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Sample records for hospital santa clara

  1. Santa Clara Demonstration Status

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O'Shea, Thomas P.

    1996-08-01

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales

  2. Sections and View of Santa Clara Pueblo looking west from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections and View of Santa Clara Pueblo looking west from channel of Santa Clara Creek - Pueblo of Santa Clara, Central Portion, State Road 30 Vicinity, Espanola Vicinity, Santa Clara Pueblo, Rio Arriba County, NM

  3. Educational and Demographic Profile: Santa Clara County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Santa Clara County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  4. SOUTH SANTA CLARA COUNTY MIGRANT TREATMENT CLINIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SKILLICORN, STANLEY A.

    IN THE SUMMER OF 1965, A MIGRANT HEALTH CLINIC WAS STARTED IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. THE CLINIC DIFFERS FROM THE PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT'S CLINICS BY OFFERING TREATMENT AND MEDICATION, INSTEAD OF ONLY PREVENTIVE SERVICES. THE ENTIRE STAFF, FROM DOCTORS TO BABY-SITTERS, VOLUNTEERS ITS TIME, AND THE CLINIC IS NOW OPEN…

  5. 78 FR 66982 - Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster #NM-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster NM-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the Santa Clara Pueblo (FEMA- 4151-DR), dated 10/29/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... disaster: Primary Areas: Santa Clara Pueblo. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage:...

  6. Sea Level Rise in Santa Clara County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milesi, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Presentation by Cristina Milesi, First Author, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA at the "Meeting the Challenge of Sea Level Rise in Santa Clara County" on June 19, 2005 Santa Clara County, bordering with the southern portion of the San Francisco Bay, is highly vulnerable to flooding and to sea level rise (SLR). In this presentation, the latest sea level rise projections for the San Francisco Bay will be discussed in the context of extreme water height frequency and extent of flooding vulnerability. I will also present preliminary estimations of levee requirements and possible mitigation through tidal restoration of existing salt ponds. The examples will draw mainly from the work done by the NASA Climate Adaptation Science Investigators at NASA Ames.

  7. Sources of emergency water supplies in Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Water distribution systems in Santa Clara County, Calif., may be damaged and rendered inoperable by a large earthquake or other disaster. In such an event, individual agencies may have to implement emergency measures to supply water for drinking, firefighting, decontamination, or other purposes. In Santa Clara County, 128 wells have been identified as potential water-supply sources in emergencies. The criteria used to select the wells are: yield of at least 3 liters per second (50 gallons per minute), good water quality, ready accessibility, and available emergency power. Purification methods of small water supplies are described. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. 78 FR 67210 - Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster #NM-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster NM-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice...: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and...

  9. Status of Santa Clara MCFC product development test

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, A.J.; O`Shea, T.P.

    1995-12-01

    The 2MW plant is the world`s first application of a commercial-scale carbonate fuel cell power plant on an electric utility system. It is located at 1255 Space Park Drive in the City of Santa Clara, CA. The balance of plant pretesting effort will continue through Sept. 1995, when the stack installation effort will be initiated.

  10. Evaluation of Santa Clara Pueblo Library Literacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zastrow, Leona M.

    A literacy program was developed and conducted through the tribal library for the members of Santa Clara Pueblo (New Mexico). Two library staff members surveyed the community, developed a literacy program, and then implemented it. The program included both individual and group tutoring. The group classes were more successful, with 64 enrollees and…

  11. Bilingual Education Project, Santa Clara County, California. Final Report, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Clara County Office of Education, San Jose, CA.

    The Spanish Dame Bilingual Education Project, located in Santa Clara County, California, served 190 children who came from homes where the primary language was Spanish and who resided within the target area schools of the Alum Rock School District. The objectives of the preschool project were (1) to demonstrate a home-teaching procedure designed…

  12. Exemplary Teaching and Programs in Santa Clara Unified School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Norman

    Gathered together are descriptions of exemplary teaching programs, systems, techniques, innovations, teaching items, or methods that have been collected from teachers and administrators in the Santa Clara Unified School District. Listed under schools, each description offers different learning conventions that have proved successful or useful.…

  13. 78 FR 66756 - Santa Clara Pueblo; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Santa Clara Pueblo; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major... amends the notice of a major disaster declaration for the Santa Clara Pueblo (FEMA-4147-DR), dated... disaster declaration for the Santa Clara Pueblo is hereby amended to include Public Assistance...

  14. 78 FR 66756 - Santa Clara Pueblo; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Santa Clara Pueblo; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major... amends the notice of a major disaster declaration for the Santa Clara Pueblo (FEMA-4151-DR), dated... disaster declaration for the Santa Clara Pueblo is hereby amended to include Public Assistance...

  15. 78 FR 64233 - Santa Clara Pueblo; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Santa Clara Pueblo; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Santa Clara Pueblo (FEMA-4147-DR), dated September 27... Santa Clara Pueblo resulting from severe storms and flooding during the period of July 19-21, 2013,...

  16. Status of Santa Clara MCFC product development test

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, A.J.; O`Shea, T.P.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of the 2MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project is the demonstration of the carbonate fuel cell technology at full scale. Additional objectives of the project include the demonstration of specific advantages of the direct carbonate fuel cell power plant, such as high efficiency, low emissions, reactive power capability, and high reliability and availability. The project will also provide design input for precommercial early production power plants.

  17. Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Mitlitsky; Sara Mulhauser; David Chien; Deepak Shukla; David Weingaertner

    2009-11-14

    The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project demonstrated the technical viability of pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters, as well as the input fuel flexibility of the PSOFC. PSOFC operation was demonstrated on natural gas and denatured ethanol. The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project goals were to acquire, site, and demonstrate the technical viability of a pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters. Additional goals included educating local permit approval authorities, and other governmental entities about PSOFC technology, existing fuel cell standards and specific code requirements. The project demonstrated the Bloom Energy (BE) PSOFC technology in grid parallel mode, delivering a minimum 15 kW over 8760 operational hours. The PSOFC system demonstrated greater than 81% electricity availability and 41% electrical efficiency (LHV net AC), providing reliable, stable power to a critical, sensitive 911 communications system that serves geographical boundaries of the entire Santa Clara County. The project also demonstrated input fuel flexibility. BE developed and demonstrated the capability to run its prototype PSOFC system on ethanol. BE designed the hardware necessary to deliver ethanol into its existing PSOFC system. Operational parameters were determined for running the system on ethanol, natural gas (NG), and a combination of both. Required modeling was performed to determine viable operational regimes and regimes where coking could occur.

  18. 78 FR 67382 - Santa Clara Pueblo; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Santa Clara Pueblo; Major Disaster and Related Determinations... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Santa Clara Pueblo (FEMA-4151-DR), dated October 24, 2013... Act''), as follows: I have determined that the damage to the lands associated with the Santa...

  19. Sedimentation of Williams Reservoir, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, John R.; Brown, William M., III

    1972-01-01

    Fifty-two acre-feet of sediment was ·deposited in Williams Reservoir between 1913 and 1971. From calculations of the sediment yields in other nearby drainage basins in Santa Clara County, it was determined that 24 to 38 acre-feet of sediment would have been transported to Williams Reservoir between 1961 and 1971 under natural conditions. The difference (14 to 28 acre-ft) is probably a consequence of increased sediment yield due to a fire that destroyed much of the vegetation in the drainage basin in 1961.

  20. 76 FR 9640 - Prevailing Rate Systems: Santa Clara, CA, Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ..., ``Santa Clara,'' which was abolished as a NAF FWS wage area by a final rule (74 FR 9951) published on... INFORMATION: On August 3, 2010, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) issued a proposed rule (75 FR... MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 532 RIN 3206-AM22 Prevailing Rate Systems: Santa Clara, CA, Tulsa County, OK,...

  1. Communication Implications of the "Martinez" Case for the Santa Clara Pueblo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, Philip D.

    In "Martinez vs. Santa Clara," an Indian woman sought to overturn a tribal decision made by the Santa Clara Pueblo, in which tribal enrollment had been denied to her children. The case raised legal issues that are related to the Indian Civil Rights Act (ICRA) and to the relationship of the United States Constitution to tribal law. The ICRA, which…

  2. Build your own cogeneration plant. [Santa Clara, Ca 5. 8-MW plant

    SciTech Connect

    Von Raesfeld, D.

    1981-11-01

    Santa Clara, California's new municipal cogeneration plant generates 5.8 MW of power for the utility and 38,000 pounds of steam per hour for a papermaking firm. A third gas-fired combustion turbine generator can be added to the original two to boost plant output. Santa Clara undertook the one-year construction project to increase its non-renewable fuel efficiency and save fuel costs. The city manager outlines Santa Clara's planning for the projects and the benefits the city will experience from its aggressive pursuit of cogeneration. 1 figure. (DCK)

  3. Perspectives of Mobile Versus Fixed Mammography in Santa Clara County, California: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang-Halpenny, Christine; Kumarasamy, Narmadan A; Venegas, Angela; Braddock III, Clarence H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to examine underserved women’s perceptions on mobile versus fixed mammography in Santa Clara, California through a focus group study. Background: Research has shown that medically underserved women have higher breast cancer mortality rates correlated with under-screening and a disproportional rate of late-stage diagnosis. The Community Health Partnership in Santa Clara County, California runs the Community Mammography Access Project (CMAP) that targets nearly 20,000 medically underserved women over the age of 40 in the county through the collaborative effort of an existing safety net of healthcare providers. However, little data exists on the advantages or disadvantages of mobile mammography units from the patient perspective.  Methods: We assessed underserved women’s perspectives on mammography services in Santa Clara County through two focus groups from women screened at mobile or fixed site programs. Patients were recruited from both CMAP clinics and a county hospital, and focus group data were analyzed using content analysis. Results: We found that women from both the mobile and fixed sites shared similar motivating factors for getting a mammogram. Both groups recognized that screening was uncomfortable but necessary for good health and had positive feedback about their personal physicians. However, mobile participants, in particular, appreciated the atmosphere of mobile screening, reported shorter wait times, and remarked on the good communication from the clinic staff and empathetic treatment they received. However, mobile participants also expressed concern about the quality of films at mobile sites due to delayed initial reading of the films.  Conclusions: Mobile mammography offers a unique opportunity for women of underserved populations to access high satisfaction screenings, and it encourages a model similar to CMAP in other underserved areas. However, emphasis should be placed on providing a warm and welcoming

  4. Modeling the Cienega de Santa Clara, Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckelbridge, K. H.; Hidalgo, H.; Dracup, J.; Ibarra Obando, S. E.

    2002-12-01

    The Cienega de Santa Clara is a created wetland located in the Colorado River Delta (CRD), in Sonora, Mexico. It is sustained by agricultural return flows from the Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation District in Arizona and the Mexicali Valley in Mexico. As one of the few wetlands remaining in the CRD, it provides critical habitat for several species of fish and birds, including several endangered species such as the desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius) and the Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis). However, this habitat may be in jeopardy if the quantity and quality of the agricultural inflows are significantly altered. This study seeks to develop a model that describes the dynamics of wetland hydrology, vegetation, and water quality as a function of inflow variability and salinity loading. The model is divided into four modules set up in sequence. For a given time step, the sequence begins with the first module, which utilizes basic diffusion equations to simulate mixing processes in the shallow wetland when the flow and concentration of the inflow deviate from the baseline. The second module develops a vegetated-area response to the resulting distribution of salinity in the wetland. Using the new area of vegetation cover determined by the second module and various meteorological variables, the third module calculates the evapotranspiration rate for the wetland, using the Penman-Montieth equation. Finally, the fourth module takes the overall evapotranspiration rate, along with precipitation, inflow and outflow and calculates the new volume of the wetland using a water balance. This volume then establishes the initial variables for the next time step. The key outputs from the model are salinity concentration, area of vegetation cover, and wetland volume for each time step. Results from this model will illustrate how the wetland's hydrology, vegetation, and water quality are altered over time under various inflow scenarios. These outputs can ultimately be used

  5. Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara Valley Science & Engineering Fair and San Francisco Bay Aera Science Fair (Students are addressed by Bob Rosen, Ames Associate Director for Aerospace Programs)

  6. Scenario liquefaction hazard maps of Santa Clara Valley, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Noce, T.E.; Bennett, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Maps showing the probability of surface manifestations of liquefaction in the northern Santa Clara Valley were prepared with liquefaction probability curves. These curves were based on complementary cumulative frequency distributions of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) for surficial geologic units in the study area. LPI values were computed with extensive cone penetration test soundings. Maps were developed for three earthquake scenarios, an M 7.8 event on the San Andreas fault comparable to the 1906 event, an M 6.7 event on the Hayward fault comparable to the 1868 event, and an M 6.9 event on the Calaveras fault. Ground motions were estimated with the Boore and Atkinson (2008) attenuation relation. Liquefaction is predicted for all three events in young Holocene levee deposits along the major creeks. Liquefaction probabilities are highest for the M 7.8 earthquake, ranging from 0.33 to 0.37 if a 1.5 m deep water table is assumed, and from 0.10 to 0.14, if a 5 m deep water table is assumed. Liquefaction probabilities of the other surficial geologic units are less than 0.05. Probabilities for the scenario earthquakes are generally consistent with observations during historical earthquakes.

  7. Wave propagation and site response in the Santa Clara Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Joe B.; Boatwright, J.; Lindh, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    Forty-two portable digital instruments were deployed across the Santa Clara Valley from June until early November 1998; this array recorded 14 small and moderate local events and 7 large teleseismic events. We analyze the ground motion from these events to determine station delays and relative site amplification within the Valley. P waves from an event at the southern edge of the valley are early (??t > -0.35 sec) at stations over an axial ridge in the basement interface in the middle of the valley, but late (??t < 0.20 sec) for stations over the Cupertino and Evergreen basins to either side. The S-wave delays are approximately twice as large. Teleseismic P-waves from an M = 7.0 event beneath the Bonin Islands show a similar pattern in travel-time delays. The P waves are amplified by factors of 1.5-3 for frequencies below 2 Hz at stations within either basin, compared with stations on the axial ridge. The P-wave coda appear enhanced at 2-3 sec, but coda Q estimates at frequencies from 0.2 to 1.1 Hz are not markedly different at stations over the basin compared with stations on the ridge with the possible exceptions of consistently high values over the northern end of the Evergreen Basin. We invert the S-wave spectra for site-specific attenuation and amplification from the 14 local events by assuming a common source spectra for each event, 1/r geometrical spreading, and constraining the inversion using the 30-m velocity profile at four stations in the array. The largest amplifications occurred in the 1- to 6-Hz band at stations near the northwest edge of the Evergreen basin. While the highest amplifications occur at stations with the lowest S-wave velocities, the scatter obscures the correlation between velocity and amplification. The stations in the basins are characterized by higher attenuation than the stations on the basement ridge.

  8. SRTM Perspective View with Landsat Overlay: Santa Paula, and Santa Clara River Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Rectangular fields of the agriculturally rich Santa Clara River Valley are visible in this perspective view generated using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and an enhanced Landsat image. The Santa Clara River, which lends its name to this valley, flows from headwaters near Acton, California, 160 km (100 miles) to the Pacific Ocean, and is one of only two natural river systems remaining in southern California. In the foreground of this image, the largely dry riverbed can be seen as a bright feature as it winds its way along the base of South Mountain. The bright region at the right end of this portion of the valley is the city of Santa Paula, California. Founded in 1902, this small, picturesque town at the geographic center of Ventura County is referred to as the 'Citrus Capital of the World.' The city is surrounded by orange, lemon, and avocado groves and is a major distribution point for citrus fruits in the United States. The bright, linear feature in the center of the valley is State Highway 126, the valley's 'main drag.' For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times. Colors, from Landsat data, approximate natural color.

    The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60 meters (about 200 feet)long, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  9. 75 FR 8106 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara... located in Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties of California. We provide this notice in..., we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR in Alameda,...

  10. Field-trip guide to the southeastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains in Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.; Messina, Paula

    2002-01-01

    This field trip is an introduction to the geology of the southeastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains in southern Santa Clara County. Seven stops include four short hikes to access rock exposures and views of the foothills east of Loma Prieta Peak between Gilroy and San José. Field-trip destinations highlight the dominant rock types of the "Franciscan assemblage" including outcrops of serpentinite, basalt, limestone, ribbon chert, graywacke sandstone, and shale. General discussions include how the rocks formed, and how tectonism and stream erosion have changed the landscape through time. All field trip stops are on public land; most are near reservoir dams of the Santa Clara Valley Water District. In addition, stops include examination of an Ohlone Indian heritage site and the New Almaden Mining Museum.

  11. Spatially explicit West Nile virus risk modeling in Santa Clara County, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previously created Geographic Information Systems model designed to identify regions of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission risk is tested and calibrated in Santa Clara County, California. American Crows that died from WNV infection in 2005 provide the spatial and temporal ground truth. Model param...

  12. Spatially Explicit West Nile Virus Risk Modeling in Santa Clara County, CA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A geographic information systems model designed to identify regions of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission risk was tested and calibrated with data collected in Santa Clara County, California. American Crows that died from WNV infection in 2005, provided spatial and temporal ground truth. When the mo...

  13. Housing Patterns in Relation to Educational Achievement. Project SIMU School: Santa Clara County Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Hoffmann, Glenn W.

    This paper focuses attention on the critical importance of zoning and housing to education. It covers the causes of undersirable housing patterns, the apparent effects of these patterns on educational achievement, and possibilities for positive action to reverse the negative effects. Although examples are drawn from Santa Clara County, the thesis…

  14. 77 FR 39726 - Land Acquisitions: Pueblo of Santa Clara

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Ray, Realty Specialist, Southwest Regional Office, Bureau of Indian Affairs, 1001 Indian School Road..., in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Together With T. 20 N., R. 7 E., Sec. 17, lots 1 to 8, inclusive; Sec. 18, lots 5 to 12, inclusive; Sec. 19, lots 12 to 17, inclusive, lots 19, 21, 23, all that portion of...

  15. Santa Clara County Library Adult Bibliotherapy Discussion Group Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lack, Clara, Comp.; Bettencourt, Bruce, Comp.

    Brief citations are given for over 300 items each of which has been used at least twice successfully with discussion groups at jails, halfway houses, convalescent hospitals, alcoholic and drug clinics, and psychiatric hospitals during 1974-75. The listings include poetry, films, biographies, essays, plays, short stories, and music. They are…

  16. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993–2006

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karen L.; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently disestablished a municipal spay/neuter voucher program for cats. Dog intakes declined from 1992–2005, as they similarly did for an adjacent county (San Mateo). However, cat intakes declined significantly more in Santa Clara County than San Mateo, with an average annual decline of approximately 700 cats for the 12 year period. Time series analysis showed a greater than expected decline in the number of cats surrendered to shelters in Santa Clara County during the years the voucher program was in effect (1994–2005). The net savings to the county by reducing the number of cat shelter intakes was estimated at approximately $1.5 million. The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. PMID:23638352

  17. Power conversion and quality of the Santa Clara 2 MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skok, A.J.; Abueg, R.Z.; Schwartz, P.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is the first application of a commercial-scale carbonate fuel cell power plant on a US electric utility system. It is also the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in the United States. The 2MW plant, located in Santa Clara, California, utilizes carbonate fuel cell technology developed by Energy Research Corporation (ERC) of Danbury, Connecticut. The ultimate goal of a fuel cell power plant is to deliver usable power into an electrical distribution system. The power conversion sub-system does this for the Santa Clara Demonstration Plant. A description of this sub-system and its capabilities follows. The sub-system has demonstrated the capability to deliver real power, reactive power and to absorb reactive power on a utility grid. The sub-system can be operated in the same manner as a conventional rotating generator except with enhanced capabilities for reactive power. Measurements demonstrated the power quality from the plant in various operating modes was high quality utility grade power.

  18. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993-2006.

    PubMed

    Kass, Philip H; Johnson, Karen L; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently disestablished a municipal spay/neuter voucher program for cats. Dog intakes declined from 1992-2005, as they similarly did for an adjacent county (San Mateo). However, cat intakes declined significantly more in Santa Clara County than San Mateo, with an average annual decline of approximately 700 cats for the 12 year period. Time series analysis showed a greater than expected decline in the number of cats surrendered to shelters in Santa Clara County during the years the voucher program was in effect (1994-2005). The net savings to the county by reducing the number of cat shelter intakes was estimated at approximately $1.5 million. The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. PMID:23638352

  19. Paleomagnetic record determined in cores from deep research wells in the Quaternary Santa Clara basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, Edward A.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2016-01-01

    The Mono Lake (ca. 32 ka), Pringle Falls (ca. 210 ka), and Big Lost (ca. 565 ka) geomagnetic excursions all seem to be represented in the Santa Clara Valley wells. Possible correlations to the Laschamp (ca. 40 ka) and Blake (ca. 110 ka) excursions are also noted. Three additional excursions that have apparently not been previously reported from western North America occur within cycle 6 (between 536 and 433 ka), near the base of cycle 5 (after 433 ka), and near the middle of cycle 2 (before ca. 75 ka).

  20. Santa Clara Valley water district multi-aquifer monitoring-well site, Coyote Creek Outdoor Classroom, San Jose, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Newhouse, M.W.; Wentworth, C.M.; Williams, C.F.; Noce, T.E.; Bennett, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD), has completed the first of several multiple-aquifer monitoring-well sites in the Santa Clara Valley. This site monitors ground-water levels and chemistry in the one of the major historic subsidence regions south of San Jose, California, at the Coyote Creek Outdoor Classroom (CCOC) (fig. 1) and provides additional basic information about the geology, hydrology, geochemistry, and subsidence potential of the upper- and lower-aquifer systems that is a major source of public water supply in the Santa Clara Valley. The site also serves as a science education exhibit at the outdoor classroom operated by SCVWD.

  1. Effect of urban growth on streamflow regimen of Permanente Creek, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, E.E.; Rantz, S.E.

    1964-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the effect of urban growth on the streamflow regimen of Permanente Creek in Mountain View, Santa Clara County, Calif. The data available did not permit a complete study of all hydrologic aspects, but there is conclusive evidence that the volume of storm runoff produced by rainfall on the valley floor has increased substantially as a result of urbanization. In 1945, storm runoff from the 5.12-square mile project area was insufficient to balance channel losses, and the streamflow entering the project area in the Permanente Creek channel was greater than that leaving the area. If, however, total outflow from the project area is considered to be the sum of the streamflow leaving the area plus channel seepage in the area, the ratio of total outflow to inflow was 1:18. By 1958, storm runoff from the project area was far in excess of channel losses and the ratio of total outflow to inflow was 1:70. This increase in outflow is attributed to the fact that urban development during the period 1945 to 1958 increased the extent of impervious surface in the project area from about 4 percent to 19 percent. The effect of urban growth in other basins in Santa Clara County should be investigated before any attempt is made to project the quantitative results of this study to other areas in the county.

