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Sample records for hospitalizados con tuberculosis

  1. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  2. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with ...

  3. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes. PMID:26377143

  4. Your Child with Tuberculosis: A Guide for Parents and Guardians = Su Nino con Tuberculosis: Un Manual para Los Padres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Rodolfo

    Presented in both Spanish and English versions, this booklet is a guide for parents and guardians of children who have tuberculosis (TB). The booklet is organized around specific questions covering topics such as the causes and spread of TB, demographics of TB sufferers, detecting and curing TB, TB treatment and medications, research on the…

  5. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to address TB and HIV coinfection around the world? The President’s U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS ... of those suffering from HIV/AIDS around the world. PEPFAR’s Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and ...

  6. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tiruviluamala, Parvathi; Reichman, Lee B

    2002-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Of these, the most common species to infect humans is M. tuberculosis. The TB bacillus is an extremely successful human pathogen, infecting two billion persons worldwide; an estimated 2 to 3 million people die from tuberculosis each year. In the United States, TB rates decreased steadily at the rate of 5% per year from 1953 until 1985 when the trend reversed, with the number of TB cases peaking in 1992. Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were reported, and these cases were documented to be transmitted in nosocomial and congregate settings, including hospitals and prisons. AIDS patients infected with M. tb developed disease rapidly, and case-fatality rates of >80% were noted in those infected with multidrug-resistant M. tb. Intensive intervention, at enormous cost, caused the number of TB cases to decline. This article discusses factors that led to the increase in TB cases, their subsequent decline, and measures needed in the future if TB is to be eliminated in the United States. PMID:11910069

  7. Pros and cons of the tuberculosis drugome approach--an empirical analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Chi; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Jie-Mao; Lin, Chieh-Hua; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Dou, Horng-Yunn; Hsiung, Chao Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), the causative pathogen of tuberculosis (TB), has become a serious threat to global public health. Yet the development of novel drugs against MTB has been lagging. One potentially powerful approach to drug development is computation-aided repositioning of current drugs. However, the effectiveness of this approach has rarely been examined. Here we select the "TB drugome" approach--a protein structure-based method for drug repositioning for tuberculosis treatment--to (1) experimentally validate the efficacy of the identified drug candidates for inhibiting MTB growth, and (2) computationally examine how consistently drug candidates are prioritized, considering changes in input data. Twenty three drugs in the TB drugome were tested. Of them, only two drugs (tamoxifen and 4-hydroxytamoxifen) effectively suppressed MTB growth at relatively high concentrations. Both drugs significantly enhanced the inhibitory effects of three first-line anti-TB drugs (rifampin, isoniazid, and ethambutol). However, tamoxifen is not a top-listed drug in the TB drugome, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen is not approved for use in humans. Computational re-examination of the TB drugome indicated that the rankings were subject to technical and data-related biases. Thus, although our results support the effectiveness of the TB drugome approach for identifying drugs that can potentially be repositioned for stand-alone applications or for combination treatments for TB, the approach requires further refinements via incorporation of additional biological information. Our findings can also be extended to other structure-based drug repositioning methods. PMID:24971632

  8. Pros and Cons of the Tuberculosis Drugome Approach – An Empirical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng-Chi; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Jie-Mao; Lin, Chieh-Hua; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Dou, Horng-Yunn; Hsiung, Chao Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), the causative pathogen of tuberculosis (TB), has become a serious threat to global public health. Yet the development of novel drugs against MTB has been lagging. One potentially powerful approach to drug development is computation-aided repositioning of current drugs. However, the effectiveness of this approach has rarely been examined. Here we select the “TB drugome” approach – a protein structure-based method for drug repositioning for tuberculosis treatment – to (1) experimentally validate the efficacy of the identified drug candidates for inhibiting MTB growth, and (2) computationally examine how consistently drug candidates are prioritized, considering changes in input data. Twenty three drugs in the TB drugome were tested. Of them, only two drugs (tamoxifen and 4-hydroxytamoxifen) effectively suppressed MTB growth at relatively high concentrations. Both drugs significantly enhanced the inhibitory effects of three first-line anti-TB drugs (rifampin, isoniazid, and ethambutol). However, tamoxifen is not a top-listed drug in the TB drugome, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen is not approved for use in humans. Computational re-examination of the TB drugome indicated that the rankings were subject to technical and data-related biases. Thus, although our results support the effectiveness of the TB drugome approach for identifying drugs that can potentially be repositioned for stand-alone applications or for combination treatments for TB, the approach requires further refinements via incorporation of additional biological information. Our findings can also be extended to other structure-based drug repositioning methods. PMID:24971632

  9. Postprimary Tuberculosis and Macrophage Necrosis: Is There a Big ConNECtion?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adult or postprimary tuberculosis (TB) accounts for most TB cases. Its hallmark is pulmonary cavitation, which occurs as a result of necrosis in the lung in individuals with tuberculous pneumonia. Postprimary TB has previously been known to be associated with vascular thrombosis and delayed-type hypersensitivity, but their roles in pulmonary cavitation are unclear. A necrosis-associated extracellular cluster (NEC) refers to a cluster of drug-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis attached to lysed host materials and is proposed to contribute to granulomatous TB. Here we suggest that NECs, perhaps due to big size, produce a distinct host response leading to postprimary TB. We propose that vascular thrombosis and pneumonia arise from NEC and that these processes are promoted by inflammatory cytokines produced from cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity, such as interleukin-17 and gamma interferon, eventually triggering necrosis in the lung and causing cavitation. According to this view, targeting NEC represents a necessary strategy to control adult TB. PMID:26758178

  10. Postprimary Tuberculosis and Macrophage Necrosis: Is There a Big ConNECtion?

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Wing; Jacobs, William R

    2016-01-01

    Adult or postprimary tuberculosis (TB) accounts for most TB cases. Its hallmark is pulmonary cavitation, which occurs as a result of necrosis in the lung in individuals with tuberculous pneumonia. Postprimary TB has previously been known to be associated with vascular thrombosis and delayed-type hypersensitivity, but their roles in pulmonary cavitation are unclear. A necrosis-associated extracellular cluster (NEC) refers to a cluster of drug-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis attached to lysed host materials and is proposed to contribute to granulomatous TB. Here we suggest that NECs, perhaps due to big size, produce a distinct host response leading to postprimary TB. We propose that vascular thrombosis and pneumonia arise from NEC and that these processes are promoted by inflammatory cytokines produced from cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity, such as interleukin-17 and gamma interferon, eventually triggering necrosis in the lung and causing cavitation. According to this view, targeting NEC represents a necessary strategy to control adult TB. PMID:26758178

  11. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis Research The New Challenge for TB Research NIAID ... HIV/AIDS Multidrug-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Research Agenda (PDF) TB Research at NIAID Research ...

  12. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis (TB) Overview In developed countries, such as the ... thought to be infected with TB bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ). TB is a chronic bacterial infection. It ...

  13. Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti). Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous catt...

  14. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  15. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Departments & Divisions Home Conditions Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Diagnosing Tuberculosis History of TB Our Specialists Charles L. Daley, ...

  16. [Extrapulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ketata, W; Rekik, W K; Ayadi, H; Kammoun, S

    2015-01-01

    Each year, there are more than eight million new cases of tuberculosis and 1.3 million deaths. There is a renewed interest in extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis as its relative frequency increases. Among extrapulmonary organs, pleura and lymph nodes are the most common. Their diagnosis is often difficult and is based on clinical, radiological, bacteriological and histological findings. Extrapulmonary lesions are paucibacillary and samplings, in most cases, difficult to obtain, so diagnosis is often simply presumptive. Nucleic acid amplification tests, which are fast and specific, have greatly facilitated the diagnosis of some forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. However, their sensitivity is poor and a negative test does not eliminate the diagnosis. Treatment is the same as for pulmonary forms, but its duration is nine to 12 months for central nervous system and for bone tuberculosis. Corticosteroids are indicated in meningeal and pericardial localizations. Complementary surgery is used for certain complicated forms. PMID:25131362

  17. Childhood tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R F; Eisenach, K D

    1993-01-01

    The dramatic resurgence and increase in the total number of cases of tuberculous infection and disease in children is alarming in the United States. With poverty, poor access to health care, overcrowding (predominantly in inner-city areas), and an increase in immigration from areas with high endemic rates of tuberculosis, the problem in children will continue to increase. If the impact of coinfection with HIV and M. tuberculosis becomes significant, as it has in adults in the United States, this increase in the total number of cases of tuberculous disease could be staggering. The impact of multiple drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis and the current crises in availability of effective antituberculous drugs will need to undergo basic and clinical research. Although the possibility for eradication of M. tuberculosis as a human pathogen in the United States still exists, clinicians must reeducate themselves regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic work-up, and effective treatment of children with tuberculosis in the current situation of increasing tuberculous disease and resistant organisms in children. PMID:8217004

  18. Tuberculosis: General Information

    MedlinePlus

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  19. Global Tuberculosis Report 2015

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis The End TB Strategy Areas ... data News, events and features About us Global tuberculosis report 2015 This is the twentieth global report ...

  20. Urinary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, P. R.

    1971-01-01

    The present incidence, clinical features and classification of urinary tuberculosis are discussed. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. The indications for surgical intervention are reviewed and procedures briefly described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:5169185

  1. Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Safak; Tatar, Oner; Akpancar, Serkan; Bilgic, Serkan; Ersen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (TB) is a significant form of TB, causing spinal deformity and paralysis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for avoiding multivertebral destruction and are critical for improving outcomes in spinal TB. We believe that appropriate treatment method should be implemented at the early stage of this disease and that the Gulhane Askeri Tıp Akademisi classification system can be considered a practical guide for spinal TB treatment planning in all countries. PMID:26609247

  2. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis Print A A A Text Size What's in ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  3. Pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, B; Davies, P D O

    2006-03-01

    Pleural effusions in tuberculosis are commonly seen in young adults as an immunological phenomenon occurring soon after primary infection. However, the epidemiology and demographics of tuberculous pleurisy are changing due to the impact of HIV co-infection and the increasing number of pleural effusions seen as part of re-activation disease. Pleural biopsy for histology and culture is the mainstay of diagnosis with closed needle biopsy adequate in the majority of cases. Techniques such as PCR of biopsy specimens and the role of pleural fluid ADA are still being evaluated as a diagnostic aid. Tuberculous empyema is less commonly seen in the western world and the diagnostic yield from pleural fluid here is greater than in "primary" effusions. Treatment with appropriate antituberculous chemotherapy is generally successful though there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of corticosteroids in this condition. PMID:16700190

  4. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  5. Tuberculosis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contacts of Persons with Infectious TB Epidemiology of Pediatric Tuberculosis in the United States Targeted Tuberculosis Testing ... and unknown risks of second-line antituberculosis drugs. Breastfeeding Breastfeeding should not be discouraged for women being ...

  6. Rigors in tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, C.; Eykyn, S.; Davidson, C.

    1993-01-01

    Rigors are not a recognized characteristic of miliary tuberculosis. We report two patients presenting with persistent rigors, thought to be suggestive of acute pyogenic infection, who were subsequently found to have miliary tuberculosis. In both cases, there was significant diagnostic delay. Miliary tuberculosis should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with unexplained rigors. PMID:8255841

  7. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis (TBVC)--foot with miliary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Padmavathy, L; Lakshmana Rao, L; Ethirajan, N; Ramakrishna Rao, M; Subrahmanyan, E N; Manohar, U

    2007-07-01

    Tuberculosis Verrucosa Cutis (TBVC) or warty tuberculosis is a variant of cutaneous tuberculosis in patients with good cell mediated immunity (CMI) to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, while Miliary Tuberculosis is associated with very poor CMI. Two widely different clinical presentations in the same patient are very rare and being reported. PMID:17886704

  8. [Childhood tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood TB is an indication of failing TB control in the community. It allows disease persistence in the population. Mortality and morbidity due to TB is high in children. Moreover, HIV co-infection and multidrug-resistant diseases are as frequent in children as in adults. Infection is more frequent in younger children. Disease risk after primary infection is greatest in infants younger than 2 years. In case of exposure, evidence of infection can be obtained using the tuberculin skin test (TST) or an interferon-gamma assay (IGRA). There is no evidence to support the use of IGRA over TST in young children. TB suspicion should be confirmed whenever possible, using new available tools, particularly in case of pulmonary and lymph node TB. Induced sputum, nasopharyngeal aspiration and fine needle aspiration biopsy provide a rapid and definitive diagnosis of mycobacterial infection in a large proportion of patients. Analysis of paediatric samples revealed higher sensitivity and specificity values of molecular techniques in comparison with the ones originated from adults. Children require higher drugs dosages than adults. Short courses of steroids are associated with TB treatment in case of respiratory distress, bronchoscopic desobstruction is proposed for severe airways involvement and antiretroviral therapy is mandatory in case of HIV infection. Post-exposure prophylaxis in children is a highly effective strategy to reduce the risk of TB disease. The optimal therapy for treatment of latent infection with a presumably multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain is currently not known. PMID:24932504

  9. Tuberculosis and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Krishna Bihari; Gupta, Rajesh; Atreja, Atulya; Verma, Manish; Vishvkarma, Suman

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems of considerable magnitude in most of the underdeveloped regions of the world. These two problems tend to interact with each other. Tuberculosis mortality rates in different economic groups in a community tend to vary inversely with their economic levels. Similarly, nutritional status is significantly lower in patients with active tuberculosis compared with healthy controls. Malnutrition can lead to secondary immunodeficiency that increases the host's susceptibility to infection. In patients with tuberculosis, it leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting. Both, protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies increase the risk of tuberculosis. It has been found that malnourished tuberculosis patients have delayed recovery and higher mortality rates than well-nourished patients. Nutritional status of patients improves during tuberculosis chemotherapy. High prevalence of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection in the underdeveloped countries further aggravates the problem of malnutrition and tuberculosis. Effect of malnutrition on childhood tuberculosis and tuberculin skin test are other important considerations. Nutritional supplementation may represent a novel approach for fast recovery in tuberculosis patients. In addition, raising nutritional status of population may prove to be an effective measure to control tuberculosis in underdeveloped areas of world. PMID:20165588

  10. [Smoking and tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Underner, Michel; Perriot, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Smoking and tuberculosis represent two major world health issues particularly in developing countries. Tobacco smoke increases risk of Mycobaterium tuberculosis infection by several means: alteration of muco-ciliary clearance, reduced alveolar macrophage activity; immune-depression of pulmonary lymphocytes, reduction of cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, alteration of the activity of the pulmonary dendritic cells. Both active and passive smoking increases the risk of latent tubercular infection and of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Active smoking increases the severity of pulmonary tuberculosis (gravity of radiological lesions). The diagnostic delay and recovery details are more important for smokers. Active smoking increases relapses of both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis after treatment with or without the Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) with poor observance of treatment. The mortality risk from tuberculosis is heightened among smokers. Smoking cessation represents an essential means of controlling tuberculosis epidemics in developing countries. PMID:22465718

  11. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  12. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M bovis , M africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  13. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  14. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  15. [Pharyngeal tuberculosis: Case report].

    PubMed

    Spini, Roxana Gabriela; Bordino, Lucas; Cohen, Daniela; Martins, Andrea; Ramírez, Zaida; González, Norma E

    2015-08-01

    Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation. In Argentina, the number of cases of tuberculosis reported in children under 19 years in 2012 was 1752. Only 12.15% had extrapulmonary manifestation. A case of a 17 year old girl with pharyngeal tuberculosis is reported. The patient presented intermittent fever and swallowing pain for 6 months, without response to conventional antibiotic treatment. Chest X-ray showedbilateral micronodular infiltrate, so hospitalization was decided to study and treat. The sputum examination for acid-fast resistant bacilli was positive and treatment with four antituberculous drugs was started, with good evolution and disappearance of symptoms. Diagnostic confirmation with the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum culture was obtained. The main symptoms of pharyngeal tuberculosis are sore throat and difficulty in swallowing of long evolution. It is important to consider tuberculosis as differential diagnosis in patients with chronic pharyngitis unresponsive to conventional treatment. PMID:26172025

  16. Endobronchial Tuberculosis Mimicking Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Argun Baris, Serap; Onyilmaz, Tuğba; Basyigit, Ilknur; Boyaci, Hasim

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) is defined as tuberculosis infection of the tracheobronchial tree with microbial and histopathological evidence. The clinical symptoms of the diseases are nonspecific. Chronic cough is the major symptom of the disease. The diagnosis is often delayed due to its nonspecific presentation and misdiagnosed as bronchial asthma. This case is presented to recall the notion that the endobronchial tuberculosis can mimic asthma and the importance of bronchoscopic evaluation in a patient with chronic cough and treatment resistant asthma. PMID:26798513

  17. TUBERCULOSIS COMO ENFERMEDAD OCUPACIONAL

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis en el lugar de trabajo, se revisan las evidencias para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en trabajadores de salud y se presenta la legislación peruana vigente al respecto. PMID:22858771

  18. [Multifocal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal tuberculosis is defined as the presence of lesions affecting at least two extrapulmonary sites, with or without pulmonary involvement. This retrospective study of 10 cases aims to investigate the clinical and evolutionary characteristics of multifocal tuberculosis. It included 41 cases with tuberculosis collected between 1999 and 2013. Ten patients had multifocal tuberculosis (24%): 9 women and 1 man, the average age was 50 years (30-68 years). Our patients were correctly BCG vaccinated. The evaluation of immunodepression was negative in all patients. 7 cases had lymph node tuberculosis, 3 cases digestive tuberculosis, 2 cases pericardial tuberculosis, 2 cases osteoarticular tuberculosis, 1 case brain tuberculosis, 2 cases urinary tuberculosis, 4 cases urogenital tuberculosis, 1 case adrenal tuberculosis, 1 case cutaneous and 1 case muscle tuberculosis. All patients received anti-tuberculosis treatment for a mean duration of 10 months, with good evolution. Multifocal tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose. It can affect immunocompetent patients but often has good prognosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy must be initiated as soon as possible to avoid sequelae. PMID:27583077

  19. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kj; Basu, Arup; Khana, Shilpi; Wattal, Chand

    2015-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is a disease which is frequently misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. In the areas where people eat crab/crayfish this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis to avoid antituberculosis treatment for a non-tubercular condition. We are reporting a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis who had been treated for tuberculosis. PMID:27604443

  20. "Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to practice acquired skills in a simulated…

  1. Psychiatry and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fantl, Kurt

    1950-01-01

    Studies on the psychosomatic aspects of tuberculosis have not brought to light a clearcut correlation between a specific personality structure and susceptibility to the illness. The recommendation is made to look for several rather than for one personality type. It is suggested that people should be studied who react to stress with loss of appetite and loss of sleep. This character structure in contrast to that where the person withdraws into sleep and overeats might make a person prone to tuberculosis. The somatopsychic influence of tuberculosis needs to be interpreted in terms of the localization of the lesion as well as infectiousness and conspicuousness of the disease. Some common sociopsychological factors of tuberculosis have been mentioned. Reports on mental illness and tuberculosis and on diet were reviewed. PMID:14792351

  2. The return of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Fätkenheuer, G; Taelman, H; Lepage, P; Schwenk, A; Wenzel, R

    1999-06-01

    At the end of the 20th century, tuberculosis remains a major public health issue. In developing countries tuberculosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and the spread of the HIV epidemic contributes significantly to the worsening of the situation. Coinfection with tuberculosis and HIV results in special diagnostic and therapeutic problems and uses up larger amounts of medical resources in developing countries. Outbreaks of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) were first reported from US-American centers caring for HIV patients, but have now been observed in many other countries. In Western Europe the tuberculosis epidemic is under control, but increasing incidence rates in migrants raise new problems in these countries. Tuberculosis is uncontrolled in large parts of the former Soviet Union due to the socio-economic break-down in these countries. Only rigorous infection control measures on a world-wide scale will prevent further detoriation of this situation. Therefore, the extension of surveillance systems, and sufficient funding for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of tuberculosis by national governments and international organizations are all urgently needed. PMID:10354864

  3. Ocular tuberculosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shakarchi, Faiz I

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization currently estimates that nearly two billion people, or one-third of the world’s population, are infected by tuberculosis, and that roughly 10% of the infected people are symptomatic. Tuberculosis affects the lungs in 80% of patients, while in the remaining 20% the disease may affect other organs, including the eye. Uveitis can be seen concurrently with tuberculosis, but a direct association is difficult to prove. Ocular tuberculosis is usually not associated with clinical evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, as up to 60% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients may not have pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis is often problematic and in nearly all reported cases, the diagnosis was only presumptive. Tuberculous uveitis is a great mimicker of various uveitis entities and it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of any type of intraocular inflammation. It is still unknown if ocular manifestations result from a direct mycobacterium infection or hypersensitivity reaction and this is reflected on the management of tuberculous uveitis. Prevalence of tuberculosis as an etiology of uveitis may reach up to 10% in endemic areas. Tuberculous uveitis is a vision-threatening disease that inevitably leads to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to illustrate the various clinical features and management of presumed tuberculous uveitis. The current review focuses on the diagnostic criteria, significance of tuberculin skin test, and use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of tuberculous uveitis as recommended in recent publications. PMID:26648690

  4. Urinary tuberculosis: modern issues.

    PubMed

    Wise, Gilbert J

    2009-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains an epidemic that affects one third of the world's population. The persistence of this disease is caused by a large pool of immune-compromised and lower socioeconomic populations. The advent of rapid transportation and migration has contributed to the persistence of this disease in developed and less developed nations. The emergence of drug-resistant strains has added an additional factor for the pervasiveness of tuberculosis. The genitourinary system is a primary target for hematogenous infections. This paper reviews the contemporary issues that affect the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tuberculosis. PMID:19570494

  5. Tuberculosis in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Bass, J B

    1995-02-01

    The steady decline in tuberculosis case rate reversed in the mid-1980s, and tuberculosis cases have increased dramatically since that time. Important factors contributing to this increase are the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and tuberculosis occurring in foreign-born persons. Tuberculosis outbreaks have occurred in HIV clinics and wards, prisons, homeless shelters, nursing homes, and health care facilities. Some of the outbreaks have involved strains of tuberculosis resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Recent recommendations for initial therapy of tuberculosis include the use of four drugs and directly observed therapy in an effort to prevent the emergence of further drug resistance. PMID:7771659

  6. Tuberculosis in tropical Africa

    PubMed Central

    Roelsgaard, E.; Iversen, E.; Bløcher, C.

