of involvement for ED cases and 51% for admitted cases. Underreporting varied widely between states. Police reported alcohol involvement for 44% of those who hospitals reported were alcohol-involved, while hospitals reported alcohol involvement for 33% of those who police reported were alcohol-involved. Police alcohol reporting completeness rose with police-reported driver injury severity. At least one system reported 62% of alcohol involvement. Police and hospitals need to communicate better about alcohol involvement. Despite the proven effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention, EDs rarely detect, much less intervene with crash-involved drinking drivers. Both police and EDs particularly need to assess alcohol involvement in minor injury better. PMID:23169120

  19. Underreporting of driver alcohol involvement in United States police and hospital records: capture-recapture estimates.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R; Gibson, Rekaya; Zaloshnja, Eduard; Blincoe, Lawrence J; Kindelberger, John; Strashny, Alexander; Thomas, Andrea; Ho, Shiu; Bauer, Michael; Sperry, Sarah; Peng, Justin; Singleton, Mike; Smith, Tracy J; Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes what portion of US nonfatal crashes are alcohol-involved and how well police and hospitals detect involvement. A capture recapture model estimated alcohol involvement from levels detected by police and hospitals and the extent of detection overlap. We analyzed 550,933 Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System driver records from 2006-2008 police crash report censuses probabilistically linked to hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) discharge censuses for CT, KY (admissions only), MD, NE, NY, SC, and UT. We computed national estimates from NHTSA's General Estimates System.Nationally an estimated 7.5% of drivers in nonfatal crashes and 12.9% of nonfatal crashes were alcohol-involved. (Crashes often involve multiple drivers but rarely are two alcohol-involved.) Police correctly identified an estimated 32% of alcohol-involved drivers in non-fatal crashes including 48% in injury crashes. Excluding KY, police in the six states reported 47% of alcohol involvement for cases treated in EDs and released and 39% for admitted cases. In contrast, hospitals reported 28% of involvement for ED cases and 51% for admitted cases. Underreporting varied widely between states. Police reported alcohol involvement for 44% of those who hospitals reported were alcohol-involved, while hospitals reported alcohol involvement for 33% of those who police reported were alcohol-involved. Police alcohol reporting completeness rose with police-reported driver injury severity. At least one system reported 62% of alcohol involvement. Police and hospitals need to communicate better about alcohol involvement. Despite the proven effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention, EDs rarely detect, much less intervene with crash-involved drinking drivers. Both police and EDs particularly need to assess alcohol involvement in minor injury better. PMID:23169120

  20. Evaluation of Unpreparedness When Issuing Copies of Medical Records in Tertiary Referral Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Myong-Mo; Seo, Sun-Won; Park, Woo-Sung; Kim, Yoon; Kim, Sung-Soo; Choi, Eun-Mi; Park, Jong; Park, Il-Soon

    2010-01-01

    Objectives As a baseline study to aid in the development of proper policy, we investigated the current condition of unpreparedness of documents required when issuing copies of medical records and related factors. Methods The study was comprised of 7,203 cases in which copies of medical records were issued from July 1st, 2007 through June 30th, 2008 to 5 tertiary referral hospitals. Data from these hospitals was collected using their established electronic databases and included study variables such as unpreparedness of the required documents as a dependent variable and putative covariates. Results The rate of unpreparedness of required documents was 14.9%. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed the following factors as being related to the high rate of unpreparedness: patient age (older patients had a higher rate), issuance channels (on admission > via out-patient clinic), type of applicant (others such as family members > for oneself > insurers), type of original medical record (utilization records on admission > other records), issuance purpose (for providing insurer > medical use), residential area of applicant (Seoul > Honam province and Jeju), and number of copied documents (more documents gave a lower rate). The rate of unpreparedness differed significantly among the hospitals; suggesting that they may have followed their own conventional protocols rather than legal procedures in some cases. Conclusions The study results showed that the level of compliance to the required legal procedure was high, but that problems occurred in assuring the safety of the medical information. A proper legislative approach is therefore required to balance the security of and access to medical information. PMID:21818431

  1. An ECG simulator for generating maternal-foetal activity mixtures on abdominal ECG recordings.

    PubMed

    Behar, Joachim; Andreotti, Fernando; Zaunseder, Sebastian; Li, Qiao; Oster, Julien; Clifford, Gari D

    2014-08-01

    Accurate foetal electrocardiogram (FECG) morphology extraction from non-invasive sensors remains an open problem. This is partly due to the paucity of available public databases. Even when gold standard information (i.e derived from the scalp electrode) is present, the collection of FECG can be problematic, particularly during stressful or clinically important events.In order to address this problem we have introduced an FECG simulator based on earlier work on foetal and adult ECG modelling. The open source foetal ECG synthetic simulator, fecgsyn, is able to generate maternal-foetal ECG mixtures with realistic amplitudes, morphology, beat-to-beat variability, heart rate changes and noise. Positional (rotation and translation-related) movements in the foetal and maternal heart due to respiration, foetal activity and uterine contractions were also added to the simulator.The simulator was used to generate some of the signals that were part of the 2013 PhysioNet Computing in Cardiology Challenge dataset and has been posted on Physionet.org (together with scripts to generate realistic scenarios) under an open source license. The toolbox enables further research in the field and provides part of a standard for industry and regulatory testing of rare pathological scenarios. PMID:25071094

  2. Health care professionals’ pain narratives in hospitalized children’s medical records. Part 1: Pain descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Rashotte, Judy; Coburn, Geraldine; Harrison, Denise; Stevens, Bonnie J; Yamada, Janet; Abbott, Laura K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although documentation of children’s pain by health care professionals is frequently undertaken, few studies have explored the nature of the language used to describe pain in the medical records of hospitalized children. OBJECTIVES: To describe health care professionals’ use of written language related to the quality and quantity of pain experienced by hospitalized children. METHODS: Free-text pain narratives documented during a 24 h period were collected from the medical records of 3822 children (0 to 18 years of age) hospitalized on 32 inpatient units in eight Canadian pediatric hospitals. A qualitative descriptive exploration using a content analysis approach was used. RESULTS: Pain narratives were documented a total of 5390 times in 1518 of the 3822 children’s medical records (40%). Overall, word choices represented objective and subjective descriptors. Two major categories were identified, with their respective subcategories of word indicators and associated cues: indicators of pain, including behavioural (eg, vocal, motor, facial and activities cues), affective and physiological cues, and children’s descriptors; and word qualifiers, including intensity, comparator and temporal qualifiers. CONCLUSIONS: The richness and complexity of vocabulary used by clinicians to document children’s pain lend support to the concept that the word ‘pain’ is a label that represents a myriad of different experiences. There is potential to refine pediatric pain assessment measures to be inclusive of other cues used to identify children’s pain. The results enhance the discussion concerning the development of standardized nomenclature. Further research is warranted to determine whether there is congruence in interpretation across time, place and individuals. PMID:24093122

  3. International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps: exercises in its application in a hospital medical record.

    PubMed

    Ford, B

    1984-01-01

    The principles and philosophies of the WHO International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps were enthusiastically espoused by all staff of a large rehabilitation hospital. It was universally seen as an accurate and standardized way of recording and reporting a patient's functional state and opened up opportunities for research between causation and consequences of diseases, the relations of impairments to handicaps, and so on. In short, it promised a hard data base about disability, which presently has been studied only anecdotally, or by large random community samples. The joy of the principle turned into torment when the attempts to apply the system to current and past medical records were made. Retrospective codification of existing records was found to be virtually impossible. Recorded data were patchy, insufficiently precise to translate into IDH codes and the codifier had to make so many value judgements, interpretations and guesses to squeeze what was written on the record into IDH codes. A totally new and disciplined way of making notations in medical records would be required to make this method applicable, and such a discipline presents challenges to the medical administrator which dwarfs the production of the WHO manual.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6241185

  4. Nurses' perceptions of and attitudes toward an electronic medical record system at Seoul National University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Sa; Park, Ihn Sook; You, Ock-Su; Shin, Hyeon-Ju; Woo, Kyung-Shun; Jo, Eun-Mee

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to investigate nurses' perceptions of and attitudes toward the use of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, 904 nurses in a university hospital were surveyed for demographic data and their perceptions of and attitudes toward an EMR system 6 months after its implementation. The questionnaire consisted of demographic information, perception statements relating to the effect of an EMR system, and attitude statements toward an EMR system (assessed on 4-point Likert scales, Cronbach's alpha = 0.979). Nurses' perceptions and attitudes were generally positive and correlated with the type of nursing unit, and their age, years of nursing experience, and job title. This result reinforces that nurses are generally accepting of the implementation of a new EMR system. However, strategies are needed for improving the satisfaction of nurses who have a negative perception of and attitude toward EMR systems. It is recommended that the findings of our study be implemented in other hospitals with ongoing EMR projects. PMID:17102423

  5. The Macalister archive: records from the Queen's Hospital, Sidcup, 1917-1921.

    PubMed

    Bamji, A N

    1993-04-01

    The Queen's Hospital opened in 1917 to care for soldiers receiving facial injuries in Western Front trenches, usually as a result of a gunshot wound. Some 8000 patients were treated by the medical teams of the UK, the Dominions and the USA. The wartime records were removed by their respective sections in 1921, but Queen Mary's Hospital has recently reacquired those of the New Zealand section, rescued from imminent destruction by Professor A.D. Macalister, late Dean of the Dental School at Dunedin, and kindly donated by him. There are 282 sets of case-notes containing typescript summaries, clinical photographs and radiographs, drawings, 77 watercolor paintings and a life-size wax model of head and upper torso illustrating some of the surgical techniques. The archive is a fine example of medical illustration 75 years ago, and provides invaluable detail on the plastic surgery and dental reconstructive methods that were developed at Sidcup. PMID:8409222

  6. Performance improvement indicators of the Medical Records Department and Information Technology (IT) in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Ketabi, Saedeh; Torabiyan, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Medical Record Department (MRD) has a vital role in making short and long term plans to improve health system services. The aim of this study was to describe performance improvement indicators of hospital MRD and information technology (IT). Collection of Data: A search was conducted in various databases, through related keywords in articles, books, and abstracts of conferences from 2001 to 2009. About 58 articles and books were available which were evaluated and finally 15 of them were selected based on their relevance to the study. MRD must be capable of supporting tasks such as patient care and continuity, institute management processes, medical education programs, medical research, communication between different wards of a hospital and administrative and medical staff. The use of IT in MRD can facilitate access to department, expedite communication within and outside department, reduce space with electronic medical records, reduce costs, accelerate activities such as coding by use of coding guide software and facilitate retrieval of records that will ultimately improve the performance of MRD. PMID:26150874

  7. Levels and causes of maternal mortality in southern India.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, J C

    1993-01-01

    Most studies of maternal mortality are hospital based. However, in developing countries, where many such deaths take place in the home, hospital statistics do not reflect the true extent of maternal mortality. Furthermore, the socioeconomic and demographic factors and health behavior affecting maternal mortality are rarely known. A study conducted in 1986 in South India demonstrates a new approach to investigating maternal mortality that combines the collection of information from hospital and health-facility records, field surveys, and case-control studies. The findings from this study indicate that there were 7.98 maternal deaths per 1,000 live births. Approximately one-half of the deaths occurred in the home or on the way to the hospital. Maternal deaths accounted for 36 percent of mortality for women of reproductive age. Analysis reveals that many of these deaths were preventable and that significant differentials existed with regard to demographic, social, and behavioral factors between the cases of maternal deaths and the controls. PMID:8296332

  8. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. PMID:24782478

  9. The incidence of adverse events in Swedish hospitals: a retrospective medical record review study

    PubMed Central

    Soop, Michael; Fryksmark, Ulla; Köster, Max; Haglund, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the incidence, nature and consequences of adverse events and preventable adverse events in Swedish hospitals. Design A three-stage structured retrospective medical record review based on the use of 18 screening criteria. Setting Twenty-eight Swedish hospitals. Population A representative sample (n = 1967) of the 1.2 million Swedish hospital admissions between October 2003 and September 2004. Main Outcome Measures Proportion of admissions with adverse events, the proportion of preventable adverse events and the types and consequences of adverse events. Results In total, 12.3% (n = 241) of the 1967 admissions had adverse events (95% CI, 10.8–13.7), of which 70% (n = 169) were preventable. Fifty-five percent of the preventable events led to impairment or disability, which was resolved during the admission or within 1 month from discharge, another 33% were resolved within 1 year, 9% of the preventable events led to permanent disability and 3% of the adverse events contributed to patient death. Preventable adverse events led to a mean increased length of stay of 6 days. Ten of the 18 screening criteria were sufficient to detect 90% of the preventable adverse events. When extrapolated to the 1.2 million annual admissions, the results correspond to 105 000 preventable adverse events (95% CI, 90 000–120 000) and 630 000 days of hospitalization (95% CI, 430 000–830 000). Conclusions This study confirms that preventable adverse events were common, and that they caused extensive human suffering and consumed a significant amount of the available hospital resources. PMID:19556405

  10. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  11. Delay in the provision of adequate care to women who died from abortion-related complications in the principal maternity hospital of Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mayi-Tsonga, Sosthene; Oksana, Litochenko; Ndombi, Isabelle; Diallo, Thierno; de Sousa, Maria Helena; Faúndes, Aníbal

    2009-11-01

    Deaths resulting from unsafe induced abortions represent a major component of maternal mortality in countries with restrictive abortion laws. Delays in obtaining care for maternal complications constitute a known determinant of a woman's risk of death. However, data on the role of delays in providing care at health care facilities are sparse. The association between the cause of maternal death (abortion versus post-partum haemorrhage or eclampsia) and the time interval between admission to hospital and the initiation of treatment were evaluated among women who died at the Maternité du Centre Hospitalier de Libreville, Gabon, between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007. The women's characteristics and the time between diagnosis of the condition that led to death and the initiation of treatment were compared for each cause of death. After controlling for selected variables, the mean time between admission and treatment was 1.2 hours (95% CI: 0.0-5.6) in the case of women who died from post-partum haemorrhage or eclampsia and 23.7 hours (95% CI: 21.1-26.3) in the case of women who died of abortion-related complications. In conclusion, delay in initiating care was far greater in cases of women with complications of unsafe abortion compared to other pregnancy-related complications. Such delays may constitute an important determinant of the risk of death in women with abortion-related complications. PMID:19962639

  12. Association between maternal exposure to housing renovation and offspring with congenital heart disease: a multi-hospital case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most prevalent birth defects. Housing renovations are a newly recognized source of indoor environmental pollution that is detrimental to health. A growing body of research suggests that maternal occupational exposure to renovation materials may be associated with an increased risk of giving birth to fetuses with CHD. However, the effect of indoor housing renovation exposure on CHD occurrence has not been reported. Methods A multi-hospital case–control study was designed to investigate the association between maternal periconceptional housing renovation exposure and the risk of CHD for offspring. In total, 346 cases and 408 controls were enrolled in this study from four hospitals in China. Exposure information was based on a questionnaire given to women during pregnancy. The association between housing renovation exposure and CHD occurrence was assessed by estimating odds ratios (OR) with logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Results The risk for CHD in offspring was significantly associated with maternal exposure to housing renovations (AOR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.29-2.77). There were similar risks for cardiac defects with or without extra-cardiac malformation (AOR of 2.65 and 1.76, respectively). Maternal housing renovation exposure may increase the fetus’ risk of suffering from conotruncal defect or anomalous venous return. There were significant risks for cardiac defects if the pregnant woman moved into a new house within one month after decoration at either 3 months before pregnancy (AOR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.03 to 5.48) or during first trimester (AOR: 4.00, 95% CI: 1.62 to 9.86). Conclusions Maternal exposure to housing renovations may have an increased risk of giving birth to fetuses with some selected types of CHD. This relationship was stronger for women who moved into a newly decorated house. However, considering the limited number of subjects and the problem of multiple exposures

  13. Maternal and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Krishna Menon, M K

    1972-01-01

    A brief analysis of data from the records of the Government Hospital for Women and Children in Madras for a 36-year period (1929-1964) is presented. India with a population of over 550 million has only 1 doctor for each 6000 population. For the 80% of the population which is rural, the doctor ratio is only 88/1 million. There is also a shortage of paramedical personnel. During the earlier years of this study period, abortions, puerperal infections; hemorrhage, and toxemia accounted for nearly 75% of all meternal deaths, while in later years deaths from these causes were 40%. Among associated factors in maternal mortality, anemia was the most frequent, it still accounts for 20% and is a contributory factor in another 20%. The mortality from postpartum hemorrhage was 9.3% but has now decreased to 2.8%. Eclampsia is a preventable disease and a marked reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality from this cause has been achieved. Maternal deaths from puerperal infections have dropped from 25% of all maternal deaths to 7%. Uterine rupture has been reduced from 75% to 9.3% due to modern facilities. Operative deliveries still have an incidence of 2.1% and a mortality rate of 1.4% of all deliveries. These rates would be further reduced by more efficient antenatal and intranatal care. Reported perinatal mortality of infants has been reduced from 182/1000 births to an average of 78/1000 in all areas, but is 60.6/1000 in the city of Madras. Socioeconomic standards play an important role in perinatal mortality, 70% of such deaths occurring in the lowest economic groups. Improvement has been noted in the past 25 years but in rural areas little progress has been made. Prematurity and low birth weights are still larger factors in India than in other countries, with acute infectious diseases, anemia, and general malnutrition among mothers the frequent causes. Problems requiring further efforts to reduce maternal and infant mortality are correct vital statistics, improved

  14. Prevention of blindness from glaucoma using the King's College Hospital computerized problem orientated medical record.

