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Sample records for hospital-based dialysis units

  1. Hospital-based dialysis centers: perspectives from the for-profit sector.

    PubMed

    Ketchum, Peter W

    2005-06-01

    Make your hospital-based dialysis program financially viable, not a drain on cash flow. Assess the program's financial performance and potential value by comparing its data with industry benchmarks. Maximize all available revenue opportunities, and closely scrutinize expenses. PMID:17240663

  2. Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney transplant, you will need a treatment called dialysis. There are two main types of dialysis. Both types filter your blood to rid your ... clinic for treatments several times a week. Peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of your abdomen, called the ...

  3. The Changing Landscape of Home Dialysis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rivara, Matthew B.; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss the changing landscape of home dialysis in the United States over the past decade, including recent research on clinical outcomes in patient undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HHD), and to describe the impact of recent payment reforms for patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Recent findings Accumulating evidence supports that clinical outcomes for patients treated with PD or HHD are as good as or better than for patients treated with conventional in-center hemodialysis (ICHD). The recent implementation of the Medicare expanded prospective payment system (PPS) for the care of ESRD patients has resulted in substantial growth in the utilization of PD in the United States. Utilization of HHD has also grown, but the contribution of the expanded PPS to this growth is less certain. Summary Home dialysis, including PD and HHD represent important alternatives to ICHD that are effective and patient-centered. Over the coming decade, growth in the number of ESRD patient treated with home dialysis modalities should prompt further comparative and cost effectiveness research, increased attention to racial and ethnic disparities, and investments in home dialysis education for both patients and providers. PMID:25197946

  4. Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney transplant, you will need a treatment called dialysis. There are two main types of dialysis. Both types filter your blood to rid your body of harmful wastes, extra salt, and water. Hemodialysis uses a machine. It is sometimes called an ...

  5. The role of leader behaviors in hospital-based emergency departments' unit performance and employee work satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Ping C; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The role of the leader of a medical unit has evolved over time to expand from simply a medical role to a more managerial one. This study aimed to explore how the behavior of a hospital-based emergency department's (ED's) leader might be related to ED unit performance and ED employees' work satisfaction. One hundred and twelve hospital-based EDs in Taiwan were studied: 10 in medical centers, 32 in regional hospitals, and 70 in district hospitals. Three instruments were designed to assess leader behaviors, unit performance and employee satisfaction in these hospital-based EDs. A mail survey revealed that task-oriented leader behavior was positively related to ED unit performance. Both task- and employee-oriented leader behaviors were found to be positively related to ED nurses' work satisfaction. However, leader behaviors were not shown to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction at a statistically significant level. Some ED organizational characteristics, however, namely departmentalization and hospital accreditation level, were found to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction. PMID:21159414

  6. Exploring the opinion of hemodialysis patients about their dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Donia, Ahmed Farouk; Elhadedy, Mohamed Ahmed; El-Maghrabi, Hanzada Mohamed; Abbas, Mohamed Hamed; Foda, Mohamed Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients are subjected to a number of physical and mental stresses. Physicians might be unaware of some of these problems. We assessed our patients' opinion about the service provided at the dialysis unit. Our unit has 89 patients on HD. A questionnaire exploring our patients' opinion relative to the service provided was prepared. The patients were asked to fill-in the questionnaire in a confidential manner. Questionnaires were then collected and examined while unaware of patient identities. Sixty-nine patients (77.5%) responded to the questionnaire. Eight patients (11.6%) revealed their names on the questionnaire. According to the questionnaire, the patients were asked to assess the service of each service by choosing one of the following grades: "excellent," "mediocre" or "bad." For the whole group of contributing patients, there were 563 "excellent," 85 "mediocre" and five "bad" choices in addition to 37 blank "no comment" choices. Food service had the least percentage (68%) of evaluation as "excellent," while doctor' performance got the highest excellent evaluation (85.5%). Thirty-five patients (50.7%) added further comment(s). An audit meeting was conducted to discuss these results. Exploring the opinion of patients on HD might uncover some areas of dissatisfaction and help in improving the provided service. We recommend widespread usage of questionnaires to assess patient satisfaction as well as to assess other health-care aspects. PMID:25579719

  7. Adherence Barriers to Chronic Dialysis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Thadhani, Ravi I.; Maddux, Franklin W.

    2014-01-01

    Hemodialysis patients often do not attend their scheduled treatment session. We investigated factors associated with missed appointments and whether such nonadherence poses significant harm to patients and increases overall health care utilization in an observational analysis of 44 million hemodialysis treatments for 182,536 patients with ESRD in the United States. We assessed the risk of hospitalization, emergency room visit, or intensive-coronary care unit (ICU-CCU) admission in the 2 days after a missed treatment relative to the risk for patients who received hemodialysis. Over the 5-year study period, the average missed treatment rate was 7.1 days per patient-year. In covariate adjusted logistic regression, the risk of hospitalization (odds ratio [OR], 3.98; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.93 to 4.04), emergency room visit (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.87 to 2.14), or ICU-CCU admission (OR, 3.89; 95% CI, 3.81 to 3.96) increased significantly after a missed treatment. Overall, 0.9 missed treatment days per year associated with suboptimal transportation to dialysis, inclement weather, holidays, psychiatric illness, pain, and gastrointestinal upset. These barriers also associated with excess hospitalization (5.6 more events per patient-year), emergency room visits (1.1 more visits), and ICU-CCU admissions (0.8 more admissions). In conclusion, poor adherence to hemodialysis treatments may be a substantial roadblock to achieving better patient outcomes. Addressing systemic and patient barriers that impede access to hemodialysis care may decrease missed appointments and reduce patient morbidity. PMID:24762400

  8. The challenges of diabetes care in the dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Stephen D

    2003-01-01

    Nephrologists, dialysis facilities, and payers are confronted with a new and more difficult set of challenges to effectively care for the steadily increasing number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD). U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) data suggest that the current care of patients with DM on dialysis is suboptimal. Recently published reports have confirmed the value of HbA1C measurements in the diabetic dialysis population, that control of blood glucose lowers mortality, and that a program of care management and diabetes education can have a significant impact on patient outcomes. As leader of the nephrology team, the nephrologist should, at a minimum, be accountable for defining who is managing the diabetes. A more systematic and educated approach to DM and its complications needs to be developed by the renal community. PMID:12753677

  9. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Use of and Outcomes with Home Dialysis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Soohoo, Melissa; Rivara, Matthew B; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Cheung, Alfred K; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Nissenson, Allen R; Ravel, Vanessa; Streja, Elani; Kuttykrishnan, Sooraj; Katz, Ronit; Molnar, Miklos Z; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2016-07-01

    Home dialysis, which comprises peritoneal dialysis (PD) or home hemodialysis (home HD), offers patients with ESRD greater flexibility and independence. Although ESRD disproportionately affects racial/ethnic minorities, data on disparities in use and outcomes with home dialysis are sparse. We analyzed data of patients who initiated maintenance dialysis between 2007 and 2011 and were admitted to any of 2217 dialysis facilities in 43 states operated by a single large dialysis organization, with follow-up through December 31, 2011 (n =: 162,050, of which 17,791 underwent PD and 2536 underwent home HD for ≥91 days). Every racial/ethnic minority group was significantly less likely to be treated with home dialysis than whites. Among individuals treated with in-center HD or PD, racial/ethnic minorities had a lower risk for death than whites; among individuals undergoing home HD, only blacks had a significantly lower death risk than whites. Blacks undergoing PD or home HD had a higher risk for transfer to in-center HD than their white counterparts, whereas Asians or others undergoing PD had a lower risk than whites undergoing PD. Blacks irrespective of dialysis modality, Hispanics undergoing PD or in-center HD, and Asians and other racial groups undergoing in-center HD were significantly less likely than white counterparts to receive a kidney transplant. In conclusion, there are racial/ethnic disparities in use of and outcomes with home dialysis in the United States. Disparities in kidney transplantation evident for blacks and Hispanics undergoing home dialysis are similar to those with in-center HD. Future studies should identify modifiable causes for these disparities. PMID:26657565

  10. Evaluating Infection Prevention Strategies in Out-Patient Dialysis Units Using Agent-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wares, Joanna R.; Lawson, Barry; Shemin, Douglas; D’Agata, Erika M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving chronic hemodialysis (CHD) are among the most vulnerable to infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines to reduce transmission of MDRO in the out-patient dialysis unit are targeted at patients considered to be high-risk for transmitting these organisms: those with infected skin wounds not contained by a dressing, or those with fecal incontinence or uncontrolled diarrhea. Here, we hypothesize that targeting patients receiving antimicrobial treatment would more effectively reduce transmission and acquisition of MDRO. We also hypothesize that environmental contamination plays a role in the dissemination of MDRO in the dialysis unit. To address our hypotheses, we built an agent-based model to simulate different treatment strategies in a dialysis unit. Our results suggest that reducing antimicrobial treatment, either by reducing the number of patients receiving treatment or by reducing the duration of the treatment, markedly reduces overall colonization rates and also the levels of environmental contamination in the dialysis unit. Our results also suggest that improving the environmental decontamination efficacy between patient dialysis treatments is an effective method for reducing colonization and contamination rates. These findings have important implications for the development and implementation of future infection prevention strategies. PMID:27195984

  11. Evaluating Infection Prevention Strategies in Out-Patient Dialysis Units Using Agent-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wares, Joanna R; Lawson, Barry; Shemin, Douglas; D'Agata, Erika M C

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving chronic hemodialysis (CHD) are among the most vulnerable to infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines to reduce transmission of MDRO in the out-patient dialysis unit are targeted at patients considered to be high-risk for transmitting these organisms: those with infected skin wounds not contained by a dressing, or those with fecal incontinence or uncontrolled diarrhea. Here, we hypothesize that targeting patients receiving antimicrobial treatment would more effectively reduce transmission and acquisition of MDRO. We also hypothesize that environmental contamination plays a role in the dissemination of MDRO in the dialysis unit. To address our hypotheses, we built an agent-based model to simulate different treatment strategies in a dialysis unit. Our results suggest that reducing antimicrobial treatment, either by reducing the number of patients receiving treatment or by reducing the duration of the treatment, markedly reduces overall colonization rates and also the levels of environmental contamination in the dialysis unit. Our results also suggest that improving the environmental decontamination efficacy between patient dialysis treatments is an effective method for reducing colonization and contamination rates. These findings have important implications for the development and implementation of future infection prevention strategies. PMID:27195984

  12. [Census of the Italian Nephrology and Dialysis Units. Comparison between Lombardy and Piedmont].

    PubMed

    Buccianti, G; Alloatti, S; Conte, F; Pedrini, L

    2006-01-01

    The Italian Society of Nephrology promoted a national survey to obtain detailed information from all the Renal and/or Dialysis Units through an on-line questionnaire concerning structural, technological and human resources, as well as organisation characteristics and activities. The purpose of this initiative was to obtain regional reference benchmarks for each Nephrology Unit. In this paper we compare two northwestern Italian Regions: Lombardy and Piedmont. As far as epidemiology is concerned, the prevalence of dialysis patients is quite similar in the two Regions: for haemodialysis 616 pmp (patients per million population) in Lombardy and 595 in Piedmont, for peritoneal dialysis 104 pmp vs. 114 pmp, while the incidence of dialysis patients is 169 vs. 166 pmp. The gross mortality for dialysis patients is 12.4% vs. 13.7% and 0.9% vs. 2.0% in transplanted patients. The distribution of vascular access is also quite similar in the two Regions: prevalent arteriovenous fistula 83% vs. 74%, central venous catheter 11% vs. 18%, vascular grafts 7% vs. 8%. Structural resources: the hospital beds (49 pmp in the two Regions) and the dialysis places (161 vs. 166 pmp) do not differ between the two Regions. Personnel resources: physicians 37 pmp in Lombardy and 44 pmp in Piedmont, renal nurses 167 pmp vs. 186, respectively. Activity: hospital admission 1722 pmp vs. 1507 pmp, renal biopsies 131 pmp vs. 109 pmp. Although the two regions examined are numerically different, both have a high standard of quality, making Italy a model of nephrology organisation. This initiative to take a census of the Italian Nephrology and Dialysis Units provides an interesting tool to describe the present status of the operational structures, to identify precise benchmarking values, at both the regional and national level, and to act as a prelude for further rationalization and growth of the nephrology network in Italy. PMID:16710824

  13. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  14. Comparison of the Prevalence of Latent Tuberculosis Infection among Non-Dialysis Patients with Severe Chronic Kidney Disease, Patients Receiving Dialysis, and the Dialysis-Unit Staff: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chin-Chung; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Feng-Jung; Wang, Jann-Tay; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with renal failure are vulnerable to tuberculosis, a common worldwide infectious disease. In the growing dialysis population, the risk for tuberculosis among the associated sub-groups is important but unclear. This study investigated latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) and among dialysis-unit staff caring for patients on dialysis. Methods From January 2012 to June 2013, patients undergoing dialysis, those with severe CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30ml/min/1.73 m2), and the dialysis-unit staff (nursing staff and doctors in hemodialysis units) in several Taiwan hospitals were prospectively enrolled. Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) through QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube was used to determine LTBI. Predictors for LTBI were analyzed. Results Of the 599 participants enrolled, 106 (25%) in the dialysis group were IGRA positive. This was higher than the seven (11%) among severe CKD patients and 12 (11%) in the dialysis-unit staff. Independent predictors of LTBI in patient with renal dysfunction were old age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03 [1.01–1.04] per year increment), prior TB lesion on chest radiograph (OR: 2.90 [1.45–5.83]), serum albumin (OR: 2.59 [1.63–4.11] per 1 g/dl increment), and need for dialysis (OR: 2.47, [1.02–5.95]). The QFT-GIT response was similar among the three groups. Malignancy (OR: 4.91 [1.84–13.10]) and low serum albumin level (OR: 0.22 [0.10–0.51], per 1 g/dl decrease) were associated with indeterminate IGRA results. Conclusions More patients on dialysis have LTBI compared to those with severe CKD and the dialysis-unit staff. Old age, prior radiographic TB lesion, high serum albumin, and need for dialysis are predictors of LTBI in patients with renal failure. Patients with severe CKD are a lower priority for LTBI screening. The hemodialysis environment is not a risk for LTBI and dialysis-unit staff may be treated as general healthcare workers. PMID

  15. Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Natour, Mohammed; Thompson, Dustin

    2016-03-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is becoming more important in the management of patients with end-stage renal disease. Because of the efforts of the "Fistula First Breakthrough Initiative," dialysis venous access in the United States has become focused on promoting arteriovenous fistula creation and reducing the number of patients who start dialysis with a tunneled catheter. This is important because tunneled catheters can lead to infection, endocarditis, and early loss of more long-term access. When planned for, peritoneal dialysis can offer patients the opportunity to start dialysis at home without jeopardizing central access or the possibilities of eventual arteriovenous fistula creation. The purpose of this review is to highlight the indications, contraindications, and procedural methods for implanting peritoneal dialysis catheters in the interventional radiology suite. PMID:27011420

  16. Aspects of Fear of Personal Death, Levels of Awareness, and Professional Affiliation among Dialysis Unit Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Lea; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined expressions of fear of personal death among physicians, nurses, and social workers working in hospital dialysis units. Results indicated no differences in fear of personal death between 71 dialysis personnel and 68 other hospital personnel serving as controls. Physicians had lowest scores of fear of personal death followed by nurses and…

  17. Associations between CMS's Clinical Performance Measures project benchmarks, profit structure, and mortality in dialysis units.

    PubMed

    Szczech, L A; Klassen, P S; Chua, B; Hedayati, S S; Flanigan, M; McClellan, W M; Reddan, D N; Rettig, R A; Frankenfield, D L; Owen, W F

    2006-06-01

    Prior studies observing greater mortality in for-profit dialysis units have not captured information about benchmarks of care. This study was undertaken to examine the association between profit status and mortality while achieving benchmarks. Utilizing data from the US Renal Data System and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' end-stage renal disease (ESRD) Clinical Performance Measures project, hemodialysis units were categorized as for-profit or not-for-profit. Associations with mortality at 1 year were estimated using Cox regression. Two thousand six hundred and eighty-five dialysis units (31,515 patients) were designated as for-profit and 1018 (15,085 patients) as not-for-profit. Patients in for-profit facilities were more likely to be older, black, female, diabetic, and have higher urea reduction ratio (URR), hematocrit, serum albumin, and transferrin saturation. Patients (19.4 and 18.6%) in for-profit and not-for-profit units died, respectively. In unadjusted analyses, profit status was not associated with mortality (hazard ratio (HR)=1.04, P=0.09). When added to models with profit status, the following resulted in a significant association between profit status (for-profit vs not-for-profit) and increasing mortality risk: URR, hematocrit, albumin, and ESRD Network. In adjusted models, patients in for-profit facilities had a greater death risk (HR 1.09, P=0.004). More patients in for-profit units met clinical benchmarks. Survival among patients in for-profit units was similar to not-for-profit units. This suggests that in the contemporary era, interventions in for-profit dialysis units have not impaired their ability to deliver performance benchmarks and do not affect survival. PMID:16732194

  18. [Referral to the pediatric dialysis unit -- the earlier the better?].

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael; Arbeiter, Klaus; Müller, Thomas; Raffelsberger, Niclas; Falger, Jutta; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2005-10-01

    Whereas recent research has demonstrated clear evidence for beneficial effects of early referral to the nephrologist in chronic renal insufficiency in adults, no such data exist for the pediatric population. In this study, we therefore correlated patient age and residual renal function at first presentation to a specialized pediatric nephrologist with the extent of secondary uremic complications and the further course of renal function. From March 2003 until March 2004, 43 children (34 boys, aged 10.1 +/- 6.3 yrs) with congenital-urologic (n = 26), congenital-nephrologic (n = 13) or acquired (n = 4) renal diseases had been followed for 3.9 yrs (14 days to 17.5 yrs) at the Kinderdialyse Wien, with a residual renal function of 35 +/- 20.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) at first presentation. With regards to uremic secondary complications, the majority of children exhibited involvement of at least two systems at first presentation. Thereafter, children with congenital diseases who were referred to the specialized pediatric nephrology unit within the first year of live demonstrated a significantly better course of residual renal function (1.8% vs -0.7%, p = 0.034) than children who were referred later. These data confirm recent registry reports on chronic renal insufficiency in children. Only about a third of the children of our population were presented to a specialized pediatric nephrology center within their first year of life (despite a congenital disease in 90% of them). Thus, therapeutic interventions might be currently offered at a delayed time point in the majority of children. PMID:16416370

  19. The Evolving Ethics of Dialysis in the United States: A Principlist Bioethics Approach.

    PubMed

    Butler, Catherine R; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Tonelli, Mark R; Lam, Daniel Y

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the history of dialysis, four bioethical principles - beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy and justice - have been weighted differently based upon changing forces of technologic innovation, resource limitation, and societal values. In the 1960s, a committee of lay people in Seattle attempted to fairly distribute a limited number of maintenance hemodialysis stations guided by considerations of justice. As technology advanced and dialysis was funded under an amendment to the Social Security Act in 1972, focus shifted to providing dialysis for all in need while balancing the burdens of treatment and quality of life, supported by the concepts of beneficence and nonmaleficence. At the end of the last century, the importance of patient preferences and personal values became paramount in medical decisions, reflecting a focus on the principle of autonomy. More recently, greater recognition that health care financial resources are limited makes fair allocation more pressing, again highlighting the importance of distributive justice. The varying application and prioritization of these four principles to both policy and clinical decisions in the United States over the last 50 years makes the history of hemodialysis an instructive platform for understanding principlist bioethics. As medical technology evolves in a landscape of changing personal and societal values, a comprehensive understanding of an ethical framework for evaluating appropriate use of medical interventions enables the clinician to systematically negotiate and optimize difficult ethical situations. PMID:26912540

  20. The Power of Advance Care Planning in Promoting Hospice and Out-of-Hospital Death in a Dialysis Unit

    PubMed Central

    Weaner, Barbara B.; Long, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite mortality rates that exceed those of most cancers, hospice remains underutilized in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis and nearly half of all dialysis patients die in the hospital. Objective: To review the impact of advance care planning on withdrawal from dialysis, use of hospice, and location of death. Design: Retrospective review. Setting: A rural outpatient dialysis unit. Participants: Former dialysis patients who died over a 5-year period. Exposure: Advance care planning, the use of physician orders for life-sustaining therapy program (POLST). Main Outcome and Measure: Use of hospice among patients withdrawing from dialysis, location of death. Results: Advance care planning was associated with a low incidence of in-hospital death and among those who withdrew, a high use of hospice. Conclusions and Relevance: Comprehensive and systematic advance care planning among patients with ESRD on dialysis promotes greater hospice utilization and may facilitate the chance that death will occur out of hospital. PMID:25006866

  1. Impact of dialysis practice patterns on outcomes in acute kidney injury in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Annigeri, Rajeev A.; Nandeesh, Venkatappa; Karuniya, Ramanathan; Rajalakshmi, Sasikumar; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent advances in dialysis therapy have made an impact on the clinical practice of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in acute kidney injury (AKI) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). We studied the impact of RRT practice changes on outcomes in AKI in ICU over a period of 8 years. Subjects and Methods: AKI patients requiring RRT in ICU referred to a nephrologist during two different periods (period-1: Between May 2004 and May 2007, n = 69; period-2: Between August 2008 and May 2011, n = 93) were studied. The major changes in the dialysis practice during the period-2, compared to period-1 were introduction of prolonged intermittent RRT (PIRRT), early dialysis for metabolic acidosis, early initiation of RRT for anuria and positive fluid balance and use of bicarbonate-based fluids for continuous RRT (CRRT) instead of lactate buffer. The primary study outcome was 28-day hospital mortality. Results: The mean age was 53.8 ± 16.1 years and 72.6% were male. Introduction of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction in utilization of CRRT during period-2 (from 85.5% to 53.7%). The overall mortality was high (68%) but was significantly reduced during period-2 compared to period-1 (59% vs. 79.7%, P = 0.006). Metabolic acidosis but not the mode of RRT, was the significant factor which influenced mortality. Conclusions: Adaption of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction of utilization of CRRT. The mortality rate was significantly reduced during the period of adaption of PIRRT, possibly due to early initiation of RRT in the latter period for indications such as anuria and metabolic acidosis. PMID:26955212

  2. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rates for ESRD facilities using the following methodology: (1) For dialysis services furnished prior to...) For dialysis services furnished on or after January 1, 2009— (i) The composite rate paid to hospital-based facilities for dialysis services shall be the same as the composite rate paid for such...

  3. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Patients of Intensive Care Unit in China: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Biao; Cong, Wei; Li, Zhi-Tao; Bi, Xiao-Gang; Xian, Ying; Wang, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhang, Kou-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in 394 patients of intensive care unit (ICU) in a hospital between April 2010 and March 2012 and analyze the association between T. gondii infection and ICU patients according to the species of disease. Toxoplasma serology was evaluated by ELISA method using a commercially available kit. Data of patients were obtained from the patients, informants, and medical examination records. Seventy-four (18.78%) of 394 patients were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies demonstrating latent infection. Of these, the highest T. gondii seroprevalence was found in the age group of 31–45 years (27.45%), and the lowest was found in the age group of <30 years (12.5%). In addition, females (21.6%) had a higher seroprevalence than males (18.36%). With respect to the species of disease, the patients with kidney diseases (57.14%), lung diseases (27.84%), and brain diseases (24%) had high T. gondii seroprevalence. The present study represents the first survey of T. gondii seroprevalence in ICU patients in China, revealing an 18.78% seropositivity. Considering the particularities of ICU patients, molecular identification, genetic characterization, and diagnosis of T. gondii should be considered in future study. PMID:25961046

  4. Systematic barriers to the effective delivery of home dialysis in the United States: a report from the Public Policy/Advocacy Committee of the North American Chapter of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Golper, Thomas A; Saxena, Anjali B; Piraino, Beth; Teitelbaum, Isaac; Burkart, John; Finkelstein, Fredric O; Abu-Alfa, Ali

    2011-12-01

    Home dialysis, currently underused in the United States compared with other industrialized countries, likely will benefit from the newly implemented US prospective payment system. Not only is home dialysis less expensive from the standpoint of pure dialysis costs, but overall health system costs may be decreased by more subtle benefits, such as reduced transportation. However, many systematic barriers exist to the successful delivery of home dialysis. We organized these barriers into the categories of educational barriers (patient and providers), governmental/regulatory barriers (state and federal), and barriers specifically related to the philosophies and business practices of dialysis providers (eg, staffing, pharmacies, supplies, space, continuous quality improvement practices, and independence). All stakeholders share the goal of delivering home dialysis therapies in the most cost- and clinically effective and least problematic manner. Identification and recognition of such barriers is the first step. In addition, we have suggested action plans to stimulate the kidney community to find even better solutions so that collectively we may overcome these barriers. PMID:21903316

  5. Dialysis and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Beal-Lloyd, Donna; Groh, Carla J

    2012-01-01

    End stage renal disease is a major health issue in the United States. Dialysis, the major form of renal replacement therapy, has physical and psychological implications that can have a major impact on both men's and women's sexuality and sexual performance. Nurses are in a key position to assist men and women on dialysis to develop healthy and realistic approaches to their sexuality. This article reviews the literature on dialysis and sexuality, and recommends nursing interventions that can assist persons on dialysis achieve the level of sexual intimacy and satisfaction they desire. PMID:23061112

  6. USB drives for communication of medical information in a pediatric dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Sethna, Christine B; Breen, Christine; Pradhan, Madhura; Green, Cynthia; Kaplan, Bernard S; Meyers, Kevin E C

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of using universal serial bus (USB) drives for communicating medical information between parents of children receiving dialysis and medical personnel during clinical encounters. When surveyed, parents and pediatric resident physicians supported the use of USB drives and were willing to use the devices. The utilization rate of USB drives was 57%. PMID:19732586

  7. Nutrition in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sen, D; Prakash, J

    2000-07-01

    Malnutrition is a common clinical problem in dialysis patients, which is multifactorial in origin. It is most often found in a patient of chronic renal failure (CRF) during the period when the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 10 ml/min, but dialysis is yet to be started. The loss of proteins, aminoacids and other essential nutrients during the procedure of dialysis may further aggravate the malnutrition. Poor nutrition in dialysis patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the form of delayed wound healing, malaise, fatigue, increased susceptibility to infection and poor rehabilitation. In view of the above consequences, all patients on dialysis must undergo nutritional assessment. It is very vital to maintain good nutritional status in-patients on dialysis by adequate protein and calories intake, appropriate supplementation of iron, calcium, minerals and water-soluble vitamins and, of course, the supplementation should be individualised. Nutritional needs are enhanced in presence of stresses like infection or surgery to limit excessive tissue catabolism and therefore, these are the situations, which demand intensive nutrition therapy. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) may be required for patients on dialysis in intensive care unit, using a central venous catheter. However, enteral route is always preferred to parenteral ones, whenever possible. Even after adequate dialysis has been given, dietary counselling is often required for both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients to ensure that they ingest the recommended amount of protein, calories and essential micronutrients. PMID:11273510

  8. Practice patterns, case mix, Medicare payment policy, and dialysis facility costs.

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, R A; Held, P J; Orzol, S M; Dor, A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of case mix, practice patterns, features of the payment system, and facility characteristics on the cost of dialysis. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The nationally representative sample of dialysis units in the 1991 U.S. Renal Data System's Case Mix Adequacy (CMA) Study. The CMA data were merged with data from Medicare Cost Reports, HCFA facility surveys, and HCFA's end-stage renal disease patient registry. STUDY DESIGN: We estimated a statistical cost function to examine the determinants of costs at the dialysis unit level. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The relationship between case mix and costs was generally weak. However, dialysis practices (type of dialysis membrane, membrane reuse policy, and treatment duration) did have a significant effect on costs. Further, facilities whose payment was constrained by HCFA's ceiling on the adjustment for area wage rates incurred higher costs than unconstrained facilities. The costs of hospital-based units were considerably higher than those of freestanding units. Among chain units, only members of one of the largest national chains exhibited significant cost savings relative to independent facilities. CONCLUSIONS: Little evidence showed that adjusting dialysis payment to account for differences in case mix across facilities would be necessary to ensure access to care for high-cost patients or to reimburse facilities equitably for their costs. However, current efforts to increase dose of dialysis may require higher payments. Longer treatments appear to be the most economical method of increasing the dose of dialysis. Switching to more expensive types of dialysis membranes was a more costly means of increasing dose and hence must be justified by benefits beyond those of higher dose. Reusing membranes saved money, but the savings were insufficient to offset the costs associated with using more expensive membranes. Most, but not all, of the higher costs observed in hospital-based units appear to reflect

  9. Conserving water in and applying solar power to haemodialysis: 'green dialysis' through wiser resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Agar, John W M

