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Sample records for hospital-based paediatric units

  1. Clinical Profile of Children and Adolescents Attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit OPD in a Tertiary Care Set up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaprakash, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are limited studies on the clinical profile of children attending child guidance clinic under Paediatric background. Aims: To study clinical profile of Children & adolescents attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit (BPU) OPD under department of Paediatrics in a tertiary care set up. Methods: Monthly average turnover in the OPD…

  2. The role of leader behaviors in hospital-based emergency departments' unit performance and employee work satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Ping C; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The role of the leader of a medical unit has evolved over time to expand from simply a medical role to a more managerial one. This study aimed to explore how the behavior of a hospital-based emergency department's (ED's) leader might be related to ED unit performance and ED employees' work satisfaction. One hundred and twelve hospital-based EDs in Taiwan were studied: 10 in medical centers, 32 in regional hospitals, and 70 in district hospitals. Three instruments were designed to assess leader behaviors, unit performance and employee satisfaction in these hospital-based EDs. A mail survey revealed that task-oriented leader behavior was positively related to ED unit performance. Both task- and employee-oriented leader behaviors were found to be positively related to ED nurses' work satisfaction. However, leader behaviors were not shown to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction at a statistically significant level. Some ED organizational characteristics, however, namely departmentalization and hospital accreditation level, were found to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction. PMID:21159414

  3. [The management of an adverse event in a paediatric unit].

    PubMed

    Cruz, Emmanuelle; Dubrulle, Aurélie

    2016-04-01

    Adverse events remain a major issue in care services. The mission of hospital authorities is to analyse them in order to put in place corrective and preventive measures. The objective is to prevent them reoccurring and to ensure the sustainable improvement of the quality and safety of care. This article presents an example in paediatrics with parenteral nutrition. PMID:27085928

  4. Beyond counting cases: public health impacts of national Paediatric Surveillance Units

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, D; Elliott, E J; Zurynski, Y; Pereira, R Rodrigues; Preece, M; Lynn, R; von Kries, R; Zimmermann, H; Dickson, N P; Virella, D

    2007-01-01

    Paediatric Surveillance Units (PSUs) have been established in 14 countries and facilitate national, prospective, active surveillance for a range of conditions, with monthly reporting by child health specialists. The International Network of Paediatric Surveillance Units (INoPSU) was established in 1998 and facilitates international collaboration among member PSUs and allows for sharing of resources, simultaneous data collection and hence comparison of data from different geographical regions. The impact of data collected by PSUs, both individually and collectively as members of INoPSU, on public health outcomes, clinical care and research is described. PMID:17158859

  5. Survey of Oxygen Delivery Practices in UK Paediatric Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Administration of supplemental oxygen is common in paediatric intensive care. We explored the current practice of oxygen administration using a case vignette in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) in the united kingdom. Methods. We conducted an online survey of Paediatric Intensive Care Society members in the UK. The survey outlined a clinical scenario followed by questions on oxygenation targets for 5 common diagnoses seen in critically ill children. Results. Fifty-three paediatric intensive care unit members from 10 institutions completed the survey. In a child with moderate ventilatory requirements, 21 respondents (42%) did not follow arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) targets. In acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis, there was a trend to aim for lower PaO2 as the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) increased. Conversely, in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension, respondents aimed for normal PaO2 even as the FiO2 increased. Conclusions. In this sample of clinicians PaO2 targets were not commonly used. Clinicians target lower PaO2 as FiO2 increases in acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis whilst targeting normal range irrespective of FiO2 in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27516901

  6. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  7. Hospital Based Prospective Observational Study to Audit the Prescription Practices and Outcomes of Paediatric Patients (6 months to 5 years age group) Presenting with Acute Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kondekar, Santosh; Rathi, Surbhi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diarrhea is a leading killer of children, accounting for 9% of all deaths among under-five children worldwide. WHO protocol deviation in management of diarrheas in children is likely due to various reasons. Aim To study the prescription practices, regarding adherence to WHO protocol and deviations, in the management of acute diarrhea in children presenting at a tertiary care hospital and its impact on the outcome. Materials and Methods This was a prospective observational hospital based study at a tertiary care carried out over a 12-month period including all cases of acute diarrhea (defined as 3 or more loose stools in last 24 hours) in children belonging to the age group of 6 months to 5 years. Patients were followed up on day 3,7,14 and 28 from the day of presentation. Software SPSS Version 17.0 was used for analysis. Correlation regression analysis was used to study predictiveness of different variables affecting outcome. Results In this study, 447 children aged between 6 months and 5 years were enrolled, of which 45 cases were lost in follow-up and excluded. The median age was 14 months. Some deviation from WHO protocol was noted in 78.4% of the cases. Most common deviations from WHO protocol were addition of probiotics (78.1% of cases) and addition of race cadotril (15.9% of cases). Inadvertent use of antibiotics in diarrhea was noted in 12.2% of cases. Presence of fever was strong predictor for use of antibiotics. Cases of early recovery within 3 days of presentation were higher in WHO protocol deviation group. Use of probiotics had statistically significant association with early recovery. Conclusion In diarrhea management, WHO protocol deviation is common. Probiotics are likely to help in early recovery. PMID:27437317

  8. Attitudes to Education in a Paediatric Renal Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Janet

    1983-01-01

    The effects of renal failure on children are outlined and current research findings relevant to the physical and psychological effects of the handicap are summarized. Results from a survey of renal unit patients is noted to include that teachers in British renal units feel that many patients underachieve. (SW)

  9. Template of patient-specific summaries facilitates education and outcomes in paediatric cardiac surgery units

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Hemant S.; Wolfram, Karen B.; Slayton, Jennifer M.; Saville, Benjamin R.; Cutrer, William B.; Bichell, David P.; Harris, Zena L.; Barr, Frederick E.; Deshpande, Jayant K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Few educational opportunities exist in paediatric cardiac critical care units (PCCUs). We introduced a new educational activity in the PCCU in the form of of patient-specific summaries (TPSS). Our objective was to study the role of TPSS in the provision of a positive learning experience to the multidisciplinary clinical team of PCCUs and in improving patient-related clinical outcomes in the PCCU. METHODS Prospective educational intervention with simultaneous clinical assessment was undertaken in PCCU in an academic children's hospital. TPSS was developed utilizing the case presentation format for upcoming week's surgical cases and delivered once every week to each PCCU clinical team member. Role of TPSS to provide clinical education was assessed using five-point Likert-style scale responses in an anonymous survey 1 year after TPSS provision. Paediatric cardiac surgery patients admitted to the PCCU were evaluated for postoperative outcomes for TPSS provision period of 1 year and compared with a preintervention period of 1 year. RESULTS TPSS was delivered to 259 clinical team members including faculty, fellows, residents, nurse practitioners, nurses, respiratory therapists and others from the Divisions of Anesthesia, Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Critical Care, and Pediatrics working in the PCCU. Two hundred and twenty-four (86%) members responded to the survey and assessed the role of TPSS in providing clinical education to be excellent based on mean Likert-style scores of 4.32 ± 0.71 in survey responses. Seven hundred patients were studied for the two time periods and there were no differences in patient demographics, complexity of cardiac defect and surgical details. The length of mechanical ventilation for the TPSS period (57.08 ± 141.44 h) was significantly less when compared with preintervention period (117.39 ± 433.81 h) (P < 0.001) with no differences in length of PCICU stay, hospital stay and mortality for the two time periods

  10. Childhood autoimmune hepatitis in a paediatric unit of a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Low, Jia Ming; Tan, Michelle; Garcia, Agatha; Aw, Marion; Quak, Seng Hock

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although childhood autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) has been extensively investigated in the West, data on AIH in the East is lacking. We aimed to investigate AIH’s clinical, biochemical and histological features, as well as its outcomes, in one of Singapore’s two major paediatric units. METHODS This was a retrospective study of children diagnosed with AIH in the paediatric unit of National University Hospital, Singapore, over the last 12 years. Children with de novo AIH after liver transplantation were excluded. The demographic and clinical features of the patients, and their laboratory, treatment and clinical outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS This study comprised ten patients (six females, four males), with a median age of 5.1 (range 2.1–13.8) years at diagnosis. Five patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Seven patients had type 1 AIH, and three had autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) and IBD; none had type 2 AIH. The median level of aspartate aminotransferase at diagnosis was 183 (range 45–2,649) U/L. Prednisolone 1 mg/kg/day was prescribed at diagnosis for eight patients. Two patients were lost to follow-up and were treated symptomatically when they re-presented with end-stage liver disease. Azathioprine or mycophenolate mofetil was prescribed after 3–7 months of treatment. Normalisation of aminotransferase levels took an average of 5.3 (range 1–39) months. CONCLUSION AIH is a rare but important cause of liver pathology. Children in this region with elevated aminotransferases or unexplained hepatomegaly should be screened for AIH. PMID:25630319

  11. Faxing ECGs from peripheral hospitals to Tertiary Paediatric Cardiology Units- Is it Safe and Sustainable?

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Sam; Skinner, Greg; Morgan, Gareth J

    2014-01-01

    Intoduction Recent local involvement with the United Kingdom“Safe and Sustainable review of paediatric cardiology services” has highlighted the need for development of clinical networks and improvement of the communication infrastructure within and between teams. One common communication between peripheral and tertiary hospitals is facsimile transfer of electrocardiograms. The quality of fax transmission can be variable, raising concerns regarding the quality of the received image, accuracy of the diagnosis and appropriateness of the resultant advice. Methods We performed a systematic quality evaluation of faxed ECGs to determine whether they should be replaced on the basis of patient safety and information governance. A sample of 50 ECGs was selected from over 300 which had been faxed to our tertiary department. These were scored according to a structured system leading to a 10 point Likert scale, assessing technical quality and the ability to make a clinically relevant assessment of the information. Results Only 1 from 50 faxed ECGs fulfilled all 9 objective criteria set. Heart rate and quadrant of the QRS axis were only identifiable in 10%. Comparing the faxed ECGs with the rating given to an original ECG confirmed a significant difference in the interpretability of faxed and original ECGs (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study suggests that faxed ECGs do not provide consistent, accurate diagnostic information. It suggests that this currently widespread practice should be considered as a potential patient safety issue within developing paediatric cardiology networks. We would recommend that faxing of ECGs be replaced with scanning of ECGs, transmitted via secure email. PMID:24757263

  12. Opportunities to improve antimicrobial use in paediatric intensive care units: a nationwide survey in Spain.

    PubMed

    Paño-Pardo, J R; Schüffelmann-Gutiérrez, C; Escosa-García, L; Laplaza-González, M; Moreno-Ramos, F; Gómez-Gil, R; López, J D; Jordán, I; Téllez, C; de la Oliva, P

    2016-02-01

    Improving antimicrobial use is a complex process that requires an accurate assessment of ongoing problems and barriers. Paediatric intensive care units (PICU) have seldom been assessed from this perspective. Two Internet-based, self-administered surveys were conducted nationwide in Spain between January and February 2014. The first survey aimed to assess those characteristics of Spanish PICUs that could influence antimicrobial prescribing or antimicrobial stewardship. The second survey targeted Spanish PICU physicians and pursued to assess their attitudes and perceptions regarding antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial use. Information about 29/39 contacted PICUs was obtained. A total of 114/206 (55.3%) paediatric intensivists responded. PICUs were heterogeneous regarding years since foundation, number of beds, type of patients admitted and staffing. Only 11 (37.9%) PICUs had available e-prescribing systems. Procalcitonin was available in 24 (89.1%) PICUs, but there were no procalcitonin-based protocols in 14 (60.9%) of them. Half of surveyed PICUs had implemented antimicrobial stewardship activities. Ninety-eight of the 114 PICU physicians (86%) who participated considered that antimicrobial resistance was a significantly relevant problem for their daily and that improving antimicrobial use in their PICU should be a priority (103; 90.4%). The main perceived problems regarding antimicrobial use were the excessive use of antimicrobials in patients with nonconfirmed infections and excessive use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The most valued antimicrobial stewardship interventions were the implementation of protocols to guide antimicrobial therapy. Spanish PICU doctors are aware of the relevance of the problem of antimicrobial resistance and the need to improve antimicrobial use. Targeted interventions should take into account their difficulties and preferences when feasible. PMID:26498852

  13. Review of Staphylococcus aureus infections requiring admission to a paediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Miles, F; Voss, L; Segedin, E; Anderson, B

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To review clinical features and outcome of children with severe Staphylococcus aureus sepsis (SAS) presenting to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with particular focus on ethnicity, clinical presentation, cardiac involvement, and outcome. Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients coded for SAS over 10 years (October 1993 to April 2004). Results: There were 58 patients identified with SAS over the 10 year study period; 55 were community acquired. This accounted for 4% of hospital admissions for SAS over this time; children with staphylococcal illness comprised 1% of all admissions to the PICU. Maori and Pacific children with SAS were overly represented in the PICU (81%) from a paediatric population where they contribute 21.6%. Musculoskeletal symptoms (79%) dominated presentation rather than isolated pneumonia (10%). An aggressive search for foci and surgical drainage of infective foci was required in 50% of children. Most children had multifocal disease (67%) and normal cardiac valves (95%); the few children (12%) presenting with methicillin resistant S aureus (MRSA) had community acquired infection. The median length of stay in the PICU was 3 (mean 5.8, SD 7.6, range 1–44) days. The median length of stay in hospital was 15 (mean 21, SD 22.7, range 2–149) days. Mortality due to SAS was 8.6% (95% CI 1.4–15.8%) compared with the overall mortality for the PICU of 6% (95% CI 5.3–6.7%). Ten children had significant morbidity after discharge. Conclusions: Community acquired SAS affects healthy children, is multifocal, and has high morbidity and mortality, in keeping with the high severity of illness scores on admission. It is imperative to look for sites of dissemination and to drain and debride foci. Routine echocardiography had low yield in the absence of pre-existing cardiac lesions, persisting fever, or persisting bacteraemia. PMID:16301556

  14. Implementation of smart pump technology in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Rodríguez, Silvia; Sánchez-Galindo, Amelia C; de Lorenzo-Pinto, Ana; González-Vives, Leticia; López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo-Álvarez, Ángel; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María; Fernández-Llamazares, Cecilia M

    2015-09-01

    Patient safety is a matter of major concern that involves every health professional. Nowadays, emerging technologies such as smart pumps can diminish medication errors as well as standardise and improve clinical practice with the subsequent benefits for patients. The aim of this paper was to describe the smart pump implementation process in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and to present the most relevant infusion-related programming errors that were prevented. This was a comparative study between CareFusion Alaris Guardrails(®) and Hospira MedNet(®) systems, as well as a prospective and intervention study with analytical components carried out in the PICU of Gregorio Marañón General and Teaching Hospital. All intravenous infusions programmed with a pump in the eleven beds of the unit were analyzed. A drug library was developed and subsequently loaded into CareFusion and Hospira pumps that were used during a three month period each. The most suitable system for implementation was selected according to their differences in features and users' acceptance. Data stored in the pumps were analyzed to assess user compliance with the technology, health care setting and type of errors intercepted. The implementation process was carried out with CareFusion systems. Compliance with the technology was 92% and user acceptance was high. Vacation substitution and drug administration periods were significantly associated with a greater number of infusion-related programming errors. High risk drugs were involved in 48% of intercepted errors. Based on these results we can conclude that implementation of smart pumps proved effective in intercepting infusion-related programming errors from reaching patients. User awareness of the importance of programming infusions with the drug library is the key to succeed in the implementation process. PMID:24496443

  15. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Patients of Intensive Care Unit in China: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Biao; Cong, Wei; Li, Zhi-Tao; Bi, Xiao-Gang; Xian, Ying; Wang, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhang, Kou-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in 394 patients of intensive care unit (ICU) in a hospital between April 2010 and March 2012 and analyze the association between T. gondii infection and ICU patients according to the species of disease. Toxoplasma serology was evaluated by ELISA method using a commercially available kit. Data of patients were obtained from the patients, informants, and medical examination records. Seventy-four (18.78%) of 394 patients were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies demonstrating latent infection. Of these, the highest T. gondii seroprevalence was found in the age group of 31–45 years (27.45%), and the lowest was found in the age group of <30 years (12.5%). In addition, females (21.6%) had a higher seroprevalence than males (18.36%). With respect to the species of disease, the patients with kidney diseases (57.14%), lung diseases (27.84%), and brain diseases (24%) had high T. gondii seroprevalence. The present study represents the first survey of T. gondii seroprevalence in ICU patients in China, revealing an 18.78% seropositivity. Considering the particularities of ICU patients, molecular identification, genetic characterization, and diagnosis of T. gondii should be considered in future study. PMID:25961046

  16. Epidemiology of pertussis-related paediatric intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in Australia, 1997–2013: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Robert S; McEniery, Julie A; Coulthard, Mark G; Lambert, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the epidemiology of pertussis-related intensive care unit (ICU) admissions across Australia, over a 17-year period. Design Retrospective descriptive study. Setting Australian ICUs contributing data to the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) Registry. The number of contributing ICUs increased over the study period, from 8 specialist paediatric ICUs in 1997 to 8 specialist paediatric and 13 general ICUs in 2013. Participants All paediatric (<16 years) ICU admissions, coded as pertussis-related, between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2013. Results A total of 373 pertussis-coded ICU admissions were identified in the ANZPIC Registry over the study period. Of these cases, 52.8% occurred during the 4 years of the recent Australian epidemic (2009–2012). ICU admissions were most likely to occur in infants aged younger than 6 weeks (41.8%, n=156) and aged 6 weeks to 4 months (42.9%, n=160). The median length of stay for pertussis-related ICU admissions was 3.6 days, with 77.5% of cases staying in ICU for <7 days. Approximately half of all admissions (54.8%) required some form of respiratory support, with 32.7% requiring invasive respiratory support. Over the study period, 23 deaths were recorded (6.2% of pertussis-related ICU admissions), of which 20 (87.0%) were infants <4 months old. Conclusions Pertussis-related ICU admissions occur primarily in infants too young to be fully protected from active immunisation. More needs to be done to protect these high-risk infants, such as maternal immunisation. PMID:27053270

  17. Epidemiology of Australian Influenza-Related Paediatric Intensive Care Unit Admissions, 1997-2013

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Marlena C.; Ware, Robert S.; Coulthard, Mark G.; McEniery, Julie; Lambert, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza virus predictably causes an annual epidemic resulting in a considerable burden of illness in Australia. Children are disproportionately affected and can experience severe illness and complications, which occasionally result in death. Methods We conducted a retrospective descriptive study using data collated in the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) Registry of influenza-related intensive care unit (ICU) admissions over a 17-year period (1997–2013, inclusive) in children <16 years old. National laboratory-confirmed influenza notifications were used for comparison. Results Between 1997 and 2013, a total of 704 influenza-related ICU admissions were recorded, at a rate of 6.2 per 1,000 all-cause ICU admissions. Age at admission ranged from 0 days and 15.9 years (median = 2.1 years), with 135 (19.2%) aged <6 months. Pneumonia/pneumonitis and bronchiolitis were the most common primary diagnoses among influenza-related admissions (21.9% and 13.6%, respectively). More than half of total cases (59.2%) were previously healthy (no co-morbidities recorded), and in the remainder, chronic lung disease (16.7%) and asthma (12.5%) were the most common co-morbidities recorded. Pathogen co-detection occurred in 24.7% of cases, most commonly with respiratory syncytial virus or a staphylococcal species. Median length of all ICU admissions was 3.2 days (range 2.0 hours– 107.4 days) and 361 (51.3%) admissions required invasive respiratory support for a median duration of 4.3 days (range 0.2 hours– 107.5 days). There were 27 deaths recorded, 14 (51.9%) in children without a recorded co-morbidity. Conclusion Influenza causes a substantial number of ICU admissions in Australian children each year with the majority occurring in previously healthy children. PMID:27023740

  18. Evaluation of physicochemical incompatibilities during parenteral drug administration in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gikic, M; Di Paolo, E R; Pannatier, A; Cotting, J

    2000-06-01

    Patients in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) often receive numerous medications by the parenteral route. Frequently two or more drugs are delivered simultaneously through the same line and the risk of physicochemical incompatibilities is thus important. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify prospectively the combinations of injectable drugs administered in the PICU of our university hospital and 2) to analyze them according to information found in the literature. The data were collected by a pharmacist over a 30-day period and classified in three categories: compatible, incompatible and undocumented. Nineteen patients were included in the study with a median age of 3.2 years. The mean number (+/- SD) of injectable drugs per patient and per day was 6.5 (+/- 2.8), for a total of 26 drugs and 7 solutes. 64 combinations of drugs were observed with 2 (31.3%), 3 (45.3%), 4 (10.9%) or 5 (12.5%) drugs. 81 drug-drug and 94 drug-solute combinations were recorded. Among these, 151 (86.3%) were compatible, 6 (3.4%) incompatible and 18 (10.3%) undocumented. The incompatibilities included furosemide (Lasix), a drug in alkaline solution and Vamina-Glucose, a total parenteral nutrition solution. No clinical consequences resulting from drug incompatibilities were shown in this study. We suggest that in vitro compatibility tests on standard drug combinations, as well as a training program for nurses on drug incompatibility problems would sensitively increase the security of parenteral drug administration. PMID:11028261

  19. Retrospective comparison of two years in a paediatric burns unit, with and without acticoat as a standard dressing.

    PubMed

    Strand, O; San Miguel, L; Rowan, S; Sahlqvist, A

    2010-12-31

    The Karolinska Burn Unit in Stockholm, Sweden, carried out a retrospective case review in order to compare the cost of the current protocol of care - in place since mid-2002 - with a previous protocol in paediatric burn patients. The study compared the years 2004 and 2007 with the year 2001. 2004 was the first full year in which the unit staff used Acticoat(TM) (Smith & Nephew Wound Management, Hull, England), IntraSite Gel(TM) (idem), and Allevyn Adhesive(TM) (idem) in the treatment of paediatric burns patients. In 2001 the unit used Mepitel(TM) (Molnlycke, Göteborg, Sweden) together with a saline solution and peroxide for cleansing. This study examined differences in both labour and material costs, measured from the hospital's perspective. Our results show that the main impact of the new protocol was on length of stay for hospitalized patients. In 2001 the mean in-patient stay was 12.5 days; in 2004 the mean stay was 5.6 days and, in 2007, 4.5 days (p < 0.001). It is hypothesized that the reason for this significant reduction in length of stay is that most of the patients treated with Acticoat were sent home earlier to be treated as outpatients because there was less need for sedation and/or analgesics, and because the risk of infection was perceived to be less. Pure hospitalization costs per in-patient were approximately Swedish kronor (kr) 67,725 in 2001 (1 kr = approx. € 0.1 or US$ 0.15) and kr 30,305 and kr 24,440 in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This represents a saving of 55% and 64% with respect to 2001 costs. PMID:21991222

  20. Retrospective Comparison of Two Years in a Paediatric Burns Unit, with and Without ActicoatTM as a Standard Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Strand, O.; San Miguel, L.; Rowan, S.; Sahlqvist, A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Karolinska Burn Unit in Stockholm, Sweden, carried out a retrospective case review in order to compare the cost of the current protocol of care - in place since mid-2002 - with a previous protocol in paediatric burn patients. The study compared the years 2004 and 2007 with the year 2001. 2004 was the first full year in which the unit staff used ActicoatTM (Smith & Nephew Wound Management, Hull, England), IntraSite GelTM (idem), and Allevyn AdhesiveTM (idem) in the treatment of paediatric burns patients. In 2001 the unit used MepitelTM (Molnlycke, Göteborg, Sweden) together with a saline solution and peroxide for cleansing. This study examined differences in both labour and material costs, measured from the hospital's perspective. Our results show that the main impact of the new protocol was on length of stay for hospitalized patients. In 2001 the mean in-patient stay was 12.5 days; in 2004 the mean stay was 5.6 days and, in 2007, 4.5 days (p < 0.001). It is hypothesized that the reason for this significant reduction in length of stay is that most of the patients treated with Acticoat were sent home earlier to be treated as outpatients because there was less need for sedation and/or analgesics, and because the risk of infection was perceived to be less. Pure hospitalization costs per in-patient were approximately Swedish kronor (kr) 67,725 in 2001 (1 kr = approx. € 0.1 or US$ 0.15) and kr 30,305 and kr 24,440 in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This represents a saving of 55% and 64% with respect to 2001 costs. PMID:21991222

  1. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Incidence, Risk Factors and Outcome in Paediatric Intensive Care Units at Cairo University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Galal, Yasmine S.; Ibrahiem, Sally K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is a major cause of hospital morbidity, mortality and increased health care costs. Although the epidemiology, pathogenesis and outcome of VAP are well described in adults; few data exist regarding VAP in paediatric patients, especially in developing countries. Aim To determine the incidence, risk factors and outcome of VAP in two Paediatric Intensive Care Units (PICUs) at Cairo University Hospital. Materials and Methods A total of 427 patients who received Mechanical Ventilation (MV) were included in this prospective study during the period from September 2014 till September 2015. Patients were observed daily till VAP occurrence, discharge from the unit or death, whichever came first. Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory results, radiographic and microbiological reports were recorded for all patients. Results Nearly 31% patients developed VAP among the entire cohort. The incidence density was 21.3 per 1000 ventilator days. The most frequently isolated organisms from VAP patients were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (47.7%), Acinetobacter (18.2%) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (14.4%). VAP patients were significantly younger than non-VAP ones. The incidence of VAP in comatose patients and those with MOSF was significantly higher. Prior antibiotic use for > 48 h before MV, supine body positioning and reintubation were significantly associated with VAP. On multiple logistic regression analysis, MOSF; prior antibiotic use > 48h; reintubation; coma; and age remained independent predictors of VAP. Mortality rate among the VAP group was significantly higher compared to the non-VAP one (68.2% vs. 48.5%, p<0.001). Survival curve analysis showed a shorter median survival time in VAP patients. Conclusion Identification of risk factors and outcome of VAP in PICUs may help in reducing the incidence and improving patients’ outcomes. The incidence of VAP in this study was relatively high. The most

  2. The water supply system as a potential source of fungal infection in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell units

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We conducted a prospective study to investigate the presence of microfungal contamination in the water supply system of the Oncology Paediatric Institute, São Paulo – Brazil after the occurrence of one invasive Fusarium solani infection in a patient after Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). During a twelve-month period, we investigated the water supply system of the HSCT unit by monitoring a total of fourteen different collection sites. Methods One litre of water was collected in each location, filtered through a 0.45 μm membrane and cultured on SDA to detect the presence of filamentous fungi. Physicochemical analyses of samples were performed to evaluate the temperature, turbidity, pH, and the concentration of free residual chlorine. Results Over the 12 months of the study, 164 samples were collected from the water supply system of the HSCT unit, and 139 of the samples tested positive for filamentous fungi (84.8%), generating a total of 2,362 colonies. Cladosporium spp., Penicillium spp., Purpureocillium spp. and Aspergillus spp. were ranked as the most commonly found genera of mould in the collected samples. Of note, Fusarium solani complex isolates were obtained from 14 out of the 106 samples that were collected from tap water (mean of 20 CFU/L). There was a positive correlation between the total number of fungal CFU obtained in all cultures and both water turbidity and temperature parameters. Our findings emphasise the need for the establishment of strict measures to limit the exposure of high-risk patients to waterborne fungal propagules. Conclusions We were able to isolate a wide variety of filamentous fungi from the water of the HSCT unit where several immunocompromised patients are assisted. PMID:23802862

  3. Paediatric manpower.

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, M M; Bellman, M H

    1982-01-01

    Two investigations of paediatric manpower in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland were carried out, each using a different method. The first survey located registrars and senior registrars and checked on their occupational status 3 years later in order to see which ones had been promoted. Loss factors--such as emigration, retirement for personal reasons, part-time training, or transfer to general practice, community paediatrics, or other medical specialties--were examined closely. The second survey was a cross-sectional analysis of the entire paediatric establishment. It examined in particular the distribution of consultants and registrars. Using figures from survey 2 and loss factors from survey 1, a model of the paediatric career structure could be constructed. This showed that the present career pyramid would be unable to absorb the current number of registrars in training. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive registration scheme for registrars, especially those with honorary contracts, who are not currently included in official records. Paediatrics is unique in having a high proportion of women for whom there is little opportunity of reconciling career aspirations with family commitments. PMID:7125690

  4. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Jitender; Satpathy, Sidhartha; Sharma, D.K.; Lodha, Rakesh; Kapil, Arti; Wadhwa, Nitya; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. A total of 20 children with HAI (cases) and 35 children without HAI (controls), admitted to the PICU during the study period (January 2012 to June 2012), were matched for gender, age, and average severity of illness score. Each patient's length of stay was obtained prospectively. Costs of healthcare were estimated according to traditional and time driven activity based costing methods approach. Results: The median extra length of PICU stay for children with HAI (cases), compared with children with no HAI (controls), was seven days (IQR 3-16). The mean total costs of patients with and without HAI were 2,04,787 (US$ 3,413) and 56,587 (US$ 943), respectively and the mean difference in the total cost between cases and controls was 1,48,200 (95% CI 55,716 to 2,40,685, P<0.01). Interpretation & conclusions: This study highlights the effect of HAI on costs for PICU patients, especially costs due to prolongation of hospital stay, and suggests the need to develop effective strategies for prevention of HAI to reduce costs of health care. PMID:27377508

  5. The utility of procalcitonin in the prediction of serious bacterial infection in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Sm, Matha; Sn, Rahiman; Bg, Gelbart; Td, Duke

    2016-09-01

    To determine utility of procalcitonin (PCT) for the prediction of bacterial infection in critically ill children, we analysed the relationship between serum PCT, cultures and other laboratory markers of bacterial sepsis or viral infection in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The outcome measures were levels of PCT in proven bacteraemia, pneumonia and viral respiratory infection; and comparison of PCT to immature to total neutrophil ratio (ITR) in prediction of bacteraemia. In 420 children with suspected sepsis, 1,226 serum PCT levels were analysed. Children with bacteraemia had a higher median PCT (2.03 ng/ml, interquartile range [IQR] 0.67-42.4) than those who did not have bacteraemia (0.82 ng/ml, IQR 0.295-2.87) (P=0.033). PCT was a significant but only moderate predictor of bacteraemia (AUC 0.65). In 866 episodes of suspected sepsis where paired PCT and ITR were performed, the median ITR in children with bacteraemia was 0.19 ng/ml (IQR 0.04-0.35), and the median PCT was 6.5 ng/ml (IQR 0.71-61.8). PCT was a marginally better predictor of bacteraemia (AUC 0.69) than the ITR (AUC 0.66). In children with viral respiratory tract infection only, the median PCT was 1.26 ng/ml (0.35-5.5), and in those with likely bacterial pneumonia the median PCT was 0.80 ng/ml (IQR 0.28-1.70). In a heterogeneous population of children in a tertiary PICU, PCT measured at a single timepoint was a moderate predictor of proven bacteraemia. In our population PCT did not reliably identify localised bacterial infection or distinguish bacterial from viral respiratory infection. PMID:27608345

  6. Paediatric diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes does not spare any section of society, and its prevalence in the paediatric and adolescent age group is rising. This review highlights the etiological and clinical features of childhood diabetes, including secular changes in epidemiology. It discusses the aspects of non pharmacological and pharmacological therapy which are unique to the paediatric age group, and explores current use of novel therapeutic modalities. The article calls for modulation of the psychological environment of the child with diabetes, to help improve his or her quality of life, and sensitizes physicians to take proactive, affirmative action to address the special needs of children with type1 diabetes. PMID:24601207

  7. Mucolytics for Intubated Asthmatic Children: A National Survey of United Kingdom Paediatric Intensive Care Consultants