    PubMed Central

    Crick, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    (1) Chronic glaucoma accounts for a high proportion of blindness which is preventable and calls for energetic action because existing knowledge is not applied as it should be because of the indifference of the Department of Health and Social Security to the glaucoma problem. (2) The condition is frequently insidious and advanced before being identified, and requires life-long supervision. (3) When diagnosed, the management of glaucoma is frequently inadequate and intermittent for a variety of reasons. (4) AtKing's College Hospital, a Glaucoma Centre has been initiated to supervise accurately and regularly a large number of glaucoma patients, assisted by numerical recording and computer analysis. While we are fortunate in having a computer in the hospital, it is important to emphasize that the system can be operated without this facility, either by employing manual methods, or by batch processing. It would be both possible and desirable to organize recording a nd analysis on a regional basis in collaboration with hospitals wishing to participiate. (5) Attempts are being made to improve the early diagnosis ofglaucoma by better communication between the hospital ophthalmologists, and other members of the medical, optical, and ancillary professions by lectures, demonstrations, and publications. (6) Research is always hampered by the absence of factual knowledge. It is planned to use fully the opportunity for research into glaucoma made possible by this basic organization. At present however, we consider it more important to carry out investigations into the problems of organizing the investigation, treatment, and follow-up of glaucoma patients than t o embark on a few individual projects of research. We are serously hampered in our work by shortage of funds for staff and facilities, but we look forward confidently to the time when, with the essential support of the Department of Health, these methods will give us access to the facts of glaucoma, which besides enabling

  15. Maternal-effect genes as the recording genes of Turing-Child patterns: sequential compartmentalization in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Yoram

    2012-05-01

    The early embryo is often a two-dimensional surface. The fate map is the subdivision of this surface into regions which give rise to parts of the phenotype. It is shown for Drosophila that the fate map is generated by the spontaneous and sequential formation of Turing-Child (TC) eigenfunction patterns. These patterns are recorded by the maternal-effect genes. The addition of the nodal lines of the TC patterns yields the correct number, positions, sequences and symmetries of regional boundaries. A simplest nontrivial 'homeotic transformation' is suggested and explained. A single mutation converts a region in one end of the fate map to a mirror-symmetric image of a nonadjacent region in the other end of the fate map, and this is attributed to the geometry of the TC patterns. This geometry also determines the initial shape of the zygotic gene expression. The vision of William Bateson that biological form is shaped like Chladni's patterns in acoustics and music is justified. A similar sequence of TC patterns occurs in the normal development of all organisms, and it is suggested that artificial intervention which completes the full sequence of TC patterns can be useful in the context of regenerative medicine and this is illustrated with the sea urchin. PMID:22564772

  16. Using electronic health records to improve quality and efficiency: the experiences of leading hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silow-Carroll, Sharon; Edwards, Jennifer N; Rodin, Diana

    2012-07-01

    An examination of nine hospitals that recently implemented a comprehensive electronic health record (EHR) system finds that clinical and administrative leaders built EHR adoption into their strategic plans to integrate inpatient and outpatient care and provide a continuum of coordinated services. Successful implementation depended on: strong leadership, full involvement of clinical staff in design and implementation, mandatory staff training, and strict adherence to timeline and budget. The EHR systems facilitate patient safety and quality improvement through: use of checklists, alerts, and predictive tools; embedded clinical guidelines that promote standardized, evidence-based practices; electronic prescribing and test-ordering that reduces errors and redundancy; and discrete data fields that foster use of performance dashboards and compliance reports. Faster, more accurate communication and streamlined processes have led to improved patient flow, fewer duplicative tests, faster responses to patient inquiries, redeployment of transcription and claims staff, more complete capture of charges, and federal incentive payments. PMID:22826903

  17. Benefits negotiation: three Swedish hospitals pursuit of potential electronic health record benefits.

    PubMed

    Jeansson, John S

    2013-01-01

    At the very heart of Swedish healthcare digitalisation are large investments in electronic health records (EHRs). These integrated information systems (ISs) carry promises of great benefits and value for organisations. However, realising IS benefits and value has, in general, proven to be a challenging task, and as organisations strive to formalise their realisation efforts a misconception of rationality threatens to emerge. This misconception manifests itself when the formality of analysis threatens to underrate the impact of social processes in deciding which potential benefits to pursue. This paper suggests that these decisions are the result of a social process of negotiation. The purpose of this paper is to observe three benefits analysis projects of three Swedish hospitals to better understand the character and management of proposed benefits negotiations. Findings depict several different categories of benefits negotiations, as well as key factors to consider during the benefits negotiation process. PMID:24191344

  18. Concordance of Electronic Health Record (EHR) Data Describing Delirium at a VA Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Spuhl, Joshua; Doing-Harris, Kristina; Nelson, Scott; Estrada, Nicolette; Fiol, Guilherme Del; Weir, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Delirium is a common syndrome in elderly hospitalized patients that is correlated with poor outcomes and higher costs yet health care teams often overlook its diagnosis and treatment. Poor data quality in EHR systems can be contributing to this as a common tool teams use to communicate and record data about their patients. METHODS Data were gathered from 30 patients chosen randomly that spanned various data domains in the EHR. These were analyzed for concordance as an indicator of data quality. RESULTS Concordance was high between the physician and nursing narrative documentation. The other domains of data were drastically less concordant. DISCUSSION The low concordance between structured and narrative data domains suggests that clinicians are forgoing the features available in modern EHR systems and opting to work in narrative. For informatics, this can be troubling as narrative data are difficult to compute. PMID:25954416

  19. Early Experiences with Mobile Electronic Health Records Application in a Tertiary Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minah; Hong, Eunseok; Kim, Sunhyu; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Jungseok; Song, Seungyeol; Kim, Tak; Kim, Jeongkeun; Yeo, Seongwoon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recent advances in mobile technology have opened up possibilities to provide strongly integrated mobile-based services in healthcare and telemedicine. Although the number of mobile Electronic Health Record (EHR) applications is large and growing, there is a paucity of evidence demonstrating the usage patterns of these mobile applications by healthcare providers. This study aimed to illustrate the deployment process for an integrated mobile EHR application and to analyze usage patterns after provision of the mobile EHR service. Methods We developed an integrated mobile application that aimed to enhance the mobility of healthcare providers by improving access to patient- and hospital-related information during their daily medical activities. The study included mobile EHR users who accessed patient healthcare records between May 2013 and May 2014. We performed a data analysis using a web server log file analyzer from the integrated EHR system. Cluster analysis was applied to longitudinal user data based on their application usage pattern. Results The mobile EHR service named M-UMIS has been in service since May 2013. Every healthcare provider in the hospital could access the mobile EHR service and view the medical charts of their patients. The frequency of using services and network packet transmission on the M-UMIS increased gradually during the study period. The most frequently accessed service in the menu was the patient list. Conclusions A better understanding regarding the adoption of mobile EHR applications by healthcare providers in patient-centered care provides useful information to guide the design and implementation of future applications. PMID:26618036

  20. Detection of segments with fetal QRS complex from abdominal maternal ECG recordings using support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Juan A.; Altuve, Miguel; Nabhan Homsi, Masun

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a robust method based on the Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm to detect the presence of Fetal QRS (fQRS) complexes in electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings provided by the PhysioNet/CinC challenge 2013. ECG signals are first segmented into contiguous frames of 250 ms duration and then labeled in six classes. Fetal segments are tagged according to the position of fQRS complex within each one. Next, segment features extraction and dimensionality reduction are obtained by applying principal component analysis on Haar-wavelet transform. After that, two sub-datasets are generated to separate representative segments from atypical ones. Imbalanced class problem is dealt by applying sampling without replacement on each sub-dataset. Finally, two SVMs are trained and cross-validated using the two balanced sub-datasets separately. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves high performance rates in fetal heartbeats detection that reach up to 90.95% of accuracy, 92.16% of sensitivity, 88.51% of specificity, 94.13% of positive predictive value and 84.96% of negative predictive value. A comparative study is also carried out to show the performance of other two machine learning algorithms for fQRS complex estimation, which are K-nearest neighborhood and Bayesian network.

  1. Adoption and Barriers to Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Nurses in Three Governmental Hospitals in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El Mahalli, Azza

    2015-01-01

    Although electronic health records (EHRs) have been implemented in many hospitals and healthcare providers benefit from their effective and efficient data processing, their evaluation from nurses has received little attention. This project aimed to assess the adoption and barriers to the use of an EHR system by nurses at three governmental hospitals implementing the same EHR software and functionalities in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. The study was a cross-sectional, paper-based questionnaire study. SPSS version 20 was used for data entry and analysis, and descriptive statistics were calculated. The study found underutilization of almost all functionalities among all hospitals and no utilization of any communication tools with patients. In addition, there were no instances of "allowing patients to use the Internet to access parts of their health records." The most frequently cited barrier among all hospitals was "loss of access to medical records transiently if computer crashes or power fails" (88.6 percent). This was followed by "lack of continuous training/ support from information technology staff in hospital" (85.9 percent), "additional time required for data entry" (84.9 percent), and "system hanging up problem" (83.8 percent). Complexity of technology (81.6 percent) and lack of system customizability (81.1 percent) were also frequently reported problems. The formation of an EHR committee to discuss problems with the system in Saudi hospitals is recommended. PMID:26604875

  2. [Assistance to delivery according to hospital classification].

    PubMed

    Lopez-escobar, G; Daza-parada, L; Riano-gamboa, G; Fortney, J

    1979-06-01

    Between March and October 1977 40 urban Colombian hospitals participated in an evaluation of services given to women with high risk pregnancies. The purpose of the study was to find out whether high risk cases go to the more appropriate and better equipped hospitals. A total of 13,450 deliveries were observed at random, i.e. 8.3% of all deliveries in all 40 hospitals during the same time. Social, cultural, and clinical characteristics of mothers and infants were carefully recorded. It was found that Social Security hospitals had the lowest number of high risk patients, a moderate number of surgical interventions, and the lowest maternal and perinatal mortality rate. On the other hand, average size hospitals serviced a larger number of high risk patients, had the highest rate of surgical intervention and of perinatal mortality, and a moderate maternal mortality rate. University hospitals, with the highest concentration of high risk patients and with a moderate incidence of surgical interventions, had a moderate rate of perinatal mortality, and a high rate of maternal mortality. Obviously not all high risk patients were serviced by the best equipped hospitals and by the best prepared personnel, which resulted in a high rate of maternal-infant morbidity and mortality. It would be necessary to reorganize all available services in a more functional way, so that high risk patients can be assisted and treated in the most appropriate environment. PMID:12310258

  3. Adoption and Barriers to Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Nurses in Three Governmental Hospitals in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mahalli, Azza El.

    2015-01-01

    Although electronic health records (EHRs) have been implemented in many hospitals and healthcare providers benefit from their effective and efficient data processing, their evaluation from nurses has received little attention. This project aimed to assess the adoption and barriers to the use of an EHR system by nurses at three governmental hospitals implementing the same EHR software and functionalities in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. The study was a cross-sectional, paper-based questionnaire study. SPSS version 20 was used for data entry and analysis, and descriptive statistics were calculated. The study found underutilization of almost all functionalities among all hospitals and no utilization of any communication tools with patients. In addition, there were no instances of “allowing patients to use the Internet to access parts of their health records.” The most frequently cited barrier among all hospitals was “loss of access to medical records transiently if computer crashes or power fails” (88.6 percent). This was followed by “lack of continuous training/ support from information technology staff in hospital” (85.9 percent), “additional time required for data entry” (84.9 percent), and “system hanging up problem” (83.8 percent). Complexity of technology (81.6 percent) and lack of system customizability (81.1 percent) were also frequently reported problems. The formation of an EHR committee to discuss problems with the system in Saudi hospitals is recommended. PMID:26604875

  4. [Social representations by health professionals of sexual violence against women: a study in three municipal public maternity hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Ludmila Fontenele; Gomes, Romeu; Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze social representations of sexual violence against women, as constructed and reproduced in prenatal care settings in three municipal maternity hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This qualitative research explored two themes: ideas about and explanations of sexual violence committed against woman. The forty-five interviews conducted with health professionals were examined using thematic content analysis. The results show that social representations of sexual violence against women were associated with ideas of suffering, behavioral disturbances, and forced sexual intercourse. The explanations offered for why this type of violence occurs included gender relations, urban violence, and ascription of blame to the victim. It can be concluded that hegemonic patterns of asymmetrical relations persist, even in the discourse of maternity health professionals, who are the point of reference for attending to victims of sexual violence. Incorporating the analytical category of gender into healthcare professional training could make prenatal care an important gateway for the recognition and management of sexual violence against women. PMID:16470280

  5. Hospitalizations of Infants and Young Children with Down Syndrome: Evidence from Inpatient Person-Records from a Statewide Administrative Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, S. A.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although individuals with Down syndrome are increasingly living into the adult years, infants and young children with the syndrome continue to be at increased risk for health problems. Using linked, statewide administrative hospital discharge records of all infants with Down syndrome born over a 3-year period, this study "follows…

  6. High Hospitalization Rates in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study Using Medical Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Sieswerda, Elske; Font-Gonzalez, Anna; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Heinen, Richard C.; Jaspers, Monique W.; van der Pal, Helena J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Caron, Huib N.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalization rates over time of childhood cancer survivors (CCS) provide insight into the burden of unfavorable health conditions on CCS and health care resources. The objective of our study was to examine trends in hospitalizations of CCS and risk factors in comparison with the general population. We performed a medical record linkage study of a cohort of 1564 ≥five-year CCS with national registers. We obtained a random sample of the general population matched on year of birth, gender and calendar year per CCS retrieved. We quantified and compared hospitalization rates of CCS and reference persons from 1995 until 2005, and we analyzed risk factors for hospitalization within the CCS cohort with multivariable Poisson models. We retrieved hospitalization information from 1382 CCS and 25583 reference persons. The overall relative hospitalization rate (RHR) was 2.2 (95%CI:1.9–2.5) for CCS compared to reference persons. CCS with central nervous system and solid tumors had highest RHRs. Hospitalization rates in CCS were increased compared to reference persons up to at least 30 years after primary diagnosis, with highest rates 5–10 and 20–30 years after primary cancer. RHRs were highest for hospitalizations due to neoplasms (10.7; 95%CI:7.1–16.3) and endocrine/nutritional/metabolic disorders (7.3; 95%CI:4.6–11.7). Female gender (P<0.001), radiotherapy to head and/or neck (P<0.001) or thorax and/or abdomen (P = 0.03) and surgery (P = 0.01) were associated with higher hospitalization rates in CCS. In conclusion, CCS have increased hospitalization rates compared to the general population, up to at least 30 years after primary cancer treatment. These findings imply a high and long-term burden of unfavorable health conditions after childhood cancer on survivors and health care resources. PMID:27433937

  7. Establishing a Personal Health Record System in an Academic Hospital: One Year's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Hyun Jung; Jung, Se Young; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung; Baek, Hyunyoung; Lee, Kiheon; Bae, Woo Kyung; Han, Jong-Soo; Kim, Sarah; Park, Hwayeon

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) are web based tools that help people to access and manage their personalized medical information. Although needs for PHR are increasing, current serviced PHRs are unsatisfactory and researches on them remain limited. The purpose of this study is to show the process of developing Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH)'s own PHR system and to analyze consumer's use pattern after providing PHR service. Methods Task force team was organized to decide service range and set the program. They made the system available on both mobile application and internet web page. The study enrolled PHR consumers who assessed PHR system between June 2013 and June 2014. We analyzed the total number of users on a monthly basis and the using pattern according to each component. Results The PHR service named Health4U has been provided from June 2013. Every patient who visited SNUBH could register Health4U service and view their medical data. The PHR user has been increasing, especially they tend to approach via one way of either web page or mobile application. The most frequently used service is to check laboratory test result. Conclusion For paradigm shift toward patient-centered care, there is a growing interest in PHR. This study about experience of establishing and servicing the Health4U would contribute to development of interconnected PHR. PMID:26019761

  8. The association between bankruptcy and hospital-presenting attempted suicide: a record linkage study.

    PubMed

    Kidger, Judi; Gunnell, David; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Overstreet, Karen A; Hollingworth, William

    2011-12-01

    The associations between admissions to an emergency department following attempted suicide and personal bankruptcy in the preceding and subsequent 2 years were evaluated. Records from a level 1 trauma center (June 1993-December 2002) in Seattle, WA, were linked with case files from the local U.S. District Bankruptcy Court (June 1991 onward). Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the risk of bankruptcy in (i) the 2 years after and (ii) the 2 years before a suicide attempt using a violent method, compared to patients admitted for any other reason. After adjusting for several confounders, patients who had attempted suicide were more likely than other patients to experience bankruptcy in the following 2 years (OR = 2.10, 95% CIs: 1.29, 3.42). A somewhat weaker association was seen with bankruptcy in the preceding 2 years (OR = 1.68, 95% CIs 1.06; 2.67). Attempted suicide is therefore associated with bankruptcy in the preceding and following 2 years. Changes to legislation, improved mental health counselling for those in financial difficulty, and provision of financial advice to those admitted to hospital following a suicide attempt may reduce future cases of serious self-harm and completed suicide. PMID:22145826