    2010-06-01

    Natural resources are under worldwide pressure, water and sustainable energy being the paramount issues. Haemodialysis, a water-voracious and energy-hungry healthcare procedure, thoughtlessly wastes water and leaves a heavy carbon footprint. In our service, 100 000 L/week of previously discarded reverse osmosis reject water--water which satisfies all World Health Organisation criteria for potable (drinking) water--no longer drains to waste but is captured for reuse. Reject water from the hospital-based dialysis unit provides autoclave steam for instrument sterilization, ward toilet flushing, janitor stations and garden maintenance. Satellite centre reject water is tanker-trucked to community sporting fields, schools and aged-care gardens. Home-based nocturnal dialysis patient reuse reject water for home domestic utilities, gardens and animal watering. Although these and other potential water reuse practices should be mandated through legislation for all dialysis services, this is yet to occur. In addition, we now are piloting the use of solar power for the reverse osmosis plant and the dialysis machines in our home dialysis training service. If previously attempted, these have yet to be reported. After measuring the power requirements of both dialytic processes and modelling the projected costs, a programme has begun to solar power all dialysis-related equipment in a three-station home haemodialysis training unit. Income-generation with the national electricity grid via a grid-share and reimbursement arrangement predicts a revenue stream back to the dialysis service. Dialysis services must no longer ignore the non-medical aspects of their programmes but plan, trial, implement and embrace 'green dialysis' resource management practices. PMID:20609097

  10. Different Aspects of Fatigue Experienced by Patients Receiving Maintenance Dialysis in Hemodialysis Units

    PubMed Central

    Biniaz, Vajihe; Tayybi, Ali; Nemati, Eghlim; Sadeghi Shermeh, Mehdi; Ebadi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Fatigue, a common symptom reported by patients receiving dialysis, is a multidimensional and subjective experience which is readily understood by individuals but difficult to measure. Objectives This study was performed to identify the prevalence of differential aspects of fatigue among patients receiving maintenance dialysis. Patients and Methods The cross-sectional study was conducted in two hemodialysis wards in Tehran with a sample of 163 participants. In this study, the multidimensional fatigue inventory was used to determine the level of fatigue. Demographic data were also collected with self-report survey. To analyze data with SPSS statistical software, test Chi square, T-test, and ANOVA were used. P- Value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results All the patients experienced degrees of fatigue and 50 (30.7%) of the participants experienced a high level of fatigue. Fatigue scores arrangement was founded for physical fatigue followed by reduced activity and general fatigue. Lower levels of fatigue were reported for mental fatigue and reduced motivation. There was no diversity in this study in the levels of fatigue in respects of gender and marital status and employment status. Participants with diabetic nephropathy were the most fatigued. Conclusions People with chronic kidney disease regardless of their age, gender, state of health, and duration of hemodialysis experience high levels of fatigue; it is particularly important for health providers to understand this level of fatigue which affects the daily life of patients. PMID:24350089

  11. Dialysis - hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    Artificial kidneys - hemodialysis; Dialysis; Renal replacement therapy - hemodialysis; End-stage renal disease - hemodialysis; Kidney failure - hemodialysis; Renal failure - hemodialysis; Chronic kidney disease - hemodialysis

  12. International Comparisons to Assess Effects of Payment and Regulatory Changes in the United States on Anemia Practice in Patients on Hemodialysis: The Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Douglas S; Bieber, Brian A; Pisoni, Ronald L; Li, Yun; Morgenstern, Hal; Akizawa, Tadao; Jacobson, Stefan H; Locatelli, Francesco; Port, Friedrich K; Robinson, Bruce M

    2016-07-01

    For years, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) use among patients on dialysis was much higher in the United States than in Europe or Japan. Sweeping changes to dialysis reimbursement and regulatory policies for ESA in the United States in 2011 were expected to reduce ESA use and hemoglobin levels. We used the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) data from 7129 patients in 223 in-center hemodialysis facilities (average per month) to estimate and compare time trends in ESA dose and hemoglobin levels among patients on hemodialysis in the United States, Germany, Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, and Japan. From 2010 to 2013, substantial declines in ESA use and hemoglobin levels occurred in the United States but not in other DOPPS countries. Between August of 2010 and April of 2013, mean weekly ESA dose in the United States decreased 40.4% for black patients and 38.0% for nonblack patients; mean hemoglobin decreased from 11.5 g/dl in black patients and 11.4 g/dl in nonblack patients to 10.6 g/dl in both groups. In 2010 and 2013, adjusted weekly ESA doses per kilogram were 41% and 11% lower, respectively, in patients in Europe and 60% and 18% lower, respectively, in patients in Japan than in nonblack patients in the United States. Adjusted hemoglobin levels in 2010 and 2013 were 0.07 g/dl lower and 0.56 g/dl higher, respectively, in patients in Europe and 0.93 and 0.01 g/dl lower, respectively, in patients in Japan than in nonblack patients in the United States. In conclusion, ESA dosing reductions in the United States likely reflect efforts in response to changes in reimbursement policy and regulatory guidance. PMID:26582402

  13. Dialysis - peritoneal

    MedlinePlus

    ... The number of exchanges and amount of dwell time depends on the method of PD you use and other factors. Your ... PD: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) . For this ... routine until it is time to drain the fluid. You are not hooked ...

  14. Peritoneal dialysis in microencephaly.

    PubMed

    Peters, April

    2008-01-01

    J.T. was able to remain home in her familiar environment and receive safe and adequate treatment for her renal disease. J.T. had no infectious episodes or hospitalizations while under this unit's care for 35 months. She was also able to participate in her regular activities of daily living, interact with her family members, and travel on occasion, thus maintaining a good quality of life. Therefore, unit goals for her care were met. J.T.'s experience demonstrates that with proper teaching, preparation, and support from the dialysis care team working with a dedicated family, peritoneal dialysis can be an ideal modality for the treatment of ESRD in people with mental disabilities. PMID:19260611

  15. Hospital-based neuropsychological services.

    PubMed

    Sciara, A D

    1986-01-01

    Hospital-based neuropsychological services may provide the hospital with a new means of interfacing with the general medical community, especially neurologists and neurosurgeons. This could produce increased census through the evaluation and treatment of patients who may not have been referred to the psychiatric hospital previously. Additionally, it is a service that can be marketed to the legal community. The establishment of neuropsychological services is a relatively inexpensive project that requires little in the way of physical plant and personnel needs other than a qualified technician and neuropsychologist. PMID:10279536

  16. Your Dialysis Care Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... technicians are responsible for maintaining dialysis machines and water quality in your center. They order dialysis supplies and reprocess dialyzers ... NY Register Now 2016 Orangeburg Kidney Walk Thu, ...

  17. Characteristics of central dialysis fluid delivery system and single patient dialysis machine for HDF.

    PubMed

    Aoike, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    The central dialysis fluid delivery system (CDDS), with which dialysis fluid is prepared at a single location and sent to each patient station, was developed as a unique system of dialysis in Japan and has been widely used. Maintenance hemodialysis using the single patient dialysis machine (SPDM), with which reverse osmosis water is first sent to each dialysis unit, and the dialysis fluid is prepared and used at each patient station, is used in many areas worldwide other than Japan and some Asian regions. Purification of dialysis fluid is essential for online hemodiafiltration, and it is possible to achieve the target purification level with both CDDS and SPDM by keeping the appropriate procedure. It is therefore desirable to understand the characteristics of both systems and make a selection based on the scale of the facility and the concept of treatment. PMID:20938129

  18. [Integration of a psychologist into Nephrology-Dialysis-Hypertension Operative Unit: from needs evaluation to the definition of an intervention model].

    PubMed

    Monica, Ratti Maria; Delli Zotti, Giulia Bruna; Spotti, Donatella; Sarno, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and the dialytic treatment cause a significant psychological impact on patients, their families and on the medical-nursing staff too. The psychological aspects linked to the chronic condition of Kidney Disease generate the need to integrated a psychologist into the healthcare team of the Nephrology, Dialysis and Hypertension Operative Unit, in order to offer a specific and professional support to the patient during the different stages of the disease, to their caregivers and to the medical team. The aim of this collaboration project between Nephrology and Psychology is to create a global and integrated healthcare model. It does not give attention simply to the physical dimension of patients affected by CKD, but also to the emotional-affective, cognitive and social dimensions and to the health environment. PMID:25315726

  19. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment. Many people have dialysis in a treatment center. This article focuses on hemodialysis at a treatment center. ... Artificial kidneys - dialysis centers - what to expect; Dialysis - what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers - what to expect

  20. Update on dialysis economics in the UK.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adnan; Baboolal, Keshwar

    2011-03-01

    The burgeoning population of patients requiring renal replacement therapy contributes a disproportionate strain on National Health Service resources. Although renal transplantation is the preferred treatment modality for patients with established renal failure, achieving both clinical and financial advantages, limitations to organ donation and clinical comorbidities will leave a significant proportion of patients with established renal failure requiring expensive dialysis therapy in the form of either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. An understanding of dialysis economics is essential for both healthcare providers and clinical leaders to establish clinically efficient and cost-effective treatment modalities that maximize service provision. In light of changes to the provision of healthcare funds in the form of "Payment by Results," it is imperative for UK renal units to adopt clinically effective and financially accountable dialysis programs. This article explores the role of dialysis economics and implications for UK renal replacement therapy programs. PMID:21364210

  1. Critical Care Dialysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Organon Teknika Corporation's REDY 2000 dialysis machine employs technology originally developed under NASA contract by Marquardt Corporation. The chemical process developed during the project could be applied to removing toxic waste from used dialysis fluid. This discovery led to the development of a kidney dialysis machine using "sorbent" dialysis, a method of removing urea from human blood by treating a dialysate solution. The process saves electricity and, because the need for a continuous water supply is eliminated, the patient has greater freedom.

  2. Maintenance dialysis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind

    2015-02-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease require renal replacement therapy with maintenance hemodialysis or chronic peritoneal dialysis while awaiting transplantation. In addition to economic issues and limited state funding for advanced health care, the lack of trained medical personnel contributes to scarce dialysis facilities for children in developing countries. The establishment and operation of a hemodialysis unit with multidisciplinary facilities is both cost- and labor-intensive. Hemodialysis is usually carried out three times a week in a hospital setting and affects the curricular and extracurricular activities of the patient. Chronic ambulatory or cyclic peritoneal dialysis is technically simpler and allows better nutrition and growth, but is expensive for the majority of patients who must pay out of their own pocket. Multiple initiatives to enhance the training of pediatricians and nurses in skills related to initiating and managing patients on maintenance dialysis have resulted in the improved survival of children with end-stage renal disease. Support from state governments and philanthropic institutions have helped in establishing pediatric nephrology units that are equipped to provide renal replacement therapy for children. PMID:24469439

  3. The microbial world and fluids in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Nystrand, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The fluids used in dialysis are all water based. Water, which is necessary for life, is also a good environment for micro-organisms. The result of this is quite simply that microbial growth, i.e., increased numbers of micro-organisms, results in the presence of endotoxins and the formation of metabolites. The situation is not favorable for dialysis and needs to be understood and corrected. In order to act in the right way we must analyze and synthesize the available information, which will lead us to decide what actions and precautions are necessary. The possible negative effects of a too-high microbiological content in dialysis fluid and the importance of hygiene have been well-documented. This chain of events depends on ensuring that the information and thus the understanding we get from that information is accurate. If it is not accurate, any actions taken may be inadequate and result in a situation we can no longer control. The patient will be in contact with the dialysis fluid in every session of dialysis due to the phenomenon of backfiltration, which means that anywhere from 100 ml to multiple liters of dialysis fluid is filtered over the dialyzer membrane and into the blood. The problems that may occur when contaminated dialysis fluid is used range from the acute pyrogenic reaction to chronic reactions over time where no acute symptoms are identified. The immune defense system is, however, constantly tested by the presence of body foreign components in the dialysis fluid. This paper will discuss the microflora (the micro-organisms present in the microbial community) that occur in systems of fluids in dialysis, limits, and methods of cultivation and disinfection. Results presented are original data examples out of some 350 investigations of fluid systems in dialysis units around the world, using analytic methods. PMID:18397140

  4. Reexploring Differences among For-Profit and Nonprofit Dialysis Providers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donald K K; Chertow, Glenn M; Zenios, Stefanos A

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether profit status is associated with differences in hospital days per patient, an outcome that may also be influenced by provider financial goals. Data Sources United States Renal Data System Standard Analysis Files and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services cost reports. Design We compared the number of hospital days per patient per year across for-profit and nonprofit dialysis facilities during 2003. To address possible referral bias in the assignment of patients to dialysis facilities, we used an instrumental variable regression method and adjusted for selected patient-specific factors, facility characteristics such as size and chain affiliation, as well as metrics of market competition. Data Extraction Methods All patients who received in-center hemodialysis at any time in 2003 and for whom Medicare was the primary payer were included (N=170,130; roughly two-thirds of the U.S. hemodialysis population). Patients dialyzed at hospital-based facilities and patients with no dialysis facilities within 30 miles of their residence were excluded. Results Overall, adjusted hospital days per patient were 17±5 percent lower in nonprofit facilities. The difference between nonprofit and for-profit facilities persisted with the correction for referral bias. There was no association between hospital days per patient per year and chain affiliation, but larger facilities had inferior outcomes (facilities with 73 or more patients had a 14±1.7 percent increase in hospital days relative to facilities with 35 or fewer patients). Differences in outcomes among for-profit and nonprofit facilities translated to 1,600 patient-years in hospital that could be averted each year if the hospital utilization rates in for-profit facilities were to decrease to the level of their nonprofit counterparts. Conclusions Hospital days per patient-year were statistically and clinically significantly lower among nonprofit dialysis providers. These findings suggest that

  5. Tailoring dialysis and resuming low-protein diets may favor chronic dialysis discontinuation: report on three cases.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Guzzo, Gabriella; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Capizzi, Irene; Clari, Roberta; Scognamiglio, Stefania; Consiglio, Valentina; Aroasio, Emiliano; Gonella, Silvana; Veltri, Andrea; Avagnina, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Renal function recovery (RFR), defined as the discontinuation of dialysis after 3 months of replacement therapy, is reported in about 1% of chronic dialysis patients. The role of personalized, intensive dialysis schedules and of resuming low-protein diets has not been studied to date. This report describes three patients with RFR who were recently treated at a new dialysis unit set up to offer intensive hemodialysis. All three patients were females, aged 73, 75, and 78 years. Kidney disease included vascular-cholesterol emboli, diabetic nephropathy and vascular and dysmetabolic disease. At time of RFR, the patients had been dialysis-dependent from 3 months to 1 year. Dialysis was started with different schedules and was progressively discontinued with a "decremental" policy, progressively decreasing number and duration of the sessions. A moderately restricted low-protein diet (proteins 0.6 g/kg/day) was started immediately after dialysis discontinuation. The most recent update showed that two patients are well off dialysis for 5 and 6 months; the diabetic patient died (sudden death) 3 months after dialysis discontinuation. Within the limits of small numbers, our case series may suggest a role for personalized dialysis treatments and for including low-protein diets in the therapy, in enhancing long-term RFR in elderly dialysis patients. PMID:24785135

  6. On discontinuing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wight, J

    1993-06-01

    Ethical issues relating to the withdrawal of dialysis are discussed, comparing dialysis with other life-support systems, particularly artificial ventilation. It is argued that there is no ethical difference between discontinuing treatment in each case. One practical difference between the two is that patients with chronic renal failure are less likely to have reduced autonomy, and so can engage in discussions with their doctors regarding the situations in which their life-supporting treatment might be discontinued. It is argued that doctors caring for patients on dialysis have an ethical duty to discuss with these patients the circumstances in which they may wish to discontinue dialysis. PMID:8331641

  7. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers; End-stage renal disease - dialysis centers; Kidney failure - dialysis ... swells and the hand on that side feels cold Your hand gets cold, numb, or weak Also ...

  8. What's the Deal with Dialysis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... White House Lunch Recipes What's the Deal With Dialysis? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's the Deal With Dialysis? ... in the blood is too low What Is Dialysis? When someone's kidneys can no longer do their ...

  9. Dialysis induced hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Habte, B; Carter, R; Shamebo, M; Veicht, J; Boulton Jones, J M

    1982-09-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which hypoxemia is produced in patients on dialysis by studying changes in neutrophil count, blood gases and pulmonary function in a patient with only trace amounts of circulating C3 associated with Type II mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis and a control group of 6 patients with normal C3 levels during a 4 hour hemodialysis. Fifteen minutes after the start of dialysis the neutrophil count fell to 13% of pre-dialysis values in the control group while it only fell to 71% in the study patient. A further fall to 47% occurred in the patient at 30 minutes. A drop in PaO2 by 15% of initial values occurred at 15 and 30 minutes in the controls and the patient respectively matching the trend of fall in the neutrophil count. PaCO2 fell sharply across the dialysis membrane with reciprocol changes in the dialysis bath. Alveolar oxygen tension showed a significant reduction starting at 15 minutes correlating with the reduction in PaO2. The A-a O2 gradient was not altered significantly. These data strongly suggest that the principal mechanism leading to hypoxemia during dialysis is hypoventilation resulting from CO2 loss into the dialysis bath. Complement mediated pulmonary leucostasis may play a secondary role in inducing a quicker fall in PaO2 in the early part of dialysis. PMID:7140022

  10. Just the Facts: Traveling on Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... notice to fit in a traveler. Other units need a few months—or even a year. Ask your social worker for a list of the dialysis units ... who has time open on the dates you need. Have your home unit’s address, fax, ... be sent for your social worker or travel coordinator to fill out. Check ...

  11. DIALYSIS FLASK FOR CONCENTRATED CULTURE OF MICROORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Philipp; Gallup, D. M.

    1963-01-01

    Gerhardt, Philipp (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), and D. M. Gallup. Dialysis flask for concentrated culture of microorganisms. J. Bacteriol 86:919–929. 1963.—A twin-chambered dialysis flask was designed with a supported membrane clamped between a reservoir of medium in the bottom and a small volume of culture above, the unit being mounted on a shaking machine to provide aeration and agitation. The performance of different dialysis membranes and membrane filters was compared in glucose-diffusion and bacterial-culture tests. Some of the variables in dialysis culture were assessed and the growth response was characterized, with Serratia marcescens as the test organism. The general usefulness and concentrating effect of dialysis culture were demonstrated in trials with 16 representative types of microorganisms. Dialysis culture was shown to be especially suitable for producing dense populations of cells or their macromolecular products in an environment free from complex medium constituents, for removing toxic products that limit growth or fermentation, and for supplying oxygen by diffusion without the damage from usual aeration procedures. Images PMID:14080802

  12. Integrated dialysis and renal transplantation: small is beautiful.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, A J; Catto, G R; Edward, N; Engeset, J; Logie, J R; Macleod, M

    1980-01-01

    Many patients in Britain with chronic renal failure suitable for renal replacement treatment die because not enough treatment facilities are available. Moreover, the number of renal transplants performed is insufficient to meet even present needs, so the number of patients on dialysis is rising. The integrated dialysis and transplant unit in Aberdeen, which has a population base much smaller than the average British unit, meets community needs for dialysis and transplantation. The problem of harvesting cadaver kidneys has been solved; the present supply has not only enabled the number of patients on dialysis to remain stable but has resulted in a net export of kidneys. The Aberdeen unit shows how estimated needs for chronic dialysis and renal transplantation may be met. PMID:6992935

  13. Measures of blood pressure and cognition in dialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are few reports on the relationship of blood pressure with cognitive function in maintenance dialysis patients. The Cognition and Dialysis Study is an ongoing investigation of cognitive function and its risk factors in six Boston area hemodialysis units. In this analysis, we evaluated the rela...

  14. Nutrition and Peritoneal Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vitamins and Minerals The dialysis treatment washes some water-soluble vitamins out of your body. If you are not getting all the vitamins and minerals you need from the foods you ... NY Register Now 2016 Orangeburg Kidney Walk Thu, ...

  15. Dialysis: Deciding to Stop

    MedlinePlus

    ... will mean. Is stopping dialysis considered suicide? Many religions teach that individuals have the right to stop ... 2016 - 4:00am Columbus, OH Register Now 2016 Eastern Iowa Kidney Walk Sun, 09/25/2016 - 2: ...

  16. Dialysis Extraction for Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnsen, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    Chromatographic-sample pretreatment by dialysis detects traces of organic contaminants in water samples analyzed in field with minimal analysis equipment and minimal quantities of solvent. Technique also of value wherever aqueous sample and solvent must not make direct contact.

  17. Baxter Aurora dialysis system.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Thomas D

    2004-01-01

    With the recent focus on the benefits of more frequent dialysis, the Baxter Aurora dialysis system provides maximum flexibility for therapy prescription, including short daily treatments, long nocturnal treatments, hemodialysis, hemofiltration, and online hemodiafiltration, all in a compact, reliable, easy to use system. A self-prompting touch screen user interface mounted on a movable arm provides for comfortable operation, whether sitting and standing. An automatic treatment setup mode facilitates easy treatment setup. Complex menus are eliminated by the use of a hardware key that automatically selects only the prescribed options during power up, eliminating all menus associated with nonprescribed functions and modalities. This prevents the user from becoming confused or accidentally altering the dialysis treatment. Prior to dialysis the instrument goes through an automatic self-test that confirms the operation of internal systems. The screen will dim when there is no action that the patient needs to attend to on the instrument. After dialysis, press the disinfect button and the instrument disinfects itself and shuts off. For patient safety, the "disinfect" menus are not available during dialysis. The instrument can also be programmed to automatically start and rinse at a set time. For remote treatment monitoring, the instrument connects to the Internet. The Aurora records information about the machine's technical status, providing a record of instrument history for easy servicing. The Aurora is a flexible platform that provides the desired renal therapy with ease of use and proper support for the hemodialysis patient when combined with Baxter's 24-hour infrastructure and support. PMID:15043620

  18. Low carbon dialysis for James Paget.

    PubMed

    2010-09-01

    ELGA Process Water explains how it provided a new water purification system for the renal dialysis unit at the James Paget University Hospital in Great Yarmouth that not only delivers the required water quality, and meets Renal Association guidelines on water treatment plants, but will also help reduce the acute healthcare facility's carbon footprint. PMID:20882912

  19. Continuous monitoring of urea in blood during dialysis.

    PubMed

    Thavarungkul, P; Håkanson, H; Holst, O; Mattiasson, B

    1991-01-01

    Urease was immobilized to porous glass and used in combination with a conductivity meter for determining urea in standard solutions as well as in blood from a patient undergoing dialysis. The sampling unit involves a possibility for heparinization at the sampling point and a dialysis step prior to exposure to the enzyme column. The unit operates in a linear mode in the concentration range 5-50 mM. Monitoring of dialysis process gave good correlation with off-line analyses. PMID:2059398

  20. Allergy to dialysis materials.

    PubMed

    Röckel, A; Klinke, B; Hertel, J; Baur, X; Thiel, C; Abdelhamid, S; Fiegel, P; Walb, D

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and six unselected patients were screened for allergic symptoms, specific IgE against ethylene oxide (ETO), isocyanates (ISO), formaldehyde (FA), phthalates (PHT), total IgE and eosinophil count. Complement activation was measured during cellulosic dialysis in atopic patients and in a control group. Sixteen patients demonstrated mild allergic symptoms during dialysis treatment. Ten of them had IgE elevation and eosinophilia. Eight of these patients had positive RASTs (ETO: n = 5, ETO-ISO(?)-FA: n = 2, ISO-PHT: n = 1) against dialysis material. All eight had an eosinophilia and seven showed an IgE elevation. An amelioration of symptoms could be obtained in three patients with elevated (greater than 15%) ETO-binding values after switching to ETO-free dialysers; avoiding PHT- and ISO-containing dialysis materials allergic symptoms remained constant. Cuprammonium rayon-induced complement activation had a more rapid onset and was more pronounced in atopic patients. The study confirms the role of ETO, but not of the other dialysis materials in the allergic sensitisation of haemodialysis patients. PMID:2510063

  1. Home-based renal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, G K; Lutz, L J; Gregory, M C

    1988-02-01

    About 20 percent of chronic dialysis patients receive treatment in their homes. An increasing number of these patients choose peritoneal dialysis. Physicians should be aware of the techniques and possible complications of home-based dialysis so that they can assist patients in choosing a form of dialysis and can help manage problems if they arise. An understanding of the technical and psychosocial problems is also necessary. PMID:3344646

  2. Phosphate control in dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Caria, Stefania; Meola, Mario; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P) mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source. Finally, boiling should be the preferred cooking procedure, because it induces food demineralization, including phosphate loss. The integrated approach outlined in this article should be actively adapted as a therapeutic alliance by clinicians, dieticians, and patients for an effective control of phosphate balance in dialysis patients. PMID:24133374

  3. Peritoneal dialysis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Nayak, K S; Prabhu, M V; Sinoj, K A; Subhramanyam, S V; Sridhar, G

    2009-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is acknowledged worldwide as a well-accepted form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Ideally, PD should be the preferred modality of RRT for ESRD in developing countries due to its many inherent advantages. Some of these are cost savings (especially if PD fluids are manufactured locally or in a neighboring country), superior rehabilitation and quality of life (QOL), home-based therapy even in rural settings, avoidance of hospital based treatment and the need for expensive machinery, and freedom from serious infections (hepatitis B and C). However, this is not the ground reality, due to certain preconceived notions of the health care givers and governmental agencies in these countries. With an inexplicable stagnation or decline of PD numbers in the developed world, the future of PD will depend on its popularization in Latin America and in Asia especially countries such as China and India, with a combined population of 2.5 billion and the two fastest growing economies worldwide. A holistic approach to tackle the issues in the developing countries, which may vary from region to region, is critical in popularizing PD and establishing PD as the first-choice RRT for ESRD. At our center, we have been pursuing a 'PD first' policy and promoting PD as the therapy of choice for various situations in the management of renal failure. We use certain novel strategies, which we hope can help PD centers in other developing countries working under similar constraints. The success of a PD program depends on a multitude of factors that are interlinked and inseparable. Each program needs to identify its strengths, special circumstances, and deficiencies, and then to strategize accordingly. Ultimately, teamwork is the 'mantra' for a successful outcome, the patient being central to all endeavors. A belief and a passion for PD are the fountainhead and cornerstone on which to build a quality PD program. PMID:19494625

  4. Peritoneal Dialysis Dose and Adequacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Peritoneal Dialysis Dose and Adequacy Page Content On this page: ... from the abdominal cavity. [ Top ] Types of Peritoneal Dialysis The two types of peritoneal dialysis differ mainly ...

  5. Depression in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    King-Wing Ma, Terry; Kam-Tao Li, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Depression is the most common psychiatric illness in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The reported prevalence of depression in dialysis population varied from 22.8% (interview-based diagnosis) to 39.3% (self- or clinician-administered rating scales). Such differences were attributed to the overlapping symptoms of uraemia and depression. Systemic review and meta-analysis of observational studies showed that depression was a significant predictor of mortality in dialysis population. The optimal screening tool for depression in dialysis patients remains uncertain. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD) have been validated for screening purposes. Patients who scored ≥14 using BDI should be referred to a psychiatrist for early evaluation. Structured Clinical Interview for DSM disorders (SCID) remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Non-pharmacological treatment options include cognitive behavioural therapy and exercise training programs. Although frequent haemodialysis may have beneficial effects on patients' physical and mental well-being, it cannot and should not be viewed as a treatment of depression. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are generally effective and safe in ESRD patients, but most studies were small, non-randomized and uncontrolled. The European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) guideline suggests a trial of SSRI for 8 to 12 weeks in dialysis patients who have moderate-major depression. The treatment effect should be re-evaluated after 12 weeks to avoid prolonging ineffective medication. This review will discuss the current understanding in the diagnosis and management of depression in dialysis patients. PMID:26860073

  6. [Algal biotoxins in Dialysis Water: a risk not managed].

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Margherita; Zuccarello, Pietro; Garufi, Angela; Cristaldi, Antonio; Oliveri Conti, Gea

    2016-01-01

    A literature review was performed to retrieve updated information on the quality of dialysis water, with a focus on the emerging problem of the presence of algal toxins (microcystins) produced by cyanobacteria. Current legislation was examined as well as studies conducted to date in different geographic areas. In this article, the authors present review results along with recommendations to operators and managers of dialysis units, for preventing possible risks for patients. PMID:27077559

  7. Effects and repercussions of local/hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA): a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health technology assessment (HTA) is increasingly performed at the local or hospital level where the costs, impacts, and benefits of health technologies can be directly assessed. Although local/hospital-based HTA has been implemented for more than two decades in some jurisdictions, little is known about its effects and impact on hospital budget, clinical practices, and patient outcomes. We conducted a mixed-methods systematic review that aimed to synthesize current evidence regarding the effects and impact of local/hospital-based HTA. Methods We identified articles through PubMed and Embase and by citation tracking of included studies. We selected qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods studies with empirical data about the effects or impact of local/hospital-based HTA on decision-making, budget, or perceptions of stakeholders. We extracted the following information from included studies: country, methodological approach, and use of conceptual framework; local/hospital HTA approach and activities described; reported effects and impacts of local/hospital-based HTA; factors facilitating/hampering the use of hospital-based HTA recommendations; and perceptions of stakeholders concerning local/hospital HTA. Due to the great heterogeneity among studies, we conducted a narrative synthesis of their results. Results A total of 18 studies met the inclusion criteria. We reported the results according to the four approaches for performing HTA proposed by the Hospital Based HTA Interest Sub-Group: ambassador model, mini-HTA, internal committee, and HTA unit. Results showed that each of these approaches for performing HTA corresponds to specific needs and structures and has its strengths and limitations. Overall, studies showed positive impacts related to local/hospital-based HTA on hospital decisions and budgets, as well as positive perceptions from managers and clinicians. Conclusions Local/hospital-based HTA could influence decision-making on several aspects

  8. Natural disasters and dialysis care in the Asia-Pacific.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nicholas A; Wolley, Martin; Liew, Adrian; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The impact of natural disasters on the provision of dialysis services has received increased attention in the last decade following Hurricane Katrina devastating New Orleans in 2005. The Asia-Pacific is particularly vulnerable to earthquakes, tsunami, typhoons (also known as cyclones and hurricanes) or storms and flooding. These events can seriously interrupt provision of haemodialysis with adverse effects for patients including missed dialysis, increased hospitalization and post-traumatic stress disorder. Furthermore, haemodialysis patients may need to relocate and experience prolonged periods of displacement from family and social supports. In contrast to haemodialysis, most literature suggests peritoneal dialysis in a disaster situation is more easily managed and supported. It has become apparent that dialysis units and patients should be prepared for a disaster event and that appropriate planning will result in reduced confusion and adverse outcomes should a disaster occur. Numerous resources are now available to guide dialysis units, patients and staff in preparation for a possible disaster. This article will examine the disaster experiences of dialysis units in the Asia-Pacific, the impact on patients and staff, methods employed to manage during the disaster and suggested plans for reducing the impact of future disasters. PMID:26032113

  9. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3.70 MB) MedlinePlus Alternate Language URL Peritoneal Dialysis Page Content On this page: What is peritoneal ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is peritoneal dialysis and how does it work? Peritoneal dialysis is ...