  2. Water resources development in Santa Clara Valley, California: insights into the human-hydrologic relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Jesse L.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    2000-06-01

    Groundwater irrigation is critical to food production and, in turn, to humankind's relationship with its environment. The development of groundwater in Santa Clara Valley, California during the early twentieth century is instructive because (1) responses to unsustainable resource use were largely successful; (2) the proposals for the physical management of the water, although not entirely novel, incorporated new approaches which reveal an evolving relationship between humans and the hydrologic cycle; and (3) the valley serves as a natural laboratory where natural (groundwater basin, surface watershed) and human (county, water district) boundaries generally coincide. Here, I investigate how water resources development and management in Santa Clara Valley was influenced by, and reflective of, a broad understanding of water as a natural resource, including scientific and technological innovations, new management approaches, and changing perceptions of the hydrologic cycle. Market demands and technological advances engendered reliance on groundwater. This, coupled with a series of dry years and laissez faire government policies, led to overdraft. Faith in centralized management and objective engineering offered a solution to concerns over resource depletion, and a group dominated by orchardists soon organized, fought for a water conservation district, and funded an investigation to halt the decline of well levels. Engineer Fred Tibbetts authored an elaborate water salvage and recharge plan that optimized the local water resources by integrating multiple components of the hydrologic cycle. Informed by government investigations, groundwater development in Southern California, and local water law cases, it recognized the limited surface storage possibilities, the spatial and temporal variability, the relatively closed local hydrology, the interconnection of surface and subsurface waters, and the value of the groundwater basin for its storage, transportation, and treatment

  3. Mapping Typha Domingensis in the Cienega de Santa Clara Using Satellite Images, Global Positioning System, and Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.; Burnett, Earl E.; Croxen, Fred

    2000-01-01

    The Cienega de Santa Clara, Sonora, Mexico, a brackish wetland area created near the delta of the Colorado River from drainage effluent flowing from the United States since 1977, may undergo changes owing to the operation of the Yuma Desalting Plant in the United States. This has become the largest wetland in the delta region containing rare and endangered species, yet little is known about the environmental impact of these changes. The water quality of the marsh is of growing concern to the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) which operates the Desalting Plant. Consequently, the BOR solicited the U.S. Geological Survey to investigate the limits and usefulness of satellite, global positioning system (GPS), and spectra data to map the Typha domingensis (cattail) of the Cienega de Santa Clara. Typha domingensis was selected by the BOR as the Cienega de Santa Clara indicator species to best predict the environmental effects of effl uent from the Yuma Desalting Plant. The successful base mapping of Typha domingensis will provide a viable tool for long-term monitoring and stress detection in the Cienega de Santa Clara.

  4. 76 FR 16812 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Bid Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Bid Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County, CA AGENCY... Management (BLM), Hollister Field Office, proposes to sell a parcel of public land consisting of... landowners would have the opportunity to submit written sealed bids to purchase the public land....

  5. 76 FR 68784 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    .... DATES: Written comments regarding the proposed sale must be received by the BLM on or before December 22, 2011. ADDRESSES: Written comments concerning the proposed sale should be sent to the Field Manager, BLM... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County,...

  6. Santa Clara County Survey of Drug, Alcohol, and Tobacco Use among Students in Grades 5, 7, 9, 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantine, Norm; And Others

    This report presents findings from the Santa Clara County (California) survey of Drug, Alcohol, and Tobacco Use among Students in Grades 5, 7, 9, and 11 administered during the spring of 1991 to 5,180 students in 51 randomly selected county schools. An executive summary discusses sampling error, sample demographics, and findings on drug use…

  7. 76 FR 72972 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... appraised fair market value. The appraised value of the public land is $135,000. DATES: Comments regarding... described contains 23.42 acres, more or less, in Santa Clara County, California. Appraised fair market value... number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, be advised that...

  8. Santa Clara County Library, Final Performance Report for Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) Title VI, Library Literacy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Taylor; Trajico, Charity A.; Levy, Michael

    This final performance report provides project outcome information and data to the U.S. Department of Education for the federally-funded Library Literacy Program. The Santa Clara County (California) Library Reading Program Computer Aided Literacy (CAL) Project involved recruitment, public awareness, training, basic literacy, collection…

  9. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Santa Clara County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, William L.; Harp, Edwin L.; Arnal, Caroline H.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $7.6 million in damages were assessed in Santa Clara County.

  10. Modeling Nitrogen Deposition for the Santa Clara County Habitat Conservation Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S. B.; Meyers, T.; Held, T.; Zippen, D.

    2009-12-01

    Nutrient-poor serpentine soils in Santa Clara County, CA, support numerous rare, threatened, and endangered species such as the Bay checkerspot butterfly. Serpentine grasslands are particularly vulnerable to atmospheric nitrogen deposition, which provides a competitive advantage to invasive annual grasses which overrun the flower-filled grasslands and degrade habitat for the protected species. The effects of N-deposition on these grasslands was first scientifically documented in 1999, and led to a series of mitigation projects for powerplants and road improvements that include habitat acquisition, monitoring, and grazing management. In 2005, a Habitat Conservation Plan/Natural Communities Conservation Plan (HCP/NCCP) was initiated to consolidate project-by-project mitigation into a regional plan covering impacts, especially indirect impacts on N-deposition, from development within the 209,500 ha study area (62% of Santa Clara County) and the cities therein. This HCP/NCCP is the first to address N-deposition effects on biodiversity. To understand the origins of the nitrogen being deposited in Santa Clara grasslands, IFC Jones & Stokes used multiple air quality modeling approaches including Gaussian line-source modeling of major highways and regional Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling. Line-source modeling allowed for the estimation of N-deposition resulting from increased traffic. Gaussian modeling results indicate that the major highways closest to serpentine habitats result in the greatest environmental impact. The CMAQ modeling used the Particle and Precursor Tagging Methodology (PPTM) source apportionment technique to partition sources. In the base period (Dec 2000- Jan 2001), the CMAQ PPTM simulation estimates that 30% of the total nitrogen deposition is associated with mobile sources operating within the study area; an additional 16% emanates from stationary sources in the study area. Therefore, 46% of nitrogen deposition on the habitat areas

  11. Isotopically anomalous silver in the Santa Clara and Pinon iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, T.; Kelly, W. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    The isotopic composition and concentration of Ag and the concentration of Pd have been determined in the Santa Clara and Pinon iron meteorites. It is shown that these meteorites contain isotopically anomalous Ag with an excess of Ag-107 relative to normal Ag, confirming earlier findings. Using an improved procedure for cleaning the sample surface from terrestrial Ag, a new concentration of 1.4 x 10 to the 11th atoms of Ag-109/g meteorite is established which is an order of magnitude below the levels found earlier. As a result ratios of Ag-107/Ag-109 were found which are enriched in Ag-107 by 60 percent to 160 percent. The existence of an excess Ag-107 in these two meteorites, which have high Pd-108/Ag-109 ratios of about 7 x 10 to the 4th is established.

  12. Startup, testing, and operation of the Santa Clara 2MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skok, A.J.; Leo, A.J.; O`Shea, T.P.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is a collaboration between several utility organizations, Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE), and the U.S. Dept. Of Energy aimed at the demonstration of Energy Research Corporation`s (ERC) direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology. ERC has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade, and this project is an integral part of the ERC commercialization effort. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project is to provide the first full, commercial scale demonstration of this technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere. An aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing interaction with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: the Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its production facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant. FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer subcontractor for the design and construction of the plant and provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

  13. Subsurface and petroleum geology of the southwestern Santa Clara Valley ("Silicon Valley"), California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Richard G.; Jachens, Robert C.; Lillis, Paul G.; McLaughlin, Robert J.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Hostettler, Frances D.; McDougall, Kristin A.; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2002-01-01

    Gravity anomalies, historical records of exploratory oil wells and oil seeps, new organic-geochemical results, and new stratigraphic and structural data indicate the presence of a concealed, oil-bearing sedimentary basin beneath a highly urbanized part of the Santa Clara Valley, Calif. A conspicuous isostatic-gravity low that extends about 35 km from Palo Alto southeastward to near Los Gatos reflects an asymmetric, northwest-trending sedimentary basin comprising low-density strata, principally of Miocene age, that rest on higher-density rocks of Mesozoic and Paleogene(?) age. Both gravity and well data show that the low-density rocks thin gradually to the northeast over a distance of about 10 km. The thickest (approx 4 km thick) accumulation of low-density material occurs along the basin's steep southwestern margin, which may be controlled by buried, northeast-dipping normal faults that were active during the Miocene. Movement along these hypothetical normal faults may been contemporaneous (approx 17–14 Ma) with sedimentation and local dacitic and basaltic volcanism, possibly in response to crustal extension related to passage of the northwestward-migrating Mendocino triple junction. During the Pliocene and Quaternary, the normal faults and Miocene strata were overridden by Mesozoic rocks, including the Franciscan Complex, along northeastward-vergent reverse and thrust faults of the Berrocal, Shannon, and Monte Vista Fault zones. Movement along these fault zones was accompanied by folding and tilting of strata as young as Quaternary and by uplift of the modern Santa Cruz Mountains; the fault zones remain seismically active. We attribute the Pliocene and Quaternary reverse and thrust faulting, folding, and uplift to compression caused by local San Andreas Fault tectonics and regional transpression along the Pacific-North American Plate boundary. Near the southwestern margin of the Santa Clara Valley, as many as 20 exploratory oil wells were drilled between 1891

  14. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in relation to water contamination, Santa Clara County, California, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Epstein, D.M.; Neutra, R.R.

    1989-05-01

    An epidemiologic study was conducted to investigate a suspected cluster of adverse outcomes of pregnancies conceived in 1980-1981 among women who resided in a census tract in Santa Clara County, California that was thought to be exposed to drinking water from a well contaminated by an organic solvent, trichloroethane. A comparison census tract that received water from a different source was selected on the basis of demographic comparability. The cluster was confirmed; the odds ratio for spontaneous abortion was 2.3 (95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.3-4.2) after adjustment by multiple logistic regression for maternal risk factors, including maternal age, alcohol consumption, smoking, and prior fetal loss. The relative risk for congenital malformations was 3.1 (95% Cl 1.1-10.4). Because of the lack of precise information on the timing and extent of contamination, the pattern of spontaneous abortion rates throughout the study period cannot be used to either support or refute a causal inference.

  15. Physical subdivision and description of the water-bearing sediments of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentworth, Carl M.; Jachens, Robert C.; Williams, Robert A.; Tinsley, John C., III; Hanson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Maps and cross sections show the elevations of cycle boundaries and the underlying bedrock surface, the varying thicknesses of the cycles and of their fine tops and coarse bottoms, and the aggregate thickness of coarse layers in those bottom intervals. Coarse sediment is more abundant toward some parts of the basin margin and in the southern part of the basin. Cycle boundary surfaces are relatively smooth, and their shapes are consistent with having been intercycle topographic surfaces. The underlying bedrock surface has a relief of more than 1,200 feet and deepens toward the center of the basin and the west edge of the fault-bounded Evergreen Basin, which is concealed beneath the east side of the Quaternary basin. The absence of consistent abrupt changes in thicknesses or boundary elevations across the basin or in cross section indicates that the interior of the basin is largely unfaulted, with the Silver Creek strand of the San Andreas system at the west edge of the Evergreen Basin being the sole exception. The east and west margins of the Santa Clara Basin, in contrast, are marked by reverse and thrust fault systems.

  16. Chromium geochemistry of serpentinous sediment in the Willow core, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oze, Christopher J.; LaForce, Matthew J.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Hanson, Randall T.; Bird, Dennis K.; Coleman, Robert G.

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of Cr geochemistry in serpentinous sediment completed for a multiple-aquifer ground-water monitoring well (Willow core of Santa Clara County, CA) determined sediment at depths >225 meters contains Cr concentrations ranging from 195 to 1155 mg/kg. Serpentinous sediment from this site is a potential source of non-anthropogenic Cr contamination. Chromium-bearing minerals such as Cr-spinel appear to be the main source of Cr in the sediment; however, Cr-bearing silicates and clay minerals are additional Cr sources. Aqueous Cr concentrations in the sediment are <4.6 mg/L; however, the valence of Cr was not identified in the solutions or in the sediment. Although there is no indication of Cr(VI) contamination derived from the serpentinous sediment, elevated Cr concentrations in the sediment, the observed ‘dissolution’ textures of the Cr-bearing minerals, the estimated redox environment, and water chemistry indicate the formation of Cr(VI) is potentially favorable.

  17. Land subsidence in the Santa Clara Valley, California as of 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, J.F.; Ireland, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    From 1916 to 1966 in the San Jose area of Santa Clara Valley, California, deficient rainfall and runoff was accompanied by a fourfold increase in groundwater withdrawals. In response the artesian head declined 180-240 ft. The land surface subsided 12.7 ft in San Jose, due to compaction of the fine-grained compressible beds. The subsidence resulted in flooding of lands, and the compaction of the sediments caused compressional failure of many well casings. From 1967 to 1975, the artesian head recovered 70 to 100 feet due to a fivefold increase in surface water imports, favorable local water supply, decreased withdrawal, and increased recharge. In 1960, the Geological Survey installed extensometers in core holes 1,000 ft deep in San Jose and Sunnyvale. Measurements of compaction of the confined aquifer system obtained from these extensometers demonstrate the marked decrease in rate of compaction in response to the major head recovery since 1967. In San Jose the rate decreased from about 1 ft/yr in 1961 to 0.1 ft/yr in 1973. The subsidence has been stopped by raising the artesian head in the aquifers until it equaled or exceeded the maximum pore pressures in the fine-grained beds. However, the subsidence will recommence if the artesian head is drawn down appreciably below the levels of 1971-73. (USGS)

  18. Daily mortality and air pollution in Santa Clara County, California: 1989-1996.

    PubMed Central

    Fairley, D

    1999-01-01

    Since the last revision of the national particulate standards, there has been a profusion of epidemiologic research showing associations between particulates and health effects--mortality in particular. Supported by this research, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated a national standard for particulate matter [less than/equal to] 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)). Nevertheless, the San Francisco Bay Area of California may meet this new standard. This study investigates the relationship between daily mortality and air pollution in Santa Clara County (a Bay Area county) using techniques similar to those utilized in earlier epidemiologic studies. Statistically significant associations persist in the early 1990s, when the Bay Area met national air pollution standards for every criteria pollutant. Of the various pollutants, the strongest associations occur with particulates, especially ammonium nitrate and PM(2.5). The continuing presence of associations between mortality and air pollutants calls into question the adequacy of national standards for protecting public health. PMID:10417361

  19. Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire: Psychometric analysis in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeremy P.; Carson, Cody S.; Shrestha, Srijana; Kunik, Mark E.; Armento, Maria E.; Stanley, Melinda A.; Amspoker, Amber B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assist researchers and clinicians considering using the Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire (SCSRFQ) with older-adult samples, the current study analyzed the psychometrics of SCSRFQ scores in two older-adult samples. Method Adults age 55 or older who had formerly participated in studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety and/or depression were recruited to complete questionnaires. In Study 1 (N = 66), the authors assessed the relations between the SCSRFQ and other measures of religiousness/spirituality, mental health, and demographic variables, using bivariate correlations and nonparametric tests. In Study 2 (N = 223), the authors also conducted confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses of the SCSRFQ, as well as an Item Response Theory analysis. Results The SCSRFQ was moderately to highly positively correlated with all measures of religiousness/spirituality. Relations with mental health were weak and differed across samples. Ethnic minorities scored higher than White participants on the SCSRFQ, but only in Study 2. Factor analyses showed that a single-factor model fit the SCSRFQ best. According to Item Response Theory analysis, SCSRFQ items discriminated well between participants with low-to-moderate levels of the construct but provided little information at higher levels. Conclusion Although the SCSRFQ scores had adequate psychometric characteristics, the measure’s usefulness may be limited in samples of older adults. PMID:24892461

  20. Modeling and validation of a 3D velocity structure for the Santa Clara Valley, California, for seismic-wave simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Williams, R.A.; Carver, D.; Frankel, A.; Choy, G.; Liu, P.-C.; Jachens, R.C.; Brocher, T.M.; Wentworth, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    A 3D seismic velocity and attenuation model is developed for Santa Clara Valley, California, and its surrounding uplands to predict ground motions from scenario earthquakes. The model is developed using a variety of geologic and geophysical data. Our starting point is a 3D geologic model developed primarily from geologic mapping and gravity and magnetic surveys. An initial velocity model is constructed by using seismic velocities from boreholes, reflection/refraction lines, and spatial autocorrelation microtremor surveys. This model is further refined and the seismic attenuation is estimated through waveform modeling of weak motions from small local events and strong-ground motion from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Waveforms are calculated to an upper frequency of 1 Hz using a parallelized finite-difference code that utilizes two regions with a factor of 3 difference in grid spacing to reduce memory requirements. Cenozoic basins trap and strongly amplify ground motions. This effect is particularly strong in the Evergreen Basin on the northeastern side of the Santa Clara Valley, where the steeply dipping Silver Creek fault forms the southwestern boundary of the basin. In comparison, the Cupertino Basin on the southwestern side of the valley has a more moderate response, which is attributed to a greater age and velocity of the Cenozoic fill. Surface waves play a major role in the ground motion of sedimentary basins, and they are seen to strongly develop along the western margins of the Santa Clara Valley for our simulation of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

  1. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Santa Clara River Valley, 2007-California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Carmen A.; Montrella, Joseph; Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 460-square-mile Santa Clara River Valley study unit was investigated from April through June 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit contains eight groundwater basins located in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties and is within the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2007 by the USGS from 42 wells on a spatially distributed grid, and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer system was defined as that part of the aquifer system corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the CDPH database for the Santa Clara River Valley study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may differ from that in shallow or deep water-bearing zones; for example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. Eleven additional wells were sampled by the USGS to improve understanding of factors affecting water quality.The status assessment of the quality of the groundwater used data from samples analyzed for anthropogenic constituents, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of untreated groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the Santa Clara River Valley study unit

  2. Ephemeral stream reaches preserve the evolutionary and distributional history of threespine stickleback in the Santa Clara and Ventura River watersheds of southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Jacobs, David K.; Backlin, Adam R.; Swift, Camm C.; Dellith, Chris; Fisher, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Much remains to be understood about the evolutionary history and contemporary landscape genetics of unarmored threespine stickleback in southern California, where populations collectively referred to as Gasterosteus aculeatus williamsoni have severely declined over the past 70+ years and are now endangered. We used mitochondrial sequence and microsatellite data to assess the population genetics and phylogeography of unarmored populations sampled immediately downstream from the type locality of G. a. williamsoni in the upper Santa Clara River, and assessed their distinctiveness with respect to low-armor populations in the downstream sections of the river and the adjacent Ventura River. We also characterized the geographic limits of different plate morphs and evaluated the congruence of those boundaries with barriers to dispersal in both river systems and to neutral genetic variation. We show substantial population structuring within the upper reach of the Santa Clara River, but little partitioning between the lower Santa Clara and Ventura Rivers—we attribute these patterns to different ancestry between spatially subdivided populations within the same drainage, a predominance of downstream gene flow, and ability for coastal dispersal between the Santa Clara and Ventura Rivers. We also show that alleles from introduced low-plate stock have infiltrated a native population in at least one upper Santa Clara River tributary, causing this formerly unarmored population to become gradually low-plated over a 30 + year time period. Measures of genetic diversity, census surveys, and severe habitat disturbance all indicate that unarmored stickleback near the type locality are currently at high risk of extinction.

  3. Predicted Liquefaction in the Greater Oakland and Northern Santa Clara Valley Areas for a Repeat of the 1868 Hayward Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, T. L.; Noce, T. E.; Bennett, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Probabilities of surface manifestations of liquefaction due to a repeat of the 1868 (M6.7-7.0) earthquake on the southern segment of the Hayward Fault were calculated for two areas along the margin of San Francisco Bay, California: greater Oakland and the northern Santa Clara Valley. Liquefaction is predicted to be more common in the greater Oakland area than in the northern Santa Clara Valley owing to the presence of 57 km2 of susceptible sandy artificial fill. Most of the fills were placed into San Francisco Bay during the first half of the 20th century to build military bases, port facilities, and shoreline communities like Alameda and Bay Farm Island. Probabilities of liquefaction in the area underlain by this sandy artificial fill range from 0.2 to ~0.5 for a M7.0 earthquake, and decrease to 0.1 to ~0.4 for a M6.7 earthquake. In the greater Oakland area, liquefaction probabilities generally are less than 0.05 for Holocene alluvial fan deposits, which underlie most of the remaining flat-lying urban area. In the northern Santa Clara Valley for a M7.0 earthquake on the Hayward Fault and an assumed water-table depth of 1.5 m (the historically shallowest water level), liquefaction probabilities range from 0.1 to 0.2 along Coyote and Guadalupe Creeks, but are less than 0.05 elsewhere. For a M6.7 earthquake, probabilities are greater than 0.1 along Coyote Creek but decrease along Guadalupe Creek to less than 0.1. Areas with high probabilities in the Santa Clara Valley are underlain by latest Holocene alluvial fan levee deposits where liquefaction and lateral spreading occurred during large earthquakes in 1868 and 1906. The liquefaction scenario maps were created with ArcGIS ModelBuilder. Peak ground accelerations first were computed with the new Boore and Atkinson NGA attenuation relation (2008, Earthquake Spectra, 24:1, p. 99-138), using VS30 to account for local site response. Spatial liquefaction probabilities were then estimated using the predicted ground motions

  4. A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Santa Clara and San Mateo County Groundwater Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-01-06

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MtBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Ambient Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2001 and 2002, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basins of Santa Clara County and San Mateo County, located to the south of the city of San Francisco. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements

  5. The Significance of Wellbore Flow in the Santa Clara Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. T.

    2005-12-01

    Interaquifer flow through water-supply wells screened across multiple aquifers is an important component to the flow of ground water in many developed aquifer systems. Wellbore flow in the Santa Clara Valley, California, was examined using flow measurements, hydrochemistry, and numerical simulations. Interaquifer flow was assessed locally using a combination of wellbore flow measurements and depth-dependent water-chemistry sampling at three water-supply wells and depth-specific samples from multiple-well monitoring sites. Interaquifer flow owing to wellbore flow in hundreds of multi-aquifer supply wells was assessed regionally using a simulation model of regional ground-water flow. Wellbore flow and depth-dependent chemical and isotopic data indicate that flow into the well from multiple aquifers, as well as capture of artificial recharge by pumping of water-supply wells, predominantly is occurring in the upper 500 feet of the aquifer system. Uncorrected carbon-14 data indicates that the ground water in the upper 500 feet generally is less than 2,000 years old, and ground water in the deeper aquifer layers generally ranges from 16,700 to 39,900 years old. Results of depth-dependent and depth-specific sampling collectively suggest that wellbores may be the main path for vertical flow between aquifer layers. In addition, on the west side of the valley, the ground water in the shallower aquifers (< 500 ft depth) contains a substantial amount of water from artificial recharge. Deuterium and oxygen isotopic data indicate as much as 60 percent of water pumped from production wells in this area originated as artificial recharge. Depth-dependent samples from water-supply wells also helped to better delineate trace amounts of anthropogenic contaminants coming from shallower aquifers . In addition to wellbore measurements, the regional effects of wellbore flow were assessed with a regional ground-water flow model that included the simulation of wellbore flow from wells

  6. Liquefaction Hazard Maps for Three Earthquake Scenarios for the Communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale, Northern Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Maps showing the probability of surface manifestations of liquefaction in the northern Santa Clara Valley were prepared with liquefaction probability curves. The area includes the communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale. The probability curves were based on complementary cumulative frequency distributions of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) for surficial geologic units in the study area. LPI values were computed with extensive cone penetration test soundings. Maps were developed for three earthquake scenarios, an M7.8 on the San Andreas Fault comparable to the 1906 event, an M6.7 on the Hayward Fault comparable to the 1868 event, and an M6.9 on the Calaveras Fault. Ground motions were estimated with the Boore and Atkinson (2008) attenuation relation. Liquefaction is predicted for all three events in young Holocene levee deposits along the major creeks. Liquefaction probabilities are highest for the M7.8 earthquake, ranging from 0.33 to 0.37 if a 1.5-m deep water table is assumed, and 0.10 to 0.14 if a 5-m deep water table is assumed. Liquefaction probabilities of the other surficial geologic units are less than 0.05. Probabilities for the scenario earthquakes are generally consistent with observations during historical earthquakes.