  9. Signs of the 2009 Influenza Pandemic in the New York-Presbyterian Hospital Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Khiabanian, Hossein; Holmes, Antony B.; Kelly, Brendan J.; Gururaj, Mrinalini; Hripcsak, George; Rabadan, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Background In June of 2009, the World Health Organization declared the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, and by July, New York City's New York-Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH) experienced a heavy burden of cases, attributable to a novel strain of the virus (H1N1pdm). Methods and Results We present the signs in the NYPH electronic health records (EHR) that distinguished the 2009 pandemic from previous seasonal influenza outbreaks via various statistical analyses. These signs include (1) an increase in the number of patients diagnosed with influenza, (2) a preponderance of influenza diagnoses outside of the normal flu season, and (3) marked vaccine failure. The NYPH EHR also reveals distinct age distributions of patients affected by seasonal influenza and the pandemic strain, and via available longitudinal data, suggests that the two may be associated with distinct sets of comorbid conditions as well. In particular, we find significantly more pandemic flu patients with diagnoses associated with asthma and underlying lung disease. We further observe that the NYPH EHR is capable of tracking diseases at a resolution as high as particular zip codes in New York City. Conclusion The NYPH EHR permits early detection of pandemic influenza and hypothesis generation via identification of those significantly associated illnesses. As data standards develop and databases expand, EHRs will contribute more and more to disease detection and the discovery of novel disease associations. PMID:20844592

  10. [Audit as a tool to assess and promote the quality of medical records and hospital appropriateness: metodology and preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Poscia, Andrea; Cambieri, Andrea; Tucceri, Chiara; Ricciardi, Walter; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In the actual economic context, with increasing health needs, efficiency and efficacy represents fundamental keyword to ensure a successful use of the resources and the best health outcomes. Together, the medical record, completely and correctly compiled, is an essential tool in the patient diagnostic and therapeutic path, but it's becoming more and more essential for the administrative reporting and legal claims. Nevertheless, even if the improvement of medical records quality and of hospital stay appropriateness represent priorities for every health organization, they could be difficult to realize. This study aims to present the methodology and the preliminary results of a training and improvement process: it was carried out from the Hospital Management of a third level Italian teaching hospital through audit cycles to actively involve their health professionals. A self assessment process of medical records quality and hospital stay appropriateness (inpatients admission and Day Hospital) was conducted through a retrospective evaluation of medical records. It started in 2012 and a random sample of 2295 medical records was examined: the quality assessment was performed using a 48-item evaluation grid modified from the Lombardy Region manual of the medical record, while the appropriateness of each days was assessed using the Italian version of Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) - 2002ed. The overall assessment was presented through departmental audit: the audit were designed according to the indication given by the Italian and English Ministry of Health to share the methodology and the results with all the involved professionals (doctors and nurses) and to implement improvement strategies that are synthesized in this paper. Results from quality and appropriateness assessment show several deficiencies, due to 40% of minimum level of acceptability not completely satisfied and to 30% of inappropriateness between days of hospitalization. Furthermore, there are

  11. Health care professionals’ pain narratives in hospitalized children’s medical records. Part 2: Structure and content

    PubMed Central

    Rashotte, Judy; Harrison, Denise; Coburn, Geraldine; Yamada, Janet; Stevens, Bonnie J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although clinical narratives – described as free-text notations – have been noted to be a source of patient information, no studies have examined the composition of pain narratives in hospitalized children’s medical records. OBJECTIVES: To describe the structure and content of health care professionals’ narratives related to hospitalized children’s acute pain. METHODS: All pain narratives documented during a 24 h period were collected from the medical records of 3822 children (0 to 18 years of age) hospitalized in 32 inpatient units in eight Canadian pediatric hospitals. A qualitative descriptive exploration using a content analysis approach was performed. RESULTS: Three major structural elements with their respective categories and subcategories were identified: information sources, including clinician, patient, parent, dual and unknown; compositional archetypes, including baseline pain status, intermittent pain updates, single events, pain summation and pain management plan; and content, including pain declaration, pain assessment, pain intervention and multidimensional elements of care. CONCLUSIONS: The present qualitative analysis revealed the multidimensionality of structure and content that was used to document hospitalized children’s acute pain. The findings have the potential to inform debate on whether the multidimensionality of pain narratives’ composition is a desirable feature of documentation and how narratives can be refined and improved. There is potential for further investigation into how health care professionals’ pain narratives could have a role in generating guidelines for best pain documentation practice beyond numerical representations of pain intensity. PMID:24093123

  12. [Local communalization of clinical records between the municipal community hospital and local medical institutes by using information technology].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shohei; Shinoki, Keiji; Ibata, Takeshi; Nakashita, Chisako; Doi, Seiko; Hidaka, Kumi; Hata, Akiko; Matsuoka, Mio; Waguchi, Hideko; Mito, Saori; Komuro, Ryutaro

    2012-12-01

    We introduced the electronic health record system in 2002. We produced a community medical network system to consolidate all medical treatment information from the local institute in 2010. Here, we report on the present status of this system that has been in use for the previous 2 years. We obtained a private server, set up a virtual private network(VPN)in our hospital, and installed dedicated terminals to issue an electronic certificate in 50 local institutions. The local institute applies for patient agreement in the community hospital(hospital designation style). They are then entitled to access the information of the designated patient via this local network server for one year. They can access each original medical record, sorted on the basis of the medical attendant and the chief physician; a summary of hospital stay; records of medication prescription; and the results of clinical examinations. Currently, there are approximately 80 new registrations and accesses per month. Information is provided in real time allowing up to date information, helping prescribe the medical treatment at the local institute. However, this information sharing system is read-only, and there is no cooperative clinical pass system. Therefore, this system has a limit to meet the demand for cooperation with the local clinics. PMID:23268886

  13. Evaluation of organizational maturity based on people capacity maturity model in medical record wards of Iranian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Tavakoli, Nahid; Shams, Assadollah; Hatampour, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Context: People capacity maturity model (PCMM) is one of the models which focus on improving organizational human capabilities. Aims: The aim of this model's application is to increase people ability to attract, develop, motivate, organize and retain the talents needed to organizational continuous improvement. Settings and Design: In this study, we used the PCMM for investigation of organizational maturity level in medical record departments of governmental hospitals and determination strengths and weaknesses of their staff capabilities. Materials and Methods: This is an applied research and cross sectional study in which data were collected by questionnaires to investigation of PCMM model needs in medical record staff of governmental hospitals at Isfahan, Iran. We used the questionnaire which has been extracted from PCMM model and approved its reliability with Cronbach's Alpha 0.96. Statistical Analysis Used: Data collected by the questionnaire was analyzed based on the research objectives using SPSS software and in accordance with research questions descriptive statistics were used. Results: Our findings showed that the mean score of medical record practitioners, skill and capability in governmental hospitals was 35 (62.5%) from maximum 56 (100%). There is no significant relevance between organizational maturity and medical record practitioners, attributes. Conclusions: Applying PCMM model is caused increasing staff and manager attention in identifying the weaknesses in the current activities and practices, so it will result in improvement and developing processes. PMID:25077147

  14. Following Up Crack Users after Hospital Discharge Using Record Linkage Methodology: An Alternative to Find Hidden Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Veralice Maria; Pedroso, Rosemeri; dos Santos, Antônio Marcos; Diemen, Lisia Von; Pechansky, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the probabilistic record linkage (PRL) methodology as an alternative way to find or follow up hard-to-reach population as crack users. PRL was based on secondary data from public health information systems and the strategy used from standardization; phonetic encoding and the rounds of matching data were described. A total of 293 patient records from medical database and two administrative datasets obtained from Ministry of Health Information Systems were used. Patient information from the medical database was the identifiers to the administrative datasets containing data on outpatient treatment and hospital admissions. 40% of patient records were found in the hospital database and 12% were found in the outpatient database; 95% of the patients were hospitalized up to 5 times, and only 10 out of them had outpatient information. The record linkage methodology by linking government databases may help to address research questions about the path of patients in the care network without spending time and financial resources with primary data collection. PMID:26425565

  15. The PEN & PAD medical record model: development of a nursing record for hospital-based care of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Heathfield, H A; Hardiker, N; Kirby, J; Tallis, R; Gonsalkarale, M

    1994-12-01

    The PEN & PAD Medical Record model describes a framework for an information model, designed to meet the requirements of an electronic medical record. This model has been successfully tested in a computer-based record system for General Practitioners as part of the PEN & PAD (GP) Project. Experiences of using the model for developing computer-based nursing records are reported. Results show that there are some problems with directly applying the model to the nursing domain. Whilst the main purpose of the nursing record is to document and communicate a patient's care, it has several other, possibly incompatible, roles. Furthermore, the structure and content of the information contained within the nursing record is heavily influenced by the need for the nursing profession to visibly demonstrate the philosophical frameworks underlying their work. By providing new insights into the professional background of nursing records, this work had highlighted the need for nurses to clarify and make explicit their uses of information, and also provided them with some tools to assist in this task. PMID:7869943

  16. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Electronic Medical Record System at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Soo; Lee, Woo Baik

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems provide various benefits, there are both advantages and disadvantages regarding its cost-effectiveness. This study analyzed the economic effects of EMR systems using a cost-benefit analysis based on the differential costs of managerial accounting. Methods Samsung Medical Center (SMC) is a general hospital in Korea that developed an EMR system for outpatients from 2006 to 2008. This study measured the total costs and benefits during an 8-year period after EMR adoption. The costs include the system costs of building the EMR and the costs incurred in smoothing its adoption. The benefits included cost reductions after its adoption and additional revenues from both remodeling of paper-chart storage areas and medical transcriptionists' contribution. The measured amounts were discounted by SMC's expected interest rate to calculate the net present value (NPV), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), and discounted payback period (DPP). Results During the analysis period, the cumulative NPV and the BCR were US$3,617 thousand and 1.23, respectively. The DPP was about 6.18 years. Conclusions Although the adoption of an EMR resulted in overall growth in administrative costs, it is cost-effective since the cumulative NPV was positive. The positive NPV was attributed to both cost reductions and additional revenues. EMR adoption is not so attractive to management in that the DPP is longer than 5 years at 6.18 and the BCR is near 1 at 1.23. However, an EMR is a worthwhile investment, seeing that this study did not include any qualitative benefits and that the paper-chart system was cost-centric. PMID:24175119

  17. Referrals to integrative medicine in a tertiary hospital: findings from electronic health record data and qualitative interviews

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Kristen H; Rivard, Rachael L; Christianson, Jon B; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine patterns of, and decision-making processes, informing referrals for inpatient access to integrative medicine (IM) services at a large, acute care hospital. Design Retrospective electronic health record review and structured qualitative interviews. Setting A 630-bed tertiary care hospital with an IM service available to inpatients. Participants IM referrals of all inpatients aged ≥18 years between July 2012 and December 2014 were identified using the hospital's electronic health record. Fifteen physicians, 15 nurses and 7 administrators were interviewed to better understand roles and perspectives in referring patients for IM services. Results In the study hospital, primary sources of referrals for IM services were the orthopaedic and neuroscience/spine service lines. While the largest absolute number of IM referrals was made for patients with lengths of stay of 3 days or fewer, a disproportionate number of total IM referrals was made for patients with long lengths of stay (≥10 days), compared with a smaller percentage of patients in the hospital with lengths of stay ≥10 days. Physicians and nurses were more likely to refer patients who displayed strong symptoms (eg, pain and anxiety) and/or did not respond to conventional therapies. IM referrals were predominantly nurse-initiated. A built-in delay in the time from referral initiation to service delivery discouraged referrals of some patients. Conclusions Conventional providers refer patients for IM services when these services are available in a tertiary hospital. Referral patterns are influenced by patient characteristics, operational features and provider perspectives. Nurses play a key role in the referral process. Overcoming cultural and knowledge differences between conventional and IM providers is likely to be a continuing challenge to providing IM in inpatient settings. PMID:27456330

  18. Screening for atrial fibrillation with baseline and intermittent ECG recording in an out-of-hospital population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background the objective of this study is to investigate the detection rate of undiagnosed atrial fibrillation (AF) with short intermittent ECG recordings during four weeks among out-of-hospital patients, having at least one additional risk factor (CHADS2) for stroke. Method Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Eight family practice centres and two hospital-based out-patient clinics in Sweden. Subjects: 989 out-of-hospital patients, without known AF, having one or more risk factors associated with stroke (CHADS2). Interventions: All individuals were asked to perform 10-second handheld ECG recordings during 28 days, twice daily and when having palpitations. Main outcome measures: Episodes of AF on handheld ECG recordings were defined as irregular supraventricular extrasystoles in series with a duration of 10 seconds. Results 928 patients completed registration. AF was found in 35 of 928 patients; 3.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.7–5.2). These 35 patients had a mean age of 70.7 years (SD ± 7.7; range 53–85) and a median CHADS2 of 2 (range 1–4). Conclusions Intermittent handheld ECG recording over a four week period had a detection rate of 3.8% newly diagnosed AF, in a population of 928 out-of-hospital patients having at least one additional risk factor for stroke. Intermittent handheld ECG registration is a feasible method to detect AF in patients with an increased risk of stroke in whom oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment is indicated. PMID:23758799

  19. Maternal mortality in Sirur.

    PubMed

    Shrotri, A; Pratinidhi, A; Shah, U

    1990-01-01

    The research aim was 1) to determine the incidence of maternal mortality in a rural health center area in Sirur, Maharashtra state, India; 2) to determine the relative risk; and 3) to make suggestions about reducing maternal mortality. The data on deliveries was obtained between 1981 and 1984. Medical care at the Rural Training Center was supervised by the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, the B.J. Medical College in Pune. Deliveries numbered 5994 singleton births over the four years; 5919 births were live births. 15 mothers died: 14 after delivery and 1 predelivery. The maternal mortality rate was 2.5/1000 live births. The maternal causes of death included 9 direct obstetric causes, 3 from postpartum hemorrhage of anemic women, and 3 from puerperal sepsis of anemic women with prolonged labor. 2 deaths were due to eclampsia, and 1 death was unexplained. There were 5 (33.3%) maternal deaths due to indirect causes (3 from hepatitis and 2 from thrombosis). One woman died of undetermined causes. Maternal jaundice during pregnancy was associated with the highest relative risk of maternal death: 106.4. Other relative risk factors were edema, anemia, and prolonged labor. Attributable risk was highest for anemia, followed by jaundice, edema, and maternal age of over 30 years. Maternal mortality at 30 years and older was 3.9/1000 live births. Teenage maternal mortality was 3.3/1000. Maternal mortality among women 20-29 years old was lowest at 2.1/1000. Maternal mortality for women with a parity of 5 or higher was 3.6/1000. Prima gravida women had a maternal mortality rate of 2.9/1000. Parities between 1 and 4 had a maternal mortality rate of 2.3/1000. The lowest maternal mortality was at parity of 3. Only 1 woman who died had received more than 3 prenatal visits. 11 out of 13 women medically examined prenatally were identified with the following risk factors: jaundice, edema, anemia, young or old maternal age, parity, or poor obstetric history. The local

  20. Pharmacological Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients With Acute Medical Illness: An Electronic Medical Records Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc; Liu, Xianchen; Phatak, Hemant; Qi, Rong; Teal, Evgenia; Nisi, Daniel; Liu, Larry Z; Ramacciotti, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with acute medical illness have an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). American College of Chest Physicians guidelines list various chronic illnesses, sepsis, advanced age, history of VTE, and immobility as risk factors and recommend prophylactic anticoagulation using fondaparinux, low-molecular weight heparin, or low-dose unfractionated heparin. The objectives of this study were to examine pharmacological prophylaxis against VTE among hospitalized medically ill patients and to assess demographic and clinical correlates related to VTE prophylaxis. A retrospective (1999-2010) electronic medical records study included patients aged 40 years and older hospitalized for at least 3 days, with significant medical illness or with a VTE hospitalization 30-365 days before admission. Each patient's first qualifying hospitalization was analyzed. Exclusions were if VTE treatment was started within 1 day of admission, or if warfarin (and not heparin or enoxaparin) was used. Prophylaxis was defined if the first inpatient dose of subcutaneous heparin or enoxaparin was at prophylaxis levels (lower than treatment levels). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with VTE prophylaxis. Among 12,980 patients, 22.1% received prophylaxis (11.8% with enoxaparin, 10.3% with heparin). VTE prophylaxis was positively associated with year of hospitalization, subcutaneous heparin in the month before admission, aspirin, self-pay status, age, and sepsis. VTE prophylaxis was negatively associated with smoking, alcohol, warfarin in the past 30 days, and primary diagnoses of stroke, infectious disease, or inflammatory bowel disease. Pharmacological VTE prophylaxis has increased significantly over the past 12 years but is still largely underused in patients hospitalized with acute medical illness. Multiple demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors are associated with inpatient VTE prophylaxis. PMID:26720163

  1. [New data on maternal mortality in India].