  10. Dialysis Culture of T-Strain Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Masover, Gerald K.; Hayflick, Leonard

    1974-01-01

    Using dialyzing cultures of T-strain mycoplasmas, it was possible to make some observations relevant to the growth and metabolism of these organisms which would not be possible in nondialyzing cultures due to growth inhibition of the organisms by elevated pH and increased ammonium ion concentration in media containing urea. The rate of ammonia accumulation was found to be related to the initial urea concentration in the medium and could not be accounted for by any change in the multiplication rate of the organisms. More ammonia was generated than could be accounted for by the added urea alone, suggesting that an ammonia-producing activity other than urease may be present in T-strain mycoplasmas. Titers above 107 color change units per ml were achieved in dialysis cultures of a T-strain mycoplasma in the presence of urea, and such titers were maintained for approximately 60 h during dialysis culture in the absence of added urea. PMID:4595203

  11. METAL SPECIATION BY DONNAN DIALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Donnan dialysis aqueous samples are separated from receiver electrolytes by an ion exchange membrane. The present work demonstrates that the dialysis of metals into salt solutions occurs in proportion to the sum of the concentrations of the free metal and the metal held in the...

  12. Rationale for hospital-based rehabilitation in obesity with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Capodaglio, P; Lafortuna, C; Petroni, M L; Salvadori, A; Gondoni, L; Castelnuovo, G; Brunani, A

    2013-06-01

    Severely obese patients affected by two or more chronic conditions which could mutually influence their outcome and disability can be defined as "complex" patients. The presence of multiple comorbidities often represents an obstacle for being admitted to clinical settings for the treatment of metabolic diseases. On the other hand, clinical Units with optimal standards for the treatment of pathological conditions in normal-weight patients are often structurally and technologically inadequate for the care of patients with extreme obesity. The aims of this review paper were to review the intrinsic (anthropometrics, body composition) and extrinsic (comorbidities) determinants of disability in obese patients and to provide an up-to-date definition of hospital-based multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs for severely obese patients with comorbidities. Rehabilitation of such patients require a here-and-now multidimensional, comprehensive approach, where the intensity of rehabilitative treatments depends on the disability level and severity of comorbidities and consists of the simultaneous provision of physiotherapy, diet and nutritional support, psychological counselling, adapted physical activity, specific nursing in hospitals with appropriate organizational and structural competences. PMID:23736902

  13. Revenue risk and price transparency in hospital-based laboratories.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jeffrey H

    2015-11-01

    Two developments with important revenue implications for hospital laboratories demand the attention of hospital finance leaders: > Significant differences in pricing between higher-priced hospital-based laboratory services and lower-priced services delivered by commercial laboratories give patients a disincentive to use the hospital-based services. > Hospital operating revenue will be substantially affected beginning in 2017 by deep, statutory cuts in payment for the highest-volume tests on the Part B Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule. PMID:26685443

  14. How to deal with dialysis catheters in the ICU setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney insufficiency (AKI) occurs frequently in intensive care units (ICU). In the management of vascular access for renal replacement therapy (RRT), several factors need to be taken into consideration to achieve an optimal RRT dose and to limit complications. In the medium and long term, some individuals may become chronic dialysis patients and so preserving the vascular network is of major importance. Few studies have focused on the use of dialysis catheters (DC) in ICUs, and clinical practice is driven by the knowledge and management of long-term dialysis catheter in chronic dialysis patients and of central venous catheter in ICU patients. This review describes the appropriate use and management of DCs required to obtain an accurate RRT dose and to reduce mechanical and infectious complications in the ICU setting. To deliver the best RRT dose, the length and diameter of the catheter need to be sufficient. In patients on intermittent hemodialysis, the right internal jugular insertion is associated with a higher delivered dialysis dose if the prescribed extracorporeal blood flow is higher than 200 ml/min. To prevent DC colonization, the physician has to be vigilant for the jugular position when BMI < 24 and the femoral position when BMI > 28. Subclavian sites should be excluded. Ultrasound guidance should be used especially in jugular sites. Antibiotic-impregnated dialysis catheters and antibiotic locks are not recommended in routine practice. The efficacy of ethanol and citrate locks has yet to be demonstrated. Hygiene procedures must be respected during DC insertion and manipulation. PMID:23174157

  15. Patient-Staff Interactions and Mental Health in Chronic Dialysis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Richard D.; Perry, Erica; Brown, Stephanie; Swartz, June; Vinokur, Amiram

    2008-01-01

    Chronic dialysis imposes ongoing stress on patients and staff and engenders recurring contact and long-term relationships. Thus, chronic dialysis units are opportune settings in which to investigate the impact of patients' relationships with staff on patient well-being. The authors designed the present study to examine the degree to which…

  16. Nephrologists' professional ethics in dialysis practices.

    PubMed

    Ozar, David T; Kristensen, Cynthia; Fadem, Stephen Z; Blaser, Robert; Singer, Dale; Moss, Alvin H

    2013-05-01

    Although the number of incidents is unknown, professional quality-oriented renal organizations have become aware of an increased number of complaints regarding nephrologists who approach patients with the purpose of influencing patients to change nephrologists or dialysis facilities (hereinafter referred to as patient solicitation). This development prompted the Forum of ESRD Networks and the Renal Physicians Association to publish a policy statement on professionalism and ethics in medical practice as these concepts relate to patient solicitation. Also common but not new is the practice of nephrologists trying to recruit their own patients to a new dialysis unit in which they have a financial interest. This paper presents two illustrative cases and provides an ethical framework for analyzing patient solicitation and physician conflict of interest. This work concludes that, in the absence of objective data that medical treatment is better elsewhere, nephrologists who attempt to influence patients to change nephrologists or dialysis facilities fall short of accepted ethical standards pertaining to professional conduct, particularly with regard to the physician-patient relationship, informed consent, continuity of care, and conflict of interest. PMID:23220423

  17. Defining the microbiological quality of dialysis fluid.

    PubMed

    Ledebo, I; Nystrand, R

    1999-01-01

    With increasing awareness about the degree and the potential impact of microbiological contamination in dialysis fluids, there is a desire to improve their microbiological quality. To achieve this goal, the origin of the microbiological contamination has to be identified. The water, the bicarbonate concentrate, and the fluid distribution system can be major contributors. Regular disinfection of the entire fluid path is necessary to prevent the formation of biofilm. The bicarbonate concentrate should be handled with special attention because it constitutes an excellent growth medium for microflora that may not be detected with regular assays. With a well maintained reverse osmosis (RO) system, frequent disinfection of the entire flow path, and microbiological awareness, it is possible to produce dialysis fluid that meets the most stringent standard (<10(2) colony forming units (CFU)/ml and <0.25 IU/ml of endotoxin). Adding a step of ultrafiltration just before the dialyzer can make the dialysis fluid ultrapure (<10(-1) CFU/ ml and <0.03 IU/ml). One additional step of controlled ultrafiltration provides sterile and pyrogen-free fluids (<10(-6) CFU/ml and <0.03 IU/ml) that can be used for infusion. PMID:9950177

  18. Just the Facts: The Dialysis Machine

    MedlinePlus

    Just the Facts: The Dialysis Machine What is a dialysis machine? During dialysis, your blood is cleaned using a fluid called dialysate, or “bath.” Wastes ... into the bath and are drained away. The dialysis machine controls the flow of the blood and ...

  19. Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

    2012-03-01

    Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with

  20. Green dialysis: the environmental challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Agar, John W M

    2015-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation website begins: "Natural resource and energy conservation is achieved by managing materials more efficiently--reduce, reuse, recycle," yet healthcare agencies have been slow to heed and practice this simple message. In dialysis practice, notable for a recurrent, per capita resource consumption and waste generation profile second to none in healthcare, efforts to: (1) minimize water use and wastage; (2) consider strategies to reduce power consumption and/or use alternative power options; (3) develop optimal waste management and reusable material recycling programs; (4) design smart buildings that work with and for their environment; (5) establish research programs that explore environmental practice; all have been largely ignored by mainstream nephrology. Some countries are doing far better than others. In the United Kingdom and some European jurisdictions, exceptional recent progress has been made to develop, adopt, and coordinate eco-practice within dialysis programs. These programs set an example for others to follow. Elsewhere, progress has been piecemeal, at best. This review explores the current extent of "green" or eco-dialysis practices. While noting where progress has been made, it also suggests potential new research avenues to develop and follow. One thing seems certain: as global efforts to combat climate change and carbon generation accelerate, the environmental impact of dialysis practice will come under increasing regulatory focus. It is far preferable for the sector to take proactive steps, rather than to await the heavy hand of government or administration to force reluctant and costly compliance on the un-prepared. PMID:25440109

  1. Peritoneal dialysis in Asia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, I K

    1996-01-01

    The socioeconomic status of Asian countries is diverse, and government reimbursement policies for treatment of patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vary greatly from one country to another. Both of these factors have a major impact not only on the choice of treatment for ESRD but also on the utilization of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in this region. Based on the data collected from 11 representative Asian countries, several observations can be made. First, the treatment rates for ESRD in these countries correlated closely with their gross domestic product (GDP) per capita income. Second, the PD utilization rate appeared to have a biphasic relationship with the GDP per capita income and treatment rate, in that countries with the highest and the lowest treatment rates tended to have lower PD utilization rates, whereas countries with modest treatment rates tended to have higher PD utilization rates. The reason for low PD utilization in countries with the highest treatment rates differs from that in countries with low treatment rates. In the former, because of full government reimbursement, there is little physician incentive to introduce PD as an alternative form of ESRD treatment to in-center hemodialysis (HD), whereas in the latter, the complete lack of government reimbursement prevents the introduction of PD as a form of treatment. This pattern is likely to change in the future because, of the 11 countries surveyed, all except Thailand have recorded a growth rate which is higher for PD than HD over the last three years. The rate of utilization of different PD systems varies greatly among different Asian countries. Automated PD has yet to gain popularity in Asia. Conventional straight-line systems remain the dominant PD systems in use in Hong Kong, Korea, Thailand, and the Philippines, while in Malaysia and Singapore UV germicidal connection devices are most popular. However, in all these countries there has been a progressive shift over the last

  2. Optimization of dialysis catheter function.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Rossi, Umberto; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential in the management of hemodialysis patients, but they also carry unintended negative consequences and in particular thrombosis and infection, adversely affecting patient morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on the etiology, prevention, and management of CVC-related dysfunction, which is mainly associated with inadequate blood flow. CVC dysfunction is a major cause of inadequate depuration. Thrombus, intraluminal and extrinsic, as well as fibrous connective tissue sheath (traditionally indicated as fibrin sheath) formation play a central role in establishing CVC dysfunction. Thrombolysis with urokinase or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) can be undertaken in the dialysis unit, restoring adequate blood flow in most patients, preserving the existing catheter, and avoiding an interventional procedure. If thrombolytics fail, mainly because of the presence of fibrous connective tissue sheath, catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption may be successful and preserve the venous access site. Prevention of CVC dysfunction is important for containing costly pharmacologic and interventional treatments, which also affect patients' quality of life. Prevention is based on the use of anticoagulant and/or thrombolytic CVC locks, which are only partially effective. Chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin has also been proposed, but its use for this indication is controversial and its overall risk-benefit profile has not been clearly established. PMID:26951903

  3. Metal speciation by Donnan dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.A.; Slonawska, K.; Gatchell, D.K.; Hiebert, A.G.

    1984-04-01

    In Donnan dialysis aqueous samples are separated from receiver electrolytes by an ion exchange membrane. The present work demonstrates that the dialysis of metals into salt solutions occurs in proportion to the sum of the concentrations of the free metal and the metal held in the form of labile complexes; however, with strongly acidic or chelating receivers, the dialysis occurs in proportion to the total soluble metal. Hence, Donnan dialysis provides the basis for a rapid estimation of the total soluble (i.e., free plus labile complexed) metal and nonlabile-complexed metal. The method is demonstrated with Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd complexes of glycine, humic acid, and nitrilotriacetic acid and is applied to a lake water sample. The results are compared to values obtained from an established approach that utilizes stripping voltammetry and separations with a chelating ion exchange resin.

  4. Toward green dialysis: focus on water savings.

    PubMed

    Ponson, Laurent; Arkouche, Walid; Laville, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Hemodialysis is one of the most water and energy-hungry medical procedures, and thus represents a clear opportunity where improvements should be made concerning the consumption and wastage of water. Three levels were investigated on which there are potential savings: the precise adjustment of water production according to specific needs, the reuse of reverse osmosis rejected water, and finally the huge volumes of post-patient dialysate effluent. The "AURAL" (Association pour l'Utilisation du Rein Artificiel à Lyon), main unit in Lyon, was the site of investigation for this study, which cares for 173 chronic hemodialysis patients. Evaluation of the 3 levels described earlier was undertaken on this particular building, and on the water treatment currently used. Volumes of produced water can be improved by different hydraulic systems or by adjusting the pure water conductivity used for dialysis. Concerning the reject water, reuse for building sanitation became the focus of further attention. The technical feasibility, volume of saved water, and applicable work costs were considered. The results suggest that out of a possible 2834 m(3)/year of reject water, 1200 m(3)/year may be reused and return on investment recovered within 5.8 years. Finally, the reprocessing and feasibility of reuse of dialysate effluent were investigated. Initial calculations show that although technical solutions are available, such processing of the wastewater production is not profitable in the short term. Regarding the significant prior authorization and risk management analysis necessary for such a project, this avenue was pursued no further. From the perspective of a "green dialysis," the reuse of reject water into sanitation is both viable and profitable in our unit, and must be the next step of our project. More widely, improvements can be made by defining a more precise range of pure water conductivity for dialysis and by applying reuse water project to new or to be renovated units

  5. Prescribing for patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Brendan; Jones, Ceridwen; Saunders, John

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The pharmacokinetics of a drug may be altered in patients with renal impairment who require dialysis. Some drugs are contraindicated. The drug’s clearance and therapeutic index determine if a dose adjustment is needed. A lower dose or less frequent dosing may be required. Consult a reference source or the patient’s nephrologist before prescribing. Start at a low dose and increase gradually. If possible give once-daily drugs after dialysis. PMID:27041803

  6. Dialysis membranes for blood purification.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K

    2000-01-01

    All of the artificial membranes in industrial use, such as a reverse-osmosis membrane, dialysis membrane, ultrafiltration membrane, microfiltration membrane and gas separation membrane, also have therapeutic applications. The most commonly used artificial organ is the artificial kidney, a machine that performs treatment known as hemodialysis. This process cleanses the body of a patient with renal failure by dialysis and filtration, simple physicochemical processes. Hemodialysis membranes are used to remove accumulated uremic toxins, excess ions and water from the patient via the dialysate, and to supply (deficit) insufficient ions from the dialysate. Dialysis membranes used clinically in the treatment of patients with renal failure account for by far the largest volume of membranes used worldwide; more than 70 million square meters are used a year. Almost all dialyzers now in use are of the hollow-fiber type. A hollow-fiber dialyzer contains a bundle of approximately 10000 hollow fibers, each with an inner diameter of about 200 microm when wet. The membrane thickness is about 20-45 microm, and the length is 160-250 mm. The walls of the hollow fibers function as the dialysis membrane. Various materials, including cellulose-based materials and synthetic polymers, are used for dialysis membranes. This paper reviews blood purification, hemodialysis and dialysis membranes. PMID:10898241

  7. [Guidelines on water and solutions for dialysis. Italian Society of Nephrology].

    PubMed

    Alloatti, S; Bolasco, P; Canavese, C; Cappelli, G; Pedrini, L; Pizzarelli, F; Pontoriero, G; Santoro, A; Anastasio, P; Teatini, U; Fuiano, G

    2005-01-01

    The National Society of Nephrology has promoted the development of specific Italian Guidelines for dialysis fluids. Two previous national inquiries showed a wide variety in the type and frequency of both microbiological and chemical controls concerning dialysis water, reinforcing the need for specific standards and recommendations. An optimal water treatment system should include tap water pre-treatment and a double reverse osmosis process. Every component of the system, including the delivery of the treated water to the dialysis machines, should prevent microbiological contamination of the fluid. Regular chemical and microbiological tests and regular disinfection of the system are necessary. 1. Chemical quality (Table: see text). Treated tap water used to prepare dialysis fluid should be within European Pharmacopoeia limits at the water treatment system inlet and at the reverse osmosis outlet. In addition dialysate, concentrate and infusion fluids must comply with specific Pharmacopoeia limits. The physician in charge of the dialysis unit is advised to institute a multidisciplinary team to evaluate the requirement for added chemical controls in the presence of local hazards. 2. Microbiological quality (Table: see text). High microbiological purity of dialysis fluid--regularly verified--is a fundamental prerequisite for dialysis quality and every dialysis unit should aim as a matter of course to obtain "ultra-pure" dialysate (microbial count <0.1 UFC/mL, endotoxins <0.03 U/mL). On-line dialysate ultrafiltration and regular disinfection of dialysis machines greatly enhance microbiological purity. On-line dialysate reinfusion requires specific devices used according to corresponding instructions and to more frequent microbiological tests. Dialysis fluids for home dialysis should comply with the same chemical and bacteriological quality. The appendix reports the water treatment system's technical characteristics, sampling and analytical methods, monitoring time

  8. The John F. Maher Award Recipient Lecture 2006. The continuum of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease: challenges and opportunities for chronic peritoneal dialysis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2007-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing renal replacement therapy have a high mortality rate and suffer from considerable morbidity. Degree of nutritional decline, disordered mineral metabolism, and vascular calcification are some of the abnormalities that predict an adverse outcome for ESRD patients. All these abnormalities begin early during the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD), long before the need for maintenance dialysis. Thus, CKD represents a continuum of metabolic and vascular abnormalities. Treatment of these abnormalities early during the course of CKD and a timely initiation of dialysis have the potential of improving patient outcomes. However, the thesis that successful management of these abnormalities will favorably modify the outcomes of dialysis patients remains untested. The proportion of incident USA ESRD patients starting chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) has historically been low. Limited physician training and inadequate predialysis patient education appear to underlie the low CPD take-on in the USA. Furthermore, two key changes have occurred in the USA: steep decline in CPD take-on and progressive increase in the use of automated peritoneal dialysis. The decline in CPD take-on has afflicted virtually every subgroup examined and has occurred, paradoxically, when the CPD outcomes in the country have improved. Understanding the reasons for historically low CPD take-on and recent steep declines in utilization may allow the development of plans to reverse these trends. PMID:17299144

  9. Intensive dialysis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hladunewich, Michelle; Schatell, Dori

    2016-07-01

    Pregnancy in women with end stage renal disease on renal replacement therapy is uncommon due to the physiologic changes associated with renal failure as well as the complexities and risk involved in managing these patients. As most of these women had long periods of illness with chronic kidney disease, the effects of their chronic illness together with the current societal trends to delay child bearing to a more advanced maternal age can hamper fertility. For those able to conceive, intensified hemodialysis (HD), through longer and/or more frequent dialysis sessions, offers improved maternal and neonatal outcomes. Intensified HD is most conveniently offered in the patient's home, where possible. This review expands the scope of the Implementing Hemodialysis in the Home website and associated supplement published previously in Hemodialysis International and includes information tailored to women of reproductive age. We describe the necessary counseling that women should receive before conception and before intensification of HD, and provide a detailed management strategy that includes nephrologic and obstetric care, should pregnancy occur. PMID:27061443

  10. Some Administrative Problems in Adaptation of Houses for Home Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Gower, P. E.; Stubbs, R. K. T.

    1971-01-01

    A study of the rate of adaptation, cost, and method of payment for converting the house for home dialysis in 35 patients from Fulham Hospital has shown considerable differences among local authorities in assessing and demanding contributions from patients in various areas. It is shown that delay in adapting houses has resulted in the dialysis unit being unable to take on at least 19 new patients during the years 1967-70. A more uniform approach, together with some central financial arrangements, might avoid undue hardship and delay. PMID:5580725

  11. Outpatient Dialysis for Patients with AKI: A Policy Approach to Improving Care.

    PubMed

    Heung, Michael; Faubel, Sarah; Watnick, Suzanne; Cruz, Dinna N; Koyner, Jay L; Mour, Girish; Liu, Kathleen D; Cerda, Jorge; Okusa, Mark D; Lukaszewski, Mark; Vijayan, Anitha

    2015-10-01

    The rate of AKI requiring dialysis has increased significantly over the past decade in the United States. At the same time, survival from AKI seems to be improving, and thus, more patients with AKI are surviving to discharge while still requiring dialysis. Currently, the options for providing outpatient dialysis in patients with AKI are limited, particularly after a 2012 revised interpretation of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines, which prohibited Medicare reimbursement for acute dialysis at ESRD facilities. This article provides a historical perspective on outpatient dialysis management of patients with AKI, reviews the current clinical landscape of care for these patients, and highlights key areas of knowledge deficit. Lastly, policy changes that have the opportunity to significantly improve the care of this at-risk population are suggested. PMID:26220818

  12. Peritoneal dialysis solution and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Verger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    20-70% of peritoneal dialysis patients have some signs of malnutrition. Anorexia, protein and amino acid losses in dialysate, advanced age of elderly patients, inflammation and cardiac failure are among the main causes. Modern dialysis solutions aim to reduce these causes, but none of them is without side effects: glucose is relatively safe and brings additional energy but induces anorexia and lipid abnormalities, amino acids compensate dialysate losses but may increase uremia and acidosis, icodextrin helps control hyperhydration and chronic heart failure and minimizes glucose side effects, but may sometimes cause inflammation, and poly chamber bags allow the replacement of lactate by bicarbonate and are more biocompatible, decrease GDP, induce less inflammation and have a better effect on nutritional status. However, it appears that the management of nutrition with the different solutions available nowadays necessitates various combinations of solutions adapted to different patient profiles and there is not actually a single universal solution to minimize malnutrition in peritoneal dialysis patients. PMID:22652708

  13. Understanding by Older Patients of Dialysis and Conservative Management for Chronic Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Okamoto, Ikumi; Leydon, Geraldine M.; Murtagh, Fliss E.M.; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Older adults with chronic kidney disease stage 5 may be offered a choice between dialysis and conservative management. Few studies have explored patients’ reasons for choosing conservative management and none have compared the views of those who have chosen different treatments across renal units. Study Design Qualitative study with semistructured interviews. Settings & Participants Patients 75 years or older recruited from 9 renal units. Units were chosen to reflect variation in the scale of delivery of conservative management. Methodology Semistructured interviews audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Analytical Approach Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results 42 interviews were completed, 4 to 6 per renal unit. Patients were sampled from those receiving dialysis, those preparing for dialysis, and those choosing conservative management. 14 patients in each group were interviewed. Patients who had chosen different treatments held varying beliefs about what dialysis could offer. The information that patients reported receiving from clinical staff differed between units. Patients from units with a more established conservative management pathway were more aware of conservative management, less often believed that dialysis would guarantee longevity, and more often had discussed the future with staff. Some patients receiving conservative management reported that they would have dialysis if they became unwell in the future, indicating the conditional nature of their decision. Limitations Recruitment of older adults with frailty and comorbid conditions was difficult and therefore transferability of findings to this population is limited. Conclusions Older adults with chronic kidney disease stage 5 who have chosen different treatment options have contrasting beliefs about the likely outcomes of dialysis for those who are influenced by information provided by renal units. Supporting renal staff in discussing conservative management as a valid

  14. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each... for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (b) CMS determines the amount on the basis of program...

  15. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each... for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (b) CMS determines the amount on the basis of program...

  16. Perspectives of Patients, Families, and Health Care Professionals on Decision-Making About Dialysis Modality—The Good, the Bad, and the Misunderstandings!

    PubMed Central

    Griva, Konstadina; Li, Zhi Hui; Lai, Alden Yuanhong; Choong, Meng Chan; Foo, Marjorie Wai Yin

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Objectives: This study explored the factors influencing decision-making about dialysis modality, integrating the perspectives of patients, their families, and health care professionals within an Asian population. The study further sought to understand the low penetration rate of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in Singapore. ♦ Methods: A sample of 59 participants comprising pre-dialysis patients, dialysis patients, caregivers, and health care professionals (HCPs) participated in semi-structured interviews to explore the decision-making process and their views about various dialysis modalities. Data were thematically analyzed using NVivo9 (QSR International, Doncaster, Australia) to explore barriers to and facilitators of various dialysis modalities and decisional support needs. ♦ Results: Fear of infection, daily commitment to PD, and misperceptions of PD emerged as barriers to PD. Side effects, distance to dialysis centers, and fear of needling and pain were barriers to hemodialysis (HD). The experiences of other patients, communicated informally or opportunistically, influenced the preferences and choices of patients and family members for a dialysis modality. Patients and families value input from HCPs and yet express strong needs to discuss subjective experiences of life on dialysis (PD or HD) with other patients before making a decision about dialysis modality. ♦ Conclusions: Pre-dialysis education should expand its focus on the family as the unit of care and should provide opportunities for interaction with dialysis patients and for peer-led learning. Barriers to PD, especially misperceptions and misunderstandings, can be targeted to improve PD uptake. PMID:23123668

  17. Dialysis fistula or graft: the role for randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Allon, Michael; Lok, Charmaine E

    2010-12-01

    The Fistula First Initiative has strongly encouraged nephrologists, vascular access surgeons, and dialysis units in the United States to make valiant efforts to increase fistula use in the hemodialysis population. Unfortunately, the rigid "fistula first" recommendations are not based on solid, current, evidence-based data and may be harmful to some hemodialysis patients by subjecting them to prolonged catheter dependence with its attendant risks of bacteremia and central vein stenosis. Once they are successfully cannulated for dialysis, fistulas last longer than grafts and require fewer interventions to maintain long-term patency for dialysis. However, fistulas have a much higher primary failure rate than grafts, require more interventions to achieve maturation, and entail longer catheter dependence, thereby leading to more catheter-related complications. Given the tradeoffs between fistulas and grafts, there is equipoise about their relative merits in patients with moderate to high risk of fistula nonmaturation. The time is right for definitive, large, multicenter randomized clinical trials to compare fistulas and grafts in various subsets of chronic kidney disease patients. Until the results of such clinical trials are known, the optimal vascular access for a given patients should be determined by the nephrologist and access surgeon by taking into account (1) whether dialysis has been initiated, (2) the patient's life expectancy, (3) whether the patient has had a previous failed vascular access, and (4) the likelihood of fistula nonmaturation. Careful clinical judgment should optimize vascular access outcomes and minimize prolonged catheter dependence among hemodialysis patients. PMID:21030576

  18. Disaster planning for peritoneal dialysis programs.

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Myra A; Norman, Lisa D; Krane, N Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Because of increased intensity of hurricanes in the Gulf Coast region of the United States, peritoneal dialysis (PD) programs have been disrupted and patients relocated temporarily following these catastrophic events. We describe the disaster planning, implementation, and follow-up that occurred in one such PD program in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. Each year at the beginning of the North American hurricane season, the PD program's disaster plan is reviewed by clinic staff and copies are distributed to patients. Patients are instructed to assemble a disaster kit and are provided with contact numbers for dialysis suppliers and for a PD program in their planned evacuation city. In July 2005, this disaster plan was tested when an early tropical storm and hurricane entered the Gulf and several patients briefly relocated or evacuated because of power loss and then returned without incident. However, when Hurricane Katrina, a category 5 storm, was predicted to strike the metropolitan area, patients were notified by telephone to evacuate, and contact information, including their evacuation city and telephone and cellular phone numbers, was obtained. Patients were also reminded to take all medications, bottled water, antibacterial soap, hand sanitizer, and 4-5 days of PD supplies. Following the storm, telephone and cellular phone services were severely disrupted. However, text messaging was available to contact patients to confirm safety and to provide further instructions. Arrangements with the major dialysis suppliers to ship emergency supplies to new locations were made by the PD nurse and the patients. Only 2 of 22 patients required hospitalization because of complications resulting from evacuation failure, contamination, and inability to perform dialysis for a prolonged period of time. Both of these patients were quickly released and have continued PD. Following the event, all patients remained on PD, and most have planned to return to their home PD

  19. Dialysis culture of T-strain mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Masover, G K; Hayflick, L

    1974-04-01

    Using dialyzing cultures of T-strain mycoplasmas, it was possible to make some observations relevant to the growth and metabolism of these organisms which would not be possible in nondialyzing cultures due to growth inhibition of the organisms by elevated pH and increased ammonium ion concentration in media containing urea. The rate of ammonia accumulation was found to be related to the initial urea concentration in the medium and could not be accounted for by any change in the multiplication rate of the organisms. More ammonia was generated than could be accounted for by the added urea alone, suggesting that an ammonia-producing activity other than urease may be present in T-strain mycoplasmas. Titers above 10(7) color change units per ml were achieved in dialysis cultures of a T-strain mycoplasma in the presence of urea, and such titers were maintained for approximately 60 h during dialysis culture in the absence of added urea. PMID:4595203

  20. Impact of facility size and profit status on intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Frankenfield, D L; Sugarman, J R; Presley, R J; Helgerson, S D; Rocco, M V

    2000-08-01

    Little information is available regarding the influence of dialysis facility size or profit status on intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients. We have combined data from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Core Indicators Project; the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) facility survey; and the HCFA On-Line Survey, Certification, and Reporting System to analyze trends in this area. For hemodialysis patients, larger facilities were more likely than smaller facilities to perform dialysis on patients who were younger than 65 years of age, black, or undergoing dialysis 2 years or more (P < 0.001). Nonprofit facilities were more likely to perform dialysis on patients with diabetes mellitus as a cause of ESRD and less likely to perform dialysis on patients with hypertension as a cause of ESRD compared with for-profit units (P < 0.05). By multivariate analysis, larger facility size was modestly associated with a greater Kt/V value and urea reduction ratio, but not with hematocrit or serum albumin values. Facility profit status was not associated with these intermediate outcomes. For peritoneal dialysis patients, there were no significant differences in patient demographics based on facility size. More patients in nonprofit units had been undergoing dialysis 2 or more years than patients in for-profit units (P < 0.05). By univariate analysis, patients in larger facilities were more likely to have an adequacy measure performed than patients from smaller facilities (P < 0.05). There were few substantial differences in intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients based on facility size or profit status. PMID:10922310

  1. Experience of using heat citric acid disinfection method in central dialysis fluid delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Koji; Uchiumi, Nobuko; Sato, Sumihiko; Aida, Nobuhiko; Ishimatsu, Taketo; Igoshi, Tadaaki; Kodama, Yoshihiro; Hotta, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    We applied the heat citric acid disinfection method in the main part of the central dialysis fluid delivery system (MPCDDS), which consists of a multiple-patient dialysis fluid supply unit, dialysis console units, and dialysis fluid piping. This disinfection method has been used for single-patient dialysis machines, but this is the first trial in the MPCDDS. We examined, by points of safety and disinfection effect, whether this disinfection method is comparable to conventional disinfection methods in Japan. The conventional disinfection method is a combination of two disinfectants, sodium hypochlorite and acetic acid, used separately for protein removal and decalcification. Consequently, total microbial counts and endotoxin concentrations fully satisfied the microbiological requirements for standard dialysis fluid of ISO 11663. From our results and discussion, this heat citric acid disinfection method is proved to be safe and reliable for MPCDDS. However, to satisfy the microbiological requirements for ultrapure dialysis fluid, further consideration for this method in MPCDDS including the reverse osmosis device composition and piping is necessary. PMID:20514548

  2. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171, furnished to ESRD patients on or after... facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form furnished to ESRD...