  7. Application Of Geowall Technology To The Analysis Of A Three Dimensional Geologic Map Of The Santa Clara (Silicon) Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, G. A.; Jachens, R. C.; Wentworth, C. M.; Langenheim, V. E.; Hanson, R. T.; Faunt, C. C.

    2003-12-01

    Geowall, a stereo projection system suitable for meetings and conferences, is being used to visualize, understand, interpret, and test a three-dimensional geologic map of the Santa Clara (Silicon) Valley, southern San Francisco Bay area, California. Geowall*, developed at the Electronic Visualization Laboratory associated with the University of Illinois, uses dual polarized images projected onto a polarization-preserving screen to create the illusion of three dimensions when viewed through polarized glasses. The map of Santa Clara Valley encompasses a 45 by 45 km area, extends to a depth of 14 km, and includes the northern Santa Clara Valley and surrounding hillsides between the active Calaveras and San Andreas faults. It is currently divided by several major faults into tectonic blocks, within which 9 units represent the Cenozoic and Mesozoic sections. Many of these units will be subdivided as the map evolves. The map is being constructed in EarthVision*(TM, Dynamic Graphics, Inc.), a geologic modeling software that includes three dimensional rendering and model manipulation capabilities. Earthvision generates data and model images of which the entire, or only portions of the model, can be viewed in three dimensions. The geowall presentation will explore the datasets and three-dimensional geologic map of Santa Clara Valley and structures defined by geologic mapping, stratigraphy, hydrology, potential field geophysics, seismic reflection, and earthquake seismicity. The map is the result of a collaborative effort among several earth science disciplines, and as such requires the integration of diverse datasets and the communication of diverse ideas. The geowall is particularly effective at promoting group discussion and analysis of the three-dimensional map, because the map can be displayed in a group setting as a 6x6 ft., stereo image. The spatial relationships of the datasets are easily seen, and the map can be deconstructed and particular relationships isolated

  8. Near-Surface Structure and Velocities of the Northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and the Western Santa Clara Valley, California, From Seismic Imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Gandhok, G.; Goldman, M.R.; Steedman, Clare

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Santa Clara Valley (SCV) is located in the southern San Francisco Bay area of California and is bounded by the Santa Cruz Mountains to the southwest, the Diablo Ranges to the northeast, and the San Francisco Bay to the north (Fig. 1). The SCV, which includes the City of San Jose, numerous smaller cities, and much of the high-technology manufacturing and research area commonly referred to as the Silicon Valley, has a population in excess of 1.7 million people (2000 U. S. Census;http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06085.html The SCV is situated between major active faults of the San Andreas Fault system, including the San Andreas Fault to the southwest and the Hayward and Calaveras faults to the northeast, and other faults inferred to lie beneath the alluvium of the SCV (CWDR, 1967; Bortugno et al., 1991). The importance of the SCV as a major industrial center, its large population, and its proximity to major earthquake faults are important considerations with respect to earthquake hazards and water-resource management. The fault-bounded alluvial aquifer system beneath the valley is the source of about one-third of the water supply for the metropolitan area (Hanson et al., 2004). To better address the earthquake hazards of the SCV, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has undertaken a program to evaluate potential seismic sources, the effects of strong ground shaking, and stratigraphy associated with the regional aquifer system. As part of that program and to better understand water resources of the valley, the USGS and the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) began joint studies to characterize the faults, stratigraphy, and structures beneath the SCV in the year 2000. Such features are important to both agencies because they directly influence the availability and management of groundwater resources in the valley, and they affect the severity and distribution of strong shaking from local and regional earthquakes sources that may affect

  9. Documentation and description of the digital spatial data base for southern California Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program, Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Predmore, Steven K.; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Paybins, Katherine S.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the geographic information system map layers and data files generated for the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, as part of a Regional Aquifer- System Analysis of southern California from 1989 to 1995. Thirty-six map layers and four data files are maintained in this geographic information system data base. The map layers cover the Santa Clara-Calleguas drainage basin and are stored in a common map projection. Attributes of the map layers and data files are described and referenced. The map layers are grouped by geography, geology, and hydrology.

  10. Clearing a Career Path: Lessons from Two Communities in Promoting Higher Education Access for the Early Care and Education Workforce. Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukakis, Kara; Bellm, Dan

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the process through which Alameda and Santa Clara Counties have used the Comprehensive Approaches to Raising Educational Standards (CARES) programs and other resources to leverage systemic change in early care and education (ECE) higher education. It describes a range of new and expanded efforts in both counties, and aims to…

  11. Evidence for the existence of Pd-107 in the early solar system. [from Santa Clara iron meteorite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the concentration and isotopic composition of Ag and Pd in the Santa Clara iron meteorite suggest that in situ decay of Pd-107 occurred in the meteorite or its parent body. The initial solar ratio of Pd-107/Pd-110 is estimated from the observed ratio of excess Ag-107/Pd-110, and the value of the Pd ratio is incompatible with an interval of approximately 100,000,000 years between the end of nucleosynthesis and the formation of planetary objects but is compatible with a later injection of material. The inferred existence of Pd-107 and Al-26 indicates that the late injection included freshly synthesized material of both intermediate and low atomic weight on a similar time scale. The significance of the Pd-107/Ag-107 chronometer is considered.

  12. Demographic factors associated with perceptions about water safety and tap water consumption among adults in Santa Clara County, California, 2011.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Brianna; Webber, Whitney L; Stoddard, Pamela; Shah, Roshni; Martin, Lori; Broderick, Bonnie; Induni, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine differences in tap water consumption and perceptions of bottle versus tap water safety for Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, as well as associations with other demographic characteristics. Data are from the Santa Clara County, California, Dietary Practices Survey (2011; N = 306). We used logistic regression to examine associations between demographic characteristics and 1) perceptions that bottled water is safer than tap and 2) primarily consuming tap water. Hispanics were less likely than non-Hispanic whites to primarily drink tap water (OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.11-0.99), although there was no significant difference in perceptions that bottled water is safer between these groups (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.11-2.27). Hispanics may be an important population for interventions promoting tap water consumption. PMID:24921901

  13. Neogene contraction between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley, San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Schmidt, K.M.; Jachens, R.C.; Stanley, R.G.; Jayko, A.S.; McDougall, K.A.; Tinsley, J.C.; Valin, Z.C.

    1999-01-01

    In the southern San Francisco Bay region of California, oblique dextral reverse faults that verge northeastward from the San Andreas fault experienced triggered slip during the 1989 M7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake. The role of these range-front thrusts in the evolution of the San Andreas fault system and the future seismic hazard that they may pose to the urban Santa Clara Valley are poorly understood. Based on recent geologic mapping and geophysical investigations, we propose that the range-front thrust system evolved in conjunction with development of the San Andreas fault system. In the early Miocene, the region was dominated by a system of northwestwardly propagating, basin-bounding, transtensional faults. Beginning as early as middle Miocene time, however, the transtensional faulting was superseded by transpressional NE-stepping thrust and reverse faults of the range-front thrust system. Age constraints on the thrust faults indicate that the locus of contraction has focused on the Monte Vista, Shannon, and Berrocal faults since about 4.8 Ma. Fault slip and fold reconstructions suggest that crustal shortening between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley within this time frame is ~21%, amounting to as much as 3.2 km at a rate of 0.6 mm/yr. Rates probably have not remained constant; average rates appear to have been much lower in the past few 100 ka. The distribution of coseismic surface contraction during the Loma Prieta earthquake, active seismicity, late Pleistocene to Holocene fluvial terrace warping, and geodetic data further suggest that the active range-front thrust system includes blind thrusts. Critical unresolved issues include information on the near-surface locations of buried thrusts, the timing of recent thrust earthquake events, and their recurrence in relation to earthquakes on the San Andreas fault.

  14. Statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.

    1998-01-01

    To better understand flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 28-mile reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. Dye was injected at a site on Piru Creek, and fluorescence of river water was measured continuously at four sites and intermittently at two sites. Discharge measurements were also made at the six sites. The time of travel of the dye, peak dye concentration, and time-variance of time-concentration curves were obtained at each site. The long tails of the time-concentration curves are indicative of sources/sinks within the river, such as riffles and pools, or transient bank storage. A statistical analysis of the data indicates that, in general, the transport characteristics follow Fickian theory. These data and previously collected discharge data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). DAFLOW solves a simplified form of the diffusion-wave equation and uses empirical relations between flow rate and cross-sectional area, and flow rate and channel width. BLTM uses the velocity data from DAFLOW and solves the advection-dispersion transport equation, including first-order decay. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of dye mass in the middle, ephemeral, subreaches, and (2) ground-water recharge does not explain the loss of dye mass in the uppermost and lowermost, perennial, subreaches. This loss of mass was simulated using a linear decay term. The loss of mass in the perennial subreaches may be caused by a combination of photodecay or adsorption/desorption.

  15. The Effect of New Insurance Coverage on the Health Status of Low-Income Children in Santa Clara County

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Embry M; Trenholm, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine whether providing health insurance coverage to undocumented children affects the health of those children. Data Sources/Study Setting The data come from a survey of 1235 parents of enrollees in the new insurance program (“Healthy Kids”) in Santa Clara County, California. The survey was conducted from August 2003 to July 2004. Study Design Cross-sectional study using a group of children insured for one year as the study group (N = 626) and a group of newly insured children as the comparison group (N = 609). Regression analysis is used to adjust for differences in the groups according to a range of characteristics. Data Collection Parents were interviewed by telephone in either English or Spanish (most responded in Spanish). The response rate was 89 percent. Principal Findings The study group—who were children continuously insured by Healthy Kids for one year—were significantly less likely to be in fair/poor health and to have functional impairments than the comparison group of newly insured children (15.9 percent versus 28.5 percent and 4.5 percent versus 8.4 percent, respectively). Impacts were largest among children who enrolled for a specific medical reason (such as an illness or injury); indeed, the impact on functional limitations was evident only for this subgroup. The study group also had fewer missed school days than the comparison group, but the difference was significant only among children who did not enroll for a medical reason. Conclusions Health insurance coverage of undocumented children in Santa Clara County was associated with significant improvements in children's health status. The size of this association could be overstated, since the comparison sample included some children who enrolled because of an illness or other temporary health problem that would have improved even without insurance coverage. However, even after limiting the study sample to children who did not enroll for a medical reason, a significant

  16. Predicted liquefaction in the greater Oakland area and northern Santa Clara Valley during a repeat of the 1868 Hayward Fault (M6.7-7.0) earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Probabilities of surface manifestations of liquefaction due to a repeat of the 1868 (M6.7-7.0) earthquake on the southern segment of the Hayward Fault were calculated for two areas along the margin of San Francisco Bay, California: greater Oakland and the northern Santa Clara Valley. Liquefaction is predicted to be more common in the greater Oakland area than in the northern Santa Clara Valley owing to the presence of 57 km2 of susceptible sandy artificial fill. Most of the fills were placed into San Francisco Bay during the first half of the 20th century to build military bases, port facilities, and shoreline communities like Alameda and Bay Farm Island. Probabilities of liquefaction in the area underlain by this sandy artificial fill range from 0.2 to ~0.5 for a M7.0 earthquake, and decrease to 0.1 to ~0.4 for a M6.7 earthquake. In the greater Oakland area, liquefaction probabilities generally are less than 0.05 for Holocene alluvial fan deposits, which underlie most of the remaining flat-lying urban area. In the northern Santa Clara Valley for a M7.0 earthquake on the Hayward Fault and an assumed water-table depth of 1.5 m (the historically shallowest water level), liquefaction probabilities range from 0.1 to 0.2 along Coyote and Guadalupe Creeks, but are less than 0.05 elsewhere. For a M6.7 earthquake, probabilities are greater than 0.1 along Coyote Creek but decrease along Guadalupe Creek to less than 0.1. Areas with high probabilities in the Santa Clara Valley are underlain by young Holocene levee deposits along major drainages where liquefaction and lateral spreading occurred during large earthquakes in 1868 and 1906.

  17. Indian Health Service Training Center, Training Course TC-72-2 (April 17-May 5, 1972): Pueblo de Santa Clara - A Description of the Perceived Health Needs of the People of Santa Clara Pueblo and the Management Processes Involved in the Delivery of Health Services to Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Indian Health.

    Members of the Health Services Management class conducted a descriptive study of the perceived health problems of the people of Santa Clara Pueblo and the management processes involved in the delivery of health services to them. Data were obtained from personal interviews with 38 Tribal members, 9 officals, 6 employees working primarily in the…

  18. Calibration formulae and values for velocity seismometers used in the 1998 Santa Clara Valley, California seismic experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindh, Allan G.; Eaton, Jerry P.; O'Neill Allen, Mary; Healy, John H.; Stewart, Samuel W.; Damerell, Lu

    1999-01-01

    Eaton (1975), Bakun and Dratler (1976), Eaton (1977), Healy and O’Neil (1977), Asten (1977), Stewart and O'Neill (1980), Liu and Peselnick (1986), Eaton (1991), Rodgers et al. (1995), and many others (see Asten (1977) for a list of earlier references) have presented formulae for calculating the damped generator constant (or motor constant), and the damping constant (or fractional damping ratio) for magnetically damped velocity seismometers. Unfortunately the notation varies between authors, and not all the formulae allow for some of the significant variables -- differences in input impedance of the recording system in particular. This has become particularly relevant because the USGS seismic networks in California have traditionally set up their velocity sensors for the 10K Ohm impedance of the standard USGS analog telemetry systems (Eaton, 1977), but modern digital recording systems are usually set up with high input impedances, often of a megaohm or greater. Thus the nominal calibration values valid for USGS velocity sensors in their “normal” configuration are incorrect when they are recorded on other systems. In this short note we have collected the relevant formulae needed, and computed the seismometer responses for the various velocity sensors used in the recent Santa Clara Valley Seismic Experiment (SCVSE, see Lindh et al., 1999).

  19. Radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in soil, vegetation, and fish collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Tl) contents were determined in soil, vegetation (overstory and understory), and fish (rainbow trout) collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon in 1995. All heavy metal and most radionuclide contents around or within the lake, except for U in soil, vegetation, and fish, were within or just above upper limit background. Detectable levels (where the analytical result was greater than two times counting uncertainty) of U in soils, vegetation, and fish were found in slightly higher concentrations than in background samples. Overall, however, maximum total committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)(95% confidence level)--based on consumption of 46 lb of fish--from Tsicoma Lake (0.066 mrem/y) was within the maximum total CEDE from the ingestion of fish from the Mescalero National Fish Hatchery (background)(0.113 mrem/y).

  20. Interim report on streamflow, sediment discharge, and water quality in the Calabazas Creek Basin, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.; Pederson, G.L.; Middelburg, Robert F.

    1978-01-01

    Streamflow, sediment-discharge, and water-quality data are being collected in the Calabazas Creek basin, Santa Clara County, Calif., to determine annual water and sediment discharge at base-line conditions that are representative of a basin prior to urbanization. Results of the first 3 years of the study (1973-75) are given in this report. Climatic conditions during this period were representative of a very wet year (1973) and 2 years of above-average rainfall (1974 and 1975). Daily water and sediment discharge were monitored at three primary stations, and periodic measurements were made at five secondary stations during selected storms. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station was transported during a few days each year. Maximum daily sediment discharge in a given year ranged from 23 to 62 percent of the annual total. Daily water discharge at the gaging station Calabazas Creek at Rainbow Drive, near Cupertino, ranged from no flow to 3.31 cubic meters per second. Streamflow at this location was significantly augmented during low flow by diversion of water from the South Bay Aqueduct. Annual sediment discharge at Calabazas Creek at Rainbow Drive was 4,900 t in 1974 and 9,570 t in 1975. A large quantity of sediment was trapped in a debris basin at Comer Drive upstream from this station during both years. If this sediment had not been trapped, sediment discharge at the station would have been about 35 percent greater in 1974 and 30 percent greater in 1975. Most of the trapped sediment consists of sand and gravel that would probably have been deposited in the Calabazas Creek channel downstream from the station. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Reach-scale channel sensitivity to multiple human activities and natural events: Lower Santa Clara River, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Peter W.; Dusterhoff, Scott R.; Sears, William A.

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the cumulative impact of natural and human influences on the sensitivity of channel morphodynamics, a relative measure between the drivers for change and the magnitude of channel response, requires an approach that accommodates spatial and temporal variability in the suite of primary stressors. Multiple historical data sources were assembled to provide a reach-scale analysis of the lower Santa Clara River (LSCR) in Ventura County, California, USA. Sediment supply is naturally high due to tectonic activity, earthquake-generated landslides, wildfires, and high magnitude flow events during El Niño years. Somewhat typically for the region, the catchment has been subject to four reasonably distinct land use and resource management combinations since European-American settlement. When combined with analysis of channel morphological response (quantifiable since ca. 1930), reach-scale and temporal differences in channel sensitivity become apparent. Downstream reaches have incised on average 2.4 m and become narrower by almost 50% with changes focused in a period of highly sensitive response after about 1950 followed by forced insensitivity caused by structural flood embankments and a significant grade control structure. In contrast, the middle reaches have been responsive but are morphologically resilient, and the upstream reaches show a mildly sensitive aggradational trend. Superimposing the natural and human drivers for change reveals that large scale stressors (related to ranching and irrigation) have been replaced over time by a suite of stressors operating at multiple spatial scales. Lower reaches have been sensitive primarily to 'local' scale impacts (urban growth, flood control, and aggregate mining) whereas, upstream, catchment-scale influences still prevail (including flow regulation and climate-driven sediment supply factors). These factors illustrate the complexity inherent to cumulative impact assessment in fluvial systems, provide evidence for a

  2. Field-trip guide to the geology of the Lexington Reservoir and Loma Prieta areas in the Santa Cruz Mountains, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.; Messina, Paula

    2002-01-01

    This guide contains a road log and five stop descriptions for a field trip in the southern Santa Cruz Mountains. The trip officially begins at the boat dock parking area on Alma Bridge Road near the dam of Lexington Reservoir. Stop 1 involves a walk up the Limekiln Trail to examine a large landslide in serpentinite that frequently takes out the trail. Stop 2 is at Miller Point picnic area along the shore of the reservoir where exposures of massive, fractured graywacke sandstone are capped with terrace gravel deposits. Stop 3 is along Highland Way in the Santa Cruz Mountains where large landslides have occasionally force the closure of the road. Stop 4A-C are several closely spaced outcrop areas along Loma Prieta Avenue and Summit-Mt. Madonna Road in the Loma Prieta summit area. A walk to scenic vista points provide opportunity to discuss the evolution of regional landscape along the crest of the Sierra Azul. In addition, a variety of rock types are exposed in the Stop 4 area along a series of road cuts, including Cretaceous age conglomerate, turbidites (consisting of interbedded sandstone and shale), and fossiliferous mudstone. Stop 5 involves returning to the boat dock parking area to examine geology and the placement of the Lexington Dam in the Los Gatos Creek canyon.

  3. Tracing ground-water movement by using the stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, upper Penitencia Creek alluvial fan, Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muir, K.S.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    1981-01-01

    Starting in 1965 the Santa Clara Valley Water District began importing about i00,000 acre-feet per year of northern California water. About one-half of this water was used to artificially recharge the Upper Penitencia Creek alluvial fan in Santa Clara Valley. In order to determine the relative amounts of local ground water and recharged imported water being pumped from the wells, stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen were used to trace the movement of the imported water in the alluvial fan. To trace the movement of imported water in the Upper Penitencia Creek alluvial fan, well samples were selected to give areal and depth coverage for the whole fan. The stable isotopes of oxygen-16, oxygen-18, and deuterium were measured in the water samples of imported water and from the wells and streams in the Santa Clara Valley. The d18oand dD compositions of the local runoff were about -6.00 o/oo (parts per thousand) and -40 o/oo, respectively; the average compositions for the local native ground-water samples were about -6.1 o/oo and -41 o/oo, respectively; and the average compositions of the imported water samples were -10.2 o/oo and -74 o/oo, respectively. (The oxygen isotopic composition of water samples is reported relative to Standard Mean Ocean Water, in parts per thousand.) The difference between local ground water and recharged imported water was about 4.1 o/oo in d18o and 33 o/oo in dL. The isotopic data indicate dilution of northern California water with local ground water in a downgradient direction. Two wells contain approximately 74 percent northern California water, six wells more than 50 percent. Data indicate that there may be a correlation between the percentage of northern California water and the depth or length of perforated intervals in wells.

  4. Radionuclides and heavy metals in rainbow trout from Tsichomo, Nana Ka, Wen Povi, and Pin De Lakes in Santa Clara Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and TI) concentrations were determined in rainbow trout collected from Tsichomo, Nana Ka, Wen Povi, and Pin De lakes in Santa Clara Canyon in 1997. Most radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in fish collected from these four lakes were within or just above upper limit background concentrations (Abiquiu reservoir), and as a group were statistically (p < 0.05) similar in most parameters to background.

  5. Geologic map of the Hayward fault zone, Contra Costa, Alameda, and Santa Clara counties, California: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graymer, R.W.; Jones, D.L.; Brabb, E.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Hayward is one of three major fault zones of the San Andreas system that have produced large historic earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area (the others being the San Andreas and Calaveras). Severe earthquakes were generated by this fault zone in 1836 and in 1868, and several large earthquakes have been recorded since 1868. The Hayward fault zone is considered to be the most probable source of a major earthquake in the San Francisco Bay Area, as much as 28% chance for a magnitude 7 earthquake before the year 2021 (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1990). The Hayward fault zone, as described in this work, is a zone of highly deformed rocks, trending north 30 degrees west and ranging in width from about 2 to 10 kilometers. The historic earthquake generating activity has been concentrated in the western portion of the zone, but the zone as a whole reflects deformation derived from oblique right-lateral and compressive tectonic stress along a significant upper crustal discontinuity for the past 10 million or more years. The Hayward fault zone is bounded on the east by a series of faults that demarcate the beginning of one or more structural blocks containing rocks and structures unrelated to the Hayward fault zone. The eastern bounding faults are, from the south, the Calaveras, Stonybrook, Palomares, Miller Creek, and Moraga faults. These faults are not considered to be part of the Hayward fault zone, although they are shown on the map to demarcate its boundary. The western boundary of the zone is less clearly defined, because the alluvium of the San Francisco Bay and Santa Clara Valley basins obscures bedrock and structural relationships. Although several of the westernmost faults in the zone clearly project under or through the alluvium, the western boundary of the fault is generally considered to be the westernmost mapped fault, which corresponds more or less with the margin of thick unconsolidated surficial deposits. The Hayward fault

  6. California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; McNab, W; Esser, B; Hudson, G; Carle, S; Beller, H; Kane, S; Tompson, A B; Letain, T; Moore, K; Eaton, G; Leif, R; Moody-Bartel, C; Singleton, M

    2005-06-29

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of long

  7. Coseismic deformation during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and range-front thrusting along the southwestern margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Schmidt, K.M.; Jachens, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    Damage patterns caused by the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake along the southwestern margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California, form three zones that coincide with mapped and inferred traces of range-front thrust faults northeast of the San Andreas fault. Damage in these zones was largely contractional, consistent with past displacement associated with these faults. The damage zones coincide with gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies; modeling of the anomalies defines a southwest-dipping thrust fault that places the Franciscan Complex over Cenozoic sedimentary rocks to minimum depths of 2 km. Diffuse Loma Prieta earthquake aftershocks encompass the downward projection of this modeled thrust to depths of 9 km. Our results indicate that in this region the potential for concentrated damage arising from either primary deformation along the thrust faults themselves or by sympathetic motion triggered by earthquakes on the San Andreas fault may be higher than previously recognized.