    1964-01-01

    Up to the end of the nineteenth century the tubercle bacillus apparently had little opportunity of disseminating among the rather isolated tribes of tropical Africa. With the creation of large centres of trade and industry in the wake of European colonization, tuberculosis seems to have spread rapidly over the continent and is today found everywhere. In a number of tuberculosis prevalence surveys conducted by WHO during 1955-60, randomly selected population groups were tuberculin tested, X-rayed and had sputa examined by direct microscopy. The three methods of examination were applied independently of one another. Data collected during the surveys have been analysed with a view to discovering common epidemiological features of tuberculosis in tropical Africa, assessing the reliability of the diagnostic methods employed and discussing their usefulness in future tuberculosis control programmes. PMID:14178027

  7. Tuberculosis Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organization Chart Advisory Groups Federal TB Task Force Data and Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... United States publication. PDF [6 MB] Interactive TB Data Tool Online Tuberculosis Information System (OTIS) OTIS is ...

  8. Update on cutaneous tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; do Nascimento, Leninha Valério; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Azulay, David Rubem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to draw special attention from health care professionals and society in general. Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infection caused by M. tuberculosis complex, M. bovis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Depending on individual immunity, environmental factors and the type of inoculum, it may present varied clinical and evolutionary aspects. Patients with HIV and those using immunobiological drugs are more prone to infection, which is a great concern in centers where the disease is considered endemic. This paper aims to review the current situation of cutaneous tuberculosis in light of this new scenario, highlighting the emergence of new and more specific methods of diagnosis, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the parasite-host interaction. PMID:25387498

  9. [Mammary tuberculosis: two cases].

    PubMed

    Hafidi, M R; Kouach, J; Hamidi, L A; Achenani, M; Benchakroun, K; Salek, G; Zoubir, Y; Moussaoui, R D; Dehayni, M

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the breast is a very rare infection, it occurs chiefly in women of childbearing potential, usually as an apparently primary infection and constitute a diagnosis and therapeutic challenge. Administration of antituberculous agents is the mainstay of therapy. Surgery is required in some cases. We report two cases of breast tuberculosis. The diagnosis was put on histology with good outcome under anti bacillary treatment. Through the literature data we recall the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and treatment of this pathology. PMID:22765979

  10. Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Ben J.; Schaaf, H. Simon

    2014-01-01

    Many clinicians regard tuberculosis as an adult pulmonary disease, but tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of disease, both pulmonary and extrapulmonary, and death in young children from TB-endemic countries, especially in areas affected by poverty, social disruption, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article reviews the disease burden and the natural history of disease in children with TB. It also provides guidance regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of TB in children. PMID:25037105

  11. Tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J; Schaaf, H Simon

    2014-09-01

    Many clinicians regard tuberculosis as an adult pulmonary disease, but tuberculosis (TB) is a major cause of disease, both pulmonary and extrapulmonary, and death in young children from TB-endemic countries, especially in areas affected by poverty, social disruption, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article reviews the disease burden and the natural history of disease in children with TB. It also provides guidance regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of TB in children. PMID:25037105

  12. The history of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Thomas M

    2006-11-01

    Tuberculosis has claimed its victims throughout much of known human history. It reached epidemic proportions in Europe and North America during the 18th and 19th centuries, earning the sobriquet, "Captain Among these Men of Death." Then it began to decline. Understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculosis began with the work of Théophile Laennec at the beginning of the 19th century and was further advanced by the demonstration of the transmissibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by Jean-Antoine Villemin in 1865 and the identification of the tubercle bacillus as the etiologic agent by Robert Koch in 1882. Clemens von Pirquet developed the tuberculin skin test in 1907 and 3 years later used it to demonstrate latent tuberculous infection in asymptomatic children. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries sanatoria developed for the treatment of patients with tuberculosis. The rest provided there was supplemented with pulmonary collapse procedures designed to rest infected parts of lungs and to close cavities. Public Health measures to combat the spread of tuberculosis emerged following the discovery of its bacterial cause. BCG vaccination was widely employed following World War I. The modern era of tuberculosis treatment and control was heralded by the discovery of streptomycin in 1944 and isoniazid in 1952. PMID:16949809

  13. Tuberculosis: Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Tuberculosis Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ...

  14. Update on Veterinary Tuberculosis Vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Educational Objective: At the conclusion of this presentation, the participant will know the current status of veterinary tuberculosis vaccine research and development, and understand the challenges which remain for the future introduction of tuberculosis vaccines intended for wildlife and livestock...

  15. [Tuberculosis in compromised hosts].

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    Recent development of tuberculosis in Japan tends to converge on a specific high risk group. The proportion of tuberculosis developing particularly from the compromised hosts in the high risk group is especially high. At this symposium, therefore, we took up diabetes mellitus, gastrectomy, dialysis, AIDS and the elderly for discussion. Many new findings and useful reports for practical medical treatment are submitted; why these compromised hosts are predisposed to tuberculosis, tuberculosis diagnostic and remedial notes of those compromised hosts etc. It is an important question for the future to study how to prevent tuberculosis from these compromised hosts. 1. Tuberculosis in diabetes mellitus: aggravation and its immunological mechanism: Kazuyoshi KAWAKAMI (Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus). It has been well documented that diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major aggravating factor in tuberculosis. The onset of this disease is more frequent in DM patients than in individuals with any underlying diseases. However, the precise mechanism of this finding remains to be fully understood. Earlier studies reported that the migration, phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of neutrophils are all impaired in DM patients, which is related to their reduced host defense to infection with extracellular bacteria, such as S. aureus and E. colli. Host defense to mycobacterial infection is largely mediated by cellular immunity, and Th1-related cytokines, such as IFN-gamma and IL-12, play a central role in this response. It is reported that serum level of these cytokines and their production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are reduced in tuberculosis patients with DM, and this is supposed to be involved in the high incidence of tuberculosis in DM. Our study observed similar findings and furthermore indicated that IFN-gamma and IL-12 production by BCG-stimulated PBMC was lower

  16. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  17. Tuberculosis: A Problem for Lifeguards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaros, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Lifeguards run the risk of workplace infection by tuberculosis-carrying swimmers. Even if they work in ventilated, sunlit areas (which reduces risk), they can contract tuberculosis when performing respiratory resuscitation. Without appropriate precautions, lifeguards may be unnecessarily exposed. A tuberculosis infection control plan is needed in…

  18. Tuberculosis-resistant transgenic cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that affects humans and many animal species. In humans, tuberculosis (TB) is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while most cases in cattle are caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, Mb can also cause, albeit rarely, human TB. In this issue, Wu et al. ...

  19. Childhood Tuberculosis, Still with Us...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaulet, Pierre; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The first section of this report on childhood tuberculosis in developed and developing countries discusses the epidemiology of tuberculosis in children. Information is presented on: (1) sources and prevalence of infection; (2) risks, frequency, and types of tuberculosis; (3) mortality rates; and (4) the relation of poverty and AIDS to…

  20. [Lymph node tuberculosis in adults].

    PubMed

    Pimentel, M; Follador, E C; Barbas, C S; Stávale, M L; Oliveira-Vianna, E dos S; Barbas Filho, J V; Leite, O M; de Carvalho, C R

    1991-01-01

    Tuberculous lymphadenitis is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that was observed in 8.4% of all cases with tuberculosis in our series. In all instances the organism isolated was M. tuberculosis. There was a high rate of PPD positiveness. The chemotherapy yielded good results. The evolution was satisfactory in 75% of the patients treated for six months. PMID:1843715

  1. [Tuberculosis and immigration].

    PubMed

    Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Rogado-González, M Cruz; Lozano-Serrano, Ana Belén; Cabezas-Fernández, M Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis worldwide is declining. However, in Western countries this decline is slower due to the impact of immigration. Tuberculosis in the immigrant population is related to health status in the country of origin and with overcrowding and poverty conditions in the host country. Immigrants with tuberculosis are younger, have a higher prevalence of extrapulmonary forms, greater proportion of drug resistance and higher treatment default rates than those of natives. New molecular techniques not only reduce diagnostic delay time but also allow the rapid identification of resistances and improve knowledge of transmission patterns. It is necessary to implement measures to improve treatment compliance in this population group like facilitating access to health card, the use of fixed-dose combination drugs, the participation of cultural mediators and community health workers and gratuity of drugs. PMID:26851978

  2. Tuberculosis and HIV Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Judith; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Källenius, Gunilla

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) constitute the main burden of infectious disease in resource-limited countries. In the individual host, the two pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV, potentiate one another, accelerating the deterioration of immunological functions. In high-burden settings, HIV coinfection is the most important risk factor for developing active TB, which increases the susceptibility to primary infection or reinfection and also the risk of TB reactivation for patients with latent TB. M. tuberculosis infection also has a negative impact on the immune response to HIV, accelerating the progression from HIV infection to AIDS. The clinical management of HIV-associated TB includes the integration of effective anti-TB treatment, use of concurrent antiretroviral therapy (ART), prevention of HIV-related comorbidities, management of drug cytotoxicity, and prevention/treatment of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). PMID:25722472

  3. Tuberculosis in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Shobita

    2016-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the world's most lethal infectious diseases. Preventive and control strategies among other high-risk groups, such as the elderly population, continues to be a challenge. Clinical features of TB in older adults may be atypical and confused with age-related diseases. Diagnosis and management of TB in the elderly person can be difficult; treatment can be associated with adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current global epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, management, and prevention of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in community-dwelling and institutionalized aging adults. PMID:27394018

  4. [The immunology of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, T

    1989-02-01

    An introductory overview on the present state and future prospect of the immunology of tuberculosis is presented with the following six chapters. 1. Contribution of tuberculosis immunologists to the modern immunology. When one reminds Koch's phenomenon, Freund's adjuvant, and the findings or new ideas of, for instance, cell-mediated transfer of tuberculin allergy, test of MIF which was first described as "lymphokines", effector macrophages activated with immune lymphocytes against mycobacterial infection, MHC-restriction for presenting tuberculin-antigen from macrophages to T cells, everyone may agree with saying that the tuberculosis immunology contributed greatly to the opening and development of modern immunology. 2. Central dogma of tuberculosis immunology. Tuberculosis immunology possesses a central dogma : infection of tubercle bacilli----phagocytosis----antigen presentation----expansion of specific T cell clone----production of lymphokines----macrophage activation----killing of the bacilli. Recent knowledges from modern immunology have clarified many things in or around this immunological process. However, there remain many important questions. In the following chapters and subtitles, what have been clarified and what are still unsolved will be described. 3. Induction of tuberculosis immunity. (1) Mechanisms of phagocytosis with macrophages, and natural resistance. (2) Antigen presentation and sensitized T cells. 4. Expression of tuberculosis immunity. (1) Lymphokines. (2) Activation of macrophages. (3) Immune suppression. 5. Special characters of tubercle bacilli in relation to the host response. Biochemistry of cellular components of tubercle bacilli and their biological activities have been reported by many investigators already in this journal. Therefore, the following items only are discussed here. (1) Mycobacterial proteins produced by gene-technology. (2) Adjuvant active derivatives of MDP. (3) DNA from BCG and its biological activities. (4

  5. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  6. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. PMID:24922567

  7. [Tuberculosis of ankle].

    PubMed

    Rubio Barbón, S; Rodríguez Cocina, B; Suárez del Villar Acebal, R; Calvo Rodríguez, C E; Villar López, A; Escalada Rodríguez, P; Torreblanca Gil, A

    2004-09-01

    The authors present a case of tuberculous arthritis of ankle with sinovial fluid and sputum aspirate Lowenstein positive (M. tuberculosis) in a patient non inmunocomprometid and review the clinical, diagnosis and treatment aspects of this entity, and show the difficult diagnosis in cases of radiology normal or low suspect. PMID:15476422

  8. [Tuberculosis in Iceland. 1976].

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur

    2005-01-01

    Because of signs of tuberculous lesions in old skeletons it can be stated with certainty that tuberculosis has occurred in the country shortly after the settlement. From that time and up to the seventeenth century, little or nothing is known about the occurrence of the disease. A few preserved descriptions of diseases and deaths indicate that tuberculosis has existed in the country before the advent of qualified physicians in 1760. On the basis of papers and reports from the first physicians and the first tuberculosis registers the opinions is set forth that the disease has been rare up to the latter part of the nineteenth century. During the two last decades of that century the disease began to spread more rapidly and increased steadily up to the turn of the century. Although reporting of the disease was started in the last decade of the nineteenth century the reporting was first ordered by law with the passage of the first tuberculosis Act in the year 1903. With this legislation official measures for tuberculosis control work really started in the country. The first sanatorium was built in 1910. In 1921 the tuberculosis Act was revised and since then practically all the expenses for the hospitalization and treatment of tuberculous cases has been defrayed by the state. In the year 1935 organized tuberculosis control work was begun and a special physician appointed to direct it. From then on systematic surveys were made, partly in health centers i.e. tuberculosis clinics, which were established in the main towns, and partly by means of transportable X ray units in outlying rural areas of the country. In 1939 the tuberculosis Act was again revised with special reference to the surveys and the activities of the tuberculosis clinics. This act is still in force. Some items of it are described. The procedure of the surveys and the methods of examination are described. The great majority of subjects were tuberculin tested and all positive reactors X rayed. Furthermore, X

  9. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jassal, Mandeep; Bishai, William R

    2009-01-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis is defined as disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis with resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, any fluoroquinolone, and at least one of three injectable second-line drugs (amikacin, capreomycin, or kanamycin). The definition has applicable clinical value and has allowed for more uniform surveillance in varied international settings. Recent surveillance data have indicated that the prevalence of tuberculosis drug resistance has risen to the highest rate ever recorded. The gold standard for drug-susceptibility testing has been the agar proportion method; however, this technique requires several weeks for results to be determined. More sensitive and specific diagnostic tests are still unavailable in resource-limited settings. Clinical manifestations, although variable in different settings and among different strains, have in general shown that XDR tuberculosis is associated with greater morbidity and mortality than non-XDR tuberculosis. The treatment of XDR tuberculosis should include agents to which the organism is susceptible, and should continue for a minimum of 18-24 months. However, treatment continues to be limited in tuberculosis-endemic countries largely because of weaknesses in national tuberculosis health-care models. The ultimate strategy to control drug-resistant tuberculosis is one that implements a comprehensive approach incorporating innovation from the political, social, economic, and scientific realms. PMID:18990610

  10. Maxillary sinusitis with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Prakash, Ved; Singh, Abhishek Bahadur; Saheer, S

    2014-01-01

    Tubercular infection of the nasal cavity is an infrequently encountered condition. More so, after the discovery of relevant antibiotics, nasal sinus tuberculosis is not commonly seen. Few cases have reported tuberculosis of the paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and larynx. With the increasing incidence of HIV, these rare forms of infection have started re-emerging. We present a case of a middle aged man presenting with nasal cavity lesion along with pulmonary tuberculosis, which came to light only after the diagnosis of maxillary sinus tuberculosis. PMID:25085948

  11. Tuberculosis of spine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vinod; Patgaonkar, P. R.; Nagariya, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity. PMID:21572628

  12. Tuberculosis control learning games.

    PubMed

    Smith, I

    1993-07-01

    In teaching health workers about tuberculosis (TB) control we frequently concentrate on the technological aspects, such as diagnosis, treatment and recording. Health workers also need to understand the sociological aspects of TB control, particularly those that influence the likelihood of diagnosis and cure. Two games are presented that help health workers comprehend the reasons why TB patients often delay in presenting for diagnosis, and why they then frequently default from treatment. PMID:8356734

  13. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cudahy, Patrick; Shenoi, Sheela V

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  14. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cudahy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  15. John Keats and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Radetsky, M

    2001-05-01

    John Keats was trained as an apothecary, the general practitioner of the day. Precocious in his sensibilities and fluent in his imagery, he also was the model of the romantic poet. That he was a physician and a poet makes his early death from tuberculosis poignant and revealing. This history traces his life and death against the backdrop of medicine at the turn of the 19th century. PMID:11368115

  16. [Tuberculosis. Future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Marques Gomes, M João

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major health problem around the world and its incidence is growing 0.4% each year. There are 2 billions of infected, 8.4 millions new cases every year and 16 million patients. The association of VIH and tuberculosis, the increasing number of multidrug resistance, failure of health systems, greater mobility of people, poverty, wars and social exclusion, are the major causes of the epidemiological situation. Faster, more specific and sensible diagnostic methods are being investigated. Some of them use molecular biology techniques, some uses radioisotopes and some others are based on colour and fluorescence modifications of dyes. New drugs, new routes of administration and ways for increasing compliance are under investigation. More potent drugs, with greater biodisponibility and adequate pharmacokinetics for shorter treatments for multidrug and latent forms of bacilli are needed. New vaccines are under investigations, namely Adjuvant Subunits Vaccines, DNA Vaccines DNA, no micobacterianos vectors, and attenuated living vaccines are being tested. Finally some considerations are made concerning the need of global committement to win the fight against tuberculosis in the near future. PMID:15202032

  17. Tuberculosis Endometritis Presenting as A Leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mahboobeh; Shahbazi, Fatemeh; Pirzadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Seyed Rahim; Ghaffari, Parisa; Eftekhar, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis. Taking into consideration that genitourinary tuberculosis may be associated with a diversity of presentations, its diagnoses may be difficult. A young woman with an initial presumptive diagnosis of a uterine leiomyoma presented with abdominal pain and a pelvic mass that after further investigations, she was diagnosed with genital tuberculosis. PMID:25780530

  18. Noninvasive Test for Tuberculosis Detection among Primates

    PubMed Central

    Mugisha, Lawrence; Shoyama, Fernanda Miyagaki; O’Malley, Melanie J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Asiimwe, Benon; Travis, Dominic A.; Singer, Randall S.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-01-01

    Traditional testing methods have limited epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis among free-living primates. PCR amplification of insertion element IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fecal samples was evaluated as a noninvasive screening test for tuberculosis in primates. Active tuberculosis was detected among inoculated macaques and naturally exposed chimpanzees, demonstrating the utility of this test. PMID:25695329