  3. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171, furnished to ESRD patients on or after... facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form furnished to ESRD...

  4. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., payment to an ESRD facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171... to an ESRD facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form...

  5. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... dialysis service drugs and biologicals as defined in § 413.171, furnished to ESRD patients on or after... facility for renal dialysis service drugs and biologicals with only an oral form furnished to ESRD...

  6. End-stage renal disease use in hurricane-prone areas: should nephrologists increase the utilization of peritoneal dialysis?

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Myra A

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina resulted in massive destruction of the gulf coast of the United States in 2005. In the immediate aftermath, displaced dialysis patients required urgent hemodialysis or additional peritoneal dialysis (PD) supplies. Massive damage to the health care infrastructure in these communities disrupted dialysis services for several months. As a result of this event and subsequent storms during the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, many decisions regarding future services to dialysis patients in hurricane prone communities (HPCs) need to occur. Nephrologists, dialysis nurses, dialysis providers, and patients need to discuss the ramifications of and types of continued dialysis services in HPC. Nephrologists should encourage PD, and efforts to educate on other renal replacement therapies including PD and transplant should occur. With the potential for interruption of electrical, sewerage, and water services, more patients should consider PD. Recovery from future events begins with appropriate disaster planning. Many questions are considered and need answering in planning for dialysis services in HPC and other communities subject to natural disasters. This summary provides the basis to begin discussions when planning for dialysis services in communities prone to natural disasters. PMID:17200049

  7. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  8. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status, Race, and Mortality in Young Adult Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Michelle M.; Crews, Deidra C.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.; Ephraim, Patti L.; Cook, Courtney; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2014-01-01

    Young blacks receiving dialysis have an increased risk of death compared with whites in the United States. Factors influencing this disparity among the young adult dialysis population have not been well explored. Our study examined the relation of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and racial differences in mortality in United States young adults receiving dialysis. We merged US Renal Data System patient-level data from 11,027 black and white patients ages 18–30 years old initiating dialysis between 2006 and 2009 with US Census data to obtain neighborhood poverty information for each patient. We defined low SES neighborhoods as those neighborhoods in US Census zip codes with ≥20% of residents living below the federal poverty level and quantified race differences in mortality risk by level of neighborhood SES. Among patients residing in low SES neighborhoods, blacks had greater mortality than whites after adjusting for baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, rurality, and access to care factors. This difference in mortality between blacks and whites was significantly attenuated in higher SES neighborhoods. In the United States, survival between young adult blacks and whites receiving dialysis differs by neighborhood SES. Additional studies are needed to identify modifiable factors contributing to the greater mortality among young adult black dialysis patients residing in low SES neighborhoods. PMID:24925723

  9. Missed dialysis sessions and hospitalization in hemodialysis patients after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Amanda H; Cohen, Andrew J; Kutner, Nancy G; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Kimmel, Paul L; Muntner, Paul

    2009-06-01

    In order to evaluate the factors that contributed to missed dialysis sessions and increased hospitalizations of hemodialysis patients after Hurricane Katrina, we contacted 386 patients from 9 New Orleans hemodialysis units. Data were collected through structured telephone interviews on socio-demographics, dialysis factors, and evacuation characteristics. Overall, 44% of patients reported missing at least one and almost 17% reported missing 3 or more dialysis sessions. The likelihood of missing 3 or more sessions was greater for those whose dialysis vintage was less than 2 years compared to those for whom it was 5 or more years, who had 38 or fewer billed dialysis sessions compared to those who had 39 or more in the 3 months before the storm, who lived alone before the storm, who were unaware of their dialysis facility's emergency plans, who did not evacuate prior to hurricane landfall, and who were placed in a shelter. The adjusted odds ratio of hospitalization among patients who missed 3 or more compared to those who did not miss any dialysis sessions was 2.16 (95% CI: 1.05-4.43). These findings suggest that when preparing for future disasters more emphasis needs to be placed on patient awareness and early execution of emergency plans. PMID:19212421

  10. Impact of Hemodialysis Catheter Dysfunction on Dialysis and Other Medical Services: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Robert I.; Newsome, Britt B.; Leung, Grace; Block, Geoffrey A.; Herbert, Robert J.; Danese, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Practice guidelines define hemodialysis catheter dysfunction as blood flow rate (BFR) <300 mL/min. We conducted a study using data from DaVita and the United States Renal Data System to evaluate the impact of catheter dysfunction on dialysis and other medical services. Patients were included if they had ≥8 consecutive weeks of catheter dialysis between 8/2004 and 12/2006. Actual BFR <300 mL/min despite planned BFR ≥300 mL/min was used to define catheter dysfunction during each dialysis session. Among 9,707 patients, the average age was 62,53% were female, and 40% were black. The median duration of catheter dialysis was 190 days, and the cohort accounted for 1,075,701 catheter dialysis sessions. There were 70,361 sessions with catheter dysfunction, and 6,33 1 (65.2%) patients had at least one session with catheter dysfunction. In multivariate repeated measures analysis, catheter dysfunction was associated with increased odds of missing a dialysis session due to access problems (Odds ratio [OR] 2.50; P < 0.001), having an access-related procedure (OR 2.10; P < 0.001), and being hospitalized (OR 1.10; P = 0.001). Catheter dysfunction defined according to NKF vascular access guidelines results in disruptions of dialysis treatment and increased use of other medical services. PMID:22518313

  11. Conflict in the dialysis clinic.

    PubMed

    Payton, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Conflict is common in healthcare settings and can affect the functioning of a dialysis clinic. Unresolved conflict can decrease staff productivity and teamwork, and potentially decrease the quality of patient care. This article discusses the causes and effects of conflict, describes the five basic conflict-handling styles that can be useful when dealing with conflict (avoidance, accommodation, competing, compromise, and collaboration), and provides resources for resolving patient-provider conflict. PMID:25244891

  12. Quality decision making in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L G; Anderberg, C; Ipsen, R; Persson, E; Andersson, G

    1998-01-01

    A patient approaching the final stage of his renal disease is faced with many difficult questions. Should he opt for a transplant or start on dialysis? In the case of dialysis, can he manage his treatment at home or will he need to be cared for in a clinic? Should be choose peritoneal dialysis or haemodialysis? Is the freedom of being independent from a machine, given by CAPD, as valuable as the freedom of having days without treatment, given by HD? The issues are complex and do not have a given answer. To make the proper decisions about his treatment the patient needs extensive information and support from the caregivers. Likewise, the caregivers need to know the patient well in order to give appropriate advice. In this exchange of information, the renal nurse has a very important role. Some patients may need to be dialysed in a hospital but most can get an equally good or even better dialysis treatment in a less stressful environment. A high degree of self-care is preferred by people who value independence and freedom of movement. Self-care also improves the self-confidence and increases the chances of maintaining employment and a rich social life. Self-care could mean both PD and HD, sometimes with the assistance of a spouse or a nurse. But a certain degree of self-care can also be maintained in limited-care centres and satellites, where the presence of nursing staff gives the feeling of security. For everybody involved, not least the purchasers of health care, it is desirable to keep the patients out of the costly hospital environment for as long as possible. PMID:10222906

  13. Using (green) bricks and mortar for dialysis clinic construction.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Bob

    2011-03-01

    The completed dialysis unit demonstrates that building green means creating and using processes that are environmentally responsible and resource efficient throughout a building's life cycle. The common objective is that green buildings are designed to reduce the overall impact of the environment on human health and the natural environment by: using energy, water and other resources more efficiently; protecting patient health while improving staff productivity; reducing waste. PMID:21755746

  14. Hospital-based rental programs to increase car seat usage.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B

    1983-05-01

    The ability of hospital-based car seat rental programs to provide car seats inexpensively throughout an entire state and the effect of these rental programs on car seat usage by newborns were evaluated. In July 1979 individuals and groups committed to child passenger safety formed a coalition called Vermont SEAT (Seatbelts Eliminate Automobile Tragedies). During the next 3 years SEAT asked the major hospitals in the state to allow volunteers to operate car seat rental programs on their premises. The number of rental programs increased from 0 to 13; the percentage of newborns born in a hospital with a rental program increased from 0% to 99%. The estimated statewide rate of car seat usage by newborns, based on observations at discharge at five hospitals, increased from 15% to 70%. These findings suggest that a network of hospital-based car seat rental programs operated by volunteers can make car seats readily available throughout a state or region, and can significantly increase car seat usage by newborns. It is recommended that such programs be a part of comprehensive strategies to improve child passenger safety. PMID:6835761

  15. Protein binding studies with radiolabeled compounds containing radiochemical impurities. Equilibrium dialysis versus dialysis rate determination

    SciTech Connect

    Honore, B.

    1987-04-01

    The influence of radiochemical impurities in dialysis experiments with high-affinity ligands is investigated. Albumin binding of labeled decanoate (97% pure) is studied by two dialysis techniques. It is shown that equilibrium dialysis is very sensitive to the presence of impurities resulting in erroneously low estimates of the binding affinity and in inconsistent results at varying albumin concentrations. Dialysis rate determination is less sensitive to impurities.

  16. [Organohalogen contamination of a dialysis-water treatment plant].

    PubMed

    Formica, M; Vallero, A; Forneris, G; Cesano, G; Pozzato, M; Borca, M; Iadarola, G M; Quarello, F

    2002-01-01

    On March 2001 the regular quality control test of the water used for dialysis in an urban centre using a reverse osmosis system revealed a high level of organo-halogenated contamination. The compounds implicated were: trichloroethylene (trielene) [M.Wt. 131 D], tetrachloroethylene, trichloromethane (chloroform) [M.Wt. 121 D], chlorodibromomethane. The dialysis unit was closed. Water samples were analysed in duplicate. The table shows the values (in ppm or microgram/l) obtained for chloroform at the given times: March 8th, altered sample; March 12th, confirmation sample; March 16th, after osmosis membranes change; March 22nd, after carbon filtration replacement; March 26th, after softener resins substitution. The AAMI doesn't recommend any value for organo-halogenated compounds in dialysis water. In the past, the European Pharmacopoeia and the Italian Health Ministry released some reference values for tap water, values which were extended to water used for dialysis. The values are 1 ppm as reference value, 30 ppm as maximum accepted value for the sum of all organo-halogenated compounds, and 10 ppm as the recommended value. In conclusion, the problem was solved by progressive replacement of the components of the water treatment system, even though the real cause remained undetermined. No clinical symptom was recorded and no level of chloroform or trielene was detected in patients' sera despite the low molecular weight and low protein binding of the compounds. A strict control of the water quality and a more comprehensive and updated reference guide are needed for better and safer dialysis delivery. PMID:12369053

  17. Echocardiographic hemodynamic study during ultrafiltration sequential dialysis.

    PubMed

    Cini, G; Camici, M; Pentimone, F; Palla, R

    1982-01-01

    4 patients on regular dialysis were studied by the echocardiographic method during ultrafiltration and dialysis performed sequentially according to two different protocols. Blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume, systolic and diastolic dimension of the left ventricle, systolic and diastolic volumes of the left ventricle, ejection fraction, shortening fraction and total peripheral vascular resistance index were measured. During ultrafiltration there is an increase of the total peripheral vascular resistance index. Myocardial contractility improves only during dialysis. Physiopathologic implications are discussed. PMID:7099320

  18. Overcoming the Underutilisation of Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Pajek, Jernej

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is troubled with declining utilisation as a form of renal replacement therapy in developed countries. We review key aspects of therapy evidenced to have a potential to increase its utilisation. The best evidence to repopulate PD programmes is provided for the positive impact of timely referral and systematic and motivational predialysis education: average odds ratio for instituting peritoneal dialysis versus haemodialysis was 2.6 across several retrospective studies on the impact of predialysis education. Utilisation of PD for unplanned acute dialysis starts facilitated by implantation of peritoneal catheters by interventional nephrologists may diminish the vast predominance of haemodialysis done by central venous catheters for unplanned dialysis start. Assisted peritoneal dialysis can improve accessibility of home based dialysis to elderly, frail, and dependant patients, whose quality of life on replacement therapy may benefit most from dialysis performed at home. Peritoneal dialysis providers should perform close monitoring, preventing measures, and timely prophylactic therapy in patients judged to be prone to EPS development. Each peritoneal dialysis programme should regularly monitor, report, and act on key quality indicators to manifest its ability of constant quality improvement and elevate the confidence of interested patients and financing bodies in the programme. PMID:26640787

  19. Psychosocial aspects of dialysis and renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Haq, I; Zainulabdin, F; Naqvi, A; Rizvi, A H; Ahmed, S H

    1991-05-01

    Keeping in view our socio cultural millieu, the psychological aspects of twenty renal transplants recipients and equal number of patients on dialysis were studied. Socio psychiatric profile in the dialysis and transplanted patients revealed that the frequency of anxiety, depression and hypochondriasis was significantly less (P less than 0.01) in the transplanted group. On Bender Gestalt Scale the transplanted group achieved normal status in significantly higher (P less than 0.05) number compared to the dialysis patients. It was concluded that transplanted patients showed marked improvement in social functioning, psychological symptoms and enduring personality traits compared to patients on maintenance dialysis. PMID:1861361

  20. Multipass haemodialysis: a novel dialysis modality

    PubMed Central

    Heaf, James Goya; Axelsen, Mette; Pedersen, Robert Smith

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Most home haemodialysis (HD) modalities are limited to home use since they are based on a single-pass (SP) technique, which requires preparation of large amounts of dialysate. We present a new dialysis method, which requires minimal dialysate volumes, continuously recycled during treatment [multipass HD (MPHD)]. Theoretical calculations suggest that MPHD performed six times weekly for 8 h/night, using a dialysate bath containing 50% of the calculated body water, will achieve urea clearances equivalent to conventional HD 4 h thrice weekly, and a substantial clearance of higher middle molecules. Methods Ten stable HD patients were dialyzed for 4 h using standard SPHD (dialysate flow 500 mL/min). Used dialysate was collected. One week later, an 8-h MPHD was performed. The dialysate volume was 50% of the calculated water volume, the dialysate inflow 500 mL/min−0.5 × ultrafiltration/min and the outflow 500 mL/min + 0.5 × ultrafiltration/min. Elimination rates of urea, creatinine, uric acid, phosphate and β2-microglobulin (B2M) and dialysate saturation were determined hourly. Results Three hours of MPHD removed 49, 54, 50, 51 and 57%, respectively, of the amounts of urea, creatinine, uric acid, phosphate and B2M that were removed by 4 h conventional HD. The corresponding figures after 8 h MPHD were 63, 78, 74, 78 and 111%. Conclusions Clearance of small molecules using MPHD 6 × 8 h/week will exceed traditional HD 3 × 4 h/week. Similarly, clearance of large molecules will significantly exceed traditional HD and HD 5 × 2.5 h/week. This modality will increase patients' freedom of movement compared with traditional home HD. The new method can also be used in the intensive care unit and for automated peritoneal dialysis. PMID:23136214

  1. Improving the uptake of independent dialysis using the Humanbecoming theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Duteau, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Soaring healthcare costs, increasing rates of chronic illness, and an aging population have left Canada struggling to meet the growing demands for quality health care. Hospitals battle to cope with altering patient demand, higher costs, provincially imposed global budgets, fast developing technology, rigid rules, new drugs, and social inequalities that lead to poor health. Canadian population health trends have played an important role in examining innovation opportunities that can dictate terms for the effective re-design of Canada's health system. Independent (home) dialysis is associated with cost savings and improved quality of life in comparison with hospital-based hemodialysis treatment. Despite this, independent dialysis has failed to increase at the same rate as hospital-based treatment for chronic kidney disease. One probable reason is the lack of healthcare providers to truly understand the patient experience of living with chronic kidney disease. Qualitative data have shown that patients living with chronic kidney disease desire independence and minimal impact to their quality of life. Parse's Humanbecoming theory has been widely accepted in nursing practice as a theoretical base in which to gain an understanding of the lived experience. The values and assumptions of the Humanbecoming theory are also congruent with patient-centered care practice and transferable to all areas of healthcare practice and disciplines. PMID:23520988

  2. Transcending Competency Testing in Hospital-Based Simulation.

    PubMed

    Lassche, Madeline; Wilson, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Simulation is a frequently used method for training students in health care professions and has recently gained acceptance in acute care hospital settings for use in educational programs and competency testing. Although hospital-based simulation is currently limited primarily to use in skills acquisition, expansion of the use of simulation via a modified Quality Health Outcomes Model to address systems factors such as the physical environment and human factors such as fatigue, reliance on memory, and reliance on vigilance could drive system-wide changes. Simulation is an expensive resource and should not be limited to use for education and competency testing. Well-developed, peer-reviewed simulations can be used for environmental factors, human factors, and interprofessional education to improve patients' outcomes and drive system-wide change for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26909459

  3. Review: understanding sorbent dialysis systems.

    PubMed

    Agar, John W M

    2010-06-01

    Although maintenance haemodialysis once had the benefit of two distinctly different dialysate preparation and delivery systems - (1) a pre-filtration and reverse osmosis water preparation plant linked to a single pass proportioning system and (2) a sorbent column dependent dialysate regeneration and recirculation system known as the REDY system - the first came to dominate the market and the second waned. By the early 1990s, the REDY had disappeared from clinical use. The REDY system had strengths. It was a small, mobile, portable and water-efficient, only 6 L of untreated water being required for each dialysis. In comparison, single pass systems are bulky, immobile and water (and power) voracious, typically needing 400-600 L/treatment of expensively pretreated water. A resurgence of interest in home haemodialysis - short and long, intermittent and daily - has provided impetus to redirect technological research into cost-competitive systems. Miniaturization, portability, flexibility, water-use efficiency and 'wearability' are ultimate goals. Sorbent systems are proving an integral component of this effort. In sorbent dialysate regeneration, rather than draining solute-rich dialyser effluent to waste - as do current systems - the effluent repetitively recirculates across a sorbent column capable of adsorption, ion exchange or catalytic conversion of all solute such that, at exit from the column, an ultra-pure water solution emerges. This then remixes with a known electrolyte concentrate for representation to the dialyser. As the same small water volume can recirculate, at least until column exhaustion, water source independence is assured. Many current technological developments in dialysis equipment are now focusing on sorbent-based dialysate circuitry. Although possibly déjà vu for some, it is timely for a brief review of sorbent chemistry and its application to dialysis systems. PMID:20609091

  4. Clinical outcome of daily dialysis.

    PubMed

    Vos, P F; Zilch, O; Kooistra, M P

    2001-01-01

    Dialysis patients are prone to malnutrition, which may be counteracted by daily home hemodialysis (DHHD, 6 times a week) due to improved clinical outcome and quality of life. Eleven patients were treated with DHHD during 18 months, after a run-in period with three dialysis sessions a week. The total weekly dialysis dose was kept constant during the first 6 months of DHHD, whereupon it was allowed to increase. KT/V was 3.1 +/- 0.5 at baseline, 3.2 +/- 0.5 after 6 months and 4.0 +/- 0.8 at 18 months. Blood pressure decreased from 142 +/- 19/83 +/- 8 to 130 +/- 25/79 +/- 9 mmHg with a more than 50% reduction in antihypertensive medication. Potassium did not change, but potassium binding resins could be stopped almost completely. Bicarbonate increased from 20.6 +/- 3.3 to 23.1 +/- 2.6 mEq/L after 18 months. Patients with a protein intake of less than 1.0 g/kg/d showed a greater increase in body weight (62.3 +/- 6.0 to 65.5 +/- 3.7, P: < 0.05) and normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) (0.87 +/- 0.08 to 1.25 +/- 0.36, ns) than patients with acceptable protein intake (>/=1.0 g/kg/d). Phosphate decreased, though not significantly, especially in the latter group. Erythropoietin dose could be reduced from 6400 +/- 5400 U/L at baseline to 5100 +/- 4000 U/L at 18 months. Quality of life improved significantly, especially with to respect to physical condition and mental health. The DHHD markedly improves hemodynamic control and quality of life. Overall nutritional parameters did not change, except cholesterol. Patients with a low protein intake, however, showed a significant increase in body weight, and a greater rise in nPCR. PMID:11158871

  5. Regulation of Synthesis and Roles of Hyaluronan in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Timothy; Meran, Soma; Williams, Aled P.; Newbury, Lucy J.; Sauter, Matthias; Sitter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan composed of repeated disaccharide units of alternating D-glucuronic acid and D-N-acetylglucosamine residues linked via alternating β-1,4 and β-1,3 glycosidic bonds. HA is synthesized in humans by HA synthase (HAS) enzymes 1, 2, and 3, which are encoded by the corresponding HAS genes. Previous in vitro studies have shown characteristic changes in HAS expression and increased HA synthesis in response to wounding and proinflammatory cytokines in human peritoneal mesothelial cells. In addition, in vivo models and human peritoneal biopsy samples have provided evidence of changes in HA metabolism in the fibrosis that at present accompanies peritoneal dialysis treatment. This review discusses these published observations and how they might contribute to improvement in peritoneal dialysis. PMID:26550568

  6. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: nurses' experiences of teaching patients.

    PubMed

    Shubayra, Amnah

    2015-03-01

    Nine nurses were interviewed to determine nurses' experiences of teaching patients to use continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The material was analyzed using content analysis. Data were sorted into four themes and ten subthemes. The themes were presented as follows: Importance of language, individualized teaching, teaching needs and structure of care in teaching. The findings highlighted important insights into how nurses experience teaching patients to perform CAPD. The study revealed some barriers for the nurses during teaching. The major barrier was shortage of Arabic speaking nursing staff. Incidental findings involved two factors that played an important role in teaching, retraining and a special team to perform pre-assessments, including home visits. In conclusion, the findings of this study showed several factors that are considered as barriers for the nurses during teaching the CAPD patients and the need to improve the communication and teaching in the peritoneal dialysis units, including the importance of individualized teaching. PMID:25758880

  7. [Acute adverse effects of dialysis].

    PubMed

    Opatrný, K

    2003-02-01

    Adverse reactions to dialyzers are a not very frequent, but because of the serious, sometimes fatal course, a dreaded complication of haemodialysis treatment. Most important among these reactions are hypersensitive reactions (anaphylactoid, reaction type A to dialyzer), which develop as a rule within the 10th minute of the procedure, and the reaction caused by the action of perfluorohydrocarbon which develop hours after onset or even completion of haemodialysis. Explanation of the development of hypersensitive reactions (HSR) by complement activation and formation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a during contact of blood with the bioincompatible dialysis membrane has been abandoned. Evidence of the etiological role of ethylene oxide (ETO) in the development of HSR influenced the selection of materials for the production of dialyzers and sterilization during manufacture, it emphasized the importance of rinsing of the dialyzer in the dialysis centre and led to the wide application of alternative methods of sterilization by gamma radiation and steam. HSR may be also caused by overproduction of bradykinin and inhibition of its degradation or degradation of its metabolites. Excessive bradykinin production caused by dialysis membranes with a negative charge is potentiated e.g. by a lower pH and increased plasma dilution in the initial stage of haemodialysis. Inhibition of bradykinin degradation develops during treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI). In prevention of HSR associated with bradykinin in addition to elimination of a combination of a negatively charged dialysis membrane and ACEI treatment a part is played also by rinsing of the dialyzer before haemodialysis with a bicarbonate solution and the modification of the membrane surface (implemented by the manufacturer) which reduces its negative charge. The first reaction to the dialyzer in conjunction with perfluorohydrocarbon (PF-5070), used in production of some dialyzers for testing the

  8. Chronic peritoneal dialysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Nia; Hussain, Farida K; Connell, Roy; Shenoy, Manoj U

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of end-stage renal disease in children is increasing. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the modality of choice in many European countries and is increasingly applied worldwide. PD enables children of all ages to be successfully treated while awaiting the ultimate goal of renal transplantation. The advantages of PD over other forms of renal replacement therapy are numerous, in particular the potential for the child to lead a relatively normal life. Indications for commencing PD, the rationale, preparation of family, technical aspects, and management of complications are discussed. PMID:26504404

  9. Dialysate leaks in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, M; Ouimet, D; Pichette, V

    2001-01-01

    Dialysate leakage represents a major noninfectious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). An exit-site leak refers to the appearance of any moisture around the PD catheter identified as dialysate; however, the spectrum of dialysate leaks also includes any dialysate loss from the peritoneal cavity other than via the lumen of the catheter. The incidence of dialysate leakage is somewhat more than 5% in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, but this percentage probably underestimates the number of early leaks. The incidence of hydrothorax or pleural leak as a complication of PD remains unclear. Factors identified as potentially related to dialysate leakage are those related to the technique of PD catheter insertion, the way PD is initiated, and weakness of the abdominal wall. The pediatric literature tends to favor Tenckhoff catheters over other catheters as being superior with respect to dialysate leakage, but no consensus on catheter choice exists for adults in this regard. An association has been found between early leaks (< or =30 days) and immediate CAPD initiation and perhaps median catheter insertion. Risk factors contributing to abdominal weakness appear to predispose mostly to late leaks; one or more of them can generally be identified in the majority of patients. Early leakage most often manifests as a pericatheter leak. Late leaks may present more subtly with subcutaneous swelling and edema, weight gain, peripheral or genital edema, and apparent ultrafiltration failure. Dyspnea is the first clinical clue to the diagnosis of a pleural leak. Late leaks tend to develop during the first year of CAPD. The most widely used approach to determine the exact site of the leakage is with computed tomography after infusion of 2 L of dialysis fluid containing radiocontrast material. Treatments for dialysate leaks include surgical repair, temporary transfer to hemodialysis, lower dialysate volumes, and PD with a cycler. Recent recommendation propose

  10. Exploring the phenomenon of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital based healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janie J; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Kolobova, Irina; Lamson, Angela L; Sira, Natalia; Musick, David

    2015-01-01

    Hospital chaplaincy and spiritual care services are important to patients' medical care and well-being; however, little is known about healthcare providers' experiences receiving spiritual support. A phenomenological study examined the shared experience of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital-based healthcare providers (HBHPs). Six distinct themes emerged from the in-depth interviews: Awareness of chaplain availability, chaplains focus on building relationships with providers and staff, chaplains are integrated in varying degrees on certain hospital units, chaplains meet providers' personal and professional needs, providers appreciate chaplains, and barriers to expanding hospital chaplains' services. While HBHPs appreciated the care received and were able to provide better patient care as a result, participants reported that administrators may not recognize the true value of the care provided. Implications from this study are applied to hospital chaplaincy clinical, research, and training opportunities. PMID:26207904