  8. Comparisons of shear-wave slowness in the Santa Clara Valley, California using blind interpretations of data from invasive and noninvasive methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Asten, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Many groups contributed to a blind interpretation exercise for the determination of shear-wave slowness beneath the Santa Clara Valley. The methods included invasive methods in deep boreholes as well as noninvasive methods using active and passive sources, at six sites within the valley (with most investigations being conducted at a pair of closely spaced sites near the center of the valley). Although significant variability exists between the models, the slownesses from the various methods are similar enough that linear site amplifications estimated in several ways are generally within 20% of one another. The methods were able to derive slownesses that increase systematically with distance from the valley edge, corresponding to a tendency for the sites to be underlain by finer-grained materials away from the valley edge. This variation is in agreement with measurements made in the boreholes at the sites.

  9. Development of a local-scale urban stream assessment method using benthic macroinvertebrates: An example from the Santa Clara Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, J.L.; Purcell, A.H.; Fend, S.V.; Resh, V.H.

    2009-01-01

    Research that explores the biological response to urbanization on a site-specific scale is necessary for management of urban basins. Recent studies have proposed a method to characterize the biological response of benthic macroinvertebrates along an urban gradient for several climatic regions in the USA. Our study demonstrates how this general framework can be refined and applied on a smaller scale to an urbanized basin, the Santa Clara Basin (surrounding San Jose, California, USA). Eighty-four sampling sites on 14 streams in the Santa Clara Basin were used for assessing local stream conditions. First, an urban index composed of human population density, road density, and urban land cover was used to determine the extent of urbanization upstream from each sampling site. Second, a multimetric biological index was developed to characterize the response of macroinvertebrate assemblages along the urban gradient. The resulting biological index included metrics from 3 ecological categories: taxonomic composition ( Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera), functional feeding group (shredder richness), and habit ( clingers). The 90th-quantile regression line was used to define the best available biological conditions along the urban gradient, which we define as the predicted biological potential. This descriptor was then used to determine the relative condition of sites throughout the basin. Hierarchical partitioning of variance revealed that several site-specific variables (dissolved O2 and temperature) were significantly related to a site's deviation from its predicted biological potential. Spatial analysis of each site's deviation from its biological potential indicated geographic heterogeneity in the distribution of impaired sites. The presence and operation of local dams optimize water use, but modify natural flow regimes, which in turn influence stream habitat, dissolved O2, and temperature. Current dissolved O2 and temperature regimes deviate from natural

  10. Seismic Imaging Evidence for the Extension of the Silver Creek Fault from the Southern Santa Clara Valley into the East Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steedman, C. E.; Catchings, R. D.; Goldman, M. R.; Rymer, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    The San Francisco Bay is bounded by several strike-slip faults of the San Andreas fault system, including the San Andreas fault to the west and the Hayward and Calaveras faults to the east. Other faults in this complex system, however, are less well-mapped. The northwest-southeast trending Silver Creek fault (SCF) has been mapped in the southern Santa Clara Valley and seismically imaged in the northern part of the valley. Two seismic reflection profiles, gravity data, and water-well data, obtained between the Santa Clara Valley and Fremont, suggest that the SCF extends farther northwest of San Jose into the East Bay. To investigate the possible northwestward extension of the SCF into the East Bay, the USGS High Resolution Seismic Imaging Group acquired two high-resolution, combined seismic reflection and refraction profiles in the Fremont area along Coyote Creek at the southernmost San Francisco Bay. Each profile was about 1.5 km long with geophone and shot spacings of 5 m. Seismic sources were generated by a Betsy Seisgun using 8-gauge shotgun blanks in 0.3-m-deep holes. Each shot was recorded for 2 s at a sample rate of 0.5 ms on 180 channels using three Geometrics Strataview RX-60 seismographs. We observe reflections to about 1000 ms. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates shallow velocities range from 1000 to 1600 m/s in the upper 50 m with multiple low- and high-velocity zones. Shot gathers indicate unusual structure in the Coyote Creek Area (in the vicinity of Albrae Slough) along the northward projection of the SCF, suggesting that the structure may be related to the SCF. Farther northward projection of the SCF and the Albrae Slough structure aligns with a fault imaged in the San Leandro area, an INSAR lineament in the Oakland area, and a mapped fault in the Richmond area. If these indicators of faulting are all associated with the SCF, then the SCF can be interpreted to extend the length of the East Bay.

  11. Public-health assessment for Advanced Micro Devices No. 915, Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAT080034234. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-29

    Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. building 915 (AMD 915) served as an active semiconductor and microprocessor manufacturing facility from 1974 until 1990. AMD 915 is located in Sunnyvale, California in Santa Clara County, approximately four miles south of San Francisco Bay. AMD 915 was included on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in September, 1990. Waste solvents and acid-neutralization liquids contained in two underground storage tanks leaked, causing contamination of subsurface soils and groundwater. The contamination originating from the AMD 915 facility has not migrated off-site and the contaminated groundwater has not impacted any private or municipal drinking water supplies. The underground storage tanks suspected of leaking and some subsurface soils have been removed. A system of groundwater extraction and air stripping/liquid phase carbon adsorption treatment is currently operating at the site to restore groundwater to acceptable drinking water standards. Based on information reviewed, the United States Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and the California Department of Health Services (CDHS) conclude that no apparent health hazard exists at the AMD 915 site.

  12. Relationships of field habitat measurements, visual habitat indices, and land cover to benthic macroinvertebrates in urbanized streams of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fend, S.V.; Carter, J.L.; Kearns, F.R.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated several approaches for measuring natural and anthropogenic habitat characteristics to predict benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages over a range of urban intensity at 85 stream sites in the Santa Clara Valley, California. Land cover was summarized as percentage urban land cover and impervious area within upstream buffers and the upstream subwatersheds. Field measurements characterized water chemistry, channel slope, sediment, and riparian canopy. In . addition to applying the visual-based habitat assessment in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's rapid bioassessment protocol, we developed a simplified urban habitat assessment index based on turbidity, fine sediment deposition, riparian condition, and channel modification. Natural and anthropogenic habitat variables covaried along longitudinal stream gradients and were highly correlated with elevation. At the scale of the entire watershed, benthic macroinvertebrate measures were equally correlated with variables expressing natural gradients and urbanization effects. When natural gradients were reduced by partitioning sites into ecoregion subsection groupings, habitat variables most highly correlated with macroinvertebrate measures differed between upland and valley floor site groups. Among the valley floor sites, channel slope and physical modification of channel and riparian habitats appeared more important than upstream land cover or water quality in determining macroinvertebrate richness and ordination scores. Among upland sites, effects of upstream reservoir releases on habitat quality appeared important. Rapid habitat evaluation methods appeared to be an effective method for describing habitat features important to benthic macroinvertebrates when adapted for the region and the disturbance of interest. ?? 2005 by the American Fisheries Society.

  13. Evaluation of tracer tests completed in 1999 and 2000 on the upper Santa Clara River, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Marisa H.; Mendez, Gregory O.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Reichard, Eric G.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of surface water and hyporheic water along the Santa Clara River in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California, was evaluated by conducting tracer tests and analyzing water-quality data under different flow conditions in October 1999 and May 2000. Tracer and water-quality samples were collected at multiple river and hyporheic sites as well as at the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts Saugus and Valencia Water Reclamation Plants. These water reclamation plants provide the main source of base flow in the river. Rhodamine WT dye was injected into the river to determine river traveltimes and to indicate when Lagrangian water-quality sampling could be performed at each site. Sodium bromide was injected into the river at a constant rate at the water reclamation plants to evaluate the surface-water and shallow ground-water interactions in the hyporheic zone. In the upper reach of the study area, which extends 2.9 river miles downstream from the Saugus Water Reclamation Plant, traveltime was 3.2 hours during May 2000. In the lower reach, which extends 14.1 river miles downstream from the Valencia Water Reclamation Plant, traveltime was 9.6 hours during October 1999 and 7.1 hours during May 2000. The sodium bromide tracer was detected at both hyporheic locations sampled during October 1999, and at two of the three hyporheic locations sampled during May 2000. On the basis of Rhodamine dye tests, flow curves were constructed from the discharge measurements in the Valencia reach. Flow-curve results indicate net gains in flow throughout most, but not all, of the upper parts of the reach and net losses in flow at the lower part of the reach. Lagrangian water-quality sampling provides information on the changes in chemistry as the water flows downstream from the water reclamation plants. Along both reaches there is an increase in sulfate (40-60 mg/L in the Saugus reach and 160 mg/L in the Valencia reach) and a decrease in chloride (about 45 mg/L in the

  14. Effects of limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations on runoff and sediment yields in the Upper Permanente Creek basin, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, K.M.; Hill, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    High sediment loads below headwater areas of the Permanente Creek drainage basin, Santa Clara County, California, have caused flood-control problems in downstream lowland areas. Measured sediment yields in Permanente Creek, which drains areas affected by limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations, were 14 times greater than yields from the West Fork Permanente Creek, which primarily drains parkland. Part of this large disparity in yields is the result of higher runoff/unit of drainage area in the Permanente Creek Basin. Results of rainfall-runoff modeling indicate that the tendency for higher runoff from Permanente Creek results from natural differences in basin physiography. Runoff during periods of high streamflow (when most sediment is transported) is dominated by subsurface flow, which is not affected by human activities. Although artificial features created by human activities seem to have had only minor effects on runoff, they apparently have had major effects on sediment availability. Artificial features accounted for 273 acres (89%) of the 307 acres of active erosional landforms mapped in 1984. Increased availability of sediment in the Permanente Creek basin appears to be indicated by elevated intercepts of sediment-transport curves. A comparison of sediment-transport curves for the West Fork Permanente Creek with similar curves for the Permanente Creek basin under natural conditions suggests that the sediment yield from Permanente Creek is about 3.5 times higher than it would be under natural basin conditions. The increased yield apparently is due to an increase in sediment availability rather than an increase in runoff. (USGS)

  15. Short baseline variations in site response and wave-propagation effects and their structural causes: Four examples in and around the santa clara valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Carver, D.; Liu, P.

    2010-01-01

    Ground motion records of local and regional events from a portable array are used to investigate the structural causes of variations in ground motion over distances of a few hundred meters to a few kilometers in the sedimentary basin environment of the Santa Clara Valley, California, and its margins. Arrays of portable seismic stations are used to target four study areas with different ground motion patterns: (1) an edge of the alluvial basin extending up onto a marginal ridge (Blossom Hill), (2) a Cenozoic basin with a nearly flat bottom (Cupertino Basin), (3) a long, narrow Cenozoic basin with a steep V profile (Evergreen Basin), and (4) a line perpendicular to the trace of the Hayward fault. Average peak velocities on Blossom Hill from local earthquakes are a factor of 2.5 times higher than nearby valley sites. Three-dimensional (3D) modeling is used to conclude that the majority of the amplification is due to lower shear-wave velocities along a local fault zone (Shannon–Berrocal). Site amplification over the Cupertino Basin in the frequency band 0.5–4 Hz is generally low (less than 2.0 relative to a Mesozoic rock site) and spatially uniform. This response is attributed to the shallow, flat-bottomed shape of the basin and the uniform, flat-laying sedimentary fill. In contrast, site amplification in the Evergreen Basin generally exceeds 3.0 and is attributed to the deep, V-shaped geometry of the basin and younger sedimentary fill. 3D waveform modeling shows the elongated shape of the Evergreen Basin causes more efficient trapping of long-period waves for sources along the long axis of the basin. A low-velocity zone is postulated along the Hayward fault with a width between 100 and 200 m, based on elevated site response along the fault trace and 4.5-Hz fault zone guided waves on the horizontal components of stations near the fault.

  16. Geologic, water-chemistry, and hydrologic data from multiple-well monitoring sites and selected water-supply wells in the Santa Clara Valley, California, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhouse, M.W.; Hanson, R.T.; Wentworth, C.M.; Everett, Rhett; Williams, C.F.; Tinsley, J.C.; Noce, T.E.; Carkin, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    To better identify the three-dimensional geohydrologic framework of the Santa Clara Valley, lithologic, geologic, geophysical, geomechanical, hydraulic, and water-chemistry data were collected from eight ground-water multiple-well monitoring sites constructed in Santa Clara County, California, as part of a series of cooperative studies between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Santa Clara Valley Water District. The data are being used to update and improve the three-dimensional geohydrologic framework of the basin and to address issues related to water supply, water chemistry, sequence stratigraphy, geology, and geological hazards. This report represents a compilation of data collected from 1999 to 2003, including location and design of the monitoring sites, cone penetrometer borings, geologic logs, lithologic logs, geophysical logs, core analysis, water-chemistry analysis, ground-water-level measurements, and hydraulic and geomechanical properties from wells and core samples. Exploratory cone penetrometer borings taken in the upper 17 to 130 feet at six of the monitoring sites identified the base of Holocene as no deeper than 75 feet in the central confined area and no deeper than 35 feet in the southern unconfined areas of the valley. Generalized lithologic characterization from the monitoring sites indicates about four to six different aquifer units separated by relatively fine-grained units occur within the alluvial deposits shallower than 860 feet deep. Analysis of geophysical logs indicates that coarse-grained units varied in thickness between 10 and 25 feet in the southeastern unconfined area of the valley and between 50 and 200 feet in the south-central and southwestern areas of the valley. Deviations from temperature-gradient logs indicate that the majority of horizontal ground-water flow occurs above a depth of 775 feet in the south central and above 510 feet in the southeastern areas of the valley. Bulk physical properties from more than 1,150 feet of

  17. Funds from telethon stay at home. Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital with Children's Miracle Network.

    PubMed

    Botvin, J D

    2001-01-01

    Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, California, works with the nonprofit Children's Miracle Network in fund raising efforts, and all money raised through its telethon remains in the local community. Volunteer efforts and donations form the core of Santa Barbara's financial support. PMID:11552593

  18. Liquefaction Scenarios in the Northern Santa Clara Valley for a Repeat of the 1868 Hayward Fault (M6.7-7.0) Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, T. L.; Noce, T. E.; Bennett, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the probability of liquefaction in the northern Santa Clara Valley, California, was predicted for a repeat of an earthquake like the 1868 Hayward Fault (M6.7-7.0) earthquake. Probabilities were computed with the methodology for probabilistic liquefaction hazard mapping that was developed by Holzer and others (USGS OFR 02-296, 2006). The methodology relies on field-based plots of cumulative frequency of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) for spatially homogenous surficial geologic units. LPI, which is a scalar parameter that integrates the liquefaction potential of the entire soil column, was computed for 164 seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT) that were conducted in Holocene and Pleistocene geologic units. The plots of cumulative frequency were used to estimate the liquefaction probability distribution for each surficial geologic unit given peak ground acceleration (PGA) and earthquake magnitude. Scenario maps were produced with ArcGIS Model Builder. PGA at each node in a 50-m grid was estimated with the new attenuation relation proposed by Boore and Atkinson (2007, v. 3.04). Regional averages of VS30 values, which were based on the SCPT, were used to account for local site amplification. The probability of liquefaction was estimated at each node using the liquefaction probability distribution appropriate for the surficial geology at the node. For a M7 earthquake and an assumed water-table depth of 1.5 m in the central part of the valley, liquefaction probabilities range from 0.1 to 0.2 along Coyote and Guadalupe Creeks, but are less than 0.05 elsewhere. For an M6.7 earthquake, probabilities remain greater than 0.1 along Coyote Creek but decrease along Guadalupe Creek to less than 0.1. For assumed water-table depths greater than 5 m, liquefaction probabilities are less than 0.05 throughout the valley. The probability of lateral spreading is less than 0.05 throughout the valley for both water table depths and both earthquakes

  19. Breaks in Pavement and Pipes as Indicators of Range-Front Faulting Resulting from the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake near the Southwest Margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Ellen, Stephen D.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Peterson, David M.; Phelps, Geoffery A.

    1995-01-01

    Damage to pavement and near-surface utility pipes, caused by the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake, provide indicators for ground deformation in a 663 km2 area near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California. The spatial distribution of 1284 sites of such damage documents the extent and distribution of detectable ground deformation. Damage was concentrated in four zones, three of which are near previously mapped faults. The zone through Los Gatos showed the highest concentration of damage, as well as evidence for pre- and post-earthquake deformation. Damage along the foot of the Santa Cruz Mountains reflected shortening that is consistent with movement along reverse faults in the region and with the hypothesis that tectonic strain is distributed widely across numerous faults in the California Coast Ranges.

  20. Clara's birth.

    PubMed

    Thorens, S; Richer, D; Bel, A; Bel, B

    1999-01-01

    Advocacy for homebirth is based on the strong assumption that birthing is a physiological process and does not require medical interventions unless things turn "wrong." Let us assume that something might always go wrong, for instance during Clara's birth when the placenta was still retained after three hours. What needs to be done? The moment the midwife entered the house she was endowed with a responsibility for any problem caused by her failure to give proper guidance. With this weight on her shoulder, and according to her training and experience, there was no other way for her than to suggest an intervention regarding the placenta. The two midwives, B, and C., might not agree on risk estimations, the nature of the intervention, whether it should be performed at home or in a hospital. The estimation of abnormalities, evaluation of risks and the procedures with which to handle them are the main practical difference between classic obstetrics and non-interventionist midwifery--by analogy, between allopathy and naturopathy. The rest (positive thinking) is basically literature. A delivery will not remain normal just because we decide it "must" be physiological. Dr. Barua, a professor of obstetrics in Pondicherry, pointed out that normal deliveries are rare--fewer than 10 percent in South India. What we have instead is either pathological or "natural" deliveries in which regenerative processes take care of abnormal situations. Unless she has developed sensitive hands, a birth assistant or midwife must rely on monitoring procedures to evaluate deviations from the normal process. Even with the greatest care, these procedures are intrusive in that they disconnect the parturient from her own sensations. While successful unattended homebirth stories emphasise the extraordinary power and sensitivity of a birthing woman, the whole dream seems to collapse in abnormal or pathological cases. It would have collapsed for Sonia as well, had she not discarded negative suggestions

  1. Outside the Bankfull Realm: Challenges in Developing a Flood-based Management and Restoration Strategy for a Large, Semi-arid River System: Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, P. W.; Dusterhoff, S. R.; Sears, W. A.

    2006-12-01

    River ecosystem restoration is usually based on re-establishing an equilibrium channel form, with the channel modified to convey the statistical bankfull discharge without quite overtopping. The rationale for bankfull-based strategies has stemmed from geomorphic studies which observed that bankfull flow exhibited a frequency that, over the long-term, transported the greatest total load of sediment, making it the `dominant' or `channel- forming' flow. Such ideas have become pervasive in the popular perception of river geomorphology. In contrast, analysis of sediment transport in the lower Santa Clara River, one of the largest coastal watersheds in Southern California (drainage area 4,212 km2) indicates that the dominant discharge is not the bankfull discharge, but instead the largest flow on record. This characteristic is due to extreme flow variability resulting from an ENSO-influenced semi-arid climate, very high sediment supply from highly erodible bedrock, and significant episodic sediment generation from landslides, earthquakes and wildfires. Channel response to large flows is enhanced because the river is now partially leveed and responding to recent in-channel gravel mining. Challenges for managing and restoring the lower Santa Clara River are, therefore, based less on managing moderate fluctuations around a long-term equilibrium channel morphology, and more on accommodating significant lateral and vertical morphological changes resulting from individual large flood events. At decadal scales, influences on channel form include the intensity of ENSO activity, the balance of flow generated by major tributaries exhibiting different sediment supply characteristics, and a suite of human activities that affect the channel at local spatial scales. Regional influences include legacy impacts from ranching, groundwater abstraction, flow regulation, and the 1928 St. Francis Dam disaster. Urban growth will likely influence future impacts. In this highly dynamic

  2. Blind shear-wave velocity comparison of ReMi and MASW results with boreholes to 200 m in Santa Clara Valley: Implications for earthquake ground-motion assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, W.J.; Louie, J.N.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.

    2005-01-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and refraction microtremor (ReMi) are two of the most recently developed surface acquisition techniques for determining shallow shear-wave velocity. We conducted a blind comparison of MASW and ReMi results with four boreholes logged to at least 260 m for shear velocity in Santa Clara Valley, California, to determine how closely these surface methods match the downhole measurements. Average shear-wave velocity estimates to depths of 30, 50, and 100 m demonstrate that the surface methods as implemented in this study can generally match borehole results to within 15% to these depths. At two of the boreholes, the average to 100 m depth was within 3%. Spectral amplifications predicted from the respective borehole velocity profiles similarly compare to within 15 % or better from 1 to 10 Hz with both the MASW and ReMi surface-method velocity profiles. Overall, neither surface method was consistently better at matching the borehole velocity profiles or amplifications. Our results suggest MASW and ReMi surface acquisition methods can both be appropriate choices for estimating shearwave velocity and can be complementary to each other in urban settings for hazards assessment.

  3. Analysis of a Spatial Point Pattern: Examining the Damage to Pavement and Pipes in Santa Clara Valley Resulting from the Loma Prieta Earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes some simple spatial statistical methods to explore the relationships of scattered points to geologic or other features, represented by points, lines, or areas. It also describes statistical methods to search for linear trends and clustered patterns within the scattered point data. Scattered points are often contained within irregularly shaped study areas, necessitating the use of methods largely unexplored in the point pattern literature. The methods take advantage of the power of modern GIS toolkits to numerically approximate the null hypothesis of randomly located data within an irregular study area. Observed distributions can then be compared with the null distribution of a set of randomly located points. The methods are non-parametric and are applicable to irregularly shaped study areas. Patterns within the point data are examined by comparing the distribution of the orientation of the set of vectors defined by each pair of points within the data with the equivalent distribution for a random set of points within the study area. A simple model is proposed to describe linear or clustered structure within scattered data. A scattered data set of damage to pavement and pipes, recorded after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, is used as an example to demonstrate the analytical techniques. The damage is found to be preferentially located nearer a set of mapped lineaments than randomly scattered damage, suggesting range-front faulting along the base of the Santa Cruz Mountains is related to both the earthquake damage and the mapped lineaments. The damage also exhibit two non-random patterns: a single cluster of damage centered in the town of Los Gatos, California, and a linear alignment of damage along the range front of the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. The linear alignment of damage is strongest between 45? and 50? northwest. This agrees well with the mean trend of the mapped lineaments, measured as 49? northwest.

  4. Preliminary Maps of (1) Pleistocene Alluvial Surface, (2) Depth to Historical High Ground Water, and (3) Thickness of Holocene Alluvium - and their use in Liquefaction Hazard Mapping, Santa Clara Valley and the East San Francisco Bay Plain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clahan, K. B.; Mattison, M. E.; Rosinski, A. M.; Bott, J. D.; Knudsen, K. L.