    PubMed

    Bhatia, J C

    1990-01-01

    A survey was carried out in urban and rural areas of the district of Anantapur, Andhra Pradesh state, India, between July 1, 1984-June 30, 1985 by a team of 6 interviewers and 1 supervisor to identify investigate, and study the causative factors/characteristics of the causes of maternal deaths. They visited each of the 15 hospitals in the district collecting information about maternal deaths that occurred in the reproductive age range of 15-49 years. 22 health centers and 50% of subcenters were also visited, registers were examined, and staff and families were also interviewed. The hospitals and centers served 569,500 people. During the 1st phase in the rural area all main village centers, 181 village subcenters, and 1192 other villages in the district with a total population of 1,090,640 were covered. During the 2nd phase all towns in the urban zones, 10 primary centers, 65 subcenters, and 135 others were visited. The maternal mortality rate was 7.9/1000 live births, well above the national average. 36% of female mortality occurred in women in reproductive age, but fewer than 1/2 of these deaths were registered and only 1/3 figured in center and subcenter records. In rural areas maternal mortality was 8.3/1000, ahead of the urban rate of 5.4/1000. 63% of 284 deaths detailed were related to live births, 14% to stillbirths, 10% to abortions, and 13% to obstructed labor. 19% of total maternal deaths occurred before birth, 12% during labor, and 69% after delivery. Among clinical causes of death sepsis accounted for 36%, hemorrhage for 12%, eclampsia for 9%, retention of placenta for 7%, and infectious hepatitis for 10%. 80% of these deaths could have been avoided by timely antenatal care, treatment of previous complaints, and medical attention and hospitalization at the right time. PMID:12179349

  2. Documentation of Medical Records in Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014: a Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Asgari, Zolaykha; Siamian, Hasan; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Gorji, Alimorad Heidari; Motamed, Nima; Fallahkharyeki, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patient care in medical record formats is always emphasized. These documents are used as a means to go on treating the patients, staff in their own defense, assessment, care, any legal proceedings and medical science education. Therefore, in this study, each of the data elements available in patients’ records are important and filling them indicates the importance put by the documenting teams, so it has been dealt with the documentation the patient records in the hospitals of Mazandaran province. Method: This cross-sectional study aimed to review medical records in 16 hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS). In order to collection data, a check list was prepared based on the data elements including four forms of the admission, summary, patients’ medical history and progress note. The data recording was defined as “Yes” with the value of 1, lack of recording was defined as “No” with the value of 2, and “Not applied” with the value of 0 for the cases in which the mentioned variable medical records are not applied. Results: The overall evaluation of the documentation was considered as 95-100% equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to “average” and below -75% equal to “poor”. Using the stratified random sample volume formula, 381 cases were reviewed. The data were analyzed by the SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistics. Results: The results showed that %62 of registration and all the four forms were in the “poor” category. There was no big difference in average registration among the hospitals. Among the educational groups Gynecology and Infectious were equal and had the highest average of documentation of %68. In the data categories, the highest documentation average belonged to the verification, %91. Conclusion: According to the overall assessment in which the rate of documentation was in the category “week”, we should make much more efforts to reach better conditions. Even if a data

  3. BMI upon discharge from hospital and its relationship with survival: an observational study utilising linked patient records

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Daniel; Falcaro, Milena; McNulty, David; Shallcross, Laura; Wood, John; Pagano, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Objective Current advice for patients being discharged from hospital suggests a body mass index of 18.5 to 24 kgm−2, although this aspirational target may often not be achieved. We examined the relationship between body mass index on discharge from hospital and subsequent mortality over a maximum follow-up of 3.8 years. Design We conducted a survival analysis using linked hospital records data with national hospital episode statistics and national death certification data. Participants & Setting The analysis included adult patients who were admitted to University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust for a period of over 24 h during 2011, excluding day cases and regular day case attenders. Main outcome measures The relationship between body mass index and mortality at medium term was estimated separately in both men and women, after accounting for case-mix. Results For both males and females, the relationship between body mass index at discharge and the loge hazard of death was strongly non-linear (p = 0.0002 for females and p < 0.0001 for males) and predictive (both p < 0.0001). In all models, the optimal body mass index range associated with best survival was 25 to 35 kgm−2, with a sharp increase in risk for lower body mass index. Conclusions There was little evidence to support current aspirational body mass index targets in the discharge population. Hospitals should ensure adequate nutrition especially among those with a reduced body mass index. PMID:27053359

  4. Containing Ontario's hospital costs under universal insurance in the 1980s: what was the record?

    PubMed

    Detsky, A S; O'Rourke, K; Naylor, C D; Stacey, S R; Kitchens, J M

    1990-03-15

    In recent years the Ontario government has been concerned that the proportion of public expenditures devoted to health care is at an all-time high. In addition, the media have devoted considerable attention to specific incidents that may represent inadequate funding of hospital services. To shed light on the debate on health care expenditures we analysed the trend in expenditures of Ontario's hospital sector in the 1980s in terms of the amount of inputs (e.g., labour) used to produce hospital services (e.g., a patient-day or admission) and after adjustment for general inflation. As in the 1970s the number of inputs grew relatively slowly during the 1980s. Inputs per patient-day grew at an annual rate of 0.46% and inputs per admission at an annual rate of 2.4%. Cost increases were largely accounted for by hospital wage increases; this could have been due to Ontario's rapidly expanding economy. These findings indicate that Ontario has continued to be successful in containing the number of inputs used in the hospital sector. However, after two decades of substantial success with publicly acceptable cost control, the government faces increased scrutiny as the media and the public focus attention on several areas of perceived inadequate funding in health care services. PMID:2107020

  5. Classification of hospital acquired complications using temporal clinical information from a large electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jeremy L; Zhang, Peijin; Liu, Jenny; Alterovitz, Gil

    2016-02-01

    Hospital acquired complications (HACs) are serious problems affecting modern day healthcare institutions. It is estimated that HACs result in an approximately 10% increase in total inpatient hospital costs across US hospitals. With US hospital spending totaling nearly $900 billion per annum, the damages caused by HACs are no small matter. Early detection and prevention of HACs could greatly reduce strains on the US healthcare system and improve patient morbidity & mortality rates. Here, we describe a machine-learning model for predicting the occurrence of HACs within five distinct categories using temporal clinical data. Using our approach, we find that at least $10 billion of excessive hospital costs could be saved in the US alone, with the institution of effective preventive measures. In addition, we also identify several keystone features that demonstrate high predictive power for HACs over different time periods following patient admission. The classifiers and features analyzed in this study show high promise of being able to be used for accurate prediction of HACs in clinical settings, and furthermore provide novel insights into the contribution of various clinical factors to the risk of developing HACs as a function of healthcare system exposure. PMID:26707449

  6. Maternal oral health status and preterm low birth weight at Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Mumghamba, Elifuraha GS; Manji, Karim P

    2007-01-01

    Background The study examined the relationship between oral health status (periodontal disease and carious pulpal exposure (CPE)) and preterm low-birth-weight (PTLBW) infant deliveries among Tanzanian-African mothers at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Tanzania. Methods A retrospective case-control study was conducted, involving 373 postpartum mothers aged 14–44 years (PTLBW – 150 cases) and at term normal-birth-weight (TNBW) – 223 controls), using structured questionnaire and full-mouth examination for periodontal and dentition status. Results The mean number of sites with gingival bleeding was higher in PTLBW than in TNBW (P = 0.026). No significant differences were observed for sites with plaque, calculus, teeth with decay, missing, filling (DMFT) between PTLBW and TNBW. Controlling for known risk factors in all post-partum (n = 373), and primiparaous (n = 206) mothers, no significant differences were found regarding periodontal disease diagnosis threshold (PDT) (four sites or more that had probing periodontal pocket depth 4+mm and gingival bleeding ≥ 30% sites), and CPE between cases and controls. Significant risk factors for PTLBW among primi- and multiparous mothers together were age ≤ 19 years (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) = 2.09, 95% Confidence interval (95% CI): 1.18 – 3.67, P = 0.011), hypertension (aOR = 2.44, (95% CI): 1.20 – 4.93, P = 0.013) and being un-married (aOR = 1.59, (95% CI): 1.00 – 2.53, P = 0.049). For primiparous mothers significant risk factors for PTLBW were age ≤ 19 years (aOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.13 – 3.81, P = 0.019), and being un-married (aOR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.42 – 4.67, P = 0.002). Conclusions These clinical findings show no evidence for periodontal disease or carious pulpal exposure being significant risk factors in PTLBW infant delivery among Tanzanian-Africans mothers at MNH, except for young age, hypertension, and being unmarried. Further research incorporating periodontal pathogens is recommended. PMID:17594498

  7. A Qualitative Exploration of Workarounds Related to the Implementation of National Electronic Health Records in Early Adopter Mental Health Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ser, Gloria; Robertson, Ann; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate the perceptions and reported practices of mental health hospital staff using national hospital electronic health records (EHRs) in order to inform future implementations, particularly in acute mental health settings. Methods Thematic analysis of interviews with a wide range of clinical, information technology (IT), managerial and other staff at two early adopter mental health National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in London, UK, implementing national EHRs. Results We analysed 33 interviews. We first sought out examples of workarounds, such as delayed data entry, entering data in wrong places and individuals using the EHR while logged in as a colleague, then identified possible reasons for the reported workarounds. Our analysis identified four main categories of factors contributing to workarounds (i.e., operational, cultural, organisational and technical). Operational factors included poor system integration with existing workflows and the system not meeting users' perceived needs. Cultural factors involved users' competence with IT and resistance to change. Organisational factors referred to insufficient organisational resources and training, while technical factors included inadequate local technical infrastructure. Many of these factors, such as integrating the EHR system with day-to-day operational processes, staff training and adequate local IT infrastructure, were likely to apply to system implementations in various settings, but we also identified factors that related particularly to implementing EHRs in mental health hospitals, for example: EHR system incompatibility with IT systems used by mental health–related sectors, notably social services; the EHR system lacking specific, mental health functionalities and options; and clinicians feeling unable to use computers while attending to distressed psychiatric patients. Conclusions A better conceptual model of reasons for workarounds should help with designing, and supporting the

  8. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  9. Which clinical scenarios do surgeons record as complications? A benchmarking study of seven hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Annelies; Ubbink, Dirk T; Gouma, Dirk J; Goslings, J Carel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate agreement and potential differences in the application and interpretation of the definition among surgical departments of various hospitals. Design 24 cases were formulated including general, trauma, gastrointestinal and vascular surgery, and based on points of discussion about the definition and ambiguities regarding complication registration as encountered in daily practice. The cases were presented to the surgical staff and residents in seven Dutch hospitals, using the national registration system of complications and an electronic response system. Results In total, 134 participants responded. Interpretation differences were particularly found regarding: (1) complications considered as logical consequences of a surgical procedure; (2) complications occurring after radiological interventions; (3) severity criteria such as when to consider a complication as a ‘(probably) permanent damage or function loss’; (4) registering a cancelled operation as a complication and (5) patients with serial complications during hospital stay. Conclusions The definition of surgical complications as currently applied in the Netherlands does not ensure a uniform complication registration. Improvement of this registration system is mandatory before benchmarking of these findings in the public domain is appropriate. Modifications of the current definition of a surgical complication, and improved consensus about specific clinical situations and training of surgeons might improve the quality of benchmarking. PMID:26033948

  10. Maternal microchimerism

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jody; Vives-Pi, Marta; Gillespie, Kathleen M

    2014-01-01

    Increased levels of non-inherited maternal HLA alleles have been detected in the periphery of children with type 1 diabetes and an increased frequency of maternal cells have been identified in type 1 diabetes pancreas. It is now clear that the phenotype of these cells is pancreatic,1 supporting the hypothesis that maternal cells in human pancreas are derived from multipotent maternal progenitors. Here we hypothesize how increased levels of maternal cells could play a role in islet autoimmunity. PMID:25093746

  11. Sentiment Measured in Hospital Discharge Notes Is Associated with Readmission and Mortality Risk: An Electronic Health Record Study

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Thomas H.; Castro, Victor M.; Cagan, Andrew; Roberson, Ashlee M.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Perlis, Roy H.

    2015-01-01

    Natural language processing tools allow the characterization of sentiment–that is, terms expressing positive and negative emotion–in text. Applying such tools to electronic health records may provide insight into meaningful patient or clinician features not captured in coded data alone. We performed sentiment analysis on 2,484 hospital discharge notes for 2,010 individuals from a psychiatric inpatient unit, as well as 20,859 hospital discharges for 15,011 individuals from general medical units, in a large New England health system between January 2011 and 2014. The primary measures of sentiment captured intensity of subjective positive or negative sentiment expressed in the discharge notes. Mean scores were contrasted between sociodemographic and clinical groups in mixed effects regression models. Discharge note sentiment was then examined for association with risk for readmission in Cox regression models. Discharge notes for individuals with greater medical comorbidity were modestly but significantly lower in positive sentiment among both psychiatric and general medical cohorts (p<0.001 in each). Greater positive sentiment at discharge was associated with significantly decreased risk of hospital readmission in each cohort (~12% decrease per standard deviation above the mean). Automated characterization of discharge notes in terms of sentiment identifies differences between sociodemographic groups, as well as in clinical outcomes, and is not explained by differences in diagnosis. Clinician sentiment merits investigation to understand why and how it reflects or impacts outcomes. PMID:26302085

  12. Sentiment Measured in Hospital Discharge Notes Is Associated with Readmission and Mortality Risk: An Electronic Health Record Study.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Thomas H; Castro, Victor M; Cagan, Andrew; Roberson, Ashlee M; Kohane, Isaac S; Perlis, Roy H

    2015-01-01

    Natural language processing tools allow the characterization of sentiment--that is, terms expressing positive and negative emotion--in text. Applying such tools to electronic health records may provide insight into meaningful patient or clinician features not captured in coded data alone. We performed sentiment analysis on 2,484 hospital discharge notes for 2,010 individuals from a psychiatric inpatient unit, as well as 20,859 hospital discharges for 15,011 individuals from general medical units, in a large New England health system between January 2011 and 2014. The primary measures of sentiment captured intensity of subjective positive or negative sentiment expressed in the discharge notes. Mean scores were contrasted between sociodemographic and clinical groups in mixed effects regression models. Discharge note sentiment was then examined for association with risk for readmission in Cox regression models. Discharge notes for individuals with greater medical comorbidity were modestly but significantly lower in positive sentiment among both psychiatric and general medical cohorts (p<0.001 in each). Greater positive sentiment at discharge was associated with significantly decreased risk of hospital readmission in each cohort (~12% decrease per standard deviation above the mean). Automated characterization of discharge notes in terms of sentiment identifies differences between sociodemographic groups, as well as in clinical outcomes, and is not explained by differences in diagnosis. Clinician sentiment merits investigation to understand why and how it reflects or impacts outcomes. PMID:26302085

  13. Melanoma in the Italian Population and Regional Environmental Influences: A National Retrospective Survey on 2001–2008 Hospitalization Records

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Prisco; Neglia, Cosimo; Falco, Andrea; Rivezzi, Matteo; Agnello, Nadia; Argentiero, Alberto; Chitano, Giovanna; Distante, Chiara; Della Rosa, Giulia; Vinci, Giorgia; De Donno, Antonella; Distante, Alessandro; Romanini, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the burden of regional environmental factors influencing the incidence of Melanoma in the Italian population and overcome the problem of partial population coverage by local cancer registries and thematic archives. Methods: We analyzed the Italian national hospitalization records from 2001 to 2008 provided by the Ministry of Health, excluding hospital re-admissions of the same patients, in order to assess the occurrence of Melanoma over a 8-year period. Data were presented by age groups (absolute number of cases from 20 to ≥80 years old) and per Region (rates per 100,000 inhabitants) for each year. Results: The overall number of new hospitalizations due to malignant Melanoma increased by 16.8% from 2001 (n = 4846) to 2008 (n = 5823), with the rate per 100,000 inhabitants passing from 10.5 to almost 12.0 at a national level. The majority of new diagnoses of malignant Melanoma was observed in two age groups: 61–70 years old (from 979 in 2001 up to 1209 in 2008, corresponding to 15.1 and 18.1 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively) and 71–80 years old (from 954 in 2001 up to 1141 in 2008, corresponding to 19.5 and 21.8 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively). The number of hospitalizations due to Melanoma increased in all age groups with the only exception of the youngest patients aged 20–30 years old. The highest increases over the 8-year period were observed in people aged ≥81 years old (+34%), 61–70 years old (+20%) and surprisingly in the age group 31–40 years old (+17%). Southern Regions showed lower hospitalization rates compared to Northern Italy and Region Lazio. The highest increases between 2001 and 2008 were observed in Trentino/Alto Adige, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Valla d’Aosta and Veneto Region. Conclusions: Hospitalizations due to malignant Melanoma in Italy seem to be influenced by environmental or population-related factors showing a decreasing incidence rate from the Northern to Southern Regions

  14. The Association between Bankruptcy and Hospital-Presenting Attempted Suicide: A Record Linkage Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidger, Judi; Gunnell, David; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Overstreet, Karen A.; Hollingworth, William

    2011-01-01

    The associations between admissions to an emergency department following attempted suicide and personal bankruptcy in the preceding and subsequent 2 years were evaluated. Records from a level 1 trauma center (June 1993-December 2002) in Seattle, WA, were linked with case files from the local U.S. District Bankruptcy Court (June 1991 onward).…

  15. Integration of data from remote monitoring systems and programmers into the hospital electronic health record system based on international standards.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, E T; Foeken, H; Witteman, T A; van Erven, L; Schalij, M J

    2012-02-01

    Remote follow-up of implanted ICDs may offer a solution to the problem of overcrowded outpatient clinics. All major device companies have developed a remote follow-up solution. Data obtained from the remote follow-up systems are stored in a central database system, operated and owned by the device company and accessible for the physician or technician. However, the problem now arises that part of the patient's clinical information is stored in the local electronic health record (EHR) system in the hospital, while another part is only available in the remote monitoring database. This may potentially result in patient safety issues. Ideally all information should become available in the EHR system. IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) is an initiative to improve the way computer systems in healthcare share information. To address the requirement of integrating remote monitoring data in the local EHR, the IHE Implantable Device Cardiac Observation (IDCO) profile has been developed. In our hospital, we have implemented the IHE IDCO profile to import data from the remote databases from two device vendors into the departmental Cardiology Information System. Data are exchanged via an HL7/XML communication protocol, as defined in the IHE IDCO profile. PMID:22231151

  16. Hepatitis C: improving the quality of screening in a community hospital by implementing an electronic medical record intervention.