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, Aarjan Peter; Brierley, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The extent to which mucolytics are utilised in mechanically ventilated asthmatic children is unknown. We sought to establish current practice in the United Kingdom (UK) including choice of mucolytic, dose, and frequency of utilisation. Methods. A national electronic survey was distributed to UK consultants during April and May 2014. We were able to identify 168 PICU consultants at 25 institutions to whom we were able to electronically distribute a survey, representing an estimated 81% of UK NHS PICU consultants. Results. Replies were received from 87 consultants at 21 institutions (response rate = 52%). Recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) does get administered by 63% of clinicians, with 54% and 19% that administer hypertonic saline or N-acetylcysteine, respectively. Of those that do administer rhDNase the majority (48%) dilute it with 0.9% saline and blindly administer it, whereas 35% administer rhDNase under bronchoscopic guidance and 17% judge the necessity for bronchoscopy according to clinical severity. 25 respondents described 7 different methods to calculate rhDNase dose. A majority (87%) of respondents expressed an interest to consider enrolling patients into an RCT that evaluates rhDNase. Conclusion. Significant variation exists regarding the necessity for mucolytics, choice of agent, optimal route, and dose in intubated asthmatic children. PMID:25722885

  8. Two years’ study of Tetanus cases in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Naseem, Faizia; Mahar, Imtiaz Ahmad; Arif, Fehmina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the demographic and clinical features, outcome, complications and treatment cost of tetanus patients admitted in Paediatirc Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK). Methods: It is a descriptive observational study conducted at Civil Hospital Karachi from July 2013 to June 2015. Patients of tetanus admitted in PICU during the study period were enrolled. Data was collected from the file records of patients and included the demographic profile, clinical presentation, grade of severity, length of stay, complications and outcome. It also included the cost of treatment. Descriptive statistics were applied to describe the results. Results: During the study period, 23 cases of tetanus were admitted in P.I.C.U. twelve were male and 11 female. Majority of cases (13) belonged to age group 2-6 years. Seventeen cases were unvaccinated and 6 had received only BCG & OPV. None was appropriately vaccinated for age. There were 9 cases of post injury tetanus, 6 of them were males, 5 cases of otogenic tetanus and 9 cases had no clinically identifiable portal of entry. Eleven cases belonged to grade III severity of Ablett classification and 6 had grade IV severity. Mortality in our case series was 26%. Autonomic instability was seen in 17 patients and all of them needed ionotropic support. The estimated cost of per day treatment of a tetanus patient with mechanical ventilation was approximatly 31, 979/Pak Rs and without mechanical ventilation was 20,000/Pak Rs. Conclusion: Tetanus is an entirely preventable disease with a high mortality. Treatment is very costly as compared to vaccination which is free of cost. Complete vaccination and proper wound care is the only option to reduce the ongoing burden of tetanus. PMID:27375706

  9. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among children attending the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, IZ; Mainasara, AS; Erhabor, Osaro; Omojuyigbe, ST; Dallatu, MK; Bilbis, LS; Adias, TC

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human enzyme deficiencies in the world. It is particularly common in populations living in malaria-endemic areas, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. This present study was conducted with the aim of determining the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children visiting the Emergency Paediatric Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital for pediatric-related care. The study included 118 children, made up of 77 (65.3%) males and 41 (34.7%) females aged ≤5 years with mean age of 3.26 ± 1.90 years. Randox G6PD quantitative in vitro test screening was used for the diagnosis of G6PD deficiency. Of the 118 children tested, 17 (14.4%) were G6PD-deficient. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency was concentrated predominantly among male children (22.1%). Male sex was significantly correlated with G6PD deficiency among the children studied (r = 7.85, P = 0.01). The highest prevalence occurred among children in the 2- to 5-year age-group. Of the 17 G6PD-deficient children, twelve (70.2%) were moderately deficient, while five (29.4%) were severely deficient. Blood film from G6PD-deficient children indicated the following morphological changes; Heinz bodies, schistocytes, target cells, nucleated red cells, spherocytes, and polychromasia. This present study has shown a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency among children residing in Sokoto in the northwestern geopolitical zone of Nigeria. The study indicated a male sex bias in the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among the children studied. There is a need for the routine screening of children for G6PD deficiency in our environment, to allow for evidence-based management of these children and to ensure the avoidance of food, drugs, and infective agents that can potentially predispose these children to oxidative stress as well as diseases that deplete micronutrients that protect against oxidative stress. There is need to build capacity in our

  10. Pulmonary hypertension in the intensive care unit. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, Michael; Schranz, Dietmar; Warnecke, Gregor; Apitz, Christian; Hansmann, Georg; Miera, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Acute pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicates the course of several cardiovascular, pulmonary and other systemic diseases in children. An acute rise of RV afterload, either as exacerbating chronic PH of different aetiologies (eg, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), chronic lung or congenital heart disease), or pulmonary hypertensive crisis after corrective surgery for congenital heart disease, may lead to severe circulatory compromise. Only few clinical studies provide evidence on how to best treat children with acute severe PH and decompensated RV function, that is, acute RV failure. The specific treatment in the intensive care unit should be based on the underlying pathophysiology and not only be focused on so-called 'specific' or 'tailored' drug therapy to lower RV afterload. In addition therapeutic efforts should aim to optimise RV preload, and to achieve adequate myocardial perfusion, and cardiac output. Early recognition of patients at high risk and timely initiation of appropriate therapeutic measures may prevent the development of severe cardiac dysfunction and low cardiac output. In patients not responding adequately to pharmacotherapy, (1) novel surgical and interventional techniques, temporary mechanical circulatory support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, (2) pumpless lung assist devices (3) and/or lung or heart-lung transplantation should be timely considered. The invasive therapeutic measures can be applied in a bridge-to-recovery or bridge-to-lung transplant strategy. This consensus statement focuses on the management of acute severe PH in the paediatric intensive care unit and provides an according treatment algorithm for clinical practice. PMID:27053699

  11. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Philippa S.; Lang, Sarah; Gilbert, Marianne; Kamat, Deepa; Bansal, Sanjay; Ford-Adams, Martha E.; Desai, Ashish P.; Dhawan, Anil; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Moore, J. Bernadette; Hart, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK). Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ), a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD), in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006) and BMI centiles (p = 0.002) than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001). Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15). Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005), who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management. PMID:26703719

  12. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Philippa S; Lang, Sarah; Gilbert, Marianne; Kamat, Deepa; Bansal, Sanjay; Ford-Adams, Martha E; Desai, Ashish P; Dhawan, Anil; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Moore, J Bernadette; Hart, Kathryn H

    2015-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK). Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ), a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD), in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006) and BMI centiles (p = 0.002) than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001). Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15). Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005), who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management. PMID:26703719

  13. Paediatric Interventional Uroradiology

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M.; Wilkinson, A. Graham; Roebuck, Derek J.

    2011-04-15

    Paediatric interventional uroradiology lies at the intersection of the disciplines of paediatric interventional radiology and paediatric endourology. Interdisciplinary collaboration has led to the development of new techniques and refinement of procedures adopted from adult practice. This article reviews the major procedures used in paediatric interventional uroradiology, with emphasis on nephrostomy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, balloon-burst pyeloplasty, and antegrade ureteric stenting.

  14. Hospital-based neuropsychological services.

    PubMed

    Sciara, A D

    1986-01-01

    Hospital-based neuropsychological services may provide the hospital with a new means of interfacing with the general medical community, especially neurologists and neurosurgeons. This could produce increased census through the evaluation and treatment of patients who may not have been referred to the psychiatric hospital previously. Additionally, it is a service that can be marketed to the legal community. The establishment of neuropsychological services is a relatively inexpensive project that requires little in the way of physical plant and personnel needs other than a qualified technician and neuropsychologist. PMID:10279536

  15. Estimation of risks associated with paediatric cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J Cyne; Smith, Andrée Durieux; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Annette; Angus, Douglas; Benzies, Karen; Schramm, David

    2010-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the rates of complications associated with paediatric cochlear implantation use: a) at one Canadian cochlear implant (CI) centre, and b) in the published literature. It comprised a retrospective hospital-based chart review and a concurrent review of complications in the published literature. There were 224 children who had undergone surgery from 1994 to June 2007. Results indicate that the rates of complications at the local Canadian paediatric CI centre are not significantly different from the literature rates for all examined complication types. This hospital-based retrospective chart review and review of the literature provide readers with an estimation of the risks to aid in evidence-based decision-making surrounding paediatric cochlear implantation. PMID:19655302

  16. Development of a database of organ doses for paediatric and young adult CT scans in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K. P.; Berrington de González, A.; Pearce, M. S.; Salotti, J. A.; Parker, L.; McHugh, K.; Craft, A. W.; Lee, C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite great potential benefits, there are concerns about the possible harm from medical imaging including the risk of radiation-related cancer. There are particular concerns about computed tomography (CT) scans in children because both radiation dose and sensitivity to radiation for children are typically higher than for adults undergoing equivalent procedures. As direct empirical data on the cancer risks from CT scans are lacking, the authors are conducting a retrospective cohort study of over 240 000 children in the UK who underwent CT scans. The main objective of the study is to quantify the magnitude of the cancer risk in relation to the radiation dose from CT scans. In this paper, the methods used to estimate typical organ-specific doses delivered by CT scans to children are described. An organ dose database from Monte Carlo radiation transport-based computer simulations using a series of computational human phantoms from newborn to adults for both male and female was established. Organ doses vary with patient size and sex, examination types and CT technical settings. Therefore, information on patient age, sex and examination type from electronic radiology information systems and technical settings obtained from two national surveys in the UK were used to estimate radiation dose. Absorbed doses to the brain, thyroid, breast and red bone marrow were calculated for reference male and female individuals with the ages of newborns, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 y for a total of 17 different scan types in the pre- and post-2001 time periods. In general, estimated organ doses were slightly higher for females than males which might be attributed to the smaller body size of the females. The younger children received higher doses in pre-2001 period when adult CT settings were typically used for children. Paediatric-specific adjustments were assumed to be used more frequently after 2001, since then radiation doses to children have often been smaller than those to adults. The

  17. JACIE accreditation in paediatric haemopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Cornish, J M

    2008-10-01

    The Joint Accreditation Committee of the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) and European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), known as JACIE, is a nonprofit body established for the purposes of assessment and accreditation in the field of haemopoietic SCT (HSCT). The committee was established in 1999 with the aim of creating a standardized system of accreditation officially recognized across Europe and based on the accreditation standards established by the US-based Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). The major objectives of JACIE are to improve the quality of HSCT in Europe by providing a means whereby transplant centres, cell collection facilities and processing facilities can demonstrate high-quality practice. JACIE launched its official inspection programme in January 2004, and since then more than 35 centres in Europe have been inspected. The history of paediatric-specific accreditation guidelines has lagged behind the overall development but is now incorporated within the standards. There is now acknowledgement that a paediatric transplant team will be headed by a paediatric programme director, that an independent paediatric unit will perform no less than 10 allogeneic transplants in children under the age of 18 per year, be looked after by nurses and junior doctors specifically trained in paediatric practice and have access to paediatric subspecialties with an intensive care unit on site. Paediatric units will be examined by a paediatric-trained inspector. Remaining issues of difference with the guidelines relate to the numbers required for accreditation in combined units. Overall, the paediatric community in Europe has embraced the JACIE guidelines. JACIE is working more closely with other international organizations in cellular therapy to develop international standards for all aspects of SCT. The recent implementation of Directive 2004/23/EC has provided an impetus for the implementation of JACIE in

  18. Non-operative management of renal trauma in very young children: experiences from a dedicated South African paediatric trauma unit.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Alex; Lazarus, John; Sebastian van As, A B

    2012-09-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma results in renal injury in 10% of paediatric cases. Over the last twenty years, the management of paediatric renal trauma has shifted towards a primarily non-operative approach that is now well-established for children up to 18 years old. This retrospective study reviews our experiences of non-operatively managing blunt renal trauma in a very young cohort of patients up to 11 years old. Between June 2006 and June 2010, 118 children presented to the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town with blunt abdominal trauma. 16 patients shown to have sustained renal injury on abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed for the mechanism of injury, severity of renal injury, clinical presentation, associated injuries, management method and clinical outcomes. All renal injuries were graded (I-V) according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Organ Injury Severity Scale. All renal trauma patients included in this study were aged between 1 and 11 years (mean of 6.5 years). 1 patient sustained grade V injuries; 2 grade IV, 6 grade III and 7 grade I injuries. The majority of injuries (9/16) were caused by motor vehicle crashes, whilst 5 children fell from height, 1 was struck by a falling tree and 1 hit by a moving train. 1 of 16 patients was haemodynamically unstable on presentation as a result of multiple splenic and hepatic lacerations. He was resuscitated and underwent immediate laparotomy. However, his renal injuries were not indications for surgical management. 15 haemodynamically stable patients were non-operatively managed for their renal injuries. Following lengths of admissions ranging from 4 to 132 days, all 16 patients were successfully discharged with no mortalities. No significant complications of renal trauma, such as new-onset hypertension, were detected during their first follow up outpatient appointments. Our findings successfully extend non

  19. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intensive care and oncology units. Infection rates are the highest in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (where bloodstream infections are the most frequent), and are usually associated with intravascular devices. On general paediatric wards, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections predominate, reflecting the occurrence in the community. The surveillance of nosocomial infections identifies priorities for infection control activities and permits evaluation of interventions. The prevention of transmission between patients and to personnel requires that certain measures be taken with all patients, and that additional precautions be taken with some infections, based on the route of transmission. The prevention of transmission from personnel involves ensuring that personnel are appropriately immunized and counselled about working with infections. The prevention of nosocomial infection also involves control of visitors, appropriate management of invasive procedures and devices, sterilization and disinfection of equipment, provision of a clean environment and adequate staffing. Severely immunocompromised children require extra protection, including ventilation systems that reduce the risk of exposure to filamentous fungi. Infection control in paediatrics is an evolving field that must adapt to changes in the paediatric patient population and in health care technology. PMID:20084127

  20. Palliative care needs of HIV exposed and infected children admitted to the inpatient paediatric unit in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nakawesi, Jane; Kasirye, Ivy; Kavuma, David; Muziru, Benjamin; Businge, Alice; Naluwooza, Jackie; Kabunga, Grace; Karamagi, Yvonne; Akankwasa, Edith; Odiit, Mary; Mukasa, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric palliative care is an emerging subspecialty that focuses on achieving the best possible quality of life for children with life-limiting conditions and also for their families. It is a response to the suffering and unique needs of such children. Globally there is limited documented data available on the palliative care needs of children with HIV. A retrospective review of data of all the HIV exposed and positive children who were admitted to the ward from January to December 2012 was done to document their palliative care needs. A total of 243 children were admitted to the ward during the stated period. Of these, 139 (57.2%) were female and 104 (42.8%) were male. Among them 131 (54%) were aged five years and below whereas 112 (46%) were above five years. Some of the identified palliative care needs documented included physical needs: pneumonia 46 (19%), severe acute malnutrition 38 (16%), mild and moderate acute malnutrition 23 (9.6%), and respiratory tract infections 22 (9.3%). Social needs: poor social support 21 (41%), financial instability 16 (31%), and child neglect 4 (8%). Psychological needs: antiretroviral treatment (ART) counselling 127 (36%), HIV counselling and testing for the child and family 63 (18%), adherence support 53 (15%), and others 11 (3%). Spiritual needs: discontinuing ART because of belief in spiritual healing 18 (81%), loss of hope because of severe ill health 1 (5%), and others 3 (14%). These results emphasise the need for palliative care in children with HIV even in the era of ART. The needs identified are in keeping with studies done elsewhere and are similar to the palliative care needs of children with other life-limiting illnesses such as cancer. Conclusion HIV positive and exposed children plus their families have vast palliative care needs and a holistic approach is the key in their management. PMID:25624870

  1. Paediatric cardiac nursing education: a national collaboration.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kerry; Daniels, Amanda; Sheehan, Karen; Langton, Helen

    2006-02-01

    Educational courses for staff working in paediatric specialties may not be financially viable because of the small numbers involved and the difficulties that potential students have in getting released from their units. The UK Paediatric Cardiac Nurses Association worked with other groups to explore the feasibility of a national multi-professional paediatric cardiac education pathway. Three options were identified, including the continuation of local in-house provision with its associated variation in standards. The relative benefits and resource implications of each option were explored and approaches made to educational institutions for support in developing the pathway. A university with an established reputation for e-learning undertook this development and a post graduate certificate in Paediatric Cardiothoracic Practice will soon be available. PMID:16518954

  2. Outbreak of nosocomial urinary tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a paediatric surgical unit associated with tap-water contamination.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A; Nguyen, L; Pron, B; Quesne, G; Brusset, M C; Berche, P

    1998-08-01

    An outbreak of 14 cases of urinary tract infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including six symptomatic infections, occurred from September to November 1994 in a paediatric surgical unit. During the outbreak, urine samples from patients and multiple samples from the environment of patients were tested for the presence of P. aeruginosa. Bacterial isolates were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Genotypic analysis showed that most of the isolates from children were different. Multiple P. aeruginosa isolates were also found in the tap water, as the only putative source of contamination. Two of these isolates were identified in two infected patients, indicating possible direct contamination of patients via tap water and this was related to the distal colonization of faucets. Bacteria were eradicated from tap water by replacement of taps. The cluster of cases of P. aeruginosa urinary infection was, therefore, related to multiple contaminations through tap water. These results illustrate an unexpected risk of nosocomial infection and emphasizes the importance of checking tap water to prevent bacterial contamination through handwashing in contaminated water. PMID:9749401

  3. Paediatric anaesthesia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Langton, Helen Elizabeth

    2015-10-28

    This article provides an overview of the nursing considerations for paediatric anaesthesia. It is aimed at newly qualified operating department practitioners and anaesthetic nurses, and those with limited experience in the care of paediatric patients. It explores the ways in which paediatric anatomy and physiology differ from those of adults and looks at the implications for treatment in the anaesthetic environment. It also discusses the equipment required and the rationale for its use. PMID:26508256

  4. Neurodevelopmental and behavioural paediatrics.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the notable shifts in Paediatrics across the last 50 years has been towards disorders that are chronic and qualitative in nature. In addition to physical health, these impact on childhood development, behaviour and wellbeing. Understanding and management of these problems extends the traditional biological toolkit of paediatrics into the complexities of uncertainties of psychological and social context. In Australasia, the profession has responded with the development of Community Paediatrics as a recognised sub-specialty, of which Neurodevelopmental and Behavioural Paediatrics is an important component. These developments are reviewed along with consideration of future challenges for this field of health care. PMID:25586854

  5. Clostridium difficile in paediatric populations

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Upton D

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Clostridium difficile infection incidence has been observed among hospitalized children in the United States. The present statement, targeted at clinicians caring for infants and children in community and institutional settings, summarizes the relevant information relating to the role of C difficile in childhood diarrhea and provides recommendations for diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Significant differences between adult and paediatric risk factors and disease are discussed, along with emerging therapies. The relationship between age and disease severity in children with a newly emergent and more fluoroqinolone-resistant strain of C difficile (North American Pulse-field type-1 [NAP1]) remains unknown. The importance of antimicrobial stewardship as a preventive strategy is highlighted. This statement replaces a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement on C difficile published in 2000. PMID:24627655

  6. Impact of conversion from an open ward design paediatric intensive care unit environment to all isolated rooms environment on incidence of bloodstream infections and antibiotic resistance in Southern Israel (2000 to 2008).

    PubMed

    Lazar, I; Abukaf, H; Sofer, S; Peled, N; Leibovitz, E

    2015-01-01

    We studied the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical aspects and outcome of bloodstream infections (BSI) in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit. All BSI episodes were prospectively identified and analysed. The paediatric intensive care unit moved in 2006 from an open-plan unit to a new (all single room) unit. Three hundred and fifty-three BSI episodes occurred in 299 of 4162 patients. Overall, BSI incidence was 85 per 1000 hospitalised children. Fewer BSI episodes occurred during the last two years of the study (2007 to 2008), compared with 2000 to 2006 (70 of 1061 admissions, 6.5% versus 283 of 3101 admissions, 9.1%, respectively, P=0.01). There were 127 of 340 (37.4%) community-acquired and 213 of 340 (62.6%) nosocomial BSI episodes (31 of 1000 and 51 of 1000, respectively). Nosocomial BSI episodes decreased during 2007 to 2008 versus 2000 to 2006 (37.7% versus 55.8%, P=0.03). In 448 instances, pathogens were isolated, 231 (52%) Gram-positive and 188 (42%) Gram-negative. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (41.1%, 19.9% and 11.7%, respectively) were the most common Gram-positive and Enterobacteriaceae spp. the most frequent Gram-negative organisms (45.2%, of them Klebsiella spp. and E. coli 40% and 29.4%, respectively). A significant decrease was recorded during 2007 to 2008 in Enterobacteriaceae resistance to piperacillin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Thirty of 299 (10%, 9 with S. pneumoniae-BSI) patients died. A significant decrease in BSI and nosocomial incidence and Enterobacteriaceae spp. antibiotic resistance was recorded following the conversion of the paediatric intensive care unit from an open ward to an all isolated rooms environment. PMID:25579287

  7. Generalisability and Cost-Impact of Antibiotic-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters for Reducing Risk of Bloodstream Infection in Paediatric Intensive Care Units in England

    PubMed Central

    Harron, Katie; Mok, Quen; Hughes, Dyfrig; Muller-Pebody, Berit; Parslow, Roger; Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Gilbert, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background We determined the generalisability and cost-impact of adopting antibiotic-impregnated CVCs in all paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in England, based on results from a large randomised controlled trial (the CATCH trial; ISRCTN34884569). Methods BSI rates using standard CVCs were estimated through linkage of national PICU audit data (PICANet) with laboratory surveillance data. We estimated the number of BSI averted if PICUs switched from standard to antibiotic-impregnated CVCs by applying the CATCH trial rate-ratio (0.40; 95% CI 0.17,0.97) to the BSI rate using standard CVCs. The value of healthcare resources made available by averting one BSI as estimated from the trial economic analysis was £10,975; 95% CI -£2,801,£24,751. Results The BSI rate using standard CVCs was 4.58 (95% CI 4.42,4.74) per 1000 CVC-days in 2012. Applying the rate-ratio gave 232 BSI averted using antibiotic CVCs. The additional cost of purchasing antibiotic-impregnated compared with standard CVCs was £36 for each child, corresponding to additional costs of £317,916 for an estimated 8831 CVCs required in PICUs in 2012. Based on 2012 BSI rates, management of BSI in PICUs cost £2.5 million annually (95% uncertainty interval: -£160,986, £5,603,005). The additional cost of antibiotic CVCs would be less than the value of resources associated with managing BSI in PICUs with standard BSI rates >1.2 per 1000 CVC-days. Conclusions The cost of introducing antibiotic-impregnated CVCs is less than the cost associated with managing BSIs occurring with standard CVCs. The long-term benefits of preventing BSI could mean that antibiotic CVCs are cost-effective even in PICUs with extremely low BSI rates. PMID:26999045

  8. Where should paediatric surgery be performed?

    PubMed

    Arul, G S; Spicer, R D

    1998-07-01

    We have tried to review the evidence for the organisation of paediatric surgical care. Difficulties arise because of the lack of published data from district general hospitals concerning paediatric surgical conditions. Hence much of the debate about the surgical management of children is based on anecdotal evidence. However, at a time when the provision of health care is being radically reorganised to an internal market based on a system of purchasers and providers it is more important than ever to understand the issues at stake. Two separate issues have been discussed: the role of the specialist paediatric centre and the provision of non-specialist paediatric surgery in district general hospitals. There are arguments for and against large regional specialist paediatric centres. The benefits of centralisation include concentration of expertise, more appropriate consultant on call commitment, development of support services, and junior doctor training. The disadvantages include children and their families having to travel long distances for care, and the loss of expertise at a local level. If specialist paediatric emergency transport is available the benefits of centralisation far outweigh the adverse effects of having to take children to a regional paediatric intensive care centre. Specialist paediatric centres are aware of the importance of treating children and their parents as a family unit as highlighted by the Platt committee; this is an important challenge and enormous improvements have occurred to provide proper accommodation for families while their children are treated in hospital. To keep these arguments of large distances and separation from the home in context, one paediatric intensive care unit in Victoria, Australia, providing a centralised service to a region larger in are than England and with a similar admission rate, has a lower mortality rate than the decentralised paediatric intensive care provided in the Trent region of the UK. There is clear

  9. Evaluation of mRNA Biomarkers to Identify Risk of Hospital Acquired Infections in Children Admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, Elisabeth; Guhadasan, Rathi; Venet, Fabienne; Textoris, Julien; Pachot, Alexandre; Monneret, Guillaume; Carrol, Enitan Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hospital-acquired infections (HAI) are associated with significant mortality and morbidity and prolongation of hospital stay, adding strain on limited hospital resources. Despite stringent infection control practices some children remain at high risk of developing HAI. The development of biomarkers which could identify these patients would be useful. In this study our objective was to evaluate mRNA candidate biomarkers for HAI prediction in a pediatric intensive care unit. Design Serial blood samples were collected from patients admitted to pediatric intensive care unit between March and June 2012. Candidate gene expression (IL1B, TNF, IL10, CD3D, BCL2, BID) was quantified using RT-qPCR. Comparisons of relative gene expression between those that did not develop HAI versus those that did were performed using Mann Whitney U-test. Patients Exclusion criteria were: age <28 days or ≥16 years, expected length of stay < 24 hours, expected survival < 28 days, end-stage renal disease and end-stage liver disease. Finally, 45 children were included in this study. Main Results The overall HAI rate was 30% of which 62% were respiratory infections. Children who developed HAI had a three-fold increase in hospital stay compared to those who did not (27 days versus 9 days, p<0.001). An increased expression of cytokine genes (IL1B and IL10) was observed in patients who developed HAI, as well as a pro-apoptosis pattern (higher expression of BID and lower expression of BCL2). CD3D, a key TCR co-factor was also significantly down-modulated in patients who developed HAI. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study of mRNA biomarkers of HAI in the paediatric population. Increased mRNA expressions of anti-inflammatory cytokine and modulation of apoptotic genes suggest the development of immunosuppression in critically ill children. Immune monitoring using a panel of genes may offer a novel stratification tool to identify HAI risk. PMID:27015534

  10. Accuracy of Bedside Paediatric Early Warning System (BedsidePEWS) in a Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant Unit.

    PubMed

    Gawronski, Orsola; Ciofi Degli Atti, Marta L; Di Ciommo, Vincenzo; Cecchetti, Corrado; Bertaina, Alice; Tiozzo, Emanuela; Raponi, Massimiliano

    2016-07-01

    Hospital mortality in children who undergo stem cell transplant (SCT) is high. Early warning scores aim at identifying deteriorating patients and at preventing adverse outcomes. The bedside pediatric early warning system (BedsidePEWS) is a pediatric early warning score based on 7 clinical indicators, ranging from 0 (all indicators within normal ranges for age) to 26. The aim of this case-control study was to assess the performance of BedsidePEWS in identifying clinical deterioration events among children admitted to an SCT unit. Cases were defined as clinical deterioration events; controls were all the other patients hospitalized on the same ward at the time of case occurrence. BedsidePEWS was retrospectively measured at 4-hour intervals in cases and controls 24 hours before an event (T4-T24). We studied 19 cases and 80 controls. The score significantly increased in cases from a median of 4 at T24 to a median of 14 at T4. The proportion of correctly classified cases and controls was >90% since T8. The area under the curve receiver operating characteristic was 0.9. BedsidePEWS is an accurate screening tool to predict clinical deterioration in SCT patients. PMID:26497915

  11. Retrospective cross-sectional review of survival rates in critically ill children admitted to a combined paediatric/neonatal intensive care unit in Johannesburg, South Africa, 2013–2015

    PubMed Central

    Ballot, Daynia E; Davies, Victor A; Cooper, Peter A; Chirwa, Tobias; Argent, Andrew; Mer, Mervyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Report on survival to discharge of children in a combined paediatric/neonatal intensive care unit (PNICU). Design and setting Retrospective cross-sectional record review. Participants All children (medical and surgical patients) admitted to PNICU between 1 January 2013 and 30 June 2015. Outcome measures Primary outcome—survival to discharge. Secondary outcomes—disease profiles and predictors of mortality in different age categories. Results There were 1454 admissions, 182 missing records, leaving 1272 admissions for review. Overall mortality rate was 25.7% (327/1272). Mortality rate was 41.4% (121/292) (95% CI 35.8% to 47.1%) for very low birthweight (VLBW) babies, 26.6% (120/451) (95% CI 22.5% to 30.5%) for bigger babies and 16.2% (86/529) (95% CI 13.1% to 19.3%) for paediatric patients. Risk factors for a reduced chance of survival to discharge in paediatric patients included postcardiac arrest (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.49), inotropic support (OR 0.085, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.17), hypernatraemia (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.6), bacterial sepsis (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.65) and lower respiratory tract infection (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.97). Major birth defects (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.74), persistent pulmonary hypertension of the new born (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.91), metabolic acidosis (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.74), inotropic support (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.45) and congenital heart defects (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.62) predicted decreased survival in bigger babies. Birth weight (OR 0.997, 95% CI 0.995 to 0.999), birth outside the hospital (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.84), HIV exposure (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.99), resuscitation at birth (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.94), metabolic acidosis (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.60) and necrotising enterocolitis (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.46) predicted poor survival in VLBW babies. Conclusions Ongoing mortality review is essential to improve provision of paediatric critical care. PMID:27259525

  12. Migrant-friendly hospitals: a paediatric perspective - improving hospital care for migrant children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The European Union (EU) Migrant-Friendly Hospital (MFH) Initiative, introduced in 2002, promotes the adoption of care approaches adapted to meet the service needs of migrants. However, for paediatric hospitals, no specific recommendations have been offered for MFH care for children. Using the Swiss MFH project as a case study, this paper aims to identify hospital-based care needs of paediatric migrants (PMs) and good service approaches. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with principal project leaders of five paediatric hospitals participating in the Swiss MFH project. A review of the international literature on non-clinical hospital service needs and service responses of paediatric MFHs was conducted. Results Paediatric care can be complex, usually involving both the patient and the patient’s family. Key challenges include differing levels of acculturation between parents and children; language barriers; cultural differences between patient and provider; and time constraints. Current service and infrastructural responses include interpretation services for PMs and parents, translated information material, and special adaptations to ensure privacy, e.g., during breastfeeding. Clear standards for paediatric migrant-friendly hospitals (P-MFH) are lacking. Conclusions International research on hospital care for migrant children is scarce. The needs of paediatric migrants and their families may differ from guidance for adults. Paediatric migrant needs should be systematically identified and used to inform paediatric hospital care approaches. Hospital processes from admission to discharge should be revised to ensure implementation of migrant-sensitive approaches suitable for children. Staff should receive adequate support, such as training, easily available interpreters and sufficient consultation time, to be able to provide migrant-friendly paediatric services. The involvement of migrant groups may be helpful. Improving the quality of care

  13. Paediatric asthma and obesity.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sean R; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E

    2006-12-01

    None of the explanations proposed for the increase in paediatric asthma have been adequate. It is becoming apparent that the cause of the increase in asthma must be multi-factorial. Increasing attention has been focused on the role of lifestyle in the development of asthma. Lifestyle changes that have occurred in children are those in diet and decreased physical activity, with obesity being the product of these changes. The increase in asthma, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have occurred together. However, a temporal relationship between asthma, obesity and decreased physical activity has not been determined in the paediatric literature. Limited data suggest that decreased physical activity could be playing a role in the aetiology of asthma independent of obesity. Furthermore, there has been substantial research on the benefits of exercise programmes for paediatric patients with asthma. Longitudinal trials monitoring physical activity, obesity and the development of asthma are needed. PMID:17098637