    2002-12-01

    The California Geological Survey (CGS) has prepared a series of Seismic Hazard Zone Maps for a portion of the southern San Francisco Bay of Northern California. Twelve 7.5-minute quadrangles (1:24,000 scale) have been released identifying areas that may be susceptible to earthquake-induced liquefaction or landsliding. Cities and Counties use these maps to identify areas requiring site-specific investigations prior to permitting development. "Liquefaction Zones of Required Investigation" are the result of the three-dimensional integration of geotechnical and geological data. For areas where we've obtained sufficient geotechnical data, liquefaction zone boundaries are sometimes delineated by comparing the depth to denser material, primarily late Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits (Qpf), and the depth to ground water. Areas are excluded from the zones of required investigation where lower density, younger (Holocene) material is above historical high ground-water levels (i.e. unsaturated) and only Pleistocene material is saturated. We have contoured the elevation of the top of the Pleistocene alluvial surface using methods similar to those of Helley (1990), for portions of the twelve 7.5-minute quadrangles that cover much of the northern Santa Clara Valley and the East San Francisco Bay Plain. Approximately 1700 geotechnical borehole logs were collected, analyzed, entered into a geotechnical GIS database, and interpreted to identify the top of the Pleistocene alluvial surface and evaluate the susceptibility of deposits to liquefaction. Physical and geotechnical characteristics evaluated to identify the Pleistocene/Holocene transition include: color; mottling; grain size; gradation; penetration resistance; unit thickness; dry density; moisture content; Unified Soil Classification; presence of organic material or caliche; lateral continuity; etc. We have also compiled a historical-high ground-water map by plotting depths to first-encountered unconfined ground water. These

  5. Sierran affinity (?) metasedimentary rocks beneath the Coast Range Ophiolite of the Sierra Azul block east of the San Andreas fault, Santa Clara County, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, R. J.; Dumitru, T. A.; Ernst, W. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Loma Prieta slate (LPS) is a <100 m thick slice of highly flattened and stretched, pebbly to shaly metasedimentary rocks exposed for a length of 700 m at Loma Prieta Peak, east of the San Andreas fault in the southern Santa Cruz Mountains. The LPS occurs along a low-dipping segment of the NW-trending, dextral-reverse Sargent fault, which places the slate and overlying Middle Jurassic Coast Range Ophiolite in the hanging wall, eastward over lower Eocene strata. The LPS and overlying Coast Range Ophiolite, in turn, form the base of a 60-80 km long fault block east of the San Andreas fault, overlain by Jurassic-lower Miocene marine strata that together define the Sierra Azul structural block (SAB). These rocks overlie terranes of the Franciscan Complex. The Sargent fault bisects the SAB section and is truncated along-strike and at depth, by the San Andreas fault. Reconstituted clastic grains of the LPS have dominant rhyo-dacitic and granitic sources and felsitic to granophyric grains preserve K-feldspar. Newly crystallized phengitic mica, chlorite and speculatively, incipient pumpellyite, are present in the LPS. No new high P/T metamorphic minerals are petrographically discernible, seemingly distinguishing the LPS from known cataclastic Franciscan Complex rocks structurally beneath the SAB. The LPS instead, has been proposed to correlate with the Jurassic arc-derived Mariposa Formation (MFS) in the Sierra Nevada Foothills, metamorphosed during the Nevadan orogeny. The correlation, however, has been problematic due to a lack of age control on the LPS, its limited surface distribution and its wide separation from the MFS. To test the correlation, we dated detrital zircons from the LPS at University of Arizona's LA-ICPMS lab and compared the results with detrital zircon data from the MFS (Snow and Ernst, 2008, GSA Special Paper 438). Weighted mean age calculations indicate a youngest zircon age cluster at about 152.5±2 Ma for the LPS, which indicates its maximum

  6. Transport and concentration controls for chloride, strontium, potassium and lead in Uvas Creek, a small cobble-bed stream in Santa Clara County, California, U.S.A. 1. Conceptual model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, V.C.; Jackman, A.P.; Zand, S.M.; Zellweger, G.W.; Avanzino, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Stream sediments adsorb certain solutes from streams, thereby significantly changing the solute composition; but little is known about the details and rates of these adsorptive processes. To investigate such processes, a 24-hr. injection of a solution containing chloride, strontium, potassium, sodium and lead was made at the head of a 640-m reach of Uvas Creek in west-central Santa Clara County, California. Uvas Creek is a cobble-bed pool-and-riffle stream draining the eastern slopes of the Santa Cruz Mountains. By September 12, 1973, after a long dry season, Uvas Creek had a low (0.0215 m3s-1 average) flow which varied diurnally, from 0.018 to 0.025 m3s-1. Because stream discharge varied while the injection rate was constant, the concentration of tracers (injected solutes), after mixing in the stream, varied inversely with discharge. Chloride, a nonreactive solute, served as a tracer of water movement. Analysis of extensive chloride concentration data at five sites below the injection point during and after the injection demonstrated that there was considerable underflow of water through the stream gravels; however, the extent of underflow varied greatly within the study reach. Pre-injection water, displaced by tracer-laden water percolating through the gravels, diluted tracers in the stream channel, giving the mistaken impression of groundwater inflow at some points. Accurate measurement of total discharge in such streams requires prolonged tracer injection unless a reach can be found where underflow is negligible. Strontium and potassium were adsorbed by the bed sediments to a moderate extent and lead was strongly adsorbed. A high proportion of these metals could be removed by adsorption from percolating underflow because of extensive and intimate contact with bed sediments. After channel clearing following injection cutoff, 51% of the added strontium and 96% of the lead remained in the study reach, whereas only 19% of the chloride remained. Packets of sized

  7. Registration of 'Clara CL' Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clara CL’ hard white winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed at the Agricultural Research Center-Hays, Kansas State University and released by the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station in 2011. Clara CL carries one Clearfield gene and has the tolerance to imazamox herbicide. Clara CL wa...

  8. The Book of the Sick of Santa Maria della Morte in Bologna and the Medical Organization of a Hospital in the Sixteenth-Century.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In 2012 a manuscript was rediscovered in the Biblioteca dell'Archiginnasio of Bologna, titled Libro degli infermi dell'Arciconfraternita di S. Maria della Morte. It is the record of incoming patients of one for the main hospitals of the city, devoted exclusively to the sick poor and not just to the poor, called Santa Maria della Morte, compiled by a young student assistant (astante) for the period 1558-1564. I publish here a transcription of a portion of this Libro pertaining to the year 1560. My introduction situates the manuscript within the context of the history of early modern Italian hospitals, describes the organization of the hospital of Santa Maria della Morte based on archival sources of the period, and finally highlights the connections between surgical and anatomical education and the internal organization of the hospital. PMID:27071302

  9. The role of rhinovirus in children hospitalized for acute respiratory disease, Santa Fe, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Juan Manuel; Molina, Fabiana; Díaz, Rocío; Bonet, Virginia; Ortellao, Lucila; Cantarutti, Diego; Gómez, Alejandra; Pierini, Judith; Cociglio, Raquel; Kusznierz, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) were historically considered upper airway pathogens. However, they have recently been proven to cause infections in the lower respiratory tract, resulting in hospitalization of children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and chronic pulmonary obstruction. In this report, HRV frequency and seasonality are described together with patient clinical-epidemiological aspects. From a total of 452 surveyed samples, the HRV nucleic acids was detected in 172 (38.1%) and found in every month of the study year. 60% of inpatients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) associated with HRV were under 6 months of age and 31% had a clinical history, being preterm birth and recurrent wheezing the prevailing conditions. The most frequent discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (35.2%), bronchiolitis (32.4%), and bronchitis (12.4%). Fifteen point nine percent of patients required admission into intensive care units. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the association between HRV and children hospitalizations caused by ARI. PMID:25983014

  10. 27 CFR 9.126 - Santa Clara Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intersects the 600 foot elevation contour line; (3) Then it meanders in a northwesterly direction along the 600 foot contour line approx. 55 miles until it intersects Vargas Road in the northwest portion of Sec... elevation contour line at El Corte De Madera, approx. .5 mile north of Trancos Woods on the Mindego...

  11. 27 CFR 9.126 - Santa Clara Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intersects the 600 foot elevation contour line; (3) Then it meanders in a northwesterly direction along the 600 foot contour line approx. 55 miles until it intersects Vargas Road in the northwest portion of Sec... elevation contour line at El Corte De Madera, approx. .5 mile north of Trancos Woods on the Mindego...

  12. 27 CFR 9.126 - Santa Clara Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intersects the 600 foot elevation contour line; (3) Then it meanders in a northwesterly direction along the 600 foot contour line approx. 55 miles until it intersects Vargas Road in the northwest portion of Sec... elevation contour line at El Corte De Madera, approx. .5 mile north of Trancos Woods on the Mindego...

  13. Geologic map of Late Cenozoic deposits, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helley, E.J.; Brabb, E.E.

    1971-01-01

    This map is the first of several in the San Francisco Bay region showing the distribution and differentiation of the late Cenozoic alluvial, estuarine, and volcanic deposits. The sedimentary deposits of gravel, sand, silt, and clay were separated into geologic map units on the basis of their post-depositional soil development, texture, and geomorphology. Some of the geologic units are associated with different landforms having recognizable topographic expression such as alluvial fans, natural stream terraces, levees, and interfluvial basins. The relative ages of these unites were established on the basis of intensity of soil profile development, stratigraphic position, and geomorphic expression. The older deposits exhibit strongly developed soil profiles with strong horizon differentiation whereas younger deposits display minimal soil profile development, consisting primarily of organic matter accumulations near the land surface. Geomorphic expression and degree of erosion and dissection were additional criteria used to aid in the age determinations. For example, younger deposits form well-defined morphologic features such as levees, terraces, and broad, undissected alluvial fans along the margin of the bay basin and are related to present drainage patterns. The oldest deposits shown on this map (QTs) are structurally deformed by folding and faulting and therefore exhibit no original depositional geomorphic features. These deposits are not related to present drainage patterns but suggest earlier patterns much different from those existing today.

  14. A SURVEY OF THE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PREISING, PAUL P.

    THIS EXTENSIVE REPORT DESCRIBES A COUNTYWIDE SURVEY OF EDUCATIONAL NEEDS TO DETERMINE WHAT CHANGES IN SCHOOL PROGRAMS WERE MOST NECESSARY AND WHAT PRIORITY SHOULD BE ASSIGNED TO EACH OF THESE CHANGES. EDUCATIONAL NEED WAS DEFINED AS THE DEGREE OF DISCREPANCY BETWEEN WHAT VARIOUS GROUPS OF PEOPLE THINK THAT THE SCHOOLS SHOULD TEACH AND WHAT THEY…

  15. 27 CFR 9.126 - Santa Clara Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: (1) The beginning point is at the junction of Elephant Head Creek and Pacheco Creek (approx. .75 mile... point the boundary moves in a northerly direction up Elephant Head Creek approx. 1.2 miles until it....G.S. map; (29) Then it moves northeast along Pacheco Creek approx. .5 mile to Elephant Head Creek...

  16. 27 CFR 9.126 - Santa Clara Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: (1) The beginning point is at the junction of Elephant Head Creek and Pacheco Creek (approx. .75 mile... point the boundary moves in a northerly direction up Elephant Head Creek approx. 1.2 miles until it....G.S. map; (29) Then it moves northeast along Pacheco Creek approx. .5 mile to Elephant Head Creek...

  17. Geologic Maps and Structure Sections of the southwestern Santa Clara Valley and southern Santa Cruz Mountains, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Clark, J.C.; Brabb, E.E.; Helley, E.J.; Colon, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    This digital map database, compiled from previously published and unpublished data, and new mapping by the authors, represents the general distribution of bedrock and surficial deposits in the mapped area. Together with the accompanying text file (scvmf.ps, scvmf.pdf, scvmf.txt), it provides current information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The scale of the source maps limits the spatial resolution (scale) of the database to 1:24,000 or smaller.

  18. The Clara cell: a "Third Reich eponym"?

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A; Noack, T

    2010-10-01

    German anatomist Max Clara (1899-1966) described the "Clara cell" of the bronchiolar epithelium in 1937. The present article investigates Clara's relationship with National Socialism, as well as his use of tissue from executed prisoners for research purposes, details about both of which are largely unknown to date. Our methodology for the present study focussed on analysis of material from historical archives and the publications of Clara and his co-workers. Clara was appointed as Chair of Anatomy at Leipzig University (Leipzig, Germany) in 1935. He owed his career, at least in part, to Nazi support. He was an active member of the Nazi party (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP)) and engaged in university politics; this included making anti-Semitic statements about other academics in appointment procedures. Nevertheless, he also supported prosecuted colleagues. Much of Clara's histological research in Leipzig, including his original description of the bronchial epithelium, was based on tissue taken from prisoners executed in nearby Dresden (Germany). Max Clara was an active and outspoken Nazi and his histological research exploited the rising number of executions during the Nazi period. Clara's discovery is thus linked to the Nazi system. The facts given in the present paper invite discussion about the eponym's neglected history and its continued and problematic use in medical terminology. PMID:20223917

  19. CLARA: an integrated clinical research administration system.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Xie, Mengjun; Hogan, William; Hutchins, Laura; Topaloglu, Umit; Lane, Cheryl; Holland, Jennifer; Wells, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Administration of human subject research is complex, involving not only the institutional review board but also many other regulatory and compliance entities within a research enterprise. Its efficiency has a direct and substantial impact on the conduct and management of clinical research. In this paper, we report on the Clinical Research Administration (CLARA) platform developed at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. CLARA is a comprehensive web-based system that can streamline research administrative tasks such as submissions, reviews, and approval processes for both investigators and different review committees on a single integrated platform. CLARA not only helps investigators to meet regulatory requirements but also provides tools for managing other clinical research activities including budgeting, contracting, and participant schedule planning. PMID:24778201

  20. The Water Discovery Center: A Cooperative Effort of the Youth Science Institute, Santa Clara Valley Water District, and Santa Clara County Parks and Recreation Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzitz, Carolyn J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a water discovery center which focuses on water ecology and conservation. Also describes nine instructional panels used with visiting school groups (or casual visitors) taking part in the four-hour program and related instructional materials containing pre- and post-visit activities. (BC)

  1. South front and west side, storage (bldg. no. 217) and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South front and west side, storage (bldg. no. 217) and refrigeration shop (bldg. no. 216) to right, looking northeast. - Agnews State Hospital, Truck Garage, Fourth Street near Avenue A, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, CA

  2. Northwest interior corner of sunroom at north front, two fullheight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northwest interior corner of sunroom at north front, two full-height arched windows, looking north-west. - Agnews State Hospital, Physician's Cottage & Garage, South Side of Palm Drive, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, CA

  3. 77 FR 24561 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment of Freight Easement Exemption-in Alameda and Santa...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ..., CA (San Jose Industrial Lead) On April 4, 2012, Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP) and Santa Clara... petition under 49 U.S.C. 10502 for exemption from the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 10903 for UP to abandon its... obligation for, a portion of the San Jose Industrial Lead between milepost 7.35 near Warm Springs...

  4. Clara cells drive eosinophil accumulation in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Ehmke, M; Marsh, L M; Dietze, J; Dudda, J C; Conrad, M L; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2012-02-01

    Development of allergic asthma is a complex process involving immune, neuronal and tissue cells. In the lung, Clara cells represent a major part of the "immunomodulatory barrier" of the airway epithelium. To understand the contribution of these cells to the inflammatory outcome of asthma, disease development was assessed using an adjuvant-free ovalbumin model. Mice were sensitised with subcutaneous injections of 10 μg endotoxin-free ovalbumin in conjunction with naphthalene-induced Clara cell depletion. Clara epithelial cell depletion in the lung strongly reduced eosinophil influx, which correlated with decreased eotaxin levels and, moreover, diminished the T-helper cell type 2 inflammatory response, including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13. In contrast, airway hyperresponsiveness was increased. Further investigation revealed Clara cells as the principal source of eotaxin in the lung. These findings are the first to show that Clara airway epithelial cells substantially contribute to the infiltration of eotaxin-responsive CCR3+ immune cells and augment the allergic immune response in the lung. The present study identifies Clara cells as a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory lung diseases such as allergic asthma. PMID:21828027

  5. Low-temperature geothermal assessment of the Santa Clara and Virgin River Valleys, Washington County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Budding, K.E.; Sommer, S.N.

    1986-01-01

    Exploration techniques included the following: (1) a temperature survey of springs, (2) chemical analyses and calculated geothermometer temperatures of water samples collected from selected springs and wells, (3) chemical analyses and calculated geothermometer temperatures of spring and well water samples in the literature, (4) thermal gradients measured in accessible wells, and (5) geology. The highest water temperature recorded in the St. George basin is 42/sup 0/C at Pah Tempe Hot Springs. Additional spring temperatures higher than 20/sup 0/C are at Veyo Hot Spring, Washington hot pot, and Green Spring. The warmest well water in the study area is 40/sup 0/C in Middleton Wash. Additional warm well water (higher than 24.5/sup 0/C) is present north of St. George, north of Washington, southeast of St. George, and in Dameron Valley. The majority of the Na-K-Ca calculated reservoir temperatures range between 30/sup 0/ and 50/sup 0/C. Anomalous geothermometer temperatures were calculated for water from Pah Tempe and a number of locations in St. George and vicinity. In addition to the known thermal areas of Pah Tempe and Veyo Hot Spring, an area north of Washington and St. George is delineated in this study to have possible low-temperature geothermal potential.

  6. Preliminary paleomagnetic results from the Coyote Creek Outdoor Classroom drill hole, Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, Edward A.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2003-01-01

    Paleomagnetic samples were obtained from cores taken during the drilling of a research well along Coyote Creek in San Jose, California, in order to use the geomagnetic field behavior recorded in those samples to provide age constraints for the sediment encountered. The well reached a depth of 308 meters and material apparently was deposited largely (entirely?) during the Brunhes Normal Polarity Chron, which lasted from 780 ka to the present time. Three episodes of anomalous magnetic inclinations were recorded in parts of the sedimentary sequence; the uppermost two we correlate to the Mono Lake (~30 ka) geomagnetic excursion and 6 cm lower, tentatively to the Laschamp (~45 ka) excursion. The lowermost anomalous interval occurs at 305 m and consists of less than 10 cm of fully reversed inclinations underlain by 1.5 m of normal polarity sediment. This lower anomalous interval may represent either the Big Lost excursion (~565 ka) or the polarity transition at the end of the Matuyama Reversed Polarity Chron (780 ka). The average rates of deposition for the Pleistocene section in this well, based on these two alternatives, are approximately 52 or 37 cm/kyr, respectively.

  7. 77 FR 53221 - Santa Clara Valley Habitat Conservation Plan/Natural Community Conservation Plan, Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... EIS for this project in the Federal Register on September 6, 2007 (72 FR 51247). The NOI announced a... published a notice of availability of the Draft Plan, EIS, and IA in the Federal Register (75 FR 79013). Two... Tiburon Indian paintbrush (Castilleja affinis ssp. neglecta), endangered coyote ceanothus...

  8. Coyote Pumping Plant 115-kV transmission line project, Santa Clara County, California: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Environmental impacts expected from the design and siting of transmission lines and the associated pumping plant station are addressed with alternative routes and actions considered, in compliance with environmental laws. (PSB)

  9. 75 FR 79013 - Santa Clara Valley Habitat Conservation Plan and Natural Community Conservation Plan, CA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... Intent (NOI) to prepare an EIR/ EIS in the Federal Register on September 6, 2007 (72 FR 51247). The NOI... butterfly (Euphydryas editha bayensis), threatened California tiger salamander (Central California...

  10. Stereoscopic displays and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Santa Clara, CA, Feb. 12-14, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, John O. (Editor); Fisher, Scott S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the fields of stereoscopic displays' user interfaces, three-dimensional (TD) visualization, novel TD displays, and applications of stereoscopic displays. Attention is given to TD cockpit displays, novel computational control techniques for stereo TD displays, characterization of higher-dimensional presentation techniques, volume visualization on a stereoscopic display, and stereoscopic displays for terrain-data base visualization. Also discussed are the experimental design of cyberspaces, a volumetric environment for interactive design of three-dimensional objects, videotape recording of TD TV images, remote manipulator tasks rendered possible by stereo TV, TD endoscopy based on alternating-frame technology, and advancements in computer-generated barrier-strip autostereography.

  11. 78 FR 67336 - Habitat Conservation Plan for the United Water Conservation District, Santa Clara River Watershed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... describe direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts on biological resources, land use, air quality, water quality, water resources, socio-economics, climate, and other environmental resources that could occur... Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and in support of United's application for State incidental take permits...

  12. From New Haven to Santa Clara: A Historical Perspective on the Milgram Obedience Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blass, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This article traces the history of obedience experiments that have used the Milgram paradigm. It begins with Stanley Milgram's graduate education, showing how some aspects of that experience laid the groundwork for the obedience experiments. It then identifies three factors that led Milgram to study obedience. The underlying principles or messages…

  13. Water quality of the Lexington Reservoir, Santa Clara County, California, 1978-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwatsubo, R.T.; Sylvester, M.A.; Gloege, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of water samples from Lexington Reservoir and Los Gatos Creek upstream from the reservoir from June 1978 through September 1980 showed that water generally met water-quality objectives identified by California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region. Water-temperature profiles show that Lexington Reservoir is a warm monomictic lake. During summer, dissolved-oxygen concentrations generally were not reduced below 5.0 mg/L in the hyplimnion; only once during the study did bottom waters become anoxic. Water transparency decreased with depth. The euphotic zone ranged from 1.0 to 5.4 m, depending on suspended solids and algae, and was greater in summer than in spring. Calcium and bicarbonate were dominant ions at all stations except during spring, following the rainy season, when waters were a mixed cation bicarbonate type. Nitrogen concentrations were greater in samples from reservoir stations than in those from Los Gatos Creek, with most of the nitrogen in ammonia and organic forms. The amount of dissolved nitrate appeared to be related to phytoplankton abundance. Phosphorus and trace-element concentrations were low at all stations. Estimates of net primary productivity and Carlson 's trophic-state index, based on chlorophyll-a concentrations, indicated that reservoir classification ranges from oligotrophic to mesotrophic. Blue-green algae generally were predominant in reservoir samples. (USGS)

  14. Santa Clara de Nanay: the MAL-ED cohort in Peru.

    PubMed

    Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Lee, Gwenyth; Olórtegui, Maribel Paredes; Chávez, César Banda; Flores, Julian Torres; Vasquez, Angel Orbe; Burga, Rosa; Pinedo, Silvia Rengifo; Asayag, César Ramal; Black, Robert E; Caulfield, Laura E; Kosek, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study communities in Peru are located in Loreto province, in a rural area 15 km from the city of Iquitos. This riverine population of approximately 5000 individuals is fairly representative of Loreto. The province lags behind the rest of the country in access to water and sanitation, per capita income, and key health indicators including infant mortality (43.0 vs 16.0 per 1000 nationwide) and under-5 mortality (60.6 vs 21.0 per 1000). Total fertility rates are higher than elsewhere in the country (4.3 vs 2.6). Nationwide, the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus is estimated at 0.45%, the prevalence of tuberculosis is 117 per 100 000, and the incidence of malaria is 258 per 100 000. Stunting in this community is high, whereas acute undernutrition is relatively uncommon. The population suffers from high rates of diarrheal disease. Prevalent enteric pathogens include Ascaris, Giardia, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Shigella, and Campylobacter. PMID:25305303

  15. International Powered Lift Conference and Exposition, Santa Clara, CA, Dec. 7-10, 1987, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The present conference on VTOL, STOVL and V/STOL fixed-wing aircraft powered lift discusses hot gas recirculation in V/STOL, flight testing of a single-engine powered lift aircraft, RAF experience with VTOL, near-term improvements of the AV-8B Harrier II, recent advancements in thrust augmentation, lift ejectors for STOVL combat aircraft, the correlation of entrainment and lift enhancement for a two-dimensional propulsive wing, the thrust efficiency of powered lift systems, and flight propulsion control integration for V/STOL aircraft. Also discussed are VSTOL design implications for tactical transports, the numerical investigation of a jet in ground effect with a cross flow, the NASA supersonic STOVL propulsion technology program, the aeroacoustics of advanced STOVL aircraft plumes, powered lift transport aircraft certification criteria status, the application of vectored thrust V/STOL experience in supersonic designs, wave drag and high speed performance of supersonic STOVL fighter configurations, and the impact of bypass ratio on thrust-to-weight for V/STOL.