  19. TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG CANCER.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and lung cancer as comorbidities has been extensively discussed in many studies. In the past, it was well known that lung cancer is a specific epidemiological successor of PTB and that lung cancer often develops in scars caused by PTB. In recent years, the relevance of the two diseases has drawn attention in terms of the close epidemiological connection and chronic inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In Japanese case series studies, most lung cancer patients with tuberculous sequelae received supportive care alone in the past, but more recently, the use of aggressive lung cancer treatment is increasing. Many studies on PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities have revealed that active PTB is noted in 2-5% of lung cancer cases, whereas lung cancer is noted in 1-2% of active PTB cases. In such instances of comorbidity, many active PTB cases showed Type II (non-extensively cavitary disease) and Spread 2-3 (intermediate-extensive diseases) on chest X-rays, but standard anti-tuberculosis treatment easily eradicates negative conversion of sputum culture for M. tuberculosis; lung cancer cases were often stage III- IV and squamous cell carcinoma predominant, and the administration of aggressive treatment for lung cancer is increasing. The major clinical problems associated with PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities include delay in diagnosis (doctor's delay) and therapeutic limitations. The former involves two factors of radiographic interpretation: the principles of parsimony (Occam's razor) and visual search; the latter involves three factors of lung cancer treatment: infectivity of M.tuberculosis, anatomical limitation due to lung damage by tuberculosis, and drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and anti-cancer drugs, especially molecularly targeted drugs. The comorbidity of these two diseases is an important health-related issue in Japan. In the treatment of PTB, the possibility of concurrent lung cancer should be kept

  20. Tuberculosis of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Iserì, Mete; Aydìner, Omer; Celìk, Levent; Peker, Onder

    2005-04-01

    Tuberculosis of the parotid gland is very rare and clinically indistinguishable from a neoplasm. Thus the diagnosis of parotid gland involvement with tuberculosis has traditionally been made after surgical resection. We present a case which was diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology and managed medically. PMID:15949089

  1. Tuberculosis of the pubic symphysis

    PubMed Central

    Gothwal, Sudarshan; Varshney, Peeyush; Mathur, Shivank; Songra, Bhupen

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of India’s public health problems. It involves various systems of the body, including the skeletal system. Osteoarticular tuberculosis is the second most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis next to lymph nodes and constitutes about 13% of all extrapulmonary cases. It is generally accepted that osteoarticular tuberculosis is the result of a haematogenous or lymphatic spread from a reactivated latent focus, usually pulmonary; however, previous infection is not always encountered, and in only 40–50% of the cases, it is possible to demonstrate another active infection site. The commonest site for skeletal tuberculosis is the spine followed by the hip, knee and ankle joints. Tuberculosis can involve literally any bone or joint. Pubic symphysis is an uncommon site for tuberculosis in the case of the skeletal system. We present a rare case of pubic symphysis tuberculosis in a 25-year-old woman presented to the general surgical department with a swelling in the right thigh region. PMID:24515233

  2. Tuberculosis vaccine: time to look into future.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sumit; Garg, Dinesh; Jain, Ram Bilas; Khanna, Pardeep; Choudhary, Satvinder; Sahoo, Soumya; Singh, Inderjeet

    2014-01-01

    Global burden of tuberculosis is nearly 12 million. As per the WHO Global TB Report 2013, there were an estimated 8.6 million incident cases of TB globally in 2012. Tuberculosis is an issue that affects development through its effect on the health of individuals and families. In humans, neither prior latent infection nor recovery from active TB confers reliable protection against reinfection or reactivation disease. The power of vaccines as a public health intervention lies in their ability to reduce onward transmission of disease as much as in their ability to protect vaccinated individuals; a feature generally referred to as "herd immunity." MVA85A is a booster vaccine, used in con-junction with BCG as part of a prime-boost strategy. BCG serves as the prime vaccination and MVA85A as the boost, operating under the theory that the addition of MVA85A will produce a better immune response and more protection against TB than BCG vaccination alone. There is a critical need to raise the profile of TB vaccine research at the community, national, regional, and global levels in order to generate support and political will, increase investment, create an enabling and supportive environment for clinical trials, and lay the groundwork for acceptance and adoption of new TB vaccines once licensed. PMID:24231233

  3. Student Pharmacists as Tuberculosis Screeners

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop, implement, and evaluate a targeted educational module on tuberculosis screening with second-year professional pharmacy students that improves their knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding tuberculosis screening. Design. A tuberculosis-screening educational module was developed in collaboration with the Washington State Pharmacy Association and Department of Health and incorporated in a core student pharmacist class. Students completed online didactic training and a live practicum, each lasting 90 minutes. Assessment. Students were assessed using a pre/postdidactic assessment, live practicum tuberculin skin testing (TST) administration and evaluation assessment, and postprogram written reflection. Student pre/postknowledge assessment scores improved in all areas except in documentation. Conclusion. The tuberculosis screening educational module significantly improved student knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding tuberculosis screening. PMID:27073277

  4. Student Pharmacists as Tuberculosis Screeners.

    PubMed

    McKennon, Skye A; Arnold, Jennifer

    2016-03-25

    Objective. To develop, implement, and evaluate a targeted educational module on tuberculosis screening with second-year professional pharmacy students that improves their knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding tuberculosis screening. Design. A tuberculosis-screening educational module was developed in collaboration with the Washington State Pharmacy Association and Department of Health and incorporated in a core student pharmacist class. Students completed online didactic training and a live practicum, each lasting 90 minutes. Assessment. Students were assessed using a pre/postdidactic assessment, live practicum tuberculin skin testing (TST) administration and evaluation assessment, and postprogram written reflection. Student pre/postknowledge assessment scores improved in all areas except in documentation. Conclusion. The tuberculosis screening educational module significantly improved student knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding tuberculosis screening. PMID:27073277

  5. Tuberculosis on the flight deck.

    PubMed

    Parmet, A J

    1999-08-01

    Tuberculosis in commercial aircraft has been a concern since a 1995 incident of possible transmission from an active case of tuberculosis to passengers in the cabin of a 747. Subsequently, commercial air carriers have been vigilant in cooperating with public health authorities in tracking all known exposures to tuberculosis. In 1998, a pilot of a commercial airliner was diagnosed with active tuberculosis. Company records demonstrated that in the previous 6 mo, the pilot had flown with 48 other pilots. Every exposed pilot was contacted and evaluated by skin testing (IPPD) or chest x-ray if previously positive. There were no skin test conversions and no changes on x-rays. This study demonstrates that transmission of tuberculosis in the aircraft cabin environment, even under close and continuous exposure to an active case, is a rare event. PMID:10447057

  6. Transformative tools for tackling tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The world is in need of more effective approaches to controlling tuberculosis. The development of improved control strategies has been hampered by deficiencies in the tools available for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and defining the dynamic consequences of the interaction of M. tuberculosis with its human host. Key needs include a highly sensitive, specific nonsputum diagnostic; biomarkers predictive of responses to therapy; correlates of risk for disease development; and host response–independent markers of M. tuberculosis infection. Tools able to sensitively detect and quantify total body M. tuberculosis burden might well be transformative across many needed use cases. Here, we review the current state of the field, paying particular attention to needed changes in experimental paradigms that would facilitate the discovery, validation, and development of such tools. PMID:26458772

  7. Tuberculosis peritonitis: gallium-67 scintigraphic appearance.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Y; Ozaki, Y; Hasegawa, H; Shindoh, N; Katayama, H; Tamamoto, F

    1999-06-01

    Tuberculosis peritonitis is a rare manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The results of gallium-67 scintigraphy of three patients with tuberculosis peritonitis were reviewed to assess its usefulness in the diagnosis of this condition. Tuberculosis peritonitis was associated with diffuse or focal abdominal localization and decreased hepatic accumulation of gallium-67. These gallium-67 scan features of tuberculosis peritonitis may help to optimize the diagnosis and management of this disease. PMID:10435380

  8. [Tuberculosis in Asia].

    PubMed

    2002-10-01

    1. Philippines: The development, expansion and maintenance of pilot area activities: Cristina B. Giango (Technical Division, Cebu Provincial Health Office, the Philippines) In 1994, the Department of Health developed the new NTP policies based on WHO recommendations and started a pilot project in Cebu Province in collaboration with the Japan International Cooperation Agency. To test its feasibility and effectiveness, the new NTP policies were pre-tested in one city and one Rural Health Unit. The test showed a high rate of three sputum collection (90%), high positive rate (10%), and high cure rate (80%). Before the new guidelines were introduced, the new policy was briefed, a baseline survey of the facility was conducted, equipment was provided, and intensive training was given. Recording/Reporting forms and procedures were also developed to ensure accurate reporting. Supervision, an important activity to ensure effective performance, was institutionalized. Laboratory services were strengthened, and a quality-control system was introduced in 1995 to ensure the quality of the laboratory services. With the implementation of DOTS strategy, barangay health workers were trained as treatment partners. In partnership with the private sector, the TB Diagnostic Committee was organized to deliberate and assess sputum negative but X-ray positive cases. The implementation of the new NTP guidelines in Cebe Province has reached a satisfactory level, the cure rate and positive rate have increased, and laboratory services have improved. Because of its successful implementation, the new NTP guidelines are now being used nationwide. 2. Nepal: The DOTS Strategy in the area with hard geographic situation: Dirgh Singh Bam (National Tuberculosis Center, Nepal) Three groups of factors characterize the population of Nepal: 1) Socio-cultural factors, e.g. migration, poverty, language; 2) Environmental factors, e.g. geography and climate; and 3) Political factors, prisoners and refugee

  9. Fish mycobacteriosis (Tuberculosis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parisot, T.J.; Wood, J.W.

    1959-01-01

    The etiologic agent for the bacterial disease, "fish tuberculosis" (more correctly "mycobacteriosis"), was first observed in carp in 189& from a pond in France. Subsequently similar agents have been isolated from or observed in fish in fresh water, salt water, and brackish water, in fish in aquaria, hatcheries, and natural habitat~ (wild populations of fish). The disease has been recognized as an important infection among hatchery reared salmonid fishes on the West Coast of the United States, and in aquarium fishes such as the neon tetra, the Siamese fighting fish, and in salt water fish held in zoological displays.

  10. Tuberculosis in the AIDS era.

    PubMed Central

    Sepkowitz, K A; Raffalli, J; Riley, L; Kiehn, T E; Armstrong, D

    1995-01-01

    A resurgence of tuberculosis has occurred in recent years in the United States and abroad. Deteriorating public health services, increasing numbers of immigrants from countries of endemicity, and coinfection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to the rise in the number of cases diagnosed in the United States. Outbreaks of resistant tuberculosis, which responds poorly to therapy, have occurred in hospitals and other settings, affecting patients and health care workers. This review covers the pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease. In addition, public health and hospital infection control strategies are detailed. Newer approaches to epidemiologic investigation, including use of restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, are discussed. Detailed consideration of the interaction between HIV infection and tuberculosis is given. We also review the latest techniques in laboratory evaluation, including the radiometric culture system, DNA probes, and PCR. Current recommendations for therapy of tuberculosis, including multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, are given. Finally, the special problem of prophylaxis of persons exposed to multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is considered. PMID:7621399

  11. Respiratory infections: pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Choby, Beth A; Hunter, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Family physicians can prevent mortality and disability due to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) by identifying high-risk patients. Recognition of symptoms (eg, cough for 3 weeks or longer) helps prevent overlooked diagnoses because results of tuberculin skin tests and interferon-gamma release assays are negative in up to 25% and 21%, respectively, of severe acute cases. The typical x-ray findings of cavities, infiltrates, and lymphadenopathy are minimal among immunosuppressed patients. Cases of active TB must be reported to local or state health departments within 24 hours of diagnosis. Sputum acid-fast bacillus tests provide results within hours and help quantify bacterial load but are not highly sensitive, and infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria can cause positive test results. Sputum cultures are adequately sensitive, identify mycobacterial species, and provide organisms for antibiotic susceptibility testing but require weeks for results. Molecular detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and of antibiotic-resistant mutations can expedite diagnosis and management of drug-resistant TB. Management of active TB should include directly observed therapy. Standard 6-month therapy with rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol resolves infection in nearly all immunocompetent adults with pansensitive TB. Multidrug-resistant TB requires second-line antibiotics (eg, fluoroquinolones, linezolid) in individualized regimens lasting 2 years. Management of latent TB infection prevents progression to active TB disease, particularly if management is completed within 2 years of infection. PMID:25685923

  12. Immunometabolism in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lanbo; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Subbian, Selvakumar

    2016-01-01

    Immunometabolism, the study of the relationship between bioenergetic pathways and specific functions of immune cells, has recently gained increasing appreciation. In response to infection, activation of the host innate and adaptive immune cells is accompanied by a switch in the bioenergetic pathway from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, a metabolic remodeling known as the Warburg effect, which is required for the production of antimicrobial and pro-inflammatory effector molecules. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the Warburg effect and discuss its association with the expression of host immune responses in tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We also discuss potential mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect with a focus on the expression and regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), the regulatory subunit of HIF-1, a major transcription regulator involved in cellular stress adaptation processes, including energy metabolism and antimicrobial responses. We also propose a novel hypothesis that Mtb perturbs the Warburg effect of immune cells to facilitate its survival and persistence in the host. A better understanding of the dynamics of metabolic states of immune cells and their specific functions during TB pathogenesis can lead to the development of immunotherapies capable of promoting Mtb clearance and reducing Mtb persistence and the emergence of drug resistant strains. PMID:27148269

  13. Immunometabolism in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lanbo; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Subbian, Selvakumar

    2016-01-01

    Immunometabolism, the study of the relationship between bioenergetic pathways and specific functions of immune cells, has recently gained increasing appreciation. In response to infection, activation of the host innate and adaptive immune cells is accompanied by a switch in the bioenergetic pathway from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, a metabolic remodeling known as the Warburg effect, which is required for the production of antimicrobial and pro-inflammatory effector molecules. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the Warburg effect and discuss its association with the expression of host immune responses in tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We also discuss potential mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect with a focus on the expression and regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), the regulatory subunit of HIF-1, a major transcription regulator involved in cellular stress adaptation processes, including energy metabolism and antimicrobial responses. We also propose a novel hypothesis that Mtb perturbs the Warburg effect of immune cells to facilitate its survival and persistence in the host. A better understanding of the dynamics of metabolic states of immune cells and their specific functions during TB pathogenesis can lead to the development of immunotherapies capable of promoting Mtb clearance and reducing Mtb persistence and the emergence of drug resistant strains. PMID:27148269

  14. Tuberculosis: Epidemiology and Control

    PubMed Central

    Sulis, Giorgia; Roggi, Alberto; Matteelli, Alberto; Raviglione, Mario C.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health concern worldwide: despite a regular, although slow, decline in incidence over the last decade, as many as 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2012. TB is by all means a poverty-related disease, mainly affecting the most vulnerable populations in the poorest countries. The presence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis in most countries, with somewhere prevalence is high, is among the major challenges for TB control, which may hinder recent achievements especially in some settings. Early TB case detection especially in resource-constrained settings and in marginalized groups remains a challenge, and about 3 million people are estimated to remain undiagnosed or not notified and untreated. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently launched a new global TB strategy for the “post-2015 era” aimed at “ending the global TB epidemic” by 2035. This strategy is based on the three pillars that emphasize patient-centred TB care and prevention, bold policies and supportive systems, and intensified research and innovation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the global TB epidemiology as well as of the main challenges that must be faced to eliminate the disease as a public health problem everywhere. PMID:25408856

  15. The resurgence of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parry, C; Davies, P D

    1996-01-01

    A lack of reliable statistics makes tuberculosis (TB) trends in developing countries difficult to estimate. Nonetheless, the World Health Organization and the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease estimated in 1990 that one-third of the world's population was infected with the tubercle bacillus and that there were 7-8 million new cases of TB annually. 95% of the new cases occurred in the developing world, with more than 5 million in Asia and the Western Pacific and more than 1 million in sub-Saharan Africa. Almost 80% of TB cases in developing countries occur among those under age 50 years. The global annual mortality was estimated at 2.5 million, with 98% of deaths occurring in developing countries. Worldwide, TB is believed to be responsible for 25% of avoidable deaths in young adults. There has been no significant decline in the average annual risk of infection in most developing countries due to incomplete coverage by control programs and inadequate cure rates. The interaction of HIV infection with TB is another factor which contributes to the deteriorating TB situation in many developing countries. Countries with a high population growth rate and little decline in the annual risk of infection should expect either a static or increasing level of TB disease. Immigration from developing countries, HIV infection, poverty, unemployment, homelessness, overcrowding, and population aging contribute to the spread of TB in developed countries. Drug resistance thwarts the control of TB worldwide. PMID:8972116

  16. Tuberculosis care: an evaluability study

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Cláudia Santos; Brito, Ewerton Willian Gomes; Negrão, Oswaldo Gomes Corrêa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to verify whether the tuberculosis control program (TCP) is evaluable and to examine the feasibility of building an evaluation model in apriority municipality for the control of tuberculosis. METHOD: this evaluability study was conducted in a municipality in northeastern Brazil. For data collection, documental analysis and interviews with key informants were performed. For indicator validation, the nominal group technique was adopted. RESULTS: the details of TCP were described, and both the logical model and the classification framework for indicators were developed and agreed up on, with the goal of characterizing the structural elements of the program, defining the structure and process indicators, and formulating the evaluation questions. CONCLUSION: TCP is evaluable. Based on logical operational analysis, it was possible to evaluate the adequacy of the program goals for the control of tuberculosis. Therefore, the performance of a summative evaluation is recommended, with a focus on the analysis of the effects of tuberculosis control interventions on decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:25493675

  17. Tuberculosis treatment and drug regimens.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Centis, Rosella; D'ambrosio, Lia; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis is an airborne infectious disease treated with combination therapeutic regimens. Adherence to long-term antituberculosis therapy is crucial for maintaining adequate blood drug level. The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are mainly favored by the inadequate medical management of the patients. The therapeutic approach for drug-resistant tuberculosis is cumbersome, because of the poor, expensive, less-effective, and toxic alternatives to the first-line drugs. New antituberculosis drugs (bedaquiline and delamanid) have been recently approved by the health authorities, but they cannot represent the definitive solution to the clinical management of drug-resistant tuberculosis forms, particularly in intermediate economy settings where the prevalence of drug resistance is high (China, India, and former Soviet Union countries). New research and development activities are urgently needed. Public health policies are required to preserve the new and old therapeutic options. PMID:25573773

  18. Tuberculosis origin: The Neolithic scenario.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Israel; Donoghue, Helen D; Minnikin, David E; May, Hila; Lee, Oona Y-C; Feldman, Michal; Galili, Ehud; Spigelman, Mark; Rothschild, Bruce M; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila

    2015-06-01

    This paper follows the dramatic changes in scientific research during the last 20 years regarding the relationship between the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and its hosts - bovids and/or humans. Once the M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis genomes were sequenced, it became obvious that the old story of M. bovis evolving into the human pathogen should be reversed, as M. tuberculosis is more ancestral than M. bovis. Nevertheless, the timescale and geographical origin remained an enigma. In the current study human and cattle bone samples were examined for evidence of tuberculosis from the site of Atlit-Yam in the Eastern Mediterranean, dating from 9250 to 8160 (calibrated) years ago. Strict precautions were used to prevent contamination in the DNA analysis, and independent centers used to confirm authenticity of findings. DNA from five M. tuberculosis genetic loci was detected and had characteristics consistent with extant genetic lineages. High performance liquid chromatography was used as an independent method of verification and it directly detected mycolic acid lipid biomarkers, specific for the M. tuberculosis complex. These, together with pathological changes detected in some of the bones, confirm the presence of the disease in the Levantine populations during the Pre-pottery Neolithic C period, more than 8000 years ago. PMID:25726364

  19. HIV-Associated Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kogieleum; Naidoo, Kasavan; Padayatchi, Nesri; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha

    2011-01-01

    The intersecting HIV and Tuberculosis epidemics in countries with a high disease burden of both infections pose many challenges and opportunities. For patients infected with HIV in high TB burden countries, the diagnosis of TB, ARV drug choices in treating HIV-TB coinfected patients, when to initiate ARV treatment in relation to TB treatment, managing immune reconstitution, minimising risk of getting infected with TB and/or managing recurrent TB, minimizing airborne transmission, and infection control are key issues. In addition, given the disproportionate burden of HIV in women in these settings, sexual reproductive health issues and particular high mortality rates associated with TB during pregnancy are important. The scaleup and resource allocation to access antiretroviral treatment in these high HIV and TB settings provide a unique opportunity to strengthen both services and impact positively in meeting Millennium Development Goal 6. PMID:20871843

  20. Molecular diagnostics for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Noor, K M; Shephard, L; Bastian, I

    2015-04-01

    The phenotypic methods of smear microscopy, culture and indirect drug susceptibility testing (DST) remain the 'gold standard' diagnostics for tuberculosis (TB) in 2015. However, this review demonstrates that genotypic methods are in the ascendancy. Current-generation nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are important supplementary tests for the rapid direct detection of (multidrug-resistant) TB in specific clinical settings. Genotypic detection is already the preferred method of detecting rifampicin and pyrazinamide resistance. Next-generation NAATs able to detect about 10 colony forming units/mL of sputum could replace culture as the initial test for detecting TB. Whole genome sequencing could also plausibly replace phenotypic DST but much work is required in method standardisation, database development and elucidation of all resistance gene determinants. The challenge then will be to rollout these increasingly complex and expensive diagnostics in the low-income countries where TB is prevalent. PMID:25719854

  1. Tuberculosis Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Chamie, Gabriel; Lienhardt, Christian; Havlir, Diane V.