    PubMed

    Shahnazarian, Vahe; Karu, Eric; Mehta, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) have recommended that adults born between the years of 1945-1965 should receive one-time testing for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). In fact, Governor Andrew Cuomo of the State of New York had signed a bill on October 23, 2013 which mandated NY hospitals and healthcare providers to offer HCV testing to all "Baby Boomers." For our project, we wanted to increase our community hospital's compliance with this law and improve the quality of patient care in doing so. An electronic medical record intervention was implemented in conjunction with our information technology services department. This intervention would flag eligible patients and would run them through a predetermined algorithm to see if they needed HCV testing. Multiple plan, do, study, act (PDSA) cycles were run during the length of the study and many changes were made in order to achieve maximum effect. We ended up increasing our HCV testing rate from 47.2% (pre-intervention) to 87.9% (final month of the study), which was statistically significant with a p-value of <0.0000001. We also ended up with a framework that is both generalizable to other projects and is also self-sustaining, so that it can continue to run itself once all the project members have finished working there as house staff. PMID:26734374

  17. Understanding Nurses' Perceptions of Electronic Health Record Use in an Acute Care Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Strudwick, Gillian; McGillis Hall, Linda; Nagle, Lynn; Trbovich, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are being implemented in health care environments in an effort to improve the safety, quality and efficiency of care. However, not all of these potential benefits have been demonstrated in empirical research. One of the reasons for this may be a number of barriers that prevent nurses from being able to incorporate EHRs into their professional practice. A review of the literature revealed a number of barriers to, and facilitators of EHR use by nurses. Among these, EHR usability, organizational context, and individual nurse characteristics were found to be concepts that influence use. It is currently unknown how these concepts together might influence nurses' perceptions of their ability to use the technology to support the nursing process. In this poster, the authors will describe a study aimed at achieving a better understanding of nurses' perceptions of their EHR use by investigating the concepts of EHR usability, organizational context and select individual nurse characteristics. PMID:27332345

  18. Two-year hospital records of burns from a referral center in Western Iran: March 2010-March 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadijouybari, Touraj; Najafi, Farid; Moradinazar, Mehdi; Karami-matin, Behzad; Karami-matin, Reza; Ataie, Maria; Hatami, Masoumeh; Purghorbani, Samira; Amee, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Burns are among the most common injuries affecting a great number of people worldwide annually. In Iran, especially in its western region and in Kermanshah province, burns have a relatively high incidence. The present study was aimed at investigating epidemiological characteristics in Western Iran. Methods: Within a cross-sectional study, the data on all patients attending the Burns Center at Imam Khomeini Hospital (Kermanshah, Iran) during 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 (24 months) were collected. Then, age, gender, cause of burns, total body surface area, and time of the occurrence were extracted from the hospital records. The data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical package (Version 19, for Windows). We used chi-squared test when we compared the categorical responses between two or more groups. For comparing means between two groups we used t-test. In addition, trends were investigated using linear regression. Results: Overall 13 248 people were referred to the Burns Center at Imam Khomeini Hospital (Kermanshah, Iran) during the period of study, including 328 cases of self-immolation. The mean age of the patients was 27±19 years and 29±13 years for unintentional burns and self-immolation respectively. Out of the total number of unintentional cases, 6 519 (50.5%) were men, while the corresponding percentage of men among the self-immolation cases was 16.6% (p less than 0.001). Trends in the number of cases were cyclic, with the highest and lowest number of burns cases being in March and May. Overall, hot liquids and flammable materials were the two most important causes of unintentional burns. However, flammable materials were the main cause of burns among self-immolation cases. During hospital admission, 168 (51%) self-immolation victims and 43 (0.33%) unintentional burn victims died. Conclusions: While major preventive measures are not adequately used in developing countries, burns and their burden can be significantly reduced by increasing

  19. Using survival analysis to determine association between maternal pelvis height and antenatal fetal head descent in Ugandan mothers

    PubMed Central

    Munabi, Ian Guyton; Luboga, Samuel Abilemech; Mirembe, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fetal head descent is used to demonstrate the maternal pelvis capacity to accommodate the fetal head. This is especially important in low resource settings that have high rates of childbirth related maternal deaths and morbidity. This study looked at maternal height and an additional measure, maternal pelvis height, from automotive engineering. The objective of the study was to determine the associations between maternal: height and pelvis height with the rate of fetal head descent in expectant Ugandan mothers. Methods This was a cross sectional study on 1265 singleton mothers attending antenatal clinics at five hospitals in various parts of Uganda. In addition to the routine antenatal examination, each mother had their pelvis height recorded following informed consent. Survival analysis was done using STATA 12. Results It was found that 27% of mothers had fetal head descent with an incident rate of 0.028 per week after the 25th week of pregnancy. Significant associations were observed between the rate of fetal head descent with: maternal height (Adj Haz ratio 0.93 P < 0.01) and maternal pelvis height (Adj Haz ratio 1.15 P < 0.01). Conclusion The significant associations observed between maternal: height and pelvis height with rate of fetal head descent, demonstrate a need for further study of maternal pelvis height as an additional decision support tool for screening mothers in low resource settings. PMID:26918071

  20. Maternal understanding of infective endocarditis after hospitalization: assessing the knowledge of mothers of children with congenital heart disease and the practical implications.

    PubMed

    Knöchelmann, Anja; Geyer, Siegfried; Grosser, Urte

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the knowledge of mothers of children with congenital heart disease as well as the association of cardiological factors and maternal characteristics with maternal understanding. Mothers of 135 children (≤2 years old) were interviewed to assess maternal knowledge of infective endocarditis (IE) using the Hannover Inventory of Parental Knowledge of Congenital Heart Disease. Two subscales, endocarditis and risk factors, were used. Cardiological data as well as maternal characteristics were collected. Two-thirds of the mothers achieved only low scores, answering 0-20 % of the questions correctly (endocarditis = 64.4 %; risk factors = 71.1 %). Mothers with higher education recalled the correct definition of IE (P = 0.001) and the importance of dental hygiene (P = 0.004) more often. Mothers with only one child were more likely to know the most typical symptom (P = 0.007). The severity of the heart disease and the requirement of endocarditis prophylaxis did not influence maternal understanding. Yet, mothers assessing the heart disease as severe showed better knowledge (typical symptom P = 0.021; importance of dental hygiene P = 0.007). If mothers learned the diagnosis before their child's birth, they remembered relevant information more often. Mothers receiving information by the medical staff and from the Internet showed better knowledge (definition P = 0.014; importance of dental hygiene P = 0.001). Due to low levels of knowledge, more efforts must be put into the education of mothers. Educational programs should take maternal characteristics into account, providing written material and thereby keeping the instruction of lower-educated persons in mind. Furthermore, education should be focused on mothers of children requiring IE prophylaxis. PMID:23982219

  1. [A fetal extraction device used in under-equipped countries: the obstetrical vacuum extractor. Results of 393 vacuum extractions in the Maternity Hospital in Sélestat. (Reflections on the use of this device in African practice)].

    PubMed

    Pambou, O; Wurch, T; Weygandt, J M; Treisser, A

    1991-01-01

    The level of mortality and feto-maternal morbidity in under-equipped countries is frightening. It is important to find answers. Among these: the obstetrical Ventouse is an instrument that can be used for extracting the fetus without too much difficulty. It is relatively easy to learn and to apply as compared with forceps (so long as the mechanism by which it is used is understood). The conditions under which it can be used are well defined at present: term pregnancy, the woman must be in labour, fetal membranes must be ruptured, the cervix must be completely dilated, presentation must be cephalic and the head must be engaged. 393 Ventouse extractions were carried out between 1982 and 1988 at the Maternity Hospital of Selastat and this resulted in delivery of 393 infants in good health. No maternal or fetal mortality occurred in the series. The maternal morbidity was low at 0.76% and the fetal morbidity was only 4.7%. In view of our experience, we believe that the tendency for black women to have android pelves makes it preferable to use the Ventouse as against the forceps because it has several advantages. In view of the literature and of their practice, the authors advise that the obstetric Ventouse should be used in under-equipped countries where conditions of practice are often precarious and the team poorly qualified. This will reduce the mortality and morbidity due to delivery. Pregnant women are insufficiently educated. The quality of health personnel is inadequate. The health services are inadequate for the needs of the population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2019713

  2. Drugs-Related Death Soon after Hospital-Discharge among Drug Treatment Clients in Scotland: Record Linkage, Validation, and Investigation of Risk-Factors

    PubMed Central

    White, Simon R.; Bird, Sheila M.; Merrall, Elizabeth L. C.; Hutchinson, Sharon J.

    2015-01-01

    We validate that the 28 days after hospital-discharge are high-risk for drugs-related death (DRD) among drug users in Scotland and investigate key risk-factors for DRDs soon after hospital-discharge. Using data from an anonymous linkage of hospitalisation and death records to the Scottish Drugs Misuse Database (SDMD), including over 98,000 individuals registered for drug treatment during 1 April 1996 to 31 March 2010 with 705,538 person-years, 173,107 hospital-stays, and 2,523 DRDs. Time-at-risk of DRD was categorised as: during hospitalization, within 28 days, 29–90 days, 91 days–1 year, >1 year since most recent hospital discharge versus ‘never admitted’. Factors of interest were: having ever injected, misuse of alcohol, length of hospital-stay (0–1 versus 2+ days), and main discharge-diagnosis. We confirm SDMD clients’ high DRD-rate soon after hospital-discharge in 2006–2010. DRD-rate in the 28 days after hospital-discharge did not vary by length of hospital-stay but was significantly higher for clients who had ever-injected versus otherwise. Three leading discharge-diagnoses accounted for only 150/290 DRDs in the 28 days after hospital-discharge, but ever-injectors for 222/290. Hospital-discharge remains a period of increased DRD-vulnerability in 2006–2010, as in 1996–2006, especially for those with a history of injecting. PMID:26539701

  3. Drugs-Related Death Soon after Hospital-Discharge among Drug Treatment Clients in Scotland: Record Linkage, Validation, and Investigation of Risk-Factors.

    PubMed

    White, Simon R; Bird, Sheila M; Merrall, Elizabeth L C; Hutchinson, Sharon J

    2015-01-01

    We validate that the 28 days after hospital-discharge are high-risk for drugs-related death (DRD) among drug users in Scotland and investigate key risk-factors for DRDs soon after hospital-discharge. Using data from an anonymous linkage of hospitalisation and death records to the Scottish Drugs Misuse Database (SDMD), including over 98,000 individuals registered for drug treatment during 1 April 1996 to 31 March 2010 with 705,538 person-years, 173,107 hospital-stays, and 2,523 DRDs. Time-at-risk of DRD was categorised as: during hospitalization, within 28 days, 29-90 days, 91 days-1 year, >1 year since most recent hospital discharge versus 'never admitted'. Factors of interest were: having ever injected, misuse of alcohol, length of hospital-stay (0-1 versus 2+ days), and main discharge-diagnosis. We confirm SDMD clients' high DRD-rate soon after hospital-discharge in 2006-2010. DRD-rate in the 28 days after hospital-discharge did not vary by length of hospital-stay but was significantly higher for clients who had ever-injected versus otherwise. Three leading discharge-diagnoses accounted for only 150/290 DRDs in the 28 days after hospital-discharge, but ever-injectors for 222/290. Hospital-discharge remains a period of increased DRD-vulnerability in 2006-2010, as in 1996-2006, especially for those with a history of injecting. PMID:26539701

  4. 'I Used to Fight with Them but Now I Have Stopped!': Conflict and Doctor-Nurse-Anaesthetists' Motivation in Maternal and Neonatal Care Provision in a Specialist Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aberese-Ako, Matilda; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Gerrits, Trudie; Van Dijk, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper analyses why and how conflicts occur and their influence on doctors and nurse-anaesthetists' motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in a specialist hospital. Methodology The study used ethnographic methods including participant observation, conversation and in-depth interviews over eleven months in a specialist referral hospital in Ghana. Qualitative analysis software Nvivo 8 was used for coding and analysis of data. Main themes identified in the analysis form the basis for interpreting and reporting study findings. Ethics Statement Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ghana Health Service Ethics Review board (approval number GHS-ERC:06/01/12) and from the University of Wageningen. Written consent was obtained from interview participants, while verbal consent was obtained for conversations. To protect the identity of the hospital and research participants pseudonyms are used in the article and the part of Ghana in which the study was conducted is not mentioned. Results Individual characteristics, interpersonal and organisational factors contributed to conflicts. Unequal power relations and distrust relations among doctors and nurse-anaesthetists affected how they responded to conflicts. Responses to conflicts including forcing, avoiding, accommodating and compromising contributed to persistent conflicts, which frustrated and demotivated doctors and nurse-anaesthetists. Demotivated workers exhibited poor attitudes in collaborating with co-workers in the provision of maternal and neonatal care, which sometimes led to poor health worker response to client care, consequently compromising the hospital's goal of providing quality health care to clients. Conclusion To improve health care delivery in health facilities in Ghana, health managers and supervisors need to identify conflicts as an important phenomenon that should be addressed whenever they occur. Effective mechanisms including training managers

  5. Healthcare resource implications of hypoglycemia-related hospital admissions and inpatient hypoglycemia: retrospective record-linked cohort studies in England

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Philip; Larsen Thorsted, Brian; Wolden, Michael; Jacobsen, Judith; Evans, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Objective Using a retrospective cohort study, the mean length of hospital stay (LoS) and total per-patient expenditure for hypoglycemia requiring admission to hospital were estimated. In a separate matched retrospective cohort study, the effect of inpatient hypoglycemia on LoS, expenditure, and risk of all-cause mortality while admitted was investigated. Methods The cohorts consisted of patients aged ≥18 years with a diagnosis of type 1 or 2 diabetes between January 1, 2002 and October 30, 2012 in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink database, who had initiated insulin treatment and had a recording of hypoglycemia in the same period. In the matched retrospective cohort study, exposed patients (who experienced hypoglycemia in hospital) were case-matched with patients who did not experience hypoglycemia during admission (unexposed). Generalized linear regression was used to estimate LoS. Risk of all-cause mortality was evaluated via logistic regression. Results In the retrospective cohort study (1131 patients), mean LoS was 5.46 (95% CI 4.62 to 6.45) days for type 1 diabetes, and 5.04 (95% CI 4.46 to 5.71) days for type 2 diabetes. Mean cost per admission was £1034 (95% CI £855 to £1253). In the matched retrospective cohort study (1079 pairs of patients), exposed patients had a mean LoS of 11.91 days (95% CI 10.96 to 12.94 days) versus 4.80 (95% CI 4.41 to 5.23) for unexposed patients, p<0.0001. Exposed patients had a higher mortality risk compared with unexposed patients (OR 1.439 (95% CI 1.060to 1.952), p=0.0195). Total average per-patient cost for exposed patients was GBP (£)2235, 40% (p<0.0001) higher than total average admission cost in unexposed patients. Conclusions Hypoglycemia has a significant negative impact on patient outcomes, healthcare resource use, and expenditure. PMID:25815204

  6. Follow up policy after treatment for Hodgkin's disease: too many clinic visits and routine tests? A review of hospital records.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, J. A.; Eardley, A.; Woodman, C.; Crowther, D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness of routine clinic review in detecting relapse after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. DESIGN: Review of hospital records. SETTING: Regional centre for cancer treatment and research. SUBJECTS: 210 patients with Hodgkin's disease recruited to a chemotherapy trial protocol between 1984 and the end of 1990 who had achieved a complete or partial remission after treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of clinic visits made by patients over the period of observation, the number of relapses occurring during that time, and the route by which relapse was detected. RESULTS: The 210 patients generated 2512 outpatient reviews, and 37 relapses were detected. Thirty relapses (81%) were diagnosed in patients who described symptoms, which in 15 cases had resulted in an earlier appointment being arranged. In only four cases (11%; 95% confidence interval 4% to 25%) was relapse detected as a result of routine physical examination on investigation of a patient who did not have symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Relapse of Hodgkin's disease after treatment is usually detected as a result of the investigation of symptoms rather than by routine screening of asymptomatic patients. It is therefore proposed that the frequency of routine follow up visits should be reduced and greater emphasis placed on patient education. This should underline the importance of symptoms and encourage patients to arrange an earlier appointment if these develop. PMID:9040326