  16. Nerve growth factor enhances Clara cell proliferation after lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Schwinge, D; Kilic, A; Yildirim, A O; Conrad, M L; Seidler, K; Müller, B; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2010-07-01

    The lung epithelia facilitate wound closure by secretion of various cytokines and growth factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been well described in airway inflammation; however, its likely role in lung repair has not been examined thus far. To investigate the repair function of NGF, experiments were performed in vitro using cultured alveolar epithelial cells and in vivo using a naphthalene-induced model of Clara epithelial cell injury. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed airway epithelial cell proliferation following injury to be dependent on NGF and the expression of its receptor, tropomyosin-receptor-kinase A. Additionally, NGF also augmented in vitro migration of alveolar type II cells. In vivo, transgenic mice over-expressing NGF in Clara cells (NGFtg) did not reveal any proliferation or alteration in Clara cell phenotype. However, following Clara cell specific injury, proliferation was increased in NGFtg and impaired upon inhibition of NGF. Furthermore, NGF also promoted the expression of collagen I and fibronectin in vitro and in vivo during repair, where significantly higher levels were measured in re-epithelialising NGFtg mice. Our study demonstrates that NGF promotes the proliferation of lung epithelium in vitro and the renewal of Clara cells following lung injury in vivo. PMID:20075049

  17. Plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Nie, Y.; Mete, O.; Hanahoe, K.; Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J.; Smith, J.; Pacey, T.; Li, Y.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.

    2016-09-01

    A plasma accelerator research station (PARS) has been proposed to study the key issues in electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the quasi-nonlinear regime of beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration is analysed. The wakefield excited by various CLARA beam settings are simulated by using a 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code. For a single drive beam, an accelerating gradient up to 3 GV/m can be achieved. For a two bunch acceleration scenario, simulation shows that a witness bunch can achieve a significant energy gain in a 10-50 cm long plasma cell.

  18. Commission Review of a Proposal by the Santa Clarita Community College District To Establish the Canyon Country Educational Center. Commission Report 04-19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this report, the Commission considers a proposal by the Santa Clara Community College District to establish an educational center in the community of Canyon Country. The district was created in 1968 when the communities of Valencia, Newhall, Canyon Country, Agua Dulce, and Val Verde voted overwhelmingly for its establishment. It serves a…

  19. Clara Schumann: 'A woman's love and life': a psychoanalytic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt-Freud, H C

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to demonstrate how psychoanalysis can shed new light on a much studied life history. Clara's emotional life knew a sequence of losses and "prohibited" intimate relationships that created grave loyalty, identity, and identificatory conflicts for her. Since her early childhood, when her father forced her to give up her mother, she had been forced into a choice between the love objects most dear to her and the one on whom she depended for her emotional survival. This resulted in her later repetition compulsion to maneuver herself into the same conflict of loyalty and in her hesitation to decide when choosing one object meant losing the other. Clara had never known a normal separation, only loss and abandonment. She strove to combine the incompatible and succeeded in remaining loyal not only to her mother and father, but also to Robert Schumann, and eventually to Johannes Brahms. Clara Schumann's ideals were conflicted not only because she was educated by two men who were fighting each other, but also because her father, as well as Robert, had internally inconsistent and ambiguous ideas about women. Clara not only had to be obedient and creative, but self-sufficient at the same time. She was partially able to satisfy her own and her partner's needs and solve her deficiencies by projective identification, choosing taciturn men, more maternal than she. PMID:11616291

  20. ["The piano trio" Robert Schumann, Clara Schumann and Johannes Brahms].

    PubMed

    Albretsen, C S

    1998-12-10

    The relationship between the pianist and composer Clara Schumann and the composers Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms has for a century been an interesting topic. Clara and Robert Schumann both suffered separation from their mothers during early childhood. Johannes Brahms was intensely spoiled by his mother. Robert Schumann needed a structuring wife in his adult life, while Johannes Brahms turned to be afraid of intrusive women. Robert Schumann's psychotic breakdown in February 1854 had a complex background: a hypomanic state, some marital problems, a stressful journey with musical appearances, and possibly a difficulty in differentiating between himself and his new friend Johannes Brahms. As for Clara Schumann, who lost her mother before the age of five, musical activities became her way of overcoming the difficulties of life. She was able to support Robert in his lunatic asylum and their seven children growing up in three separate towns. The chronic diseases of the sons: schizophrenia, polyarthritis and tuberculosis made a deep impression on her and her fingers and hands were periodically immobilised with severe pain. For four decades Johannes was her able "son" and Clara was his "mother", at a safe distance. PMID:9914757

  1. Cultural Contact through Musical Poetry in Clara Janes's "Kampa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faszer-McMahon, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Clara Janes's "Kampa" is a love song dedicated to the renowned Czech poet Vladimir Holan. The work includes a musical and lyrical composition performed on tape, and its unconventional musical mode offers an alternative to divisions between western and non-western literary and musical forms. The poetry of "Kampa" presents musical methods of…

  2. Escaping Slavery: "Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sue Ann

    This lesson uses the picture book "Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt" by Deborah Hopkinson and an interactive website to enhance third- through fifth-grade students' understanding of the Underground Railroad and slavery, development of reading comprehension skills, and application of mapping skills. During three 45-60 minute lessons, students…

  3. Bone Marrow Cells Expressing Clara Cell Secretory Protein Increase Epithelial Repair After Ablation of Pulmonary Clara Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Martha L; Mura, Marco; Marcus, Paula; Hwang, David; Ludkovski, Olga; Wong, Amy P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported a subpopulation of bone marrow cells (BMC) that express Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP), generally felt to be specific to lung Clara cells. Ablation of lung Clara cells has been reported using a transgenic mouse that expresses thymidine kinase under control of the CCSP promoter. Treatment with ganciclovir results in permanent elimination of CCSP+ cells, failure of airway regeneration, and death. To determine if transtracheal delivery of wild-type bone marrow CCSP+ cells is beneficial after ablation of lung CCSP+ cells, transgenic mice were treated with ganciclovir followed by transtracheal administration of CCSP+ or CCSP− BMC. Compared with mice administered CCSP− cells, mice treated with CCSP+ cells had more donor cells lining the airway epithelium, where they expressed epithelial markers including CCSP. Although donor CCSP+ cells did not substantially repopulate the airway, their administration resulted in increased host ciliated cells, better preservation of airway epithelium, reduction of inflammatory cells, and an increase in animal survival time. Administration of CCSP+ BMC is beneficial after permanent ablation of lung Clara cells by increasing bronchial epithelial repair. Therefore, CCSP+ BMC could be important for treatment of lung diseases where airways re-epithelialization is compromised. PMID:23609017

  4. Santa Cruz River Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes qualitative research insights gained during development of a nonmarket valuation survey for changes to the Santa Cruz River in Southern Arizona. Qualitative research provides an important avenue for understanding how the public interprets valuation s...

  5. 1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 'SANTA ANA RIVER IN SANTA ANA CANYON. ORANGE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the northeast taken from the northeast extremity of the canyon, showing, in the middle distance, the confluence of Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, site of the future Prado Dam. File number written on negative: R & H 80 026. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  6. The Santa Ana Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cournoyer, David, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    One of the priority interests of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation is to connect the knowledge and resources of institutions with communities in order to improve the quality of life in community. Partnerships achieve uncommon results. In Santa Ana, California, an unusual partnership of public schools, community college, universities, community…

  7. The Santa Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imber, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Discusses legal issues related to the celebration of Christmas in public schools. Concludes that schools can display secular symbols of Christmas such as reindeer, elves, and Santa Clause, but not religious ones, such as wise men, angels, and nativity scenes. (PKP)

  8. A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Washburn, L.; Siegel, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The ephemeral Santa Clara River delivers large amounts of freshwater and sediment to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief, episodic discharge events. This discharge into the channel was characterized here with shipboard measurements during floods of 1997 and 1998. Within approximately 1-km of the river mouth, the river discharge quickly stratifies into a freshened, turbid surface plume and a bottom nephloid layer. Observations immediately off the Santa Clara River mouth on a peak day of river discharge revealed that sediment rapidly settled from the freshened surface waters, as suspended sediment in the freshened surface plume contained only ???6% of the sediment mass expected if the sediment mixed conservatively. On the two subsequent days the reduction of sediment mass in the surface plume continued at ???50% per day. These observations suggest that river sediment undergoes rapid initial settling within ???1-km of the river mouth, followed by somewhat slower rates of settling. Although we did not measure sedimentation or bottom boundary layer processes, our mass balance results suggest that almost all of the river sediment either escapes along or deposits upon the inner shelf seabed.

  9. CLARA: A Contemporary Approach to Physics Data Processing

    SciTech Connect

    V Gyurjyan, D Abbott, J Carbonneau, G Gilfoyle, D Heddle, G Heyes, S Paul, C Timmer, D Weygand, E Wolin

    2011-12-01

    In traditional physics data processing (PDP) systems, data location is static and is accessed by analysis applications. In comparison, CLARA (CLAS12 Reconstruction and Analysis framework) is an environment where data processing algorithms filter continuously flowing data. In CLARA's domain of loosely coupled services, data is not stored, but rather flows from one service to another, mutating constantly along the way. Agents, performing event processing, can then subscribe to particular data/events at any stage of the data transformation, and make intricate decisions (e.g. particle ID) by correlating events from multiple, parallel data streams and/or services. This paper presents a PDP application development framework based on service oriented and event driven architectures. This system allows users to design (Java, C++, and Python languages are supported) and deploy data processing services, as well as dynamically compose PDP applications using available services. The PDP service bus provides a layer on top of a distributed pub-sub middleware implementation, which allows complex service composition and integration without writing code. Examples of service creation and deployment, along with the CLAS12 track reconstruction application design will be presented.

  10. Santa and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, P.

    2012-05-01

    This article reflects on the use of illustrations of the Moon in images of Santa Claus, on Christmas gift-wrapping paper and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: the USA and the Netherlands. The appearance of the Moon in Halloween illustrations is also considered. The lack of either knowledge concerning the physical origin of the Moon's phases, or interest in understanding them, is found to be widespread in the Netherlands, but is also clearly present in the USA, and is quite possibly global. Certainly incomplete, but surely representative, lists that compile occurrences of both scientifically correct and scientifically incorrect gift- wrapping paper and children's books are also presented.

  11. CLARA: A Contemporary Approach to Physics Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyurjyan, V.; Abbott, D.; Carbonneau, J.; Gilfoyle, G.; Heddle, D.; Heyes, G.; Paul, S.; Timmer, C.; Weygand, D.; Wolin, E.

    2011-12-01

    CLARA (CLAS12 Reconstruction and Analysis framework) is CLAS12 physics data processing (PDP) application development framework based on a service oriented architecture (SOA). This framework allows users to design and deploy data processing services as well as dynamically compose PDP applications using available services. Services can be written in Java, C++, and Python languages. The PDP service bus provides a layer on top of a distributed pub-sub middleware implementation. This allows complex service composition and integration without writing a code. We believe that by deviating from the traditional self contained, monolithic PDP application models we can improve maintenance, scalability and quality of physics data analysis. The SOA approach also helps us to separate a specific service programmer from a PDP application designer. Examples of service creation and deployment, along with the CLAS12 track reconstruction application design are presented.

  12. 'Santa Anita' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Santa Anita' Panorama (QTVR)

    This color mosaic taken on May 21, 25 and 26, 2004, by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was acquired from a position roughly three-fourths the way between 'Bonneville Crater' and the base of the 'Columbia Hills.' The area is within a low thermal inertia unit (an area that heats up and cools off quickly) identified from orbit by the Mars Odyssey thermal emission imaging system instrument. The rover was roughly 600 meters (1,968 feet) from the base of the hills.

    This mosaic, referred to as the 'Santa Anita Panorama,' is comprised of 64 pointings, acquired with six of the panoramic camera's color filters, including one designed specifically to allow comparisons between orbital and surface brightness data. A total of 384 images were acquired as part of this panorama. The mosaic is an approximate true-color rendering constructed from images using the camera's 750-, 530- and and 480-nanometer filters, and is presented at the full resolution of the camera.

  13. Systemic, Integrated, and Sustainable Family Engagement across the Early Age Spectrum in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehrer, Kendra

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates the critical importance of appropriate supports for children and their families at early ages, as well as the potential for targeted interventions to make meaningful contributions to children's development. Family involvement in the early years of a child's learning and development can serve as a protective…

  14. 78 FR 21397 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... notice (77 FR 28895, May 16, 2012). The Draft CCP/EA identified and evaluated three alternatives for... within the approved boundary, applicability of state health and safety codes in relation to mosquito... mosquito management plan would be implemented to improve coordination with local mosquito...

  15. Community Profile: A Comprehensive Base for Educational Planning. Research Report No. 12 of Project SIMU School: Santa Clara County Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Richard D.; And Others

    A broad range of data and data sources useful in educational planning are identified along with some of the problems in collecting and using that data, and several systematic approaches for analyzing groups of community data are described. The place of a community profile as a data-collection, information-generating process in a comprehensive…

  16. A Futures Primer for Local Education Agencies. Research Report No. 14 of Project SIMU School: Santa Clara County Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Tom; And Others

    This document contains a series of exercises and materials designed by the Futures Task Force to sensitize fellow citizens to rapid change and to encourage them to begin thinking in terms of what the future may bring in their community. Nine sections comprise the publication and cover: (1) a brief history describing the formation of the Futures…

  17. A Tool for Providing Data on Small Areas: Development of Neighborhood Profiles for Santa Clara County, California, 2014.

    PubMed

    Webber, Whitney L; Stoddard, Pamela; van Erp, Brianna; Baath, Mandeep; Bazhaw, Greg; Kelsey, Kate; Schenk, Douglas; Shah, Roshni; Shoe, Bill; Sujeer, Anandi

    2016-01-01

    Data on small geographic areas that can be easily accessed and updated have become essential for targeting public health programs and services. Disaggregating data at the sub-county or sub-city level has the potential to reveal disparities not otherwise evident for large geographies. As important as such data are, the methods to produce data on small geographic areas are challenging and resource-intensive, and little description and analysis of such tools exists. We describe a tool--neighborhood profiles--that provides a way for public health agencies and their partners to define neighborhood boundaries, select indicators, and disseminate data in a user-friendly format. We also share lessons learned, including the importance of involving planning departments in boundary definition to ensure relevance to the community, selecting a framework that links indicators to broader conceptual categories that can highlight disparities, and forming a team with the diverse skills necessary for planning and developing the profiles. PMID:26843668

  18. Deformation from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Ellen, Stephen D.; Peterson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    To gain additional measurement of any permanent ground deformation that accompanied this damage, we compiled and conducted post-earthquake surveys along two 5-km lines of horizontal control and a 15-km level line. Measurements of horizontal distortion indicate approximately 0.1 m shortening in a NE-SW direction across the valley margin, similar to the amount measured in the channel lining. Evaluation of precise leveling by the National Geodetic Survey showed a downwarp, with an amplitude of >0.1 m over a span of >12 km, that resembled regional geodetic models of coseismic deformation. Although the leveling indicates broad, regional warping, abrupt discontinuities characteristic of faulting characterize both the broad-scale distribution of damage and the local deformation of the channel lining. Reverse movement largely along preexisting faults and probably enhanced significantly by warping combined with enhanced ground shaking, produced the documented coseismic ground deformation.

  19. 77 FR 28895 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... Federal Register notice of intent on February 23, 2010 (75 FR 8106), to solicit additional comments. To.... Additional habitat management actions would include further tidal marsh improvements, more aggressive control of invasive weeds, revegetation of grassland areas, and more aggressive enhancement and...

  20. 76 FR 16811 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Lands in Santa Clara County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... County Open Space Authority for the appraised fair market value. The total appraised value of all three.... The parcel has an appraised fair market value of $80,000. Parcel No. 2, T. 10S., R. 2E., Sec. 5, lot 2... value of $135,000. Parcel No. 3, T. 10S., R. 2E., Sec. 6, lots 3, 4, and 6. The area described...

  1. Extracting meaning from complex data: Processing, display, interaction; Proceedings of the Meeting, Santa Clara, CA, Feb. 14-16, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on extracting meaning from complex data emphasizes processing, display, and interaction, and encompasses volume visualization, software systems for data interpretation, interfaces for volumetric interpretation, sound and images for data presentation, multiple variable techniques, applications, and data structures. Specific issues addressed include a level surface cutting-plane program for fluid-flow data, 3D data visualization using DSP meshes, data analysis and visualization tools, a 3D interactive physically based microworld, the auditory presentation of experimental data, and tools for the interpretation of multispectral data. Also addressed are the visualization of processes near a black hole, sphere quadtrees, an integrated image database system on a local area network, and scientific visualization at the Center for the Analysis and Prediction of Storms.

  2. Sox2 Is Required for Maintenance and Differentiation of Bronchiolar Clara, Ciliated, and Goblet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, David H.; Besnard, Valérie; Lange, Alexander W.; Wert, Susan E.; Keiser, Angela R.; Smith, April N.; Lang, Richard; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    The bronchioles of the murine lung are lined by a simple columnar epithelium composed of ciliated, Clara, and goblet cells that together mediate barrier function, mucociliary clearance and innate host defense, vital for pulmonary homeostasis. In the present work, we demonstrate that expression of Sox2 in Clara cells is required for the differentiation of ciliated, Clara, and goblet cells that line the bronchioles of the postnatal lung. The gene was selectively deleted in Clara cells utilizing Scgb1a1-Cre, causing the progressive loss of Sox2 in the bronchioles during perinatal and postnatal development. The rate of bronchiolar cell proliferation was decreased and associated with the formation of an undifferentiated, cuboidal-squamous epithelium lacking the expression of markers of Clara cells (Scgb1a1), ciliated cells (FoxJ1 and α-tubulin), and goblet cells (Spdef and Muc5AC). By adulthood, bronchiolar cell numbers were decreased and Sox2 was absent in extensive regions of the bronchiolar epithelium, at which time residual Sox2 expression was primarily restricted to selective niches of CGRP staining neuroepithelial cells. Allergen-induced goblet cell differentiation and mucus production was absent in the respiratory epithelium lacking Sox2. In vitro, Sox2 activated promoter-luciferase reporter constructs for differentiation markers characteristic of Clara, ciliated, and goblet cells, Scgb1a1, FoxJ1, and Agr2, respectively. Sox2 physically interacted with Smad3 and inhibited TGF-β1/Smad3-mediated transcriptional activity in vitro, a pathway that negatively regulates proliferation. Sox2 is required for proliferation and differentiation of Clara cells that serve as the progenitor cells from which Clara, ciliated, and goblet cells are derived. PMID:20011520

  3. Coastal Processes Study of Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Revell, David L.; Hoover, Dan; Warrick, Jon; Brocatus, John; Draut, Amy E.; Dartnell, Pete; Elias, Edwin; Mustain, Neomi; Hart, Pat E.; Ryan, Holly F.

    2009-01-01

    The Santa Barbara littoral cell (SBLC) is a complex coastal system with significant management challenges. The coastline ranges broadly in exposure to wave energy, fluvial inputs, hard structures, and urbanization. Geologic influence (structural control) on coastline orientation exerts an important control on local beach behavior, with anthropogenic alterations and the episodic nature of sediment supply and transport also playing important roles. Short- and long-term temporal analyses of shoreline change, beach width, and volume change show no obvious trends in regional beach behavior. Extensive armoring along the SBLC has accreted the back beach, narrowing beach widths and in some cases increasing sediment transport. Unarmored beaches have exhibited mild erosion while maintaining similar widths. Harbor constructions have had notable impacts on downdrift beaches, but once the coastal system has equilibrated the signal becomes strongly dampened and littoral-drift gradients driven by natural shoreline orientation again become dominant. Sediment inputs from the Santa Clara River dominate sediment processes on beaches to the south. The SBLC is dominated by episodic flood and storm-wave events. Exceptionally large accretion signals along this stretch of coastline are closely tied to major flood events when large amounts of sediment are deposited in deltas. These deltas decay over time, supplying downdrift beaches with sediment. Storm-wave impacts and gradients in alongshore transport can lead to beach rotations and migrating erosion hotspots when geological controls are weak. Annual and seasonal rates of cross-shore and alongshore transport are at least 2-3 times higher for the more west- and southwest-facing beaches south of the Ventura River as compared to the more sheltered beaches to the west/north. Gross littoral transports are good approximations of net littoral transports for beaches west/north of Ventura as transport is almost purely unidirectional. However

  4. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Conrad, James E.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    utilized Santa Barbara coastal zone, including Arroyo Burro Beach Park, Leadbetter Beach, East Beach, and “Butterfly Beach.” There are ongoing coastal erosion problems associated with both development and natural processes; between 1933–1934 and 1998, cliff erosion in the map area occurred at rates of about 0.1 to 1 m/yr, the largest amount (63 m) occurring at Arroyo Burro in the western part of the map area. In addition, development of the Santa Barbara Harbor, which began in 1928, lead to shoaling west of the harbor as the initial breakwater trapped sand, as well as to coastal erosion east of the harbor. Since 1959, annual harbor dredging has mitigated at least some of the downcoast erosion problems. The Offshore of Santa Barbara map area lies in the central part of the Santa Barbara littoral cell, which is characterized by littoral drift to the east-southeast. Drift rates have been estimated to be about 400,000 tons/yr at Santa Barbara Harbor. Sediment supply to the western and central parts of the littoral cell, including the map area, is largely from relatively small transverse coastal watersheds. Within the map area, these coastal watersheds include (from east to west) San Ysidro Creek, Oak Creek, Montecito Creek, Sycamore Creek, Mission Creek, Arroyo Burro, and Atascadero Creek. The Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers, the mouths of which are about 40 to 50 km southeast of Santa Barbara, are much larger sediment sources. Still farther east, eastward-moving sediment in the littoral cell is trapped by Hueneme and Mugu Canyons and then transported to the deep-water Santa Monica Basin. The offshore part of the map area consists of a relatively flat and shallow continental shelf, which dips gently seaward (about 0.4° to 0.8°) so that water depths at the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters are about 45 m in the east and about 75 m in the west. This part of the Santa Barbara Channel is relatively well protected from large Pacific swells from the north

  5. Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase in Clara cell-ablated mice inhaling crystalline silica.