    2011-01-01

    An unprecedented number of new tuberculosis (TB) medications are currently in development, and there will be great pressure to deploy these new drugs among all populations after their efficacy is demonstrated. People living with HIV experience a large burden of TB and have a particularly pressing need for TB treatments that are shorter and less toxic. In addition, all people living with HIV now require antiretroviral therapy during TB treatment. A roadmap of the research, programmatic, and regulatory considerations includes the following: (1) inclusion of people living with HIV early in clinical trials for treatment and prevention using new TB medications, (2) prioritization of key studies of HIV–TB drug interactions and interactions between new TB agents, and (3) optimization of clinical trial infrastructure, laboratory capacity, and drug susceptibility testing. PMID:21868507

  2. Towards host-directed therapies for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Hoelscher, Michael; Ntoumi, Francine; Rustomjee, Roxana; Vilaplana, Cristina; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Rasolof, Voahangy; Munderi, Paula; Singh, Nalini; Aklillu, Eleni; Padayatchi, Nesri; Macete, Eusebio; Kapata, Nathan; Mulenga, Modest; Kibiki, Gibson; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Nyirenda, Thomas; Maboko, Leonard; Garcia-Basteiro, Alberto; Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Reither, Klaus; Gagneux, Sebastien; Edwards, Sarah; Mfinanga, Elirehema; Abdulla, Salim; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Russell, James B W; Gant, Vanya; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Elkington, Paul; Bonnet, Maryline; Menendez, Clara; Dieye, Tandakha N; Diarra, Bassirou; Maiga, Almoustapha; Aseffa, Abraham; Parida, Shreemanta; Wejse, Christian; Petersen, Eskild; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Oliver, Matt; Craig, Gill; Corrah, Tumena; Tientcheu, Leopold; Antonio, Martin; Rao, Martin; McHugh, Timothy D; Sheikh, Aziz; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Ramjee, Gita; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Churchyard, Gavin; Steyn, Andrie; Grobusch, Martin; Sanne, Ian; Martinson, Neil; Madansein, Rajhmun; Wilkinson, Robert J; Mayosi, Bongani; Schito, Marco; Wallis, Robert S

    2015-08-01

    The treatment of tuberculosis is based on combinations of drugs that directly target Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A new global initiative is now focusing on a complementary approach of developing adjunct host-directed therapies. PMID:26184493

  3. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  4. An Update on Global Tuberculosis (TB)

    PubMed Central

    Talip, Balkis A.; Sleator, Roy D.; Lowery, Colm J.; Dooley, James S.G.; Snelling, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis globally results in almost 2 million human deaths annually, with 1 in 4 deaths from tuberculosis being human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related. Primarily a pathogen of the respiratory system, aerobic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infects the lungs via the inhalation of infected aerosol droplets generated by people with pulmonary disease through coughing. This review focuses on M. tuberculosis transmission, epidemiology, detection methods and technologies. PMID:24847176

  5. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  6. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  7. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  8. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  9. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  10. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  11. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  12. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  13. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  14. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  15. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  16. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  17. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  18. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  19. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  20. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  1. Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Lepromatous Leprosy Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Sendrasoa, F. A.; Ranaivo, I. M.; Raharolahy, O.; Andrianarison, M.; Ramarozatovo, L. S.; Rapelanoro Rabenja, F.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of leprosy and pulmonary tuberculosis is reported infrequently in the modern era. We report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed in patient being treated with glucocorticoids for complications of leprosy (type II reaction). Physicians should recognize that the leprosy patients treated with glucocorticoid may develop tuberculosis. PMID:26504603

  2. Gene Regulatory Networks Activated during Chronic Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a burden for most of world’s population. Several genes were found to be up-regulated at the late stage of chronic tuberculosis when DNA microarray protocol was used to analyze murine tuberculosis. Rv0348 is a potential transcriptional regulator that is highly expresse...

  3. [Tuberculosis--a neverending story].

    PubMed

    Dzieciołowska-Baran, Edyta; Gawlikowska-Sroka, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that over one third of the human population is now exposed or has been exposed in the past to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and new infections occur in the world at a rate of one per second. The history of tuberculosis is long and very interesting, because before the isolation of mycobacteria and the finding of a cure, the disease mercilessly killed thousands of people and deprived doctors of hope. Robert Koch's momentous discovery was a major breakthrough in the fight against tuberculosis. Unfortunately, the disease has never been fully controlled. Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease localized in 90-95% of cases in the lungs, and therefore it is extremely difficult to diagnose unequivocally in paleopathological material. Only the form of osteo-arthritis leaves traces in archaeological material. The earliest evidence of tuberculosis (the location of the spine, Pott's disease) in the form of fossils is dated to before 8000 BC. Another very old trace is considered to be human remains from the Neolithic period (ca 5000 BC), found near Heidelberg, where changes in the thoracic spine are typical for spondylitis in tuberculosa. Constant growth in the incidence of new cases in the world can be observed today. Not everyone infected will develop the full-blown disease. The infection may remain dormant. However, one in ten latent infections will subsequently be activated, leading, if not treated, to the death of almost half of the patients. PMID:25026769

  4. Esophageal tuberculosis presenting with hematemesis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samit S; Somani, Piyush O; Mahey, Rajeshkumar C; Shah, Dharmesh K; Contractor, Qais Q; Rathi, Pravin M

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal tuberculosis is rare, constituting about 0.3% of gastrointestinal tuberculosis. It presents commonly with dysphagia, cough, chest pain in addition to fever and weight loss. Complications may include hemorrhage from the lesion, development of arterioesophageal fistula, esophagocutaneous fistula or tracheoesophageal fistula. There are very few reports of esophageal tuberculosis presenting with hematemesis due to ulceration. We report a patient with hematemesis that was due to the erosion of tuberculous subcarinal lymph nodes into the esophagus. A 15-year-old boy presented with hemetemesis as his only complaint. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed an eccentric ulcerative lesion involving 50% of circumference of the esophagus. Biopsy showed caseating epitheloid granulomas with lymphocytic infiltrates suggestive of tuberculosis. Computerised tomography of the thorax revealed thickening of the mid-esophagus with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes in the subcarinal region compressing the esophagus along with moderate right sided pleural effusion. Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis therapy (Rifampicin, Isoniazid, Pyrazinamide, Ethambutol) for 6 mo. Repeat EGD showed scarring and mucosal tags with complete resolution of the esophageal ulcer. PMID:24255751

  5. [The child in tuberculosis hotbeds].

    PubMed

    Răduţă, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    The city of Cluj-Napoca and the Cluj County, once situated in the comfortable zone of tuberculosis incidence, below the country, average, have registered a permanent and alarming increase in the both adult and child incidence of tuberculosis the last 5 years, which made us find the analysis of the phenomenon useful and constructive--having in view children mainly. Therefore we started to study all the adult bacillary hotbeds, bacteriologically confirmed in the city (150, totaling 172 cases) and having in contact between 1995-2000 with 280 children; superposing period of the 1995-2000. Antituberculosis National Programme reviewed in 1997. Statistical correlation between clinical forms of tuberculosis identified in children has been analyzed as well as aspects connected to: sources (number, contagiousness, intimacy of contact etc), epidemiological inquiry, intradermoreaction, groups of age, bacteriological confirmation (of adults and children), X-ray aspects, B.C.G, treatment (place of application, regime), prophylaxis. In spite of the growing incidence, the clinical forms of tuberculosis registered in children have been benign, no death registered and a positive evaluation after a year (90% achieved healing and treatment) which demonstrates a good epidemiological, therapeutical and prophylactic covering of a pediatric cases from the patent hotbeds of adult tuberculosis, but which must be completed and sustained by a socio-economical and better cultural context. PMID:12043273

  6. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  7. Crescentic Glomerulonephritis Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanikar, A.V.; Patel, R.D.; Suthar, K. S.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of kidney and urinary tract is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Kidney is usually infected by haematogenous spread of bacilli from focus of infection in the lungs. Glomerular involvement in tuberculosis presenting as a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis is a rare entity. We report a rare case of crescentic glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in a 26-year-old man. Patient was treated with corticosteroids, haemodialysis, intravenous immunoglobulin and four cycles of plasmapheresis. He did not respond to 4-drug anti-tuberculosis treatment for renal pathology and was switched over to maintenance haemodialysis. However, he responded to pulmonary TB. PMID:26894074

  8. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  9. Immunotherapy for tuberculosis: future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Getahun; Hoft, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major global health problem. A third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only ~10% of infected individuals develop TB but there are 9 million TB cases with 1.5 million deaths annually. The standard prophylactic treatment regimens for latent TB infection take 3–9 months, and new cases of TB require at least 6 months of treatment with multiple drugs. The management of latent TB infection and TB has become more challenging because of the spread of multidrug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant TB. Intensified efforts to find new TB drugs and immunotherapies are needed. Immunotherapies could modulate the immune system in patients with latent TB infection or active disease, enabling better control of M. tuberculosis replication. This review describes several types of potential immunotherapies with a focus on those which have been tested in humans. PMID:27529060

  10. Optimal intervention strategies for tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowong, Samuel; Aziz Alaoui, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of optimal control of a deterministic model of tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus). We first present and analyze an uncontrolled tuberculosis model which incorporates the essential biological and epidemiological features of the disease. The model is shown to exhibit the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where a stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with one or more stable endemic equilibria when the associated basic reproduction number is less than the unity. Based on this continuous model, the tuberculosis control is formulated and solved as an optimal control problem, indicating how control terms on the chemoprophylaxis and detection should be introduced in the population to reduce the number of individuals with active TB. Results provide a framework for designing the cost-effective strategies for TB with two intervention methods.

  11. What's new in tuberculosis vaccines?

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Ann M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development has resurged as an active area of investigation. The renewed interest has been stimulated by the recognition that, although BCG is delivered to approximately 90% of all neonates globally through the Expanded Programme on Immunization, Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause over 8 million new cases of TB and over 2 million deaths annually. Over one hundred TB vaccine candidates have been developed, using different approaches to inducing protective immunity. Candidate vaccines are typically screened in small animal models of primary TB disease for their ability to protect against a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. The most promising are now beginning to enter human safety trials, marking real progress in this field for the first time in 80 years. PMID:12132007

  12. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  13. Tuberculosis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Apuzzio, Joseph J.

    1996-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) during pregnancy and in the perinatal period was once considered to be an infrequent event in the United States. After a decade of steady decline, however, the disease has begun a resurgence. According to the CDC, a 20% increase in the number of reported cases occurred between 1985 and 1992. The factors associated with this increase are the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the development of drug-resistant organisms, substance abuse, homelessness, and immigration. Environmental factors promoting transmission can be found in overcrowded areas such as correctional facilities, nursing homes, hospitals, and migrant-worker camps. For a large number of medically underserved women, the obstetrician is the only interface with medical care, as most of these patients do not have primary-care providers. It is important, therefore, that health-care providers recognize the clinical symptoms of TB and follow the recognized guidelines for antenatal screening for TB because the omission of these steps can lead to potentially disastrous sequelae in the fetus and neonate. PMID:18476074

  14. Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Tagliabue, Claudia; Bosis, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in children is a neglected aspect of the TB epidemic despite it constituting 20% or more of all TB cases in many countries with high TB incidence. Childhood TB is a direct consequence of adult TB but remains overshadowed by adult TB because it is usually smear-negative. Infants and young children are more likely to develop life-threatening forms of TB than older children and adults due to their immature immune systems. Therefore, prompt diagnoses are extremely important although difficult since clinical and radiological signs of TB can be non-specific and variable in children. Despite undeniable advances in identifying definite, probable, or possible TB markers, pediatricians still face many problems when diagnosing TB diagnosis. Moreover, curing TB can be difficult when treatment is delayed and when multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens are the cause of the disease. In these cases, the prognosis in children is particularly poor because MDR-TB treatment and treatment duration remain unclear. New studies of diagnostic tests and optimal treatment in children are urgently needed with the final goal of developing an effective anti-TB vaccine. PMID:24363879

  15. Tuberculosis and women.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Tuberculosis is responsible for far more women's deaths each year than all the causes of maternal deaths combined (e.g., in 1990, 720,000 vs. 428,000). TB attacks women in the most productive years of life, the years in which they raise children and work in the household, labor force, or fields. Mothers infected with TB are a threat to their children, since they often infect their children with TB before they die. Lack of diagnosis or poor treatment account for the deaths of around 33% of the 6 million women with TB at any given time. Various reasons explain why women do not seek or receive treatment: lack of time because of family and work demands, lack of money and transportation, the need to get permission from or be accompanied by a male family member to visit a health center, the stigma of infertility, poor education, and lack of female health workers in cultures where female modesty is important. Deaths of women to TB have major effects on child survival, economic productivity, and family well-being. In order to increase case finding and treatment, TB programs and health workers must respond to the needs of women. PMID:12292164

  16. Tuberculosis lymphadenitis in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Biadglegne, Fantahun; Tesfaye, Weghata; Anagaw, Belay; Tessema, Belay; Debebe, Tewodrose; Anagaw, Berhanu; Mulu, Andargachew; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious public health challenges in Ethiopia. Indeed, Ethiopia ranks 7th among 22 countries with a high burden of TB worldwide. Both pulmonary TB and extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) are issues of concern. Ethiopia ranks 3rd in terms of the number of EPTB patients worldwide, with TB lymphadenitis (TBL) being the most common. According to the World Health Organization's Global TB Report 2009, the estimated number of TB patients in Ethiopia was 314,267 in 2007, with an estimated incidence rate of 378 patients per 100,000 population. Furthermore, 36% patients suffered from EPTB, with TBL accounting for 80% of these patients. In Ethiopia, pathological services, culture, and drug susceptibility testing for mycobacterium species are not available as routine tests, not even for cases with suspected infection by drug-resistant strains. Therefore, the management of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB in Ethiopia is currently unsatisfactory. Against this background, a high index of clinical doubt and timely use of diagnostic methods, prompt confirmation of diagnosis, and early initiation of specific anti-TB treatment are the key factors for the successful management of MDR-TB and TBL in Ethiopia. PMID:23883834

  17. Burden of tuberculosis in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Guwatudde, David; Zalwango, Sarah; Kamya, Moses R.; Debanne, Sara M.; Diaz, Mireya I.; Okwera, Alphonse; Mugerwa, Roy D.; King, Charles; Whalen, Christopher C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis in one of Uganda's poor peri-urban areas. METHODS: Multi-stage sampling was used to select a sample of households whose members were evaluated for presence of signs and/or symptoms of active tuberculosis; history of tuberculosis treatment; and relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and household environment characteristics. Patients with suspected tuberculosis underwent standardized evaluation for active disease. FINDINGS: A sample of 263 households with 1142 individuals was evaluated. Nineteen people were classified as having had tuberculosis during the one-year reference period (May 2001-April 2002): nine (47%) cases already had been diagnosed through the health care system, while 10 cases (53%) were diagnosed through the survey. The prevalences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 14.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8-20.3) and 4.4 (CI = 0.83-7.89) per thousand, respectively. The incidences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 9.2 (CI = 3.97-14.4) and 3.7 (CI = 0.39-6.95) per thousand per year, respectively. CONCLUSION: The rate of tuberculosis in this peri-urban community was exceptionally high and may be underestimated by current surveillance systems. The need for interventions aimed at reducing tuberculosis transmission in this, and other similar communities with high case rates, is urgent. PMID:14758406

  18. A family cluster of tuberculosis cases, including a case of acquired multidrug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Holden, Julie; Trachtman, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Although the number of tuberculosis cases in the US is at an all-time low, with progressive declines seen for the past 17 years, many goals in the tuberculosis elimination process remain unrealized. This report describes a cluster of four tuberculosis cases in a family, including one case of acquired multidrug resistant tuberculosis. It also underscores some important issues in tuberculosis control today, including significant disparities in the foreign-born population with multidrug resistant tuberculosis as a looming problem, as well as utilization of therapeutic drug level monitoring in complicated cases. PMID:22533114

  19. [The bacteriology of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis mycobacterial infections].

    PubMed

    Wyplosz, B; Truffot-Pernot, C; Robert, J; Jarlier, V; Grosset, J

    1997-12-01

    Changing incidence and nature of mycobacterial infections subsequent to the historical regression of tuberculosis and the acquired human immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, as well as the development of new technical tools for molecular biology, have profoundly modified the methods used for the bacteriological diagnosis of mycobacteria infections. Although microscopic search for acid-fast bacilli, culture and antibiotic resistance tests on Löwenstein-Jensen medium remain the reference methods, more rapid and sophisticated methods are now available. Culture on radiolabeled media using the Bactec system has shortened the delay for positive culture and interpretable antibiotic sensitivity tests. Molecular techniques allow: 1) rapid identification of the most frequently isolated mycobacteria strains, including the most frequent laboratory contaminant M. gordonae, with genome probes; 2) genome typing of M. tuberculosis strains to trace interhuman transmission, detect recurrence or exogenous reinfection or demonstrate laboratory contamination; 3) rapid detection of rifampicin resistance; and 4) direct detection of M. tuberculosis and M. avium in pathological specimens. The role of mycobacteria in the environment causing opportunistic infections, atypical mycobacteria or non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), particularly the aviaire complex, has grown considerably. Isolation and identification relies on methods used to detect bacilli as well as blood cultures and analysis of fecal matter. NTM are naturally resistant to most of the antituberculosis antibiotics but are sometimes sensitive to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones or new macrolides. PMID:9496590

  20. Controlling the seedbeds of tuberculosis: diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X; Cavalcante, Solange C; Marais, Ben J; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a crucial opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programmes focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programmes that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control might continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly used method that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission, and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. In this Series paper we outline challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provide pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. We further advocate for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed worldwide focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems and community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programmes. PMID:26515679

  1. New tuberculosis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martín Montañés, Carlos; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2011-03-01

    The current tuberculosis (TB) vaccine, bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), is a live vaccine used worldwide, as it protects against severe forms of the disease, saving thousands of lives every year, but its efficacy against pulmonary forms of TB, responsible for transmission of the diseases, is variable. For more than 80 years now no new TB vaccines have been successfully developed. Over the last decade the effort of the scientific community has resulted in the design and construction of promising vaccine candidates. The goal is to develop a new generation of vaccines effective against respiratory forms of the disease. We will focus this review on new prophylactic vaccine candidates that aim to prevent TB diseases. Two are the main strategies used to improve the immunity conferred by the current BCG vaccine, by boosting it with new subunit vaccines, and a second strategy is focused on the construction of new more effective live vaccines, capable to replace the current BCG and to be used as prime vaccines. After rigorous preclinical studies in different animal models new TB vaccine candidates enter in clinical trials in humans. First, a small Phase I for safety followed by immunological evaluation in Phase II trials and finally evaluated in large population Phase III efficacy trials in endemic countries. At present BCG prime and boost with different subunit vaccine candidates are the more advanced assessed in Phase II. Two prime vaccines (based on recombinant BCG) have been successfully evaluated for safety in Phase I trials. A short number of live attenuated vaccines are in advance preclinical studies and the candidates ready to enter Phase I safety trials are produced under current good manufacturing practices. PMID:21420568