  11. The surgical management of peritoneal dialysis catheters.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Nicholas R.; White, Steven A.; Waller, Julian R.; Nicholson, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is a safe and effective form of renal-replacement therapy. Its use is increasing as the gap widens between the number of patients waiting for renal transplants and the number of available organs. This article reviews the surgical considerations and complications of peritoneal dialysis that may present to general surgeons. PMID:15140305

  12. Renal function recovery in chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jay K; Folkert, Vaughn W

    2010-01-01

    Renal function recovery (RFR) from acute kidney injury requiring dialysis occurs at a high frequency. RFR from chronic dialysis, on the other hand, is an uncommon but well-recognized phenomenon, occurring at a rate of 1.0-2.4% according to data from large observational studies. The underlying etiology of renal failure is the single most important predicting factor of RFR in chronic dialysis patients. The disease types with the highest RFR rates are atheroembolic renal disease, systemic autoimmune disease, renovascular diseases, and scleroderma. The disease types with the lowest RFR rates are diabetic nephropathy and cystic kidney disease. Initial dialysis modality does not appear to influence RFR. Careful observation and history taking are needed to recognize the often nonspecific clinical and laboratory signs of RFR. When RFR is suspected in a chronic dialysis patient, a 24-hour urine urea and creatinine clearance should be measured. Based on the renal clearance, along with other clinical factors, the dialysis prescription may be gradually reduced until a complete discontinuation of dialysis. After RFR from maintenance dialysis, patients require close follow-up in an office setting for chronic kidney disease management. PMID:21166875

  13. Output of peritoneal cells during peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, O; Al-Mondhiry, H; Rifaat, U N; Khalil, M A; Al-Rawi, A M

    1978-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis provides a good source for the collection of macrophages. Six patients with chronic renal failure undergoing peritoneal dialysis for the first time were studied, and maximum cell egress, mostly macrophages, occurred at 24-48 hours and diminished after 48 hours. PMID:670419

  14. [The past and present of peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Polner, Kálmán

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews briefly the history of peritoneal dialysis, and highlights the significance of the work of two Hungarian nephrologists, Stephen I. Vas and István Taraba . By now, peritoneal dialysis has been considered as equal renal replacement modality compared to haemodialysis. It is even more advantageous in the protection of the patients' residual renal function, morbidity-mortality indices, and quality of life peritoneal dialysis in the first two years. From economical point of view peritoneal dialysis is less expensive than hemodialysis, therefore in the future its greater role can be expected in the treatment of more and more renal patients. The recently achieved technical development, and also the more widespread use of the automated peritoneal dialysis machines contribute to quality improvement. The peritoneal dialysis therapy, by the patients' self-treatment, establishes a new kind of relationship between the patients and the medical personnel; there is a growing requirement for patient education, the patients' self-esteem and cooperation increase, which altogether provides better results in rehabilitation and higher quality of life. Our national peritoneal dialysis utilization falls behind the European achievements, but has been growing dynamically, and we can expect an increase of the number of renal patients on peritoneal dialysis. PMID:18089476

  15. [Destructive spondylarthropathy in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Stein, G; Schneider, A; Marzoll, I; Sperschneider, H; Ritz, E

    1991-01-01

    Back pain and a cervicobrachial syndrome, as well as progressive sensory and motor deficits as far as symptoms of paraplegia, developed in two dialysis patients two and five years after the start of dialysis. One was a 60-year-old woman with pyelonephritis, the other a 55-year-old man with glomerulonephritis. There were typical radiological signs of destructive spondylarthropathy (narrowed intervertebral spaces and slippage of the vertebral bodies). The female patient required several operations (spondylothesis and orthothesis) and both patients received daily 10,000 IU vitamin D and 3-4 g calcium carbonate. In the woman the destructive process no longer progressed one year after onset of symptoms, but she still required many analgesics. She died three months later of circulatory failure. The man died four weeks after the onset of symptoms from purulent meningitis. At autopsy only renal fibrous ostitis was still demonstrable. Amyloidosis resulting from an increase in beta 2-microglobulin level were excluded by both histological and immunohistochemical examinations. PMID:1985800

  16. Risky business for dialysis services.

    PubMed

    Schohl, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    When self-insured health plans and their third-party administrators pay an artificially low out-of-network rate for dialysis services, they could be liable for the difference between that rate and the reimbursement level provided for by their health plan. Paying a rate that the repricers advised them to pay does not relieve self-insured health plans and third-party administrators of that obligation; only where the repricer has legitimately secured a negotiated contract rate is a lower payment justified. [Editor's note: The term "repricer" has no universally-accepted or formal definition, but it will be used here to describe those companies formed to act as middlemen between health care payers-like self-insured employer plans and TPAs working on behalf of such plans-and health care providers.] Failing to adhere to this will result in lawsuits against self-insured health plans and third-party administrators where they will be forced to defend the repricers' recommended payment amounts, while the repricers try to get themselves dismissed. A better option for plan holders and third-party administrators would be to negotiate directly with the dialysis providers and agree upon a mutually acceptable rate. PMID:20509404

  17. Compliance with automated peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Rivetti, M; Battú, S; Barrile, P; Benotto, S; Berruto, L; Bosio, A; d'Auria, L

    2002-01-01

    Compliance in peritoneal dialysis is reported as being a significant problem. In CAPD, the percentage of non-compliant patients varies between 10 and 40%. In APD the phenomenon seems to be more limited, at 15% - 20%. We considered 23 patients who had been on APD for more than 3 months.The dialytic treatment was performed using the Home Choice Pro device to record all the parameters of the dialysis session. The last 30 days of treatment were considered in the assessment of compliance, evaluating differences in daytime and night-time volumes between the prescription and the actual treatment,the length of the night-time session, and the days of treatment. As regards volume and duration, no differences were found compared to the dialytic prescriptions. For the days of treatment, a differencewas onlyfound in 3 patients: 2 self-administered patients missed day of therapy out of 30, and in both cases the missed tretment was ageed with the Centre; non-compliance was only found in 1 patient (4,3%), whose treatment was performed by the family, and who missed 4 days out of 30. PMID:12035903

  18. Experience with the JMS fully automated dialysis machine.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shinichiro; Moriishi, Misaki; Takahashi, Naoko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kawanishi, Hideki; Kim, Sung-Teh; Masaoka, Katsunori

    2003-01-01

    A fully automated dialysis machine has been developed and evaluated clinically. It uses highly pure dialysate (produced by a new dialysate cleaning system) instead of the conventional physiologic saline for the processes of priming, guiding blood to the dialysis machine, replenishing fluid, and returning the blood to the body. The piping for the dialysate is in the shape of a loop, and the dialyzer coupler has no mechanical parts that might become contaminated. As a result of these and certain other improvements in machine design, it is now possible to obtain reasonably clean dialysate. For the priming process, the machine uses a volume of up to 4 L of the dialysate after reverse filtration from the dialyzer. Most foreign matter or eluates can be removed from the dialyzer and the blood channels. Before blood is guided out of the body into the dialysis system, the needles inserted in the artery and vein are simultaneously connected to the blood channel, and the dialysate remaining in the channel is removed from the dialyzer. If the patient's blood pressure falls during dialysis, the dialysate can be replenished at any desired flow rate for reverse filtration. Blood return can be started automatically when the planned dialysis time has elapsed and the target water volume has been removed. The cleaned dialysate is infused from the dialyzer into the blood channel by reverse filtration to allow the blood to be returned to the body via both the artery and the vein at the same time. A total of 216 units of this fully automated dialysis machine have been placed in service at two of our facilities. During the 6 month period beginning in July 2001, they were used for 40,000 hemodialysis sessions in 516 patients. During the dialysate preparation process, the endotoxin levels in the reverse osmosis (RO) water, prefilter dialysate, and reverse filtered dialysate were all less than 1 EU/L. The time required to guide blood into the dialyzer (n = 39) decreased from the 4.6 +/- 1

  19. Microbiological Surveillance and State of the Art Technological Strategies for the Prevention of Dialysis Water Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Bolasco, Piergiorgio; Contu, Antonio; Meloni, Patrizia; Vacca, Dorio; Galfrè, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Methods: The present report attempts to illustrate the positive impact on the microbiological quality of dialysis patients over a 15-year period through the progressive implementation of state-of-the-art technological strategies and the optimization of microbiological surveillance procedures in five dialysis units in Sardinia. Results: Following on better microbiological, quality controls of dialysis water and improvement of procedures and equipment, a drastic improvement of microbiological water quality was observed in a total of 945 samples. The main aim was to introduce the use of microbiological culture methods as recommended by the most important guidelines. The microbiological results obtained have led to a progressive refining of controls and introduction of new materials and equipment, including two-stage osmosis and piping distribution rings featuring a greater capacity to prevent biofilm adhesion. The actions undertaken have resulted in unexpected quality improvements. Conclusions: Dialysis water should be viewed by the nephrologist as a medicinal product exerting a demonstrable positive impact on microinflammation in dialysis patients. A synergic effort between nephrologists and microbiologists undoubtedly constitutes the most effective means of preventing dialysis infections. PMID:23066395

  20. RISK OF DEMENTIA IN PERITONEAL DIALYSIS PATIENTS COMPARED WITH HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgram, Dawn F.; Szabo, Aniko; Murray, Anne M.; Whittle, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background Compared with similarly aged controls, patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a higher prevalence of cognitive impairment and more rapid cognitive decline, which is not explained by traditional risk factors alone. Since previous small studies suggest an association of cognitive impairment with dialysis modality, we compared incident dementia among patients initiating hemodialysis (HD) versus peritoneal dialysis (PD) in a large national cohort. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of incident dialysis patients in the United States from 2006 to 2008 with no diagnosis of dementia prior to beginning dialysis. We evaluated the effect of initial dialysis modality on incidence of dementia, diagnosed by Medicare claims data, adjusted for baseline demographic and clinical data from USRDS registry. Results Our analysis included 121,623 patients, of whom 8,663 initiated dialysis on PD. The mean age of our cohort was 69.2 years. Patients who initiated on PD had a lower cumulative incidence of dementia than those who initiated HD (1.0% versus 2.7%, 2.5% versus 5.3%, and 3.9% versus 7.3% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively). The risk of dementia for patients who started on PD was lower compared with those who started on HD, with a hazard ratio (HR) = 0.46 [0.41, 0.53], in an unadjusted model and HR 0.74 [0.64, 0.86] in a matched model. Conclusions Dialysis modality is associated with incident dementia in a cohort of older ESRD patients. This finding warrants further investigation of the effect of dialysis modality on cognitive function and evaluation for possible mechanisms. PMID:25742686

  1. Pleuro-Peritoneal Fistula – An Important Condition to Consider in Patients using Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shreena; Robson, Natalie; Sajid, Salman

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusions are a common finding in patients admitted on the medical take. This case decribes a patient using peritoneal dialysis who presented with progressive dyspnoea. Clinical examination and chest x-ray confirmed the presence of a pleural effusion. Thoracocentesis confirmed a 'sweet' effusion (higher pleural: serum glucose content), suggesting a pleuro-peritoneal leak. Optimal management involved switch from peritoneal to haemodialysis and referral to a specialised renal unit. This case highlights the need to consider the diagnosis of pleuro-peritoneal leak in patients using peritoneal dialysis who present to the acute medical unit with pleural effusion. PMID:26305084

  2. Peritoneal dialysis in the developing world: the Mexican scenario.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Becerra, Alejandro; Maimone, Maria Antonieta Schettino

    2002-09-01

    In the developing countries it is not possible to determine the total amount of money spent in the treatment of chronic diseases, and the practice of renal replacement therapies faces many obstacles. In Mexico, the introduction of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) achieved very good results. Unfortunately, renal disease still affected as much as 95% of chronic renal failure patients and it became a disaster with an annual mortality rate higher than 60%. This was known as the Mexican Model which failed in establishing peritoneal dialysis as the only procedure for treating patients. In order to avoid a similar scenario with the 2 replacement therapies, we created the Official Norm for hemodialysis, and now we are experimenting with an increase from 5% to 20% of hemodialysis patients who are receiving therapy, principally in private units that attend Social Security patients. In addition, the government has established a Council for Transplantation that acts as a regulatory board. In other words, we are in the process of making chronic renal diseases a priority within the National Program. PMID:12197926

  3. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. 876... Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. (a) Identification. (1) A peritoneal dialysis system and... peritoneal dialysis, a source of dialysate, and, in some cases, a water purification mechanism. After...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. 876... Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. (a) Identification. (1) A peritoneal dialysis system and... peritoneal dialysis, a source of dialysate, and, in some cases, a water purification mechanism. After...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. 876... Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. (a) Identification. (1) A peritoneal dialysis system and... peritoneal dialysis, a source of dialysate, and, in some cases, a water purification mechanism. After...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. 876... Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. (a) Identification. (1) A peritoneal dialysis system and... peritoneal dialysis, a source of dialysate, and, in some cases, a water purification mechanism. After...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. 876... Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. (a) Identification. (1) A peritoneal dialysis system and... peritoneal dialysis, a source of dialysate, and, in some cases, a water purification mechanism. After...

  8. Lifestyle behaviours and weight among hospital-based nurses

    PubMed Central

    ZAPKA, JANE M.; LEMON, STEPHENIE C.; MAGNER, ROBERT P.; HALE, JANET

    2008-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to (i) describe the weight, weight-related perceptions and lifestyle behaviours of hospital-based nurses, and (ii) explore the relationship of demographic, health, weight and job characteristics with lifestyle behaviours. Background The obesity epidemic is widely documented. Worksite initiatives have been advocated. Nurses represent an important part of the hospital workforce and serve as role models when caring for patients. Methods A sample of 194 nurses from six hospitals participated in anthropometric measurements and self-administered surveys. Results The majority of nurses were overweight and obese, and some were not actively involved in weight management behaviours. Self-reported health, diet and physical activity behaviours were low, although variable by gender, age and shift. Reports of co-worker norms supported low levels of healthy behaviours. Conclusions Findings reinforce the need to address the hospital environment and culture as well as individual behaviours for obesity control. Implications for nursing management Nurse managers have an opportunity to consider interventions that promote a climate favourable to improved health habits by facilitating and supporting healthy lifestyle choices (nutrition and physical activity) and environmental changes. Such efforts have the potential to increase productivity and morale and decrease work-related disabilities and improve quality of life. PMID:19793242

  9. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients on long-term dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juliana; Szabo, Aniko

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has not been adequately characterized. Using United States Renal Data System data we investigated the epidemiology of GIB in hospitalized patients receiving long-term dialysis. Methods Medicare ESRD patients who began dialysis between 1996 and 2005 were followed from 90 days after starting dialysis to death, transplant, loss of Medicare, or December 31, 2006. GIB events were identified using claims data. Predictors of GIB incidence were analyzed using over-dispersed Poisson regression and Cox regression was used to evaluate the effect on survival. Repeat episodes were modeled using a partially conditional Cox regression model. Results 406,836 patients were followed for 832,131 person-years, during which 133,967 events were identified. The incidence of GIB was stable through year 2000 but steadily increased thereafter. Chronic gastric ulcer and colonic diverticulosis were the commonest defined causes of upper and lower GIB respectively. Age >49 years, female gender, hypertension as the cause of ESRD, and initiation on hemodialysis was associated with a greater risk of GIB. An episode of GIB conferred a increased hazard of death (hazard ratio 1.9, 95 % CI 1.86–1.93). A previous episode of GIB was associated with greater hazard of another episode (hazard ratio 3.93, 95 % CI 3.82–4.05). Conclusions In ESRD patients incident to long-term dialysis the incidence of hospital-associated GIB is increasing, is associated with a greater hazard of death, and carries a great hazard of repeat episodes. PMID:25185727

  10. Routine disinfection of the total dialysis fluid system.

    PubMed

    Gorke, A; Kittel, J

    2002-01-01

    The importance of bacteria and endotoxin free, sterile dialysis fluid for long term, high quality haemodialysis treatment is obvious and very much demanded (1,2). Dead spaces and connections between units (segments) of fluid production and delivery in elder systems are a continuous source for bacteria growth, biofilm generation and endotoxin release (3). After varying success with routine disinfection of system components showing partly fast recovery and growth of bacteria (i.e. < 48 hours) we changed to routine disinfection of the entire fluid production and distribution system. We call this'system disinfection'. We report the methods and results from observation of practice over 28 months of disinfection. The fluid system is composed of a soft water tank, reverse osmosis (double RO), RO fluid loop, central bicarbonate production and delivery system and dialysis stations with and without ultrafilter and citric-thermal disinfection before and after each haemodialysis. The system disinfection is carried out bimonthly with peracetic acid 3.5% in > 0.1% solution at a mean temperature of > 15 degrees C and at a minimum of 60 minutes of disinfection time. Samples for microbiological testing and endotoxin measurement were assessed 3-4 monthly at 7 measurement points. The tests were carried out 7 times on the 11th day (mean value [MV]) after routine system disinfection. The result was in 0.2 CFU/ml (MV) in 40 tests. The endotoxin levels (IU/L) were all < 0.25 except one at 0.325 in RO water. Endotoxin was assessed 5 times in 26 tests over 28 months. Samples were taken at 10.5 (MV) days after system disinfection. The Gel Clot or turbometric method was used. Efficient and preventive routine system disinfection of an entire dialysis fluid production and distribution system as standard in modern equipment - can support sufficient quality in dialysis fluid produced and distributed by elder and composed systems. PMID:12371736

  11. Association between Psoriasis Vulgaris and Coronary Heart Disease in a Hospital-Based Population in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Masayuki; Kato, Takao; Funasako, Moritoshi; Nakane, Eisaku; Miyamoto, Shoichi; Izumi, Toshiaki; Haruna, Tetsuya; Inoko, Moriaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with an immune-genetic background. It has been reported as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States and Europe. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between psoriasis and CHD in a hospital-based population in Japan. Methods For 113,065 in-hospital and clinic patients at our institution between January 1, 2011 and January 1, 2013, the diagnostic International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 codes for CHD, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and psoriasis vulgaris were extracted using the medical accounting system and electronic medical record, and were analyzed. Results The prevalence of CHD (n = 5,167, 4.5%), hypertension (n = 16,476, 14.5%), dyslipidemia (n = 9,236, 8.1%), diabetes mellitus (n = 11,555, 10.2%), and psoriasis vulgaris (n = 1,197, 1.1%) were identified. The prevalence of CHD in patients with hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and psoriasis vulgaris were 21.3%, 22.2%, 21.1%, and 9.0%, respectively. In 1,197 psoriasis patients, those with CHD were older, more likely to be male, and had more number of the diseases surveyed by ICD-10 codes. Multivariate analysis showed that psoriasis vulgaris was an independent associated factor for CHD (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01–1.58; p = 0.0404) along with hypertension (adjusted OR: 7.78; 95% CI: 7.25–8.36; p < 0.0001), dyslipidemia (adjusted OR: 2.35; 95% CI: 2.19–2.52; p < 0.0001), and diabetes (adjusted OR: 2.86; 95% CI: 2.67–3.06; p < 0.0001). Conclusion Psoriasis vulgaris was independently associated with CHD in a hospital-based population in Japan. PMID:26910469

  12. Animal models in peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikitidou, Olga; Peppa, Vasiliki I.; Leivaditis, Konstantinos; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G.; Liakopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been extensively used over the past years as a method of kidney replacement therapy for patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). In an attempt to better understand the properties of the peritoneal membrane and the mechanisms involved in major complications associated with PD, such as inflammation, peritonitis and peritoneal injury, both in vivo and ex vivo animal models have been used. The aim of the present review is to briefly describe the animal models that have been used, and comment on the main problems encountered while working with these models. Moreover, the differences characterizing these animal models, as well as, the differences with humans are highlighted. Finally, it is suggested that the use of standardized protocols is a necessity in order to take full advantage of animal models, extrapolate their results in humans, overcome the problems related to PD and help promote its use. PMID:26388781

  13. Dialysis technicians' perception of certification.

    PubMed

    Williams, Helen F; Garbin, Margery

    2015-03-01

    The Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission initiated this research project to study the viewpoint of dialysis technicians regarding the value of certification. A national convenience sample was obtained using both paper-and-pencil and online forms of the survey instrument. Demographic characteristics were obtained concerning age, race, ethnicity, education, and future employment planning. Technicians' primary work settings, the roles they fill, and the types of certification they hold are described. Incentives offered by employers are considered to explore how they contribute to job satisfaction. Understanding the perceptions of technicians regarding the benefits of certification and the limitations of workplace incentives should enable employers to improve their recruitment and retention programs. Information obtained may offer a baseline for future observations of the characteristics of these significant and essential contributors to the nephrology workforce. PMID:26480642

  14. Cross polarization compatible dialysis chip.

    PubMed

    Kornreich, Micha; Heymann, Michael; Fraden, Seth; Beck, Roy

    2014-10-01

    We visualize birefringence in microliter sample volumes using a microfluidic dialysis chip optimized for cross polarization microscopy. The chip is composed of two overlapping polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channels separated by a commercial cellulose ester membrane. Buffer exchange in the sample chamber is achieved within minutes by dialyzing under continuous reservoir flow. Using fd virus as a birefringent model system, we monitor the fd virus isotropic to liquid crystal phase transition as a function of ionic strength. We show that the reorientation of the fd virus spans a few tens of seconds, indicative of fast ion exchange across the membrane. Complete phase separation reorganization takes minutes to hours as it involves diffusive virus mass transport within the storage chamber. PMID:25105977

  15. Establishing a successful home dialysis program.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Buxo, Jose A; Crawford-Bonadio, Terri L; St Pierre, Donna; Ingram, Katherine M

    2006-01-01

    The renewed interest in home dialysis therapies makes it pertinent to address the essentials of establishing and running a successful home dialysis program. The success of a home program depends on a clear understanding of the structure of the home program team, the physical plant, educational tool requirements, reimbursement sources and a business plan. A good command of the technical and economic aspects is important, but the primary drivers for the creation and growth of a home dialysis program are the confidence and commitment of the nephrological team. PMID:16361836

  16. Update on Ethical Issues in Pediatric Dialysis: Has Pediatric Dialysis Become Morally Obligatory?

    PubMed

    Wightman, Aaron G; Freeman, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    Improvements in pediatric dialysis over the past 50 years have made the decision to proceed with dialysis straightforward for the majority of pediatric patients. For certain groups, however, such as children with multiple comorbid conditions, children and families with few social and economic resources, and neonates and infants, the decision of whether to proceed with dialysis remains much more controversial. In this review, we will examine the best available data regarding the outcomes of dialysis in these populations and analyze the important ethical considerations that should guide decisions regarding dialysis for these patients. We conclude that providers must continue to follow a nuanced and individualized approach in decision making for each child and to recognize that, regardless of the decision reached about dialysis, there is a continued duty to care for patients and families to maximize the remaining quality of their lives. PMID:27037272

  17. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Program § 414.316 Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each patient, the carrier pays a flat amount that covers all physician services...

  18. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Program § 414.316 Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each patient, the carrier pays a flat amount that covers all physician services...

  19. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Program § 414.316 Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each patient, the carrier pays a flat amount that covers all physician services...

  20. The Stoke contribution to peritoneal dialysis research.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Martin E; Jenkins, Sarah B

    2011-03-01

    The Stoke Renal Unit has been at the forefront of peritoneal dialysis (PD) research for much of the past two decades. Central to this work is the PD cohort study, which was started in 1990 and is based on regular outpatient measurements of peritoneal and clinical function, correlating these with long-term outcomes. It has provided a wealth of information on risk factors for morbidity and mortality in patients on PD, the most significant being demonstration of the effects of time and dialysate glucose exposure on changes to the peritoneal membrane, as evidenced by increases in small solute transport. Early on, the study confirmed the adverse relationship between high small-solute transport status and outcome but more recently suggested that this relationship no longer held with modern techniques for managing patients on PD. Central themes of the PD research in Stoke have included evaluation of euvolemia, the importance of ultrafiltration and how best to achieve it, and detailed assessments of transmembrane water movement. The work has included the study of sodium removal and the use of novel low sodium dialysates. More recently, attention has turned to the significance of impaired ultrafiltration capacity in patients on PD as a sign of structural membrane damage. It is hoped that further work in this area will identify preventive strategies. PMID:21364207

  1. Uric acid: association with rate of renal function decline and time until start of dialysis in incident pre-dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) hyperuricemia is common. Evidence that hyperuricemia might also play a causal role in vascular disease, hypertension and progression of CKD is accumulating. Therefore, we studied the association between baseline uric acid (UA) levels and the rate of decline in renal function and time until start of dialysis in pre-dialysis patients. Methods Data from the PREPARE-2 study were used. The PREPARE-2 study is an observational prospective cohort study including incident pre-dialysis patients with CKD stages IV-V in the years between 2004 and 2011. Patients were followed for a median of 14.9 months until start of dialysis, kidney transplantation, death, or censoring. Main outcomes were the change in the rate of decline in renal function (measured as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)) estimated using linear mixed models, and time until start of dialysis estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results In this analysis 131 patients were included with a baseline UA level (mean (standard deviation (SD)) of 8.0 (1.79) mg/dl) and a mean decline in renal function of -1.61 (95% confidence interval (CI), -2.01; -1.22) ml/min/1.73 m2/year. The change in decline in GFR associated with a unit increase in UA at baseline was -0.14 (95% CI -0.61;0.33, p = 0.55) ml/min/1.73 m2/year. Adjusted for demography, comorbidities, diet, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids, proteinuria, diuretic and/or allopurinol usage the change in decline in eGFR did not change. The hazard ratio (HR) for starting dialysis for each mg/dl increase in UA at baseline was 1.08 (95% CI, 0.94;1.24, p = 0.27). After adjustment for the same confounders the HR became significant at 1.26 (95% CI, 1.06;1.49, p = 0.01), indicating an earlier start of dialysis with higher levels of UA. Conclusion Although high UA levels are not associated with an accelerated decline in renal function, a high serum UA level in incident pre-dialysis

  2. Potential for Hospital Based Corneal Retreival in Hassan District Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Melsakkare, Suresh Ramappa; Manipur, Sahana R.; Acharya, Pavana; Ramamurthy, Lakshmi Bomalapura

    2015-01-01

    Context In developing countries, corneal diseases are the second leading cause of blindness. This corneal blindness can be treated through corneal transplantation. Though the present infrastructure is strong enough to increase keratoplasty numbers at a required rate, India has largest corneal blind population in the world. So a constant supply of high quality donor corneal tissue is the key factor for reduction of prevalence of corneal blindness. Considering the magnitude of corneal blindness and shortage of donor cornea, there is a huge gap in the demand and supply. Aim To study the potential for hospital based retrieval of donor corneal tissue in Hassan district hospital after analysing the indicated and contraindicated causes of deaths, so that hospital corneal retrieval program in Hassan district hospital can be planned. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional, retrospective and record-based study included all hospital deaths with age group more than two years occurred during one year period (January 2014 to December 2014). Data regarding demographic profile, cause of death, treatment given and presence of any systemic diseases were collected. The causes of deaths which are contraindicated for the retrieval of corneas were analysed and noted. The contraindications were based on the NPCB guidelines for standard of eye banking in India 2009. Results Out of 855 deaths, number of deaths in males (565) was greater than females (290). Numbers of deaths were highest between 41-60 years age group (343). Deaths due to HIV, septicaemia, meningitis, encephalitis, disseminated malignancies were contraindicated for corneal retrieval. Corneas could be retrieved from 736 deaths out of 855. Potential for corneal retrieval in a period of one year in Hassan District hospital was 86%. Conclusion Hospital corneal retrieval program has got a great potential to bridge the gap between the need for the cornea and actually collected corneas which will contribute enormously in

  3. Laughter and humor therapy in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Paul N; Parsons, Trisha; Ben-Moshe, Ros; Weinberg, Melissa; Neal, Merv; Gilbert, Karen; Rawson, Helen; Ockerby, Cherene; Finlay, Paul; Hutchinson, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Laughter and humor therapy have been used in health care to achieve physiological and psychological health-related benefits. The application of these therapies to the dialysis context remains unclear. This paper reviews the evidence related to laughter and humor therapy as a medical therapy relevant to the dialysis patient population. Studies from other groups such as children, the elderly, and persons with mental health, cancer, and other chronic conditions are included to inform potential applications of laughter therapy to the dialysis population. Therapeutic interventions could range from humorous videos, stories, laughter clowns through to raucous simulated laughter and Laughter Yoga. The effect of laughter and humor on depression, anxiety, pain, immunity, fatigue, sleep quality, respiratory function and blood glucose may have applications to the dialysis context and require further research. PMID:24467450

  4. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for comfort. The catheter has one or two cuffs made of a polyester material—called Dacron—that ... or cloudiness in used dialysis solution a catheter cuff that pushes out of your body Fluid and ...

  5. Six Tips to Prevent Dialysis Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of infection. Ask your doctor about getting a fistula or graft instead. Learn how to take care ... have any problem with the catheter. Patients with Fistulas or Grafts TIP Take care of your dialysis ...