    PubMed Central

    Yatera, K; Morimoto, Y; Kim, H N; Yamato, H; Tanaka, I; Kido, M

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the function of Clara cells in vivo during exposure to inhaled crystalline silica by examining pulmonary matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mRNA levels in mice. The Clara cells of male FVB/n mice (8-12 weeks old) were ablated by intraperitoneal administration of naphthalene (300 mg/kg) in a corn oil vehicle. The mice were then exposed to crystalline silica (Min-U-Sil-5 silica, 97.1 +/- 9.5 mg/m(2), 6 hr/day, 5 days/week) for up to 2 weeks. Transcriptional levels of mRNA extracted from the lungs were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Gene expression of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 was significantly more marked in the Clara cell-ablated group than in the group with Clara cells, indicating that Clara cells inhibit MMP expression. Our findings suggest that Clara cells inhibit pulmonary inflammation induced by crystalline silica via MMPs in vivo. PMID:11564614

  6. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  7. Local smoke-free policy development in Santa Fe, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Glantz, Stanton A

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe the process of approval and implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free law in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina, between 2005 and 2009. Methods Review of the Santa Fe smoke-free legislation, articles published in local newspapers and documentation on two lawsuits filed against the law, and interviews with key individuals in Santa Fe. Results Efforts to implement smoke-free policies in Santa Fe began during the 1990s without success, and resumed in 2005 when the provincial Legislature approved the first 100% smoke-free subnational law in Argentina. There was no strong opposition during the discussions within the legislature. As in other parts of the world, pro-tobacco industry interests attempted to block the implementation of the law using well known strategies. These efforts included a controversy media campaign set up, the creation of a hospitality industry association and a virtual smokers' rights group, the introduction of a counterproposal seeking modification of the law, the challenge of the law in the Supreme Court, and the proposal of a weak national bill that would ‘conflict’ with the subnational law. Tobacco control advocates sought media attention as a strategy to protect the law. Conclusions Santa Fe is the first subnational jurisdiction in Latin America to have enacted a comprehensive smoke-free policy following the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. After 3 years of implementation, pro-tobacco industry forces failed to undermine the law. Other subnational jurisdictions in Argentina, as well as in Mexico and Brazil are following the Santa Fe example. PMID:19955534

  8. Santa Ana Forecasting and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, T.; Eichhorn, D.; D'Agostino, B. J.; Vanderburg, S.; Means, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Southern California experiences wildfires every year, but under certain circumstances these fires grow into extremely large and destructive fires, such as the Cedar Fire of 2003 and the Witch Fire of 2007. The Cedar Fire burned over 1100 km2 , destroyed more than 2200 homes and killed 15 people; the Witch fire burned more than 800 km2, destroyed more than 1000 homes and killed 2 people. Fires can quickly become too large and dangerous to fight if they are accompanied by a very strong "Santa Ana" condition, which is a foehn-like wind that may bring strong winds and very low humidities. However there is an entire range of specific weather conditions that fall into the broad category of Santa Anas, from cold and blustery to hot with very little wind. All types are characterized by clear skies and low humidity. Since the potential for destructive fire is dependent on the characteristics of Santa Anas, as well as the level of fuel moisture, there exists a need for further classification, such as is done with tropical cyclones and after-the-fact with tornadoes. We use surface data and fuel moisture combined with reanalysis to diagnose those conditions that result in Santa Anas with the greatest potential for destructive fires. We use this data to produce a new classification system for Santa Anas. This classification system should be useful for informing the relevant agencies for mitigation and response planning. In the future this same classification may be made available to the general public.

  9. Clara Haber, nee Immerwahr (1870–1915): Life, Work and Legacy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We examine the life, work, and legacy of Clara Haber, nee Immerwahr, who became the first woman to earn a doctorate from the University of Breslau, in 1900. In 1901 she married the chemist Fritz Haber. With no employment available for female scientists, Clara freelanced as an instructor in the continued education of women, mainly housewives, while struggling not to become a housewife herself. Her duties as a designated head of a posh household hardly brought fulfillment to her life. The outbreak of WWI further exacerbated the situation, as Fritz Haber applied himself in extraordinary ways to aid the German war effort. The night that he celebrated the “success” of the first chlorine cloud attack, Clara committed suicide. We found little evidence to support claims that Clara was an outspoken pacifist who took her life because of her disapproval of Fritz Haber's involvement in chemical warfare. We conclude by examining “the myth of Clara Immerwahr” that took root in the 1990s from the perspective offered by the available scholarly sources, including some untapped ones. PMID:27099403

  10. Structure and regulation of the murine Clara cell secretory protein gene.

    PubMed

    Stripp, B R; Huffman, J A; Bohinski, R J

    1994-03-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC10 or CCSP) is an abundant component of airway secretions and has the ability to bind small hydrophobic molecules. Genomic clones were isolated for the murine gene coding for Clara cell secretory protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the gene was composed of three exons that span 4316 bp. Organization of the murine CCSP gene was very similar to that of the rabbit gene that codes for the biochemically related uteroglobin protein. Messenger RNAs for both genes were coded for by three exons, counterparts of which encode similar structural and functional protein domains. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the 5' flanking DNA were conserved between species, as were the functional properties of these elements when characterized in assays of promoter function. These data support the notion that Clara cell secretory protein genes from the rat and mouse, and the uteroglobin gene in rabbit, represent interspecies homologues. PMID:8020953

  11. University of California, Santa Cruz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHenry, Dean E.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the evolution of the innovative University of California, Santa Cruz, looks at its origins, campus organization, curriculum and instructional philosophy, campus design, leadership and faculty, student population, campus life, and curriculum design. Strategies for and obstacles to effective change are highlighted. (MSE)

  12. Discovery of ammocrypta clara (western sand darter) in the upper Ohio River of West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cincotta, Dan A.; Welsh, Stuart A.

    2010-01-01

    Ammocrypta clara Jordan and Meek (western sand darter) occurs primarily in the western portions of Mississippi River system, but also has been reported from a Lake Michigan drainage and a few eastern Texas Gulf Slope rivers. Additional range records depict a semi-disjunct distribution within the Ohio River drainage, including collections from Wabash River in Indiana, the Cumberland, Green, Kentucky and Big Sandy rivers of Kentucky, and the upper Tennessee River in Tennessee and Virginia. This paper documents the occurrence of A. clara from the upper Ohio River drainage within the lower Elk River, West Virginia, based on collections from 1986, 1991, 1995, 2005 and 2006. The Elk River population, consistent with those of other Ohio River drainages, has slightly higher counts for numbers of dorsal-fin rays, scales below lateral line and lateral line scales when compared to data from populations outside of the Ohio River drainage. Modal counts of meristic characters are similar among populations, except for higher modal counts of lateral line scales in the Ohio River population. The discovery of the Elk River population extends the range distribution of A. clara in the Eastern Highlands region, documents wide distributional overlap and additional sympatry with its sister species,A. pellucida (eastern sand darter), and softens support for an east-west Central Highlands vicariance hypothesis for the present distribution of A. clara and A. pellucida.

  13. Clara Barton High School. Bilingual Project. O.E.E. Evaluation Report, 1981-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; And Others

    The report evaluates the Bilingual-Bicultural Project conducted in 1981-82 at Clara Barton High School, in Brooklyn, New York, for 50 Spanish speaking students with limited English proficiency (LEP). The project was designed to provide tutorial support to LEP students and to enable them to be placed in one of the more challenging health profession…

  14. Clara Barton High School Bilingual Program. O.E.E. Evaluation Report, 1982-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collazo-Levy, Dora; Sica, Michael

    In 1982-83, the program evaluated here provided tutorial and supportive services to approximately 50 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency (LEP) in grades 9-12 at Clara Barton High School, Brooklyn, New York. The program's main objective was to enable LEP students to function successfully in terms of language achievement and…

  15. See Us as We Are: Clara Chu--University of California at Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This article highlights the influence of Clara Chu, associate professor in the University of California at Los Angeles's (UCLA) Department of Information Studies. Her influence extends far beyond her campus. She works with many organizations to advance multiculturalism in librarianship. As a prolific researcher, writer, and speaker, Chu has given…

  16. First light measurements of the Total Solar Irradiance experiment CLARA on NORSAT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutz, Werner

    2016-07-01

    NORSAT-1 is a Norwegian micro-satellite, which will be launched April 22, 2016. (In the future at the time of writing this abstract.) The satellite carries two scientific instruments and an AIS receiver for performing ship detection from space. One of the scientific instruments is a Compact Light-weight Absolute RAdiometer (CLARA) and the other is a Langmuir Probe instrument comprising four probes mounted on booms. The latter experiment will measure electron density and the platform's floating potential along the orbit. The University of Oslo provides the Langmuir probes. The radiometer experiment CLARA has been built by PMOD/WRC funded through the Swiss PRODEX program. It will measure Total Solar Irradiance with an instrument of novel design that is optimized for minimizing mass and size by still ensuring highest measuring accuracy and thermal stability. The radiometers of CLARA have been fully characterized as well as calibrated at the TRF facility. It is expected that the first light accuracy of the absolute measurement of Total Solar Irradiance will be better than pm0.3 W/m^{2, allowing to probe the current TSI composite for its absolute level. The presentation will give an overview of the CLARA instrument and its calibration. It is expected that at the time of the COSPAR conference the first light TSI value of CLARA/NORSAT-1 is ready for publication. Together with a previous absolute TSI measurements available for July 27, 2010 measured by PREMOS/PICARD the new absolute TSI measurement will be used to test the accuracy of long term TSI trend given by the relative TSI composite.

  17. Urbanisation of yellow fever in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Van der Stuyft, P; Gianella, A; Pirard, M; Cespedes, J; Lora, J; Peredo, C; Pelegrino, J L; Vorndam, V; Boelaert, M

    1999-05-01

    Until recently, urban yellow fever had not been reported from the Americas since 1954, but jungle yellow fever increasingly affects forest dwellers in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. The reinvasion by Aedes aegypti of cities in the Americas now threatens to urbanize yellow fever. After yellow fever infection was identified in a resident of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, in December 1997, all subsequent suspected cases were investigated. Active surveillance of yellow fever was introduced in the Santa Cruz area, with hospitals and selected urban and rural health centers reporting all suspected cases. Patients were serologically screened for yellow fever, dengue, hepatitis A and B, and leptospirosis; clinical and epidemiological data were collected from patients' records and through interviews; and a population-based serosurvey was conducted in the neighborhood of one case. Between December 1997 and June 1998, symptomatic yellow fever infection was confirmed in 6 residents of Santa Cruz, of whom 5 died. 5 lived in the southern sector of the city. 2 cases did not leave the city during their incubation period, and 1 had visited only an area in which sylvatic transmission was deemed impossible. Of the 281 people covered in the serosurvey, 16 (6%) were positive for IgM antibody to yellow fever. Among 5 people for whom that result could not be explained by recent vaccination, there were 2 pairs of neighbors. This instance of urban yellow fever transmission was limited in both time and space. PMID:10334253

  18. 2. OBLIQUE VIEW TO NORTHEAST ALONG FRONT OF SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OBLIQUE VIEW TO NORTHEAST ALONG FRONT OF SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAM. NOTE CABLE CAR SUSPENSION CABLE AT GATE ATOP DAM. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Santa Ana River Diversion Dam, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, Thompson Creek near Clara, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1979-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on Thompson Creek near Clara, MS: Water depths, velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on Thompson Creek near Clara, MS, for flood of March 3, 1971, are shown, together with peak water-surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on a graph. (USGS).

  20. You're a "What"? Santa Claus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royster, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Professional Santas entertain children and adults during the holiday season at all types of events. They work at shopping malls or stores; entertain crowds at parades and tree lightings; and make appearances at holiday parties, charity events, and people's homes. Most Santas work during the Christmas holiday season, which usually lasts from late…

  1. Santa Claus, Ga./Ind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The towns of Santa Claus, Ga., (top) and Santa Claus, Ind. (bottom), are shown in these two images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. They are the only two Santa Claus towns in the United States with post offices and zip codes, although there are 11 towns with this name in the United States. Santa Claus, Ga. is located in Toombs County, and has a population of 237. Santa Claus, Ind. is located in Spencer County, and has a population of 2,041. Its name was accepted by the United States Postal Service in 1856. The images were acquired on July 3, 2000 (top) and June 16, 2001 (bottom), respectively.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science

  2. Santa Barbara Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

    2013-11-30

    This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara County’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the County’s innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara County’s emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the program’s first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The County’s investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative

  3. 75 FR 51846 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Software Nashua, NH July 12, 2009. Corporation. 74,401 Savvion, A Progress Santa Clara, CA........ July 12... Dial Corporation.... St. Louis, MO 72,762 Upper Connecticut Valley Colebrook, NH Hospital...

  4. Foxm1 Transcription Factor Is Critical for Proliferation and Differentiation of Clara Cells during Development of Conducting Airways

    PubMed Central

    Ustiyan, Vladimir; Wert, Susan E.; Ikegami, Machiko; Wang, I-Ching; Kalin, Tanya V.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Kalinichenko, Kalinichenko

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory epithelial cells are derived from cell progenitors in the foregut endoderm that subsequently differentiate into the distinct cell types lining the conducting and alveolar regions of the lung. To identify transcriptional mechanisms regulating differentiation and maintenance of respiratory epithelial cells, we conditionally deleted Foxm1 transcription factor from the conducting airways of the developing mouse lung. Conditional deletion of Foxm1 from Clara cells, controlled by the Scgb1a1 promoter, dramatically altered airway structure and caused peribronchial fibrosis, resulting in airway hyperreactivity in adult mice. Deletion of Foxm1 inhibited proliferation of Clara cells and disrupted the normal patterning of epithelial cell differentiation in the bronchioles, causing squamous and goblet cell metaplasia, and the loss of Clara and ciliated cells. Surprisingly, conducting airways of Foxm1-deficient mice contained highly differentiated cuboidal type II epithelial cells that are normally restricted to the alveoli. Lineage tracing studies showed that the ectopic alveolar type II cells in Foxm1-deficient airways were derived from Clara cells. Deletion of Foxm1 inhibited Sox2 and Scgb1a1, both of which are critical for differentiation and function of Clara cells. In co-transfection experiments, Foxm1 directly bound to and induced transcriptional activity of Scgb1a1 and Sox2 promoters. Foxm1 is required for differentiation and maintenance of epithelial cells lining conducting airways. PMID:22885335

  5. ChE at UC Santa Barbara.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seborg, Dale E.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the chemical engineering program at the University of California, Santa Barbara, including history of the department, faculty research interests and professional activities, graduate and undergraduate programs, and research in nuclear engineering. (SK)

  6. Serum clara cell protein: a sensitive biomarker of increased lung epithelium permeability caused by ambient ozone.

    PubMed

    Broeckaert, F; Arsalane, K; Hermans, C; Bergamaschi, E; Brustolin, A; Mutti, A; Bernard, A

    2000-06-01

    Ozone in ambient air may cause various effects on human health, including decreased lung function, asthma exacerbation, and even premature mortality. These effects have been evidenced using various clinical indicators that, although sensitive, do not specifically evaluate the O(3)-increased lung epithelium permeability. In the present study, we assessed the acute effects of ambient O(3) on the pulmonary epithelium by a new approach relying on the assay in serum of the lung-specific Clara cell protein (CC16 or CC10). We applied this test to cyclists who exercised for 2 hr during episodes of photochemical smog and found that O(3) induces an early leakage of lung Clara cell protein. The protein levels increased significantly into the serum from exposure levels as low as 0.060-0.084 ppm. Our findings, confirmed in mice exposed to the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for O(3) (0.08 ppm for 8 hr) indicate that above the present natural background levels, there is almost no safety margin for the effects of ambient O(3) on airway permeability. The assay of CC16 in the serum represents a new sensitive noninvasive test allowing the detection of early effects of ambient O(3) on the lung epithelial barrier. PMID:10856027

  7. The new Heavy-ion MCP-based Ancillary Detector DANTE for the CLARA-PRISMA Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; Della Vedova, F.; Fioretto, E.; Marginean, N.; Napoli, D. R.; Orlandi, R.; Pokrovsky, I.; Sahin, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Brambilla, S.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Lunardi, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Ur, C. A.

    2006-08-14

    The CLARA-PRISMA setup is a powerful tool for spectroscopic studies of neutron-rich nuclei produced in multi-nucleon transfer and deep-inelastic reactions. It combines the large acceptance spectrometer PRISMA with the {gamma}-ray array CLARA. At present, the ancillary heavy-ion detector DANTE, based on Micro-Channel Plates to be installed at the CLARA-PRISMA setup, is being constructed at LNL. DANTE will open the possibility of measuring {gamma}-{gamma} Doppler-corrected coincidences for the events outside the acceptance of PRISMA. In this presentation, it is described the heavy-ion detector DANTE, as well as the performances of the first prototype.

  8. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in relation to water consumption: a re-analysis of data from the original Santa Clara County Study, California, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Epstein, D.M.; Neutra, R.R. )

    1992-03-01

    Residents of a census tract that received drinking water from a well contaminated with solvents were previously shown to experience a spontaneous abortion rate over twice that occurring in an unexposed census tract. In addition, the rate of birth defects in the exposed tract was three times that in the unexposed tract. Surprisingly, increased tapwater consumption was associated with higher rates of spontaneous abortions in both the exposed and the unexposed tracts. Subsequent studies in this area have investigated the relation between spontaneous abortions and consumption of tapwater in more detail. In this report, data from the original study have been re-analyzed using methods comparable with those used in more recent studies. These results confirm the association between spontaneous abortions and reported cold tapwater consumption that was seen in the original study. The observed effect was not due to maternal risk factors, nor was it a function of consumption of bottled water. After controlling for bottled water, the odds ratio for consumption of tapwater was 3.4 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-19.4).

  9. Captured Knowledge: Presentations and Notes of the KMWorld Conference and Exposition (4th, Santa Clara, California, September 13-15, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca, Ed.; Nixon, Carol, Comp.; Burmood, Jennifer, Comp.

    This publication contains presentations, notes, and illustrative materials used in the annual KMWorld Conference and Exposition, "Knowledge Nets: Defining and Driving the E-Enterprise." Presentations include: "Knowledge Management Applied to the Manufacturing Enterprise" (Matthew Artibee); "Ryder Knowledge Center: Building Best practices through…

  10. Kahn v. Superior Court of the County of Santa Clara: The Right to Privacy and the Academic Freedom Privilege with Respect to Confidential Peer Review Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Maureen P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A case in which California's constitutional right to privacy is used to protect confidential peer review files is analyzed, and the case's significance and possible ramifications for discovery requests of peer review files are discussed. (MSE)

  11. Child-Care Aid and Quality for California Families: Focusing on San Francisco and Santa Clara Counties. PACE Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce; Chang, Yueh-Wen; Suzuki, Sawako; Kagan, Sharon Lynn

    Against the backdrop of evolving welfare policies in California following the approval of federal welfare reforms in 1996, the Growing Up in Poverty Project is examining how single mothers and their children fare as they move from cash aid to jobs, the types and quality of child care arrangements selected, and if mothers' access to child care…

  12. Planning for Educational Change. A Process Model for Designing Future Forms of Educational Facilities. Research Report No. 5 of Project SIMU School: Santa Clara County Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leu, Donald J.; And Others

    This position paper argues that education should be planned, designed, operationalized, and continuously modified to serve effectively the defined human and educational needs of a rapidly changing world. It focuses on emerging contemporary societal changes impacting learning theory, curriculum, and teaching methodology; and it outlines the…

  13. The painful perils of a pair of pianists: the chronic pain of Clara Schumann and Sergei Rachmaninov.

    PubMed

    Hingtgen, C M

    1999-01-01

    Clara Wieck Schumann (1819-1896) and Sergei Vassilievich Rachmaninov (1873-1943) were two of the greatest pianists that ever lived. They had full lives composing and performing music. Each also had more than his or her fair share of hardships. In addition to all the pressures that are part of a performer's life, both Clara Schumann and Sergei Rachmaninov also suffered from chronic pain. This article discusses the pain syndromes that plagued these great musicians and the effect of chronic illness on their music. PMID:10718525

  14. Population size of island loggerhead shrikes on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Thomas R.; Teel, Susan; Hall, Linnea S.; Dye, Linda C.; Laughrin, Lyndal L.

    2012-01-01

    Island loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus anthonyi) are an endemic, genetically distinct subspecies of loggerhead shrike on California's Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, and Santa Catalina Islands (USA). This subspecies is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the California Department of Fish and Game and has been petitioned for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act. The combination of suspected low numbers and the possibility of federal listing, prompted us to undertake a study to rigorously estimate the number of remaining individuals on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands. During the 2009 and 2010 breeding seasons, we surveyed sample units on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands using a double-observer method with independent observers to estimate joint detection probabilities (p), where we selected units under a stratified random sampling design. We estimated shrike abundance to be 169 in 2009 (p = 0.476) and 240 in 2010 (p = 0.825) for Santa Rosa Island, and 35 in 2009 (p = 0.816) and 42 in 2010 (p = 0.710) for Santa Cruz Island. These numbers, especially for Santa Rosa Island, are higher than previously reported but nevertheless are still low. Rapid vegetation change on both islands due to recent removal of nonnative herbivores may threaten the habitat and status of this subspecies and, therefore, we suggest that intensive demographic and habitat use research be initiated immediately to obtain additional information vital for the management of this subspecies. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. 18. Photocopy of undated illustration in unidentified publication. CEILING AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of undated illustration in unidentified publication. CEILING AND REREDOS PRESERVED IN 1884 RESTORATION - Mission Santa Clara de Asis, Franklin & Grant Streets, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, CA

  16. 30. Photocopy of October 1926 photograph in San Francisco CallBulletin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of October 1926 photograph in San Francisco Call-Bulletin Library. ARTICLES SAVED FROM THE FIRE OF OCTOBER 23, 1926 - Mission Santa Clara de Asis, Franklin & Grant Streets, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, CA

  17. 13. Photocopy of circa 1870 watercolor in Society of California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of circa 1870 watercolor in Society of California Pioneers Collection. VIEW OF COMPLEX FROM THE SOUTHEAST - Mission Santa Clara de Asis, Franklin & Grant Streets, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, CA

  18. The role and importance of club cells (Clara cells) in the pathogenesis of some respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Rokicki, Wojciech; Rokicki, Marek; Wojtacha, Jacek; Dżeljijli, Agata

    2016-03-01

    The report presents the cellular structure of the respiratory system as well as the history of club cells (Clara cells), their ultrastructure, and location in the airways and human organs. The authors discuss the biochemical structure of proteins secreted by these cells and their importance for the integrity and regeneration of the airway epithelium. Their role as progenitor cells for the airway epithelium and their involvement in the biotransformation of toxic xenobiotics introduced into the lungs during breathing is emphasized. This is followed by a discussion of the clinical aspects associated with club cells, demonstrating that tracking the serum concentration of club cell-secreted proteins is helpful in the diagnosis of a number of lung tissue diseases. Finally, suggestions are provided regarding the possible use of proteins secreted by club cells in the treatment of serious respiratory conditions. PMID:27212975

  19. The role and importance of club cells (Clara cells) in the pathogenesis of some respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rokicki, Marek; Wojtacha, Jacek; Dżeljijli, Agata

    2016-01-01

    The report presents the cellular structure of the respiratory system as well as the history of club cells (Clara cells), their ultrastructure, and location in the airways and human organs. The authors discuss the biochemical structure of proteins secreted by these cells and their importance for the integrity and regeneration of the airway epithelium. Their role as progenitor cells for the airway epithelium and their involvement in the biotransformation of toxic xenobiotics introduced into the lungs during breathing is emphasized. This is followed by a discussion of the clinical aspects associated with club cells, demonstrating that tracking the serum concentration of club cell-secreted proteins is helpful in the diagnosis of a number of lung tissue diseases. Finally, suggestions are provided regarding the possible use of proteins secreted by club cells in the treatment of serious respiratory conditions. PMID:27212975

  20. Suffering for her art: the chronic pain syndrome of pianist Clara Wieck-Schumann.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Kopiez, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Clara Schumann was an outstanding pianist, systematically trained as a child prodigy by her father Friedrich Wieck. Married to the composer Robert Schumann she gave birth to 8 children, however, was able to continue performing regularly in public. After the mental breakdown of her husband, she had to increase her public performance activities due to the need to earn a living for her large family. In this time, the first pains in the right arm occurred, which at the beginning were of shorter duration, however increasingly required prolonged periods of rest. Later, when attempting to work on the highly demanding piano works of Johannes Brahms, especially on his first piano concerto, she developed chronic pain, which forced her to interrupt any concert activities for more than 1 year. Obviously, Brahms' modern treatment of the piano in an almost orchestral way imposed technical difficulties which Clara Schumann was not properly prepared to deal with. Finally, she underwent a multimodal pain therapy in the private sanatorium of Dr. Esmarch, which consisted of an integrated interdisciplinary approach comprising pain medication, psychotherapy, physiotherapy and modification of playing habits. She fully recovered and successfully continued her career as an internationally renowned concert pianist. The case report impressively demonstrates the stressors an outstanding female elite musician had to cope with in the 19th century. Furthermore, it is a convincing example of how the intuition and mere experience of a sensitive and understanding doctor lead to the right conclusions and to a modern multimodal pain therapy in chronic overuse injury. Furthermore the case report demonstrates the important role of prevention, including physical exercises, self-awareness, and reasonable practice schedules. PMID:20375525

  1. Estimating the population size of island loggerhead shrikes on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Thomas R.; Teel, Susan; Hall, Linnea S.; Dye, Linda C.; Laughrin, Lyndal L.