  2. Tuberculosis and Cardiovascular Disease: Linking the Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Henson, David; Ticona, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R.; Garvy, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is enormous worldwide. CVD rates are rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Public health programs have been challenged with the overlapping tuberculosis and CVD epidemics. Monocyte/macrophages, lymphocytes and cytokines involved in cellular mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also main drivers of atherogenesis, suggesting a potential pathogenic role of tuberculosis in CVD via mechanisms that have been described for other pathogens that establish chronic infection and latency. Studies have shown a pro-atherogenic effect of antibody-mediated responses against mycobacterial heat shock protein-65 through cross reaction with self-antigens in human vessels. Furthermore, subsets of mycobacteria actively replicate during latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and recent studies suggest that LTBI is associated with persistent chronic inflammation that may lead to CVD. Recent epidemiologic work has shown that the risk of CVD in persons who develop tuberculosis is higher than in persons without a history of tuberculosis, even several years after recovery from tuberculosis. Together, these data suggest that tuberculosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of CVD. Further research to investigate a potential link between tuberculosis and CVD is warranted. PMID:26835156

  3. Facing multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to at least two of the most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs (i.e., isoniazid and rifampicin). Therapeutic regimens based on second- and third-line anti-tuberculosis medicines showed poor efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles. It was estimated that in 2012 the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis incidence ranged from 300,000 to 600,000 cases, mainly diagnosed in the Eastern European and Central Asian countries. The highest proportion of cases is among individuals previously exposed to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Three main conditions can favour the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis: the poor implementation of the DOTS strategy, the shortage or the poor quality of the anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the poor therapeutic adherence of the patients to the prescribed regimens. Consultation with tuberculosis experts (e.g., consilium) is crucial to tailor the best anti-tuberculosis therapy. New therapeutic options are necessary: bedaquiline and delamanid seem promising drugs; in particular, during the development phase they demonstrated a protective effect against the emergence of further resistances towards the backbone drugs. In the recent past, other antibiotics have been administered off-label: the most relevant efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile was proved in linezolid-, meropenem/clavulanate-, cotrimoxazole-containing regimens. New research and development activities are needed in the diagnostic, therapeutic, preventive fields. PMID:24792579

  4. Tuberculosis diagnostics: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nema, Vijay

    2012-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been a disease affecting almost all parts of the world since ages. Lot many efforts came in the past for improving diagnosis and treatment. Also, an effective vaccine has been sought after for long. With the emergence of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causal organisms of tuberculosis, and complexities emerging due to other associated infections and disease conditions, there is a desperate need for further research input in the field. Be it the better medication and care or better resistance management, proper diagnostics holds the key to success. It has been observed that a high burden of the disease was accompanied by resource limitations and poor research set-up. The scenario remained like this for several decades. With the refreshed vision of resourceful countries and funding agencies, funding is being provided in many areas of research in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. This review has been written with an aim to bring forth the limitations of available methods in the field of diagnostics and making researchers aware about the changing scenario with better funding opportunities and support. The author visualizes an enthusiasm from all over the world for the development of better modalities and urges scientists to join the struggle at this very perfect time to take the challenge and come forward with innovations in this field. PMID:22919166

  5. Tuberculosis Prevention in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Stephen J.; Bernardo, John; Daly, Jennifer S.; Husson, Robert

    2004-01-01

    To help college health services in all parts of the country improve their approach to latent tuberculosis, two Listservs were provided for them to post their questions on dealing with TB infection. In this article, the authors present some of the questions posted in the Listservs and their corresponding answers. In their answers, the authors have…

  6. Pancardiac tuberculosis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Lad, Shilpa K; Amonkar, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous involvement of the heart though not common has been reported in literature. Pericardium is commonly involved followed by the myocardium. Endocardial involvement is rare. We would like to report a case of a 14-year-old female with florid and extensive involvement of all the layers of the heart by tuberculosis. PMID:26507144

  7. Epidemiology and clinical management of tuberculosis in children in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Shaun K; Demers, Anne-Marie; Lam, Ray; Pell, Lisa G; Giroux, Ryan JP; Kitai, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Although often regarded as a foreign disease, latent tuberculosis or tuberculosis disease will be encountered in many clinical situations by the Canadian child health practitioner. There are key differences between tuberculosis in children and adults. In the present article, the changing epidemiology of tuberculosis in children in Canada and around the world, the pathogenesis of infection, diagnostic tests, and clinical management of childhood latent tuberculosis and tuberculosis disease are reviewed. PMID:25838781

  8. Tuberculosis: medico-legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Vetrugno, G; De-Giorgio, F; D'Alessandro, F; Scafetta, I; Berloco, F; Buonsenso, D; Abbate, F; Scalise, G; Pascali, V L; Valentini, P

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a diffusive infectious disease whose typical behaviour differentiates it from other infectious diseases spread by human-to-human transmission (flu, chicken pox, cholera, etc.) that follow a classic epidemic pattern. Indeed, in the presence of a known source of Koch bacilli that is capable of spreading the bacteria by air, not all exposed individuals inhale the bacteria, not all those who inhale them absorb them, not all those who absorb the bacteria are unable to eliminate them, not all who are able to eliminate them do so using delayed hypersensitivity, not all those who react with delayed hypersensitivity suffer lasting tissue damage (among other things, minor), not all who suffer tissue damage have anatomical sequelae, and not all those who have anatomical sequelae, however minimal, become carriers of bacilli in the latent period. The vast majority (90-95%) of the latter - which are in any case a portion, not the totality of those exposed - remain asymptomatic throughout their lives and never develop active tuberculosis. Based on these biological characteristics and the legal concepts of "epidemic" and "disease," it becomes highly problematic, if not impossible, to assert both that tuberculosis can cause events of sufficient magnitude to be associated with the crime of "epidemic," and that the mere diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection is sufficient to assume the presence of an illness legally prosecutable in criminal proceedings or a disability prosecutable in civil proceedings. Furthermore, clinically apparent tuberculosis is a temporarily-and in some cases permanently-disabling condition, and in certain work environments, even with the difficulties caused by the lack of available effective diagnostic tools and the insidious behaviour of the disease in the early stages, targeted monitoring to identify other persons who may become ill is appropriate. PMID:24804006

  9. Determination of Urinary Neopterin/Creatinine Ratio to Distinguish Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael; Hargreaves, Dougal S.; Scott, Anne; Housley, David; Walters, Andrew; Mulla, Rohinton

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biomarkers to distinguish latent from active Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis infection in clinical practice are lacking. The urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio can quantify the systemic interferon-gamma effect in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. Methods. In a prospective observational study, urinary neopterin levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with active tuberculosis, in people with latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in healthy controls and the urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio was calculated. Results. We included a total of 44 patients with M. tuberculosis infection and nine controls. 12 patients had active tuberculosis (8 of them culture-confirmed). The median age was 15 years (range 4.5 to 49). Median urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio in patients with active tuberculosis was 374.1 micromol/mol (129.0 to 1072.3), in patients with latent M. tuberculosis infection it was 142.1 (28.0 to 384.1), and in controls it was 146.0 (40.3 to 200.0), with significantly higher levels in patients with active tuberculosis (p < 0.01). The receiver operating characteristics curve had an area under the curve of 0.84 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.97) (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Urinary neopterin/creatinine ratios are significantly higher in patients with active tuberculosis compared to patients with latent infection and may be a significant predictor of active tuberculosis in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27433370

  10. [Increased IL-4 production in response to virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tuberculosis patients with advanced disease].

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane J; Martins, Marta S; Costa, Leonor M; Freire, Mónica S; Arroz, Maria J; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ventura, Fernando A

    2005-01-01

    The study was designed to compare immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and antigens in healthy Portuguese subjects and pulmonary tuberculosis patients (TB), and to correlate immune status with clinical severity of tuberculosis disease. PBMC were cultured and stimulated with live and killed M. tuberculosis H37Rv and purified protein derivative (PPD) and lymphoproliferation and production of IFN-gamma and IL-5/IL-4 by these cultures were evaluated by the use of ELISA and multi-parameter flow cytometry. PBMC from 30 tuberculosis patients demonstrated significantly reduced amounts of proliferation and IFN-gamma when stimulated with live M. tuberculosis compared the control group. Of 15 tuberculosis patients tested for intracellular IL-4 following stimulation with M. tuberculosis, 7 showed greatly increased IL-4 production in CD8+ and gammadelta+ T cells. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated an increase of intracellular IL-4 after PBMC were stimulated with live M. tuberculosis in the CD4+ phenotype, but more notably in CD8+ and gammadelta TCR+ subsets. Increased production of IL-4 in tuberculosis patients was primarily in individuals with advanced involvement of lung parenchymal with high bacterial loads in sputum. These results suggest that an alteration in type 1 and type 2 cytokine balance can occur in patients with tuberculosis at an advanced clinical stage of disease. PMID:16202332

  11. An update on lower urinary tract tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wise, Gilbert J; Shteynshlyuger, Alex

    2008-07-01

    Tuberculosis of the genitourinary tract presents with atypical manifestations. Only 20% to 30% of patients with genitourinary tuberculosis have a history of pulmonary infection. Tuberculosis often affects the lower genitourinary system rather than the kidney. Tuberculosis of the lower genitourinary tract most commonly affects the epididymis and the testis, followed by bladder, ureter, prostate, and penis. Use of bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy for bladder cancer can cause symptomatic tubercular infections of the lower genitourinary tract. Tuberculosis of the lower genitourinary tract can present with irritative voiding symptoms, hematuria, epididymo-orchitis, prostatitis, and fistulas. Tuberculosis of the seminal vesicles, vas, fallopian tubes, and the uterus can cause infertility. Urinalysis may demonstrate sterile pyuria, hematuria, or albuminuria. Identification of acid-fast bacilli in culture or tissue or by polymerase chain reaction studies is diagnostic. Medical treatment may not result in resolution of symptoms. Surgical intervention and reconstruction of the urinary tract are frequently indicated. PMID:18765130

  12. Genitourinary tuberculosis masquerading as a ureteral calculus

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Nathan; Hoag, Nathan A.; Jones, Edward C.; Rowley, Allen; McLoughlin, Martin G.; Paterson, Ryan F.

    2013-01-01

    The genitourinary tract is a common extrapulmonary site of tuberculosis infection, yet remains a rare clinical entity in North America. We report the case of a 37-year-old man who presented for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for a suspected ureteral stone on imaging. Further workup confirmed a diagnosis of genitourinary tuberculosis. Medical management was undertaken and, ultimately, nephrectomy performed. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of clinical suspicion for genitourinary tuberculosis. PMID:23766841

  13. [Primary rhinopharyngeal tuberculosis: an unusual location].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Alfonso; Lede, Angel; Fernández, José A

    2011-01-01

    We describe a primary rhinopharyngeal tuberculosis case in a woman who presented with an asymptomatic mass found incidentally on a MRI scan. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen showed granulomatous inflammation and caseous necrosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy was applied for a 6-month period, after which nasopharyngeal examination was normal. This case supports the necessity of including tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis for a rhinopharyngeal mass. PMID:21168119

  14. [Tuberculosis of the pancreas, an anatomoclinical case].

    PubMed

    Henríquez, M; Trejo, C; Ojeda, M; Benavides, A

    1992-10-01

    A 49 year old "mapuche" male patient was operated on and tuberculosis of the gallbladder was found. Later on, he developed evidence of meningeal and pulmonary involvement and elevated pancreatic enzyme levels. In spite of appropriate anti-tuberculosis therapy, the patient died. Autopsy revealed multiorgan involvement with pancreatic tuberculosis and areas of steatonecrosis. Immune deficiency related to the previous cholecystectomy may have facilitated the severe dissemination of the disease observed in this patient. PMID:1341779

  15. Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A minireview.

    PubMed

    Alnimr, Amani M

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis play important roles in understanding various aspects of tuberculosis pathogenesis and in the testing of novel therapeutic regimens. By simulating the latent tuberculosis infection, in which the bacteria exist in a non-replicative state, the models demonstrate reduced susceptibility to antimycobacterial agents. This minireview outlines the models available for simulating latent tuberculosis both in vitro and in several animal species. Additionally, this minireview discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these models for investigating the bacterial subpopulations and susceptibilities to sterilization by various antituberculosis drugs. PMID:26413043

  16. Monkey Models of Tuberculosis: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Juliet C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of animal models has been invaluable for studying the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, as well as for testing the efficacy of vaccines and drug regimens for tuberculosis. Among the applied animal models, nonhuman primates, particularly macaques, share the greatest anatomical and physiological similarities with humans. As such, macaque models have been used for investigating tuberculosis pathogenesis and preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines. This review focuses on published major studies which illustrate how the rhesus and cynomolgus macaques have enriched and may continue to advance the field of global tuberculosis research. PMID:25547788

  17. Tuberculosis transmission in a large urban jail.

    PubMed

    King, L; Geis, G

    1977-02-21

    Following diagnosis of moderately advanced tuberculosis in an inmate of Cook County Jail, tuberculin testing was performed to assess the degree of transmission of tuberculosis within the jail. Twenty-three percent of inmates exposed to the index patient were initially found to be tuberculin positive. Subsequent tuberculin testing three months later demonstrated a 71% rate of skin-test conversion in previously tuberculin-negative inmates exposed to the index patient. The rate of infectivity of tuberculosis within a jail is analogous to a household situation. Despite major obstacles, modern programs of tuberculosis screening and treatment are essential in correctional institutions. PMID:576316

  18. Improving the tuberculosis drug development pipeline.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; McHugh, Timothy D

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is considered one of the most successful pathogens and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, a disease that urgently requires new chemical entities to be developed for treatment. There are currently several new molecules under clinical investigation in the tuberculosis (TB) drug development pipeline. However, the complex lifestyle of M. tuberculosis within the host presents a barrier to the development of new drugs. In this review, we highlight the reasons that make TB drug discovery and development challenging as well as providing solutions, future directions and alternative approaches to new therapeutics for TB. PMID:25772393

  19. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  20. Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A minireview

    PubMed Central

    Alnimr, Amani M.

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis play important roles in understanding various aspects of tuberculosis pathogenesis and in the testing of novel therapeutic regimens. By simulating the latent tuberculosis infection, in which the bacteria exist in a non-replicative state, the models demonstrate reduced susceptibility to antimycobacterial agents. This minireview outlines the models available for simulating latent tuberculosis both in vitro and in several animal species. Additionally, this minireview discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these models for investigating the bacterial subpopulations and susceptibilities to sterilization by various antituberculosis drugs. PMID:26413043

  1. [Tuberculosis control of urban areas in Japan].

    PubMed

    2000-10-01

    The rates of tuberculosis remain high in urban areas. The declining speed of tuberculosis incidence rate in urban areas has been slower than other areas. Efforts and resources to tuberculosis control must be concentrated on urban locations to eradicate tuberculosis in Japan. 1. Tuberculosis control in a public health center of urban area: Teru OGURA and Chiyo INOGUCHI (Toshima City, Ikebukuro Public Health Center, Tokyo Metropolitan) A wide range of TB control measures is implemented by public health centers, such as a patient registration, home-visit guidance, contact examination in urban areas. Directors of every health center have the direct responsibility for tuberculosis control measures in their jurisdiction. Ikebukuro is urban areas where there are many offices, shopping and amusement facilities. Urban people is often on the move looking for job, so public health centers are often not easy to carry out contact examinations as planned. In recent years, homelessness has been recognized as a growing urban social problem. Their incidence of tuberculosis is high. Special TB control program must be carried out in urban areas. 2. Tuberculosis Control in Tokyo Metropolitan: Kazumasa MATSUKI (Department of Infectious Diseases and Tuberculosis, Bureau of Public Health, Tokyo Metropolitan) There has been a steady decline in the TB wards. The beds for TB patients are running short and even smear positive TB cases cannot be put in a hospital without waiting several days. Staffs of an urban emergency department must protect tuberculosis infection by environmental controls of emergency room. Tokyo Metropolitan government supports the engineering improvements of emergency room to hospitals. Directly observed therapy for tuberculosis patients at a district has been implemented to complete their therapy. On DOT, a trained health worker observes the patient take anti-TB medication. 3. Usefulness of Molecular Epidemiologic approach on Tuberculosis Control: Atsushi HASE (Osaka

  2. Tuberculosis and nature's pharmacy of putative anti-tuberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing problem of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, coupled with the twinning of tuberculosis (TB) to human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), the burden of TB is now difficult to manage. Therefore, new antimycobacterial agents are being sought from natural sources. This review focuses on natural antimycobacterial agents from endophytes and medicinal plants of Africa, Europe, Asia, South America and Canada. In the countries mentioned in this review, numerous plant species display putative anti-TB activity. Several antimycobacterial chemical compounds have also been isolated, including: ellagitannin punicalagin, allicin, anthraquinone glycosides, iridoids, phenylpropanoids, beta-sitosterol, galanthimine, crinine, friedelin, gallic acid, ellagic acids, anthocyanidin, taraxerol, termilignan B, arjunic acid, glucopyranosides, 1-epicatechol, leucopelargonidol, hydroxybenzoic acids, benzophenanthridine alkaloids, neolignans, and decarine. These compounds may provide leads to novel and more efficacious drugs to lessen the global burden of TB and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. If there is a long-term remedy for TB, it must lie in nature's pharmacy of putative antimycobacterial agents. PMID:26464047

  3. Navicular tuberculosis: A rare localization of bone tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Frikh, Mohammed; Belfquih, Bouchra; Jaafar, Abdelwahab; Bouya, Ayoub; Jidal, Mohamed; Boussouga, Mustapha; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health problem endemic to Morocco. While extrapulmonary TB uncommonly presents in osteoarticular anatomic locations, tarsal or metatarsal osteitis can occur when TB presents in the tarsal bones. Clinical symptoms are often insidious causing a delay in diagnosis that may lead to bone destruction. While diagnosis can be guided by X-ray imaging, bacteriologic and histologic examination of the tissue allows for pathogen isolation, identification of the bacillus and strain sensitivity to antibacillary treatment. We report a rare case of navicular osteitis associated with tarso-metatarsal arthritis caused by tuberculosis in a 68-year-old man. This case illustrates an exceptional location of osteoarticular TB and support diagnostic difficulties encountered: (i) imaging is not specific; (ii) lesions are paucibacillary which reduces conventional microbiological methods sensitivity and (iii) the peripheral location of the Koch bacillus within the lesion dictates surgical biopsy than percutaneous puncture. We recommend testing for tuberculosis in any case of chronic osteolysis and/or arthritis of the foot, especially in TB endemic countries. PMID:26793464

  4. Macrophage immunoregulatory pathways in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V.S.; Ni, Bin; Dodd, Claire E.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages, the major host cells harboring Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), are a heterogeneous cell type depending on their tissue of origin and host they are derived from. Significant discord in macrophage responses to M.tb exists due to differences in M.tb strains and the various types of macrophages used to study tuberculosis (TB). This review will summarize current concepts regarding macrophage responses to M.tb infection, while pointing out relevant differences in experimental outcomes due to the use of divergent model systems. A brief description of the lung environment is included since there is increasing evidence that the alveolar macrophage (AM) has immunoregulatory properties that can delay optimal protective host immune responses. In this context, this review focuses on selected macrophage immunoregulatory pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), cytokines, negative regulators of inflammation, lipid mediators and microRNAs (miRNAs). PMID:25453226

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  6. Pharmacotherapy for multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen; Aseri, M. L.; Dixit, Ramakant; Gaur, S.