  14. Paediatric pituitary adenomas: a decade of change.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Federica; Storr, Helen L; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Ghigo, Ezio; Savage, Martin O

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas, although rare in the paediatric age range and mostly benign, represent very challenging disorders for diagnosis and management. The recent identification of genetic alterations in young individuals with pituitary adenomas has broadened the scope of molecular investigations and contributed to the understanding of mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Recent identification of causative mutations of genes such as GNAS, PRKAR1A, MEN1 and AIP has introduced the concept of molecular screening of young apparently healthy family members. Population-based studies have reported a significantly higher number of affected subjects and genetic variations than expected. Radiological techniques have advanced, yet many microadenomas remain undetectable on scanning. However, experience with transsphenoidal and endoscopic pituitary surgery has led to higher rates of cure. Prolactinomas, corticotroph and somatotroph adenomas remain the most prevalent, with each diagnosis presenting its own challenges. As paediatric pituitary adenomas occur very infrequently within the paediatric age range, paediatric endocrine units cannot provide expert management in isolation. Consequently, close co-operation with adult endocrinology colleagues with experience of pituitary disease is strongly recommended. PMID:24525527

  15. [New analgesics in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Avez-Couturier, Justine; Wood, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of different types of analgesics in paediatrics. They must be used in accordance with the situation, the type of pain and the characteristics of the child. In all cases, strict compliance with the posology and the instructions for use is essential to avoid any risk of error. Finally, pharmacological, physical and psychological treatments are employed in a complementary manner, for the biopsychosocial management of the child's care. PMID:27177483

  16. Treatment of paediatric burns with a nanocrystalline silver dressing compared with standard wound care in a burns unit: a cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Cox, S G; Cullingworth, L; Rode, H

    2011-10-01

    Burns are a leading cause of non-natural death in South African infants and children. Conventional care of partial-thickness burns often requires painful, time consuming and costly twice-daily dressing changes to clean the wound and apply antimicrobial topical agents. A new topical nanocrystalline silver-coated NS dressing (Acticoat; Smith & Nephew) has been developed and is the first-line treatment of choice in many burn centres. However, because of its cost the Department of Health has been reluctant to introduce it as a standard of care. We retrospectively studied 4 randomly selected paediatric burn patients, calculating the cost associated with the use of NS dressings and comparing this with the projected costs of three previously standard burn wound treatment regimens. NS dressings were changed every 3 days based on their sustained and slow release of silver ions over 72 hours. Using NS clearly saved costs compared with the three other regimens. The demonstrated cost savings resulted primarily from the decreased number of dressings, and the presumed shorter hospital stay. PMID:22272852

  17. The experience of paediatric residents participating in a child protection rotation: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Lewington, Laura; Unruh, Anita; Ornstein, Amy

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practitioners working in the field of child maltreatment are at risk for vicarious traumatization. For Canadian paediatric residents, exposure to child abuse during training is limited. OBJECTIVE: To explore how paediatric residents experience a mandatory rotation within a hospital-based child protection team (CPT) from an emotional and professional development standpoint. METHOD: Eight paediatric residents were interviewed following their CPT rotation and transcripts were analyzed using a phenomenological approach. Exemplar quotes were then highlighted. RESULTS: Four major themes were identified: baseline experiences; individual resident factors; intrinsic CPT rotation factors; and overall rotation assessment. The themes and their subthemes were used to inform a conceptual model of residents’ experiences. CONCLUSIONS: The knowledge provided through residents’ accounts can be applied to strengthen future educational opportunities in the field of child maltreatment and offer insight to help guide the development of support systems and debriefing processes that are important in this challenging field. PMID:24421681

  18. Effects and repercussions of local/hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA): a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health technology assessment (HTA) is increasingly performed at the local or hospital level where the costs, impacts, and benefits of health technologies can be directly assessed. Although local/hospital-based HTA has been implemented for more than two decades in some jurisdictions, little is known about its effects and impact on hospital budget, clinical practices, and patient outcomes. We conducted a mixed-methods systematic review that aimed to synthesize current evidence regarding the effects and impact of local/hospital-based HTA. Methods We identified articles through PubMed and Embase and by citation tracking of included studies. We selected qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods studies with empirical data about the effects or impact of local/hospital-based HTA on decision-making, budget, or perceptions of stakeholders. We extracted the following information from included studies: country, methodological approach, and use of conceptual framework; local/hospital HTA approach and activities described; reported effects and impacts of local/hospital-based HTA; factors facilitating/hampering the use of hospital-based HTA recommendations; and perceptions of stakeholders concerning local/hospital HTA. Due to the great heterogeneity among studies, we conducted a narrative synthesis of their results. Results A total of 18 studies met the inclusion criteria. We reported the results according to the four approaches for performing HTA proposed by the Hospital Based HTA Interest Sub-Group: ambassador model, mini-HTA, internal committee, and HTA unit. Results showed that each of these approaches for performing HTA corresponds to specific needs and structures and has its strengths and limitations. Overall, studies showed positive impacts related to local/hospital-based HTA on hospital decisions and budgets, as well as positive perceptions from managers and clinicians. Conclusions Local/hospital-based HTA could influence decision-making on several aspects

  19. Supportive care utilization and treatment toxicity in children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoid leukaemia at free-standing paediatric hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Elizabeth G; Li, Yimei; Fisher, Brian T; Rheingold, Susan R; Fitzgerald, Julie; Seif, Alix E; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Although inferior outcomes of children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) are established, national supportive care patterns for these patients are unknown. A validated retrospective cohort of paediatric patients diagnosed with ALL from 1999 to 2011 was assembled from the US Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database to examine organ toxicity, sepsis, and resource utilization in children with and without DS. Among 10699 ALL patients, 298 had DS-ALL (2·8%). In a multivariate model, DS was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular (odds ratio [OR] 2·0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·6-2·7), respiratory (OR 2·1, 95% CI: 1·6-2·9), neurologic (OR 3·4, 95% CI 1·9-6·2), and hepatic (OR 1·4, 95% CI 1·0-1·9) dysfunction and sepsis (OR 1·8, 95% CI: 1·4-2·4). Children with DS-ALL used significantly more respiratory support, insulin, and anti-infectives, including broad-spectrum Gram-positive agents, quinolones, and azoles. They used significantly fewer analgesics and antiemetics compared to non-DS-ALL children. Ultimately, this study confirms the increased risk of infectious and end-organ toxicity in children with DS-ALL and quantifies important differences in resource utilization between children with DS and non-DS ALL. These findings highlight the importance of investigating the impact of these care variations and developing specific supportive care guidelines for this population. PMID:27161549

  20. Theatre of paediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    McBride, Craig A; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    In the 50 years since the first edition of this journal, operative paediatric surgery has undergone radical change. Many of the most common instruments are unchanged, both as a testament to their utility and in recognition of past surgeons remembered eponymously. Surrounding that basic core of instruments, theatre has changed radically as new tools and techniques have arisen. Surgeons have come down from their pedestals, recognising surgery as a team sport rather than a solo performance. More than half of the current paediatric surgical trainees are women, a higher proportion than in any other craft group of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. The appearance, and rapid development, of laparoscopy is to many observers the most notable change in surgery over the last 50 years. Placed in its context though, it is simply the most prominent example of a frameshift in surgical thinking. The patient as a whole is now the focus, rather than just the disease. Recent developments are as much about minimising harm to normal tissues as they are about extirpating pathology. As a surgical maxim, 'Primum non nocere' is even more in evidence in 2015 than it was in 1965. PMID:25586851

  1. [Assessing and making safe the medicine use pathway in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Didelot, Nicolas; Guerrier, Catherine; Didelot, Anne; Fritsch, Sandrine; Pelte, Jean-Pierre; Socha, Marie; Javelot, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Based on an assessment of adverse events in a follow-up care and rehabilitation unit in paediatrics, audits were carried out of the medicine use pathway. The evaluation grid taken from this study today serves as a basis for the audits carried out on the medicine use pathway on a national level. PMID:27177486

  2. Rationale for hospital-based rehabilitation in obesity with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Capodaglio, P; Lafortuna, C; Petroni, M L; Salvadori, A; Gondoni, L; Castelnuovo, G; Brunani, A

    2013-06-01

    Severely obese patients affected by two or more chronic conditions which could mutually influence their outcome and disability can be defined as "complex" patients. The presence of multiple comorbidities often represents an obstacle for being admitted to clinical settings for the treatment of metabolic diseases. On the other hand, clinical Units with optimal standards for the treatment of pathological conditions in normal-weight patients are often structurally and technologically inadequate for the care of patients with extreme obesity. The aims of this review paper were to review the intrinsic (anthropometrics, body composition) and extrinsic (comorbidities) determinants of disability in obese patients and to provide an up-to-date definition of hospital-based multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs for severely obese patients with comorbidities. Rehabilitation of such patients require a here-and-now multidimensional, comprehensive approach, where the intensity of rehabilitative treatments depends on the disability level and severity of comorbidities and consists of the simultaneous provision of physiotherapy, diet and nutritional support, psychological counselling, adapted physical activity, specific nursing in hospitals with appropriate organizational and structural competences. PMID:23736902

  3. Diagnostic paediatric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.M.; Lingam, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a case study teaching manual presenting radiographs and examples of other imaging modalities from 100 paediatric patients. The material comes from the radiological teaching collection at the Hospital for Sick Children at Great Ormond Street in London and was compiled over a ten year period. With each case a short clinical history is given and a series of questions posed, similar to those encountered in postgraduate medical examinations. Sample answers with comments and more illustrations are presented on the following page. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in the range and sophistication of diagnostic imaging modalities which are available to clinicians. Since it is impossible to achieve comprehensive coverage in a book of this size, the authors have selected examples of cases which illustrate the range of imaging modalities currently available and which may be encountered in both clinical practice and in examinations.

  4. [Toxicology screening in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Algar, Óscar; Cuadrado González, Ainoha; Falcon, María

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse in paediatric patients, from the neonatal period to adolescence, is not well established as most cases go unnoticed. Regardless of clinical cases of acute poisoning leading to visits to emergency room, the exposure is usually detected by a questionnaire to the parents or children. In the last few years, new validated analytical methodologies have been developed in order to detect parent drugs and their metabolites in different biological matrices. These biological matrices have different time windows for detection of the exposure: acute (i.e., urine, blood, oral fluid), and chronic (i.e., hair, meconium or teeth). The aim of this paper was to review the scenarios where the use of biological matrices is indicated for the detection of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse. PMID:26458521

  5. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  6. Revenue risk and price transparency in hospital-based laboratories.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jeffrey H

    2015-11-01

    Two developments with important revenue implications for hospital laboratories demand the attention of hospital finance leaders: > Significant differences in pricing between higher-priced hospital-based laboratory services and lower-priced services delivered by commercial laboratories give patients a disincentive to use the hospital-based services. > Hospital operating revenue will be substantially affected beginning in 2017 by deep, statutory cuts in payment for the highest-volume tests on the Part B Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule. PMID:26685443

  7. Paediatric personnel extremity dose study.

    PubMed

    Gallet, J M C; Reed, M H

    2002-03-01

    Concern has been expressed in paediatric radiology regarding the magnitude of the extremity dose received by attending personnel during routine fluoroscopic procedures and CT. Common procedures that may be of short duration in adults can be quite the opposite in paediatric patients. The extremities of attending personnel are more likely to be exposed to the primary beam and for a longer period of time owing to a variety of reasons such as assisting in the procedure or physically restraining the patient during the examination. During the period mid 1998 to mid 2000, two paediatric radiologists, four senior radiographers and two paediatric nurses were monitored using ring thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Each participant wore the ring TLD on either the left or right ring finger, depending on which hand the individual favoured. Left/right asymmetrical studies were not conducted, nor were records kept of whether an examination used a grid or gridless technique. Initial apprehension about higher paediatric fluoroscopic and CT extremity doses was dispelled as a result of this quantitative dosimetric study. PMID:11932219

  8. [Consensus document by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the advisory committee on vaccines of the Spanish Paediatrics Association on vaccination in immunocompromised children].

    PubMed

    Mellado Peña, M J; Moreno-Pérez, D; Ruíz Contreras, J; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2011-12-01

    Vaccination in immunocompromised infants, children and adolescents is a major aspect in the follow-up of this complex pathology in specific Paediatric Units. Vaccination is also an important prevention tool, as this can, to a certain extent, determine the morbidity and mortality in these patients. This consensus document was jointly prepared by Working Groups of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Paediatric Association, who are usually involved in updating the management of vaccinations in immunocompromised children, and reflects their opinions. The consensus specifically summarises indications for vaccination in the following special paediatric populations: Solid organ and haematopoietic transplant-recipients; primary immunodeficiency; asplenic children; non-previously transplanted immunocompromised patients; chronically ill patients; HIV-infected children and also the vaccines recommended for immunodeficient children who travel. PMID:21963606

  9. Management of paediatric GERD.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Yvan

    2014-03-01

    Paediatric GERD is complicated to manage, as symptoms are diverse and often difficult to interpret. In infants, regurgitation is a common physiological condition. Nevertheless, when it occurs frequently (>4 times per day) and causes the infant distress, parents often seek medical help. In children 2-10 years of age, GERD is often considered to cause extra-oesophageal symptoms, despite the absence of hard evidence. Diagnostic investigations often lack solid validation and the signs and symptoms of GERD overlap with those of cow's milk protein allergy and eosinophillic oesophagitis. Reassurance, dietary treatment and positional adaptations are recommended for troublesome infant reflux. Anti-acid medication, mainly PPIs, is over-used in infants even though, in many children, reflux is not an acid-related condition. Moreover, evidence is increasing that PPIs cause adverse events such as gastroenteritis and respiratory tract infections. Management in children older than 10 years is similar to that in adults. Using prokinetics to treat nonerosive reflux disease remains only a promising theoretical concept, as no such molecule is currently available. Today, the adverse effects of each prokinetic molecule largely outweigh its potential benefit. Laparoscopic surgery is indicated in children who have life-threatening symptoms or in cases of drug dependence. PMID:24126561

  10. Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society: building an international paediatric electrophysiology organisation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Stephenson, Elizabeth; Skinner, Jon; Drago, Fabrizio; Davis, Andrew; Janousek, Jan; Rosenthal, Eric; Collins, Kathryn K; Triedman, John

    2016-08-01

    The Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) is a non-profit organisation comprised of individuals dedicated to improving the care of children and young adults with cardiac rhythm disturbances. Although PACES is a predominantly North American-centric organisation, international members have been a part of PACES for the last two decades. This year, PACES expanded its North American framework into a broadly expansive international role. On 12 May, 2015, paediatric electrophysiology leaders from within the United States of America and Canada met with over 30 international paediatric electrophysiologists from 17 countries and five continents discussing measures to (1) expand PACES' global vision, (2) address ongoing challenges such as limited resource allocation that may be present in developing countries, (3) expand PACES' governance to include international representation, (4) promote joint international sessions at future paediatric EP meetings, and (5) facilitate a global multi-centre research consortium. This meeting marked the inception of a formal international collaborative spirit in PACES. This editorial addresses some solutions to breakdown the continental silos paediatric electrophysiologists have practiced within; however, there remain ongoing limitations, and future discussions will be needed to continue to move the PACES global international vision forward. PMID:27075202

  11. Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society: building an international paediatric electrophysiology organisation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Stephenson, Elizabeth; Skinner, Jon; Drago, Fabrizio; Davis, Andrew; Janousek, Jan; Rosenthal, Eric; Collins, Kathryn K; Triedman, John

    2016-05-01

    The Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) is a non-profit organisation comprised of individuals dedicated to improving the care of children and young adults with cardiac rhythm disturbances. Although PACES is a predominantly North American-centric organisation, international members have been a part of PACES for the last two decades. This year, PACES expanded its North American framework into a broadly expansive international role. On May 12, 2015, paediatric electrophysiology leaders from within the United States of America and Canada met with over 30 international paediatric electrophysiologists from 17 countries and five continents discussing measures to (1) expand PACES' global vision, (2) address ongoing challenges such as limited resource allocation that may be present in developing countries, (3) expand PACES' governance to include international representation, (4) promote joint international sessions at future paediatric EP meetings, and (5) facilitate a global multi-centre research consortium. This meeting marked the inception of a formal international collaborative spirit in PACES. This editorial addresses some solutions to breakdown the continental silos paediatric electrophysiologists have practiced within; however, there remain ongoing limitations, and future discussions will be needed to continue to move the PACES global international vision forward. PMID:27090729

  12. Maintenance Intravenous Fluid Prescribing Practices Among Paediatric Residents

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael A; Ayus, Juan C; Moritz, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the sodium composition of maintenance intravenous fluids used by paediatric residents throughout the United States in common clinical scenarios of arginine vasopressin excess. Methods We distributed an online survey to paediatric residency programs asking what type of maintenance intravenous fluids (0.2%, 0.45%, 0.9% NaCl or Lactated Ringers) they would administer in four common clinical scenarios of arginine vasopressin excess (gastroenteritis, pneumonia, meningitis and post-operative) in both a 6-month-old (mo) and a 13-year-old (yo) child. Results We had 472 responses, representing 5% of the total paediatric residency population in the US. Hypotonic maintenance intravenous fluids were selected in 78% of children (88.2% of 6 mo and 68.5% of 13 yo). Isotonic maintenance intravenous fluids were selected approximately twice as often for patients with meningitis as for those without (21.4% vs 8.7% 6 mo and 42.8% vs 27.7% 13 yo; p <.0.001). Conclusions The majority of US paediatric residents would prescribe hypotonic maintenance intravenous fluids in disease states associated with arginine vasopressin excess. However, a significant number of residents are using isotonic maintenance intravenous fluids. Isotonic fluids are more likely to be prescribed in older children and children with meningitis. PMID:22765308

  13. Paediatric blood pressure and anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mather, C M

    1991-05-01

    One percent of children have appreciably and consistently raised arterial blood pressure. A 7-year-old girl admitted for routine tonsillectomy, had unrecognised hypertension which put her at increased risk. Should anaesthetic practice take more note of paediatric blood pressures? PMID:2035786

  14. Usage of unpublished paediatric data.

    PubMed

    Saint-Raymond, Agnès; Pelle, Benjamin; Zaccaria, Cosimo; Sennwitz, Matthias; Branch, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The European Paediatric Regulation (EC No 1901/2006) has three main objectives: increasing the number of appropriate medicines for children, increasing information on these medicines and stimulating high-quality ethical research with children. To contribute to the information, pharmaceutical companies were required under article 45 of the Regulation to submit existing paediatric studies to regulatory authorities for review and update of the product information. Nearly, 19 000 study reports have been identified for a thousand active substances. The data are being assessed by member states' competent authorities in collaboration with European Medicines Agency (EMA). After 7 years, 262 active substances have been assessed, all of the 62 centrally approved and nearly 200 nationally approved medicines. The review so far has led to 16 new paediatric indications, of importance in addressing previously unmet needs, in particular, in younger age groups. The information is being made publicly available in an EMA database accessible directly or through the public face of the European Clinical Trials Register. This will increase awareness of existing data that are useful to researchers and other healthcare professionals, and contribute to avoiding unnecessary duplication of paediatric trials. PMID:26543071

  15. A review of epidemiology of paediatric elbow injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Magra, Merzesh; Caine, Dennis; Maffulli, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    The elbow is a common site of orthopaedic injury in the paediatric population. The number of these injuries continues to rise following increased levels of participation in paediatric recreational and competitive sport. Injuries to the paediatric elbow can be classified as either overuse or acute. Delineating injury patterns to the elbow in children can be challenging, given the cartilaginous composition of the distal humerus and the multiple secondary ossification centres that appear and unite with the epiphysis at defined ages. Pitching in baseball, serving in tennis, spiking in volleyball, passing in American football and launching in javelin-throwing can all produce elbow pathology by forceful valgus stress, with medial stretching, lateral compression and posterior impingement. In children and adolescents, the epiphyseal plate is weaker than the surrounding ligaments, predisposing them to epiphyseal plate injuries. On the other hand, post-pubescent or skeletally mature athletes are more prone to tendinous or ligamentous injury. Injuries may cause significant impact on the athlete, parents and healthcare system. With the exception of baseball, there are few prospective cohort studies on the epidemiological trends of childhood elbow injuries in other sports. This paper aims to describe the epidemiological trends in paediatric elbow injuries related to sports, suggests prevention strategies and discusses the scope for further research. A web-based search of existing articles pertaining to paediatric elbow injuries in sports was performed. The implications of acute and overuse injuries and the possibility of permanent damage should be understood by parents, coaches and the athletes. Proper understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors that could lead to elbow injuries is thus required. Measures to prevent elbow injuries should include proper coaching, warm-up, officiation, legislation, medical expertise and protective gear. There are still many

  16. Evidence-based paediatric nursing: paediatric early warning systems.

    PubMed

    Gawronski, Orsola

    2016-05-01

    In hospital cardiac arrest are rare events in paediatrics. Most children receive appropriate care without experiencing undetected severe clinical deterioration during hospital admission. Outcomes of paediatric cardiac arrests are however generally poor, with high mortality rates and neurological damage at survival. A review of child mortality in the UK showed that a high proportion of unexpected deaths were preventable ( Pearsons 2008 ). Several studies of patient records of children who suffered cardiac arrests showed the presence of clear signs of clinical deterioration up to 24 hours before (Tume 2006). Appropriate recognition of clinical deterioration could have led to timely intervention to stabilise the patient. Missed deterioration may be due to lack of staff situational awareness, communication failure among professionals or between staff and families and other human factors ( Brady 2014 ). PMID:27214413

  17. Inequality of Paediatric Workforce Distribution in China.

    PubMed

    Song, Peige; Ren, Zhenghong; Chang, Xinlei; Liu, Xuebei; An, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Child health has been addressed as a priority at both global and national levels for many decades. In China, difficulty of accessing paediatricians has been of debate for a long time, however, there is limited evidence to assess the population- and geography-related inequality of paediatric workforce distribution. This study aimed to analyse the inequality of the distributions of the paediatric workforce (including paediatricians and paediatric nurses) in China by using Lorenz curve, Gini coefficient, and Theil L index, data were obtained from the national maternal and child health human resource sampling survey conducted in 2010. In this study, we found that the paediatric workforce was the most inequitable regarding the distribution of children <7 years, the geographic distribution of the paediatric workforce highlighted very severe inequality across the nation, except the Central region. For different professional types, we found that, except the Central region, the level of inequality of paediatric nurses was higher than that of the paediatricians regarding both the demographic and geographic distributions. The inner-regional inequalities were the main sources of the paediatric workforce distribution inequality. To conclude, this study revealed the inadequate distribution of the paediatric workforce in China for the first time, substantial inequality of paediatric workforce distribution still existed across the nation in 2010, more research is still needed to explore the in-depth sources of inequality, especially the urban-rural variance and the inner- and inter-provincial differences, and to guide national and local health policy-making and resource allocation. PMID:27420083

  18. Inequality of Paediatric Workforce Distribution in China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Peige; Ren, Zhenghong; Chang, Xinlei; Liu, Xuebei; An, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Child health has been addressed as a priority at both global and national levels for many decades. In China, difficulty of accessing paediatricians has been of debate for a long time, however, there is limited evidence to assess the population- and geography-related inequality of paediatric workforce distribution. This study aimed to analyse the inequality of the distributions of the paediatric workforce (including paediatricians and paediatric nurses) in China by using Lorenz curve, Gini coefficient, and Theil L index, data were obtained from the national maternal and child health human resource sampling survey conducted in 2010. In this study, we found that the paediatric workforce was the most inequitable regarding the distribution of children <7 years, the geographic distribution of the paediatric workforce highlighted very severe inequality across the nation, except the Central region. For different professional types, we found that, except the Central region, the level of inequality of paediatric nurses was higher than that of the paediatricians regarding both the demographic and geographic distributions. The inner-regional inequalities were the main sources of the paediatric workforce distribution inequality. To conclude, this study revealed the inadequate distribution of the paediatric workforce in China for the first time, substantial inequality of paediatric workforce distribution still existed across the nation in 2010, more research is still needed to explore the in-depth sources of inequality, especially the urban-rural variance and the inner- and inter-provincial differences, and to guide national and local health policy-making and resource allocation. PMID:27420083

  19. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  20. Concepts from paediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for adult intensivists.

    PubMed

    Butt, Warwick; MacLaren, Graeme

    2016-12-01

    Over the last 5 years, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adult patients with severe respiratory or cardiac failure. This contrasts to the use of the technology in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units, where it has been regarded as a standard of care for a number of conditions for over 25 years. Many innovations in ECMO circuitry or clinical management evolve first in one particular discipline and it may be helpful for individual clinicians to keep abreast of developments in ECMO across the entire age range, from neonatology to older adults. This review addresses nine concepts in ECMO that are better studied or established in paediatric medicine and considers their application in adult patients. PMID:26940318

  1. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  2. Noddings's caring ethics theory applied in a paediatric setting.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Anita; Nilstun, Tore

    2009-04-01

    Since the 1990s, numerous studies on the relationship between parents and their children have been reported on in the literature and implemented as a philosophy of care in most paediatric units. The purpose of this article is to understand the process of nurses' care for children in a paediatric setting by using Noddings's caring ethics theory. Noddings's theory is in part described from a theoretical perspective outlining the basic idea of the theory followed by a critique of her work. Important conceptions in her theory are natural caring (reception, relation, engrossment, motivational displacement, reciprocity) and ethical caring (physical self, ethical self, and ethical ideal). As a nurse one holds a duty of care to patients and, in exercising this duty, the nurse must be able to develop a relationship with the patient including giving the patient total authenticity in a 'feeling with' the patient. Noddings's theory is analysed and described in three examples from the paediatrics. In the first example, the nurse cared for the patient in natural caring while in the second situation, the nurse strived for the ethical caring of the patient. In the third example, the nurse rejected the impulse to care and deliberately turned her back to ethics and abandoned her ethical caring. According to the Noddings's theory, caring for the patient enables the nurse to obtain ethical insights from the specific type of nursing care which forms an important contribution to an overall increase of an ethical consciousness in the nurse. PMID:19291199

  3. Hospital-based rental programs to increase car seat usage.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B

    1983-05-01

    The ability of hospital-based car seat rental programs to provide car seats inexpensively throughout an entire state and the effect of these rental programs on car seat usage by newborns were evaluated. In July 1979 individuals and groups committed to child passenger safety formed a coalition called Vermont SEAT (Seatbelts Eliminate Automobile Tragedies). During the next 3 years SEAT asked the major hospitals in the state to allow volunteers to operate car seat rental programs on their premises. The number of rental programs increased from 0 to 13; the percentage of newborns born in a hospital with a rental program increased from 0% to 99%. The estimated statewide rate of car seat usage by newborns, based on observations at discharge at five hospitals, increased from 15% to 70%. These findings suggest that a network of hospital-based car seat rental programs operated by volunteers can make car seats readily available throughout a state or region, and can significantly increase car seat usage by newborns. It is recommended that such programs be a part of comprehensive strategies to improve child passenger safety. PMID:6835761

  4. Varicella paediatric hospitalisations in Belgium: a 1-year national survey

    PubMed Central

    Blumental, Sophie; Sabbe, Martine; Lepage, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Varicella universal vaccination (UV) has been implemented in many countries for several years. Nevertheless, varicella UV remains debated in Europe and few data are available on the real burden of infection. We assessed the burden of varicella in Belgium through analysis of hospitalised cases during a 1-year period. Methods Data on children admitted to hospital with varicella were collected through a national network from November 2011 to October 2012. Inclusion criteria were either acute varicella or related complications up to 3 weeks after the rash. Results Participation of 101 hospitals was obtained, covering 97.7% of the total paediatric beds in Belgium. 552 children were included with a median age of 2.1 years. Incidence of paediatric varicella hospitalisations reached 29.5/105 person-years, with the highest impact among those 0–4 years old (global incidence and odds of hospitalisation: 79/105 person-years and 1.6/100 varicella cases, respectively). Only 14% (79/552) of the cohort had an underlying chronic condition. 65% (357/552) of children had ≥1 complication justifying their admission, 49% were bacterial superinfections and 10% neurological disorders. Only a quarter of children (141/552) received acyclovir. Incidence of complicated hospitalised cases was 19/105 person-years. Paediatric intensive care unit admission and surgery were required in 4% and 3% of hospitalised cases, respectively. Mortality among Belgian paediatric population was 0.5/106 and fatality ratio 0.2% among our cohort. Conclusions Varicella demonstrated a substantial burden of disease in Belgian children, especially among the youngest. Our thorough nationwide study, run in a country without varicella UV, offers data to support varicella UV in Belgium. PMID:26130380

  5. Design of paediatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Veronica

    2016-05-01

    The impact of healthcare environments on children and young people's (CYP) health and psychosocial wellbeing has attracted much attention in recent years. This sits within the realm of the political drive for enhanced awareness of the need to take account of the rights and voice of the child. Perhaps as a direct result of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, and recognition from evidence in adult population studies of the impact of healthcare environments on psychosocial healing, contemporary times have witnessed a discernible movement towards enhancing quality care by promoting child and adolescent-friendly hospital environments. The Council of Europe guidelines on child-friendly health care moved to place the rights and needs of children at the heart of health care. The Council acknowledges that the delivery of child-oriented services, which includes the notion of family-centred care, should be delivered in child and family friendly environments. However, knowledge about what constitutes a child-friendly healthcare environment from CYP's perspective is often lacking with hospital architectural blueprints predominantly designed around adult proxy-reported assumptions about the needs and desires of children. PMID:27214414

  6. Are paediatric burns more common in asylum seekers? An analysis of paediatric burn admissions.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, M P; Orr, D J A

    2006-03-01

    The number of asylum seekers in Ireland has increased dramatically over the last 10 years. Based on our impression that the number of children admitted to our burn unit was disproportionately represented by children of asylum seekers we performed an audit to establish (1) what proportion of admissions are from this subgroup and (2) the characteristics of their burns. All paediatric burn admissions from May 2003 to April 2004 were reviewed. Data collected from a retrospective chart review included patient demographics and details of the burn injuries. The National Census of 2002 and the Office of the Refugee Applications Commissioner were consulted for population statistics. Total burn admissions for the period were 126: Irish nationals (n=107), non-national residents (n=2), asylum seekers (n=14) and patients of unknown asylum status (n=3, excluded from study). In the asylum seeker group, the median age was 18.6 months (range 10 months-5.3 years) with the majority less than 2 years (n=11). All burns occurred in the domestic setting. Scalds accounted for 13 cases, one contact burn occurred from a hot grill. The median total body surface area burned was 5.7% (range 1.5-26%). The National Census of 2002 recorded a population of 3,917,203. With less than 12,000 asylum seekers in the country, they comprise only approximately 0.3% of the population yet they account for 11.4% of the burn patients admitted to our unit, p<0.0001. Children of asylum seekers are over-represented in our series of paediatric admissions for burns and are more likely than Irish children to sustain a burn at a younger age and in the domestic setting. This may indicate an increased risk of injury and warrants further investigation. PMID:16448770

  7. Gene therapy for paediatric leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, R F; Bollard, C M; Heslop, H E

    2001-07-01

    Improvements in the chemotherapeutic and transplant regimens have had a significant impact in improving survival rates for paediatric leukaemia. However, there are still important problems to address including what options are available for patients with chemoresistant disease and what strategies are available to avoid the concerns regarding the toxicity associated with highly cytotoxic treatment regimens. Gene therapy and immunotherapy protocols hold great promise. Using gene transfer of a marker gene, a number of biological issues in the therapy of leukaemia have been addressed. For example, by gene marking autologous bone marrow grafts it has been possible to demonstrate that infused marrow contributes to relapse in acute and chronic myeloid leukaemias. In the allogeneic transplant setting, genetically modified T-cells have proven valuable for the prophylaxis and treatment of viral diseases and may have an important role in preventing or treating disease relapse. Gene transfer is also being used to modify tumour function, enhance immunogenicity, and confer drug-resistance to normal haematopoietic stem cells. With the continued scientific advancements in this field, gene therapy will almost certainly have a major impact on the treatment of paediatric leukaemia in the future. PMID:11727502

  8. [The electrocardiogram in the paediatric age group].