  7. Comprehensive Evaluation of Electronic Medical Record System Use and User Satisfaction at Five Low-Resource Setting Hospitals in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic medical record (EMR) systems are increasingly being implemented in hospitals of developing countries to improve patient care and clinical service. However, only limited evaluation studies are available concerning the level of adoption and determinant factors of success in those settings. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the usage pattern, user satisfaction level, and determinants of health professional’s satisfaction towards a comprehensive EMR system implemented in Ethiopia where parallel documentation using the EMR and the paper-based medical records is in practice. Methods A quantitative, cross-sectional study design was used to assess the usage pattern, user satisfaction level, and determinant factors of an EMR system implemented in Ethiopia based on the DeLone and McLean model of information system success. Descriptive statistical methods were applied to analyze the data and a binary logistic regression model was used to identify determinant factors. Results Health professionals (N=422) from five hospitals were approached and 406 responded to the survey (96.2% response rate). Out of the respondents, 76.1% (309/406) started to use the system immediately after implementation and user training, but only 31.7% (98/309) of the professionals reported using the EMR during the study (after 3 years of implementation). Of the 12 core EMR functions, 3 were never used by most respondents, and they were also unaware of 4 of the core EMR functions. It was found that 61.4% (190/309) of the health professionals reported over all dissatisfaction with the EMR (median=4, interquartile range (IQR)=1) on a 5-level Likert scale. Physicians were more dissatisfied (median=5, IQR=1) when compared to nurses (median=4, IQR=1) and the health management information system (HMIS) staff (median=2, IQR=1). Of all the participants, 64.4% (199/309) believed that the EMR had no positive impact on the quality of care. The participants indicated an

  8. Maternal and fetal outcomes in term premature rupture of membrane

    PubMed Central

    Endale, Tigist; Fentahun, Netsanet; Gemada, Desta; Hussen, Mamusha Aman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Premature rupture of membrane (PROM) is linked to significant maternal prenatal mortalities and morbidity. In Ethiopia, where maternal mortality is still high, the maternal and fetal outcomes in PROM is very important to decrease maternal and child mortality and for better management and prevention of complications. Thus, this study aimed to detect the maternal and fetal outcomes and associated factors in term PROM at Mizan-Aman General Hospital, south-west Ethiopia. METHODS: A retrospective cross sectional study was conducted using data available at Mizan-Aman General Hospital during a period of 3 years (January 2011 to December 2013). We examined records of 4 525 women who gave birth in the hospital; out of these women, 185 were diagnosed with term PROM and all of them were included in the study. The data of these women were collected using a checklist based on registration books. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 statistical package. The association between independent and dependent variables was assessed by bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. 95%CI and P value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Of the 4 525 women who gave birth in the hospital, 202 were complicated by term PROM. About 22.2% of the women showed unfavorable maternal outcomes. The most common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality was puerperal sepsis. About 33.5% of neonates experienced unfavorable outcomes. The duration of PROM >12 hours (AOR=5.6, 95%CI 1.3–24.1) latency >24 hours (AOR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7–11.8), residing in rural areas (AOR=4.2, 95%CI 3.96–29.4) and birth weight less than 2 500 g were associated with unfavorable outcomes. CONCLUSION: Women residing in rural areas, long latency, and neonates with birth weight less 2 500 g may have unfavorable outcomes. Therefore, optimum obstetric and medical care is essential for the reduction of the devastating complications related to disorders. PMID:27313811

  9. Evaluation of natural language processing from emergency department computerized medical records for intra-hospital syndromic surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The identification of patients who pose an epidemic hazard when they are admitted to a health facility plays a role in preventing the risk of hospital acquired infection. An automated clinical decision support system to detect suspected cases, based on the principle of syndromic surveillance, is being developed at the University of Lyon's Hôpital de la Croix-Rousse. This tool will analyse structured data and narrative reports from computerized emergency department (ED) medical records. The first step consists of developing an application (UrgIndex) which automatically extracts and encodes information found in narrative reports. The purpose of the present article is to describe and evaluate this natural language processing system. Methods Narrative reports have to be pre-processed before utilizing the French-language medical multi-terminology indexer (ECMT) for standardized encoding. UrgIndex identifies and excludes syntagmas containing a negation and replaces non-standard terms (abbreviations, acronyms, spelling errors...). Then, the phrases are sent to the ECMT through an Internet connection. The indexer's reply, based on Extensible Markup Language, returns codes and literals corresponding to the concepts found in phrases. UrgIndex filters codes corresponding to suspected infections. Recall is defined as the number of relevant processed medical concepts divided by the number of concepts evaluated (coded manually by the medical epidemiologist). Precision is defined as the number of relevant processed concepts divided by the number of concepts proposed by UrgIndex. Recall and precision were assessed for respiratory and cutaneous syndromes. Results Evaluation of 1,674 processed medical concepts contained in 100 ED medical records (50 for respiratory syndromes and 50 for cutaneous syndromes) showed an overall recall of 85.8% (95% CI: 84.1-87.3). Recall varied from 84.5% for respiratory syndromes to 87.0% for cutaneous syndromes. The most frequent cause of

  10. Alternative Maternity Services in Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starzyk, Patricia M.

    The nature of maternity services has changed in the past 20 years, with a movement away from traditional (physician delivery in a hospital) towards other alternative services. This study examined alternative maternity services in Washington State, which ranks eighth in the country in the use of such services. Data were collected from birth and…

  11. Maternal mortality in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S K; Sengupta, B S; Chattopadhyay, C; Zaidi, Z; Showail, H

    1983-09-01

    The maternal mortality in the Maternity and Children Hospital, Riyadh, during the years 1978-1980 was 52 per 100 000 births, when the total births were 55 428. This is higher than the rate reported from the hospitals in developed countries but lower than rates reported by the university hospitals of developing countries such as India, Thailand and Nigeria. Haemorrhage, associated disease, pulmonary embolism and infection, in that order, were the main causes of maternal deaths. The main avoidable factor was failure by the patient to seek the medical care. Much could be done in reducing deaths due to haemorrhage by improving blood transfusion facilities in the peripheral hospitals. Adequate health education, especially of rural women and their midwives, is a crucial factor in improving the maternal death rate for the country as a whole. PMID:6615737

  12. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  13. Epidemiological Changes in Leishmaniasis in Spain According to Hospitalization-Based Records, 1997–2011: Raising Awareness towards Leishmaniasis in Non-HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, B. Carolina; Granados, Marisol; San Martín, Juan Victor; Aparicio, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    In Spain, Leishmania infantum is endemic, human visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis cases occurring both in the Peninsula, as well as in the Balearic Islands. We aimed to describe the clinical characteristics of leishmaniasis patients and the changes in the disease evolution after the introduction of antiretroviral therapy in 1997. In this descriptive study, we used Spanish Centralized Hospital Discharge Database for the hospitalized leishmaniasis cases between 1997 and 2011. We included in the analysis only the records having leishmaniasis as the first registered diagnosis and calculated the hospitalization rates. Disease trend was described taking into account the HIV status. Adjusted odds-ratio was used to estimate the association between clinical and socio-demographic factors and HIV co-infection. Of the total 8010 Leishmaniasis hospitalizations records, 3442 had leishmaniasis as first diagnosis; 2545/3442 (75.6%) were males and 2240/3442 (65.1%) aged between 14-65 years. Regarding disease forms, 2844/3442 (82.6%) of hospitalizations were due to visceral leishmaniasis (VL), while 118/3442 (3.4%) hospitalizations were cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Overall, 1737/2844 of VL (61.1%) were HIV negatives. An overall increasing trend was observed for the records with leishmaniasis as first diagnosis (p=0.113). Non-HIV leishmaniasis increased during this time period (p=0.021) while leishmaniasis-HIV co-infection hospitalization revealed a slight descending trend (p=0.717). Leishmaniasis-HIV co-infection was significantly associated with male sex (aOR=1.6; 95% CI: 1.25-2.04), 16-64 years age group (aOR=17.4; 95%CI: 2.1-143.3), visceral leishmaniasis aOR=6.1 (95%CI: 3.27-11.28) and solid neoplasms 4.5 (95% CI: 1.65-12.04). The absence of HIV co-infection was associated with lymph/hematopoietic neoplasms (aOR=0.3; 95%CI:0.14-0.57), other immunodeficiency (aOR=0.04; 95% CI:0.01-0.32) and transplant (aOR=0.01; 95%CI:0.00-0.07). Our findings suggest a significant increase of

  14. Protocol to describe the analysis of text-based communication in medical records for patients discharged from intensive care to hospital ward

    PubMed Central

    Parsons Leigh, Jeanna; Brown, Kyla; Buchner, Denise; Stelfox, Henry T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Effective communication during hospital transitions of patient care is fundamental to ensuring patient safety and continuity of quality care. This study will describe text-based communication included in patient medical records before, during and after patient transfer from the intensive care unit (ICU) to a hospital ward (n=10 days) by documenting (1) the structure and focus of physician progress notes within and between medical specialties, (2) the organisation of subjective and objective information, including the location and accessibility of patient data and whether/how this changes during the hospital stay and (3) missing, illegible and erroneous information. Methods This study is part of a larger mixed methods prospective observational study of ICU to hospital ward transfer practices in 10 ICUs across Canada. Medical records will be collected and photocopied for each consenting patient for a period of up to 10 consecutive days, including the final 2 days in the ICU, the day of transfer and the first 7 days on the ward (n=10 days). Textual analysis of medical record data will be completed by 2 independent reviewers to describe communication between stakeholders involved in ICU transfer. Ethics and dissemination Research ethics board approval has been obtained at all study sites, including the coordinating study centre (which covers 4 Calgary-based sites; UofC REB 13-0021) and 6 additional study sites (UofA Pro00050646; UBC PHC Hi4-01667; Sunnybrook 336-2014; QCH 20140345-01H; Sherbrooke 14-172; Laval 2015-2171). Findings from this study will inform the development of an evidence-based tool that will be used to systematically analyse the series of notes in a patient's medical record. PMID:27401367

  15. Maternal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Michelle H; Beigi, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization holds tremendous promise to improve maternal and neonatal health for a number of infectious conditions. The unique susceptibilities of pregnant women to infectious conditions, as well as the ability of maternally-derived antibody to offer vital neonatal protection (via placental transfer), together have produced the recent increased attention on maternal immunization. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) currently recommends 2 immunizations for all pregnant women lacking contraindication, inactivated Influenza and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap). Given ongoing research the number of vaccines recommended during pregnancy is likely to increase. Thus, achieving high vaccination coverage of pregnant women for all recommended immunizations is a key public health enterprise. This review will focus on the present state of vaccine acceptance in pregnancy, with attention to currently identified barriers and determinants of vaccine acceptance. Additionally, opportunities for improvement will be considered. PMID:25483490

  16. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  17. Incorporating immunizations into routine obstetric care to facilitate Health Care Practitioners in implementing maternal immunization recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Heather; Street, Jackie; Marshall, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against pertussis, influenza, and rubella reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and their offspring. Health care professionals (HCPs) caring for women perinatally are uniquely placed to reduce maternal vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs). Despite guidelines recommending immunization during the perinatal period, maternal vaccine uptake remains low. This qualitative study explored the role of obstetricians, general practitioners, and midwives in maternal vaccine uptake. Semi-structured interviews (n = 15) were conducted with perinatal HCPs at a tertiary maternity hospital in South Australia. HCPs were asked to reflect on their knowledge, beliefs, and practice relating to immunization advice and vaccine provision. Interviews were transcribed and coded using thematic analysis. Data collection and analysis was an iterative process, with collection ceasing with theoretical saturation. Participants unanimously supported maternal vaccination as an effective way of reducing risk of disease in this vulnerable population, however only rubella immunity detection and immunization is embedded in routine care. Among these professionals, delegation of responsibility for maternal immunization was unclear and knowledge about maternal immunization was variable. Influenza and pertussis vaccine prevention measures were not included in standard pregnancy record documentation, information provision to patients was “ad hoc” and vaccinations not offered on-site. The key finding was that the incorporation of maternal vaccinations into standard care through a structured process is an important facilitator for immunization uptake. Incorporating vaccine preventable disease management measures into routine obstetric care including incorporation into the Pregnancy Record would facilitate HCPs in implementing recommendations. Rubella prevention provides a useful “template” for other vaccines. PMID:24509790

  18. Use of a homecare electronic health record to find associations between patient characteristics and re-hospitalizations in patients with heart failure using telehealth.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Jacelon, Cynthia S; Bigelow, Carol; Roche, Joan; Marquard, Jenna; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2013-02-01

    Data from homecare electronic health records were used to explore the association of patient characteristics with re-hospitalizations of patients with heart failure (HF) during a 60-day period of telemonitoring following hospital discharge. Data from 403 Medicare patients with HF who had used telehealth from 2008 to 2010 were analysed. There were 112 all-cause (29%) and 73 cardiac-related (19%) re-hospitalizations within 60 days of the start of telemonitoring. In adjusted analyses, the patients' number of medications and type of cardiac medications were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with an increased risk of re-hospitalization. After stratifying the sample by illness severity, age and gender, other significant (P < 0.05) predictors associated with an increased risk of all-cause and cardiac re-hospitalization were psychiatric co-morbidity, pulmonary and obesity co-morbidities within gender, beta blocker prescription in females and primary HF diagnosis in the oldest age stratum. The study's findings may assist homecare agencies seeking to allocate resources without compromising patient care. PMID:23528787

  19. Use of a homecare Electronic Health Record (EHR) to find associations between patient characteristics and hospitalizations for heart failure in patients using telehealth

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Jacelon, Cynthia S; Bigelow, Carol; Roche, Joan; Marquard, Jenna; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-01-01

    Summary Data from homecare electronic health records were used to explore the association of patient characteristics with re-hospitalizations of patients with heart failure (HF) during a 60-day period of telemonitoring following hospital discharge. Data from 403 Medicare patients with HF who had used telehealth from 2008 to 2010 were analysed. There were 112 all-cause (29%) and 73 cardiac-related (19%) re-hospitalizations within 60 days of being admitted to the homecare agency. In adjusted analyses, the patients’ prescribed number of medications and type of prescribed cardiac medications were significantly (P<0.05) associated with increased risk of re-hospitalization. After stratifying the sample by illness severity, age and gender, other significant (P<0.05) predictors associated with increased risk of all-cause and cardiac re-hospitalization were psychiatric co-morbidity, co-morbidities related to pulmonary and obesity within gender, beta blocker prescription in females and primary HF diagnosis in the oldest age stratum. The study’s findings may assist homecare agencies seeking to allocate resources without compromising patient care. PMID:23528787

  20. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR) in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR) among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address psychosocial needs of HCR

  1. Influential Factors for and Outcomes of Hospitalized Patients with Suicide-Related Behaviors: A National Record Study in Taiwan from 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Wen; Huang, Hui-Chuan; Lin, Mei-Feng; Shyu, Meei-Ling; Tsai, Po-Li; Chang, Hsiu-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigating the factors related to suicide is crucial for suicide prevention. Psychiatric disorders, gender, socioeconomic status, and catastrophic illnesses are associated with increased risk of suicide. Most studies have typically focused on the separate influences of physiological or psychological factors on suicide-related behaviors, and have rarely used national data records to examine and compare the effects of major physical illnesses, psychiatric disorders, and socioeconomic status on the risk of suicide-related behaviors. Objectives To identify the characteristics of people who exhibited suicide-related behaviors and the multiple factors associated with repeated suicide-related behaviors and deaths by suicide by examining national data records. Design This is a cohort study of Taiwan’s national data records of hospitalized patients with suicide-related behaviors from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2010. Participants The study population included all people in Taiwan who were hospitalized with a code indicating suicide or self-inflicted injury (E950–E959) according to the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Results Self-poisoning was the most common method of self-inflicted injury among hospitalized patients with suicide-related behaviors who used a single method. Those who were female, had been hospitalized for suicide-related behaviors at a younger age, had a low income, had a psychiatric disorder (i.e., personality disorder, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, alcohol-related disorder, or adjustment disorder), had a catastrophic illness, or had been hospitalized for suicide-related behaviors that involved two methods of self-inflicted injury had a higher risk of hospitalization for repeated suicide-related behaviors. Those who were male, had been hospitalized for suicide-related behaviors at an older age, had low income, had schizophrenia, showed repeated suicide

  2. Predicting admissions and time spent in hospital over a decade in a population-based record linkage study: the EPIC-Norfolk cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shabina; Khaw, K T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify hospital use in a general population over 10 years follow-up and to examine related factors in a general population-based cohort. Design A prospective population-based study of men and women. Setting Norfolk, UK. Participants 11 228 men and 13 786 women aged 40–79 years in 1993–1997 followed between 1999 and 2009. Main outcomes measures Number of hospital admissions and total bed days for individuals over a 10-year follow-up period identified using record linkage; five categories for admissions (from zero to highest ≥7) and hospital bed days (from zero to highest ≥20 nights). Results Over a period of 10 years, 18 179 (72.7%) study participants had at least one admission to hospital, 13.8% with 7 or more admissions and 19.9% with 20 or more nights in hospital. In logistic regression models with outcome ≥7 admissions, low education level OR 1.14 (1.05 to 1.24), age OR per 10-year increase 1.75 (1.67 to 1.82), male sex OR 1.32 (1.22 to 1.42), manual social class 1.22 (1.13 to 1.32), current cigarette smoker OR 1.53 (1.37 to 1.71) and body mass index >30 kg/m² OR 1.41 (1.28 to 1.56) all independently predicted the outcome with p<0.0001. Results were similar for those with ≥20 hospital bed days. A risk score constructed using male sex, manual social class, no educational qualifications; current smoker and body mass index >30 kg/m², estimated percentages of the cohort in the categories of admission numbers and hospital bed days in stratified age bands with twofold to threefold differences in future hospital use between those with high-risk and low-risk scores. Conclusions The future probability of cumulative hospital admissions and bed days appears independently related to a range of simple demographic and behavioural indicators. The strongest of these is increasing age with high body mass index and smoking having similar magnitudes for predicting risk of future hospital usage. PMID:26792216

  3. [Death certificates of women in childbearing age: search for maternal deaths].