    2012-01-01

    The current global concern in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is the emergence of resistance to the two most potent drugs namely, isoniazid and rifampicin. Emergence of multidrug resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is now a health problem faced by most of the developing countries as well as developed countries across the globe. MDR-TB is a man-made disease that is caused by improper treatment, inadequate drug supplies, and poor patient supervision. HIV infection and AIDS have been implicated as important cause for this. The review of a published literature suggests that the most powerful predictor of treatment of MDR-TB is a history of treatment of TB. Although the treatment is efficacious, there are also a number of adverse effects caused by drugs used in the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:22629081

  7. Tuberculosis: a disease without boundaries.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Nicole

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) that usually affects the lungs leading to severe coughing, fever, and chest pains. Although current research in the past four years has provided valuable insight into TB transmission, diagnosis, and treatment, much remains to be discovered to effectively decrease the incidence of and eventually eradicate TB. The disease still puts a strain on public health, being only second to HIV/AIDS in causing high mortality rates. This review will highlight the history of TB as well as provide an overview of the current literature on epidemiology, pathogenesis and the immune response, treatment, and control of TB. In this race to combat a disease that knows no boundaries, it is necessary to have a conceptual and clear understanding of TB overall with the hope of providing better treatment through novel and collaborative research and public health efforts. PMID:26198113

  8. Tuberculosis in domestic animal species.

    PubMed

    Pesciaroli, M; Alvarez, J; Boniotti, M B; Cagiola, M; Di Marco, V; Marianelli, C; Pacciarini, M; Pasquali, P

    2014-10-01

    M. bovis and M. caprae, members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), are the major causative agents of tuberculosis in domestic animals. Notably, M. bovis exhibits a wide host range; the infection has been reported in many domesticated animals and free or captive wildlife. Despite most of them acting as spill-over hosts in particular epidemiological scenarios, some domesticated species as pigs, camelids and goats may display high rates of infection and possibly play a role in the inter-species transmission of the disease. The aim of this review is to make an updated overview of the susceptibility and the role in the transmission of the disease of the most common domesticated animals species such as small ruminants, pigs, horses, camelids, dogs and cats. An overview of the diagnostic approaches to detect the infection in each of the species included in the review is also presented. PMID:25151859

  9. Novel Vaccination Strategies against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Peter; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the BCG (Bacillus Calmette–Guérin) vaccine. Novel vaccination strategies are urgently needed to arrest global transmission and prevent the uncontrolled development of multidrug-resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in the field of vaccine development with numerous innovative preclinical candidates and more than a dozen vaccines in clinical trials. These vaccines are developed either as boosters of the current BCG vaccine or as novel prime vaccines to replace BCG. Given the enormous prevalence of latent TB infection, vaccines that are protective on top of an already established infection remain a high priority and a significant scientific challenge. Here we discuss the current state of TB vaccine research and development, our understanding of the underlying immunology, and the requirements for an efficient TB vaccine. PMID:24890836

  10. Novel approaches in diagnosing tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, Arend H. J.; Dang, Ngoc A.; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Gibson, Tim; Anthony, Richard; Claassens, Mareli M.; Kaal, Erwin; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2011-06-01

    The WHO declared tuberculosis (TB) a global emergency. An estimated 8-9 million new cases occur each year with 2-3 million deaths. Currently, TB is diagnosed mostly by chest-X ray and staining of the mycobacteria in sputum with a detection limit of 1x104 bacteria /ml. There is an urgent need for better diagnostic tools for TB especially for developing countries. We have validated the electronic nose from TD Technology for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by headspace analysis of 284 sputum samples from TB patients. We used linear discriminant function analysis resulting in a sensitivity of 75% a specificity of 67% and an accuracy of 69%. Further research is still required to improve the results by choosing more selective sensors and sampling techniques. We used a fast gas chromatography- mass spectrometry method (GC-MS). The automated procedure is based on the injection of sputum samples which are methylated inside the GC injector using thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM-GC-MS). Hexacosanoic acid in combination with tuberculostearic acid was found to be specific for the presence of M. tuberculosis. The detection limit was similar to microscopy. We found no false positives, all microscopy and culture positive samples were also found positive with the THM-GC-MS method. The detection of ribosomal RNA from the infecting organism offers great potential since rRNA molecules outnumber chromosomal DNA by a factor 1000. It thus may possible to detect the organism without amplification of the nucleic acids (NA). We used a capture and a tagged detector probe for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis in sputum. So far the detection limit is 1x106 bacteria / ml. Currently we are testing a Lab-On-A-Chip Interferometer detection system.

  11. Mechanical complication of endobronchial tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Quratulain Fatima

    2015-01-01

    A 19-year-old Vietnamese lady was diagnosed with culture positive, left upper lobe pulmonary tuberculosis for which medical treatment was initiated. Four months into treatment, she developed a 'rubber-band-like' stretching sensation in her left chest with wheezing and shortness of breath. Decreased respiratory excursion over the left lung was present on physical-examination. Chest-Xray revealed left-upper-lobe collapse with leftward deviation of the trachea and mediastinum. CT thorax revealed a long segment of stenosis in the left mainstem bronchus. FEV1 was 1.26 L (45% predicted), FVC 1.53 L (49% predicted), FEV1/FVC 82% (95% predicted) indicating airway limitation. Ventilation-perfusion scan noted 9.8% ventilation to the left lung and 92.8% to the right lung and 7.6% perfusion to the left lung and 92.4% to the right lung. Bronchoscopy was notable for pin point stenosis of the left mainstem bronchus beyond which was inflamed mucosa and abnormal cartilage rings in the left upper and middle lobe bronchi. Nine months of medical therapy for tuberculosis along with oral steroid taper was completed successfully; however the patient has required six serial bronchscopies with dilatations without stent placement at four to six week intervals due to partial restenosis, with the last bronchoscopy at four months after completion of tuberculosis therapy. PMID:26744678

  12. Multifocal skeletal tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M A; Mutanabbi, M; Rahman, M H; Arefin, K E; Helal, M A

    2009-01-01

    Multifocal bone involvement is though rare but is reported from some countries where tuberculosis is endemic. Here we report a case of three years old boy was admitted in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka with the complaints of difficulty in walking ,low grade fever for six months, swelling over the back, elbow joint, knee joint and upper part of forearm and legs for two months. Family history of tuberculosis was positive. Mantoux test was 18 mm, ESR 85 mm in first hour, chest X-ray reveals right hilar lymphadenopathy, X-ray dorsolumber spine shows wedge shaped deformity in T11, L4 and with paravertebral collection from L2-L4. X-ray of legs, knee joint and forearms show multiple lytic lesions in shaft with periosteal reaction and cortical thickening. Ultrasonograph of whole abdomen shows psoas abscess. Culture of bone marrow aspirate reveals Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient was given an anti tubercular regimen with Rifampicin, Isoniazid, Pyrazinamide and Streptomycin for initial two months which to be followed by Rifampicin and Isoniazid for another 10 months. PMID:19182762

  13. Diabetes and tuberculosis: the impact of the diabetes epidemic on tuberculosis incidence

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Catherine R; Forouhi, Nita G; Roglic, Gojka; Williams, Brian G; Lauer, Jeremy A; Dye, Chirstopher; Unwin, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality in developing countries, and in these countries diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly. Diabetes increases the risk of TB. Our aim was to assess the potential impact of diabetes as a risk factor for incident pulmonary tuberculosis, using India as an example. Methods We constructed an epidemiological model using data on tuberculosis incidence, diabetes prevalence, population structure, and relative risk of tuberculosis associated with diabetes. We evaluated the contribution made by diabetes to both tuberculosis incidence, and to the difference between tuberculosis incidence in urban and rural areas. Results In India in 2000 there were an estimated 20.7 million adults with diabetes, and 900,000 incident adult cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Our calculations suggest that diabetes accounts for 14.8% (uncertainty range 7.1% to 23.8%) of pulmonary tuberculosis and 20.2% (8.3% to 41.9%) of smear-positive (i.e. infectious) tuberculosis. We estimate that the increased diabetes prevalence in urban areas is associated with a 15.2% greater smear-positive tuberculosis incidence in urban than rural areas – over a fifth of the estimated total difference. Conclusion Diabetes makes a substantial contribution to the burden of incident tuberculosis in India, and the association is particularly strong for the infectious form of tuberculosis. The current diabetes epidemic may lead to a resurgence of tuberculosis in endemic regions, especially in urban areas. This potentially carries a risk of global spread with serious implications for tuberculosis control and the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. PMID:17822539

  14. Secular trends of tuberculosis in western Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Raviglione, M. C.; Sudre, P.; Rieder, H. L.; Spinaci, S.; Kochi, A.

    1993-01-01

    Deaths due to tuberculosis have decreased uniformly in all countries in Western Europe, and most have occurred among those aged > or = 65 years. In recent years, tuberculosis case notifications have continued to decline in Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, and Spain, and have levelled off in Sweden and the United Kingdom; increases have, however, been recorded in Austria, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, and Switzerland. In Denmark, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland an increasing number of cases of tuberculosis among foreign-born residents has resulted in a change from the expected downward trend. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection appears to contribute only marginally to the overall tuberculosis morbidity; however, it appears to be important in Paris and its surrounding areas, and tuberculosis is very common among HIV-infected persons in Italy and Spain. Despite these recent changes in the incidence of tuberculosis, there is currently no evidence of its increased transmission among the youngest age groups of the indigenous populations. Properly designed disease surveillance systems are critical for monitoring the tuberculosis trends so that each country can identify its own high-risk groups and target interventions to prevent, diagnose, and treat the disease. Tuberculosis remains a global disease and because of increasing human migrations, its elimination in Western Europe cannot be envisaged without concomitant improvements in its control in high-incidence, resource-poor countries. PMID:8324847

  15. Tuberculosis immunity: Opportunities from studies with cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis are closely related (>99% genetic identity), inducing similar host responses and disease expression upon infection. There is a rich history of co-discovery in the development of control measures applicable to both human and bovine tuberculosis (TB) including s...

  16. Tuberculosis: Art Therapy with Patients in Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner-David, Irene; Ilusorio, Shereen

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis is reappearing with increasing prevalence and presenting new treatment challenges. Art therapy, which partly originated in a tuberculosis sanatoria, again serves to assist patients in coping with their illness and confinement. Case examples illustrate aspects of the disease and related emotions and highlight the potential for such an…

  17. Using Peer Helpers for Tuberculosis Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCue, Maureen; Afifi, Larry Anna

    1996-01-01

    Describes a peer helper program initiated by the University of Iowa Student Health Services to prevent active tuberculosis development among foreign national students. Before instituting the program, compliance with tuberculosis prevention efforts for those students was less than 5%. Since the peer program was instituted, compliance has risen to…

  18. Tuberculosis: will it infect wild elk?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Smith, B.

    1992-01-01

    Tuberculosis! Just the name conjures up images of a devastating, chronic, debilitating disease. And so it is in both humans and animals. Tuberculosis (TB) is not known to be present to any significant degree in the free-ranging elk herds of North America. But increasing reports of TB in deer species-including elk-on game ranches prompt grave concern.

  19. Tuberculosis screening: An update for NPs.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Sharisse A

    2016-09-22

    One-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. If NPs are to effectively participate in eliminating and preventing tuberculosis (TB), they must be cognizant of the current CDC-approved TB screening methods and guidelines. PMID:27552684

  20. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  1. Peritoneal tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium caprae

    PubMed Central

    Nebreda, T.; Álvarez-Prida, E.; Blanco, B.; Remacha, M.A.; Samper, S.; Jiménez, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis in humans due to Mycobacterium caprae is very low and is almost confined to Europe. We report a case of a previously healthy 41-year-old Moroccan with a 6 month history of abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue and diarrhea. A diagnosis of peritoneal tuberculosis due to M. caprae was made. PMID:27134824

  2. Tuberculosis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Health Resource Center French (français) Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculose (TB) - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations ... Minnesota Department of Health Portuguese (português) Tuberculosis (TB) ... (TB) - português (Portuguese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations ...

  3. Preventive therapy for tuberculosis in Maryland.

    PubMed

    Rabindran, E; Matuszak, D L; Israel, E; Woodall, H; Highsmith, H; Flynn, J

    1991-09-01

    Maryland data substantiate the safety of isoniazid therapy in preventing tuberculosis. To eradicate tuberculosis in the U.S., private physicians must play an active role by offering preventive therapy to patients at high risk of developing the disease. PMID:1921656

  4. Tuberculosis outbreak in a Texas prison, 1994.

    PubMed

    Bergmire-Sweat, D; Barnett, B J; Harris, S L; Taylor, J P; Mazurek, G H; Reddy, V

    1996-12-01

    In 1994 a Texas prison containing a population of mentally retarded inmates experienced a large tuberculosis outbreak. Fifteen cases of tuberculosis were identified (8 confirmed by positive cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and more than 100 inmates became infected. The culture-confirmed patients were infected with an identical strain of tuberculosis as demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based DNA fingerprinting technique. The prison followed standard tuberculosis infection control policies, but these controls were inadequate to prevent tuberculosis transmission in this special population. Two hundred and thirty inmates (119 inmates showing evidence of new tuberculosis infection or active disease and 111 healthy controls) were enrolled in the investigation. Inmate cell assignments, job duties, and educational classes were identified and medical chart reviews were conducted on all inmates. Tuberculosis transmission was associated with residing on the D Wing of the prison (OR = 25.84, P < 0.01), attending school in Classroom A (OR = 8.34, P = 0.01) and working on the prison utility work crew (OR = 2.52, P < 0.01). The index case in the outbreak had been prescribed 6 months of isoniazid (INH) chemoprophylaxis in 1988. PMID:8972673

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host response

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Cole, Stewart T.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric; Nathan, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances reported at a recent international meeting highlight insights and controversies in the genetics of M. tuberculosis and the infected host, the nature of protective immune responses, adaptation of the bacillus to host-imposed stresses, animal models, and new techniques. PMID:15939785

  6. Developments and strategies for inhaled antibiotic drugs in tuberculosis therapy: a critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hoppentocht, M; Hagedoorn, P; Frijlink, H W; de Boer, A H

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled antibiotics have been a valuable tool in treating pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis patients for decades, and the pulmonary route is now becoming increasingly interesting for other infectious diseases like tuberculosis too. Especially with multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis emerging, great effort is put into the improvement of pulmonary antibiotic administration to fight this global threat. Several reviews have been written on inhalable antibiotics, giving clear overviews of the compounds of interest. Furthermore, various formulation studies and administration strategies are on-going with these compounds. What is often missing is a critical evaluation of these developments. Several risks may be involved varying from obtaining insufficient local drug concentrations to adverse side effects and unwanted changes in physiological processes from the excipients used. In this manuscript, the pros and cons and feasibility of recent advances in pulmonary antibiotic tuberculosis therapy are presented and critically evaluated. Furthermore, the advantages of dry powder inhalation over wet nebulisation for inhaled antibiotics in developing countries where prevalence of tuberculosis is highest are discussed. It has to be concluded that a greater effort in good inhaler development and more research in the physico-chemical properties of the compounds of interest are needed. PMID:24189498

  7. Tackling tuberculosis: Insights from an international TB Summit in London

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arundhati; Danquah, Cynthia A; Scotti, Francesca; Howard, Tracey K; Kamil, Tengku K; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a grave predicament to the world as it is not merely a scientific challenge but a socio-economic burden as well. A prime cause of mortality in human due to an infectious disease; the malady and its cause, Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained an enigma with many questions that remain unanswered. The ability of the pathogen to survive and switch between varied physiological states necessitates a protracted therapeutic regimen that exerts an excessive strain on low-resource countries. To complicate things further, there has been a significant rise of antimicrobial resistance. Existing control measures, including treatment regimens have remained fairly uniform globally for at least half a century and require reinvention. Overcoming the societal and scientific challenges requires an increase in dialog to identify key regions that need attention and effective partners with whom successful collaborations can be fostered. In this report, we explore the discussions held at the International TB Summit 2015 hosted by EuroSciCon, which served as an excellent platform for researchers to share their recent findings. Ground-breaking results require outreach to affect policy design, governance and control of the disease. Hence, we feel it is important that meetings such as these reach a wider, global audience. PMID:26151309

  8. Tackling tuberculosis: Insights from an international TB Summit in London.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Arundhati; Danquah, Cynthia A; Scotti, Francesca; Howard, Tracey K; Kamil, Tengku K; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a grave predicament to the world as it is not merely a scientific challenge but a socio-economic burden as well. A prime cause of mortality in human due to an infectious disease; the malady and its cause, Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained an enigma with many questions that remain unanswered. The ability of the pathogen to survive and switch between varied physiological states necessitates a protracted therapeutic regimen that exerts an excessive strain on low-resource countries. To complicate things further, there has been a significant rise of antimicrobial resistance. Existing control measures, including treatment regimens have remained fairly uniform globally for at least half a century and require reinvention. Overcoming the societal and scientific challenges requires an increase in dialog to identify key regions that need attention and effective partners with whom successful collaborations can be fostered. In this report, we explore the discussions held at the International TB Summit 2015 hosted by EuroSciCon, which served as an excellent platform for researchers to share their recent findings. Ground-breaking results require outreach to affect policy design, governance and control of the disease. Hence, we feel it is important that meetings such as these reach a wider, global audience. PMID:26151309

  9. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cytochrome P450 System

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Hugues; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a leading cause of human mortality. The emergence of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent, that are resistant to the major frontline antitubercular drugs increases the urgency for the development of new therapeutic agents. Sequencing of the M. tuberculosis genome revealed the existence of twenty cytochrome P450 enzymes, some of which are potential candidates for drug targeting. The recent burst of studies reporting microarray-based gene essentiality and transcriptome analyses under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions highlight the importance of selected P450 isoforms for M. tuberculosis viability and pathogenicity. Current knowledge of the structural and biochemical properties of the M. tuberculosis P450 enzymes and their putative redox partners is reviewed, with an emphasis on findings related to their physiological function(s) as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:19635450

  10. Assessment of treatment response in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Neesha; du Bruyn, Elsa; Morris, Thomas; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic treatment of tuberculosis has a duration of several months. There is significant variability of the host immune response and the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic properties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis sub-populations at the site of disease. A limitation of sputum-based measures of treatment response may be sub-optimal detection and monitoring of Mycobacterium tuberculosis sub-populations. Potential biomarkers and surrogate endpoints should be benchmarked against hard clinical outcomes (failure/relapse/death) and may need tailoring to specific patient populations. Here, we assess the evidence supporting currently utilized and future potential host and pathogen-based models and biomarkers for monitoring treatment response in active and latent tuberculosis. Biomarkers for monitoring treatment response in extrapulmonary, pediatric and drug resistant tuberculosis are research priorities. PMID:27030924

  11. Tonsillar tuberculosis: a forgotten clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Das, Anirban; Das, Sibes K; Pandit, Sudipta; Basuthakur, Sumitra

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis of tonsils is an extremely rare variety of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis which frequently simulates the tonsillar malignancy, especially in elderly individuals. Secondary form is more common than primary one, and in present day, contact with the infected sputum or saliva in a case of sputum smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis is the main source of the disease. Chronic or recurrent tonsillitis with enlarged tonsils and sore throat is the main clinical presentation. As it is very difficult to differentiate it from tonsillar malignancy on clinical ground, histopathological examination of the tissue is must for the diagnosis of tonsillar TB. Antitubercular therapy is adequate for its successful resolution. Here, we report a primary form of tonsillar tuberculosis in a 76-year-old male, in whom, no pulmonary tuberculosis was documented. PMID:25811002

  12. [Unilateral to bilateral pleurisy: Pleural tuberculosis?].