    PubMed

    Sanches, M; Coelho, A; Oliveira, E; Lopes, A

    2014-09-01

    A properly interpreted electrocardiogram (ECG) provides important information and is an inexpensive and easy test to perform. It continues to be the method of choice for the diagnosis of arrhythmias. Although the principles of cardiac electrophysiology are the same, there are anatomical and physiological age-dependent changes which produce specific alterations in the paediatric ECG, and which may be misinterpreted as pathological. The intention of this article is to address in a systematic way the most relevant aspects of the paediatric ECG, to propose a possible reading scheme of the ECG and to review the electrocardiograph tracings most frequently found in the paediatric age group. PMID:24907888

  9. Paediatric exercise training in prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pieles, Guido E; Horn, Richard; Williams, Craig A; Stuart, A Graham

    2014-04-01

    Exercise training is an underused intervention in paediatric healthcare. This is surprising, since initial evidence demonstrates its effectiveness and safety; furthermore it confers socioeconomic benefits for healthcare systems. Pilot studies have assessed and confirmed the feasibility of exercise training in many paediatric disease settings. However, more research is needed to understand the pathophysiology, quantify treatment effects and monitor outcomes. A concerted effort from researchers, health professionals and police makers will be necessary to make exercise training an evidence-based and cost-effective intervention in paediatric care. PMID:24351606

  10. Aetiologies of Central Nervous System Infection in Viet Nam: A Prospective Provincial Hospital-Based Descriptive Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Ho Dang Trung, Nghia; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Wolbers, Marcel; Nguyen Van Minh, Hoang; Nguyen Thanh, Vinh; Van, Minh Pham; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Le Van, Tan; Song, Diep To; Le Thi, Phuong; Thi Phuong, Thao Nguyen; Van, Cong Bui; Tang, Vu; Ngoc Anh, Tuan Hoang; Nguyen, Dong; Trung, Tien Phan; Thi Nam, Lien Nguyen; Kiem, Hao Tran; Thi Thanh, Tam Nguyen; Campbell, James; Caws, Maxine; Day, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D.; Van Vinh, Chau Nguyen; Van Doorn, H. Rogier; Tinh, Hien Tran; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) remain common and life-threatening, especially in developing countries. Knowledge of the aetiological agents responsible for these infections is essential to guide empiric therapy and develop a rational public health policy. To date most data has come from patients admitted to tertiary referral hospitals in Asia and there is limited aetiological data at the provincial hospital level where most patients are seen. Methods We conducted a prospective Provincial Hospital-based descriptive surveillance study in adults and children at thirteen hospitals in central and southern Viet Nam between August 2007– April 2010. The pathogens of CNS infection were confirmed in CSF and blood samples by using classical microbiology, molecular diagnostics and serology. Results We recruited 1241 patients with clinically suspected infection of the CNS. An aetiological agent was identified in 640/1241 (52%) of the patients. The most common pathogens were Streptococcus suis serotype 2 in patients older than 14 years of age (147/617, 24%) and Japanese encephalitis virus in patients less than 14 years old (142/624, 23%). Mycobacterium tuberculosis was confirmed in 34/617 (6%) adult patients and 11/624 (2%) paediatric patients. The acute case fatality rate (CFR) during hospital admission was 73/617 (12%) in adults and to 42/624 (7%) in children. Conclusions Zoonotic bacterial and viral pathogens are the most common causes of CNS infection in adults and children in Viet Nam. PMID:22662232

  11. Impact of the European paediatric legislation in paediatric rheumatology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Vesely, Richard; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Martini, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Conducting clinical trials in paediatric rheumatology has been difficult mainly because of the lack of funding for academic studies and the lack of interest by pharmaceutical companies in the small and non-rewarding paediatric market. The situation changed dramatically a few years ago with the introduction of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act in the USA and of specific legislation for the development of paediatric medicines (Paediatric Regulation) in the European Union (EU). The EU Paediatric Regulation had a positive impact in paediatric rheumatology-in particular, on the development of new treatments for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Some problems remain, however, such as greater harmonisation of the regulatory aspects of medicines, how to handle me-too agents, how to conduct adequate pharmacokinetic studies and develop age-appropriate formulations, ethical problems in study review and implementation, and a change in the current JIA classification. The introduction of specific legislation, coupled with the existence of large international networks such as the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG at http://www.prcsg.org), covering North America, and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO at http://www.printo.it), covering more than 50 countries, has led to great advances in paediatric rheumatology. Future changes might increase the possibility of conducting trials with similar approaches in other paediatric rheumatological conditions and provide evidence-based treatments for children affected by rheumatic diseases. PMID:23962457

  12. Transcending Competency Testing in Hospital-Based Simulation.

    PubMed

    Lassche, Madeline; Wilson, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Simulation is a frequently used method for training students in health care professions and has recently gained acceptance in acute care hospital settings for use in educational programs and competency testing. Although hospital-based simulation is currently limited primarily to use in skills acquisition, expansion of the use of simulation via a modified Quality Health Outcomes Model to address systems factors such as the physical environment and human factors such as fatigue, reliance on memory, and reliance on vigilance could drive system-wide changes. Simulation is an expensive resource and should not be limited to use for education and competency testing. Well-developed, peer-reviewed simulations can be used for environmental factors, human factors, and interprofessional education to improve patients' outcomes and drive system-wide change for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26909459

  13. Case report: paediatric intramuscular haemangiomata--don't overlook the phlebolith!

    PubMed

    Morris, S J; Adams, H

    1995-02-01

    Three children presented with soft tissue masses which were clinically suspected to be soft tissue sarcomas. The identification of phleboliths on initial radiological studies should have suggested the correct diagnosis of benign intramuscular haemangiomata. Subsequent referral to a paediatric oncological unit, and the unnecessary parental anxiety so generated, could have been avoided. PMID:7735755

  14. Exploring the phenomenon of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital based healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janie J; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Kolobova, Irina; Lamson, Angela L; Sira, Natalia; Musick, David

    2015-01-01

    Hospital chaplaincy and spiritual care services are important to patients' medical care and well-being; however, little is known about healthcare providers' experiences receiving spiritual support. A phenomenological study examined the shared experience of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital-based healthcare providers (HBHPs). Six distinct themes emerged from the in-depth interviews: Awareness of chaplain availability, chaplains focus on building relationships with providers and staff, chaplains are integrated in varying degrees on certain hospital units, chaplains meet providers' personal and professional needs, providers appreciate chaplains, and barriers to expanding hospital chaplains' services. While HBHPs appreciated the care received and were able to provide better patient care as a result, participants reported that administrators may not recognize the true value of the care provided. Implications from this study are applied to hospital chaplaincy clinical, research, and training opportunities. PMID:26207904

  15. Surgical strategies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Colin T; Smith, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises two distinct but related chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions affecting different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s disease is characterised by a patchy transmural inflammation affecting both small and large bowel segments with several distinct phenotypic presentations. Ulcerative colitis classically presents as mucosal inflammation of the rectosigmoid (distal colitis), variably extending in a contiguous manner more proximally through the colon but not beyond the caecum (pancolitis). This article highlights aspects of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of IBD that have relevance for paediatric practice with particular emphasis on surgical considerations. Since 25% of IBD cases present in childhood or teenage years, the unique considerations and challenges of paediatric management should be widely appreciated. Conversely, we argue that the organizational separation of the paediatric and adult healthcare worlds has often resulted in late adoption of new approaches particularly in paediatric surgical practice. PMID:26034347

  16. Popliteal vasculature injuries in paediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, S A; Roberts, D C; Clarke, N M P

    2012-10-01

    Popliteal-artery injuries in the paediatric-trauma patient are uncommon, difficult to diagnose and with prolonged ischaemia lead to substantial complications. We report three cases of popliteal-vasculature injury in paediatric-trauma patients with diverse mechanisms of injury: blunt trauma, penetrating injury and a Salter-Harris I fracture. We present a range of the significant sequelae that can result from paediatric popliteal-artery injury, both physically and psychologically. It is imperative that clinicians have a high index of suspicion when confronted with paediatric patients with trauma around the knee and that popliteal-vasculature injuries are diagnosed early. If insufficiencies are detected, further imaging should be considered, but surgical exploration should not be delayed in the presence of ischaemia. PMID:22776610

  17. United States laws under review.

    PubMed

    Leahey, M

    2007-01-01

    As well as reauthorisation of the Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act, others isues are under consideration by the United States Congress. These include the introduction of incentives for the development of medical devices for paediatric care. PMID:17585722

  18. Parental involvement in paediatric cancer treatment decisions

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, K; Collier, J; Hewitt, M; Blake, H

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated parents' information needs and involvement in decision-making processes affecting the care of children diagnosed with cancer. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess parental satisfaction in 50 mothers and 16 fathers responsible for 58 children in an English Paediatric Oncology Unit. Parents reported that doctors contributed almost twice as much to the decision-making process as they did, but parental satisfaction was positively correlated with the amount of information provided when giving informed consent. Satisfaction about their involvement in this process relied heavily upon the level of support received from others. Parents consenting to their child's involvement in non-randomised trials perceived themselves to be under greater pressure from others during the decision-making process while those whose children were further along the treatment trajectory were more uncertain about decisions previously made. Findings indicate that the accessibility, support, information and degree of control afforded to parents by healthcare professionals impacts upon their satisfaction with both the decision-making process and their confidence in the decisions thus made. Information and support tailored to parents' specific needs may therefore enhance satisfaction with clinical decision making and reassure parents about decisions made in the long-term interest of their child's health. PMID:19807776

  19. Sedation/anaesthesia in paediatric radiology

    PubMed Central

    Arlachov, Y; Ganatra, R H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In this article we will give a comprehensive literature review on sedation/general anaesthesia (S/GA) and discuss the international variations in practice and options available for S/GA for imaging children. Methods The key articles were obtained primarily from PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, NHS Evidence and The Cochrane Library. Results Recently, paediatric radiology has seen a surge of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, some of which require children to be still and compliant for up to 1 h. It is difficult and sometimes even impossible to obtain quick and high-quality images without employing sedating techniques in certain children. As with any medical procedure, S/GA in radiological practice is not without risks and can have potentially disastrous consequences if mismanaged. In order to reduce any complications and practice safety in radiological units, it is imperative to carry out pre-sedation assessments of children, obtain parental/guardian consent, monitor them closely before, during and after the procedure and have adequate equipment, a safe environment and a well-trained personnel. Conclusion Although the S/GA techniques, sedative drugs and personnel involved vary from country to country, the ultimate goal of S/GA in radiology remains the same; namely, to provide safety and comfort for the patients. Advances in knowledge Imaging children under general anaesthesia is becoming routine and preferred by operators because it ensures patient conformity and provides a more controlled environment. PMID:22898157

  20. Steroid Assays in Paediatric Endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274330

  1. Paediatrics: the etymology of a name.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2011-08-01

    Within the history of paediatrics is the history of the name used to describe it. The etymology of the word 'paediatrics' dates from its first written use, recorded as 'pädiatrik' in the German literature and as 'paediatric', later 'pediatric' in the USA, both first in 1850. Professor Robley Dunglison (1788-1869), the British and American medical lexicographer, first defined 'paediatria' as 'the treatment of the diseases of children' in 1855. 'Pediatric medicine' was promoted as a specialty in the USA in 1880. The oldest monumental inscription defining the specialty of 'paediatrics' in the UK is to be found on a plaque added (in 1950) to the memorial to Dr George Armstrong (1719-1789), a founder of the specialty of paediatrics, in Castleton Cemetery, Scottish Borders, Roxburghshire. 'Paediatrics' and 'child health', with subtle semantic distinctions, had become well established in the English-speaking world by the middle of the 20th century. This paper presents an interpretative chronology of the etymology of the descriptors of the specialty that enjoins all who care for children. PMID:21646328

  2. Paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Shumer, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Medical intervention for transgender adolescents is a controversial issue but a recently published article describing long-term psychological outcomes using ‘the Dutch model’ of care should help to silence critics and reassure the growing number of clinicians treating this patient population. PMID:25403246

  3. The incidence, spectrum and outcome of paediatric trauma managed by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service

    PubMed Central

    Manchev, V; Bruce, JL; Oosthuizen, GV; Laing, GL

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service (PMTS) has run a systematic quality improvement programme since 2006. A key component included the development and implementation of an effective surveillance system in the form of an electronic surgical registry (ESR). This study used data from the ESR to review the incidence, spectrum and outcome of paediatric trauma in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Methods The ESR was reviewed, and all cases of paediatric trauma managed between 1 January 2012 and 30 July 2014 were retrieved for analysis. Results During the study period, 1,041 paediatric trauma patients (724 male, 69.5%) were managed by the PMTS, averaging a monthly admission of 36. The mean age was 10.9 years (standard deviation: 5.4 years). The mechanism of injury (MOI) was blunt trauma in 753 patients (72.3%) and penetrating trauma in 170 (16.3%). Pedestrian vehicle collisions accounted for 21% of cases and motor vehicle collisions for a further 11%. Intentional trauma accounted for 282 patients (27.1%) and self-inflicted trauma for 14 cases (1.3%). Ninety patients admitted to the intensive care unit and fifty-one required high dependency unit admission. There were 17 deaths, equating to an in-hospital mortality rate of 1.7%. A total of 172 children died on the scene of an incident. There were 35 road traffic related deaths, 26 suicides by hanging, 27 deaths from blunt assault and 23 deaths from penetrating assault. The overall mortality rate for paediatric trauma was 18.2%. Conclusions The ESR has proved to be an effective surveillance system and has enabled the accurate quantification of the burden of paediatric trauma in Pietermaritzburg. This has improved our understanding of the mechanisms and patterns of injury, and has identified a high incidence of intentional and penetrating trauma as well as road traffic collisions. These data can be used to guide strategies to reduce the burden of paediatric trauma in our environment. PMID:26263934

  4. Lifestyle behaviours and weight among hospital-based nurses

    PubMed Central

    ZAPKA, JANE M.; LEMON, STEPHENIE C.; MAGNER, ROBERT P.; HALE, JANET

    2008-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to (i) describe the weight, weight-related perceptions and lifestyle behaviours of hospital-based nurses, and (ii) explore the relationship of demographic, health, weight and job characteristics with lifestyle behaviours. Background The obesity epidemic is widely documented. Worksite initiatives have been advocated. Nurses represent an important part of the hospital workforce and serve as role models when caring for patients. Methods A sample of 194 nurses from six hospitals participated in anthropometric measurements and self-administered surveys. Results The majority of nurses were overweight and obese, and some were not actively involved in weight management behaviours. Self-reported health, diet and physical activity behaviours were low, although variable by gender, age and shift. Reports of co-worker norms supported low levels of healthy behaviours. Conclusions Findings reinforce the need to address the hospital environment and culture as well as individual behaviours for obesity control. Implications for nursing management Nurse managers have an opportunity to consider interventions that promote a climate favourable to improved health habits by facilitating and supporting healthy lifestyle choices (nutrition and physical activity) and environmental changes. Such efforts have the potential to increase productivity and morale and decrease work-related disabilities and improve quality of life. PMID:19793242

  5. A new tool for the paediatric HIV research: general data from the Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There are approximately from 1,100 to 1,200 HIV-infected children in a follow-up in Spain. In 2008 an open, multicentral, retrospective and prospective Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe) was founded. The CoRISpe is divided into the node 1 and node 2 representing geographically almost the whole territory of Spain. Since 2008 seventy-five hospitals have been participating in the CoRISpe. All the retrospective data of the HIV-infected children have been kept in the CoRISpe since 1995 and prospective data since 2008. In this article we are going to present the notion of CoRISpe, its role, the structure, how the CoRISpe works and the process how a child is transferred from Paediatric to Adults Units. The main objective of the CoRISpe is to contribute to furthering scientific knowledge on paediatric HIV infection by providing demographic, sociopsychological, clinical and laboratory data from HIV-infected paediatric patients. Its aim is to enable high-quality research studies on HIV-infected children. PMID:23282073

  6. A new tool for the paediatric HIV research: general data from the Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe).

    PubMed

    de Jose, Ma Isabel; Jiménez de Ory, Santiago; Espiau, Maria; Fortuny, Claudia; Navarro, Ma Luisa; Soler-Palacín, Pere; Muñoz-Fernandez, Ma Angeles

    2013-01-01

    There are approximately from 1,100 to 1,200 HIV-infected children in a follow-up in Spain. In 2008 an open, multicentral, retrospective and prospective Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe) was founded. The CoRISpe is divided into the node 1 and node 2 representing geographically almost the whole territory of Spain. Since 2008 seventy-five hospitals have been participating in the CoRISpe. All the retrospective data of the HIV-infected children have been kept in the CoRISpe since 1995 and prospective data since 2008. In this article we are going to present the notion of CoRISpe, its role, the structure, how the CoRISpe works and the process how a child is transferred from Paediatric to Adults Units. The main objective of the CoRISpe is to contribute to furthering scientific knowledge on paediatric HIV infection by providing demographic, sociopsychological, clinical and laboratory data from HIV-infected paediatric patients. Its aim is to enable high-quality research studies on HIV-infected children. PMID:23282073

  7. Association between Psoriasis Vulgaris and Coronary Heart Disease in a Hospital-Based Population in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Masayuki; Kato, Takao; Funasako, Moritoshi; Nakane, Eisaku; Miyamoto, Shoichi; Izumi, Toshiaki; Haruna, Tetsuya; Inoko, Moriaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with an immune-genetic background. It has been reported as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States and Europe. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between psoriasis and CHD in a hospital-based population in Japan. Methods For 113,065 in-hospital and clinic patients at our institution between January 1, 2011 and January 1, 2013, the diagnostic International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 codes for CHD, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and psoriasis vulgaris were extracted using the medical accounting system and electronic medical record, and were analyzed. Results The prevalence of CHD (n = 5,167, 4.5%), hypertension (n = 16,476, 14.5%), dyslipidemia (n = 9,236, 8.1%), diabetes mellitus (n = 11,555, 10.2%), and psoriasis vulgaris (n = 1,197, 1.1%) were identified. The prevalence of CHD in patients with hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and psoriasis vulgaris were 21.3%, 22.2%, 21.1%, and 9.0%, respectively. In 1,197 psoriasis patients, those with CHD were older, more likely to be male, and had more number of the diseases surveyed by ICD-10 codes. Multivariate analysis showed that psoriasis vulgaris was an independent associated factor for CHD (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01–1.58; p = 0.0404) along with hypertension (adjusted OR: 7.78; 95% CI: 7.25–8.36; p < 0.0001), dyslipidemia (adjusted OR: 2.35; 95% CI: 2.19–2.52; p < 0.0001), and diabetes (adjusted OR: 2.86; 95% CI: 2.67–3.06; p < 0.0001). Conclusion Psoriasis vulgaris was independently associated with CHD in a hospital-based population in Japan. PMID:26910469

  8. Can linking databases answer questions about paediatric heart failure?

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sara K; Schumacher, Kurt R; Davies, Ryan R

    2015-08-01

    Numerous data sets collect information on patients with paediatric cardiovascular disease, including paediatric heart failure and transplant patients. This review discusses methodologies available for linking and integrating information across data sets, which may help facilitate answering important questions in the field of paediatric heart failure and transplant that cannot be answered with individual data sets or single-centre data alone. PMID:26377723

  9. Potential for Hospital Based Corneal Retreival in Hassan District Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Melsakkare, Suresh Ramappa; Manipur, Sahana R.; Acharya, Pavana; Ramamurthy, Lakshmi Bomalapura

    2015-01-01

    Context In developing countries, corneal diseases are the second leading cause of blindness. This corneal blindness can be treated through corneal transplantation. Though the present infrastructure is strong enough to increase keratoplasty numbers at a required rate, India has largest corneal blind population in the world. So a constant supply of high quality donor corneal tissue is the key factor for reduction of prevalence of corneal blindness. Considering the magnitude of corneal blindness and shortage of donor cornea, there is a huge gap in the demand and supply. Aim To study the potential for hospital based retrieval of donor corneal tissue in Hassan district hospital after analysing the indicated and contraindicated causes of deaths, so that hospital corneal retrieval program in Hassan district hospital can be planned. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional, retrospective and record-based study included all hospital deaths with age group more than two years occurred during one year period (January 2014 to December 2014). Data regarding demographic profile, cause of death, treatment given and presence of any systemic diseases were collected. The causes of deaths which are contraindicated for the retrieval of corneas were analysed and noted. The contraindications were based on the NPCB guidelines for standard of eye banking in India 2009. Results Out of 855 deaths, number of deaths in males (565) was greater than females (290). Numbers of deaths were highest between 41-60 years age group (343). Deaths due to HIV, septicaemia, meningitis, encephalitis, disseminated malignancies were contraindicated for corneal retrieval. Corneas could be retrieved from 736 deaths out of 855. Potential for corneal retrieval in a period of one year in Hassan District hospital was 86%. Conclusion Hospital corneal retrieval program has got a great potential to bridge the gap between the need for the cornea and actually collected corneas which will contribute enormously in

  10. Paediatric use of mycophenolate mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Heather J; Pirmohamed, Munir; Beresford, Michael W; Smyth, Rosalind L

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications do not have a licence, or label, for use in the paediatric age group nor for the specific indication for which they are being used in children. Over recent years, mycophenolate mofetil has increasingly been used off-label (i.e. off-licence) in adults for a number of indications, including autoimmune conditions; progressively, this wider use has been extended to children. This review summarizes current use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in children, looking at how MMF works, the pharmacokinetics, the clinical conditions for which it is used, the advantages it has when compared with other immunosuppressants and the unresolved issues remaining with use in children. The review aims to focus on off-label use in children so as to identify areas that require further research and investigation. The overall commercial value of MMF is limited because it has now come off patent in adults. Given the increasing knowledge of the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics demonstrating the clinical benefits of MMF, new, formal, investigator-led studies, including trials focusing on the use of MMF in children, would be of immense value. PMID:22519685

  11. Guidelines for paediatric life support. Paediatric Life Support Working Party of the European Resuscitation Council.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The paediatric life support working party of the European Resuscitation Council was set up in 1992 with the aim of producing guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric resuscitation that would be acceptable throughout Europe. The commonest cause of cardiac arrest in children is problems with the airway. The resulting difficulties in breathing and the associated hypoxia rapidly cause a severe bradycardia or asystole. In contrast, adults have primary cardiac events resulting in ventricular fibrillation. This important difference in the pathogenesis of paediatric and adult cardiac arrest is reflected in these European Resuscitation Council guidelines, which complement those already published for adults. PMID:8019227

  12. Hot tonsillectomy for paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Paula; Marzouk, Sherief Deya; Gerolympou, Margarita; Marais, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common presentation in paediatric ear, nose and tongue (ENT) outpatients. The use of sleep studies is controversial however once a diagnosis has been made, frequently treatment is surgery. Should these patients be operated on as urgent cases? A 5-year-old boy was admitted under the paediatric team with difficultly breathing and desaturations to 77%. The patient had previously been seen by ENT as an outpatient with an 8-month history of obstructive sleep apnoea and was listed for an adenotonsillectomy with the standard waiting time. During this admission he had an emergency adenotonsillectomy. The patient improved immediately with no large desaturations in recovery and normal observations throughout his stay. It is never ideal to do a paediatric emergency operation and we have reviewed the evidence base to answer the question: Should these patients be treated urgently when seen in outpatients? PMID:24907212

  13. Disease Activity Measures in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Nadia J.; Feldman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity refers to potentially reversible aspects of a disease. Measurement of disease activity in paediatric rheumatic diseases is a critical component of patient care and clinical research. Disease activity measures are developed systematically, often involving consensus methods. To be useful, a disease activity measure must be feasible, valid, and interpretable. There are several challenges in quantifying disease activity in paediatric rheumatology; namely, the conditions are multidimensional, the level of activity must be valuated in the context of treatment being received, there is no gold standard for disease activity, and it is often difficult to incorporate the patient's perspective of their disease activity. To date, core sets of response variables are defined for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, as well as definitions for improvement in response to therapy. Several specific absolute disease activity measures also exist for each condition. Further work is required to determine the optimal disease activity measures in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24089617

  14. Retinal Detachment in Southwest Ethiopia: A Hospital Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Asaminew, Tsedeke; Gelaw, Yeshigeta; Bekele, Sisay; Solomon, Berhan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of retinal detachment in Blacks is generally considered to be low though there are few supporting studies in Africa. This study, thus, aimed at describing the clinical profile of patients with retinal detachment in Southwest Ethiopia. Methods A hospital-based study was done on all consecutive retinal detachment patients who presented to Jimma University Hospital over six months period. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect patients’ sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history. Comprehensive anterior and posterior segment eye examinations were done and risk factors were sought for. Statistical tests were considered significant if P < 0.05. Results A total of 94 eyes of 80 patients (1.5%) had retinal detachment (RD) and about 69% of patients were symptomatic for over a month before presentation. The mean age was 41.4 years (SD ±16.5). Fourteen patients (17.5%) had bilateral RD. At presentation, 61 eyes (64.9%) were blind from RD and 11 (13.8%) patients were bilaterally blind from RD. Rhegmatogenous RD was seen in 55 eyes (58.5%) and tractional RD in 22 eyes (23.4%). The most common risk factors were ocular trauma (32 eyes, 34.0%), myopia (23 eyes, 24.5%), posterior uveitis (13 eyes, 13.8%) and diabetic retinopathy (9 eyes, 9.6%). Most retinal breaks (25 eyes, 43.1%) were superotemporal and horse-shoe tear was the most common (19 eyes, 20.2%). Macula was off in 77 eyes (81.9%) and 38 eyes (69.1% of RRD eyes) had grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Macular status was significantly associated with PVR (P=0.011), and duration of symptoms (RR=1.25, 95%CI: 1.059-1.475, P=0.040). Conclusions A significant numbers of patients with ocular problem had retinal detachment, and nearly two third of the patients presented late. Trauma and myopia were the most important risk factors. People should be educated to improve their health seeking behavior and use eye safety precautions to prevent ocular trauma. PMID:24086614

  15. Resuscitation of general paediatrics in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wacogne, I; Scott-Jupp, R; Chambers, T

    2006-12-01

    "The report of my death was an exaggeration", said Mark Twain. For a dying specialty, general paediatrics has certainly been looking very healthy recently. It is timely to examine why our specialty was thought to be at such risk, and to explore why, although in many cases shocked and confused, it is well on the way to recovery. This article explores what is needed to keep it healthy to ensure that the general paediatrician is at the centre of the delivery of paediatrics in the UK. PMID:17119078

  16. Growth in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cezard, J P; Touati, G; Alberti, C; Hugot, J P; Brinon, C; Czernichow, P

    2002-01-01

    Growth failure (GF) is one of the major complications affecting children with inflammatory bowel disease. The faltering is temporary in 40-50% of cases and prolonged in 10-20% in Crohn's disease (CD). Such failure is rare in children with ulcerative colitis (5%). This complication is often associated with retarded bone development and delayed onset of sexual maturation. The delayed linear growth has a variety of causes including insufficient intake due to anorexia and the inflammatory process with increased energy and protein expenditure. Other factors are increased intestinal loss, secondary hypopituitarism and treatment with steroids. Therapeutic strategies of CD in children have changed this last decade by introducing new therapeutic agents such as topic steroids, immunosuppressors, anti-TNF (antibody and notably in children enteral nutrition which has shown its efficacy in inducing remissions of active CD, restoring nutritional status and stimulation of linear growth. The results of a recent prospective multicentric study over 2 years in 82 CD show that severe GF (-2 SD) is initially present in 15% (n = 12), among them 11 remain < -2SD after 2 years of follow-up. Six patients who were on the normal range initially increased their GF during the follow-up (< -2SD) (total 21% < -2SD (n = 17) at 2 years). At inclusion in this group there was no difference in growth velocity, used of steroids, enteral nutrition or severity of CD as compared to the group with no GF. It suggests that new treatment strategy should be developed in the future for this specific complication of paediatric CD. PMID:12373007

  17. The Extent of Consumer Product Involvement in Paediatric Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Catchpoole, Jesani; Walker, Sue; Vallmuur, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in utilising health sector injury data for Product Safety purposes is that clinically coded data have limited ability to inform regulators about product involvement in injury events, given data entry is bound by a predefined set of codes. Text narratives collected in emergency departments can potentially address this limitation by providing relevant product information with additional accompanying context. This study aims to identify and quantify consumer product involvement in paediatric injuries recorded in emergency department-based injury surveillance data. A total of 7743 paediatric injuries were randomly selected from Queensland Injury Surveillance Unit database and associated text narratives were manually reviewed to determine product involvement in the injury event. A Product Involvement Factor classification system was used to categorise these injury cases. Overall, 44% of all reviewed cases were associated with consumer products, with proximity factor (25%) being identified as the most common involvement of a product in an injury event. Only 6% were established as being directly due to the product. The study highlights the importance of utilising injury data to inform product safety initiatives where text narratives can be used to identify the type and involvement of products in injury cases. PMID:27399744

  18. The Extent of Consumer Product Involvement in Paediatric Injuries.

    PubMed

    Catchpoole, Jesani; Walker, Sue; Vallmuur, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in utilising health sector injury data for Product Safety purposes is that clinically coded data have limited ability to inform regulators about product involvement in injury events, given data entry is bound by a predefined set of codes. Text narratives collected in emergency departments can potentially address this limitation by providing relevant product information with additional accompanying context. This study aims to identify and quantify consumer product involvement in paediatric injuries recorded in emergency department-based injury surveillance data. A total of 7743 paediatric injuries were randomly selected from Queensland Injury Surveillance Unit database and associated text narratives were manually reviewed to determine product involvement in the injury event. A Product Involvement Factor classification system was used to categorise these injury cases. Overall, 44% of all reviewed cases were associated with consumer products, with proximity factor (25%) being identified as the most common involvement of a product in an injury event. Only 6% were established as being directly due to the product. The study highlights the importance of utilising injury data to inform product safety initiatives where text narratives can be used to identify the type and involvement of products in injury cases. PMID:27399744

  19. Global health: A lasting partnership in paediatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lakhoo, Kokila; Msuya, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: To emphasise the value of on-going commitment in Global Health Partnerships. Materials and Methods: A hospital link, by invitation, was set up between United Kingdom and Tanzania since 2002. The project involved annual visits with activities ranging from exchange of skill to training health professionals. Furthermore, the programme attracted teaching and research activities. For continuity, there was electronic communication between visits. Results: Six paediatric surgeons are now fully trained with three further in training in Africa. Paediatric surgery services are now separate from adult services. Seven trainee exchanges have taken place with four awarded fellowships/scholarships. Twenty-three clinical projects have been presented internationally resulting in eight international publications. The programme has attracted other health professionals, especially nursing and engineering. The Tropical Health and Education Trust prize was recently achieved for nursing and radiography. National Health Service has benefited from volunteering staff bringing new cost-effective ideas. A fully funded medical student elective programme has been achieved since 2008. Conclusion: Global Health Partnerships are an excellent initiative in establishing specialist services in countries with limited resources. In the future, this will translate into improved patient care as long as it is sustained and valued by long term commitment. PMID:26168748

  20. Paediatric head injuries in the Kwazulu-Natal Province of South Africa: a developing country perspective.

    PubMed

    Okyere-Dede, Ebenezer K; Nkalakata, Munyaradzi C; Nkomo, Tshepo; Hadley, G P; Madiba, Thandinkosi E