  6. Urgent-start peritoneal dialysis: nursing aspects.

    PubMed

    Groenhoff, Cheryl; Delgado, Edna; McClernon, Marilyn; Davis, Alicia; Malone, Latasha; Majirsky, Janet; Guest, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Urgent-start peritoneal dialysis (PD) refers to the initiation of dialysis soon after a PD catheter placement and is a treatment option available to the late-referred patient with advanced kidney disease. This article reviews nursing aspects of urgent-start PD and can serve as a guide for this evolving clinical pathway that can provide renal replacement therapy for a critical segment of the population with Stage 5 chronic kidney disease who require renal replacement therapy. PMID:25244889

  7. Geriatric Issues in Older Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Geriatric syndrome is common among older patients on dialysis. Basic knowledge about its prevalence and management is crucial for nephrologists to provide standard patient care. In busy clinical settings, up-to-date and holistic medical care can be delivered to elderly dialysis patients by collaboration of nephrology and geriatrics teams, or in part by training nephrology fellows the basics of geriatrics. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27379352

  8. The elderly patient on dialysis: geriatric considerations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pooja; Germain, Michael J; Cohen, Lewis; Unruh, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The burgeoning population of older dialysis patients presents opportunities to provide personalized care. The older dialysis population has a high burden of chronic health conditions, decrements in quality of life and a high risk of death. In order to address these challenges, this review will recommend routinely establishing prognosis through the use of prediction instruments and communicating these findings to older patients. The challenges to prognosis in adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) include the subjective nature of clinical judgment, application of appropriate prognostic tools and communication of findings to patients and caregivers. There are three reasons why we believe these conversations occur infrequently with the dialysis population. First, there have previously been no clinically practical instruments to identify individuals undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD) who are at highest risk for death. Second, nephrologists have not been trained to have conversations about prognosis and end-of-life care. Third, other than hospitalizations and accrual of new diagnoses, there are no natural milestone guidelines in place for patients supported by dialysis. The prognosis can be used in shared decision-making to establish goals of care, limits on dialysis support or parameters for withdrawal from dialysis. As older adults with ESRD benefit from kidney transplantation, prognosis can also be used to determine who should be referred for evaluation by a kidney transplant team. The use of prognosis in older adults may determine approaches to optimize well-being and personalize care among older adults ranging from hospice to kidney transplantation. PMID:23787545

  9. Retinal Detachment in Southwest Ethiopia: A Hospital Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Asaminew, Tsedeke; Gelaw, Yeshigeta; Bekele, Sisay; Solomon, Berhan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of retinal detachment in Blacks is generally considered to be low though there are few supporting studies in Africa. This study, thus, aimed at describing the clinical profile of patients with retinal detachment in Southwest Ethiopia. Methods A hospital-based study was done on all consecutive retinal detachment patients who presented to Jimma University Hospital over six months period. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect patients’ sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history. Comprehensive anterior and posterior segment eye examinations were done and risk factors were sought for. Statistical tests were considered significant if P < 0.05. Results A total of 94 eyes of 80 patients (1.5%) had retinal detachment (RD) and about 69% of patients were symptomatic for over a month before presentation. The mean age was 41.4 years (SD ±16.5). Fourteen patients (17.5%) had bilateral RD. At presentation, 61 eyes (64.9%) were blind from RD and 11 (13.8%) patients were bilaterally blind from RD. Rhegmatogenous RD was seen in 55 eyes (58.5%) and tractional RD in 22 eyes (23.4%). The most common risk factors were ocular trauma (32 eyes, 34.0%), myopia (23 eyes, 24.5%), posterior uveitis (13 eyes, 13.8%) and diabetic retinopathy (9 eyes, 9.6%). Most retinal breaks (25 eyes, 43.1%) were superotemporal and horse-shoe tear was the most common (19 eyes, 20.2%). Macula was off in 77 eyes (81.9%) and 38 eyes (69.1% of RRD eyes) had grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Macular status was significantly associated with PVR (P=0.011), and duration of symptoms (RR=1.25, 95%CI: 1.059-1.475, P=0.040). Conclusions A significant numbers of patients with ocular problem had retinal detachment, and nearly two third of the patients presented late. Trauma and myopia were the most important risk factors. People should be educated to improve their health seeking behavior and use eye safety precautions to prevent ocular trauma. PMID:24086614

  10. Restless legs syndrome in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Jahdali, Hamdan H; Al-Qadhi, Waleed A; Khogeer, Haithm A; Al-Hejaili, Fayez F; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed M; Al Sayyari, Abdullah A

    2009-05-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is an extremely distressing problem experienced by patients on dialysis; the prevalence appears to be greater than in the general population, with a wide variation from 6.6% to 80%. The diagnosis of RLS is a clinical one, and its definition has been clarified and standardized by internationally recognized diagnostic criteria, published in 1995 by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG). This study was designed to find out the prevalence of RLS in Saudi patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance dialysis. This is a cross sectional study carried out between May and Sept 2007 at two centers, King Abdulaziz Medical City-King Fahad National Guard Hospital (KAMC-KFNGH), Riyadh and King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFHRC), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data were gathered on 227 Saudi patients on chronic maintenance hemodialysis or chronic peritoneal dialysis. The prevalence of RLS was measured using IRLSSG's RLS Questionnaire (RLSQ). Potential risk factors for RLS including other sleep disorders, underlying cause of chronic renal failure, duration on dialysis, dialysis shift, biochemical tests and demographic data were also evaluated. The overall prevalence of RLS was 50.22% including 53.7% males and 46.3% females. Their mean age was 55.7 +/- 17.2 years and mean duration on dialysis 40.4 +/- 37.8 months. Significant predictors of RLS were history of diabetes mellitus (DM), coffee intake, afternoon dialysis, gender and type of dialysis (P= 0.03, 0.01, < 0.001, 0.05 and 0.009 respectively). Patients with RLS were found to be at increased risk of having insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) (P= < 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Our study suggests that RLS is a very common problem in dialysis population and was significantly associated with other sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, and EDS. Optimal care of dialysis patient should include particular attention to the diagnosis and

  11. [Cost of dialysis in France].

    PubMed

    Zambrowski, Jean-Jacques

    2016-04-01

    According to latest data published by the French health authority (HAS), nearly 74,000 French patients in end-stage chronic renal disease are following a replacement therapy. They were 61,000 in 2007, amounting to a cost of 4 billions euros for public health insurance. The cost varies depending on the age and comorbidities. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is the cheapest mode of treatment, while the heavy haemodialysis centres costs are close to twice as expensive. But these two different treatments are - a priori - not applied for the same patients in terms of level of severity of disease. Moreover, associated costs, medical treatment, transportation, etc. are to be taken into account, as well as losses of income for patients facing major job difficulties. As recommended by HAS experts, it will be important to regularly conduct surveys allowing a regular economic assessment of the various modes of financial healthcare for end-stage chronic renal disease. PMID:26972098

  12. [Biocompatibility of peritoneal dialysis fluids].

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Eric; Moranne, Olivier; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Rougier, Jean-Phillipe; Ronco, Pierre; Pagniez, Dominique; Wautier, Jean-Luc

    2005-03-01

    Repeated and long-term exposure to conventional glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDFs) with poor biocompatibility plays a central role in the pathogenesis of the functional and structural changes of the peritoneal membrane. We have used immortalized human peritoneal mesothelial cells in culture to assess in vitro the biocompatibility of PDFs. Low pH, high glucose concentration and heat sterilization represent major factors of low biocompatibility. Two recent groups of glucose derivatives have been described. Glucose degradation products (GDPs) are formed during heat sterilization (glycoxidation) and storage. GDPs can bind protein and form AGEs (Advanced Glycation End-products), which can also result from the binding of glucose to free NH2 residues of proteins (glycation). The physiological pH, and the separation of glucose during heat sterilization (low GDP content) in the most recent PDFs dramatically increase the biocompatibility. The choice of PD programs with high biocompatibility PDFs allows preserving the function of the peritoneal membrane. Improvement of PDF biocompatibility may limit the occurrence of chronic chemical peritonitis and may allow long-term PD treatment. PMID:16895663

  13. Nosocomial infections in dialysis access.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Alexander; Trevino, Sergio; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections in patients requiring renal replacement therapy have a high impact on morbidity and mortality. The most dangerous complication is bloodstream infection (BSI) associated with the vascular access, with a low BSI risk in arteriovenous fistulas or grafts and a comparatively high risk in central venous catheters. The single most important measure for preventing BSI is therefore the reduction of catheter use by means of early fistula formation. As this is not always feasible, prevention should focus on educational efforts, hand hygiene, surveillance of dialysis-associated events, and specific measures at and after the insertion of catheters. Core measures at the time of insertion include choosing the optimal site of insertion, the use of maximum sterile barrier precautions, adequate skin antisepsis, and the choice of catheter type; after insertion, access care needs to ensure hub disinfection and regular dressing changes. The application of antimicrobial locks is reserved for special situations. Evidence suggests that bundling a selection of the aforementioned measures can significantly reduce infection rates. The diagnosis of central line-associated BSI (CLABSI) is based on clinical signs and microbiological findings in blood cultures ideally drawn both peripherally and from the catheter. The prompt installation of empiric antibiotic treatment covering the most commonly encountered organisms is key regarding CLABSI treatment. Catheter removal is recommended in complicated cases or if cultures yield Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Pseudomonas or fungi. In other cases, guide wire exchange or catheter salvage strategies with antibiotic lock solutions may be acceptable alternatives. PMID:25676304

  14. Patency and Complications of Translumbar Dialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-01-01

    Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short- and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter-related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/minute) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter, and total catheter were 65, 84, and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6, and 12 months were 43%, 25%, and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter-related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal, respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. This study data suggest that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  15. Best Practices Consensus Protocol for Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement by Interventional Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed K.; Dybbro, Paul; Hathaway, Peter; Guest, Steven; Neuwirth, Michael; Krishnamurthy, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters can be placed by interventional radiologists, an approach that might offer scheduling efficiencies, cost-effectiveness, and a minimally invasive procedure. In the United States, changes in the dialysis reimbursement structure by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are expected to result in the increased use of PD, a less costly dialysis modality that offers patients the opportunity to receive dialysis in the home setting and to have more independence for travel and work schedules, and that preserves vascular access for future dialysis options. Placement of PD catheters by interventional radiologists might therefore be increasingly requested by nephrology practices, given that recent publications have demonstrated the favorable impact on PD practices of an interventional radiology PD placement capability. Earlier reports of interventional radiology PD catheter placement came from single-center practices with smaller reported experiences. The need for a larger consensus document that attempts to establish best demonstrated practices for radiologists is evident. The radiologists submitting this consensus document represent a combined experience of more than 1000 PD catheter placements. The authors submit these consensus-proposed best demonstrated practices for placement of PD catheters by interventional radiologists under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. This technique might allow for expeditious placement of permanent PD catheters in late-referred patients with end-stage renal disease, thus facilitating urgent-start PD and avoiding the need for temporary vascular access catheters. PMID:24584622

  16. Pre-Dialysis Visits to a Nephrology Department and Major Cardiovascular Events in Patients Undergoing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Chuang, Chi-Rou; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Pre-dialysis care by a nephrology out-patient department (OPD) may affect the outcomes of patients who ultimately undergo maintenance dialysis. This study examined the effect of pre-dialysis care by a nephrology OPD on the incidence of one-year major cardiovascular events after initiation of dialysis. Design, Setting Participants, & Measurements The study consisted of Taiwanese patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who commenced dialysis from 2006 to 2008. The number of nephrology OPD visits during the critical care period (within 6 months of initiation of dialysis) and the early care period (6–36 months before initiation of dialysis) were analyzed. The primary outcome measure was one-year major cardiovascular events. Results A total of 1191 CKD patients who initiated dialysis from 2006 to 2008 were included. Binary logistic regression showed that patients with ≧3 visits during the critical care period and those with ≧11 visits during the early care period had fewer composite major cardiovascular events than those with 0 visits. Patients with early referral are less likely to experience composite major cardiovascular events than those with late referral, with aOR 0.574 (95% CI = 0.43–0.77, P<0.001). Patients with both ≧3 visits during critical care period and ≧11 visits during early care period were less likely to experience composite major cardiovascular events (aOR = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.16–0.39, P < 0.001). Conclusions Patients with adequate pre-dialysis nephrology OPD visits, not just early referral, may had fewer one-year composite major cardiovascular events after initiation of dialysis. This information may be important to medical care providers and public health policy makers in their efforts to improve the well-being of CKD patients. PMID:26900915

  17. Peritoneal dialysis reduces the use of non native fistula access in dialysis programs.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, D J; Jindal, K K; Schaubel, D E; Fenton, S S

    1999-01-01

    Access problems remain the major difficulty associated with chronic hemodialysis. Despite recent recommendations by the Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative (DOQI) that native arteriovenous (AV) fistulae are the optimal form of vascular access, grafts and central catheters are used by many patients. We analyzed our large Canadian regional dialysis program, which has a high prevalence of peritoneal dialysis, to examine the effect of dialysis modality choice on vascular access utilization. Point prevalence data were collected from our program in October 1997, and technique and patient survival data for the period 1990-1996 were analyzed and compared to data for the remainder of Canada from the Canadian Organ Replacement Register. Mortality rate ratios were estimated using a Poisson regression model to correct for comorbidity, age, and end-stage renal disease etiology. Of 141 in-center hemodialysis patients, 91 had an AV fistula, 1 had a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft, and 49 were catheter-dependent. The program also included 20 home hemodialysis patients with AV fistulae, and 156 patients on peritoneal dialysis. No mortality risk differences between hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are seen in our center, nor are they seen for each modality in comparison with the remainder of Canada. Technique survival for peritoneal dialysis at our center was about 80% at 2 years, significantly greater than for Canada. For the program as a whole, 49% of patients used peritoneal dialysis 35% a native AV fistula, and 15% a central catheter. For Canada and the U.S.A. respectively, the comparable data were: peritoneal dialysis, 32% and 17%; native fistula, 33% and 15%; PTFE, 19% and 41%; and central catheter 16% and 27%. These data suggest that the use of peritoneal dialysis may allow reduced use of non native AV fistula access without mortality penalty. PMID:10682085

  18. “Is There Life on Dialysis?”: Time and Aging in a Clinically Sustained Existence

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Ann J.; Shim, Janet K.; Kaufman, Sharon R.

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, in the United States, lives are being extended at ever-older ages through the implementation of routine medical procedures such as renal dialysis. This paper discusses the lives and experiences of a number of individuals 70 years of age and older at two dialysis units in California. It considers what kind of life it is that is being sustained and prolonged in these units, the meanings of the time gained through (and lost to) dialysis for older people, and the relationship of “normal” life outside the units to an exceptional state on the inside that some patients see as not-quite-life. Highlighting the unique dimensions of gerontological time on chronic life support, the article PMID:16249136

  19. Increasing sodium removal on peritoneal dialysis: applying dialysis mechanics to the peritoneal dialysis prescription.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Michel; Schmitt, Claus Peter; Shroff, Rukshana; Zaloszyc, Ariane; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-04-01

    Optimal fluid removal on peritoneal dialysis (PD) requires removal of water coupled with sodium, which is predominantly achieved via the small pores in the peritoneal membrane. On the other hand, free-water transport takes place through aquaporin-1 channels, but leads to sodium retention and over hydration. PD prescription can be adapted to promote small pore transport to achieve improved sodium and fluid management. Both adequate dwell volume and dwell time are required for small pore transport. The dwell volume determines the amount of "wetted" peritoneal membrane being increased in the supine position and optimized at dwell volumes of approximately 1400 ml/m(2). Diffusion across the recruited small pores is time-dependent, favored by a long dwell time, and driven by the transmembrane solute gradient. According to the 3-pore model of conventional PD, sodium removal primarily occurs via convection. The clinical application of these principles is essential for optimal performance of PD and has resulted in a new approach to the automated PD prescription: adapted automated PD. In adapted automated PD, sequential short- and longer-dwell exchanges, with small and large dwell volumes, respectively, are used. A crossover trial in adults and a pilot study in children suggests that sodium and fluid removal are increased by adapted automated PD, leading to improved blood pressure control when compared with conventional PD. These findings are not explained by the current 3-pore model of peritoneal permeability and require further prospective crossover studies in adults and children for validation. PMID:26924063

  20. Considering health insurance: how do dialysis initiates with Medicaid coverage differ from persons without Medicaid coverage?

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, James B.; Rigler, Sally K.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Type of health insurance is an important mediator of medical outcomes in the United States. Medicaid, a jointly sponsored Federal/State programme, is designed to serve medically needy individuals. How these patients differ from non-Medicaid-enrolled incident dialysis patients and how these differences have changed over time have not been systematically examined. Methods. Using data from the United States Renal Data System, we identified individuals initiating dialysis from 1995 to 2004 and categorized their health insurance status. Longitudinal trends in demographic, risk behaviour, functional, comorbidity, laboratory and dialysis modality factors, as reported on the Medical Evidence Form (CMS-2728), were examined in all insurance groups. Polychotomous logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted generalized ratios (AGRs) for these factors by insurance status, with Medicaid as the referent insurance group. Results. Overall, males constitute a growing percentage of both Medicaid and non-Medicaid patients, but in contrast to other insurance groups, Medicaid has a higher proportion of females. Non-Caucasians also constitute a higher proportion of Medicaid patients than non-Medicaid patients. Body mass index increased in all groups over time, and all groups witnessed a significant decrease in initiation on peritoneal dialysis. Polychotomous regression showed generally lower AGRs for minorities, risk behaviours and functional status, and higher AGRs for males, employment and self-care dialysis, for non-Medicaid insurance relative to Medicaid. Conclusions. While many broad parallel trends are evident in both Medicaid and non-Medicaid incident dialysis patients, many important differences between these groups exist. These findings could have important implications for policy planners, providers and payers. PMID:19736241

  1. Continuous peritoneal dialysis for children: a decade of worldwide growth and development.

    PubMed

    Alexander, S R; Honda, M

    1993-02-01

    This review surveys the dramatic worldwide expansion of the use of continuous peritoneal dialysis as maintenance renal replacement therapy for children with end-stage renal disease that has occurred during the past decade. Before 1982, fewer than 100 pediatric patients had been treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), and continuous cycler peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) for children was virtually unknown. By the end of 1989 CAPD/CCPD was accounting for 50% of pediatric dialysis patients (less than 15 years old) in the United States, 65% in Canada, and 75% in Australia/New Zealand. Growth of CAPD/CCPD for children in Europe overall has been less spectacular, but there is wide variability from country to country, with CAPD/CCPD concentrated in eight member countries of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association. Several of these countries (notably the United Kingdom, Israel, the Netherlands and the former Federal Republic of Germany) were treating 46% to 70% of pediatric patients with CAPD/CCPD by the end of 1987. Other European countries such as France and Spain showed little growth of CAPD/CCPD over the decade (10% to 20% of patients treated with CAPD/CCPD). In Japan, CAPD for children has just begun, but because Japanese children are likely to spend longer periods on dialysis awaiting transplantation, information on long-term use of CAPD/CCPD in children may be forthcoming from Japan in the future. No effort is made to compare CAPD/CCPD to hemodialysis as a maintenance therapy for children. The advantages of CAPD/CCPD for the young patient, especially the infant and very young child are noted, and from the past decade of dramatic worldwide growth of CAPD/CCPD in pediatric patients it is inferred that the majority of children, (from 50% to 75%) can be successfully treated with these modalities, at least for the short-term (that is, several years), while awaiting transplantation. PMID:8445841

  2. Dental management in renal failure: patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Jover Cerveró, Alba; Bagán, José V; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Poveda Roda, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Chronic renal failure is an important health care problem throughout the world, with an incidence of 337, 90, 107 and 95 new cases per million inhabitants/year in the United States, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, respectively. These figures moreover invariably tend to increase. During the progression of renal damage, clinical manifestations are noted in practically all body organs and systems, and 90% of all affected patients experience oral symptoms. The existing management options range from simple measures based on changes in diet and life style, to different forms of dialysis (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis), and also kidney transplantation. Given the multiple oral manifestations of chronic renal failure, and the different repercussions of its treatment upon the oral cavity, these patients require special considerations and precautions in the face of dental treatment. Consultation with the nephrologist is essential before any dental treatment is carried out, in order to determine the condition of the patient, define the best moment for dental treatment, introduce the necessary pharmacological adjustments, or to establish other important aspects for preventing complications in the dental clinic. The present study reviews the characteristics of the disease, the existing therapeutic options, and the considerations of relevance for the dental professional. PMID:18587305

  3. [Adequacy of peritoneal dialysis and laboratory procedures].

    PubMed

    Klarić, Dragan; Predovan, Gorana

    2012-07-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is an equally valuable method for some patients. It is a method with some advantages and thus should be considered the method of choice. Are the trends of treatment with this method instead of terminal kidney disease replacement stagnating? In our ten-year retrospective study, we tried to do assess how to control the efficiency of dialysis and what was its influence on patient survival. We compared clinical state of patients, laboratory indicators of dialysis dosage (Kt/v) and peritoneal membrane transport function (PET). Patients were divided according to Kt/v values <1.7, 1.7-2.2 and >2.2. According to PET findings, they were divided into four standard groups. Kt/v and PET are unavoidable evaluation factors of peritoneal membrane and for prescribing dialysis. The transport, ultrafiltration and other membrane characteristics change with time and with inflammatory processes. On any calculation of adequacy, it is essential to distinguish diuretic and anuric patients. The adequacy of peritoneal dialysis should be incorporated in the conclusion on prescriptions and quality treatment of each individual patient. PMID:23441537

  4. Dialysis: a characterization method of aggregation tendency.

    PubMed

    Pesarrodona, Mireia; Unzueta, Ugutz; Vázquez, Esther

    2015-01-01

    All researchers immersed in the world of recombinant protein production are in agreement that often the production and purification process of a protein can become a nightmare due to an unexpected behavior of the protein at different protocol stages. Once the protein is purified, scientists know that they still cannot relax. There is a decisive last step missing: performing a protein dialysis in a suitable buffer for subsequent experimental trials. Here is when we can find proteins that precipitate during dialysis by buffer-related factors (ionic strength, pH, etc.), which are intrinsic to each protein and are difficult to predict. How can we find the buffer in which a protein is more stable and with less tendency to precipitate? In this chapter we go over possible factors affecting the protein precipitation tendency during the dialysis process and describe a general dialysis protocol with tricks to reduce protein aggregation. Furthermore, we propose a fast method to detect the most appropriate buffer for the stability of a particular protein, performing microdialysis on a battery of different buffers to measure afterwards precipitation by a colorimetric method, and thus being able to choose the most suitable buffer for the dialysis of a given protein. PMID:25447873

  5. Implementation of a Hospital-Based Quality Assessment Program for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hendren, Samantha; McKeown, Ellen; Morris, Arden M.; Wong, Sandra L.; Oerline, Mary; Poe, Lyndia; Campbell, Darrell A.; Birkmeyer, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quality improvement programs in Europe have had a markedly beneficial effect on the processes and outcomes of rectal cancer care. The quality of rectal cancer care in the United States is not as well understood, and scalable quality improvement programs have not been developed. The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of a hospital-based quality assessment program for rectal cancer, targeting both community and academic hospitals. Methods: We recruited 10 hospitals from a surgical quality improvement organization. Nurse reviewers were trained to abstract rectal cancer data from hospital medical records, and abstracts were assessed for accuracy. We conducted two surveys to assess the training program and limitations of the data abstraction. We validated data completeness and accuracy by comparing hospital medical record and tumor registry data. Results: Nine of 10 hospitals successfully performed abstractions with ≥ 90% accuracy. Experienced nurse reviewers were challenged by the technical details in operative and pathology reports. Although most variables had less than 10% missing data, outpatient testing information was lacking from some hospitals' inpatient records. This implementation project yielded a final quality assessment program consisting of 20 medical records variables and 11 tumor registry variables. Conclusion: An innovative program linking tumor registry data to quality-improvement data for rectal cancer quality assessment was successfully implemented in 10 hospitals. This data platform and training program can serve as a template for other organizations that are interested in assessing and improving the quality of rectal cancer care. PMID:24839288

  6. Tying it all together: integrating a hospital-based health care system through case management education.

    PubMed

    Czerenda, A J; Best, L

    1994-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of the case manager as a system integrator, United Health Services, Inc. (UHS), a hospital-based health care system located in upstate New York, implemented several diverse case management models. Case managers were working in a variety of settings, often in isolation. It was determined that a system-wide case management education program would accomplish two goals: (a) provide all case managers within the UHS system with similar case management practice skills and language, and (b) provide an opportunity for case managers to meet, share role responsibilities and common case management issues, and use each other as resources. With input from leadership throughout the UHS system, a 4-week case management education program was developed and presented. Participants included multidisciplinary staff who had case management responsibilities within the system. Sessions were taught by UHS staff experts in a number of different disciplines. A teaching guide and manual were developed to supplement the didactic material. Feedback from the program was provided via written participant evaluation and follow-up discussions. PMID:8000326

  7. Hydrothorax: pleural effusion associated with peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lew, Susie Q

    2010-01-01

    Hydrothorax in a patient treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) poses a diagnostic dilemma. Hydrothorax due to migration of dialysis fluid across the diaphragm and into the pleural space creates a serious complication of PD but generally does not threaten life. Shortness of breath causes the patient to seek medical attention. A sudden diminution in dialysis adequacy or poor ultrafiltration rate constitutes a unique marker for patients treated with PD compared to the general population. This article reviews the etiology for hydrothorax specifically in the PD population. Thoracentesis with chemical analysis of the fluid, imaging studies with and without contrast or markers, and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery play important roles in the evaluation of hydrothorax. A conservative PD regimen, surgical intervention, and pleurodesis provide treatment options to those receiving PD. PMID:20056973

  8. Maintaining Safety in the Dialysis Facility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Errors in dialysis care can cause harm and death. While dialysis machines are rarely a major cause of morbidity, human factors at the machine interface and suboptimal communication among caregivers are common sources of error. Major causes of potentially reversible adverse outcomes include medication errors, infections, hyperkalemia, access-related errors, and patient falls. Root cause analysis of adverse events and "near misses" can illuminate care processes and show system changes to improve safety. Human factors engineering and simulation exercises have strong potential to define common clinical team purpose, and improve processes of care. Patient observations and their participation in error reduction increase the effectiveness of patient safety efforts. PMID:25376767

  9. Maintaining safety in the dialysis facility.

    PubMed

    Kliger, Alan S

    2015-04-01

    Errors in dialysis care can cause harm and death. While dialysis machines are rarely a major cause of morbidity, human factors at the machine interface and suboptimal communication among caregivers are common sources of error. Major causes of potentially reversible adverse outcomes include medication errors, infections, hyperkalemia, access-related errors, and patient falls. Root cause analysis of adverse events and "near misses" can illuminate care processes and show system changes to improve safety. Human factors engineering and simulation exercises have strong potential to define common clinical team purpose, and improve processes of care. Patient observations and their participation in error reduction increase the effectiveness of patient safety efforts. PMID:25376767

  10. The poetics of professionalism among dialysis technicians.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Laura L

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of care for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients is provided by skilled (but not formally educated) paraprofessional technicians. Using Goffman's (1959) framing of the performance of self in everyday discourse, this study examines discourse from dialysis technicians and technical aides to explore these paraprofessionals' construction and performance of professional identity and professional communication within the context of an outpatient dialysis clinic. Themes of professionalism--individualized care, vigilance, teamwork, and emotion management--are illustrated via poetic transcription of interviews with technicians. I contend that such representation offers validity equal to that of traditional research accounts while embodying alternative representational strengths. PMID:21181599

  11. [Should dialysis be for all? Yes indeed!].

    PubMed

    Panzetta, G; Grignetti, M; Toigo, G

    2008-01-01

    Clinically compromised patients who must undergo chronic dialysis are, in general, at risk because the procedure can be difficult to perform and give poor results in terms of survival and of rehabilitation. However, it is dialysis of the very elderly which is routinely characterized by misgivings about the indication for and limits of the technique. Patients older than 75 years of age currently represent more than 35% of the population that begin dialysis in most European registries. In our center at least 30 very old patients begin dialysis every year, which represents 45% of the total incident patients. About 30% of these patients, because of severe physical and/or mental disability, often associated with a situation of social deprivation, rarely achieve true clinical stability and depend upon outside caregivers in order to survive. The treatment of these patients strains the resources of the health and social structure, as well as the Nephrology Division, whose organization can be disrupted by their urgent needs, such as hospitalization, transportation, convalescent care, etc. Despite these difficulties and a mean survival of only 28 months, the global clinical conditions of patients older than 75 years of age are not much different than patients in the age bracket of 65 to 75 years. In fact, excluding patients older than 85 years of age (a category which geriatricians consider separately), the survival and rehabilitation of the very elderly appear similar to those of patients 65 to 75 years of age. Many of the clinical problems of the dialyzed elderly, such as sensory, mental and functional impairment, are the result of advanced age per se rather than of uremia or of dialysis. Therefore, ethical considerations of dialysis and of health maintenance in the very elderly are similar to those presented by patients who are afflicted by other serious diseases such as cancer, heart failure, or extensive stroke. As a result of modern technology and the advancement of

  12. Peritoneal Dialysis Registry With 2012 Survey Report.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takeshi; Nakai, Shigeru; Moriishi, Misaki; Ito, Yasuhiko; Itami, Noritomo; Masakane, Ikuto; Hanafusa, Norio; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Hamano, Takayuki; Shoji, Tetsuo; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Shinoda, Toshio; Kazama, Junichiro; Watanabe, Yuzo; Shigematsu, Takashi; Marubayashi, Seiji; Morita, Osamu; Wada, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Seiji; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Kimata, Naoki; Wakai, Kenji; Fujii, Naohiko; Ogata, Satoshi; Tsuchida, Kenji; Nishi, Hiroshi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Nakamoto, Hidetomo

    2015-12-01

    Since 2009, the peritoneal dialysis (PD) registry survey has been carried out as part of the annual nationwide survey conducted by the Statistical Survey Committee of the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy with the cooperation of the Japanese Society for Peritoneal Dialysis. In this report, the current status of PD patients is presented on the basis of the results of the survey conducted at the end of 2012. The subjects were PD patients who lived in Japan and participated in the 2012 survey. Descriptive analysis of various items was performed, which included the current status of the combined use of PD and another dialysis method such as hemodialysis (HD) or hemodiafiltration (HDF), the method of exchanging dialysate, the use of an automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) machine, and the rates of peritonitis and catheter exit-site infection. From the results of the facility survey in 2012, the number of PD patients was 9514, a decrease of 128 from 2011. Among the entire dialysis patient population, 3.1% were PD patients, a decrease of 0.1%. Among the studied patients, 347 had a peritoneal catheter and underwent peritoneal lavage, 175 were started on PD in 2012 but introduced to other blood purification methods in the same year, and 1932 underwent both PD and another dialysis method such as HD or HDF. The percentage of patients who underwent PD and another dialysis method increased with PD vintage: <1 year, 4.8%; 1 to <2 years, 9.2%; 2 to <4 years, 16.3%; 4 to <8 years, 32.0%; and ≥8 years, 47.5%. The percentage of PD patients who completely manually exchanged the dialysate was 29.8%. The percentages of PD patients who used a double-bag exchange system with ultraviolet-light irradiation and those who used the same system but with a sterile connecting device were 54.7 and 13.9%, respectively. The percentage of patients on PD for <1 year using an APD machine was 43.4%, and it decreased with a PD vintage of ≥2 years. The mean rate of peritonitis was 0.22 per patient

  13. Hamster bite peritonitis: Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Campos, A; Taylor, J H; Campbell, M

    2000-11-01

    We report the first case of Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient. This rare infection was the result of contamination of the dialysis tubing by a pet hamster. We stress the importance of household pets as a source of infection in the peritoneal dialysis population. PMID:11095007

  14. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not paid under...