    PubMed

    Gil, Mariana Marcos; Gomes-Sponholz, Flavia Azevedo

    2013-01-01

    In Brazil, there is a lack of complete records on death certificates, and its reliability is questioned, especially for causes attributed to pregnancy and childbirth. We investigated, based on death certificates of women in reproductive age, any fields for identifying maternal deaths. Documentary research, conducted in hospital records. We analyzed in death certificates, maternal and no maternal deaths, inconclusive deaths and hidden deaths. To analyze the underlying causes of death we used ICD 10th Revision. Of the 301 death certificates reviewed, 60% had the fields 43/44 completed, and 40% had these fields blank and/or ignored. We found 58.5% of no maternal deaths, 2% of maternal deaths and 39.5% inconclusive. The analysis of inconclusive deaths allowed us to classify 4.3% as hidden deaths. To overcome the incompletitudes of civil registries, it is necessary that all health professionals be committed to the reliability of the information, so the priority target could be reached. PMID:23887780

  4. Pattern of Maternal Complications and Low Birth Weight: Associated Risk Factors among Highly Endogamous Women.

    PubMed

    Bener, Abdulbari; Salameh, Khalil M K; Yousafzai, Mohammad T; Saleh, Najah M

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The objective of the study was to examine the pattern of low birth weight LBW, maternal complications, and its related factors among Arab women in Qatar. Design. This is a prospective hospital-based study. Setting. The study was carried out in Women's Hospital, Doha. Subjects and Methods. Pregnant women in their third trimester were identified in the log book of Women's Hospital and recruited into the study during first week of January 2010 to July 2011. Only 1674 (out of 2238) Arab women (74.7%) consented to participate in this study. Data on clinical and biochemistry parameters were retrieved from medical records. Follow-up data on neonatal outcome was obtained from labor room register. Results. The incidence of LBW (<2500 g) was 6.7% among Arab women during 2010 in Qatar. Distribution of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), antepartum hemorrhage (APH), maternal anemia, premature rupture of membrane (PROM), maternal occupation, parity, sheesha smoking, and parental consanguinity were significantly different (P < 0.05) between mothers of LBW and normal birth weight NBW (≥2500 g) babies. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that previous LBW, consanguinity, parity, smoking shesha, GDM, APH, anemia, PROM, maternal occupation, and housing condition were significantly associated with LBW adjusting for gestational age. Conclusion. Maternal complications such as GDM, APH, anemia, PROM, and smoking shesha during pregnancy are significantly increasing the risk of LBW outcome. Screening and prompt treatment for maternal complications and health education for smoking cessation during routine antenatal visits will help in substantial reduction of LBW outcome. PMID:22991672

  5. Development and implementation of a secure, integrated management system for medical images and electronic clinical records for small hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Javier; Castro, Antonio F; Perez, Juan L; Novoa, Francisco J; Vázquez, Jose M; Teijeiro, Jorge; Pazos, Alejandro; Ezquerra, Norberto

    2007-06-01

    The field of Medical Informatics is currently experiencing increasing demands for new models of the Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) protocols. Despite of the considerable advantages of current systems, implementation in hospitals is remarkably slow, due primarily to difficulties in integration and relatively high costs. Even though the success of DICOM standards has greatly contributed to the development of PACS, many hospitals remain unable to support it or to make full use of its potential because various imaging modalities in use at these sites generate images that cannot be stored in the PACS and cannot be managed in a centralized manner without DICOM standardization modules. Furthermore, the imaging modalities being used in such smaller centers are expensive and unlikely to be replaced, making DICOM compliance untenable. With this in mind, this paper describes the design, development, and implementation of a management system for medical diagnostic imaging, based on the DICOM standard and adapted to the needs of a small hospital. The system is currently being implemented in the San Rafael Hospital at A Coruna in Spain, and integrated with the existing hospital information system (HIS). We have studied the networking infrastructure of the hospital and its available image generation devices, and have subsequently carried out a series of measurements including transmission times, image file size, compression ratios, and many others that allow us to analyze the behavior of the system. Results obtained from these investigations demonstrate both the flexibility of using such a "small-hospital" DICOM-based framework as well as the relative cost-effectiveness of the system. In this regard, the approach, described herein, might serve as a model for other small, and possibly mid-sized, medical centers. PMID:17603833

  6. Maternal Depression and Parent Management Training Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jack; McQuillin, Samuel; Butler, Ashley M; Axelrad, Marni E

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the impact of maternal depression on reductions in children's behavior problems severity following implementation of the Brief Behavioral Intervention-a brief, manualized parent management training treatment. The parents of 87 children aged 2-6 years of age received parent management training at a metropolitan hospital. Parents of participants completed measures of externalizing behavior and maternal depression. The association between pre-post treatment change in externalizing behavior and maternal depression was examined using an autoregressive cross-lagged model. Results showed that self-reported maternal depressive symptoms at pre-treatment negatively influenced the overall magnitude of reduction of reported externalizing behaviors in children following treatment. Results indicate that aspects of family functioning not specifically targeted by parent management training, such as maternal depression, significantly affect treatment outcomes. Clinicians providing parent management training may benefit from assessing for maternal depression and modifying treatment as indicated. PMID:27448152

  7. Guided imagery: an innovative approach to improving maternal sleep quality.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Linda; Jallo, Nancy; Howland, Lois; James, Kathy; Glaser, Dale; Arnell, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Mothers of preterm infants are at risk for poor sleep quality, which may adversely affect their health, maternal-infant attachment, and infant caretaking activities. This study examined the relationship of an 8-week relaxation guided imagery intervention on sleep quality and the association between sleep quality and maternal distress (perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and state anxiety) in 20 mothers of hospitalized preterm infants. Mothers received a CD (compact disc) with three 20-minutes recordings and were asked to listen to at least 1 recording daily for 8 weeks. This analysis used self-report data gathered at baseline and 8 weeks. Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationships between mean cumulative relaxation guided imagery use and measures of maternal distress and sleep quality scores at 8 weeks. Complete data on 19 mothers were available for analysis. At 8 weeks, higher mean relaxation guided imagery use was inversely correlated with sleep quality scores (r = -0.30); sleep quality scores were positively correlated with stress (r = 0.42), depressive symptoms (r = 0.34), and anxiety (r = 0.39) scores. In mothers of preterm infants, sleep quality was negatively affected by mental distress and may be improved by a guided imagery intervention. PMID:23618936

  8. Development of an Integrated Medical Record System at a Large Hospital Using COSTAR as a Designing Tool

    PubMed Central

    Schteingart, R.; Wachenchauzer, R.; Jamschon, R.; Uman, G.; Visciglio, H.; Donovan, K.; D'Adamo, G.; Panuncio, C.

    1982-01-01

    It is usually very complex to design an Integrated Information System in a hospital that includes both in-patient and out-patient medical care data. The difficulty appears because each department within the organization tends to create its own information system, according to its requirements and interests, and absolutely unaware of the requirements of the other departments. In this article, we will describe the design, programming and implementation of an integrated information system in a hospital. It has a unique data base to store all the in-patient and out-patient information. COSTAR experience was used to design this system. Advantages and disadvantages of using COSTAR in a hospital with 850 beds and 2.500 daily out-patient visits are pointed out, and the new system designed on the basis of COSTAR functionality is described.

  9. Effect of an electronic health record on the culture of an outpatient medical oncology practice in a four-hospital integrated health care system: 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Brockstein, Bruce; Hensing, Thomas; Carro, George W; Obel, Jennifer; Khandekar, Janardan; Kaminer, Lynne; Van De Wege, Christine; de Wilton Marsh, Robert

    2011-07-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) was adopted into the NorthShore University HealthSystem, a four-hospital integrated health system located in suburban Chicago, in 2003. By 2005, all chemotherapy and medicine order entry was conducted through the EHR, completing the incorporation of a fully paperless EHR in our hospital-based oncology practice in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The use of the EHR has dramatically changed our practice environment by improving efficiency, patient safety, research productivity, and operations, while allowing evaluation of adherence to established quality measures and incorporation of new quality improvement initiatives. The reach of the EHR has been substantial and has influenced every aspect of care at our institution over the short period since its implementation. In this article, we describe subjective and objective measures, outcomes, and achievements of our 5-year EHR experience. PMID:22043197

  10. Maternal Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sam

    1975-01-01

    The overwhelming evidence from years of research is that maternal employment, by itself, has little influence on the behaviors of children. More relevant issues are: mother's reasons for working, family's acceptance of mother's employment, quality of substitute child care, family's social and emotional health, and economic conditions. (Author/AJ)

  11. [Psychiatry at the maternal clinic].

    PubMed

    Ammälä, Antti-Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Various mental disorders are encountered at the maternal clinic. Pregnancy predisposes to some mental disorders, most commonly depressive and anxiety disorders. The recognition of substance use disorders during pregnancy is very important, but difficult owing to the associated disgrace. An eating disorder with an onset preceding the pregnancy may cause problems for growth and development of the fetus and should thus be identified early enough. The rare but severe postpartum psychosis may often break out only after discharge from the maternity hospital. Drug therapy during pregnancy requires careful consideration and clear-cut reasoning. PMID:26237899

  12. Using an electronic medical record system to describe injury epidemiology and health care utilization at an inner-city hospital in Indiana.

    PubMed

    Odero, Wilson W; Tierney, William M; Einterz, Robert M; Mungai, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Injuries are a major public health problem worldwide. In the USA, injuries cause 146, 400 deaths annually, with 31 million non-fatal injury visits to emergency departments (EDs). EDs thus represent an important source of injury data. The primary objective of the current study was to describe the epidemiology of injury-related ED visits and assess injury-related utilization of health care resources in an inner-city hospital in Indiana, using data stored in a computerized medical record system. It involved a retrospective review of the records for injury visits to EDs and injury admissions over a 3-year period. The variables extracted and analysed included patients' demographics, external cause of injury, diagnosis, length of stay, ED and hospital charges. A total of 60,470 injury-related ED visits were made, the majority of patients were male (61.6%), uninsured (63.1%), treated in ED and discharged (98.4%). The leading causes of injury were falls (18.8%), motor vehicle crashes (18.4%), assaults (17.6%), being struck (11.2%) and overexertion (10.6). Firearms caused most injury deaths (32.4%; n = 314); motor vehicle crashes were the leading cause of hospitalization (26.6%; n = 642) and also the most expensive to treat as inpatients (mean charge $19,190). The mean charge per patient treated and discharged was $150 compared to $11,116 for patients admitted. These findings demonstrate the value of computerized medical records in capturing and storing E-coded injury data. The system generates data that can be used for epidemiological surveillance and injury prevention at the local level, and for assessment of impact of specific injuries on health care resources. PMID:15903162

  13. Preterm Labor and Maternal Hypoxia in Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Pinell, Phillip; Martens, Mark G.; Faro, Sebastian

    1996-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine if preterm labor is associated with the degree of maternal hypoxia in pregnant women with community-acquired pneumonia but no other maternal diseases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all antepartum patients admitted with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia to an inner-city university hospital between 1983 and 1987. Included in this review were only the patients with radiologically confirmed diagnose of pneumonia and documented arterial blood gases on room air at the time of admission, but no other maternal diseases. Results: A total of 22 cases were identified. There was no maternal mortality, but there were 2 patients (9%) who developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae was documented in 1 patient (5%). Preterm labor complicated 5 cases (23%) and led to preterm delivery in 3 patients (14%). Terbutaline tocolysis was instituted in 3 patients, but was discontinued in 1 patient who was allowed to deliver because of her worsening condition. Preterm labor was associated with the WBC count on admission, usually > 18,000/mm3, but no statistically significant correlation with the severity of maternal hypoxia was noted. Five patients (23%) were incorrectly diagnosed at the time of admission, 4 with an initial diagnosis of pyelonephritis and 1 with an initial diagnosis of cholecystitis. Conclusions: Community-acquired pneumonia in the antepartum period is responsible for significant maternal and fetal complications even in the absence of other maternal diseases. Preterm labor and delivery remain frequent, and tocolysis should be used cautiously. At the time of admission, the diagnosis may be difficult. The degree of maternal hypoxia on admission does not correlate with the presence of preterm labor. PMID:18476096

  14. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and admission to hospital for upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation: a record linkage case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. M.; McMahon, A. D.; McGilchrist, M. M.; White, G.; Murray, F. E.; McDevitt, D. G.; MacDonald, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the relation between topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. DESIGN--A case-control study with 1103 patients admitted to hospital for upper gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation between January 1990 and December 1992 (cases). Two different control groups were used, with six community controls and with two hospital controls for each case. Previous exposure to topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ulcer healing drugs was assessed. STUDY POPULATION--The population of 319,465 people who were resident in Tayside and were registered with a Tayside general practitioner between January 1989 and October 1994. A record linkage database containing all data on hospital events and dispensed drugs between 1989 and 1992 was used for this population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios of exposure in those admitted to hospital compared with controls. RESULTS--Significant unadjusted associations were detected between all three classes of drug and upper gastrointestinal complications. The significant association detected for topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was no longer evident in analyses which adjusted for the confounding effect of concomitant exposure to oral anti-inflammatories and ulcer healing drugs (odds ratio = 1.45; 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 2.50 with community controls; 1.06; 0.60 to 1.88 with hospital controls). CONCLUSION--In this study topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were not significantly associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation after adjustment for the confounding effects of concomitant use of oral anti-inflammatories and ulcer healing drugs. PMID:7613317

  15. Cohort Records Study of 19,655 Women Who Received Postabortion Care in a Tertiary Hospital 2010–2013 in China: What Trends Can Be Observed?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhen-Yu; Quan, Song; Chai, Dong-Ning; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The retrospective cohort epidemiological study was to investigate the characteristics of women who underwent induced abortion. Data were retrospectively collected from women who underwent induced abortions (n = 19,655) at the Xiamen Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital (2010–2013). The characteristics of women who underwent induced abortions included mean age, unmarried status, no previous deliveries, first pregnancy, ≥2 abortions including the current one, and a history of caesarian section. From 2010 to 2013, mean age increased and declines were observed in the ratio of induced abortions to live births, the proportion of induced abortions among women of 15–24 years, those who were unmarried, had their first pregnancy, or had no history of delivery. However, the rates of induced abortions increased among women who were lactating, had a history of caesarian section, or had an interpregnancy interval of <6 months. This snapshot of induced abortions in China might suggest that the numbers are increasing but the ratio to live births has fallen. Methods should be improved to prevent unwanted pregnancies and reduce the number of induced abortions in China. It must be emphasized that differences in mentality and culture between countries might limit the representativeness of these results. PMID:26989681

  16. Cohort Records Study of 19,655 Women Who Received Postabortion Care in a Tertiary Hospital 2010-2013 in China: What Trends Can Be Observed?

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhen-Yu; Quan, Song; Chai, Dong-Ning; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The retrospective cohort epidemiological study was to investigate the characteristics of women who underwent induced abortion. Data were retrospectively collected from women who underwent induced abortions (n = 19,655) at the Xiamen Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital (2010-2013). The characteristics of women who underwent induced abortions included mean age, unmarried status, no previous deliveries, first pregnancy, ≥2 abortions including the current one, and a history of caesarian section. From 2010 to 2013, mean age increased and declines were observed in the ratio of induced abortions to live births, the proportion of induced abortions among women of 15-24 years, those who were unmarried, had their first pregnancy, or had no history of delivery. However, the rates of induced abortions increased among women who were lactating, had a history of caesarian section, or had an interpregnancy interval of <6 months. This snapshot of induced abortions in China might suggest that the numbers are increasing but the ratio to live births has fallen. Methods should be improved to prevent unwanted pregnancies and reduce the number of induced abortions in China. It must be emphasized that differences in mentality and culture between countries might limit the representativeness of these results. PMID:26989681

  17. Recorded categories of non-principal diagnoses in Victorian public hospital transient ischaemic attack and stroke admissions.