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the causes, management and outcome of head injuries in paediatric patients admitted to the paediatric surgery unit at King Edward VIII Hospital over a 3-year period, from 1999 to 2001. There were 506 patients (331 male; M:F ratio 2:1) and the mean age was 71.99 +36.8 months (2 weeks to 180 months). The injuries were due to: motor vehicle crashes (324); falls (121); assault (30); inadvertent injury (23); and unknown (11). Forty-nine patients (9%) were admitted with a Glasgow Coma Scale ≤8. The most common intracranial pathology on computed tomography was: intracranial haematoma/haemorrhage (44); contusion (16); and brain oedema (10). Nineteen patients (3.4%) underwent neurosurgical intervention and the rest were managed conservatively. Eighteen died in hospital (3.6%). The mean hospital stay was 5 ± 12 days. Twenty-three patients (4.5%) were discharged with neurological sequelae. Few paediatric patients are admitted with severe head injury: the majority from blunt injury caused by motor vehicle crashes. Management mainly requires simple neurological observation in a general ward with a surprisingly good prognosis. Specific protocols for paediatric head injuries have been proposed based on these findings. PMID:23550196

  1. Non-operative advances: what has happened in the last 50 years in paediatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Holland, Andrew J A; McBride, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Paediatric surgeons remain paediatric clinicians who have the unique skill set to treat children with surgical problems that may require operative intervention. Many of the advances in paediatric surgical care have occurred outside the operating theatre and have involved significant input from medical, nursing and allied health colleagues. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units, especially those focusing on the care of surgical infants, has greatly enhanced the survival rates and long-term outcomes of those infants with major congenital anomalies requiring surgical repair. Educational initiatives such as the advanced trauma life support and emergency management of severe burns courses have facilitated improved understanding and clinical care. Paediatric surgeons have led with the non-operative management of solid organ injury following blunt abdominal trauma. Nano-crystalline burn wound dressings have enabled a reduced frequency of painful dressing changes in addition to effective antimicrobial efficacy and enhanced burn wound healing. Burns care has evolved so that many children may now be treated almost exclusively in an ambulatory care setting or as day case-only patients, with novel technologies allowing accurate prediction of burn would outcome and planning of elective operative intervention to achieve burn wound closure. PMID:25588791

  2. Recent advances in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Andrew; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M

    2016-02-01

    This review highlights important advances in paediatric respiratory medicine since 2014, excluding cystic fibrosis. It focuses mainly on the more common conditions, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, bronchiolitis and preschool wheezing, asthma, pneumonia and sleep, and highlights some of the rarer conditions such as primary ciliary dyskinesia and interstitial lung disease (ILD). PMID:26289061

  3. Measuring the Expertise of Paediatric Rehabilitation Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Gillian; Bartlett, Doreen J.; Currie, Melissa; Gilpin, Michelle; Baxter, Donna; Willoughby, Colleen; Tucker, Mary Ann; Strachan, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development of a classification system to measure the expertise levels of practicing paediatric rehabilitation therapists. Seventy-five therapists from five disciplines (physical, occupational, speech-language, behaviour, and recreational therapy) were involved, along with 170 peers, and 188 parents of children with…

  4. [The medicine use pathway in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Didelot, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The medicine use pathway is a process which is constantly evolving in order to comply with intangible rules. As in other therapeutic fields, the drug regimen in paediatrics must tolerate no error and must be able to detect all warning signs, however minor, in order to optimise this approach. PMID:27177481

  5. Use of smartphone apps by paediatric trainees.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, Srinivas; Halton, Fiona; Goodyear, Helen

    2015-08-01

    Over 70% of the population owns a smartphone and there are now millions of apps available. This study looks at smartphone and app use among paediatric trainees, in particular whether they are accessing medical apps to help with clinical practice. PMID:26255919

  6. Recent developments in paediatric neuraxial blocks

    PubMed Central

    Ponde, Vrushali Chandrashekhar

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric anaesthesia and paediatric regional anaesthesia are intertwined. Almost all surgeries unless contradicted could be and should be supplemented with a regional block. The main objective of this review is to elaborate on the recent advances of the central neuraxial blocks, such as application of ultrasound guidance and electrical stimulation in the pursuit of safety and an objective end point. This review also takes account of the traditional technique and understand the benefits as well the risk of each as compared with the recent technique. The recent trends in choosing the most appropriate peripheral block for a given surgery thereby sparing the central neuroaxis is considered. A penile block for circumcision or a sciatic block for unilateral foot surgery, rather than caudal epidural would have a better risk benefit equation. Readers will find a special mention on the recent thoughts on continuous epidural analgesia in paediatrics, especially its rise and fall, yet its unique importance. Lastly, the issue of block placements under sedation or general anaesthesia with its implication in this special population is dealt with. We conducted searches in MEDLINE (PubMed) and assessed the relevance of the abstracts of citations identified from literature searches. The search was carried out in English, for last 10 years, with the following key words: Recent advances in paediatric regional anaesthesia; ultrasound guidance for central neuraxial blocks in children; role of electrical stimulation in neuraxial blocks in children; complications in neuraxial block. Full-text articles of potentially relevant abstracts were retrieved for further review. PMID:23293386

  7. Implementation of a Hospital-Based Quality Assessment Program for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hendren, Samantha; McKeown, Ellen; Morris, Arden M.; Wong, Sandra L.; Oerline, Mary; Poe, Lyndia; Campbell, Darrell A.; Birkmeyer, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quality improvement programs in Europe have had a markedly beneficial effect on the processes and outcomes of rectal cancer care. The quality of rectal cancer care in the United States is not as well understood, and scalable quality improvement programs have not been developed. The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of a hospital-based quality assessment program for rectal cancer, targeting both community and academic hospitals. Methods: We recruited 10 hospitals from a surgical quality improvement organization. Nurse reviewers were trained to abstract rectal cancer data from hospital medical records, and abstracts were assessed for accuracy. We conducted two surveys to assess the training program and limitations of the data abstraction. We validated data completeness and accuracy by comparing hospital medical record and tumor registry data. Results: Nine of 10 hospitals successfully performed abstractions with ≥ 90% accuracy. Experienced nurse reviewers were challenged by the technical details in operative and pathology reports. Although most variables had less than 10% missing data, outpatient testing information was lacking from some hospitals' inpatient records. This implementation project yielded a final quality assessment program consisting of 20 medical records variables and 11 tumor registry variables. Conclusion: An innovative program linking tumor registry data to quality-improvement data for rectal cancer quality assessment was successfully implemented in 10 hospitals. This data platform and training program can serve as a template for other organizations that are interested in assessing and improving the quality of rectal cancer care. PMID:24839288

  8. Tying it all together: integrating a hospital-based health care system through case management education.

    PubMed

    Czerenda, A J; Best, L

    1994-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of the case manager as a system integrator, United Health Services, Inc. (UHS), a hospital-based health care system located in upstate New York, implemented several diverse case management models. Case managers were working in a variety of settings, often in isolation. It was determined that a system-wide case management education program would accomplish two goals: (a) provide all case managers within the UHS system with similar case management practice skills and language, and (b) provide an opportunity for case managers to meet, share role responsibilities and common case management issues, and use each other as resources. With input from leadership throughout the UHS system, a 4-week case management education program was developed and presented. Participants included multidisciplinary staff who had case management responsibilities within the system. Sessions were taught by UHS staff experts in a number of different disciplines. A teaching guide and manual were developed to supplement the didactic material. Feedback from the program was provided via written participant evaluation and follow-up discussions. PMID:8000326

  9. Early UK experience in the use of clofarabine in the treatment of relapsed and refractory paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David; Sibson, Keith; Caswell, Mark; Connor, Philip; Cummins, Michelle; Mitchell, Chris; Motwani, Jayashree; Taj, Mary; Vora, Ajay; Wynn, Robert; Kearns, Pamela R

    2011-08-01

    Clofarabine is a second-generation purine nucleoside analogue, which has shown promising activity in relapsed and refractory paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). This report summarizes the early United Kingdom experience of clofarabine for the treatment of paediatric ALL in 23 patients, outside of the context of a clinical trial. Our results demonstrated that clofarabine-based chemotherapy regimes were effective and well-tolerated in this heavily pre-treated group, with an overall response rate of 67% when used in combination regimes. Responses were seen in both B and T cell disease and in patients with adverse cytogenetics. PMID:21689087

  10. Meteorological factors and El Nino Southern Oscillation are associated with paediatric varicella infections in Hong Kong, 2004-2010.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y C; Lin, H L; Tian, L W

    2014-07-01

    Varicella accounts for substantial morbidities and remains a public health issue worldwide, especially in children. Little is known about the effect of meteorological variables on varicella infection risk for children. This study described the epidemiology of paediatric varicella notifications in Hong Kong from 2004 to 2010, and explored the association between paediatric varicella notifications in children aged <18 years and various meteorological factors using a time-stratified case-crossover model, with adjustment of potential confounding factors. The analysis found that daily mean temperature, atmospheric pressure and Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) were positively associated with paediatric varicella notifications. We found that an interquartile range (IQR) increase in temperature (8·38°C) at lag 1 day, a 9·50 hPa increase in atmospheric pressure for the current day, and a 21·91 unit increase in SOI for the current day may lead to an increase in daily cases of 5·19% [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·90-8·58], 5·77% (95% CI 3·01-8·61), and 4·32% (95% CI 2·98-5·68), respectively. An IQR increase in daily relative humidity (by 11·96%) was associated with a decrease in daily paediatric varicella (-2·79%, 95% CI -3·84 to -1·73). These findings suggest that meteorological factors might be important predictors of paediatric varicella infection in Hong Kong. PMID:24074377

  11. Paediatric admissions to the British military hospital at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Arul, GS; Reynolds, J; DiRusso, S; Scott, A; Bree, S; Templeton, P; Midwinter, MJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION International humanitarian law requires emergency medical support for both military personnel and civilians, including children. Here we present a detailed review of paediatric admissions with the pattern of injury and the resources they consume. METHODS All paediatric admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion between 1 January and 29 April 2011 were analysed prospectively. Data collected included time and date of admission, patient age and weight, mechanism of injury, extent of wounding, treatment, length of hospital stay and discharge destination. RESULTS Eighty-five children (65 boys and 17 girls, median age: 8 years, median weight: 20kg) were admitted. In 63% of cases the indication for admission was battle related trauma and in 31% non-battle trauma. Of the blast injuries, 51% were due to improvised explosive devices. Non-battle emergencies were mainly due to domestic burns (46%) and road traffic accidents (29%). The most affected anatomical area was the extremities (44% of injuries). Over 30% of patients had critical injuries. Operative intervention was required in 74% of cases. The median time to theatre for all patients was 52 minutes; 3 patients with critical injuries went straight to theatre in a median of 7 minutes. A blood transfusion was required in 27 patients; 6 patients needed a massive transfusion. Computed tomography was performed on 62% of all trauma admissions and 40% of patients went to the intensive care unit. The mean length of stay was 2 days (range: 1–26 days) and there were 7 deaths. CONCLUSIONS Paediatric admissions make up a small but significant part of admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion. The proportion of serious injuries is very high in comparison with admissions to a UK paediatric emergency department. The concentration of major injuries means that lessons learnt in terms of teamwork, the speed of transfer to theatre and massive transfusion protocols could be applied to UK paediatric practice. PMID:22524930

  12. An inexpensive, interdisciplinary, methodology to conduct an impact study of homeless persons on hospital based services.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Regier, Michael; Brown, Zachary; Davis, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Homelessness is a primary concern for community health. Scientific literature on homelessness is wide ranging and diverse. One opportunity to add to existing literature is the development and testing of affordable, easily implemented methods for measuring the impact of homeless on the healthcare system. Such methodological approaches rely on the strengths in a multidisciplinary approach, including providers, both healthcare and homeless services and applied clinical researchers. This paper is a proof of concept for a methodology which is easily adaptable nationwide, given the mandated implementation of homeless management information systems in the United States and other countries; medical billing systems by hospitals; and research methods of researchers. Adaptation is independent of geographic region, budget restraints, specific agency skill sets, and many other factors that impact the application of a consistent methodological science based approach to assess and address homelessness. We conducted a secondary data analysis merging data from homeless utilization and hospital case based data. These data detailed care utilization among homeless persons in a small, Appalachian city in the United States. In our sample of 269 persons who received at least one hospital based service and one homeless service between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, the total billed costs were $5,979,463 with 10 people costing more than one-third ($1,957,469) of the total. Those persons were primarily men, living in an emergency shelter, with pre-existing disabling conditions. We theorize that targeted services, including Housing First, would be an effective intervention. This is proposed in a future study. PMID:24894404

  13. Quality in paediatric emergency medicine: Measurement and reporting.

    PubMed

    Borland, Meredith L; Shepherd, Mike

    2016-02-01

    There is a clear demand for quality in the delivery of health care around the world; paediatric emergency medicine is no exception to this movement. It has been identified that gaps exist in the quality of acute care provided to children. Regulatory bodies in Australia and New Zealand are moving to mandate the implementation of quality targets and measures. Within the paediatric emergency department (ED), there is a lack of research into paediatric specific indicators. The existing literature regarding paediatric acute care quality measures has been recently summarised, and expert consensus has now been reported. It is clear that there is much work to be performed to generalise this work to ED. We review suggestions from the current literature relating to feasible indicators within the paediatric acute care setting. We propose options to develop a quality 'scorecard' that could be used to assist Australian and New Zealand EDs with quality measurement and benchmarking for their paediatric patients. PMID:27062615

  14. Paediatric UK demyelinating disease longitudinal study (PUDDLS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that at least 5% of Multiple sclerosis (MS) cases manifest in childhood. Children with MS present with a demyelinating episode involving single or multiple symptoms prior to developing a second event (usually within two years) to then meet criteria for diagnosis. There is evidence from adult cohorts that the incidence and sex ratios of MS are changing and that children of immigrants have a higher risk for developing MS. A paediatric population should reflect the vanguard of such changes and may reflect trends yet to be observed in adult cohorts. Studying a paediatric population from the first demyelinating event will allow us to test these hypotheses, and may offer further valuable insights into the genetic and environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of MS. Methods/Design The Paediatric UK Demyelinating Disease Longitudinal Study (PUDDLS) is a prospective longitudinal observational study which aims to determine the natural history, predictors and outcomes of childhood CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PUDDLS will involve centres in the UK, and will establish a cohort of children affected with a first CNS inflammatory demyelinating event for long-term follow up by recruiting for approximately 5 years. PUDDLS will also establish a biological sample archive (CSF, serum, and DNA), allowing future hypothesis driven research. For example, the future discovery of a biomarker will allow validation within this dataset for the evaluation of novel biomarkers. Patients will also be requested to consent to be contacted in the future. A secondary aim is to collaborate internationally with the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group when future collaborative studies are proposed, whilst sharing a minimal anonymised dataset. PUDDLS is the second of two jointly funded studies. The first (UCID-SS) is an epidemiological surveillance study that already received ethical approvals, and started on the 1st September 2009. There is

  15. Current views and advances on Paediatric Virology: An update for paediatric trainees

    PubMed Central

    MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; GREENOUGH, ANNE; THEODORIDOU, MARIA; KRAMVIS, ANNA; CHRISTAKI, ILIANA; KOUTSAFTIKI, CHRYSSIE; KOUTSAKI, MARIA; PORTALIOU, DIMITRA M.; KOSTAGIANNI, GEORGIA; PANAGOPOULOU, PARASKEVI; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Virology is a bold new scientific field, which combines Paediatrics with Virology, Epidemiology, Molecular Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Clinical Governance, Quality Improvement, Pharmacology and Immunology. The Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which took place on Saturday October 10, 2015 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview of recent views and advances on viral infections occurring in neonates and children. It was included in the official programme of the 20th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and the 18th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine, which attracted over 500 delegates from the five continents. During the Workshop, the topics covered included the challenges of vaccine implementation against human papillomaviruses in countries under financial crisis, strategies for eradicating poliomyelitis and its 60th vaccine anniversary, as well as the debate on the association between autism and vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. Among the non-vaccine related topics, emphasis was given to viral infections in prematurely born infants and their long-term outcomes, new paediatric intensive care management options for bronchiolitis related to respiratory syncytial virus, the clinical implications of hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus genotyping, the Ebola virus threat and preparedness in Paediatric Emergency Departments, oral, oropharynx, laryngeal, nasal and ocular viral infections and Merkel cell polyomavirus as a novel emerging virus of infancy and childhood. In this review, we provide selected presentations and reports discussed at the Workshop. PMID:26889211

  16. The use of nalbuphine in paediatric anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kubica-Cielińska, Anna; Zielińska, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Nalbuphine is an agonist-antagonist opioid. It causes analgesic and sedative effect and because of ceiling effect it does not cause a respiratory depression. In a perioperative therapy of paediatric patients it may be used for premedication, sedation during diagnostic procedures as well as for postoperative pain treatment. It reverses adverse reactions of other opioids such as itch or urinary retention, not significantly influencing its analgetic properties. After sevoflurane anaesthesia of small children, it reduces the incidences of emergence agitation. Nalbuphine is considered a safe drug, which causes nausea and vomiting less frequently than other opioids. Analgesic effect, the ability to provide moderate sedation and a large margin of safety make that analgesic often used for paediatric patients. PMID:26165241

  17. Effects of anaesthesia on paediatric lung function.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, D; Svendsen, J; Erb, T O; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory adverse events are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in paediatric anaesthesia. Aside from predisposing conditions associated with an increased risk of respiratory incidents in children such as concurrent infections and chronic airway irritation, there are adverse respiratory events directly attributable to the impact of anaesthesia on the respiratory system. Anaesthesia can negatively affect respiratory drive, ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) matching and tidal breathing, all resulting in potentially devastating hypoxaemia. Understanding paediatric respiratory physiology and its changes during anaesthesia will enable anaesthetists to anticipate, recognize and prevent deterioration that can lead to respiratory failure. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview of the effects of anaesthesia on respiration in children. It focuses on the impact of the different components of anaesthesia, patient positioning and procedure-related changes on respiratory physiology. PMID:27440626

  18. Paediatric infectious diseases: the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Starr, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Many advances and challenges have occurred in the field of paediatric infectious diseases during the past 50 years. It is impossible to cover all of these in a short review, but a few highlights and lowlights will be covered. These include virtual disappearance of some infectious diseases, emergence of new ones, infections in the immunocompromised, antimicrobial resistance, development of new and improved antimicrobials, improved diagnostic tests and the Human Microbiome Project. PMID:25557805

  19. Sleep · 8: Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Brouillette, R

    2005-01-01

    In the past 25 years there has been increasing recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as a common condition of childhood. Morbidity includes impairment of growth, cardiovascular complications, learning impairment, and behavioural problems. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition in children differs in many respects from that in adults. We review here the key features of paediatric OSA, highlighting differences from adult OSA, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:15923253

  20. Ciprofloxacin safety in paediatrics: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Adefurin, Abiodun; Sammons, Helen; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Choonara, Imti

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety of ciprofloxacin in paediatric patients in relation to arthropathy, any other adverse events (AEs) and drug interactions. Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL and bibliographies of relevant articles was carried out for all published articles, regardless of design, that involved the use of ciprofloxacin in any paediatric age group ≤17 years. Only articles that reported on safety were included. Results 105 articles met the inclusion criteria and involved 16 184 paediatric patients. There were 1065 reported AEs (risk 7%, 95% CI 3.2% to 14.0%). The most frequent AEs were musculoskeletal AEs, abnormal liver function tests, nausea, changes in white blood cell counts and vomiting. There were six drug interactions (with aminophylline (4) and methotrexate (2)). The only drug related death occurred in a neonate who had an anaphylactic reaction. 258 musculoskeletal events occurred in 232 paediatric patients (risk 1.6%, 95% CI 0.9% to 2.6%). Arthralgia accounted for 50% of these. The age of occurrence of arthropathy ranged from 7 months to 17 years (median 10 years). All cases of arthropathy resolved or improved with management. One prospective controlled study estimated the risk of arthropathy as 9.3 (OR 95% CI 1.2 to 195). Pooled safety data of controlled trials in this review estimated the risk of arthropathy as 1.57 (OR 95% CI 1.26 to 1.97). Conclusion Musculoskeletal AEs occur due to ciprofloxacin use. However, these musculoskeletal events are reversible with management. It is recommended that further prospective controlled studies should be carried out to evaluate the safety of ciprofloxacin, with particular focus on the risk of arthropathy. PMID:21785119

  1. Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.

    PubMed

    Dekking, Sara A S; Van Der Graaf, Rieke; Van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-07-01

    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for research is compromised in these two scenarios, and if so whether this is also morally problematic. For this, we employ the account of voluntary consent from Nelson and colleagues, who assert that voluntary consent requires substantial freedom from controlling influences. We argue that, in the absence of persuasion or manipulation, inclusion by the treating physician does not compromise voluntariness. However, it may function as a risk factor for controlling influence as it narrows the scope within which parents make decisions. Furthermore, physician appeal to reciprocity is not controlling as it constitutes persuasion. In addition, framing information is a form of informational manipulation and constitutes a controlling influence. In the second scenario, treatments confined to the research context qualify as controlling if the available options are restricted through manipulation of options. Although none of the influences is morally problematic in itself, a combination of influences may create morally problematic instances of involuntary informed consent. Therefore, safeguards should be implemented to establish an optimal environment for parents to provide voluntary informed consent in an integrated research-care context. PMID:26686529

  2. Paediatric suicidal burns: A growing concern.

    PubMed

    Segu, Smitha; Tataria, Rachana

    2016-06-01

    An alarming rise in rates of paediatric population committing self-immolation acts is a growing social and medical problem. In recent times there seems to be a rising concern in paediatric population. A study was conducted at a government tertiary care burn centre over 5 years in paediatric age group of <18 years who had committed self-immolation. Demographic data, aetiology, burn severity, associated illnesses, treatment and outcomes of the patients were collected with preventive strategies. Of total 89 patients, 12 patients were below 12 years (children) and 77 between 12-18 years (adolescent) with female preponderance. Majority belonged to lower middle and upper lower class families. Most had deep partial thickness burns. Psychiatric and personality disorder were found in 24.03% and 31.46% patients respectively. Kerosene was the main agent chosen to inflict injury. The average length of hospital stay was 19.8 days. The crude mortality rate observed was 38.2%. With cultural and socio-economic changes children and adolescents are exposed to increased levels of stress and peer pressure leaving them vulnerable. A multidisciplinary care involving medical, psychological and social support is required. Identifying children at risk and proper counselling and support can form an important strategy at prevention rather than cure. PMID:26803366

  3. Paediatric airway management: What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R; Archana, SR

    2012-01-01

    Airway management plays a pivotal role in Paediatric Anaesthesia. Over the last two decades many improvements in this area have helped us to overcome this final frontier. From an era where intubation with a conventional laryngoscope or blind nasal intubation was the only tool for airway management, we have come a long way. Today supraglottic airway devices have pride of place in the Operating Room and are becoming important airway devices used in routine procedures. Direct and indirect fibreoptic laryngoscopes and transtracheal devices help us overcome difficult and previously impossible airway situations. These developments mean that we need to update our knowledge on these devices. Also much of our basic understanding of the physiology and anatomy of the paediatric airway has changed. This article attempts to shed light on some of the most important advances/opinions in paediatric airway management like, cuffed endotracheal tubes, supraglottic airway devices, video laryngoscopes, rapid sequence intubation, the newly proposed algorithm for difficult airway management and the role of Ex Utero Intrapartum Treatment (EXIT) procedure in the management of the neonatal airway. PMID:23293383

  4. Paediatric Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus

    PubMed Central

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of Paediatric Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire paediatric trainees and future Paediatric Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241

  5. Paediatric radiology seen from Africa. Part I: providing diagnostic imaging to a young population.

    PubMed

    Andronikou, Savvas; McHugh, Kieran; Abdurahman, Nuraan; Khoury, Bryan; Mngomezulu, Victor; Brant, William E; Cowan, Ian; McCulloch, Mignon; Ford, Nathan

    2011-07-01

    Paediatric radiology requires dedicated equipment, specific precautions related to ionising radiation, and specialist knowledge. Developing countries face difficulties in providing adequate imaging services for children. In many African countries, children represent an increasing proportion of the population, and additional challenges follow from extreme living conditions, poverty, lack of parental care, and exposure to tuberculosis, HIV, pneumonia, diarrhoea and violent trauma. Imaging plays a critical role in the treatment of these children, but is expensive and difficult to provide. The World Health Organisation initiatives, of which the World Health Imaging System for Radiography (WHIS-RAD) unit is one result, needs to expand into other areas such as the provision of maintenance servicing. New initiatives by groups such as Rotary and the World Health Imaging Alliance to install WHIS-RAD units in developing countries and provide digital solutions, need support. Paediatric radiologists are needed to offer their services for reporting, consultation and quality assurance for free by way of teleradiology. Societies for paediatric radiology are needed to focus on providing a volunteer teleradiology reporting group, information on child safety for basic imaging, guidelines for investigations specific to the disease spectrum, and solutions for optimising imaging in children. PMID:21656276

  6. Paediatric Orbital Fractures: The Importance of Regular Thorough Eye Assessment and Appropriate Referral

    PubMed Central

    Kassam, Karim; Rahim, Ishrat; Mills, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The paediatric orbital fracture should always raise alarm bells to all clinicians working in an emergency department. A delay or failure in diagnosis and appropriate referral can result in rapidly developing and profound complications. We present a boy of childhood age who sustained trauma to his eye during a bicycle injury. Acceptance of the referral was based on no eye signs; however, on examination in our unit the eye had reduction in visual acuity, no pupillary reaction, and ophthalmoplegia. CT scan suggested bone impinging on the globe and the child was rushed to theatre for removal of the bony fragment. Postoperatively no improvement was noted and a diagnosis of traumatic optic neuropathy was made. An overview of factors complicating paediatric orbital injuries, their associated “red flags”, and appropriate referral are discussed in this short paper. PMID:24349804

  7. Paediatric orbital fractures: the importance of regular thorough eye assessment and appropriate referral.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Karim; Rahim, Ishrat; Mills, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The paediatric orbital fracture should always raise alarm bells to all clinicians working in an emergency department. A delay or failure in diagnosis and appropriate referral can result in rapidly developing and profound complications. We present a boy of childhood age who sustained trauma to his eye during a bicycle injury. Acceptance of the referral was based on no eye signs; however, on examination in our unit the eye had reduction in visual acuity, no pupillary reaction, and ophthalmoplegia. CT scan suggested bone impinging on the globe and the child was rushed to theatre for removal of the bony fragment. Postoperatively no improvement was noted and a diagnosis of traumatic optic neuropathy was made. An overview of factors complicating paediatric orbital injuries, their associated "red flags", and appropriate referral are discussed in this short paper. PMID:24349804

  8. Children with dermatological conditions admitted to paediatric intensive care: analysis of a national clinical audit database.

    PubMed

    George, S M C; Sen, S M; Harrison, D A; McShane, P; Patel, K; Darley, C R

    2016-06-01

    There is little published literature about dermatological conditions in paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). The aim of this study was to describe the range of skin disorders in children admitted to PICUs in the UK and Ireland using data from a national audit. An analysis was conducted using data for 2002 - 2010 from the Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network (PICANet). In total, 999 admissions of 882 children were identified, representing 0.8% of all PICU admissions. The most frequent dermatological conditions were skin infections, including cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis, and inflammatory conditions. In 28% of cases, the dermatological diagnosis was considered the reason for PICU admission, in 35% it was a manifestation of systemic disease and in 37% it was considered incidental. Overall mortality was similar to the general PICU population, with 52 deaths (5.2%), but was greater in children with vascular/haematological conditions. PMID:26684929

  9. Proposed educational objectives for hospital-based dentists during catastrophic events and disaster response.

    PubMed

    Psoter, Walter J; Herman, Neal G; More, Frederick G; Park, Patricia; Robbins, Miriam; Rekow, E Dianne; Ryan, James M; Triola, Marc M; Glotzer, David

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this project was to define education and training requirements for hospital-based dentists to efficiently and meaningfully participate in a hospital disaster response. Eight dental faculty with hospital-based training and/or military command and CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive) expertise were recruited as an expert panel. A consensus set of recommended educational objectives for hospital-based dentists was established using the following process: 1) identify assumptions supported by all expert panelists, 2) determine current advanced dental educational training requirements, and 3) conduct additional training and literature review by various panelists and discussions with other content and systems experts. Using this three-step process, educational objectives that the development group believed necessary for hospital-based dentists to be effective in treatment or management roles in times of a catastrophic event were established. These educational objectives are categorized into five thematic areas: 1) disaster systems, 2) triage/medical assessment, 3) blast and burn injuries, 4) chemical agents, and 5) biological agents. Creation of training programs to help dentists acquire these educational objectives would benefit hospital-based dental training programs and strengthen hospital surge manpower needs. The proposed educational objectives are designed to stimulate discussion and debate among dental, medical, and public health professionals about the roles of dentists in meeting hospital surge manpower needs. PMID:16896086

  10. A national, cross-sectional survey of children's hospital-based safety resource centres

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Sadiqa; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Seaver Hill, Karen; Arbogast, Kristy B; Gittelman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the location, staffing, clientele, safety product disbursement patterns, education provided and sustainability of safety resource centres (SRCs) in US children's hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was distributed to children's hospital-based SRC directors. Survey categories included: funding sources, customer base, items sold, items given free of charge, education provided and directors’ needs. Results 32/38 (84.2%) SRC sites (affiliated with 30 hospitals) completed the survey. SRCs were in many hospital locations including lobby (28.1%), family resource centres (12.5%), gift shop/retail space (18.8%), mobile units (18.8%) and patient clinics (12.5%). 19% of respondents reported that their SRC was financially self-sustainable. Sales to patients predominated (mean of 44%); however, hospital employees made up a mean of 20% (range 0–60%) of sales. 78.1% of SRCs had products for children with special healthcare needs. Documentation kept at SRC sites included items purchased (96.9%), items given free of charge (65.6%) and customer demographics (50%). 56.3% of SRCs provided formal injury prevention education classes. The SRCs’ directors’ most important needs were finances (46.9%), staffing (50%) and space (46.9%). All of the directors were ‘somewhat interested’ or ‘very interested’ in each of the following: creation of a common SRC listserv, national SRC data bank and multisite SRC research platform. Conclusions SRCs are located in many US children's hospitals, and can be characterised as heterogeneous in location, products sold, data kept and ability to be financially sustained. Further research is needed to determine best practices for SRCs to maximise their impact on injury prevention. PMID:24667383

  11. Hospital based superconducting cyclotron for neutron therapy: Medical physics perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudelev, M.; Burmeister, J.; Blosser, E.; Maughan, R. L.; Kota, C.

    2001-12-01

    The neutron therapy facility at the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center, Harper University Hospital in Detroit has been operational since September 1991. The d(48.5)+Be beam is produced in a gantry mounted superconducting cyclotron designed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Measurements were performed in order to obtain the physical characteristics of the neutron beam and to collect the data necessary for treatment planning. This included profiles of the dose distribution in a water phantom, relative output factors and the design of various beam modifiers, i.e., wedges and tissue compensators. The beam was calibrated in accordance with international protocol for fast neutron dosimetry. Dosimetry and radiobiology intercomparions with three neutron therapy facilities were performed prior to clinical use. The radiation safety program was established in order to monitor and reduce the exposure levels of the personnel. The activation products were identified and the exposure in the treatment room was mapped. A comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program was developed to sustain safe and reliable operation of the unit at treatment standards comparable to those for conventional photon radiation. The program can be divided into three major parts: maintenance of the cyclotron and related hardware; QA of the neutron beam dosimetry and treatment delivery; safety and radiation protection. In addition the neutron beam is used in various non-clinical applications. Among these are the microdosimetric characterization of the beam, the effects of tissue heterogeneity on dose distribution, the development of boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy and variety of radiobiology experiments.