  15. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not paid under...

  16. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 415.176 Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not...

  17. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 415.176 Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not...

  18. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 415.176 Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not...

  19. An inexpensive, interdisciplinary, methodology to conduct an impact study of homeless persons on hospital based services.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Regier, Michael; Brown, Zachary; Davis, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Homelessness is a primary concern for community health. Scientific literature on homelessness is wide ranging and diverse. One opportunity to add to existing literature is the development and testing of affordable, easily implemented methods for measuring the impact of homeless on the healthcare system. Such methodological approaches rely on the strengths in a multidisciplinary approach, including providers, both healthcare and homeless services and applied clinical researchers. This paper is a proof of concept for a methodology which is easily adaptable nationwide, given the mandated implementation of homeless management information systems in the United States and other countries; medical billing systems by hospitals; and research methods of researchers. Adaptation is independent of geographic region, budget restraints, specific agency skill sets, and many other factors that impact the application of a consistent methodological science based approach to assess and address homelessness. We conducted a secondary data analysis merging data from homeless utilization and hospital case based data. These data detailed care utilization among homeless persons in a small, Appalachian city in the United States. In our sample of 269 persons who received at least one hospital based service and one homeless service between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, the total billed costs were $5,979,463 with 10 people costing more than one-third ($1,957,469) of the total. Those persons were primarily men, living in an emergency shelter, with pre-existing disabling conditions. We theorize that targeted services, including Housing First, would be an effective intervention. This is proposed in a future study. PMID:24894404

  20. Improving Outcomes in Patients Receiving Dialysis: The Peer Kidney Care Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, James B; Gilbertson, David T; Liu, Jiannong; Collins, Allan J

    2016-07-01

    The past decade has witnessed a marked reduction in mortality rates among patients receiving maintenance dialysis. However, the reasons for this welcome development are uncertain, and greater understanding is needed to translate advances in care into additional survival gains. To fill important knowledge gaps and to enable dialysis provider organizations to learn from one another, with the aim of advancing patient care, the Peer Kidney Care Initiative (Peer) was created in 2014 by the chief medical officers of 14 United States dialysis provider organizations and the Chronic Disease Research Group. Areas of particular clinical importance were targeted to help shape the public health agenda in CKD and ESRD. Peer focuses on the effect of geographic variation on outcomes, the implications of seasonality for morbidity and mortality, the clinical significance of understudied disorders affecting dialysis patients, and the debate about how best to monitor and evaluate progress in care. In the realm of geovariation, Peer has provided key observations on regional variation in the rates of ESRD incidence, hospitalization, and pre-ESRD care. Regarding seasonality, Peer has reported on variation in both infection-related and non-infection-related hospitalizations, suggesting that ambient environmental conditions may affect a range of health outcomes in dialysis patients. Specific medical conditions that Peer highlights include Clostridium difficile infection, which has become strikingly more common in patients in the year after dialysis initiation, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the treatments for which have the potential to contribute to sudden cardiac death. Finally, Peer challenges the nephrology community to consider alternatives to standardized mortality ratios in assessing progress in care, positing that close scrutiny of trends over time may be the most effective way to drive improvements in patient care. PMID:27006497

  1. Geographic Variation in Cardioprotective Antihypertensive Medication Usage in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, James B.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Hou, Qingjiang; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Rigler, Sally K.; Spertus, John A.; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite their high risk for adverse cardiac outcomes, persons on chronic dialysis have been shown to have lower use of antihypertensive medications with cardioprotective properties, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), β-blockers, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs), than might be expected. We constructed a novel database that permits detailed exploration into the demographic, clinical and geographic factors associated with the use these agents of among hypertensive chronic dialysis patients. Study Design National cross-sectional retrospective analysis linking Medicaid prescription drug claims with United States Renal Data System core data. Setting & Participants 48,882 hypertensive chronic dialysis patients who were dually-eligible for Medicaid and Medicare services in 2005. Factors Demographics, comorbidities, functional status, and state of residence. Outcomes Prevalence of cardioprotective antihypertensive agents in Medicaid pharmacy claims and state-specific observed:expected odds ratios of medication exposure. Measurements Factors associated with medication use were modeled using multi-level logistic regression models. Results In multivariable analyses, cardioprotective antihypertensive medication exposure was significantly associated with younger age, female sex, non-Caucasian race, intact functional status, and use of in-center hemodialysis. Diabetes was associated with a statistically-significant 28% higher odds of ACE inhibitor/ARB use, but congestive heart failure (CHF) was associated with only a 9% increase in the odds of β-blockers and no increase in ACE inhibitor/ARB use. There was substantial state-by-state variation in use of all classes of agents, with a greater than 2.9-fold difference in adjusted rate odds ratios between the highest- and lowest-prescribing states for ACE inhibitors/ARBs and a 3.6-fold difference for β-blockers. Limitations Limited generalizability beyond study

  2. Exploring the Association between Macroeconomic Indicators and Dialysis Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Stel, Vianda S.; Caskey, Fergus J.; Stengel, Benedicte; Elliott, Robert F.; Covic, Adrian; Geue, Claudia; Cusumano, Ana; MacLeod, Alison M.; Jager, Kitty J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Mortality on dialysis varies greatly worldwide, with patient-level factors explaining only a small part of this variation. The aim of this study was to examine the association of national-level macroeconomic indicators with the mortality of incident dialysis populations and explore potential explanations through renal service indicators, incidence of dialysis, and characteristics of the dialysis population. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Aggregated unadjusted survival probabilities were obtained from 22 renal registries worldwide for patients starting dialysis in 2003–2005. General population age and health, macroeconomic indices, and renal service organization data were collected from secondary sources and questionnaires. Linear modeling with log–log transformation of the outcome variable was applied to establish factors associated with survival on dialysis. Results Two-year survival on dialysis ranged from 62.3% in Iceland to 89.8% in Romania. A higher gross domestic product per capita (hazard ratio=1.02 per 1000 US dollar increase), a higher percentage of gross domestic product spent on healthcare (1.10 per percent increase), and a higher intrinsic mortality of the dialysis population (i.e., general population-derived mortality risk of the dialysis population in that country standardized for age and sex; hazard ratio=1.04 per death per 10,000 person years) were associated with a higher mortality of the dialysis population. The incidence of dialysis and renal service indicators were not associated with mortality on dialysis. Conclusions Macroeconomic factors and the intrinsic mortality of the dialysis population are associated with international differences in the mortality on dialysis. Renal service organizational factors and incidence of dialysis seem less important. PMID:22837275

  3. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children Undergoing Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Vazirian, Shams; Seyedzadeh, Abolhasan; Rafeie, Mohammad; Salehi, Bahman; Amiri, Mohammad; Ebrahimimonfared, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common childhood psychiatric disorder. This disorder is more prevalent in some chronic disease. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate ADHD in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and to compare the results with those of healthy children. Patients and Methods: This case-control study was conducted for six months (December 22, 2013 to June 21, 2014) on five to 16-year-old children, visiting the Pediatric Dialysis Unit of Amirkabir Hospital, Arak, Iran, and Taleghani Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran. A total of 100 children with ESRD who had undergone CAPD for at least six months and 100 healthy children were included in this study as case and control groups, respectively. ADHD was diagnosed by Conner's Parent Rating Scale-48 (CPRS-48) and DSM-IV-TR criteria, and was confirmed through consultation by psychologist. Data were analyzed by Binomial test in SPSS 18. Results: The ADHD inattentive type was observed in 16 cases (16%) with CAPD and five controls (5%) (P = 0.01). Moreover, ADHD hyperactive-impulsive type was observed in 27 cases (27%) with CAPD and seven controls (9%) (P = 0.002). Despite these significant differences, no children were diagnosed with ADHD combined type among all subjects. Conclusions: Inattentive type and hyperactive-impulsive type of ADHD are more prevalent in children with ESRD undergoing CAPD. Therefore screening methods for ADHD is necessary in these patients. PMID:25830120

  4. [Dialysis and ecology: can we do better in the future?].

    PubMed

    Vuignier, Y; Pruijm, M; Jarrayah, F; Burnier, M

    2013-02-27

    Development of dialysis has saved the lives of many patients. However, haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are very demanding in resources such as water and electricity, and generate a large amount of waste. In this article, we will review the environmental aspects of dialysis. Different solutions will be discussed, such as recycling of water discharged during reverse osmosis, the integration of solar energy, recycling of waste plastics, and the use of other techniques such as sorbent dialysis. In a world where natural resources are precious and where global warming is a major problem, it is important that not only dialysis, but all branches of medicine become more attentive to ecology. PMID:23539814

  5. Soft tissue calcification in chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzela, D. C.; Huffer, W. E.; Conger, J. D.; Winter, S. D.; Hammond, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Autopsy protocols and microscopic slides of 56 dialyzed and 18 nondialyzed chronically uremic patients were reviewed to assess the presence, extent, and severity of extraosseous soft tissue calcification. Calcification was identified in 79% of the dialysis patients and 44% of the nondialysis patients (P iss less than .025). Soft tissue calcification most frequently involved the heart, lungs, stomach, and kidneys. Lesions were severe in 36% of the dialysis patients and, when strategically located within the myocardium, were life-threatening. The deaths of 6 dialysis patients were attributed to severe calcification of the cardiac conduction system and/or myocardium. The presence and severity of soft tissue calcification was not related to duration of dialysis, patients' age, degree of parathyroid gland hyperplasia, radiographic evidence of soft tissue calcification, serum calcium and phosphate levels, Ca X P products, or type or severity of metabolic bone disease. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:836675

  6. Laboratory dialysis--past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Parikshit; Ajay, Dara

    2012-04-01

    Laboratory dialysis, one of the most widely used techniques in biological research is truly a ' gateway technology' . The analogy is to that of a ' gate' of a building through which everybody has to pass, even though they may wish to go to different departments. Similarly, researchers may be working in altogether different areas but all may need to use laboratory dialysis at one stage or the other during the course of their research. Biochemists may use it to purify enzymes, an immunologist may use it to purify monoclonal antibodies from culture supernatants, a chemist may use it as a step in the crystallography process or for purification of ionic liquids, a biotechnologist may use it to study the effectiveness of enzyme immobilization and a drug discovery scientist may use it for determining drug-protein interaction. The present article reviews patents in the field of laboratory dialysis from inception till date, focusing on the various developmental and innovation related milestones during evolution of the technique. It captures the full panorama of a very interesting technique which continues to be as relevant today as it was in 1866 when the term ' dialysis' was first coined. PMID:22420880

  7. Dialysis for severe hyponatraemia in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Annemarie; Hill, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Severe hyponatraemia is a rare complication of preeclampsia. In the case presented, the rapid recovery of liver function test abnormalities and thrombocytopenia were accompanied by acute renal failure, relative oliguria and progressive hyponatraemia contributing to confusion and ileus. Dialysis was instigated and the patient promptly recovered. Renal function recovered fully.

  8. Removal of phosphorus by peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Delmez, J A

    1993-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists that peritoneal dialysis, as currently practiced, cannot alone remove adequate amounts of phosphorus in well-nourished patients. Current efforts should address the possibility of developing improved nontoxic oral phosphorus binders and/or different compositions of dialysate fluid. PMID:8399639

  9. Peritoneal dialysis: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis was first employed in patients with acute renal failure in the 1940s and since the 1960s for those with end-stage renal disease. Its popularity increased enormously after the introduction of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in the end of 1970s. This stimulated both clinical and basic research. In an ideal situation, this should lead to cross-fertilization between the two. The present review describes two examples of interactions: one where it worked out very well and another where basic science missed the link with clinical findings. Those on fluid transport are examples of how old physiological findings on absorption of saline and glucose solutions were adopted in peritoneal dialysis by the use of glucose as an osmotic agent. The mechanism behind this in patients was first solved mathematically by the assumption of ultrasmall intracellular pores allowing water transport only. At the same time, basic science discovered the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP-1), and a few years later, studies in transgenic mice confirmed that AQP-1 was the ultrasmall pore. In clinical medicine, this led to its assessment in patients and the notion of its impairment. Drugs for treatment have been developed. Research on biocompatibility is not a success story. Basic science has focussed on dialysis solutions with a low pH and lactate, and effects of glucose degradation products, although the first is irrelevant in patients and effects of continuous exposure to high glucose concentrations were largely neglected. Industry believed the bench more than the bedside, resulting in ‘biocompatible’ dialysis solutions. These solutions have some beneficial effects, but are evidently not the final answer. PMID:26120456

  10. Risk of Tuberculosis Among Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chin-Chung; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Wei, Yu-Feng; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Feng-Jung; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Chen, Jin-Shing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients on long-term dialysis are at high risk for tuberculosis (TB). Although latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is good target for TB eradication, interferon-gamma release assay-defined LTBI has a high proportion of negative conversion and lacks active TB correlation among patients on dialysis. Patients on long-term dialysis were screened in multiple centers in Taiwan. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT) was used to define LTBI and was performed thrice at 6-month intervals. The primary outcome was active TB diagnosed after LTBI screening. The incidence and predictive value of QFT-GIT were analyzed. The 940 dialysis patients enrolled had an average age of 59.3 years. The initial QFT-GIT results were positive in 193, including 49.6% with persistent positive results on second check. In an average follow-up period of 3 years, 7 patients had TB. Three (319.1 per 100,000 person-yrs) and 4 (141.8 per 100,000 person-yrs) of them were prevalent and incident TB cases, respectively. Persistent positive QFT-GIT for 2 and 3 times correlated with increased hazard ratio for TB (14.44 and 20.29, respectively) compared with a single positive result (hazard ratio 10.38). Among those with 3 positive QFT-GIT results, TB development rate was 4.5% and incidence rate was 1352.3 per 100,000 person-years. In contrast, none of the incident TB occurred in those with initial positive and then negative conversion of QFT-GIT. In an area of intermediate TB incidence, dialysis patients have high TB risk. LTBI status is a good predictor of TB development, especially for those with more than 1 positive result. After excluding prevalent TB cases, serial follow-up of LTBI may narrow the target population to reduce treatment costs. PMID:27258523

  11. Slow continuous ultrafiltration with bound solute dialysis.

    PubMed

    Patzer, John F; Safta, Stefan A; Miller, Richard H

    2006-01-01

    Bound solute dialysis (BSD), often referred to as "albumin dialysis" (practiced clinically as the molecular adsorbents recirculating system, MARS, or single-pass albumin dialysis, SPAD) or "sorbent dialysis" (practiced clinically as the charcoal-based Biologic-DT), is based upon the thermodynamic principle that the driving force for solute mass transfer across a dialysis membrane is the difference in free solute concentration across the membrane. The clinically relevant practice of slow continuous ultrafiltration (SCUF) for maintenance of patients with liver failure is analyzed in conjunction with BSD. The primary dimensionless operating parameters that describe SCUF-BSD include (1) beta, the dialysate/blood binder concentration ratio; (2) kappa, the dialyzer mass transfer/blood flow rate ratio; (3) alpha, the dialysate/blood flow rate ratio; and, (4) gamma, the ultrafiltration/blood flow rate ratio. Results from mathematical modeling of solute removal during a single pass through a dialyzer and solute removal from a one-compartment model indicate that solute removal is remarkably insensitive to gamma. Solute removal approaches an asymptote (improvement in theoretical clearance over that obtainable with no binder in the dialysate) with increasing beta that is dependent on kappa and independent of alpha. The amount of binder required to approach the asymptote decreases with increasing solute-binder equilibrium constant, i.e., more strongly bound solutes require less binder in the dialysate. The results of experimental observations over a range of blood flow rates, 100 to 180 mL/min, dialysate flow rates, 600 to 2150 mL/h, ultrafiltration rates, 0 to 220 mL/h, and dialysate/blood albumin concentration ratios, beta = 0.01 to 0.04, were independently predicted remarkably well by the one-compartment model (with no adjustable parameters) based on BSD principles. PMID:16436890

  12. Obesity paradox in patients on maintenance dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kopple, Joel D

    2006-01-01

    Overweight (body mass index [BMI]=25-30 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) have become mass phenomena with a pronounced upward trend in prevalence in most countries throughout the world and are associated with increased cardiovascular risk and poor survival. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing maintenance hemodialysis an 'obesity paradox' has been consistently reported, i.e., a high BMI is incrementally associated with better survival. While this 'reverse epidemiology' of obesity is relatively consistent in maintenance hemodialysis patients, studies in peritoneal dialysis patients have yielded mixed results. A similar obesity paradox has been described in patients with chronic heart failure as well as in 20 million members of other distinct medically 'at risk' populations in the USA. Possible causes of the reverse epidemiology of obesity include: (1) time-discrepancies between the competing risks for the adverse events that are associated with overnutrition and undernutrition; (2) sequestration of uremic toxins in adipose tissue; (3) selection of a gene pool favorable to longer survival in dialysis patients during the course of CKD progression, which eliminates over 95% of the CKD population before they commence maintenance dialysis therapy; (4) a more stable hemodynamic status; (5) alterations in circulating cytokines; (6) unique neurohormonal constellations; (7) endotoxin-lipoprotein interactions; and (8) reverse causation. Examining the causes and consequences of the obesity paradox in dialysis patients can improve our understanding of similar paradoxes observed both for other conventional risk factors in chronic dialysis patients, such as blood pressure and serum cholesterol, and in other populations, such as patients with heart failure, cancer or AIDS or geriatric populations. PMID:16929133

  13. Survival advantages of obesity in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Abbott, Kevin C; Salahudeen, Abdulla K; Kilpatrick, Ryan D; Horwich, Tamara B

    2005-03-01

    In the general population, a high body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. However, the effect of overweight (BMI: 25-30) or obesity (BMI: >30) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) is paradoxically in the opposite direction; ie, a high BMI is associated with improved survival. Although this "reverse epidemiology" of obesity or dialysis-risk-paradox is relatively consistent in MHD patients, studies in CKD patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis have yielded mixed results. Growing confusion has developed among physicians, some of whom are no longer confident about whether to treat obesity in CKD patients. A similar reverse epidemiology of obesity has been described in geriatric populations and in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Possible causes of the reverse epidemiology of obesity include a more stable hemodynamic status, alterations in circulating cytokines, unique neurohormonal constellations, endotoxin-lipoprotein interaction, reverse causation, survival bias, time discrepancies among competitive risk factors, and malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome. Reverse epidemiology may have significant clinical implications in the management of dialysis, CHF, and geriatric patients, ie, populations with extraordinarily high mortality. Exploring the causes and consequences of the reverse epidemiology of obesity in dialysis patients can enhance our insights into similar paradoxes observed for other conventional risk factors, such as blood pressure and serum cholesterol and homocysteine concentrations, and in other populations such as those with CHF, advanced age, cancer, or AIDS. Weight-gaining interventional studies in dialysis patients are urgently needed to ascertain whether they can improve survival and quality of life. PMID:15755821

  14. Is Dialysis Modality a Factor in the Survival of Patients Initiating Dialysis After Kidney Transplant Failure?

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Jeffrey; Dong, James; Rose, Caren; Jassal, Sarbjit Vanita; Gill, John S.

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Kidney transplant failure (TF) is among the leading causes of dialysis initiation. Whether survival is similar for patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) and with hemodialysis (HD) after TF is unclear and may inform decisions concerning dialysis modality selection. ♦ Methods: Between 1995 and 2007, 16 113 adult dialysis patients identified from the US Renal Data System initiated dialysis after TF. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the impact of initial dialysis modality (1 865 PD, 14 248 HD) on early (1-year) and overall mortality in an intention-to-treat approach. ♦ Results: Compared with HD patients, PD patients were younger (46.1 years vs 49.4 years, p < 0.0001) with fewer comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus (23.1% vs 25.7%, p < 0.0001). After adjustment, survival among PD patients was greater within the first year after dialysis initiation [adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74 to 0.97], but lower after 2 years (AHR: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.29). During the entire period of observation, survival in both groups was similar (AHR for PD compared with HD: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.0 to 1.20). In a sensitivity analysis restricted to a cohort of 1865 propensity-matched pairs of HD and PD patients, results were similar (AHR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.93 to 1.14). Subgroups of patients with a body mass index exceeding 30 kg/m2 [AHR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.52) and with a baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 5 mL/min/1.73 m2 (AHR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.98) experienced inferior overall survival when treated with PD. ♦ Conclusions: Compared with HD, PD is associated with an early survival advantage, inferior late survival, and similar overall survival in patients initiating dialysis after TF. Those data suggest that increased initial use of PD among patients returning to dialysis after TF may be associated with improved outcomes, except among patients with a higher

  15. Proposed educational objectives for hospital-based dentists during catastrophic events and disaster response.

    PubMed

    Psoter, Walter J; Herman, Neal G; More, Frederick G; Park, Patricia; Robbins, Miriam; Rekow, E Dianne; Ryan, James M; Triola, Marc M; Glotzer, David

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this project was to define education and training requirements for hospital-based dentists to efficiently and meaningfully participate in a hospital disaster response. Eight dental faculty with hospital-based training and/or military command and CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive) expertise were recruited as an expert panel. A consensus set of recommended educational objectives for hospital-based dentists was established using the following process: 1) identify assumptions supported by all expert panelists, 2) determine current advanced dental educational training requirements, and 3) conduct additional training and literature review by various panelists and discussions with other content and systems experts. Using this three-step process, educational objectives that the development group believed necessary for hospital-based dentists to be effective in treatment or management roles in times of a catastrophic event were established. These educational objectives are categorized into five thematic areas: 1) disaster systems, 2) triage/medical assessment, 3) blast and burn injuries, 4) chemical agents, and 5) biological agents. Creation of training programs to help dentists acquire these educational objectives would benefit hospital-based dental training programs and strengthen hospital surge manpower needs. The proposed educational objectives are designed to stimulate discussion and debate among dental, medical, and public health professionals about the roles of dentists in meeting hospital surge manpower needs. PMID:16896086

  16. A national, cross-sectional survey of children's hospital-based safety resource centres

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Sadiqa; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Seaver Hill, Karen; Arbogast, Kristy B; Gittelman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the location, staffing, clientele, safety product disbursement patterns, education provided and sustainability of safety resource centres (SRCs) in US children's hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was distributed to children's hospital-based SRC directors. Survey categories included: funding sources, customer base, items sold, items given free of charge, education provided and directors’ needs. Results 32/38 (84.2%) SRC sites (affiliated with 30 hospitals) completed the survey. SRCs were in many hospital locations including lobby (28.1%), family resource centres (12.5%), gift shop/retail space (18.8%), mobile units (18.8%) and patient clinics (12.5%). 19% of respondents reported that their SRC was financially self-sustainable. Sales to patients predominated (mean of 44%); however, hospital employees made up a mean of 20% (range 0–60%) of sales. 78.1% of SRCs had products for children with special healthcare needs. Documentation kept at SRC sites included items purchased (96.9%), items given free of charge (65.6%) and customer demographics (50%). 56.3% of SRCs provided formal injury prevention education classes. The SRCs’ directors’ most important needs were finances (46.9%), staffing (50%) and space (46.9%). All of the directors were ‘somewhat interested’ or ‘very interested’ in each of the following: creation of a common SRC listserv, national SRC data bank and multisite SRC research platform. Conclusions SRCs are located in many US children's hospitals, and can be characterised as heterogeneous in location, products sold, data kept and ability to be financially sustained. Further research is needed to determine best practices for SRCs to maximise their impact on injury prevention. PMID:24667383

  17. Hospital based superconducting cyclotron for neutron therapy: Medical physics perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudelev, M.; Burmeister, J.; Blosser, E.; Maughan, R. L.; Kota, C.

    2001-12-01

    The neutron therapy facility at the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center, Harper University Hospital in Detroit has been operational since September 1991. The d(48.5)+Be beam is produced in a gantry mounted superconducting cyclotron designed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Measurements were performed in order to obtain the physical characteristics of the neutron beam and to collect the data necessary for treatment planning. This included profiles of the dose distribution in a water phantom, relative output factors and the design of various beam modifiers, i.e., wedges and tissue compensators. The beam was calibrated in accordance with international protocol for fast neutron dosimetry. Dosimetry and radiobiology intercomparions with three neutron therapy facilities were performed prior to clinical use. The radiation safety program was established in order to monitor and reduce the exposure levels of the personnel. The activation products were identified and the exposure in the treatment room was mapped. A comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program was developed to sustain safe and reliable operation of the unit at treatment standards comparable to those for conventional photon radiation. The program can be divided into three major parts: maintenance of the cyclotron and related hardware; QA of the neutron beam dosimetry and treatment delivery; safety and radiation protection. In addition the neutron beam is used in various non-clinical applications. Among these are the microdosimetric characterization of the beam, the effects of tissue heterogeneity on dose distribution, the development of boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy and variety of radiobiology experiments.

  18. Influence of safety warnings on ESA prescribing among dialysis patients using an interrupted time series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In March, 2007, a black box warning was issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to use the lowest possible erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) doses for treatment of anemia associated with renal disease. The goal is to determine if a change in ESA use was observed following the warning among US dialysis patients. Methods ESA therapy was examined from September 2004 through August 2009 (thirty months before and after the FDA black box warning) among adult Medicare hemodialysis patients. An interrupted time series model assessed the impact of the warnings. Results The FDA black box warning did not appear to influence ESA prescribing among the overall dialysis population. However, significant declines in ESA therapy after the FDA warnings were observed for selected populations. Patients with a hematocrit ≥36% had a declining month-to-month trend before (−164 units/week, p = <0.0001) and after the warnings (−80 units/week, p = .001), and a large drop in ESA level immediately after the black box (−4,744 units/week, p = <.0001). Not-for-profit facilities had a declining month-to-month trend before the warnings (−90 units/week, p = .009) and a large drop in ESA dose immediately afterwards (−2,487 units/week, p = 0.015). In contrast, for-profit facilities did not have a significant change in ESA prescribing. Conclusions ESA therapy had been both profitable for providers and controversial regarding benefits for nearly two decades. The extent to which a FDA black box warning highlighting important safety concerns influenced use of ESA therapy among nephrologists and dialysis providers was unknown. Our study found no evidence of changes in ESA prescribing for the overall dialysis population resulting from a FDA black box warning. PMID:23927675

  19. Peritoneal dialysis in China: meeting the challenge of chronic kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Due to limited medical and economic resources, particularly in the countryside and remote areas, the proportion of individuals with end-stage kidney disease who are treated with dialysis in China is only about 20%. For the rest, renal replacement therapy currently is not available. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been developed and used for more than 30 years in China to treat patients with end-stage kidney disease. Several national PD centers of first-rate scale and quality have sprung up, but the development of PD varies widely among geographic regions across China. The Chinese government has dedicated itself to continually increasing the coverage and level of medical service for patients with end-stage kidney disease. Under the guidance of the government and because of promotion by kidney care professionals, presently there are more than 40,000 prevalent PD patients in China, representing approximately 20% of the total dialysis population. Recently, a National Dialysis Unit Training Program for countywide hospitals has been initiated. Through the efforts of programs like this, we believe that awareness of PD and advances in the underlying technology will benefit more patients with end-stage kidney disease in China. PMID:25446022

  20. [Cardiac arrest in dialysis patients: Risk factors, preventive measures and management in 2015].