    2012-01-01

    Island loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus anthonyi) are an endemic, genetically distinct subspecies of loggerhead shrike on California’s Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands. This subspecies is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the California Department of Fish and Game and has been petitioned for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act. Because of suspected low numbers and the possibility of federal listing, there was an urgent need to rigorously estimate the number of remaining individuals on the Islands. In 2009 and 2010, biologists from the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service surveyed sample units on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands using a double-observer method with independent observers, where units were selected under a stratified random sampling design. Shrike abundance was estimated to be 169 in 2009 and 240 in 2010 for Santa Rosa Island, and 35 in 2009 and 42 in 2010 for Santa Cruz Island. These numbers, especially for Santa Rosa Island, are higher than previously reported but nevertheless are still low. Rapid vegetation change on both islands due to recent removal of non-native herbivores may threaten the habitat and status of this subspecies. In view of this circumstance and the still-low numbers of shrikes, additional intensive demographic and habitat-use studies are critical for obtaining information vital for the perpetuation of this subspecies.

  2. Lens-effect in Santa Monica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Carmen M.; Olsen, Kim B.

    We used finite-difference simulations of 10-Hz P-SV and SH waves to estimate the contribution from the deep basin structure to the large ground motion amplification in Santa Monica, California, observed for seismic waves incident from the north. Our simulations of a 17-km deep Northridge aftershock with epicenter 30 km north of Santa Monica show that focusing at the lens-shaped boundary of the sediments can only account for less than half the amplification observed in the area that was heavily damaged during the 1994 M 6.7 Northridge earthquake. The focusing in the simulations caused amplification of up to 1.6 times in a zone 0.65-2.4 km south of the Santa Monica fault and de-amplification at sites just south of the fault where some of the largest amplification is observed in the data.

  3. 4. INTERIOR OF ABANDONED SANTA ANA CANAL TUNNEL, SHOWING CEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR OF ABANDONED SANTA ANA CANAL TUNNEL, SHOWING CEMENT TROUGH FLOOR AND UNFINISHED GRANITE ROOF. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Abandoned Tunnel, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. 53. SIPHON NO. 1, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2 PROJECT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. SIPHON NO. 1, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2 PROJECT, EXHIBIT L, PROJECT 1933, MAY 1973. SCE drawing no. 5110869 (sheet no. 11; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. 42. FOUNDATIONS TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. FOUNDATIONS - TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, EDISON ELECTRIC CO., NOV. 3, 1904. SCE drawing no. 5393. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  6. 60. NEEDLE AND NOZZLE TIP, SANTA ANA NO. 1, SOUTHERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. NEEDLE AND NOZZLE TIP, SANTA ANA NO. 1, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON CO., APR. 28, 1910, REVISED MAY 12, 1910. SCE drawing no. 4500. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 34. ELEVATION OF RELAY AND CONTROL SWITCHBOARD, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. ELEVATION OF RELAY AND CONTROL SWITCHBOARD, SANTA ANA RIVER P.H. #3, JUNE 23, 1943. SCE drawing no. 413187-1. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. 4. PENSTOCKS. EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PENSTOCKS. EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523197 (sheet no. 7; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Forebay & Penstock, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. 52. INDOOR SWITCHRACK, ELEVATION AND SECTIONS. SANTA ANA RIVER NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. INDOOR SWITCHRACK, ELEVATION AND SECTIONS. SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 11, 1951, AND MAR. 20, 1952. SCE drawing no. 534986-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. 54. ALDER CREEK DIVERSION, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. ALDER CREEK DIVERSION, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 2 SCE drawing no. 5206858, no date (FERC no. 1933-48). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. 53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, JAN. 24, 1977. SCE drawing no. 455670-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. 3. TAILRACE AND FOREBAY, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. TAILRACE AND FOREBAY, SANTA ANA NO. 3, EXHIBIT L, JAN. 25, 1956. SCE drawing no. 541475 (sheet 6; for filing with Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Forebay & Penstock, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. 32. SHAW BOX 5 TON CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SHAW BOX 5 TON CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 3, JAN. 24, 1977. SCE drawing no. 455678-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. 41. EXTERNAL ELEVATIONS, POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. EXTERNAL ELEVATIONS, POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, EDISON ELECTRIC CO., NOV. 3, 1904. SCE drawing no. 5392. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. 56. CROSS SECTION OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. CROSS SECTION OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 1. SCE drawing no. 5206856 (no date; FERC no. 1933-46). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. 54. PLAN OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. PLAN OF POWERHOUSE, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 1. SCE drawing no. 5206855 (no date; FERC no. 1933-45). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. 51. SWITCHBOARD ELEVATIONS, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. SWITCHBOARD ELEVATIONS, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, DEC. 14, 1951; REVISIONS, MAR. 20 AND SEPT. 19, 1952. SCE drawing no. 534984-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  18. 57. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PLOT PLAN, SANTA ANA NO. 1 HYDRO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PLOT PLAN, SANTA ANA NO. 1 HYDRO PLANT, OCTOBER 10, 1958. SCE drawing no. 428615-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. 49. BEAR CREEK AND SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAMS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. BEAR CREEK AND SANTA ANA RIVER DIVERSION DAMS AND CONCRETE CONDUIT NO. 1, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 1. SCE drawing no. 5206851, no date (FERC no. 1933-41). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  20. 52. POWER HOUSE AREA, SANTA ANA NO. 2; DETAIL MAP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. POWER HOUSE AREA, SANTA ANA NO. 2; DETAIL MAP OF SANTA ANA NO. 1 AND NO. 2 HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT, EXHIBIT K, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523691 (sheet no. 6; for filing with the Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  2. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  3. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  4. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  5. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA. The 72 COLREGS shall apply to the harbors on Santa Catalina Island....

  6. 2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the north, looking over the flooded fields between Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, just upstream of the Prado Dam site. File number written on negative: R & H 80 024. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  7. 51. INTAKE AND POWER HOUSE AREAS, SANTA ANA NO. 1; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. INTAKE AND POWER HOUSE AREAS, SANTA ANA NO. 1; DETAIL MAP OF SANTA ANA NO. 1 AND NO. 2 HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT, EXHIBIT K, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523690 (sheet no. 5; for filing with the Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. California Child Care Workforce Study: Family Child Care Providers and Assistants in Alameda County, Kern County, Monterey County, San Benito County, San Francisco County, San Mateo County, Santa Cruz County, and Santa Clara County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy; Almaraz, Mirella; Jo-Yung, Joon; Sakai, Laura; Boots, Shelley Waters; Voisin, Irene; Young, Marci; Burton, Alice; Duff, Brian; Laverty, Kassin; Bellm, Dan; Jay, E. Deborah; Krishnaswamy, Nandini; Kipnis, Fran

    An important first step toward more effectively addressing the complexities of child care as a service for families and as an employment setting for workers in California is to develop a detailed picture of the child care workforce. On this premise, a study examined licensed family child care provider demographics, professional preparation, length…

  9. Santa Rosa, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Santa Rosa, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  10. Educational and Demographic Profile: Santa Barbara County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Santa Barbara County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  11. Educational and Demographic Profile: Santa Cruz County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Santa Cruz County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation provides a framework for enhanced communication and…

  12. USEPA Santa Cruz River Public Survey Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Office of Research and Development, Western Ecology Division is investigating how urban households value different possibilities for the Santa Cruz River in southern Arizona. A random sample of households in the Phoenix and Tucson areas are being asked to provide their ...

  13. Santa Claus and the Conservation of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassani, Sadri

    2005-01-01

    This article examines an amusing application of the concept of kinetic energy. Using some rudimentary physical notions, we have analysed the energetics of the motion of Santa Claus. The results, which are quite surprising, can be of interest to high school and early college physics educators when they teach kinetic energy, and energy conservation…

  14. Santa Cruz Community Service Television Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, Herbert Allan

    A non-profit corporation, called the Santa Cruz Community Service Television Project (S.C.C.S.T.P.), is proposed that would produce videotape for the purpose of intra-community communication. The corporation would use portable videotape equipment to record a variety of community programs, such as an ecological history of the Monterey Bay area, the…

  15. Ecotourism: The Santa Elena Rainforest Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearing, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Describes an ecotourism project in which the community of Santa Elena, Costa Rica, are developing a rainforest reserve on government land leased permanently to the local high school. Discusses the impact of the project on the community's economy and environment. (Contains 30 references.) (MDH)

  16. Coarse-grained sediment delivery and distribution in the Holocene Santa Monica Basin, California: Implications for evaluating source-to-sink flux at millennial time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romans, B.W.; Normark, W.R.; McGann, M.M.; Covault, J.A.; Graham, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing accumulations of coarse-grained terrigenous sediment from deep-marine basins to evaluate the relative contributions of and history of controls on sediment flux through a source-to-sink system has been difficult as a result of limited knowledge of event timing. In this study, six new radiocarbon (14C) dates are integrated with five previously published dates that have been recalibrated from a 12.5-m-thick turbidite section from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1015 in Santa Monica Basin, offshore California. This borehole is tied to high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles that cover an 1100 km2 area of the middle and lower Hueneme submarine fan and most of the basin plain. The resulting stratigraphic framework provides the highest temporal resolution for a thick-bedded Holocene turbidite succession to date, permitting an evaluation of source-to-sink controls at millennial (1000 yr) scales. The depositional history from 7 ka to present indicates that the recurrence interval for large turbidity-current events is relatively constant (300-360 yr), but the volume of sediment deposited on the fan and in the basin plain has increased by a factor of 2 over this period. Moreover, the amount of sand per event on the basin plain during the same interval has increased by a factor of 7. Maps of sediment distribution derived from correlation of seismic-reflection profiles indicate that this trend cannot be attributed exclusively to autogenic processes (e.g., progradation of depocenters). The observed variability in sediment accumulation rates is thus largely controlled by allogenic factors, including: (1) increased discharge of Santa Clara River as a result of increased magnitude and frequency of El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events from ca. 2 ka to present, (2) an apparent change in routing of coarse-grained sediment within the staging area at ca. 3 ka (i.e., from direct river input to indirect, littoral cell input into Hueneme submarine canyon), and (3

  17. Sputum and BAL Clara cell secretory protein and surfactant protein D levels in asthma.

    PubMed

    Emmanouil, P; Loukides, S; Kostikas, K; Papatheodorou, G; Papaporfyriou, A; Hillas, G; Vamvakaris, I; Triggidou, R; Katafigiotis, P; Kokkini, A; Papiris, S; Koulouris, N; Bakakos, P

    2015-06-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) is associated with Th2 modulation. Surfactant protein D (SPD) plays an important role in surfactant homeostasis and eosinophil chemotaxis. We measured CC16 and SPD in sputum supernatants of 84 asthmatic patients and 12 healthy controls. In 22 asthmatics, we additionally measured CC16 and SPD levels in BAL and assessed smooth muscle area (SMA), reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickness, and epithelial detachment (ED) in bronchial biopsies. Induced sputum CC16 and SPD were significantly higher in patients with severe asthma (SRA) compared to mild-moderate and healthy controls. BAL CC16 and SPD levels were also higher in SRA compared to mild-moderate asthma. CC16 BAL levels correlated with ED, while SPD BAL levels correlated with SMA and RBM. Severity represented a significant covariate for these associations. CC16 and SPD levels are upregulated in SRA and correlate with remodeling indices, suggesting a possible role of these biomarkers in the remodeling process. PMID:25728058

  18. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  19. Lifetime measurements using the CLARA-PRISMA setup around the {sup 48}Ca doubly-magic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Corradi, L.; De Angelis, G.; Fioretto, E.; Grodner, E.; Mason, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Mengoni, D.; Farnea, E.; Bazzacco, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Ur, C. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Lunardi, S.; Scarlassara, F.; Dewald, A.

    2008-11-11

    The lifetimes of the first excited states of nuclei around the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been determined using a novel method that combines the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) method with the CLARA-PRISMA spectrometers. This is the first time such a method is applied to measure lifetimes of neutron-rich nuclei populated via a multinucleon transfer reaction. This novel method and some preliminary results on lifetimes are presented.

  20. Structural development in the Santa Catharina meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, R. S., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A metallographic study was undertaken to seek support for the idea that Santa Catharina is really massive cloudy taenite. Available metal-rich nuggets of Santa Catharina appear to have been single crystals of taenite in the few centimeter size range, separated from each other by grain boundaries occupied by troilite and schreibersite. Metallographic and electron microprobe data allow one to postulate the following cooling and structural development history: (1) single crystal taenite formed at high temperature; (2) phosphate formed within the taenite and grain boundary schreibersite formed at interfaces with troilite or with other taenite crystals; (3) schreibersite began to precipitate within taenite at about 650 C; (4) at about 450 C the meteorite entered the three phase field at which point kamacite precipitated and started growing; and (5) kamacite/schreibersite interface measurements indicate that cooling continued down to about 350 C, with large Ni diffusion gradients developing within schreibersites.

  1. Post-Last Glacial Maximum (Latest Pleistocene to Holocene) geology of the Santa Barbara shelf, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Ritchie, A. C.; Conrad, J. E.; Dartnell, P.; Phillips, E.; Sliter, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution bathymetric and seismic-reflection data collected for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/mapping/csmp/) provide new insights for understanding the post-Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) evolution of the Santa Barbara shelf, highlighting relationships between tectonics, eustasy, and sediment supply. The west-trending shelf extends offshore for 5 to 7 km and is bounded on the south by the deep Santa Barbara basin and on the north by a narrow coastal zone and the steep, rapidly uplifting Santa Ynez Mountains. The active, west-trending, north-dipping Ventura-Pitas Point-North Channel and Red Mountain fault systems form the structural boundary between two distinct shelf domains. The smooth, gently sloping, southern shelf is flooded by thick (35 to 40 m), prograding Santa Clara and Ventura River deltaic deposits. These thick strata drape the shelfbreak and fill the accommodation space created by rising sea level, largely masking the influence of active tectonics. In contrast, the northern shelf has complex bathymetry and a well-defined, sharp shelfbreak at ~90 m water depth. The northern shelf is relatively sediment starved (mean sediment thickness is 3 to 4 m), with thickest accumulations (up to ~18 m) forming shallow (< 30 m), discontinuous to laterally coalescing, inner-shelf bars that are best developed at the mouths of steep coastal watersheds. These watersheds also feed several distinct, coarse-grained sediment lobes (as large as ~1.5 km2, extending to 3 km offshore and depths of 70 m) that probably formed during massive flood events. The relative lack of offshore deposits on the northern shelf suggests sediment transport is dominated by easterly nearshore drift. Faulting and folding on the northern shelf are significant controls on sediment distribution and thickness, the occurrence of bedrock uplifts, and common hydrocarbon-associated seeps, pockmarks, and mounds. Bedrock, typically "soft" Neogene strata, is especially

  2. Exercise but not mannitol provocation increases urinary Clara cell protein (CC16) in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Romberg, Kerstin; Bjermer, Leif; Tufvesson, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Elite swimmers have an increased risk of developing asthma, and exposure to chloramine is believed to be an important trigger factor. The aim of the present study was to explore pathophysiological mechanisms behind induced bronchoconstriction in swimmers exposed to chloramine, before and after swim exercise provocation as well as mannitol provocation. Urinary Clara cell protein (CC16) was used as a possible marker for epithelial stress. 101 elite aspiring swim athletes were investigated and urinary samples were collected before and 1 h after completed exercise and mannitol challenge. CC16, 11β-prostaglandin (PG)F(2α) and leukotriene E(4) (LTE(4)) were measured. Urinary levels of CC16 were clearly increased after exercise challenge, while no reaction was seen after mannitol challenge. Similar to CC16, the level of 11β-PGF(2α) was increased after exercise challenge, but not after mannitol challenge, while LTE(4) was reduced after exercise. There was no significant difference in urinary response between those with a negative compared to positive challenge, but a tendency of increased baseline levels of 11β-PGF(2α) and LTE(4) in individuals with a positive mannitol challenge. The uniform increase of CC16 after swim exercise indicates that CC16 is of importance in epithelial stress, and may as such be an important pathogenic factor behind asthma development in swimmers. The changes seen in urinary levels of 11β-PGF(2α) and LTE(4) indicate a pathophysiological role in both mannitol and exercise challenge. PMID:20696561

  3. Secretion of mucus proteinase inhibitor and elafin by Clara cell and type II pneumocyte cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sallenave, J M; Silva, A; Marsden, M E; Ryle, A P

    1993-02-01

    The regulation of proteinases secreted by neutrophils is very important for the prevention of tissue injury. We recently described the isolation of elafin from bronchial secretions, a new elastase-specific inhibitor that is also found in the skin of patients with psoriasis. In this study, we investigated the secretion of elafin and mucus proteinase inhibitor (MPI), another inhibitor showing sequence similarity with elafin, in two lung carcinoma cell lines, NCI-H322 and A549, which have features of Clara cells and type II alveolar cells, respectively. The results presented show that the two inhibitors are produced when the cells are cultured either in serum-free or in serum-containing media. MPI was detected immunologically as a unique molecule of M(r) 14 kD, in accordance with previous studies. Conversely, one or two elafin-immunoreactive species were detected depending on the cell line: a 12- to 14-kD species was observed in the A549 cell line, regardless of the culture conditions, whereas in the NCI-H322 cell line we detected a 6-kD species in serum-containing (10% fetal calf serum) conditions and a 12- to 14-kD species in serum-free conditions. The 12- to 14-kD molecule probably represents an active precursor of elafin. Whether the cleavage of the 12- to 14-kD precursor giving rise to the elafin molecule is of any physiologic significance is not known. In showing for the first time that MPI and elafin (and its precursor) are secreted by the A549 cell line, this report implicates the type II alveolar cell in the defense of the peripheral lung against the neutrophil elastase secreted during inflammation. PMID:8427705

  4. Mass-casualty Response to the Kiss Nightclub in Santa Maria, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dal Ponte, Silvana T; Dornelles, Carlos F D; Arquilla, Bonnie; Bloem, Christina; Roblin, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    On January 27, 2013, a fire at the Kiss Nightclub in Santa Maria, Brazil led to a mass-casualty incident affecting hundreds of college students. A total of 234 people died on scene, 145 were hospitalized, and another 623 people received treatment throughout the first week following the incident.1 Eight of the hospitalized people later died.1 The Military Police were the first on scene, followed by the state fire department, and then the municipal Mobile Prehospital Assistance (SAMU) ambulances. The number of victims was not communicated clearly to the various units arriving on scene, leading to insufficient rescue personnel and equipment. Incident command was established on scene, but the rescuers and police were still unable to control the chaos of multiple bystanders attempting to assist in the rescue efforts. The Municipal Sports Center (CDM) was designated as the location for dead bodies, where victim identification and communication with families occurred, as well as forensic evaluation, which determined the primary cause of death to be asphyxia. A command center was established at the Hospital de Caridade Astrogildo de Azevedo (HCAA) in Santa Maria to direct where patients should be admitted, recruit staff, and procure additional supplies, as needed. The victims suffered primarily from smoke inhalation and many required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. There was a shortage of ventilators; therefore, some had to be borrowed from local hospitals, neighboring cities, and distant areas in the state. A total of 54 patients1 were transferred to hospitals in the capital city of Porto Alegre (Brazil). The main issues with the response to the fire were scene control and communication. Areas for improvement were identified, namely the establishment of a disaster-response plan, as well as regularly scheduled training in disaster preparedness/response. These activities are the first steps to improving mass-casualty responses. PMID:25544145

  5. Mixteco de Santa Maria Penoles, Oaxaca (Mixtec of Santa Maria Penoles, Oaxaca).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Mixtec, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in Santa Maria Penoles in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling of the…

  6. Chocho de Santa Catarina Ocotlan, Oaxaca (Chocho of Santa Catarina Ocotlan, Oaxaca).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken by the Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Chocho, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in Santa Catarina Ocotlan, in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling…

  7. Geologic Map of the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain Area, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Keller, Edward A.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a newly revised and expanded digital geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map to 2,000 feet on the ground)1 and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. The map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Dos Pueblos Canyon, Goleta, Santa Barbara, and Carpinteria 7.5' quadrangles. The new map supersedes an earlier preliminary geologic map of the central part of the coastal plain (Minor and others, 2002; revised 2006) that provided coastal coverage only within the Goleta and Santa Barbara quadrangles. In addition to new mapping to the west and east, geologic mapping in parts of the central map area has been significantly revised from the preliminary map compilation - especially north of downtown Santa Barbara in the Mission Ridge area - based on new structural interpretations supplemented by new biostratigraphic data. All surficial and bedrock map units, including several new units recognized in the areas of expanded mapping, are described in detail in the accompanying pamphlet. Abundant new biostratigraphic and biochronologic data based on microfossil identifications are presented in expanded unit descriptions of the marine Neogene Monterey and Sisquoc Formations. Site-specific fault kinematic observations embedded in the digital map database are more complete owing to the addition of slip-sense determinations. Finally, the pamphlet accompanying the present report includes an expanded and refined summary of stratigraphic and structural observations and interpretations that are based on the composite geologic data contained in the new map compilation. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along an east-west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest

  8. Free inside: The Music Class at Santa Ana Jail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fierro, Joe

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the workings of the music class at the Santa Ana Jail in Santa Ana, California. It gives us insight into a jail system and a music class focused on helping inmates position themselves to become productive members of society. In this article I examine how the facility encourages inmates' good behaviour and why the music class…

  9. 29. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. PLAN FOR POWER HOUSE, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. PLAN FOR POWER HOUSE, SANTA ANA RIVER P. H. NO. 3, JUNE 23, 1943; REVISIONS, MAR. 14, 1945 AND MAY 17, 1954. SCE drawing no. 523219-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. Public Values Related to the Santa Cruz River

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Santa Cruz Basin is a focus geography for EPA Southwestern ecosystem services research, and the focal resource is water. The goal of one component of the Santa Cruz effort is to characterize the ways in which basin residents value the river, and environmental resources relate...