  12. Exciting times: towards a totally minimally invasive paediatric urology service.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, John

    2011-02-01

    Following on from the first paediatric laparoscopic nephrectomy in 1992, the growth of minimally invasive ablative and reconstructive procedures in paediatric urology has been dramatic. This article reviews the literature related to laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty, optimising posterior urethral valve ablation and intravesical laparoscopic ureteric reimplantation. PMID:21933475

  13. Development of a hospital-based care coordination program for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Petitgout, Janine M; Pelzer, Daniel E; McConkey, Stacy A; Hanrahan, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    A hospital-based Continuity of Care program for children with special health care needs is described. A family-centered team approach provides care coordination and a medical home. The program has grown during the past 10 years to include inpatients and outpatients from multiple services and outreach clinics. Improved outcomes, including decreased length of stay, decreased cost, and high family satisfaction, are demonstrated by participants in the program. Pediatric nurse practitioners play an important role in the medical home, collaborating with primary care providers, hospital-based specialists, community services, and social workers to provide services to children with special health care needs. PMID:22575784

  14. A statewide hospital-based program to improve child passenger safety.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B

    1984-01-01

    A statewide network of hospital-based low-cost car seat rental and educational programs, operated by volunteers, was begun in Vermont in 1979. In four years the rate of correct car seat usage by newborns at hospital discharge increased from less than 16% to 71%. High usage rates appear to continue in the first two years of life. It is hypothesized that availability of car seats, direct educational intervention in the hospitals, high visibility, and indirect educational processes in the community contributed to these changes. It is concluded that hospital-based programs should be included in comprehensive strategies to improve child passenger safety. PMID:6520003

  15. Paediatric palliative care by video consultation at home: a cost minimisation analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the vast state of Queensland, Australia, access to specialist paediatric services are only available in the capital city of Brisbane, and are limited in regional and remote locations. During home-based palliative care, it is not always desirable or practical to move a patient to attend appointments, and so access to care may be even further limited. To address these problems, at the Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) in Brisbane, a Home Telehealth Program (HTP) has been successfully established to provide palliative care consultations to families throughout Queensland. Methods A cost minimisation analysis was undertaken to compare the actual costs of the HTP consultations, with the estimated potential costs associated with face-to face-consultations occurring by either i) hospital based consultations in the outpatients department at the RCH, or ii) home visits from the Paediatric Palliative Care Service. The analysis was undertaken from the perspective of the Children’s Health Service. The analysis was based on data from 95 home video consultations which occurred over a two year period, and included costs associated with projected: clinician time and travel; costs reimbursed to families for travel through the Patients Travel Subsidy (PTS) scheme; hospital outpatient clinic costs, project co-ordination and equipment and infrastructure costs. The mean costs per consultation were calculated for each approach. Results Air travel (n = 24) significantly affected the results. The mean cost of the HTP intervention was $294 and required no travel. The estimated mean cost per consultation in the hospital outpatient department was $748. The mean cost of home visits per consultation was $1214. Video consultation in the home is the most economical method of providing a consultation. The largest costs avoided to the health service are those associated with clinician time required for travel and the PTS scheme. Conclusion While face-to-face consultations are

  16. War zone paediatrics in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    1996-08-01

    Children are particularly vulnerable to injury and death in two types of 20th century conflicts; terrorist attack and civil war. This account describes some first-hand experiences of the aftermath of the Rwandan Civil War of 1994. Events leading to the conflict are described, eye witness accounts of child trauma during the war are recorded and the medical problems (currently ongoing) affecting children are described. Over a period of 3 months from April to June 1994, between half and one million Rwandese, a significant proportion of them women and children, were murdered in brutal hand-to-hand killing, dying from close-quarter gunshot and machete slaughter. Nearly half of the population became refugees in neighbouring countries or displaced persons in their own land. UNAMIR II, the United Nations Emergency Humanitarian Response, grew to some 7000 persons by May 1995. Medical aid was provided by emergency medical contingents from the United Kingdom, Canada and Australia, the latter through its Australian Medical Support Force, providing the definitive emergency medical infrastructure from August 1994. In the consequent post-war civil and social disruption, children suffered from burns, cholera and from motor vehicle trauma. Ongoing landmine blasts continue to affect children and adolescents especially. A new International humanitarian code to build a time-expiry device into landmines and other similar ordinance is urgently required as the post-conflict ongoing disasters in Rwanda, Afghanistan and Cambodia illustrate. Current problems affecting children include an increasing risk of HIV infection, trauma and the special humanitarian needs of thousands of orphans. PMID:8844531

  17. Tinea capitis outbreak among paediatric refugee population, an evolving healthcare challenge.

    PubMed

    Mashiah, Jacob; Kutz, Ana; Ben Ami, Ronen; Savion, Mihal; Goldberg, Ilan; Gan Or, Tamar; Zidan, Omri; Sprecher, Eli; Harel, Avikam

    2016-09-01

    Outbreaks of tinea capitis (TC) represent a major medical and economic burden. Population migrations have become a phenomenon of increasing relevance for medical conditions management. Given the recent massive arrival of immigrants, we sought to determine epidemiologic trends for TC among paediatric populations at the Tel Aviv Medical Center. We conducted a retrospective study of all TC cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2014 in a paediatric dermatology unit of a tertiary medical centre, serving as a referral centre for the paediatric refugee population from the great Tel Aviv area. Epidemiologic, clinical and treatment data including effectiveness and safety were reviewed. In all, 145 children met the inclusion criteria. Trend analyses showed increases in TC rates over the study period. Incidence rates were higher in boys than in girls. Children of African origin had the highest TC incidence rates as compared with other ethnic groups. Trichophyton violaceum and Microsporum audouinii were the predominant causative organisms. Treatment with griseofulvin was satisfactory in all cases. There was a significant increase in TC incidence rates in the Tel Aviv area over the study period. TV and MA were the predominant organisms. These trends may be a result of poor living conditions and crowded school premises. PMID:27061446

  18. Salbutamol in paediatrics: pharmacology, prescribing and controversies.

    PubMed

    Andrzejowski, Paul; Carroll, Will

    2016-08-01

    Salbutamol has become a key drug in respiratory medicine since it was first developed by Sir David Jack et al in 1968, 5000 years after the β agonist ephedrine was first used in its raw form, as the Ma Huang herb in Chinese medicine to treat asthma. It is one of the most commonly encountered medicines in paediatric practice and the authors have found that an understanding of its pharmacology in clinical practice is incredibly helpful. In this article, we discuss its pharmacology and pharmacodynamics, practical prescribing points and some unresolved issues surrounding its use, which should serve to provide an essential working knowledge for the busy paediatrician. PMID:27059284

  19. Infection control in paediatric office settings

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Transmission of infection in the paediatric office is of increasing concern. The present document discusses routes of transmission of infection and the principles of current infection control measures. Prevention includes appropriate office design and administrative policies, triage, routine practices for the care of all patients (eg, hand hygiene; use of gloves, masks, eye protection and gowns for specific procedures; adequate cleaning, disinfection and sterilization of surfaces and equipment including toys, and aseptic technique for invasive procedures), and additional precautions for specific infections. Personnel should be adequately immunized, and those infected should follow work-restriction policies. PMID:19412374

  20. The impact of paediatric early warning systems.

    PubMed

    Naddy, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    The child who is ill enough to be admitted to a children's ward has the potential to deteriorate rapidly. If this deterioration is not recognised and acted on in a timely manner, such children may require cardiopulmonary resuscitation, high dependency or intensive care. A paediatric early warning tool used with routine nursing observations will alert staff to the need for increased monitoring, the support of an associated outreach team or emergency medical attention. If the tool is used, a nurse can provide objective, transparent evidence of the child's condition to experienced clinicians. Appropriate education and supervision of staff should be ensured through the use of an outreach team. PMID:23167014

  1. Predictors of Mortality in Paediatric Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammed Junaid; Mittal, Mahima; Kushwaha, K.P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric myocarditis can present as mild flu like symptoms to fulminent form. Early identification of the severity of illness and prioritization of intensive care is helpful especially in developing countries with limited resources. Aim To know the factors at admission that can predict mortality in paediatric myocarditis. Materials and Methods This was an observational study which enrolled children who presented with fever of acute onset (less than 15 days in duration), and were diagnosed as suspected myocarditis on the basis of clinical features, Troponin I and echocardiography, according to Expanded criteria for myocarditis in Paediatric ward at our institute over a period from August 2014 to December 2015. Their clinical features, cardiac biomarkers and echocardiography findings were compared between survivors and non-survivors. Statistical Analysis All statistical analysis was done using graphpad Prism 5 and SPSS statistical software. A Fisher exact p-value <0.05 was regarded as significant. Multivariate Logistic Regression was carried out to quantify the relationship between cardiac death and other predictor variables. The logistic coefficients for the predictor variables and their exponents, that is, log odds were calculated. Statistical significance of these predictor variables was interpreted by p-values. Results A 17.7% (n=11/62) patients of paediatric myocarditis died in this study. New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV dyspnea (p=0.0115) and hypotension (p=0.0174) were more in patients who did not survive. The mean value of Troponin I was more in the non-survivor group (0.958 ± 1.13ng/ml); (p=0.0074). More number of patients who died had Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) levels increased in their plasma (p=0.0087) with higher mean value (p=0.0175). LV ejection fraction was decreased markedly in non survivor group with mean value of 37±8.09 % as compared to survivor group with mean value of 46.6±10.5%, (p=0.0115). On multivariate

  2. Paediatric travel medicine: vaccines and medications

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The paediatric aspects of travel medicine can be complex, and individual advice is often required. Nonetheless, children are much more likely to acquire common infections than exotic tropical diseases whilst travelling. Important exceptions are malaria and tuberculosis, which are more frequent and severe in children. Overall, travellers' diarrhoea is the most common illness affecting travellers. This review discusses vaccines and medications that may be indicated for children who are travelling overseas. It focuses on immunizations that are given as part of the routine schedule, as well as those that are more specific to travel. Malaria and travellers' diarrhoea are also discussed. PMID:23163285

  3. Paediatric procedural sedation within the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Krieser, David; Kochar, Amit

    2016-02-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia in children requires the use of non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches to facilitate the management of painful procedures. The development of skills in such techniques has mirrored the development of paediatric emergency medicine as a subspecialty. Governance, education and credentialing must facilitate safe sedation practice, using a structured approach, as sedating children in the busy environment of an emergency department is not without risk. Emergency clinicians, patients and caregivers all have a role to play in developing a safe, effective sedation plan. PMID:27062624

  4. Caring for Young Adolescent Sexual Abuse Victims in a Hospital-Based Children's Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edinburgh, Laurel; Saewyc, Elizabeth; Levitt, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This study compared health care assessments, referrals, treatment, and outcomes for young adolescent sexual assault/sexual abuse victims seen at a hospital-based Child Advocacy Center (CAC), to that provided to similar victims evaluated by other community providers. A second purpose was to document how common DNA evidence is found…

  5. Characteristics of Hospital-Based Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Okuyama, Makiko; Kasahara, Mari; Nakamura, Ayako

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores characteristics of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSBP) in Japan, a country which provides an egalitarian, low cost, and easy-access health care system. Methods: We sent a questionnaire survey to 11 leading doctors in the child abuse field in Japan, each located in different hospital-based sites. Child abuse doctors…

  6. Hospital-based dialysis centers: perspectives from the for-profit sector.

    PubMed

    Ketchum, Peter W

    2005-06-01

    Make your hospital-based dialysis program financially viable, not a drain on cash flow. Assess the program's financial performance and potential value by comparing its data with industry benchmarks. Maximize all available revenue opportunities, and closely scrutinize expenses. PMID:17240663

  7. DriveWise: An Interdisciplinary Hospital-Based Driving Assessment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Margaret G.; Kapust, Lissa R.; Hollis, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals working with the elderly have opportunities through research and clinical practice to shape public policy affecting the older driver. This article describes DriveWise, an interdisciplinary hospital-based driving assessment program developed in response to clinical concerns about the driving safety of individuals with…

  8. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rates for ESRD facilities using the following methodology: (1) For dialysis services furnished prior to...) For dialysis services furnished on or after January 1, 2009— (i) The composite rate paid to hospital-based facilities for dialysis services shall be the same as the composite rate paid for such...

  9. Community- And Hospital-Based Early Intervention Team Members' Attitudes and Perceptions of Teamwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Michael; McPherson, Jenny

    2004-01-01

    Sixty early intervention team members (30 community-based and 30 hospital-based) were surveyed regarding their attitudes and perceptions of teamwork. Respondents were recruited using a purposive non-probability sampling technique and completed a packet of questionnaires consisting of a detailed demographic survey, Attitudes About Teamwork Survey,…

  10. An inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, M; Green, C; Kelly, I P

    2012-06-01

    The need for emergent management of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures is being questioned in the literature. Open reduction rates of up to 46% have been reported in the non-emergent management of these injuries. At our institution these fractures are managed as operative emergencies by senior personnel. To examine the ongoing need for this policy we reviewed our results. All patients managed over a five year period with Gartland type IIB or III paeditric supracondylar humeral fractures were identified and a comprehensive chart and radiographic review undertaken. The mean time from injury to fracture reduction and stabilization was 6.6 h. Consultants performed or supervised 90% of cases. Open reduction was necessary in 5% of cases. Complications included a perioperative nerve injury rate of 6% and a superficial pin site infection rate of 3%. This study suggests that, despite the challenge to trauma on-call rostering, the emergency management of these injuries is advantageous to patients in units of our size. Based on the data presented here we continue our practice of emergent management. We suggest that units of a similar size to our own would show a benefit from an analogous policy albeit an inconvenient truth. PMID:22525415

  11. Accounting for care: Healthcare Resource Groups for paediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Janet; Morris, Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Healthcare Resource Groups are a way of grouping patients in relation to the amount of healthcare resources they consume. They are the basis for implementation of Payment by Results by the Department of Health in England. An expert working group was set up to define a dataset for paediatric critical care that would in turn support the derivation of Healthcare Resource Groups. Three relevant classification systems were identified and tested with data from ten PICUs, including data about diagnoses, number of organ systems supported, interventions and nursing activity. Each PICU provided detailed costing for the financial year 2005/2006. Eighty-three per cent of PICU costs were found to be related to staff costs, with the largest cost being nursing costs. The Nursing Activity Score system was found to be a poor predictor of staff resource use, as was the adult HRG model based on the number of organ systems supported. It was decided to develop the HRGs based on a 'levels of care' approach; 32 data items were defined to support HRG allocation. From October 2007, data have been collected daily to identify the HRGs for each PICU patient and are being used by the Department of Health to estimate reference costs for PICU services. The data can also be used to support improved audit of PICU activity nationally as well as comparison of workload across different units and modelling of staff requirements within a unit. PMID:18335904

  12. Standard instruction versus simulation: Educating registered nurses in the early recognition of patient deterioration in paediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Jessica; Nash, Robyn; Lewis, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and stabilising deterioration in a child with significant clinical compromise is both a challenging and necessary role of the paediatric critical care nurse. Within adult critical care research, high fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has been shown to positively impact learner outcomes regarding identification and management of a deteriorating patient; however, there is a paucity of evidence examining the use of HFPS in paediatric nursing education. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HFPS on nurses' self-efficacy and knowledge for recognising and managing paediatric deterioration. Further, participants' perceptions of the learning experiences specific to the identification and management of a deteriorating child were also explored. Registered nurses working in a tertiary-referral paediatric critical care unit were recruited for this quasi-experimental study. Using a pre-test/post-test control-group design, participants were assigned to one of two learning experiences: HFPS or standard instruction. Following the learning experience, nurses were also invited to participate in semi-structured interviews. 30 nurses participated in the study (control n=15, experiment n=15). Participants in the HFPS intervention were most likely to demonstrate an increase in both perceived self-efficacy (p=<0.01) and knowledge (p=<0.01). No statistically significant change was observed in control group scores. The mean difference in self-efficacy gain score between the two groups was 5.67 score units higher for the experiment group compared to the control. HFPS also yielded higher follow-up knowledge scores (p=0.01) compared to standard instruction. Ten nurses participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis of the interview data identified four themes: self-awareness, hands-on learning, teamwork, and maximising learning. The results of this study suggest that HFPS can positively influence nurses' self-efficacy and knowledge test scores

  13. Development of a Comprehensive Hospital-Based Elder Abuse Intervention: An Initial Systematic Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Du Mont, Janice; Macdonald, Sheila; Kosa, Daisy; Elliot, Shannon; Spencer, Charmaine; Yaffe, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Elder abuse, a universal human rights problem, is associated with many negative consequences. In most jurisdictions, however, there are no comprehensive hospital-based interventions for elder abuse that address the totality of needs of abused older adults: psychological, physical, legal, and social. As the first step towards the development of such an intervention, we undertook a systematic scoping review. Objectives Our primary objective was to systematically extract and synthesize actionable and applicable recommendations for components of a multidisciplinary intersectoral hospital-based elder abuse intervention. A secondary objective was to summarize the characteristics of the responses reviewed, including methods of development and validation. Methods The grey and scholarly literatures were systematically searched, with two independent reviewers conducting the title, abstract and full text screening. Documents were considered eligible for inclusion if they: 1) addressed a response (e.g., an intervention) to elder abuse, 2) contained recommendations for responding to abused older adults with potential relevance to a multidisciplinary and intersectoral hospital-based elder abuse intervention; and 3) were available in English. Analysis The extracted recommendations for care were collated, coded, categorized into themes, and further reviewed for relevancy to a comprehensive hospital-based response. Characteristics of the responses were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results 649 recommendations were extracted from 68 distinct elder abuse responses, 149 of which were deemed relevant and were categorized into 5 themes: Initial contact; Capacity and consent; Interview with older adult, caregiver, collateral contacts, and/or suspected abuser; Assessment: physical/forensic, mental, psychosocial, and environmental/functional; and care plan. Only 6 responses had been evaluated, suggesting a significant gap between development and implementation of

  14. Developing paediatric medicines: identifying the needs and recognizing the challenges.

    PubMed

    Ernest, Terry B; Elder, David P; Martini, Luigi G; Roberts, Matthew; Ford, James L

    2007-08-01

    There is a significant need for research and development into paediatric medicines. Only a small fraction of the drugs marketed and utilized as therapeutic agents in children have been clinically evaluated. The majority of marketed drugs are either not labelled, or inadequately labelled, for use in paediatric patients. The absence of suitable medicines or critical safety and efficacy information poses significant risks to a particularly vulnerable patient population. However, there are many challenges associated with developing medicines for the paediatric population and this review paper is intended to highlight these. The paediatric population is made up of a wide range of individuals of substantially varied physical size, weight and stage of physiological development. Experimentation on children is considered by many to be unethical, resulting in difficulties in obtaining critical safety data. Clinical trials are subject to detailed scrutiny by the various regulatory bodies who have recently recognized the need for pharmaceutical companies to invest in paediatric medicines. The costs associated with paediatric product development could result in poor or negative return on investment and so incentives have been proposed by the EU and US regulatory bodies. Additionally, some commonly used excipients may be unsuitable for use in children; and some dosage forms may be undesirable to the paediatric population. PMID:17725846

  15. Paediatric emergency department utilisation: is it necessary an educational intervention?

    PubMed

    De Tina, Annalisa; Quattrin, Rosanna; Montina, Laura; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years there has been a progressive increase in accesses to services for paediatric emergency room, documented in Italy and abroad. The aim of the study is describe the sociodemographic, cultural, subjective and objective factors for non-urgent access to paediatric emergency service in an Italian region. It was adopted a descriptive survey of a sample of non-urgent accesses to two paediatric emergency room services in an Italian region during the period from February-March 2009, through the administration of questionnaires and the consultation of facilities databases. Half of the accesses to the paediatric emergency room are not urgent and are to be referred to the paediatric primary care. 80% of the users do not call for advice before coming to the emergency room. The convenience of the service, which accounts for more than 50% of the case, and the proximity from home are reasons to go to the emergency room. Approximately half of the accesses to the paediatric emergency department could be managed by primary care services. The convenience of the service, the self-referred and the proximity to home are emerging as the only influential factors reported by literature. In the future it should become crucial providing strategies for education/health information focused on non-urgent paediatric problems and offering people a call center phone service in order to filter and prevent the inappropriate accesses. PMID:25008221

  16. Recent advances in paediatric cardiac anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Vakamudi, Mahesh; Ravulapalli, Harish; Karthikeyan, Ranjith

    2012-09-01

    Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia involves anaesthetizing very small children with complex congenital heart disease for major surgical procedures. The unique nature of this patient population requires considerable expertise and in-depth knowledge of the altered physiology. There have been several developments in the last decade in this subspecialty that has contributed to better care and improved outcome in this vulnerable group of patients. The purpose of this review is to present some of the recent advances in the anesthetic management of these children from preoperative evaluation to postoperative care. This article reviews the role of magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in preoperative evaluation, the use of ultrasound to secure vascular access, the use of cuffed endotracheal tubes, the optimal haematocrit and the role of blood products, including the use of recombinant factor VIIa. It also deals with the advances in technology that have led to improved monitoring, the newer developments in cardiopulmonary bypass, the use of centrifugal pumps and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and the role of DHCA. The role of new drugs, especially the α-2 agonists in paediatric cardiac anesthetic practice, fast tracking and effective postoperative pain management have also been reviewed. PMID:23293388

  17. Paediatric Preputial Pathology: Are we Circumcising Enough?

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, IE; Cosgrove, C; Lambert, AW

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Preputial problems are a common reason for referral to the paediatric surgical out-patient department. Many boys referred do not need surgical intervention. One indication for intervention is balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO), a potentially serious condition previously considered rare in childhood. PATIENTS AND METHODS Consecutive boys referred to a paediatric general surgical out-patient department with problems relating to their prepuce during a period of 4 years were included. The out-patient diagnosis and management was recorded. All foreskins excised were sent for histological analysis. RESULTS A total of 422 boys were referred, median age 6 years 2 months (range, 3 months to 16 years). Over half the boys referred simply required re-assurance that all was normal with their penis. However, 186 boys (44.1%) were listed for surgical procedures – 148 circumcision, 33 preputial adhesiolysis, and 5 frenuloplasty. There were histological abnormalities in 110 specimens (84.8%); chronic inflammation (n = 69; 46.6%), BXO (n = 51; 34.5%), and fibrosis(n = 4; 2.7%). Nineteen (12.8%) specimens were reported as histologically normal. The overall prevalence of BXO in the boys referred was 12.1%. CONCLUSIONS In this series, the percentage of boys circumcised and the prevalence of BXO were both higher than in other published series. BXO may be more common and present at a younger age than previously thought. PMID:17316525

  18. Clinical practice: immune thrombocytopenia in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Labarque, Veerle; Van Geet, Chris

    2014-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a disease affecting both children and adults. It is defined as acquired isolated thrombocytopenia caused by the autoimmune production of anti-platelet antibodies. Childhood ITP most frequently occurs in young children who have been previously well, although a viral respiratory tract infection often precedes thrombocytopenia. A benign and self-limiting course is common, but major bleeding complications such as intracranial haemorrhage may occur. Yet one cannot predict which child will have a prolonged course of thrombocytopenia and who will develop an intracranial haemorrhage. In children without atypical characteristics, only minimal diagnostic investigations are needed, and most paediatric ITP patients do not need platelet-enhancing therapy even though various treatment options are available. A "watch and wait" strategy should be considered in paediatric patients with mild disease. Steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin G or anti-D immunoglobulin are the current first-line therapeutic measures for children at risk for severe bleeding. When life-threatening bleeding occurs, a combination of therapies is needed. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge on primary ITP in children and adolescents. PMID:24390128

  19. Osteoporosis in paediatric patients with spina bifida

    PubMed Central

    Marreiros, Humberto Filipe; Loff, Clara; Calado, Eulalia

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and morbidity associated with osteoporosis and fractures in patients with spina bifida (SB) highlight the importance of osteoporosis prevention and treatment in early childhood; however, the issue has received little attention. The method for the selection of appropriate patients for drug treatment has not been clarified. Objective To review the literature concerning fracture risks and low bone density in paediatric patients with SB. We looked for studies describing state-of-the-art treatments and for prevention of secondary osteoporosis. Methods Articles were identified through a search in the electronic database (PUBMED) supplemented with reviews of the reference lists of selected papers. The main outcome measures were incidence of fractures and risk factors for fracture, an association between bone mineral density (BMD) and occurrence of fracture, risk factors of low BMD, and effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on BMD and on the incidence of fractures. We considered as a secondary outcome the occurrence of fractures in relation to the mechanism of injury. Results Results indicated that patients with SB are at increased risk for fractures and low BMD. Risk factors that may predispose patients to fractures include higher levels of neurological involvement, non-ambulatory status, physical inactivity, hypercalciuria, higher body fat levels, contractures, and a previous spontaneous fracture. Limitations were observed in the number and quality of studies concerning osteoporosis prevention and treatment in paediatric patients with SB. The safety and efficiency of drugs to treat osteoporosis in adults have not been evaluated satisfactorily in children with SB. PMID:22330186

  20. Paediatric pandemic planning: children's perspectives and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Koller, Donna; Nicholas, David; Gearing, Robin; Kalfa, Ora

    2010-07-01

    Children, as major stakeholders in paediatric hospitals, have remained absent from discussions on important healthcare issues. One critical area where children's voices have been minimised is in the planning for future pandemics. This paper presents a subset of data from a programme of research which examined various stakeholder experiences of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreaks of 2003. These data also generated recommendations for future pandemic planning. Specifically, this paper will examine the perspectives and recommendations of children hospitalised during SARS in a large paediatric hospital in Canada. Twenty-one (n = 21) child and adolescent participants were interviewed from a variety of medical areas including cardiac (n = 2), critical care (n = 2), organ transplant (n = 4), respiratory medicine (n = 8) and infectious diseases (patients diagnosed with suspected or probable SARS; n = 5). Data analyses exposed a range of children's experiences associated with the outbreaks as well as recommendations for future pandemic planning. Key recommendations included specific policies and guidelines concerning psychosocial care, infection control, communication strategies and the management of various resources. This paper is guided by a conceptual framework comprised of theories from child development and literature on children's rights. The authors call for greater youth participation in healthcare decision-making and pandemic planning. PMID:20180866

  1. Selective lung intubation during paediatric thoracic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mixa, V; Nedomova, B; Rygl, M

    2016-01-01

    Selective lung intubation is a necessary prerequisite for the completion of most interventions comprising thoracotomy and thoracoscopy. In paediatric care, our site uses Univent tubes for children up to the age of three years and double-lumen tubes (DLT) for children from 6-8 years of age. In younger children, we usually use regular endotracheal intubation, with the lung being held in the hemithorax position being operated on using a surgical retractor. The article presents the analysis of 860 thoracic surgeries, of which 491 comprised selective intubation (Univent 57 cases, DLT 434 cases). The use of the aforementioned devices is connected with certain complications. Univent tube can be connected with intraoperative dislocation of the obturating balloon (29.8%) and balloon perforation (5.2%). DLT insertion may be connected with failure of tube fitting. In 84 cases we had to repeat DLT insertion (20.6%). In 8 cases we were not able to insert DLT at all (1.8%). Standard use of selective intubation methods in paediatric patients from two years of age improved the conditions for surgical interventions (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 19). PMID:27546541

  2. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:26229655

  3. Systems for Paediatric Sepsis: A Global Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kang, KT; Chandler, HK; Espinosa, V; Kissoon, N

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the resources available for early diagnosis and treatment of paediatric sepsis at hospitals in developing and developed countries. Methods: This was a voluntary online survey involving 101 hospitals from 41 countries solicited through the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies contact list and website. The survey was designed to assess the spectrum of sepsis epidemiology, patterns of applied therapies, availability of resources and barriers to optimal sepsis treatment. Results: Ninety per cent of respondents represented a tertiary or general hospital with paediatric intensive care facilities, including 63% from developed countries. Adequate triage services were absent in more than 20% of centres. Insufficiently trained personnel and lack of a sepsis protocol was reported in 40% of all sites. While there were specific guidelines for sepsis management in 78% of centres (n = 100), protocols for assessing sepsis patients were not applied in nearly 70% of centres. Lack of parental recognition of sepsis and failure of referring centres to diagnose sepsis were identified as major barriers by more than 50% of respondents. Conclusions: Even among centres with no significant resource constraints and advanced medical systems, significant deficits in sepsis care exist. Early recognition and management remains a key issue and may be addressed through improved triage, augmented support for referring centres and public awareness. Focussed research is necessary at the institutional level to identify and address specific barriers. PMID:25867557

  4. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes.

  5. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart.