    PubMed

    Luque, Yosu; Bataille, Aurélien; Taldir, Guillaume; Rondeau, Éric; Ridel, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Patients undergoing hemodialysis have a 10 to 20 times higher risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) than the general population. Sudden cardiac death is a rare event (approximately 1 event per 10,000 sessions) but has a very high mortality rate. Epidemiological data comes almost exclusively from North American studies; there is a great lack of European data on the subject. Ventricular arrhythmia is the main mechanism of sudden cardiac deaths in dialysis patients. These patients develop increased sensitivity mainly due to a high prevalence of severe ischemic heart disease and left ventricular hypertrophy and to a frequent trigger event: electrolytic and plasma volume shifts during dialysis sessions. Unfortunately, accurate predictive markers of SCA do not exist, however some primary prevention trials using beta-blockers or angiotensin II receptor blockers are encouraging, while the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in the population of chronic dialysis patients remains controversial. Identification of patients at risk, minimizing trigger events such as electrolytic shifts and improving team skills in the diagnosis and initial resuscitation with the latest recommendations from 2010 seem necessary to reduce incidence and improve survival in this high risk population. Organization of European studies would also allow a more accurate view of this reality in our dialysis units. PMID:26547563

  1. Acute peritoneal dialysis in a Jehovah's Witness post laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Appalsawmy, Usha Devi; Akbani, Habib

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man who was a Jehovah's Witness with an advanced directive against autologous procedures developed acute kidney injury needing renal replacement therapy while he was intubated and ventilated on the intensive care unit. He was being treated for hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. He also had a healing laparotomy wound, having undergone a splenectomy less than a month ago following a road traffic accident. His hyperkalaemia and metabolic acidosis were refractory to medical treatment. As he became oligoanuric, decision was taken to carry out acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) by inserting a Tenckhoff catheter in his abdomen using peritoneoscopic technique. The patient was started on automated PD without any complications. His urine output gradually improved, and his renal function eventually recovered. On discharge from hospital, his renal function was within normal range, and he had no abdominal complications from the acute PD. PMID:27581233

  2. Dialysis and Quality of Dialysate in Southeast Asian Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Naramura, Tomotaka; Hyodo, Toru; Kokubo, Kenichi; Matsubara, Hirokazu; Wakai, Haruki; Nakajima, Fumitaka; Shibahara, Nobuhisa; Yoshida, Kazunari; Komaru, Yoshinori; Kawanishi, Hideki; Kawamura, Akio; Hidai, Hideo; Takesawa, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of dialysis patients has been increasing in Southeast Asia, but statistical data about these patients and on the quality of dialysates in Southeast Asian dialysis facilities are still imprecise. For this study, dialysis-related statistical data were collected in Southeast Asia. Methods A survey of the quality of dialysates was carried out at 4 dialysis facilities in Vietnam and Cambodia. The dialysis patient survey included the numbers of dialysis facilities and patients receiving dialysis, a ranking of underlying diseases causing the initiation of dialysis, the number of patients receiving hemodialysis (HD)/on-line hemodiafiltration/continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, the number of HD monitoring devices installed, the cost of each session of dialysis (in USD), the percentage of out-of-pocket payments, and the 1-year survival rates of the dialysis patients (in percent). The dialysate survey covered the endotoxin (ET) level and bacterial count in tap water, in water filtered through a reverse osmosis system and in dialysate. Results In each of the countries, the most frequent reason for the initiation of dialysis is diabetes mellitus. HD is usually carried out according to the ‘reuse’ principle. The 1-year survival rates are 70% in Myanmar and about 90% in the Philippines and Malaysia. The ET levels in standard dialysates were satisfactory at 2 facilities. The bacterial counts in dialysates were not acceptable at any of the facilities investigated. Conclusion There is an urgent need to teach medical workers involved in dialysis how to prepare sterile and ET-free dialysates. PMID:24926310

  3. Design and Development of a Dialysis Food Frequency Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Bross, Rachelle; Benner, Debbie; Noori, Nazanin; Murali, Sameer B; Block, Torin; Norris, Jean; Kopple, Joel D; Block, Gladys

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Periodic assessment of dietary intake across a given dialysis population may help improve clinical outcomes related to such nutrients as dietary protein, phosphorus, or potassium. Whereas dietary recalls and food records are used to assess dietary intake at individual level and over shorter time periods, food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are employed to rank subjects of a given population according to their nutrient intake over longer time periods. DESIGN To modify and refine the conventional Block’s FFQ in order to develop a dialysis patients specific FFQ. SETTING Eight DaVita outpatient dialysis clinics in Los Angeles area, which participated in the “Nutrition and Inflammation in Dialysis Patients” (NIED) Study. PATIENTS 154 maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Dietary intake of participating MHD patients using a 3-day food record, supplemented by a person-to-person dietary interview, to capture food intake over the last hemodialysis treatment day of the week and the 2 subsequent non-dialysis days. RESULTS Analyses of the food records identified the key contributors to the daily nutrient intake in the 154 participating MHD patients. A “Dialysis-FFQ” was developed to include approximately 100 food items representing 90% of the patients’ total food intake of the NIED Study population. Distinctions were made in several food items based on key nutritional issues in dialysis patients such as protein, phosphorus and potassium. CONCLUSIONS We have developed a “Dialysis FFQ” to compare and rank dialysis patients according to their diverse nutrient intake. Whereas, the Dialysis-FFQ may be a valuable tool to compare dialysis patients and to identify those who ingest higher or lower amounts of a given nutrient, studies are needed to examine the utility of the Dialysis-FFQ for nutritional assessment of dialysis patients. PMID:20833073

  4. Development of a hospital-based care coordination program for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Petitgout, Janine M; Pelzer, Daniel E; McConkey, Stacy A; Hanrahan, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    A hospital-based Continuity of Care program for children with special health care needs is described. A family-centered team approach provides care coordination and a medical home. The program has grown during the past 10 years to include inpatients and outpatients from multiple services and outreach clinics. Improved outcomes, including decreased length of stay, decreased cost, and high family satisfaction, are demonstrated by participants in the program. Pediatric nurse practitioners play an important role in the medical home, collaborating with primary care providers, hospital-based specialists, community services, and social workers to provide services to children with special health care needs. PMID:22575784

  5. A statewide hospital-based program to improve child passenger safety.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B

    1984-01-01

    A statewide network of hospital-based low-cost car seat rental and educational programs, operated by volunteers, was begun in Vermont in 1979. In four years the rate of correct car seat usage by newborns at hospital discharge increased from less than 16% to 71%. High usage rates appear to continue in the first two years of life. It is hypothesized that availability of car seats, direct educational intervention in the hospitals, high visibility, and indirect educational processes in the community contributed to these changes. It is concluded that hospital-based programs should be included in comprehensive strategies to improve child passenger safety. PMID:6520003

  6. Skin disorders in peritoneal dialysis patients: An underdiagnosed subject

    PubMed Central

    Gursu, Meltem; Uzun, Sami; Topcuoğlu, Derya; Koc, Leyli Kadriye; Yucel, Lamiye; Sumnu, Abdullah; Cebeci, Egemen; Ozkan, Oktay; Behlul, Ahmet; Koc, Leyla; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine all skin changes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients followed up in our unit. METHODS: Patients on PD program for at least three months without any known chronic skin disease were included in the study. Patients with already diagnosed skin disease, those who have systemic diseases that may cause skin lesions, patients with malignancies and those who did not give informed consent were excluded from the study. All patients were examined by the same predetermined dermatologist with all findings recorded. The demographic, clinical and laboratory data including measures of dialysis adequacy of patients were recorded also. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows 16.0 standard version was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Among the patients followed up in our PD unit, those without exclusion criteria who gave informed consent, 38 patients were included in the study with male/female ratio and mean age of 26/12 and 50.3 ± 13.7 years, respectively. The duration of CKD was 7.86 ± 4.16 years and the mean PD duration was 47.1 ± 29.6 mo. Primary kidney disease was diabetic nephropathy in 11, nephrosclerosis in six, uropathologies in four, chronic glomerulonephritis in three, chronic pyelonephritis in three, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in three patients while cause was unknown in eight patients. All patients except for one patient had at least one skin lesion. Loss of lunula, onychomycosis and tinea pedis are the most frequent skin disorders recorded in the study group. Diabetic patients had tinea pedis more frequently (P = 0.045). No relationship of skin findings was detected with primary renal diseases, comorbidities and medications that the patients were using. CONCLUSION: Skin abnormalities are common in in PD patients. The most frequent skin pathologies are onychomycosis and tinea pedis which must not be overlooked. PMID:27458566

  7. Bowel Perforation During Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Abreo, Kenneth; Sequeira, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    Interventional nephrologists and radiologists place peritoneal dialysis catheters using the percutaneous fluoroscopic technique in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. Nephrologists caring for such patients may have to diagnose and manage the complications resulting from these procedures. Abdominal pain can occur following peritoneal dialysis catheter placement when the local and systemic analgesia wears off. However, abdominal pain with hypotension is suggestive of a serious complication. Bleeding into the abdomen and perforation of the colon or bladder should be considered in the differential diagnosis. In the case reported here, the peritoneogram showed contrast in the bowel, and correct interpretation by the interventionist would have prevented this complication. The characteristic pattern of peritoneogram images in this case will guide interventionists to avoid this complication, and the discussion of the differential diagnosis and management will assist nephrologists in taking care of such patients. PMID:26857647

  8. Role of Pharmacogenomics in Dialysis and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Birdwell, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Pharmacogenomics is the study of differences in drug response based on individual genetic background. With rapidly advancing genomic technologies and decreased costs of genotyping, the field of pharmacogenomics continues to develop. Application to patients with kidney disease provides growing opportunities for improving drug therapy. Recent Findings Pharmacogenomics studies are lacking in patients with chronic kidney disease and dialysis but are abundant in the kidney transplant field. A clinically actionable genetic variant exists in the CYP3A5 gene, with the initial tacrolimus dose selection optimized based on CYP3A5 genotype. Though many pharmacogenomics studies have focused on transplant immunosuppression pharmacokinetics, an expanding literature on pharmacodynamic outcomes like calcineurin inhibitor toxicity and new onset diabetes is providing new information on patients at risk. Summary Appropriately powered pharmacogenomics studies with well-defined phenotypes are needed to validate existing studies and unearth new findings in patients with kidney disease, especially the chronic kidney disease and dialysis population. PMID:25162201

  9. Dialysis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Arabic (العربية) Dialysis (Arabic) غسيل الكلى - العربية Bilingual PDF ...

  10. Peritoneal dialysis infections: an opportunity for improvement.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anabela; Maciel, Marília; Santos, Cledir; Machado, Diana; Sampaio, Joana; Lima, Nelson; Carvalho, Maria J; Cabrita, António; Martins, Margarida

    2014-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter-associated infections remain a challenging cause of technique failure. Patient training and preventive measures are key elements in the management of infection rates. Twenty-seven of the 167 PD catheter transfer sets analyzed (19%) yielded a positive microbial culture (58% gram-negative bacteria). These results show that subclinical contamination, particularly from environmental gram-negative bacteria, is a potential hazard, indicating the need for a protocol for regular transfer set changes. PMID:25179339

  11. Waste acid recycling via diffusion dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.

    1995-05-26

    Inorganic acids are commonly used for surface cleaning and finishing of metals. The acids become unuseable due to contamination with metals or diluted and weakened. Diffusion dialysis has become a way to recover the useable acid and allow separation of the metals for recovery and sale to refineries. This technique is made possible by the use of membranes that are strong enough to withstand low ph and have long service life.

  12. Dual-wavelength method and optoelectronic sensor for online monitoring of the efficiency of dialysis treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevsky, A. M.; Konoplev, G. A.; Stepanova, O. S.; Zemchenkov, A. Yu; Gerasimchuk, R. P.; Frorip, A.

    2015-11-01

    The absorption spectra of effluent dialysate in the ultraviolet region were investigated. A novel dual-wavelength spectrophotometric method for uric acid determination in effluent dialysate and an optoelectronic sensor based on UV LED were developed. Clinical trials of the proposed sensor were carried out in the dialysis unit of St. Petersburg Mariinsky Hospital. The relative error of measurement for the concentration of uric acid does not exceed 10%.

  13. Satisfaction with care in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, J; Perera-Chang, M; Klinkner, G; Soley, I; Marcelli, D; Arkossy, O; Stopper, A; Kimmel, P L

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of dialysis care, only recently evaluated in clinical studies. We developed a tool to assess peritoneal dialysis (PD) customer satisfaction, and sought to evaluate and validate the Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), quantifying PD patient satisfaction. The CSQ included questions regarding administrative issues, Delivery Service, PD Training, Handling Requests, and transportation. The study was performed using interviews in all Hungarian Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers offering PD. CSQ results were compared with psychosocial measures to identify if patient satisfaction was associated with perception of social support and illness burden, or depression. We assessed CSQ internal consistency and validity. Factor analysis explored potential underlying dimensions of the CSQ. One hundred and thirty-three patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease for more than 3 months were interviewed. The CSQ had high internal consistency. There was high patient satisfaction with customer service. PD patient satisfaction scores correlated with quality of life (QOL) and social support measures, but not with medical or demographic factors, or depressive affect. The CSQ is a reliable tool to assess PD customer satisfaction. PD patient satisfaction is associated with perception of QOL. Efforts to improve customer satisfaction may improve PD patients' quantity as well as QOL. PMID:16900092

  14. Internal dialysis of Limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, J H; Lisman, J E

    1982-01-01

    The internal dialysis technique has been applied to Limulus ventral photoreceptors. This method potentially allows quantitative control of the concentration of diffusible molecules within living cells. During dialysis, Limulus photoreceptors retained their ability to respond to light. Under conditions of dim illumination, responses were normal for close to an hour. In bright light, abnormalities developed more rapidly. The reversible effects of raising the dialysate Mg2+ concentration and the entrance of rhodamine-labeled albumin into cells shows that the dialysis method is useful for assaying the effects of small or large molecules on visual transduction. This method has been used to examine the effects of nucleotide triphosphates and cyclic nucleotides. The results show that nucleotide triphosphates (5-10 mM) are required to maintain a low rate of spontaneous quantum bumps. The importance of cyclic nucleotides in transduction is less clear; the light response was reduced by either cGMP or cAMP but only at very high concentrations (10 mM). Images PMID:6961434

  15. Dialysis Modalities and HDL Composition and Function.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Schilcher, Gernot; Curcic, Sanja; Trieb, Markus; Ljubojevic, Senka; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kopecky, Chantal M; Rosenkranz, Alexander R; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2015-09-01

    Lipid abnormalities may have an effect on clinical outcomes of patients on dialysis. Recent studies have indicated that HDL dysfunction is a hallmark of ESRD. In this study, we compared HDL composition and metrics of HDL functionality in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) with those in healthy controls. We detected a marked suppression of several metrics of HDL functionality in patients on HD or PD. Compositional analysis revealed that HDL from both dialysis groups shifted toward a more proinflammatory phenotype with profound alterations in the lipid moiety and protein composition. With regard to function, cholesterol efflux and anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic functions seemed to be more severely suppressed in patients on HD, whereas HDL-associated paraoxonase activity was lowest in patients on PD. Quantification of enzyme activities involved in HDL metabolism suggested that HDL particle maturation and remodeling are altered in patients on HD or PD. In summary, our study provides mechanistic insights into the formation of dysfunctional HDL in patients with ESRD who are on HD or PD. PMID:25745027

  16. Exit-site care in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Nand K; Reddy, Gampala H

    2007-01-01

    Exit-site infection (ESI), tunnel infection and associated peritonitis are major causes of morbidity and catheter loss in chronic peritoneal dialysis patients. Meticulous exit-site care is vital in preventing ESI. Avoiding trauma to the exit-site and daily cleaning of the exit-site with a dedicated antimicrobial soap is essential for the longevity of the peritoneal dialysis catheter. Antibiotics cream and disinfectant agents including povidone-iodine, chlorhexidine, electrolytic chloroxidizing solutions (Amuchina 10% - ExSept Plus, Amuchina 5% - ExSept) are useful to keep the resident micro-organisms inhibited. ESI rates in peritoneal dialysis patients treated with Amuchina 10% (ExSept Plus) and Amuchina 5% (ExSept) for the exit-site care are similar or lower compared to povidone-iodine or chlorhexidine. Electrolytic chloroxidizing (Amuchina 10% - ExSept Plus and Amuchina 5% - ExSept) solutions for exit-site care are effective for prevention and treatment of ESI. PMID:17099306

  17. Dialysis Modalities and HDL Composition and Function

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Michael; Schilcher, Gernot; Curcic, Sanja; Trieb, Markus; Ljubojevic, Senka; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kopecky, Chantal M.; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Heinemann, Akos

    2015-01-01

    Lipid abnormalities may have an effect on clinical outcomes of patients on dialysis. Recent studies have indicated that HDL dysfunction is a hallmark of ESRD. In this study, we compared HDL composition and metrics of HDL functionality in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) with those in healthy controls. We detected a marked suppression of several metrics of HDL functionality in patients on HD or PD. Compositional analysis revealed that HDL from both dialysis groups shifted toward a more proinflammatory phenotype with profound alterations in the lipid moiety and protein composition. With regard to function, cholesterol efflux and anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic functions seemed to be more severely suppressed in patients on HD, whereas HDL-associated paraoxonase activity was lowest in patients on PD. Quantification of enzyme activities involved in HDL metabolism suggested that HDL particle maturation and remodeling are altered in patients on HD or PD. In summary, our study provides mechanistic insights into the formation of dysfunctional HDL in patients with ESRD who are on HD or PD. PMID:25745027

  18. The Bacterial Biofilms in Dialysis Water Systems and the Effect of the Sub Inhibitory Concentrations of Chlorine on Them

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Ethel; Varghese, Benji; Joseph, Neethu; Nisha, Kumari; Kotian, M. Shashidhar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of bacteria in the form of biofilms poses a problem in the fluid pathways of haemodialysis plants and procedures which are aimed to detach and neutralize biofilms are necessary to improve the patient safety and the quality of the healthcare. The present study was therefore aimed at isolating the organisms which colonized dialysis water systems as biofilms, as well as to study the effect of the sub inhibitory concentrations of chlorine on the biofilms which were produced by these isolates. Methods: Swabs were used to collect the biofilms which were produced on the internal surface of the dialysis tubing from the dialysis units. This study was conducted at the Department of Microbiology, Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Mangalore, India. The cultures were performed on MacConkey’s agar and blood agar. The organisms which were isolated were identified and antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed. The biofilm production was done by the microtitre plate method of O’Toole and Kolter. The biofilm production was also studied in the presence of sub inhibitory concentrations of chlorine. Results: Acinetobacter spp and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the two predominant organisms which colonized the dialysis water systems as biofilms. The sub inhibitory concentrations of chlorine did not bring about any decrease in the biofilm production by the isolates. On the contrary, there was an increase in the biofilm production. Conclusion: Our study highlighted the importance of using appropriate methods to improve the quality of the water in dialysis units. This in turn, may help in reducing the biofilm formation in the water systems of dialysis units and thus, contribute to the prevention of hospital acquired infections in the patients who need haemodialysis. PMID:23814726

  19. Pro: Higher serum bicarbonate in dialysis patients is protective.

    PubMed

    Misra, Madhukar

    2016-08-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis is common in dialysis patients. Bicarbonate administration via the dialysate helps maintain the acid-base balance in these patients. Serum bicarbonate level in dialysis patients is determined by several factors that include dietary protein intake, nutritional status and dialysis prescription, etc. Additionally, a meaningful interpretation of serum bicarbonate in dialysis patients requires an understanding of complexities involving its measurement. Both very low as well very high levels of serum bicarbonate have been associated with adverse outcomes in observational studies. However, recent observational data, when adjusted for the confounding effects of nutritional status, do not associate higher predialysis serum bicarbonate with adverse consequences. At this time, there are no prospective studies available that have examined the association of serum bicarbonate with hard outcomes in dialysis patients. The ideal level of serum bicarbonate in dialysis patients is therefore unknown. This article examines the available data with regard to the benefits of higher predialysis serum bicarbonate. PMID:27411723

  20. [The diet of the elderly person undergoing dialysis].

    PubMed

    Gourc, Christophe; Ramade, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The elderly patient undergoing dialysis is often at risk of undernutrition. The condition may already be present at the pre-dialysis stage and can worsen once dialysis starts. Aside from the impact on the patient's quality of life and general health status, undernutrition exposes them to serious risk of complications and can be life-threatening. It is therefore essential that it is diagnosed early. PMID:26805644

  1. Peritonitis caused by Rothia mucilaginosa in a peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Gosmanova, Elvira O; Garrett, Tiffani R; Wall, Barry M

    2013-12-01

    Peritonitis is an important cause of morbidity in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Rothia mucilaginosa has been reported as an unusual cause of peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis. Difficulty in the management of this microorganism lies in the absence of uniform recommendations for anti-microbial therapy directed against this pathogen. The current report describes the clinical course of an episode of peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis caused by Rothia mucilaginosa. Treatment options for this organism are summarized. PMID:24263080

  2. Practical guidelines for automated peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Sritippayawan, Suchai; Nilwarangkur, Sukij; Aiyasanon, Nipa; Jattanawanich, Parnthip; Vasuvattakul, Somkiat

    2011-09-01

    The development of APD technologies enables physician to customize PD treatment for optimal dialysis. Dialysis dose can be increased with APD alone or in conjunction with daytime dwells. Although there is no strong evidence of the advantage over CAPD, APD is generally recommended for patients having a high peritoneal transport, outflow problems or high intraperitoneal pressure (IPP) and those who depend on caregivers for their dialysis. The benefits of APD over CAPD depends on the problems and treatment results among dialysis centers. Before starting the APD, medical, psychosocial and financial aspects, catheter function, residual renal function (RRF), body surface area and peritoneal transport characteristic must be evaluated. The recommended starting prescription for APD is the dwell volume of 1,500 ml/m2, 2 hours/cycle, and 5 cycles/session, which will provides 10-15 L of total volume and 10 hours per session. The IPP should be monitored and kept below 18 cmH2O. NIPD is accepted for patients with significant RRF. Anuric patients usually require 15-20 L of total fill volume and may need 1-2 day-dwells of 2L icodextrin or hypertonic glucose solutions. Small solute clearances and ultrafiltration depend on the peritoneal catheter function and dialysis schedule. The clinical outcomes and small solute clearances must be monitored and adjusted accordingly to meet the weekly total Kt/V urea > or = 1.7 and in low peritoneal transporters, the weekly total CCr should be > or = 45 L/1.73 m2. The volume status must be normal. To diagnose the peritonitis in NIPD patients, 1 L of PDF should be infused and permitted to dwell for 2 hours before sending for analysis. The differential of white cell count may be more useful than the total cell counts. In Siriraj Hospital, APD patients had 1.5-3 times less peritonitis than CAPD patients and most of our anuric patients can achieve the weekly total Kt/V urea target with 10 L of NIPD. PMID:22043586

  3. Caring for Young Adolescent Sexual Abuse Victims in a Hospital-Based Children's Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edinburgh, Laurel; Saewyc, Elizabeth; Levitt, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This study compared health care assessments, referrals, treatment, and outcomes for young adolescent sexual assault/sexual abuse victims seen at a hospital-based Child Advocacy Center (CAC), to that provided to similar victims evaluated by other community providers. A second purpose was to document how common DNA evidence is found…

  4. Characteristics of Hospital-Based Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Okuyama, Makiko; Kasahara, Mari; Nakamura, Ayako

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores characteristics of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSBP) in Japan, a country which provides an egalitarian, low cost, and easy-access health care system. Methods: We sent a questionnaire survey to 11 leading doctors in the child abuse field in Japan, each located in different hospital-based sites. Child abuse doctors…

  5. DriveWise: An Interdisciplinary Hospital-Based Driving Assessment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Margaret G.; Kapust, Lissa R.; Hollis, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals working with the elderly have opportunities through research and clinical practice to shape public policy affecting the older driver. This article describes DriveWise, an interdisciplinary hospital-based driving assessment program developed in response to clinical concerns about the driving safety of individuals with…

  6. Community- And Hospital-Based Early Intervention Team Members' Attitudes and Perceptions of Teamwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Michael; McPherson, Jenny

    2004-01-01

    Sixty early intervention team members (30 community-based and 30 hospital-based) were surveyed regarding their attitudes and perceptions of teamwork. Respondents were recruited using a purposive non-probability sampling technique and completed a packet of questionnaires consisting of a detailed demographic survey, Attitudes About Teamwork Survey,…

  7. Economics of dialysis dependence following renal replacement therapy for critically ill acute kidney injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Ethgen, Olivier; Schneider, Antoine G.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The obective of this study was to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing intermittent with continuous renal replacement therapy (IRRT versus CRRT) as initial therapy for acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods Assuming some patients would potentially be eligible for either modality, we modeled life year gained, the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and healthcare costs for a cohort of 1000 IRRT patients and a cohort of 1000 CRRT patients. We used a 1-year, 5-year and a lifetime horizon. A Markov model with two health states for AKI survivors was designed: dialysis dependence and dialysis independence. We applied Weibull regression from published estimates to fit survival curves for CRRT and IRRT patients and to fit the proportion of dialysis dependence among CRRT and IRRT survivors. We then applied a risk ratio reported in a large retrospective cohort study to the fitted CRRT estimates in order to determine the proportion of dialysis dependence for IRRT survivors. We conducted sensitivity analyses based on a range of differences for daily implementation cost between CRRT and IRRT (base case: CRRT day $632 more expensive than IRRT day; range from $200 to $1000) and a range of risk ratios for dialysis dependence for CRRT as compared with IRRT (from 0.65 to 0.95; base case: 0.80). Results Continuous renal replacement therapy was associated with a marginally greater gain in QALY as compared with IRRT (1.093 versus 1.078). Despite higher upfront costs for CRRT in the ICU ($4046 for CRRT versus $1423 for IRRT in average), the 5-year total cost including the cost of dialysis dependence was lower for CRRT ($37 780 for CRRT versus $39 448 for IRRT on average). The base case incremental cost-effectiveness analysis showed that CRRT dominated IRRT. This dominance was confirmed by extensive sensitivity analysis. Conclusions Initial CRRT is cost-effective compared with initial IRRT by reducing the rate of long-term dialysis

  8. Assessing the utility of testing aluminum levels in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish K; Toussaint, Nigel D; Pickering, Janice; Beeston, Tony; Smith, Edward R; Holt, Stephen G

    2015-04-01

    Plasma aluminum (Al) is routinely tested in many dialysis patients. Aluminum exposure may lead to acute toxicity and levels in excess of ∼2.2 μmol/L (60 μg/L) should be avoided. Historically, toxicity has been caused by excessive dialyzate Al but modern reverse osmosis (RO) water should be Al free. Nevertheless, many units continue to perform routine Al levels on dialysis patients. This single-center study retrospectively analyzed Al levels in plasma, raw water feed, and RO product between 2010 and 2013 using our database (Nephworks 6) with the aim of determining the utility of these measurements. Two thousand fifty-eight plasma Al tests in 755 patients (61.9% male, mean age 64.7 years) were reviewed showing mean ± SD of 0.41 ± 0.30 μmol/L. One hundred eleven (5.4%) tests from 61 patients had Al levels >0.74 μmol/L and 45 (73.8%) of these patients were or had been prescribed Al hydroxide (Al(OH)(3)) as a phosphate binder. Seven patients had Al concentrations >2.2 μmol/L with no source of Al identified in 1 patient. One hundred sixty-six patients taking Al(OH)(3) (78.7% of all patients on Al(OH)(3)) had levels ≤0.74 μmol/L, the odds ratio of plasma Al > 0.74 μmol/L on Al(OH)3 was 9. The cost of plasma Al assay is $A30.60; thus, costs were $A62,974.80 over the study period. Despite RO feed water Al levels as high as 48 μmol/L, Al output from the RO was almost always undetectable (<0.1 μmol/L) with dialyzate Al levels > 2.2 μmol/L only 3 times since 2010, and never in the last 3 years. Routine unselected testing of plasma Al appears unnecessary and expensive and more selective testing in dialysis patients should be considered. PMID:25306885

  9. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Patients' Satisfaction with Their Dialysis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al Eissa, M.; Al Sulaiman, M.; Jondeby, M.; Karkar, A.; Barahmein, M.; Shaheen, F. A. M.; Al Sayyari, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To assess the degree of satisfaction among hemodialysis patients and the factors influencing this satisfaction. Methods. Patients were recruited from 3 Saudi dialysis centers. Demographic data was collected. Using 1 to 10 Likert scale, the patients were asked to rate the overall satisfaction with, and the overall impact of, their dialysis therapy on their lives and to rate the effect of the dialysis therapy on 15 qualities of life domains. Results. 322 patients were recruited (72.6% of the total eligible patients). The mean age was 51.7 years (±15.4); 58% have been on dialysis for >3 years. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index was 3.2 (±2), and Kt/V was 1.3 (±0.44). The mean satisfaction score was (7.41 ± 2.75) and the mean score of the impact of the dialysis on the patients' lives was 5.32 ± 2.55. Male patients reported worse effect of dialysis on family life, social life, energy, and appetite. Longer period since the commencement of dialysis was associated with adverse effect on finances and energy. Lower level of education was associated with worse dialysis effect on stress, overall health, sexual life, hobbies, and exercise ability. Conclusion. The level of satisfaction is affected by gender, duration on dialysis, educational level, and standard of care given. PMID:21152200

  10. Azygos catheter placement as a cause of failure of dialysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G D; Jackson, A; Beards, S C

    1993-11-01

    Common complications of venous dialysis catheters include sepsis and accidental removal. Angiographic demonstration of dialysis lines is only rarely requested usually to confirm the presence of clot or stenosis as a cause for poor dialysis flow. Poor flow can also be due to inadvertent placement of the catheter in the azygos system. The use of dialysis catheters with a long venous limb which extends beyond the arterial port may predispose to such placement as their lumen is lateral to the central axis of the catheter. In those patients with poor venous access catheter placement under angiographic control may be helpful. PMID:8258225