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, S; Smaoui, S; Kamoun, F; Chabchoub, I; Kamoun, T; Messaadi, F; Aloulou, H; Hachicha, M

    2016-04-01

    Pleural tuberculosis is the first or second most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis as well as the main cause of pleural effusion in many countries. It is rare in young infants and is more common in children over 10 years of age. We report the case of a 19-month-old girl admitted for prolonged fever with unilateral pleural effusion. The mother reported a history of lymph node tuberculosis 6 years previously. Intravenous antibiotics with cefotaxime and vancomycin were started. Thoracocentesis yielded a serosanguinous exudate fluid with a lymphocyte predominance. The tuberculin skin test and PCR GeneXpert(©) on pleural fluid were negative. The initial outcome was favorable, but the chest X-rays 10 days after discharge showed bilateral pleural effusion. Pleural biopsy was proposed but the culture of pleural fluid was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The child was put under standard treatment for tuberculosis. The outcome was favorable. PMID:26922570

  13. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: are statistical reports accurate?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Before discussing the epidemiology of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) and particularly urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB), unification of the terminology is necessary. The term ‘urogenital tuberculosis’ is preferable to ‘genitourinary tuberculosis’, as renal and urinary tract tuberculosis is more common than genital tuberculosis. Some understand the term ‘extrapulmonary tuberculosis’ as a specific tuberculosis (TB) lesion of all organs excluding the bronchus, lungs, pleura and intrathoracic bronchopulmonary lymph nodes, but others consider pleural TB as one form of EPTB – and it is a reason for very different proportions in the spectrum of EPTB. Enigmatic tendencies have also been revealed in patients' distribution – in neighbouring regions the incidence rate may differ significantly. Although there is no clear explanation for these tendencies, careful study of the epidemiology of EPTB in different conditions will improve early diagnosis. PMID:25165556

  14. Mathematical Models of Tuberculosis Reactivation and Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is highly variable, as is the response to treatment of active tuberculosis. There is presently no direct means to identify individuals in whom Mtb infection has been eradicated, whether by a bactericidal immune response or sterilizing antimicrobial chemotherapy. Mathematical models can assist in such circumstances by measuring or predicting events that cannot be directly observed. The 3 models discussed in this review illustrate instances in which mathematical models were used to identify individuals with innate resistance to Mtb infection, determine the etiologic mechanism of tuberculosis in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor blockers, and predict the risk of relapse in persons undergoing tuberculosis treatment. These examples illustrate the power of various types of mathematic models to increase knowledge and thereby inform interventions in the present global tuberculosis epidemic. PMID:27242697

  15. Primary Nasal Tuberculosis in a 10-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Özer, Murat; Özsurekçi, Yasemin; Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Özçelik, Uğur; Yalçın, Ebru; Gököz, Özay

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tuberculosis is a rare clinical entity which mainly presents in elderly people. Nasal tuberculosis has always been considered to be secondary to tuberculosis of the lungs, and in rare instances it is a primary infection, usually when mycobacteria are inhaled. We describe the case of a 10-year-old girl who was successfully treated for primary nasal tuberculosis. This patient is one of the very few children who have been reported to have primary nasal tuberculosis. PMID:27366187

  16. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    PubMed

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort. PMID:7713546

  17. Pathway Profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne T.; VanderVen, Brian C.; Sherman, David R.; Russell, David G.; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, imports and metabolizes host cholesterol during infection. This ability is important in the chronic phase of infection. Here we investigate the role of the intracellular growth operon (igr), which has previously been identified as having a cholesterol-sensitive phenotype in vitro and which is important for intracellular growth of the mycobacteria. We have employed isotopically labeled low density lipoproteins containing either [1,7,15,22,26-14C]cholesterol or [1,7,15,22,26-13C]cholesterol and high resolution LC/MS as tools to profile the cholesterol-derived metabolome of an igr operon-disrupted mutant (Δigr) of M. tuberculosis. A partially metabolized cholesterol species accumulated in the Δigr knock-out strain that was absent in the complemented and parental wild-type strains. Structural elucidation by multidimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the accumulated metabolite to be methyl 1β-(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α-(3′-propanoic acid)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone. Heterologously expressed and purified FadE28-FadE29, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase encoded by the igr operon, catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 2′-propanoyl-CoA ester side chains in substrates with structures analogous to the characterized metabolite. Based on the structure of the isolated metabolite, enzyme activity, and bioinformatic annotations, we assign the primary function of the igr operon to be degradation of the 2′-propanoate side chain. Therefore, the igr operon is necessary to completely metabolize the side chain of cholesterol metabolites. PMID:22045806

  18. Ultrasonographic diagnosis in abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, M; Moosa, I; Hussein, F M; Qurttom, M A; Behbehani, A I

    1999-05-01

    Sonographic findings were retrospectively analysed in 39 patients with proven abdominal tuberculosis (TB). The patients were treated over 15 years at a major teaching hospital, Mubarak Al-Kabber Hospital, in Kuwait. The findings included clear or complex ascites with fine strands, loculations and debris. The other findings were lymphadenopathy, bowel wall thickening, omental mass, focal lesions in the liver and spleen and psoas abscess. The sonographic findings in abdominal TB are not specific but may give valuable information to prevent unnecessary laparotomy. PMID:10901897

  19. Forced removals embodied as tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Eugene T; Morrow, Carl D; Ho, Theodore; Fürst, Nicole; Cohelia, Rebekkah; Tram, Khai Hoan; Farmer, Paul E; Wood, Robin

    2016-07-01

    South Africa has one of the worst tuberculosis burdens in the world. Several ecological forces have contributed to this, including high HIV prevalence; failing TB control strategies; crowded, poorly ventilated indoor environments-including the complex web of political and economic interests which produce them; the development of racial capitalism; and mining and migration. In the following study, we measure CO2 levels in public transport to investigate the role extended commutes from peri-urban settlements to urban sites of work-a direct result of forced removals-potentially play in propagating the TB epidemic in Cape Town, South Africa. PMID:27239703

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces pili during human infection

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Xicohténcatl-Cortes, Juan; Hess, Sonja; Caballero-Olín, Guillermo; Girón, Jorge A.; Friedman, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is responsible for nearly 3 million human deaths worldwide every year. Understanding the mechanisms and bacterial factors responsible for the ability of M. tuberculosis to cause disease in humans is critical for the development of improved treatment strategies. Many bacterial pathogens use pili as adherence factors to colonize the host. We discovered that M. tuberculosis produces fine (2- to 3-nm-wide), aggregative, flexible pili that are recognized by IgG antibodies contained in sera obtained from patients with active tuberculosis, indicating that the bacilli produce pili or pili-associated antigen during human infection. Purified M. tuberculosis pili (MTP) are composed of low-molecular-weight protein subunits encoded by the predicted M. tuberculosis H37Rv ORF, designated Rv3312A. MTP bind to the extracellular matrix protein laminin in vitro, suggesting that MTP possess adhesive properties. Isogenic mtp mutants lost the ability to produce Mtp in vitro and demonstrated decreased laminin-binding capabilities. MTP shares morphological, biochemical, and functional properties attributed to bacterial pili, especially with curli amyloid fibers. Thus, we propose that MTP are previously unidentified host-colonization factors of M. tuberculosis. PMID:17360408

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  2. Ovarian tuberculosis mimicking a malignant tumour

    PubMed Central

    Yebouet, Eric; Olivier, Moulot Martial; Koui, Sylvanus; Bankole, Sanni R.

    2015-01-01

    There has been reported increased incidence of ovarian tuberculosis in the tropics since the advent of HIV/AIDS disease. We report a case of bilateral ovarian tuberculosis associated with a single right kidney of uncertain origin in an immunocompetent 15-year-old generally healthy-looking girl. Abdominopelvic scan was equivocal about the diagnosis of the lesion as it failed to differentiate it from malignancy. Tuberculin and histopathology were necessary to confirm the diagnosis of ovarian tuberculosis. Antituberculous medical therapy successfully resolved the disease. PMID:26168758

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis wears what it eats

    PubMed Central

    Russell, David G.; VanderVen, Brian C.; Lee, Wonsik; Abramovitch, Robert B.; Kim, Mijeong; Homolka, Susanne; Niemann, Stefan; Rohde, Kyle H.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most pernicious of human pathogens. Current vaccines are ineffective and drugs, although efficacious, require prolonged treatment with constant medical oversight. Overcoming these problems requires a greater appreciation of M. tuberculosis in the context of its host. Upon infection of either macrophages in culture or animal models, the bacterium re-aligns its metabolism in response to the new environments it encounters. Understanding these environments, and the stresses that they place on M. tuberculosis, should provide insights invaluable for the development of new chemo- and immuno-therapeutic strategies. PMID:20638643

  4. [A new case of pseudotumoral renal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sarf, I; Dahami, Z; Dakir, M; Aboutaeib, R; el Moussaoui, A; Joual, A; El Mrini, M; Meziane, F; Benjelloun, S

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of urogenital tuberculosis is still frequent and constitutes a current public health problem in Morocco, a country in which tuberculosis is endemic. The clinical presentation of this form of the disease may be misleading. The pseudotumoral type of renal tuberculosis is extremely uncommon, and in this study this disease has been described in a young patient. The radiological findings suggested the possibility of this lesion being renal cancer. The preliminary diagnosis was corrected and a definitive diagnosis of pseudotumor was made following pathological examination of the surgically-removed kidney. PMID:11233318

  5. [Smoking and adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G; Meurice, J-C; Dautzenberg, B

    2016-02-01

    Smoking and tuberculosis are two major public health issues. Tobacco smoke increases the risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and the severity of pulmonary tuberculosis. Active smoking increases the risk of relapse of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis after treatment; smokers are less adherent to anti-tuberculosis treatment. Smoking cessation represent a means of controlling the tuberculosis epidemic in developing countries. This general review identified 17 studies in the international literature on the link between active smoking and the adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment. It highlights a positive association between smoking and a lack of adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment. This justifies the systematic application of aid to stopping smoking in smokers with tuberculosis. PMID:26777112

  6. Antimicrobial therapy of pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Walsh

    1960-01-01

    The discovery, some nine years ago, of the highly specific antituberculous drug, isoniazid, marked an important advance in the antimicrobial therapy of tuberculosis, first practised successfully with streptomycin and p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) in the late 'forties. Isoniazid is relatively non-toxic and, unlike streptomycin, can be administered orally, so that it is eminently suitable for use, either alone or in combination with PAS, in the domiciliary treatment of tuberculous patients. The wisdom of employing it on a large scale in home-treatment programmes, however, has been questioned on the ground that such wide-spread use might result in a spread of tubercle bacilli resistant to the drug. This controversial subject is discussed in some detail in this general review of the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. The author is convinced that, so far, the benefits of isoniazid therapy have outweighed the disadvantages and, though well aware of the possible consequences in terms of isoniazid-resistance, sees no reason at the present time for not making full use of this valuable weapon in the antituberculosis armamentarium. PMID:20604078

  7. Field-Friendly Tuberculosis Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proper, Nathan; Stone, Jeremy; Jevsevar, Kristen L.; Scherman, Michael; McNeil, Michael R.; Krapf, Diego

    2010-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a fading threat in the United States, but in the developing world it is still a major health-care concern. With the rising number of cases and lack of resources, there is a desperate need for an affordable, portable detection system. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a field-friendly immunological biosensor that utilizes florescence and specialized surface chemistries. We observe fluorescently labeled antibodies as they bind to a glass slide. Slides are treated with biotinylated polyethylene glycol to inhibit non-specific interactions and facilitate the binding of primary antibodies allowing for a high degree of specificity. Solutions of tuberculosis-specific antigens where mixed with fluorescently labeled secondary antibodies and incubated on the treated surfaces. An array of different concentrations of antigens bound to fluorescent tags is then read in an epifluorescnece microscope. This assay was used in the portable detector to show that higher concentrations of bound labeled antigens produce a greater emission when excited by a HeNe laser. Home-built electronics, off-the-shelf optics, and a Si photodiode (PD) were used. The data collected from multiple concentrations show a measurable photocurrent. Work is now underway to incorporate a avalanche (PD), flow-cell technology, in a portable box.

  8. Perspectives on tuberculosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Ahmed, Yusuf; Kapata, Nathan; Maeurer, Markus; Mwaba, Peter; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been recognized as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnancy for nearly a century, but research and efforts to roll out comprehensive TB screening and treatment in high-risk populations such as those with a high prevalence of HIV or other diseases of poverty, have lagged behind similar efforts to address HIV infection in pregnancy and the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission. Immunological changes during pregnancy make the activation of latent TB infection or de novo infection more likely than among non-pregnant women. TB treatment in pregnancy poses several problems that have been under-researched, such as contraindications to anti-TB and anti-HIV drugs and potential risks to the neonate, which are particularly important with respect to second-line TB treatment. Whilst congenital TB is thought to be rare, data from high HIV burden settings suggest this is not the case. There is a need for more studies screening for TB in neonates and observing outcomes, and testing preventative or curative actions. National tuberculosis control programmes (NTPs) should work with antenatal and national HIV programmes in high-burden populations to provide screening at antenatal clinics, or to establish functioning systems whereby pregnant women at high risk can drop in to routine NTP screening stations. PMID:25809768

  9. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  10. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  11. Adrenal function in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D J; Naraqi, S; Temu, P; Turtle, J R

    1989-01-01

    Although tuberculosis is a recognised cause of adrenal insufficiency, little is known about adrenal function in patients with active tuberculosis. Ninety Melanesian adults with active tuberculosis (30 pulmonary, 30 miliary, 30 extrapulmonary) had adrenal function assessed prospectively before and three to four weeks after starting antituberculous chemotherapy. Basal serum cortisol concentrations were normal in 55 (61%) and raised in 35 (39%) of the subjects. No patient had a low basal cortisol concentration. After Synacthen stimulation, cortisol responses were normal in 81 (92%) of the patients and subnormal in seven (8%). After antituberculous chemotherapy the response to Synacthen stimulation was normal in all but one patient. It is concluded that adrenal dysfunction is an uncommon problem in patients with active tuberculosis, and that, contrary to recent reports, antituberculous chemotherapy regimens that include rifampicin do not have an adverse effect on adrenal function. PMID:2763243

  12. Sarcoidosis in tuberculosis-endemic regions: India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease of unknown etiology affecting multiple organs. Earlier reports suggested that sarcoidosis was a disease of the developed world. However, recent reports suggest that the disease is found in the developing countries as well. Clinical, radiological, and histopathological similarities with tuberculosis pose a great challenge in countries endemic for tuberculosis. Mantoux test, high resolution computed tomography, and transbronchial lymph node and lung biopsies are diagnostic modalities, which play an important role in the diagnosis of sarcoid. In this review, we look at the epidemiology of sarcoid in tuberculosis-endemic regions, the sarcoidosis-tuberculosis link, clinical profile, diagnostic modalities, dilemma in the diagnosis, and the treatment of this disease. PMID:23803558

  13. Molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in Cambodian children.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, K; Rieder, H L; Steinlin-Schopfer, J F; van Soolingen, D; Bodmer, T; Chantana, Y; Studer, P; Laurent, D; Zwahlen, M; Richner, B

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY We analysed Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from children, hospitalized from January 2004 to July 2008 in the largest paediatric hospital complex in Cambodia. Specimens were tested for drug susceptibility and genotypes. From the 260 children, 161 strains were available. The East African-Indian genotype family was the most common (59.0%), increasing in frequency with distance from the Phnom Penh area, while the frequency of the Beijing genotype family strains decreased. The drug resistance pattern showed a similar geographical gradient: lowest in the northwest (4.6%), intermediate in the central (17.1%), and highest in the southeastern (30.8%) parts of the country. Three children (1.9%) had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The Beijing genotype and streptomycin resistance were significantly associated (P < 0.001). As tuberculosis in children reflects recent transmission patterns in the community, multidrug resistance levels inform about the current quality of the tuberculosis programme. PMID:25050615

  14. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... associated cachexia; (4) When a tuberculosis lesion is found in any muscle or intermuscular tissue, or bone... of draining a muscle, bone, joint, or abdominal organ (excluding the gastrointestinal tract);...

  15. Priorities for tuberculosis research: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rylance, Jamie; Pai, Madhukar; Lienhardt, Christian; Garner, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Reliable and relevant research can help to improve tuberculosis control worldwide. In recent years, various organisations have assessed research needs and proposed priorities for tuberculosis. We summarise existing priority statements and assess the rigour of the methods used to generate them. We found 33 documents that specifically outline priorities in tuberculosis research. The top priority areas were drug development (28 articles), diagnosis and diagnostic tests (27), epidemiology (20), health services research (16), basic research (13), and vaccine development and use (13). The most focused questions were on the treatment and prevention of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in people co-infected with HIV. Methods used to identify these priorities were varied. Improvements can be made to ensure the process is more rigorous and transparent, and to use existing research or systematic reviews more often. WHO, Stop TB Partnership, and other organisations could adopt an incremental process of priority development, building on the existing knowledge base. PMID:21050822

  16. A history of tuberculosis on stamps.

    PubMed

    Shampo, Marc A; Rosenow, Edward C

    2009-08-01

    Tuberculosis, only a few decades ago, was believed to be under control and decreasing in incidence, in both developed and developing countries. A number of scientists and physicians have contributed to the understanding of tuberculosis and have been honored on postage stamps by several countries around the world. This article contains brief histories of these individuals and depictions of the postage stamps commemorating them for their contributions to the better understanding of the disease. PMID:19666757

  17. Utility of PCR in diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bennedsen, J; Thomsen, V O; Pfyffer, G E; Funke, G; Feldmann, K; Beneke, A; Jenkins, P A; Hegginbothom, M; Fahr, A; Hengstler, M; Cleator, G; Klapper, P; Wilkins, E G

    1996-01-01

    At present, the rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis rests with microscopy. However, this technique is insensitive and many cases of pulmonary tuberculosis cannot be initially confirmed. Nucleic acid amplification techniques are extremely sensitive, but when they are applied to tuberculosis diagnosis, they have given variable results. Investigators at six centers in Europe compared a standardized PCR system (Amplicor; Roche) against conventional culture methods. Defined clinical information was collected. Discrepant samples were retested, and inhibition assays and backup amplification with a separate primer pair were performed. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms were recovered from 654 (9.1%) of 7,194 samples and 293 (7.8%) of 3,738 patients. Four hundred fifty-two of the M. tuberculosis isolates from 204 patients were smear positive and culture positive. Among the culture-positive specimens, PCR had a sensitivity of 91.4% for smear-positive specimens and 60.9% for smear-negative specimens, with a specificity of 96.1%. Analysis of 254 PCR-positive, culture-negative specimens with discrepant results revealed that 130 were from patients with recently diagnosed tuberculosis and 94 represented a presumed laboratory error. Similar analysis of 118 PCR-negative, culture-positive specimens demonstrated that 27 discrepancies were due to presumed uneven aliquot distribution and 11 were due to presumed laboratory error; PCR inhibitors were detected in 8 specimens. Amplicor enables laboratories with little previous experience with nucleic acid amplification to perform PCR. Disease in more than 60% of the patients with tuberculosis with smear-negative, culture-positive specimens can be diagnosed at the time of admission, and potentially all patients with smear-positive specimens can immediately be confirmed as being infected with M. tuberculosis, leading to improved clinical management. PMID:8735089

  18. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging. PMID:25779326

  19. Animal models of tuberculosis for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, U D; Katoch, V M

    2009-01-01

    Animal models for testing different vaccine candidates have been developed since a long time for studying tuberculosis. Mice, guinea pigs and rabbits are animals most frequently used. Each model has its own merits for studying human tuberculosis, and none completely mimics the human disease. Different animal models are being used depending upon the availability of the space, trained manpower as well as other resources. Efforts should continue to develop a vaccine which can replace/outperform the presently available vaccine BCG. PMID:19287053

  20. Esophageal tuberculosis: mimicry of gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Frengley, D; Wolinsky, E; Spagnuolo, P J

    1987-01-01

    A case of tuberculous involvement of the esophagus was studied in an adult with mediastinal lymphadenopathy unrecognized by roentgenography of the chest. The roentgenographic and endoscopic features in this case were more consistent with malignancy than with tuberculosis. Nineteen additional cases from the English-language literature were reviewed. Although esophageal tuberculosis is a rare disease, it should be strongly suspected in a patient with dysphagia who has a positive tuberculin skin test, active pulmonary disease, or mediastinal adenopathy. PMID:3823717

  1. [Chest wall tuberculosis: report of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Zidane, A; Bakzaza, O; Afandi, O; Baiz, Y; Chafik, A

    2015-10-01

    Despite the dramatic decline in the incidence of tuberculosis during the last decades, the disease remains a significant public health problem especially in developing countries. Chest wall tuberculosis is a very rare location. Clinically, it can present as a pyogenic abscess or soft tumor, making diagnosis difficult, particularly in the absence of warning signs. Optimal therapeutic management is controversial. Medical treatment alone in often insufficient and must be associated with a surgical excision or debridement. PMID:25725600

  2. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  3. Tuberculosis, a rare cause of haematuria.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Joshua Anton; Patel, Kunal; Hotston, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the bladder is a rare pathology in the western world and often not considered as a differential when seeing patients with common urological presentations. This case illustrates a 69-year-old woman in rural England who presented with visible haematuria and was subsequently diagnosed with tuberculosis of the bladder. The case aims to highlight the significance of early diagnosis and treatment, which in turn may help prevent disease progression and organ dysfunction. PMID:27440856

  4. [Nodular regenerative hyperplasia following liver tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Boursier, Jérôme; Foulet, Armelle; Pilette, Christophe

    2005-10-01

    We reported a case of nodular regenerative hyperplasia revealed by hemorrhage from portal hypertention and ascites in a 81 years old patient. This patient presented two years ago hepatic tuberculosis well documented by liver biopsy. If this patient do not have exhaustive etiologic research of nodular regenerative hyperplasia, the relationship between the tuberculosis infection and the developpement of this nodular regenerative hyperplasia appears highly probable and must be researched. PMID:16435515

  5. [Immigration and tuberculosis. Five year experience].