    PubMed

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies - body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior-posterior (AP)/posterior-anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:26229655

  6. Medicolegal issues in paediatric practice: proceedings of the 4th Northern Regional Paediatric Colloquium.

    PubMed

    Cousins, D A; Barrett, I; Kaplan, C A

    2004-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas frequently arise in paediatric practice. Given the nature of the speciality, these issues are pertinent to both the medical and legal professions. It is of potential benefit for the professions to meet and discuss such cases outwith the immediate clinical setting. A series of such meetings have been held in the Northern region. We report the proceedings of the fourth meeting. Four cases were presented and the issues arising were debated. The key points from each discussion are described. PMID:14984219

  7. Paediatric patient family engagement with clinical research at a tertiary care paediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Carson; Ansermino, Mark J; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Mulpuri, Kishore; Doan, Quynh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subject recruitment is essential for conducting clinical research; however, there are very few studies evaluating research uptake by families in a paediatric setting. OBJECTIVES: To determine how frequently paediatric patients and their families receiving care at a tertiary paediatric hospital participated in research. The secondary objectives were to explore factors that influence patient families’ decisions to participate in research and how they perceived their experiences. METHODS: A cross-sectional study surveying families of children receiving care in a sample of clinical areas at a tertiary care paediatric hospital in British Columbia was conducted. A self-administered questionnaire was used, and was facilitated by trained interviewers. Descriptive statistics were used to report the proportion of patient families that have previously been invited to participate in research and, among these, the proportion who had agreed to participate. Patient families’ perceptions of research and their past experiences therein were also reported. RESULTS: A total of 657 families were approached, of which 543 were enrolled (82.6% response rate). Among the 439 families that had visited the hospital previously, 114 (26.0%) had been invited to participate in research and 99 (87%) had consented to participate. Of these 99 families, only one had a negative experience, and 84 (85%) of these participant families were at least somewhat likely to participate in research again in the future. CONCLUSIONS: Only one-quarter of families that had previously visited the hospital had been invited to participate in a research project. Of the families approached previously, there was a high rate of participation and willingness to participate in future research. PMID:25587233

  8. Tracing Sydenham's chorea: historical documents from a British paediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Martino, D; Tanner, A; Defazio, G; Church, A J; Bhatia, K P; Giovannoni, G; Dale, R C

    2005-05-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) became a well defined nosological entity only during the second half of the nineteenth century. Such progress was promoted by the availability of large clinical series provided by newly founded paediatric hospitals. This paper analyses the demographic and clinical features of patients with chorea admitted to the first British paediatric hospital (the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, London) between 1852 and 1936. The seasonal and demographic characteristics of SC during this time appear strikingly similar to those observed today, and witness the introduction of modern "statistically averaging" techniques in the approach to complex paediatric syndromes. Great Ormond Street (GOS) hospital case notes provide detailed descriptions of the "typical cases" of SC, and show that British physicians working in the early age of paediatric hospitals succeeded in recognising the most distinctive clinical features of this fascinating condition. PMID:15851434

  9. Management of Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunts in the Paediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Low, David; Drake, James M; Seow, Wan Tew; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of hydrocephalus is a challenging one. The development of shunt devices have greatly improved the survival and quality of life of paediatric patients with hydrocephalus; however, shunt dysfunction is a common problem which represents a significant scope of work for paediatric neurosurgeons with shunt failures occuring in up to 40 to 50% of patients during the first two years after shunt surgery. Numerous pathologies ranging from congenital to acquired conditions can result in the development of hydrocephalus in the paediatric population. Obstruction of proximal or distal catheter ends, misplacement, infections and over drainage are some of the common problems accounting for shunt failures. We discussed some of the pertinent problems and nuances involved in treatment of paediatric hydrocephalus with VPS as well as to review the role of endoscopic procedures as an alternative to VPS. PMID:22028738

  10. Paediatric obesity and renal transplantation: current challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Terrace, John D; Oniscu, Gabriel C

    2016-04-01

    The increased incidence of obesity in the paediatric population poses significant challenges to renal transplantation. Whilst the body mass index appears to be widely used as a measure of obesity in adults, there are no standardised definitions in the paediatric population, making comparative analyses difficult. In the paediatric transplant population, obesity is associated with an increased incidence of surgical complications, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and cardiovascular morbidity, leading to diminished graft function and impacting patient and graft survival. Management of obesity in renal transplantation requires multiple interventions starting with life-style and behavioural modification combined with medical and possibly surgical therapies, representing a unique challenge in the childhood setting. In this review we discuss the current challenges of obesity and potential solutions in the setting of paediatric transplantation. PMID:26018121

  11. Organizational Issues in the Implementation of a Hospital-Based Syringe Exchange Program

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Carmen L.; Sorensen, James L.; Grossman, Nina; Sporer, Karl A.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Perlman, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Little published information exists to guide health care institutions in establishing syringe exchange program (SEP) services. To address this gap, this article discusses organizational issues encountered in the implementation of a hospital-based SEP in San Francisco, California (USA). Investigators collaborated with a community organization in implementing a county hospital-based SEP. SEP services integrated into a public hospital presented unique challenges directly related to their status as a health care institution. In the course of introducing SEP services into a hospital setting as part of a clinical trial, various ethical, legal, and logistical issues were raised. Based on these experiences, this paper provides guidance on how to integrate an SEP into a traditional health care institution. PMID:20397875

  12. Exclusive hospital-based service agreements: what radiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Blau, Michael L

    2004-07-01

    This article provides radiologists with the information that they need to know to participate meaningfully in negotiating or renegotiating an exclusive hospital-based radiology service agreement. It discusses the contract negotiation process, including how to identify and prioritize contract objectives, and how to assess and create bargaining leverage. Options for achieving contract longevity, for resolving "turf" issues and for achieving financial objectives are also addressed. The article further explains the key regulatory issues that shape exclusive hospital-based radiology service agreements, including antitrust, fraud and abuse, Stark Law, HIPAA, tax, and Medicare reimbursement considerations. The author discusses the contract negotiation process from both the radiology group and hospital perspectives. He suggests that successful negotiation will depend on "fitting" the group's contracting agenda with the hospital's priorities, organizational structure, culture and resources. PMID:17411635

  13. An analysis of revenues and expenses in a hospital-based ambulatory pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Berkelhamer, J E; Rojek, K J

    1988-05-01

    We developed a method of analyzing revenues and expenses in a hospital-based ambulatory pediatric practice. Results of an analysis of the Children's Medical Group (CMG) at the University of Chicago Medical Center demonstrate how changes in collection rates, practice expenses, and hospital underwriting contribute to the financial outcome of the practice. In this analysis, certain programmatic goals of the CMG are achieved at a level of just under 12,000 patient visits per year. At this activity level, pediatric residency program needs are met and income to the CMG physicians is maximized. An ethical problem from the physician's perspective is created by seeking profit maximization. To accomplish this end, the CMG physicians would have to restrict their personal services to only the better-paying patients. This study serves to underscore the importance of hospital-based physicians and hospital administrators structuring fiscal incentives for physicians that mutually meet the institutional goals for the hospital and its physicians. PMID:3358399

  14. Nonoffending Guardian Assessment of Hospital-Based Sexual Abuse/Assault Services for Children.

    PubMed

    Du Mont, Janice; Macdonald, Sheila; Kosa, Daisy; Smith, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    In circumstances in which child sexual abuse/assault is suspected, pediatric guidelines recommend referral to services such as multidisciplinary hospital-based violence treatment centers, for specialized medical treatment, forensic documentation, and counseling. As little is known about how such services are perceived, the objective of this case report was to measure the satisfaction of nonoffending guardians of child sexual abuse/assault victims who presented for care at Ontario's hospital-based sexual assault treatment centers. Of the 1,136 individuals who reported sexual abuse/assault and were enrolled in a province-wide service evaluation, 58 were 11 years old and younger. Thirty-three guardians completed a survey. Ratings of care were overwhelmingly positive, with 97% of respondents indicating that they would recommend these services. Nonetheless, it is important to evaluate these pediatric sexual assault services frequently to ensure ongoing optimal, family-centered care. PMID:26910267

  15. Hospital-based Surveillance of Rotavirus Diarrhea among Under- five Children in Chandigarh.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhu; Singh, M P; Guglani, Vishal; Mahajan, K S; Pandit, S

    2016-07-01

    In a prospective hospital-based surveillance of 958 under five children admitted with acute gastroenteritis in Chandigarh (May 2011 to July 2012), 239 stool samples were collected. Rotavirus antigen was detected in 18.8% of samples by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Genotypes G1P[8] (53.3%), G12P[6] (15.6%) were prevalent, and G3 not detected. PMID:27508548

  16. Surviving managed care: the effect on job satisfaction in hospital-based nursing.

    PubMed

    Buiser, M

    2000-06-01

    Major changes brought about by managed care have redefined the nursing profession. Current trends such as case management, downsizing, restructuring of the workforce, and changes in the patient profile have had numerous effects, particularly on job satisfaction among hospital-based nurses. Strategies to improve job satisfaction during this era of increased managed care penetration include enhanced communication mechanisms, support from hospital administration, implementation of care models that promote professional nursing practice, adequate staffing, and competitive salaries and benefits. PMID:11033702

  17. Azithromycin use in paediatrics: A practical overview

    PubMed Central

    Ovetchkine, Philippe; Rieder, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin is an antibiotic that is commonly prescribed for upper and lower respiratory tract infections in children. While it has proven benefits, some concerns regarding azithromycin use have arisen in recent years. This practice point considers azithromycin therapy for acute respiratory infections in otherwise healthy children. Pharmacokinetics, spectrum of activity, the problem of resistant bacteria and clinical aspects are considered, along with recommendations for use and contraindications. Azithromycin should be avoided in patients with a significant risk of bacteremia. It is associated with pneumococcal resistance and, with stated exceptions, is generally not recommended for the treatment of acute pharyngitis, acute otitis media or pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia in the paediatric population. PMID:24421702

  18. Aspects of deceased organ donation in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Brierley, J; Hasan, A

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplantation offers children in acute or chronic severe organ failure similar opportunities to adults. However, while the number who might benefit is relatively low, significantly fewer cadaveric donors exist for any given child compared with an adult. Incompatible organ size and relatively low donation rates mean that despite living parental donation and innovations to reduce donated organ size, children die before organs become available. The severity of the UK situation is compounded by restrictions on paediatric living donation, uncertainties over the application of brain death criteria, and ethical concerns about the use of donation after circulatory death. The UK Department of Health's Organ Donation Task Force suggested the means by which the adult donor pool might be increased, recommending that outstanding ethical and legal issues be resolved, but made no specific recommendations about children. PMID:22194438

  19. Retinal haemorrhages associated with fatal paediatric infections.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, Marcus C; Lantz, Patrick E

    2015-04-01

    For many physicians, retinal haemorrhages (RHs) in infants and young children remain highly diagnostic of non-accidental (abusive) head trauma. Because clinicians have applied indirect ophthalmoscopy selectively to cases of suspected child abuse, the association between RH and other conditions such as infection, coagulopathy and accidental trauma has encountered habitual bias, creating the potential for iatrogenic misdiagnosis of child abuse. We present an autopsy case series of four children, aged three years old or younger, in whom RHs were detected by post-mortem monocular indirect ophthalmoscopy after the patients had died from infections. We discuss the laterality, number, type and location of RHs in these cases, and summarize proposed mechanisms of RH formation in fatalities from paediatric infection. We demonstrate that many of the ophthalmological findings that have been considered diagnostic of abusive head trauma can also occur in association with infective processes. PMID:24644226

  20. Students’ perceptions of the instructional quality of district hospital-based training

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Shehla Jabbar; Louw, Jakobus Murray; Hugo, Jannie; Rauf, Waqar-un Nisa; Sandars, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background An innovative, three-year training programme, the Bachelor of Clinical Medical Practice (BCMP), for mid-level medical healthcare workers was started in 2009 by the Department of Family Medicine, University of Pretoria. Aim To measure the students’ perceptions of the instructional quality of district hospital-based training. Setting Training of students took place at clinical learning centres in rural district hospitals in the Mpumalanga and Gauteng provinces. Methods A survey using the MedEd IQ questionnaire was performed in 2010 and 2011 to measure BCMP second- and third-year students’ perceptions of instructional quality of district hospital-based training. The MedEd IQ questionnaire is composed of four subscales: preceptor activities, learning opportunities, learner involvement and the learning environment. Composite scores of instructional quality were used to present results. Results The preceptor activities, learning opportunities and the learning environment were considered by second- and third-year BCMP students to be of consistently high instructional quality. In the area of learner involvement, instructional quality increased significantly from second to third year. Conclusion Overall, instructional quality of district hospital-based training was high for both second- and third-year BCMP students, and the instructional quality of learner involvement being significantly higher in third year students. The MedEd IQ tool was a useful tool for measuring instructional quality and to inform programme quality improvement. PMID:27543282

  1. Immunity to hepatitis A in paediatric and nursery nurses.

    PubMed

    Poole, C J; Shakespeare, A T

    1996-10-01

    A cross-sectional epidemiological survey of immunity to the hepatitis A virus (HAV) was undertaken in paediatric and nursery nurses to ascertain whether these occupational groups were at an increased risk of infection with the virus. Seropositivity to HAV was measured in 33 surgical (control), 36 paediatric, 55 nursery and 29 specialist paediatric nurses in a district general hospital, community clinics and a children's hospital in the West Midlands. IgG antibodies to HAV were found in 27% of surgical (control), 31% of paediatric (relative risk [RR] = 1.19, 95% confidence interval [Cl] = 0.56-2.51), 26% of nursery nurses (RR = 0.99, Cl = 0.48-2.04) and 10% of specialist paediatric nurses (RR = 0.40, Cl = 0.12-1.35). These data are comparable to immunity to HAV for this age group in the general population of this country and do not support routine immunization of paediatric or nursery nurses against HAV. PMID:8918151

  2. Paediatric nursing in Europe: influencing policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Fiona

    2007-12-01

    The WHO European Health Report 2005 called for significant efforts from all countries to protect and promote children's health. Nurses across Europe have a major role to play in this effort but in many countries they lack the appropriate education and organisational support to make a meaningful contribution. A network of paediatric nursing associations in Europe was formed in 2003 to strengthen nurses' voices in child health policy and improve the potential of nurses to contribute to protecting and promoting the health of children and young people. Based on a consensus definition of the European paediatric nurse, the Paediatric Nursing Associations of Europe has developed consensus position statements on issues such as regulation and educational preparation. These have been used to lobby at national levels with positive results such as new mechanisms for identifying paediatric nurses on some national nursing registers, legislation to protect the use of the title 'paediatric nurse' and consideration of the reintroduction of specific programmes at both pre and post registration level for preparation of paediatric nurses. PMID:18196854

  3. Our surgical heritage: the role of the Department of Paediatric Surgery in the development of paediatric surgery in Cape Town, in Africa, and around the world.

    PubMed

    Rode, Heinz; Millar, Alastair J W

    2012-06-01

    The Department of Paediatric Surgery at the University of Cape Town has made a remarkable contribution to the academic body of knowledge of Paediatric Surgery both in South Africa and around the world. It has played a key role in the development of the specialty in South Africa and through the South African diaspora has trained many paediatric surgeons who have made their mark internationally. More recently it has become a major focus of teaching and training for African paediatric surgeons. This article traces this legacy through its origins in the early 1920s to its current prominent position in the world paediatric surgical community. PMID:22668921

  4. Negative pressure pulmonary oedema following tracheal tube obstruction in a paediatric patient: a preventable anaesthesia related morbidity.

    PubMed

    Imarengiaye, C O; Ogunsakin, A

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe negative pressure pulmonary oedema due to undetected tracheal tube obstruction in a paediatric patient. A healthy 6 week-old scheduled for release of tongue-tie under general anaesthesia was noticed to be diagnosed at the preparation of the surgical site. The patient was quickly assessed, and ventilation with 100% oxygen was commenced. The heart sounds were still present. Two minutes later, pink frothy secretion was noticed in the lumen of the tracheal tube. Assisted manual ventilation was continued for about 3 hours in the intensive care unit (ICU). Clinical examination after 8 hours of oxygen therapy indicated stable vital signs and was discharged to the ward. Undetected tracheal obstruction due to unsupervised patient positioning may result in negative pressure pulmonary oedema in a paediatric patient. Improved communication between the surgical and the anaesthetic teams may prevent this morbidity. PMID:14692058

  5. Impact of 24 hour critical care physician staffing on case-mix adjusted mortality in paediatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Goh, A Y; Lum, L C; Abdel-Latif, M E

    2001-02-10

    The 24 h availability of intensive care consultants (intensivists) has been shown to improve outcomes in adult intensive care units (ICU) in the UK. We tested whether such availability would improve standardised mortality ratios when compared to out-of-hours cover by general paediatricians in the paediatric ICU setting of a medium-income developing country. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) improved significantly from 1.57 (95%CI 1.25-1.95) with non-specialist care to 0.88 (95%CI 0.63-1.19) with intensivist care (rate ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.47-0.67). Mortality odds ratio decreased by 0.234, 0.246 and 0.266 in the low, moderate and high-risk patients. 24 h availability of intensivists was associated with improved outcomes and use of resources in paediatric intensive care in a developing country. PMID:11273070

  6. Assessing the burden of paediatric influenza in Europe: the European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project

    PubMed Central

    Paget, W. John; Casas, Inmaculada; Donker, Gé; Edelman, Laurel; Fleming, Douglas; Larrauri, Amparo; Meijer, Adam; Puzelli, Simona; Rizzo, Caterina; Simonsen, Lone

    2010-01-01

    The European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project is a multi-country project that was created to collect, analyse and present data regarding the paediatric influenza burden in European countries, with the purpose of providing the necessary information to make evidence-based decisions regarding influenza immunisation recommendations for children. The initial approach taken is based on existing weekly virological and age-specific influenza-like illness (ILI) data from surveillance networks across Europe. We use a multiple regression model guided by longitudinal weekly patterns of influenza virus to attribute the weekly ILI consultation incidence pattern to each influenza (sub)type, while controlling for the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics. Modelling the ILI consultation incidence during 2002/2003–2008 revealed that influenza infections that presented for medical attention as ILI affected between 0.3% and 9.8% of children aged 0–4 and 5–14 years in England, Italy, The Netherlands and Spain in an average season. With the exception of Spain, these rates were always higher in children aged 0–4 years. Across the six seasons analysed (five seasons were analysed from the Italian data), the model attributed 47–83% of the ILI burden in primary care to influenza virus infection in the various countries, with the A(H3N2) virus playing the most important role, followed by influenza viruses B and A(H1N1). National season averages from the four countries studied indicated that between 0.4% and 18% of children consulted a physician for ILI, with the percentage depending on the country and health care system. Influenza virus infections explained the majority of paediatric ILI consultations in all countries. The next step will be to apply the EPIA modelling approach to severe outcomes indicators (i.e. hospitalisations and mortality data) to generate a complete range of mild and severe influenza burden estimates needed for decision making

  7. A review of paediatric telehealth for pre- and post-operative surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anthony C; Garner, Lisa; Caffery, Liam J; McBride, Craig A

    2014-10-01

    The Queensland Telepaediatric Service (QTS) was established in the year 2000 to deliver a broad range of paediatric specialist health services from the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) in Brisbane, mainly via videoconference. During a 13-year study period, the QTS facilitated 18,949 video consultations, comprising Mental Health (42%), Medicine (30%), Surgery (21%) and Other (8%). We reviewed the surgical services provided through the QTS. There were 3880 video consultations with a paediatric surgeon. Most of these (91%) used fixed videoconferencing units, 8% were delivered via mobile units (robots) and 1% were delivered using Skype. Surgical consultations were provided by telehealth to 106 sites: 89% in Queensland and the rest to other states. The main surgical specialties were burns (50%), ear, nose and throat (19%), general surgery (21%), orthopaedics (9%) and vascular anomalies (2%). During a 12-month audit period, there were 224 teleconsultations in general surgery; the most common reason for referral was for undescended testes (17%). During the study period there was a significant growth in all surgical telehealth activity: linear regression showed an annual increase of 17 cases per year (P < 0.02). In the last four years of the study, there was a substantial growth in the general surgical component, although there was also a reduction in the burns component. Telehealth has potential for other specialist consultations which require periodic assessment and review. PMID:25400001

  8. Validity of a hospital-based obstetric register using medical records as reference

    PubMed Central

    Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Johansen, Nanna Roed; Rørbye, Christina; Weber, Tom; Due, Pernille; Koushede, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Background Data from hospital-based registers and medical records offer valuable sources of information for clinical and epidemiological research purposes. However, conducting high-quality epidemiological research requires valid and complete data sources. Objective To assess completeness and validity of a hospital-based clinical register – the Obstetric Database – using a national register and medical records as references. Methods We assessed completeness of a hospital-based clinical register – the Obstetric Database – by linking data from all women registered in the Obstetric Database as having given birth in 2013 to the National Patient Register with coverage of all births in 2013. Validity of eleven selected indicators from the Obstetric Database was assessed using medical records as a golden standard. Using a random sample of 250 medical records, we calculated proportion of agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for each indicator. Two assessors independently reviewed medical records and inter-rater reliability was calculated as proportion of agreement and Cohen’s κ coefficient. Results We found 100% completeness of the Obstetric Database when compared to the Danish National Patient Register. Except for one delivery all 6,717 deliveries were present in both registers. Proportion of agreement between the Obstetric Database and medical records ranged from 91.1% to 99.6% for the eleven indicators. The validity measures ranged from 0.70 to 1.00 indicating high validity of the Obstetric Database. κ coefficients from the inter-rater reliability ranged from 0.71 to 1.00. Conclusion Completeness and validity of the Obstetric Database were found acceptable when using the National Patient Register and medical records as golden standards. The Obstetric Database therefore offers a valuable source for examining clinical, administrative, and research questions. PMID:26648757

  9. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Jeevan; Kaehler, Nils; Marahatta, Sujan Babu; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Subedi, Sudarshan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs. Methods A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study. Results The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar) and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%), clothes (9.8%) and transport (7.3%). For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of “days of work loss” were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007), employed house head (p = 0.011), monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees) (p = 0.014), private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001), C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001), longer duration (>5days) of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001), longer distance (>15km) from house to hospital (p = 0.0001) and longer travel time (>240 minutes) from house to hospital (p = 0.007) showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs). Conclusion Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time) were associated

  10. [Paediatric simulation today and tomorrow. Perspectives and concepts].

    PubMed

    Jordi Ritz, E-M; Eich, C; Gisin, S; Heinzel, O; Hüpfl, M; Erb, T O

    2009-12-01

    The confrontation with critically ill newborns, infants and small children is rare and poses a particular challenge for the medical team. Confident technical and non-technical skills are essential for successful emergency treatment. Paediatric simulators facilitate a didactic infrastructure, linking textbook theory with experience-based practice. To summarize the current status of paediatric simulation in Germany, Austria and Switzerland an online survey of all associated centres was conducted. Paediatric simulation is currently available at 24 centres, which have 39 paediatric simulators available, including 8 for newborns, 26 for infants and 5 for children. A certain congruence of standards is detectable among these centres and most instructors have completed a specialized instructor training. Of the instructors 26% are specialized nursing personnel and 67% are physicians of which most are paediatricians and anaesthesiologists. Many centres (38%) operate solely by means of the enthusiastic dedication of the employees who organize various activities during their free time. Nearly all centres (92%) place particular emphasis on non-technical skills which include the interpersonal aspects of crisis resource management. Video-supported debriefing is considered to be the basis for effective training. Within the scope of the recently established PaedSim project the curricula of paediatric simulation courses should be more structured and internationally standardized, thereby increasing both efficacy and sustainability of these training programs. PMID:20012246

  11. Understanding the responsibilities and obligations of the modern paediatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Spencer W

    2015-02-01

    The modern paediatric surgeon needs to be competent in multiple domains that extend well beyond their clinical and technical expertise. This article, based on the Journal of Pediatric Surgery Lecture at the BAPS Congress (2014), explores some of these less well understood responsibilities and obligations, including professionalism, leadership, effective clinical teaching, and research. The consequence of falling short in these areas includes risks to our profession as a whole as well as compromising our ability to provide our patients with the best clinical care. Paediatric surgeons have a responsibility to influence the configuration of services to improve the quality of care and equity of access to specialist services for all children in their region. Evidence presented shows how a well-organised and funded regional paediatric surgical service allows children to receive quality treatment closer to home and is reflected in better clinical outcomes, less unnecessary surgery, and fewer complications. A paradigm for support to emerging countries as they increase the capacity and infrastructure of their paediatric surgical services is proposed. The way we judge ourselves and others should relate to our performance across the full scope of roles that a responsible and committed paediatric surgeon is expected to display. PMID:25638607

  12. Down syndrome and postoperative complications after paediatric cardiac surgery: a propensity-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Roland; Szántó, Péter; Prodán, Zsolt; Lex, Daniel J; Sápi, Erzsébet; Szatmári, András; Gál, János; Szántó, Tamás; Székely, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The incidence of congenital heart disease is ∼50%, mostly related to endocardial cushion defects. The aim of our study was to investigate the postoperative complications that occur after paediatric cardiac surgery. METHODS Our perioperative data were analysed in paediatric patients with Down syndrome undergoing cardiac surgery. We retrospectively analysed the data from 2063 consecutive paediatric patients between January 2003 and December 2008. After excluding the patients who died or had missing data, the analysed database (before propensity matching) contained 129 Down patients and 1667 non-Down patients. After propensity matching, the study population comprised 222 patients and 111 patients had Down syndrome. RESULTS Before propensity matching, the occurrences of low output syndrome (21.2 vs 32.6%, P = 0.003), pulmonary complication (14 vs 28.7%, P < 0.001) and severe infection (11.9 vs 22.5%, P = 0.001) were higher in the Down group. Down patients were more likely to have prolonged mechanical ventilation [median (interquartile range) 22 (9–72) h vs 49 (24–117) h, P = 0.007]. The total intensive care unit length of stay [6.9 (4.2–12.4) days vs 8.3 (5.3–13.2) days, P = 0.04] and the total hospital length of stay [17.3 (13.3–23.2) days vs 18.3 (15.1–23.6) days, P = 0.05] of the Down patients were also longer. Mortality was similar in the two groups before (3.58 vs 3.88%, P = 0.86) and after (5.4 vs 4.5%, P = 1.00) propensity matching. After propensity matching, there was no difference in the occurrence of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS After propensity matching Down syndrome was not associated with increased mortality or complication rate following congenital cardiac surgery. PMID:23832837

  13. Whole-body MRI in paediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Littooij, Annemieke S

    2016-05-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and follow-up of paediatric malignancies. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has been the imaging technique of choice in children with cancer, but nowadays there is an increasing interest in the use of functional imaging techniques like positron emission tomography and single-photon emission tomography. These later techniques are often combined with CT allowing for simultaneous acquisition of image data on the biological behaviour of tumour, as well as the anatomical localisation and extent of tumour spread. Because of the small but not negligible risk of radiation induced secondary cancers and the significantly improved overall survival rates of children with cancer, there is an increasing interest in the use of alternative imaging techniques that do not use ionising radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging tool that allows for acquiring images with a high spatial resolution and excellent soft tissue contrast throughout the body. Moreover, recent technological advances have resulted in fast diagnostic sequences for whole-body MR imaging (WB-MRI), including functional techniques such as diffusion weighted imaging. In this review, the current status of the technique and major clinical applications of WB-MRI in children with cancer will be discussed. PMID:26631075

  14. [Strategies for paediatric spleen and liver injuries].

    PubMed

    Zundel, S; Lieber, J; Tsiflikas, I; Henk, A-K; Schmittenbecher, P

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injuries of the spleen and liver are typically caused by age-related falls or sports and traffic accidents. Today, the non-operative management for isolated injuries is established and evidence-based guidelines are available. The intact abdominal wall and the limited space within the peritoneum produce a compression which is the pathophysiological explanation for the limitation of the haemorrhage. Precondition for the non-operative therapy is the radiology-based classification of the injury (organ injury scale) and a haemodynamically stable patient. Haemodynamic stability is, if necessary maintained with blood transfusion, volume substitutes and the administration of catecholamines. In cases of hilar vascular injury and devascularisation or haemodynamic instability of the patient, despite utilisation of the measures mentioned above, urgent operative therapy needs to be performed. Organ sparing surgery is the therapy of choice for both liver and spleen. The spleen is required for the development of a competent immune system in the growing organism. Liver injuries can be further complicated by injury to the bile system, which might require operative reconstruction. If a patient suffers from multiple injuries and spleen or liver are involved, the decision on the management needs to be taken individually, no guidelines exist but the rate for operative therapy increases. Independent of the dimensions of injury, an experienced paediatric surgeon with his multidisciplinary team, considering the anatomic and age specific characteristics of a child, achieves the best therapeutic results. PMID:25531632

  15. Satisfaction and attrition in paediatric weight management.

    PubMed

    Skelton, J A; Martin, S; Irby, M B

    2016-04-01

    Paediatric obesity treatment experiences unacceptably high rates of attrition. Few studies have explored parent and child perspectives on dropout. This study sought to capture child and parent experience in treatment and expressed contributors to attrition. Children and parents enrolled in a single family-based weight management programme participated in semi-structured interviews, conducted either upon completion of the first intensive phase of treatment or program dropout. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and coded using a multistage inductive approach. Interviews were obtained from 57 parents and 30 children, nearly equal between 'completers' or 'dropouts'. Five themes emerged: overall positive experience with programme; logistical challenges of participation; improved health; discrepancies between child and parent experience and perception, and importance of structure and expectations of weight loss. Primary reasons given for dropout were time commitment; distance from clinic; missed school and work; lack of dedicated adolescent programme; clinic hours; and stress. Few parents or children expressed dissatisfaction. Children reportedly enjoyed 'having someone to talk to' about weight, and spending increased time with family. Children and parents overall reported positive experiences in this weight management programme. Attrition appears more related to logistical issues than low satisfaction. Innovative approaches to help overcome logistical challenges and preserve positive aspects may help in decreasing programme attrition. PMID:27008068

  16. Paediatrics and the doctor-soldier.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John H

    2012-08-01

    Sick and injured children, like combatants wounded by shot and shell in war, are disproportionately represented in the tallies of both man-made and national disasters. Paediatricians have a particularly proud heritage of military service, a nexus dating in Australia from the early 19th century. This paper traces this link between service to children in peacetime and the care of servicemen, women and children in times of war and disaster. The extraordinary record of Australian 'paediatric' doctors who also served in the Gallipoli Campaign (1915) is documented as an illustration of this duality. Paediatricians who serve in the Defence Reserves and in civilian non-government organisations which respond to disasters and civil wars have special credentials in their advocacy for the protection of children enmeshed in conflict or disaster. Such applies particularly to the banning of the recruitment and use of child soldiers; support for children caught up in refugee and illegal immigrant confrontations; and continued advocacy for greater international compliance with the Ottawa Convention to ban the use of anti-personnel landmines. Volunteering for such service must occur in cold 'down time', ensuring that paediatricians are trained in disaster and conflict response, when such challenges inevitably confront the paediatricians of the future. PMID:22471873

  17. Recent pharmacological advances in paediatric analgesics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J; Palmer, G M

    2006-08-01

    Growth and development are two linked processes that distinguish children from adults. The use of size as the primary covariate during pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses allows exploration of the effects of age. Allometric scaling models have assisted understanding of the developmental clearance changes in common analgesic drugs such as paracetamol, morphine, tramadol and local anaesthetics agents. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (pharmacogenomics [PG]) and their impact on hepatic drug metabolism for opioids, tramadol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and drug receptor responses are increasingly reported. Altered chemical structure or formulations of common analgesics alter pharmacodynamic (PD) effects enhancing safety and efficacy for NSAIDs by stereoselectivity and the addition of nitric oxide, for intravenous paracetamol by formulation and structural difference from propacetamol and for local anaesthetics through stereoselectivity. This article focuses upon recent data for analgesics used in paediatric pain management including paracetamol, NSAIDs, morphine, tramadol, amide local anaesthetics and ketamine. It centres on PK and clinical studies in neonates, infants and children. PG studies are acknowledged as potentially allowing individual drug therapy tailoring through a decrease in between-patient population variability, although the impact of PG in the very young is less certain. There are few data describing age-related PD changes in children despite recognition that the number, affinity and type of receptors or the availability of natural ligands changes with age. PMID:16854558

  18. Assessment of the use of angiotensin receptor blockers in major European markets among paediatric population for treating essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Balkrishnan, R; Phatak, H; Gleim, G; Karve, S

    2009-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the use of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in European paediatric patients experiencing essential hypertension. This was a retrospective analysis of the IMS MIDAS Prescribing Insight Medical Database. Five major important European markets, including France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK were studied for the usage of ARBs as either a monotherapy or fixed-dose combination (FDC) therapy . Paediatric patients with essential hypertension were identified using ICD-10 codes, and anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) classification was used to identify major classes of antihypertensives. Projected prescription data for paediatric patients (<18 years) in the time period of October 2005 to September 2006 were analysed. Special emphasis was placed on the category of 6-17 years of age, as many ARBs were recommended in children above 6 years of age. Out of 242,405 estimated paediatric patients with hypertension, 222,033 (91.6%) were diagnosed with essential hypertension. Out of 230,220 projected prescriptions dispensed in these essential hypertensives, approximately 76.2% were for patients in the category of 6-17 years of. In the age group of 6-17 years, ARBs constituted 25.5% of the projected prescriptions, with 10.6% in the form of FDC of ARBs with hydrochlorothiazides (HCTz). Projected ARB prescription usage, either as a monotherapy or as an FDC with HCTz, was higher in Italy (35.7%), France (30.9%) and Spain (28.1%), but was lower in Germany (5.3%), and non-existent in the United Kingdom. Valsartan-based and losartan-based FDCs were commonly used in the age range of 6-17 years, and accounted for 39. and 13.9% of the projected prescription volume in the ARB-FDC category, respectively. In a majority of the important European markets, paediatric hypertensive patients in the age range of 6-17 years are often treated with ARB monotherapy or FDC therapy. Some ARBs lack necessary clinical studies to support its use in treating essential

  19. Developing leadership practices in hospital-based nurse educators in an online learning community.

    PubMed

    Stutsky, Brenda J; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-based nurse educators are in a prime position to mentor future nurse leaders; however, they need to first develop their own leadership practices. The goal was to establish a learning community where hospital-based nurse educators could develop their own nursing leadership practices within an online environment that included teaching, cognitive, and social presence. Using a pretest/posttest-only nonexperimental design, 35 nurse educators from three Canadian provinces engaged in a 12-week online learning community via a wiki where they learned about exemplary leadership practices and then shared stories about their own leadership practices. Nurse educators significantly increased their own perceived leadership practices after participation in the online community, and teaching, cognitive, and social presence was determined to be present in the online community. It was concluded that leadership development can be enhanced in an online learning community using a structured curriculum, multimedia presentations, and the sharing and analysis of leadership stories. Educators who participated should now be better equipped to role model exemplary leadership practices and mentor our nurse leaders of the future. PMID:24256766

  20. Improving infant sleep safety through a comprehensive hospital-based program.

    PubMed

    Goodstein, Michael H; Bell, Theodore; Krugman, Scott D

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated a comprehensive hospital-based infant safe sleep education program on parental education and safe sleep behaviors in the home using a cross-sectional survey of new parents at hospital discharge (HD) and 4-month follow-up (F/U). Knowledge and practices of infant safe sleep were compared to the National Infant Sleep Position Study benchmark. There were 1092 HD and 490 F/U surveys. Supine sleep knowledge was 99.8% at HD; 94.8% of families planned to always use this position. At F/U, 97.3% retained supine knowledge, and 84.9% maintained this position exclusively (P < .01). Knowledge of crib as safest surface was 99.8% at HD and 99.5% F/U. Use in the parents' room fell to 91.9% (HD) and 68.2% (F/U). Compared to the National Infant Sleep Position Study, the F/U group was more likely to use supine positioning and a bassinette or crib. Reinforcing the infant sleep safety message through intensive hospital-based education improves parental compliance with sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction guidelines. PMID:25670685

  1. The decision to add a second hospital-based EMS helicopter.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R; Leicht, M J; Brotman, S

    1989-11-01

    An analysis of the first seven years of performance of our hospital-based emergency medical services (EMS) helicopter was conducted to evaluate the possible need for a second aircraft. A survey of seven hospitals currently operating two or more helicopters resulted in a consensus that one helicopter can effectively perform only 70 to 90 flights per month. The number of requests for our helicopter service has increased 148% from 610 to 1,512 in seven years while the number of completed missions has increased only 92% from 486 (40.5/month) to 935 (78/month). Requests denied due to inclement weather (265 in 1988) cannot be captured with a second visual-flight-rated (VFR) EMS helicopter; however, those missed due to maintenance requirements of the helicopter and overlapping requests (232 in 1988) can be captured. The need for a second aircraft exists when the number of requests for the service grows while the number of captured flights plateaus. Our data and industry survey suggests this will occur at 75 captured flights per month. Affordability and continued overall growth of trauma and other critical care referrals to the base hospital(s) is mandatory. This study provides a model for hospital-based EMS helicopter operators to apply to the decision whether to add a second aircraft. PMID:10296622

  2. Hospital-based nurse practitioner roles and interprofessional practice: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Forchuk, Cheryl; Orchard, Carole; van Soeren, Mary; Reeves, Scott

    2014-09-01

    This scoping review provides current global understanding of the rapidly evolving nurse practitioner role within hospital settings, and considers the level of understanding of its enactment within interprofessional teamwork. Arksey and O'Malley's framework was used to explore recent primary research, reviews, and gray literature in two ways. First, hospital-based nurse practitioner literature was mapped to country of origin, and thematically summarized. Second, clearly developed and consistently defined key interprofessional concepts were identified in the interprofessional literature then conceptually mapped to the nurse practitioner studies by their operationalization. The nurse practitioner review located 103 abstracts. Twenty-nine, originating from four countries, met the inclusion criteria. The interprofessional concept review identified a total of 137 relevant abstracts, however, only ten met the inclusion criteria. Understanding the nurse practitioner role within hospital teams remains limited due to a small number of countries producing evidence, the lack of nurse practitioner role title standardization hindering consistent knowledgebase development, and limited application and inconsistent operationalization of concepts within nurse practitioner research. Research focused on role enactment is needed to understand the uniqueness of the hospital-based nurse practitioner role. PMID:24330003

  3. Paediatric radiation oncology in the care of childhood cancer: A position paper by the International Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS).