    PubMed

    Nadathur, Shymala G

    2008-01-01

    Information about the number and types of non-principal diagnoses (NPDs) would make an important contribution to prediction of outcome and hence patient management. The study reported here is based on analysis of three fiscal years of the Victorian public hospital transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke admissions. The incidence of NPDs and co-occurrence of NPD-associated prefix categories (that identify the onset or relevance of each condition to the episode) are described in each of the broad stroke subtypes. The distributions of length of stay and in-hospital deaths in the cohorts without and with NPDs and in the various prefix categories are determined. The study also compares the age and gender distribution in the various subpopulations of interest. The importance of collecting complete and accurate data on nature of NPDs and its potential in describing the complexity of presentation are discussed. PMID:18941264

  18. Variation between Hospitals with Regard to Diagnostic Practice, Coding Accuracy, and Case-Mix. A Retrospective Validation Study of Administrative Data versus Medical Records for Estimating 30-Day Mortality after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Skyrud, Katrine Damgaard; Lindman, Anja Schou

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of patient administrative data (PAS) for calculating 30-day mortality after hip fracture as a quality indicator, by a retrospective study of medical records. Methods We used PAS data from all Norwegian hospitals (2005–2009), merged with vital status from the National Registry, to calculate 30-day case-mix adjusted mortality for each hospital (n = 51). We used stratified sampling to establish a representative sample of both hospitals and cases. The hospitals were stratified according to high, low and medium mortality of which 4, 3, and 5 hospitals were sampled, respectively. Within hospitals, cases were sampled stratified according to year of admission, age, length of stay, and vital 30-day status (alive/dead). The final study sample included 1043 cases from 11 hospitals. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical records. Diagnostic and clinical information from the medical records and PAS were used to define definite and probable hip fracture. We used logistic regression analysis in order to estimate systematic between-hospital variation in unmeasured confounding. Finally, to study the consequences of unmeasured confounding for identifying mortality outlier hospitals, a sensitivity analysis was performed. Results The estimated overall positive predictive value was 95.9% for definite and 99.7% for definite or probable hip fracture, with no statistically significant differences between hospitals. The standard deviation of the additional, systematic hospital bias in mortality estimates was 0.044 on the logistic scale. The effect of unmeasured confounding on outlier detection was small to moderate, noticeable only for large hospital volumes. Conclusions This study showed that PAS data are adequate for identifying cases of hip fracture, and the effect of unmeasured case mix variation was small. In conclusion, PAS data are adequate for calculating 30-day mortality after hip-fracture as a quality

  19. The importance of cardiovascular pathology contributing to maternal death: Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths in South Africa, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Soma-Pillay, Priya; Seabe, Joseph; Soma-Pillay, Priya; Seabe, Joseph; Sliwa, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aims Cardiac disease is emerging as an important contributor to maternal deaths in both lower-to-middle and higher-income countries. There has been a steady increase in the overall institutional maternal mortality rate in South Africa over the last decade. The objectives of this study were to determine the cardiovascular causes and contributing factors of maternal death in South Africa, and identify avoidable factors, and thus improve the quality of care provided. Methods Data collected via the South African National Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths (NCCEMD) for the period 2011–2013 for cardiovascular disease (CVD) reported as the primary pathology was analysed. Only data for maternal deaths within 42 days post-delivery were recorded, as per statutory requirement. One hundred and sixty-nine cases were reported for this period, with 118 complete hospital case files available for assessment and data analysis. Results Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) (34%) and complications of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) (25.3%) were the most important causes of maternal death. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, HIV disease infection and anaemia were important contributing factors identified in women who died of peripartum cardiomyopathy. Mitral stenosis was the most important contributor to death in RHD cases. Of children born alive, 71.8% were born preterm and 64.5% had low birth weight. Seventy-eight per cent of patients received antenatal care, however only 33.7% had a specialist as an antenatal care provider. Avoidable factors contributing to death included delay in patients seeking help (41.5%), lack of expertise of medical staff managing the case (29.7%), delay in referral to the appropriate level of care (26.3%), and delay in appropriate action (36.4%). Conclusion The pattern of CVD contributing to maternal death in South Africa was dominated by PPCM and complications of RHD, which could, to a large extent, have been avoided. It is likely that there were

  20. Maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy and child outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Catharine R; Robinson, Sian M; Harvey, Nicholas C; Javaid, M Kassim; Jiang, Benyu; Martyn, Christopher N; Godfrey, Keith M; Cooper, Cyrus

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether exposure to high maternal concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D in pregnancy poses any risk to the child. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Princess Anne Maternity Hospital, Southampton, UK. Subjects: 596 pregnant women were recruited. 466 (78%) children were examined at birth, 440 (74%) at age 9 months and 178 (30%) at age 9 years. Methods: Maternal (OH)-vitamin D concentrations were measured in late pregnancy. Anthropometry of the child was recorded at birth, 9 months and 9 years. At 9 months, atopic eczema was assessed. At 9 years, children had an echocardiogram and a DXA scan, blood pressure, arterial compliance and carotid intima-media thickness were measured and intelligence and psychological function assessed. Results: There were no associations between maternal 25(OH)-vitamin D concentrations and the child's body size or measures of the child's intelligence, psychological health or cardiovascular system. Children whose mothers' concentration of 25(OH)-vitamin D in pregnancy was >75 nmol/l had an increased risk of eczema on examination at 9 months (OR 3.26, 95% CI 1.15-9.29, p=0.025) and asthma at age 9 years (OR 5.40, 95% CI, 1.09-26.65, p=0.038) compared to children whose mothers' concentration was <30 nmol/l. Conclusion: Exposure to maternal concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D in pregnancy in excess of 75 nmol/l does not appear to influence the child's intelligence, psychological health or cardiovascular system; there could be an increased risk of atopic disorders, but this needs confirmation in other studies. PMID:17311057

  1. Conversion and Data Quality Assessment of Electronic Health Record Data at a Korean Tertiary Teaching Hospital to a Common Data Model for Distributed Network Research

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dukyong; Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Park, Man Young; Cho, Soo Yeon; Ryan, Patrick; Schuemie, Martijn J.; Shin, Dahye; Park, Hojun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A distributed research network (DRN) has the advantages of improved statistical power, and it can reveal more significant relationships by increasing sample size. However, differences in data structure constitute a major barrier to integrating data among DRN partners. We describe our experience converting Electronic Health Records (EHR) to the Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics (OHDSI) Common Data Model (CDM). Methods We transformed the EHR of a hospital into Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) CDM ver. 4.0 used in OHDSI. All EHR codes were mapped and converted into the standard vocabulary of the CDM. All data required by the CDM were extracted, transformed, and loaded (ETL) into the CDM structure. To validate and improve the quality of the transformed dataset, the open-source data characterization program ACHILLES was run on the converted data. Results Patient, drug, condition, procedure, and visit data from 2.07 million patients who visited the subject hospital from July 1994 to November 2014 were transformed into the CDM. The transformed dataset was named the AUSOM. ACHILLES revealed 36 errors and 13 warnings in the AUSOM. We reviewed and corrected 28 errors. The summarized results of the AUSOM processed with ACHILLES are available at http://ami.ajou.ac.kr:8080/. Conclusions We successfully converted our EHRs to a CDM and were able to participate as a data partner in an international DRN. Converting local records in this manner will provide various opportunities for researchers and data holders. PMID:26893951

  2. Strategies for reducing maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Clark, Steven L

    2012-02-01

    The maternal death rate in the United States has shown no improvement in several decades and may be increasing. On the other hand, hospital systems that have instituted comprehensive programs directed at the prevention of maternal mortality have demonstrated rates that are half of the national average. These programs have emphasized the reduction of variability in the provision of care through the use of standard protocols, reliance on checklists instead of memory for critical processes, and an approach to peer review that emphasizes systems change. In addition, elimination of a small number of repetitive errors in the management of hypertension, postpartum hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, and cardiac disease will contribute significantly to a reduction in maternal mortality. Attention to these general principles and specific error reduction strategies will be of benefit to every practitioner and more importantly to the patients we serve. PMID:22280865

  3. Pregnancy Outcomes of Mothers with Detectable CMV-Specific IgM Antibodies: A Three-Year Review in a Large Irish Tertiary Referral Maternity Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Richard J.; Stapleton, Patrick; Abu, Hala; Healy, Eibhlín; Ferguson, Wendy; De Gascun, Cillian; O'Gorman, Joanne; Eogan, Maeve

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective audit was performed for all obstetric patients who had positive CMV IgM results between January 2012 and December 2014 in the Rotunda Hospital, Ireland. In total, 622 CMV IgM positive tests were performed on samples from 572 patients. Thirty-seven patients had a positive CMV IgM result (5.9%) on the Architect system as part of the initial screening. Three patients were excluded as they were not obstetric patients. Of the 34 pregnant women with CMV IgM positive results on initial screening, 16 (47%) had CMV IgM positivity confirmed on the second platform (VIDAS) and 18 (53%) did not. In the 16 patients with confirmed positive CMV IgM results, four (25%) had acute infection, two (12.5%) had infection of uncertain timing, and ten (62.5%) had infection more than three months prior to sampling as determined by the CMV IgG avidity index. Two of the four neonates of women with low avidity IgG had CMV DNA detected in urine. Both these cases had severe neurological damage and the indication for testing their mothers was because the biparietal diameter (BPD) was less than the 5th centile at the routine 20-week gestation anomaly scan. PMID:26696757

  4. [Influence of tobacco smoking on newborn's birth weight--analisys of dates concerning births from Maternity Hospital named. Dr S. Mossor's in Opole City].

    PubMed

    Guzikowski, Wojciech; Pirogowicz, Iwona

    2008-01-01

    Despite wide education, tobacco smoking while being pregnant is very important issue in perinatology. It is important problem because of life style of polish society, including pregnant women. Clinical observation of this issue is pointing on risk of occurring pathology in pregnancy, unfavorable consequences for neonate also many distant pathological effects among children. Purpose of this was getting an answer for question: whether in current social and economic situation there is connection between low birth mass and smoking tobacco during pregnancy. Under analysis were found births between 38th and 40th one hundred successive births (according to book of birth-room from 2860 labors in hospital in Opol, 2007) of mothers are smoking up to 10 cigarettes a day (group I), mothers smoking 11-20 cigarettes a day (group II) and mothers that are not smoking. This works affirms that smoking has negative influence on child birth mass. It is also displayed that higher the number of smoked cigarettes the higher percent of newborns with low birth mass and higher number o fetus with intrauterine growth retardation. Among mothers that are smoking the biggest group were young women (mean. 24, years) and multipara female (58%). PMID:19189515

  5. Midwives’ knowledge and attitudes when encountering Gender-Based Violence in their practice at a maternity-hospital in Kingston, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Pitter, Cynthia Pearl

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gender-based violence (GBV) can have devastating consequences for pregnancy because both mother and child are at risk. Midwives are in a strategic position to identify and empower pregnant women experiencing GBV; however, currently midwives in Jamaica are not required to screen for GBV, neither are they prepared to do so. Aim This study forms the baseline of a larger study designed to improve the capacity of midwives to identify and treat pregnant women experiencing GBV in Jamaica. This specific component assessed midwives’ knowledge and attitudes when encountering GBV in their practice in Kingston, Jamaica. Methods A qualitative study design was used. Six practicing midwives were purposely selected to participate in a focus group discussion at the antenatal clinic of a hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. Results All six respondents said it was very important to screen for GBV among pregnant women in their care. The findings from their report revolved around six themes, namely midwives have suboptimal knowledge, are exposed to women experiencing GBV in pregnancy, lack professional preparedness, report gaps in the institutional framework to guide their practice, are concerned for their safety and security, and are willing to intervene. Conclusion This study confirmed that midwives are aware of the problem and are willing to intervene but are faced with lack of formal procedures to detect and treat pregnant women who are experiencing GBV. Findings could be used to inform a protocol which is being developed to guide midwives’ practice. Findings could also be incorporated in the national strategy to eliminate GBV. PMID:26894744

  6. Examining Evidence-Based Content Related to Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcer Prevention in Paper and Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaekel, Camilla M.

    2012-01-01

    Although there have been great advancements in the Electronic Health Record (EHR), there is a dearth of rigorous research that examines the relationship between the use of electronic documentation to capture nursing process components and the impact of consistent documentation on patient outcomes (Daly, Buckwalter & Maas, 2002; Gugerty, 2006;…

  7. Death Anxiety in Hospitalized End-of-Life Patients as Captured from a Structured Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Muhammad Kamran; Cheema, Umer Iftikhar; Stifter, Janet; Wilkie, Diana J.; Keenan, Gail M.; Yao, Yingwei; Ansari, Rashid; Khokhar, Ashfaq A.

    2015-01-01

    The nursing outcomes of hospitalized patients whose plans of care include death anxiety, which is a diagnosis among patients at the end-of-life, are obscure. The authors of the current article applied data mining techniques to nursing plan-of-care data for patients diagnosed with death anxiety, as defined by North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International, from four different hospitals to examine nursing care outcomes and associated factors. Results indicate that <50% of patients met the expected outcome of comfortable death. Gerontology unit patients were more likely to meet the expected outcome than patients from other unit types, although results were not statistically significant. Younger patients (i.e., age <65) had a lower chance of meeting the outcome compared with older patients (i.e., age ≥65) (χ2(1) = 9.266, p < 0.004). Longer stays improved the chances of meeting the outcome (χ2(2) = 6.47, p < 0.04). Results indicate that death anxiety outcomes are suboptimal and suggest the need to better educate clinicians about diagnosing and treating death anxiety among patients who face the end-of-life transition. PMID:25157534

  8. ‘Shell shock’ Revisited: An Examination of the Case Records of the National Hospital in London

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Stefanie Caroline; Jones, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    During the First World War the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic, in Queen Square, London, then Britain’s leading centre for neurology, took a key role in the treatment and understanding of shell shock. This paper explores the case notes of all 462 servicemen who were admitted with functional neurological disorders between 1914 and 1919. Many of these were severe or chronic cases referred to the National Hospital because of its acknowledged expertise and the resources it could call upon. Biographical data was collected together with accounts of the patient’s military experience, his symptoms, diagnostic interpretations and treatment outcomes. Analysis of the notes showed that motor syndromes (loss of function or hyperkinesias), often combined with somato-sensory loss, were common presentations. Anxiety and depression as well as vegetative symptoms such as sweating, dizziness and palpitations were also prevalent among this patient population. Conversely, psychogenic seizures were reported much less frequently than in comparable accounts from German tertiary referral centres. As the war unfolded the number of physicians who believed that shell shock was primarily an organic disorder fell as research failed to find a pathological basis for its symptoms. However, little agreement existed among the Queen Square doctors about the fundamental nature of the disorder and it was increasingly categorised as functional disorder or hysteria. PMID:25284893

  9. ["I was like a ticking bomb": Experiences of severe maternal morbidity in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Szulik, Dalia; Szwarc, Lucila

    2015-12-01

    With the objective of recording and analyzing women's experiences with severe maternal morbidity from their perspective, between February and May 2011, 16 semi-structured interviews with women treated in the public hospitals of the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area who suffered from severe maternal morbidity were carried out. In their testimonies, women report a number of delays in care, such as difficulties in identifying the problem on time, obstacles in accessing health centers and important faults in the management of obstetric emergencies. They describe the event as surprising, distressing and painful, a perception reinforced by the violation of their rights and significant communication problems. These findings are meant as a step towards the holistic and comprehensive study of severe maternal morbidity, as well as to confirm the urgent need for further research from a gender and humans rights perspective. PMID:26676597

  10. Simple interventions can greatly improve clinical documentation: a quality improvement project of record keeping on the surgical wards at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Glen, Peter; Earl, Naomi; Gooding, Felix; Lucas, Emily; Sangha, Nicole; Ramcharitar, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Clinical documentation is an integral part of the healthcare professional's job. Good record keeping is essential for patient care, accurate recording of consultations and for effective communication within the multidisciplinary team. Within the surgical department at the Great Western Hospital, Swindon, the case notes were deemed to be bulky and cumbersome, inhibiting effective record keeping, potentially putting patients' at risk. The aim of this quality improvement project was therefore to improve the standard of documentation, the labelling of notes and the overall filing. A baseline audit was firstly undertaken assessing the notes within the busiest surgical ward. A number of variables were assessed, but notably, only 12% (4/33) of the case notes were found to be without loose pages. Furthermore, less than half of the pages with entries written within the last 72 hours contained adequate patient identifiers on them. When assessing these entries further, the designation of the writer was only recorded in one third (11/33) of the cases, whilst the printed name of the writer was only recorded in 65% (21/33) of the entries. This project ran over a 10 month period, using a plan, do study, act methodology. Initial focus was on simple education. Afterwards, single admission folders were introduced, to contain only information required for that admission, in an attempt to streamline the notes and ease the filing. This saw a global improvement across all data subsets, with a sustained improvement of over 80% compliance seen. An educational poster was also created and displayed in clinical areas, to remind users to label their notes with patient identifying stickers. This saw a 4-fold increase (16%-68%) in the labelling of notes. In conclusion, simple, cost effective measures in streamlining medical notes, improves the quality of documentation, facilitates the filing and ultimately improves patient care. PMID:26734440