    PubMed

    Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Freeman, Carolyn; Marcus, Karen; Claude, Line; Dieckmann, Karin; Halperin, Edward; Esiashvili, Natia; Paulino, Arnold; Mahajan, Anita; Seiersen, Klaus; Ahern, Verity; Ricardi, Umberto; Carrie, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Paediatric malignancies are a challenge for the radiation oncologist due to their rarity, the great variety of histological types, and the complexity of treatment concepts that evolve over time. The Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS) is the only internationally operating society for paediatric radiation oncology. The objectives of PROS are to set a world-wide standard of excellence with respect to radiation oncology aspects in curing children and adolescents with cancer, to provide a forum for communication between radiation oncologists, and to exchange information with all professionals involved in the management of paediatric and adolescent cancer. Challenges include the need to promote education and support practice in low and middle income countries (LMIC) as well as the cost and availability of modern treatment technologies for all but most especially these countries. Collaborations with other societies that include for example the education programmes provided jointly with ESTRO, and the upgraded technical platform of the PROS web site offer new possibilities to enhance the efficacy of PROS in education and support of paediatric radiation oncology practice world-wide. PROS has made an important contribution to the management of childhood malignancies over the past decade and new and developing collaborations between PROS and other societies or organizations will ultimately lead to a reduction in world-wide health care inequalities. PMID:27106553

  4. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2008-09-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies. PMID:26525515

  5. Basics, principles, techniques and modern methods in paediatric ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the mainstay of paediatric Radiology. This review aims at revisiting basic US principles, to list specific needs throughout childhood, and to discuss the application of new and modern US methods. The various sections elude to basic US physics, technical requisites and tips for handling, diagnostically valuable applications of modern techniques, and how to properly address hazards, risks and limitations. In conclusion, US holds vast potential throughout childhood in almost all body regions and many childhood specific queries - helping to reduce the need for or to optimize more invasive or irradiating imaging. Make the most of US and offerings a dedicated paediatric US service throughout the day, the week and the year thus is and will stay a major task of Paediatric Radiology. PMID:24932845

  6. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie C.I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2008-01-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain. Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity. There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems. Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain. Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies. PMID:26525515

  7. Potential for optimisation of paediatric chest X-ray examination.

    PubMed

    Kostova-Lefterova, D; Taseva, D; Ingilizova, K; Hristova-Popova, J; Vassileva, J

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the important aspects of paediatric radiological practice and the patient doses from chest X-ray examinations performed in three hospitals in Bulgaria. Data from 163 paediatric patients were recorded using a standardised form. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to patient was calculated from the air-kerma air product (KAP) and field size measurements. Large variations were found for KAP and ESAK. Inappropriate film size and insufficient collimation were often used. Inappropriate use of automatic exposure control and antiscatter grid was found. In most cases, no attention was paid to reduce dose to sensitive organs by means of shielding or proper collimation. Recommendations were given to the hospitals on how to reduce patient doses in paediatric chest radiography. PMID:21824872

  8. Drug discovery in paediatric oncology: roadblocks to progress

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter C.; Houghton, Peter J.; Perilongo, Giorgio; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Approval of new cancer drugs for paediatric patients generally occurs after their development and approval for treating adult cancers. As most drug development occurs in the industry setting, the relatively small market of paediatric oncology does not provide the financial incentives for companies to actively pursue paediatric oncology solutions. Indeed, between 1948 and January 2003 the FDA approved 120 new cancer drugs, of which only 30 have been used in children. This slow rate of development must be addressed in a meaningful way if we are to make progress in the most pressing settings in childhood cancer. In this Viewpoint article, the key opinion leaders in the field weigh in and offer practical advice on how to address this issue. PMID:25223555

  9. Oral Medicines for Children in the European Paediatric Investigation Plans

    PubMed Central

    van Riet – Nales, Diana A.; Römkens, Erwin G. A. W.; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Schobben, Alfred F. A. M.; Egberts, Toine C. G.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pharmaceutical industry is no longer allowed to develop new medicines for use in adults only, as the 2007 Paediatric Regulation requires children to be considered also. The plans for such paediatric development called Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs) are subject to agreement by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and its Paediatric Committee (PDCO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the key characteristics of oral paediatric medicines in the PIPs and the changes implemented as a result of the EMA/PDCO review. Methods All PIPs agreed by 31 December 2011 were identified through a proprietary EMA-database. PIPs were included if they contained an agreed proposal to develop an oral medicine for children 0 to 11 years. Information on the therapeutic area (EMA classification system); target age range (as defined by industry) and pharmaceutical characteristics (active substance, dosage form(s) as listed in the PIP, strength of each dosage form, excipients in each strength of each dosage form) was extracted from the EMA website or the EMA/PDCO assessment reports. Results A hundred and fifty PIPs were included corresponding to 16 therapeutic areas and 220 oral dosage forms in 431 strengths/compositions. Eighty-two PIPs (37%) included tablets, 44 (20%) liquids and 35 (16%) dosage forms with a specific composition/strength that were stored as a solid but swallowed as a liquid e.g. dispersible tablets. The EMA/PDCO review resulted in an increase of 13 (207 to 220) oral paediatric dosage forms and 44 (387 to 431) dosage forms with a specific composition/strength. For many PIPs, the target age range was widened and the excipient composition and usability aspects modified. Conclusion The EMA/PDCO review realized an increase in the number of requirements for the development of oral dosage forms and a larger increase in the number of dosage forms with a specific composition/strength, both targeting younger children. Changes to their pharmaceutical design were

  10. Neonatal circumcision revisited. Fetus and Newborn Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assist physicians in providing guidance to parents regarding neonatal circumcision. OPTIONS: Whether to recommend the routine circumcision of newborn male infants. OUTCOMES: Costs and complications of neonatal circumcision, the incidence of urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases and cancer of the penis in circumcised and uncircumcised males, and of cervical cancer in their partners, and the costs of treating these diseases. EVIDENCE: The literature on circumcision was reviewed by the Fetus and Newborn Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society. During extensive discussion at meetings of the committee over a 24-month period, the strength of the evidence was carefully weighed and the perspective of the committee developed. VALUES: The literature was assessed to determine whether neonatal circumcision improves the health of boys and men and is a cost-effective approach to preventing penile problems and associated urinary tract conditions. Religious and personal values were not included in the assessment. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The effect of neonatal circumcision on the incidence of urinary tract infection, sexually transmitted diseases, cancer of the penis, cervical cancer and penile problems; the complications of circumcision; and estimates of the costs of neonatal circumcision and of the treatment of later penile conditions, urinary tract infections and complications of circumcision. RECOMMENDATION: Circumcision of newborns should not be routinely performed. VALIDATION: This recommendation is in keeping with previous statements on neonatal circumcision by the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The statement was reviewed by the Infectious Disease Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society. The Board of Directors of the Canadian Paediatric Society has reviewed its content and approved it for publication. SPONSOR: This is an official statement of the Canadian Paediatric Society. No external

  11. Continuous positive airway pressure for bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward; a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is commonly used to relieve respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis, but has mostly been studied in an intensive care setting. Our prime aim was to evaluate the feasibility of CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward, and secondary to assess capillary PCO2 (cPCO2) levels before and during treatment. Methods From May 1st 2008 to April 30th 2012, infants with bronchiolitis at Stavanger University Hospital were treated with CPAP in a general paediatric ward, but could be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU) when needed, according to in-house guidelines. Levels of cPCO2 were prospectively registered before the start of CPAP and at approximately 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours of treatment as long as CPAP was given. We had a continuous updating program for the nurses and physicians caring for the infants with CPAP. The study was population based. Results 672 infants (3.4%) were hospitalized with bronchiolitis. CPAP was initiated in 53 infants (0.3%; 7.9% of infants with bronchiolitis), and was well tolerated in all but three infants. 46 infants were included in the study, the majority of these (n = 33) were treated in the general ward only. These infants had lower cPCO2 before treatment (8.0; 7.7, 8.6)(median; quartiles) than those treated at the ICU (n = 13) (9.3;8.5, 9.9) (p < 0.001). The level of cPCO2 was significantly reduced after 4 h in both groups; 1.1 kPa (paediatric ward) (p < 0.001) and 1.3 kPa (ICU) (p = 0.002). Two infants on the ICU did not respond to CPAP (increasing cPCO2 and severe apnoe) and were given mechanical ventilation, otherwise no side effects were observed in either group treated with CPAP. Conclusion Treatment with CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis may be feasible in a general paediatric ward, providing sufficient staffing and training, and the possibility of referral to an ICU when needed. PMID:24886569

  12. Global Challenges in the Development and Delivery of Paediatric Antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Asha; Palasanthiran, Pamela; Sohn, Annette H.

    2008-01-01

    By the end of 2006, compared with 28% coverage for adults, only 15% of children with HIV who needed antiretroviral treatment were receiving it. Major challenges in delivering treatment include the lack of paediatric antiretrovirals that can be dosed in small children and limited studies examining safety and efficacy for existing antiretroviral formulations. The high costs of treatment have been reduced through the use of generic, fixed-dose combination drugs. Evidence-based strategies for managing resistance and the scale-up of pharmacological trials for children in low- and middle-income countries are critical to the success and future development of paediatric antiretrovirals. PMID:18549980

  13. Challenges in paediatric procedural sedation: political, economic, and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mason, K P

    2014-12-01

    Paediatric sedation has expanded in volume and demand over the past decade. In parallel with the increasing demand for and delivery of sedation by multi-specialty providers, conflicting political agendas have surfaced. With a limited selection of sedatives and few new sedatives to market over the past decade, some providers utilize agents that formerly were considered exclusive for administration by anaesthesiologists. This review highlights the important contributions to paediatric sedation over the past century. Considerations include the barriers and politics that impede progress and also future advances and contributions that may lie ahead. PMID:25498582

  14. Clinical competence in developmental-behavioural paediatrics: raising the bar.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Mick

    2014-01-01

    For our specialist paediatric workforce to be suitably equipped to deal with current childhood morbidity, a high level of competence in developmental-behavioural paediatrics (DBP) is necessary. New models of training and assessment are required to meet this challenge. An evolution of training in DBP, built around the centrepiece of competency-based medical education, is proposed. Summative assessment based upon entrustable professional activities, and a menu of formative workplace-based assessments specific to the DBP context are key components. A pilot project to develop and implement these changes is recommended. PMID:23714394

  15. Near infrared spectroscopy and process analytical technology to master the process of busulfan paediatric capsules in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Paris, I; Janoly-Dumenil, A; Paci, A; Mercier, L; Bourget, P; Brion, F; Chaminade, P; Rieutord, A

    2006-06-16

    The prescription of unlicensed oral medicines in paediatrics leads the hospital pharmacists to compound hard capsules, such as busulfan, an alkylating agent prescribed in preparative regimens for bone marrow transplantation. In this study, we have investigated how the general principle of process analytical technology (PAT) can be implemented at the small size of our hospital pharmacy manufacturing unit. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was calibrated for raw material identification, blend uniformity analysis and final content uniformity of busulfan hard capsules of 11 different strengths. Measurements were performed on capsules from 2 to 40 mg (n=440). After optimisation, accuracy and linearity of the NIRS quantitative method was demonstrated after comparison with a previously validated quantitative high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method. Such a comparison led to attractive NIRS precision: +/-0.7 to +/-1.0 mg for capsules from 2 to 40 mg, respectively. As NIRS is a rapid and non-destructive technique, the individual control of a whole batch of busulfan paediatric capsules intended to be administrated is possible. Actually, mastering the process of busulfan paediatric capsules with the NIRS integrated into the notion of PAT is a powerful analytical tool to assess the process quality and to perform content uniformity of at least 5mg busulfan-containing capsules. PMID:16621419

  16. Proton linac for hospital-based fast neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Swenson, D.A.; Winje, R.A.; Young, D.E.; Rush Univ., Chicago, IL; Science Applications International Corp., Princeton, NJ; Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1989-09-01

    Recent developments in linac technology have led to the design of a hospital-based proton linac for fast neutron therapy. The 180 microamp average current allows beam to be diverted for radioisotope production during treatments while maintaining an acceptable dose rate. During dedicated operation, dose rates greater than 280 neutron rads per minute are achievable at depth, DMAX = 1.6 cm with source to axis distance, SAD = 190 cm. Maximum machine energy is 70 MeV and several intermediate energies are available for optimizing production of isotopes for Positron Emission Tomography and other medical applications. The linac can be used to produce a horizontal or a gantry can be added to the downstream end of the linac for conventional patient positioning. The 70 MeV protons can also be used for proton therapy for ocular melanomas. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. The use of hospital-based nurses for the surveillance of potential disease outbreaks.

    PubMed Central

    Durrheim, D. N.; Harris, B. N.; Speare, R.; Billinghurst, K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study a novel surveillance system introduced in Mpumalanga Province, a rural area in the north-east of South Africa, in an attempt to address deficiencies in the system of notification for infectious conditions that have the potential for causing outbreaks. METHODS: Hospital-based infection control nurses in all of Mpumalanga's 32 public and private hospitals were trained to recognize, report, and respond to nine clinical syndromes that require immediate action. Sustainability of the system was assured through a schedule of regular training and networking, and by providing feedback to the nurses. The system was evaluated by formal review of hospital records, evidence of the effective containment of a cholera outbreak, and assessment of the speed and appropriateness of responses to other syndromes. FINDINGS: Rapid detection, reporting and response to six imported cholera cases resulted in effective containment, with only 19 proven secondary cholera cases, during the two-year review period. No secondary cases followed detection and prompt response to 14 patients with meningococcal disease. By the end of the first year of implementation, all facilities were providing weekly zero-reports on the nine syndromes before the designated time. Formal hospital record review for cases of acute flaccid paralysis endorsed the value of the system. CONCLUSION: The primary goal of an outbreak surveillance system is to ensure timely recognition of syndromes requiring an immediate response. Infection control nurses in Mpumalanga hospitals have excelled in timely weekly zero-reporting, participation at monthly training and feedback sessions, detection of priority clinical syndromes, and prompt appropriate response. This review provides support for the role of hospital-based nurses as valuable sentinel surveillance agents providing timely data for action. PMID:11217663

  18. Demographic and histopathologic profile of pediatric brain tumors: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Harshil C.; Ubhale, Bhushan P.; Shah, Jaimin K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Very few hospital-based or population-based studies are published in the context to the epidemiologic profile of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) in India and Indian subcontinent. Aim: To study the demographic and histopathologic profile of PBTs according to World Health Organization 2007 classification in a single tertiary health care center in India. Materials and Methods: Data regarding age, gender, topography, and histopathology of 76 pediatric patients (0–19 years) with brain tumors operated over a period of 24 months (January-2012 to December-2013) was collected retrospectively and analyzed using EpiInfo 7. Chi-square test and test of proportions (Z-test) were used wherever necessary. Results: PBTs were more common in males (55.3%) as compared to females (44.7%) with male to female ratio of 1.23:1. Mean age was 10.69 years. Frequency of tumors was higher in childhood age group (65.8%) when compared to adolescent age group (34.2%). The most common anatomical site was cerebellum (39.5%), followed by hemispheres (22.4%). Supratentorial tumors (52.6%) were predominant than infratentorial tumors (47.4%). Astrocytomas (40.8%) and embryonal tumors (29.0%) were the most common histological types almost contributing more than 2/3rd of all tumors. Craniopharyngiomas (11.8%) and ependymomas (6.6%) were the third and fourth most common tumors, respectively. Conclusion: Astrocytomas and medulloblastomas are the most common tumors among children and adolescents in our region, which needs special attention from the neurosurgical department of our institute. Demographic and histopathologic profile of cohort in the present study do not differ substantially from that found in other hospital-based and population-based studies except for slight higher frequency of craniopharyngiomas. PMID:26942148

  19. A Methodological Description of a Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing Hospital-Based Care and Hospital-Based Home Care when a Child is Newly Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tiberg, Irén; Carlsson, Annelie; Hallström, Inger

    2011-01-01

    Aim and objective: To describe the study design of a randomised controlled trial with the aim of comparing two different regimes for children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes; hospital-based care and hospital-based home care. Background: Procedures for hospital admission and sojourn in connection with diagnose vary greatly worldwide and the existing evidence is insufficient to allow for any conclusive determination of whether hospital-based or home-based care is the best alternative for most families. Comparative studies with adequate power and outcome measurements, as well as measurements of cost-effectiveness are needed. Design: The study design was based on the Medical Research Council framework for complex interventions. After two to three days with hospital-based care, children between the ages of 3 and 16 were randomised to receive either continued hospital-based care for a total of 1-2 weeks or hospital-based home care, which refers to specialist care in a home-based setting. The trial started in March 2008 at a University Hospital in Sweden and was closed in September 2011 when a sufficient number of children according to power calculation, were included. The primary outcome was the child’s metabolic control during the following two years. Secondary outcomes were set to evaluate the family and child situation as well as the organisation of care. Discussion: Childhood diabetes requires families and children to learn to perform multiple daily tasks. Even though intervention in health care is complex with several interacting components entailing practical and methodological difficulties, there is nonetheless, a need for randomised controlled trials in order to evaluate and develop better systems for the learning processes of families that can lead to long-term improvement in adherence and outcome. Trial Registration: Trial Register NCT00804232. PMID:22371819

  20. [The nurse consultation in a Swiss university paediatric emergency department].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Corinne; Hemme, Denis; Gehri, Mario; Pittet, Anne; Rey-Bellet Gasser, Céline

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, overcrowding in tertiary emergency departments is a frequent problem, resulting in lengthy waiting times, lower satisfaction on the part of families and a risk for patient's safety. The setting up of a nurse consultation in a university paediatric emergency centre has helped to improve the quality of care in this context. PMID:26573404

  1. Aetiology of Intellectual Disability in Paediatric Outpatients in Northern India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jauhari, Prashant; Boggula, Raju; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Singh, Chandrakanta; Kohli, Neera; Yadav, Rajesh; Kumar, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To study the aetiology of intellectual disability in patients presenting to hospital and the diagnostic yield of a standardized examination. Method: Over a 1-year period, the first three children presenting to the paediatric outpatients department (OPD) on 2 selected weekdays with developmental delay, suspected intellectual disability, or…

  2. A review of nutrient treatments for paediatric depression.

    PubMed

    Lopresti, Adrian L

    2015-08-01

    Paediatric depression is estimated to affect 15-20% of youths prior to adulthood and is associated with significant social, educational and physical impairment. Current treatments comprise moderately efficacious psychological therapies and pharmaceutical antidepressants. However, nutritional therapies are also available and are regularly sought by people with depressive illnesses and parents of depressed youths. In this narrative review, studies examining the antidepressant effects of individual nutritional supplements in child and adolescent populations are appraised. Epidemiological studies examining the relationship between nutritional status and paediatric depression, or depressive symptoms are also reviewed. Nutrients covered in this article include: omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, s-adenosylmethionine, vitamin C, vitamin D, zinc, iron and B-vitamins. Although several of these nutrients present as promising treatments for paediatric depression, there is a lack of high-quality studies examining the antidepressant effects of all the aforementioned ingredients. Before nutritional treatments are accepted as validated treatments for paediatric depression, further high-quality studies are required. PMID:25913919

  3. Surveillance biopsies after paediatric kidney transplantation: A review.

    PubMed

    Rose, Edward M; Kennedy, Sean E; Mackie, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective means of treating children with end-stage kidney disease, and yet, there continues to be a limited "life span" of transplanted kidneys in paediatric recipients. Early graft monitoring, using the surveillance biopsy, has the potential to extend renal allograft survival in paediatric recipients. The surveillance biopsy provides important and timely information about acute and chronic graft pathology, particularly SCR and calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity, which can subsequently guide management decisions and improve long-term graft survival. The ostensible value of the surveillance biopsy is furthered by the limitations of conventional renal functional studies. However, there is still much debate surrounding the surveillance biopsy in paediatric recipients, particularly in regard to its overall utility, safety and timing. This review discusses the current literature regarding the utility, safety, and potential predictive value of surveillance biopsies for guiding post-transplant management in paediatric renal allograft recipients, as well as the viability of other potentially newer non-invasive strategies for renal allograft monitoring. PMID:27306873

  4. The Infancy of an International Paediatric Pharmacy Network

    PubMed Central

    Knoppert, David; Arenas-Lopez, Sara; McArtney, Rowena

    2008-01-01

    There are several pharmacy and clinical pharmacology organizations in which pediatrics is one of many special interest groups and a few whose focus is entirely pediatric drug therapy. Recently the foundation for the establishment of an International Network of Paediatric Pharmacists has been laid. This paper describes that network. PMID:23055865

  5. Paediatric entrance doses from exposure index in computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Martinez, D.; Fernandez, J. M.; Ordiales, J. M.; Prieto, C.; Floriano, A.; Ten, J. I.

    2008-06-01

    Over the last two years we have evaluated paediatric patient doses in projection radiography derived from exposure level (EL) in computed radiography (CR) in a large university hospital. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for 3501 paediatric examinations was calculated from the EL, which is a dose index parameter related to the light emitted by the phosphor-stimulable plate, archived in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) header of the images and automatically transferred to a database using custom-built dedicated software. Typical mean thicknesses for several age bands of paediatric patients was estimated to calculate ESAK from the EL values, using results of experimental measurements with phantoms for the typical x-ray beam qualities used in paediatric examinations. Mean/median ESAK values (in µGy) for the age bands of <1 year, 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years have been obtained for chest without a bucky: 51/41, 57/34, 91/54 and 122/109; chest with a bucky (for only the last three age bands): 114/87, 129/105 and 219/170; abdomen: 119/91, 291/225, 756/600 and 1960/1508 and pelvis: 65/48, 455/314, 943/707 and 2261/1595. Sample sizes of clinical images used for the (indirect) measurements were 1724 for chest without a bucky, 799 for chest with a bucky, 337 for abdomen and 641 for pelvis. The methodology we describe could be applicable to other centres using CR as an imaging modality for paediatrics. Presently, this method is the only practical approach to automatically extract parameters contained in the DICOM header, for the calculation of patient dose values for the CR modality.

  6. Virtual support for paediatric HIV treatment decision making

    PubMed Central

    Le Doare, Kirsty; Mackie, N E; Kaye, S; Bamford, A; Walters, S; Foster, C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to review clinical outcomes of recommendations made by a multidisciplinary paediatric virtual clinic (PVC) for complex case management of paediatric HIV as a model of care within a tertiary network. Design A retrospective review of the clinical outcomes of paediatric and adolescent (0–21 years) referrals to the PVC at St. Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London was performed between October 2009 and November 2013. Results 234 referrals were made for 182 children from 37 centres, discussed in 42 meetings (median age 13 years, IQR 10–15 years). Reasons for referral included virological failure (44%), simplification of the current regimen (24%) and antiretroviral drug complications (24%). At latest follow-up, PVC advice had been instituted in 80% of referrals. Suppression following virological failure was achieved in 48% following first referral and 57% following subsequent discussions and was maintained in 95% of children referred for regimen simplification. Following advice, dyslipidaemia resolved in 42% and liver function normalised in 73% with biochemical hepatitis. Adherence support aided resolution of viraemia in nine children and 12% of referrals resulted in additional support, including psychology, social services and mental health input. Conclusions Combined multidisciplinary virtual input with adult expertise in resistance and newer agents, paediatric knowledge of pill swallowing, childhood formulations/weight banding and parental support, assists complex treatment decision making in paediatric HIV infection. The Virtual Clinic model could be applied to the management of other rare complex diseases of childhood within a clinical network. PMID:25549664

  7. Licensing and labelling of drugs in a paediatric oncology ward

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Henk; Tak, Nanda

    2011-01-01

    AIM Paediatric drug prescriptions are known for their high percentages of off-label and unlicensed use. In paediatric oncology data available are scarce. The aim of this paper is an analysis of the licensing and labelling status of all prescribed medication over a 2 week period in a Dutch paediatric oncology centre. METHODS An analysis of the delivery of medication by the hospital pharmacy to patients admitted to the paediatric oncology centre was carried out. RESULTS In total 268 precriptions were filed for 39 patients. In 87% of children unlicensed medication was used. Fifty-nine per cent of the children received at least two unlicensed drugs. In total 72% of the drugs were used licensed and on-label was found in 57% of the prescriptions. There was a trend that in younger children percentages were lower. International and local guidelines necessitated in many cases unlicensed use, e.g. intrathecal prednisolone, low dose medication such as heparin, ethanol and vancomycin for locking intravenous devices and higher intravenous vancomycin dosages. There were no major differences with respect to type of malignancy. CONCLUSION Our figures are substantially higher than the figures reported from adult oncology. Comparison with other paediatric reports are cumbersome, due to different percentages of diseases in the reports and other rules to dispense medication in the outpatient setting. Our data are in line with reports mentioning the higher percentages of unlicensed and off-label use. Our data further underpin the need for more research on suitable formulations, dosages, safety and efficacy in these children. PMID:21453298

  8. The Paediatric Board of the Royal College of Physicians of London: its role in the college.

    PubMed

    Chambers, T

    1992-01-01

    Conscious of its responsibilities to its Fellows and Members who are paediatricians, the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) is anxious to play its part, along with others, in maintaining and improving standards in paediatrics. Recognising the importance and prominence of the specialty within the generality of specialist medicine, and alongside general internal medicine, it has established a Paediatric Board, reporting directly to Council, which will deal with and advise on all matters concerning paediatrics and child health, and thus enhance the autonomy and influence of the specialty both within the College and on medical affairs in general. It will do this in close association with the British Paediatric Association (BPA) which will nominate members of the Board. In particular the RCP will continue to set standards in paediatrics through examinations, accreditation, representatives on consultant advisory appointment committees, and its membership of the GMC and the Conference of Medical Royal Colleges and their Faculties, to which the Paediatric Board will make a substantial contribution. The network of regional paediatric advisers to the RCP will ensure that the Board is kept in touch with paediatric opinion throughout England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Relationships with Scottish paediatrics and paediatricians will be important, for example, in the organisation and development of the MRCP(UK) examination and its paediatric Part II. Links with paediatricians in the Irish Republic exist through the Joint Committee on Higher Medical Training. PMID:1573597

  9. Paediatric near-drowning: mortality and outcome in a temperate climate.

    PubMed

    Crowe, S; Mannion, D; Healy, M; O'Hare, B; Lyons, B

    2003-10-01

    The decision whether to continue to resuscitate the paediatric victim of near-drowning is influenced by potential poor neurological outcome. A low core body temperature at presentation is frequently cited as a reason to continue resuscitation. We report the case of an 11 month old infant admitted to the intensive care unit following near-drowning and a prolonged resuscitation. The infant's core body temperature was 29 degrees C. Cardiac output was restored, but the child remains in a persistent vegetative state. We present the results of a ten year review of near-drowning in a tertiary referral institution, to evaluate the mortality and outcome in a temperate climate. Thirteen patients were identified in the review. The mortality was 23%. The incidence of a persistent vegetative state was 15%. Asystole, immersion time greater than 15 minutes, resuscitation time longer than 30 minutes, the administration of epinephrine, and a low core body temperature were associated with a poor outcome. PMID:14753583

  10. An overview of moral distress and the paediatric intensive care team.

    PubMed

    Austin, Wendy; Kelecevic, Julija; Goble, Erika; Mekechuk, Joy

    2009-01-01

    A summary of the existing literature related to moral distress (MD) and the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) reveals a high-tech, high-pressure environment in which effective teamwork can be compromised by MD arising from different situations related to: consent for treatment, futile care, end-of-life decision making, formal decision-making structures, training and experience by discipline, individual values and attitudes, and power and authority issues. Attempts to resolve MD in PICUs have included the use of administrative tools such as shift worksheets, the implementation of continuing education, and encouragement to report. The literature does not yet show these approaches to be effective in the resolution of MD. The need to acknowledge MD among PICU teams is discussed and an argument made that, to facilitate understanding among team members, practice stories need to be shared. PMID:19103691