    PubMed

    Rifes, Graça; Villar, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    Immigrants are a tuberculosis risk group. In Portugal, in 2000, they had an incidence rate 3.6 times higher than the global incidence, and were native, predominantly, from Angola and Cabo Verde. Being the Chest Disease Center of Venda Nova located in a residential area with a great number of immigrants, most of them living in slums, we decided to evaluate the tuberculosis cases in this group, between 1996/2000, comparing the data obtained with some data of the tuberculosis cases in the non-immigrants. Immigrants with tuberculosis corresponded to 24.5% of all cases, 71.4% male, 93.9% black and mostly native from Cabo Verde and Angola. 73% lived in Portugal for more than 5 years, 86.7% were new cases and 13.3% relapses. 174 were pulmonary forms, 70.7% of which were D+ and 81% confirmed (against 75% in the non-immigrants). Of the 91 drug susceptibility tests done in the pulmonary forms, 9.9% revealed multidrug resistance, against 5% in the non-immigrants. Twenty six point six percent had AIDS against 18% in the non-immigrants. Some conclusions: important percentage of immigrants with tuberculosis in the Chest Disease Center of Venda Nova; immigrants have a higher confirmation rate of pulmonary tuberculosis, more multidrug resistance and AIDS cases. PMID:14685630

  6. [Lessons learned from tuberculosis outbreak cases].

    PubMed

    Kato, Seiya; Kuwabara, Katsuhiro

    2014-02-01

    Most TB outbreaks were caused by exposure of many people to tuberculosis bacilli due to delayed detection of initial cases who had long-lasting severe coughs and excretion of massive tuberculosis bacilli. They were also affected by several other factors, such as socio-environmental factors of the initial case; time and place of infection; and host factors of the infected persons such as immune status, infectivity, and/or pathogenicity of the bacilli. In this symposium, we learned the seriousness of infection and disease among immune-suppressed groups, special environmental factors with regard to the spread of infection, disease after treatment of latent tuberculosis infection, diagnostic specification of IGRA, and bacteriological features including genotyping of the bacilli. We reaffirmed that countermeasures for the case are important, but outbreaks can provide excellent opportunities to learn important information about infection, disease progression, etc. 1. Tuberculosis outbreak in a cancer ward: Katsuhiro KUWABARA (Division of Respiratory Diseases, National Hospital Organization Nishi-Niigata Chuo National Hospital) There was an outbreak of tuberculosis in a cancer ward of a highly specialized medical center. Outbreak cases included eight hospitalized patients and two medical staff members over a 1.5-year observation period after initial contact. Three immune-compromised patients including the index patent died of cancer and tuberculosis. Community hospitals and highly specialized medical centers, such as cancer centers, should carefully prepare a proper system to prevent nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis. 2. Sixty-one cases of TB exposures in hospital settings and contact investigations of the hospital staff, with special reference to the application of QFT: Hiroko Yoshikawa NIGORIKAWA (The Division of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Metropolitan Health and Medical Treatment Corporation, Toshima Hospital; present: Division of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo

  7. Novel drugs against tuberculosis: a clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Olaru, Ioana Diana; von Groote-Bidlingmaier, Florian; Heyckendorf, Jan; Yew, Wing Wai; Lange, Christoph; Chang, Kwok Chiu

    2015-04-01

    The United Nations Millennium Development Goal of reversing the global spread of tuberculosis by 2015 has been offset by the rampant re-emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis, in particular fluoroquinolone-resistant multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. After decades of quiescence in the development of antituberculosis medications, bedaquiline and delamanid have been conditionally approved for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis, while several other novel compounds (AZD5847, PA-824, SQ109 and sutezolid) have been evaluated in phase II clinical trials. Before novel drugs can find their place in the battle against drug-resistant tuberculosis, linezolid has been compassionately used with success in the treatment of fluoroquinolone-resistant multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. This review largely discusses six novel drugs that have been evaluated in phase II and III clinical trials, with focus on the clinical evidence for efficacy and safety, potential drug interactions, and prospect for using multiple novel drugs in new regimens. PMID:25431273

  8. [Future prospects of molecular epidemiology in tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomoshige; Iwamoto, Tomotada

    2009-12-01

    Before the availability of high-resolution genotyping tools in 1990s, there was a prevailing dogma of little genomic sequence diversity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Due to the low levels of genetic variation, it was assumed that M. tuberculosis exhibit very little phenotypic variation in immunologic and virulence factors. The fingerprinting method based on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of IS6110 insertion sequences had unveiled the underestimation of the sequence variation in M. tuberculosis and the importance of strain-to-strain variation for understanding pathogenesis, immune mechanisms, bacterial evolution, and host adaptation. This method became a gold standard for strain differentiation in the molecular epidemiological study. It had lead to a profusion of studies in molecular epidemiology such as the detection of unsuspected transmission, the estimation of the extent of recent transmission, the identification of laboratory cross-contamination, the identification of outbreaks, and distinction between reinfection and relapse. This, in 1990s, is the opening of the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. After the completion of genome project of the M. tuberculosis laboratory strain H37Rv, some of the clinical isolates were completely sequenced. This prompted the in silico genome comparison and identified various genomic markers which can give a unifying framework for both epidemiology and evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis population. Of them, variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) was found as the most promising PCR-based method which can provide adequate discrimination of M. tuberculosis strains in many cases, including the estimation of M. tuberculosis transmission and the identification of genetic lineages. PCR-based VNTR analysis is easy, rapid, and highly specific and can generate portable digit-based data, unlike the analog information obtained from IS6110 RFLP which is labor intensive. In this regards, investigators can

  9. Porins increase copper susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis. PMID:24013632

  10. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  11. Quantiferon-Gold Tuberculosis Test Cannot Detect Latent Tuberculosis in Patients With Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rendini, Tina; Levis, William

    2015-11-01

    Five of 10 paucibacillary leprosy patients were Quantiferon Gold (Q-G) positive with negative chest X-rays. Forty multibacillary leprosy patients were negative. Reports have shown 100% cross-reactivity of ESAT6 and CFP10 between Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The Q-G test cannot detect latent tuberculosis in patients with leprosy. PMID:26209684

  12. The immune response to bovine tuberculosis: Correlates of protection and relevance to human tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB), primarily due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans and Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, is a classic model for demonstration of the One Health Concept. Early studies with cattle were instrumental in the development of the use of Koch’s tuberculin as an in vivo measure of cell-med...

  13. Vaccine approaches for bovine tuberculosis: Correlates of protection and relevance to human tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB), primarily due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans and Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, is a classic model of the One Health Concept. M. bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) was first proven effective in cattle prior to use in humans. Recent experimental trials with cattle have d...

  14. Two Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp. canetti

    PubMed Central

    Morillon, Marc; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Varnerot, Anne; Briant, Jean-François; Nguyen, Gilbert; Verrot, Denis; Bonnet, Daniel; Vincent, Véronique

    2002-01-01

    We identified an unusual strain of mycobacteria from two patients with pulmonary tuberculosis by its smooth, glossy morphotype and, primarily, its genotypic characteristics. Spoligotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism typing were carried out with the insertion sequence IS6110 patterns. All known cases of tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium canetti have been contracted in the Horn of Africa. PMID:12453369

  15. Epidemiological features of skeletal tuberculosis at an urban district tuberculosis centre.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rajat; Bhatt, Rama; Biswas, S K; Bhalla, R

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal tuberculosis is an important component of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. It can lead to substantial morbidity and poses serious occupational and economic problem. We conducted a study in an urban District Tuberculosis Centre (DTC) to assess the burden and distribution of skeletal tuberculosis in the community. Our centre was catering to a population of 6-7 lakhs between 2007 and 2012. During this period, we treated 11,274 cases of tuberculosis. Out of these, 3086 (27.3%) were cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and 219 (1.94%) were cases of skeletal tuberculosis. Skeletal TB predominantly affects the young Indian population with incidence peaking in the second and third decades of life. 172 patients (78.5%) in our study were new cases. There were no drugs resistant (DRTB) skeletal TB cases till we concluded our study. Tuberculosis commonly involves joints more than long bones. The spinal column was the most commonly involved skeletal site affecting 62.6% of all cases. The rate of spinal TB in our study is much higher than that reported in literature. The high number of patients calls for close co-ordination between managing orthopaedic surgeons, treating physicians and DOT providers to ensure adequate patient care. PMID:27451817

  16. Complication of antiquated tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Husta, Bryan; Devarajan, Sunjay; Reichner, Cristina A

    2014-01-01

    In the early 20th century, the rapid spread of tuberculosis (TB) invited novel therapies for treatment. A surgical procedure known as plombage was one such method where lobes were forced to collapse by placing an inert object such as mineral oil, paraffin wax, gauze or Lucite (methyl methacylate) balls. The collapse would lead to isolation of TB infection and decrease aeration of the affected lung. Removal of these objects had initially been, usually after 24 months, however this fell out of favor after the patient had recovered without commonly seen late complications. Decades later, reports have been made illustrating complications such as migration and infection of the plombe as well as expanding oleothorax. PMID:26029549

  17. Pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis: mimicker of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lall, Mahima; Sahni, Ajay Kumar; Rajput, A K

    2013-01-01

    Infection caused by the lung fluke is endemic in north eastern parts of India. Paragonimus westermani and Paragonimus heterotremus are known to be endemic in eastern Indian states of Manipur and Nagaland. The infection is related to eating habits of the locals and is acquired by ingestion of raw, inadequately cooked crabs or crayfish containing encysted metacercariae which act as second intermediate hosts during the life cycle of the lung fluke. Diagnosis is generally delayed due to lack of suspicion and presentation similar to tuberculosis which is endemic in the population. We report pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis in a soldier from eastern India who presented with chest pain, haemoptysis, and eosinophilia. He gave history of consumption of raw crabs while on leave at his native village in Nagaland. Ova morphologically resembling Paragonimus heterotremus were detected in sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage specimen. Symptoms resolved with praziquantel treatment. PMID:23432864

  18. [Cerebromeningeal tuberculosis: 15 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Ould Khalifa, I; Selmi, H; Tabaeki, B; Ould Beddi, M; Sidi Mohamed, A O; Yacoub, M; Sahloul Essoussi, A

    2001-01-01

    Fifteen patients (9 girls and 6 boys) with different forms of cerebromeningeal tuberculosis (meningitis: 13 cases, tuberculoma: 2 cases) was reported. Their mean age was 6 years (4 months to 14 years). The initial diagnosis was difficult. Half patients had meningism, abnormal mental state and defects signs. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leukocyte count was > 20/mm3, protein > 1 g/l (66%) and glucose < 2.2 mmol/l (80%). BK was isolated in 7 patients. Five patients (33%) died. Major neurological sequelae developed in 5 patients and 5 patients completely recovered. Factors predicting fatal outcome and permanent sequelae were: diagnosis delay, altered level of consciousness, hypotrophy and low glucose level in CSF. PMID:11332339

  19. Reactivation tuberculosis: role of surveillance.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Andrew R; Guy, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    The incidence and death rates from tuberculosis (TB) have declined through concerted efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of active disease. Despite this, 9.6 million new cases and 1.1 million deaths in 2014 are unacceptably high. To decrease the rates of TB further, the huge number of persons with latent TB infection (LTBI) from whom new cases will arise has to be addressed with a sense of priority. Identifying the highest risk groups and providing effective treatment has been shown to decrease active TB. Further research to refine the predictors of reactivation and shorter effective treatments are urgently needed. Implementing intensified case finding, testing and treatment for LTBI will require continued investment in health care capacity at multiple levels. PMID:27042967

  20. Psychosis secondary to tuberculosis meningitis.

    PubMed

    Che Rahim, Mohd Jazman; Wan Ghazali, Wan Syamimee

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old immunocompetent Malay woman who presented with a worsening psychotic disorder of 1-year duration. She initially presented with social isolation with subsequent mutism and stupor. Physical examination revealed a stuporous, emaciated, dehydrated woman with Glasgow Coma Scale of 11/15 (E4V2M5). She had a blank stare, mutism and akinesia. Motor examination revealed upper motor neuron findings. Neck stiffness was present, however, Kernig's and Brudzinski's signs were negative. There were no other findings on other systems. Brain imaging and EEG were normal. Cerebrospinal fluid investigations revealed positive cerebrospinal fluid Mycobacterium tuberculosis PCR (MTB PCR). The patient was treated with empirical antituberculosis drugs and steroids. On follow-up visit 1 month later, her psychotic symptoms had fully resolved. She was able to ambulate and care for herself; she was unable to recall the symptoms she had experienced before and during admission. PMID:26969352

  1. [Hospital detention in tuberculosis control].

    PubMed

    Villalbí, Joan R; Rodríguez-Campos, Mònica; Orcau, Àngels; Espachs, M Àngels; Salamero, Marta; Maldonado, José; Caylà, Joan A

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the actions of public health services of the city of Barcelona to prevent tuberculosis transmission by noncompliant smear-positive patients by using the possibilities of Spanish Law 3/1986. The actions were based on a resolution of the health authorities on the need to locate such patients and to detain them in hospitals to provide treatment. This involved police cooperation, informing noncompliant patients, and requesting ratification from the Administrative Court. The article describes the process and the characteristics of the cases involved. Over nine years, from July 2006 to June 2015, the law was used in only twelve cases. The authors conclude that the criteria of prudence and proportionality were used in the application of the law, which resulted in the treatment of patients who posed a risk to their environment, reducing the transmission of infection. PMID:26832855

  2. Predicting tuberculosis among migrant groups.

    PubMed

    Watkins, R E; Plant, A J

    2002-12-01

    In industrialized countries migrants remain a high-risk group for tuberculosis (TB). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine the ability of indicators of TB incidence in the country of birth to predict the incidence of TB among migrants in Australia during 1997. World Health Organization total case notifications, new smear-positive case notifications and the estimated incidence of TB by country of birth explained 55, 69 and 87% of the variance in TB incidence in Australia, respectively. Gross national income of the country of birth and unemployment level in Australia were also significant predictors of TB in migrant groups. Indicators of the incidence of TB in the country of birth are the most important group-level predictors of the rate of TB among migrants in Australia. PMID:12558347

  3. Tip of nose tuberculosis: A rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Darshan K; Verma, Ajay K; Jaiswal, Riddhi; Kant, Surya; Patel, Anand; Asnani, Mona

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis is notorious that it affects various sites of the human body and presents in different ways. One of the uncommon or rather rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis is nasal tuberculosis. The nose apart from its physiological functions also contributes to facial aesthetics and gives a defined appearance and its deformity imparts cosmetic disfigurement and unsightly appearance. Both primary and secondary forms of nasal tuberculosis are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative or crusting lesions of the nose. Here we report such a case of nasal tuberculosis, which presented as an ulcerative and crusting lesion over the tip of the nose in a female child. The patient was given antituberculous chemotherapy after establishing the diagnosis and responded well to treatment. PMID:27195200

  4. Tip of nose tuberculosis: A rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Darshan K.; Verma, Ajay K.; Jaiswal, Riddhi; Kant, Surya; Patel, Anand; Asnani, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis is notorious that it affects various sites of the human body and presents in different ways. One of the uncommon or rather rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis is nasal tuberculosis. The nose apart from its physiological functions also contributes to facial aesthetics and gives a defined appearance and its deformity imparts cosmetic disfigurement and unsightly appearance. Both primary and secondary forms of nasal tuberculosis are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative or crusting lesions of the nose. Here we report such a case of nasal tuberculosis, which presented as an ulcerative and crusting lesion over the tip of the nose in a female child. The patient was given antituberculous chemotherapy after establishing the diagnosis and responded well to treatment. PMID:27195200

  5. Cervical lymphadenitis: tuberculosis or tularaemia?

    PubMed

    Karabay, O; Kilic, S; Gurcan, S; Pelitli, T; Karadenizli, A; Bozkurt, H; Bostanci, S

    2013-02-01

    Both tuberculosis cervical lymphadenitis (TCL) and oropharyngeal tularaemia (OT) have similar signs, symptoms and pathological findings. We aimed to investigate the frequency of tularaemia antibodies in patients diagnosed with TCL. Using data from the Tuberculosis Control Dispensaries between the years of 2008 and 2011 in Turkey, all patients diagnosed with TCL were informed about and included in the study. Control group subjects were selected from healthy blood donors who lived in the same region. After informed consent was obtained, the sera obtained from volunteer TCL patients and the control group were tested with a microagglutination technique for Francisella tularensis. Antibodies to Brucella were also investigated with a tube agglutination test for cross-reactivity in sera that were seropositive for tularaemia. Sera were obtained from a total of 1170 individuals in the TCL group and 596 in the control group from 67 of 81 provinces in Turkey. Francisella tularensis-positive antibodies were found in 79 (6.75%) cases in the TCL group and two (0.33%) cases in the control group with a titre of ≥1:80 (p < 0.01). When the presence of antibody of any titre was considered, the ratio became 8.2% (96/1170) in the TCL group and 0.67% (4/596) in the control group (p < 0.001). For the first time, with this study, tularaemia serology was found to be positive in a significant portion (6.75%) of diagnosed cases of TCL. In tularaemia endemic regions, it was concluded that tularaemia serology should be investigated in patients suspected of having TCL. PMID:23211027

  6. Tuberculosis: Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Tuberculosis (TB) Disease: Symptoms & Risk Factors Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ...

  7. Detection of lipoarabinomannan as a diagnostic test for tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sada, E; Aguilar, D; Torres, M; Herrera, T

    1992-01-01

    A coagglutination technique was established for the detection of lipoarabinomannan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human serum samples and evaluated for its utility in the diagnosis of tuberculosis at the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias in Mexico City. The test had a sensitivity of 88% in patients with sputum-smear-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis. The sensitivity in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis negative for acid-fast bacilli in sputum was 67%. Less favorable results were obtained for patients with AIDS and tuberculosis, with a sensitivity of 57%. The specificity in control patients with lung diseases different from tuberculosis and in healthy subjects was 100%. The positive predictive value was 100%, and the negative predictive value for patients with sputum-positive active pulmonary tuberculosis was 97%. The results of this study suggest that the detection of lipoarabinomannan is an accurate test for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:1401008

  8. Normalization of mediastinal widening after successful treatment of mediastinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Raskin, Jo; Van Bleyenbergh, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    Clinical image of an asymmetrical mediastinal widening due to tuberculosis of mediastinal lymph nodes, without evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis. Image at first presentation and after successful treatment, showing normalization of the mediastinum. PMID:27149681

  9. Could Killing Bacterial Subpopulations Hit Tuberculosis out of the Park?

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Catherine; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-07-14

    One hurdle to treating tuberculosis could be that it is so difficult to kill nonreplicating subpopulations of the causative pathogens. This work describes two new cephalosporin derivatives that specifically target this population of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:27322073

  10. Fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inside rat peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vishwanath, V; Meera, R; Puvanakrishnan, R; Narayanan, P R

    1997-10-01

    Rat peritoneal macrophages in vitro were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the fate of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages was monitored. Alteration in the levels of nitric oxide (NO) measured in terms of nitrite formed, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lysosomal enzymes such as acid phosphatase, cathepsin-D and beta-glucuronidase in macrophages following M. tuberculosis infection was also studied. Elevation in the levels of nitrite were observed from 72 h of M. tuberculosis infection. Irrespective of the time point, M. tuberculosis infected macrophages produced elevated levels of H2O2. Maximum increase in the level of acid phosphatase was observed from 72 h of M. tuberculosis infection, whereas maximum elevation in the level of beta-glucuronidase was observed 48 h after M. tuberculosis infection. However these microbicidal agents did not alter the intracellular viability of M. tuberculosis. PMID:9350049

  11. Tuberculosis of the oral cavity: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, M C; Arrais, M J; Mato, M J; de Araújo, V C

    1997-11-01

    Tuberculosis of the oral mucosa was associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in a 38-year-old white man. The patient presented with multiple oral ulcerations with an irregular periphery and a granular vegetative fundus. The oral lesions antedated the findings of primary pulmonary tuberculosis, and the diagnosis was initially established histologically. Through the differential diagnosis of oral ulcerations, the dentist can play a role in the early detection of tuberculosis. PMID:9573865

  12. An unusual presentation of primary male genital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lakmichi, Mohamed Amine; Kamaoui, Imane; Eddafali, Brahim; Sellam, A Ibn; Dahami, Zakaria; Moudouni, Said Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Urogenital tuberculosis is a rare disease; however, it is the second most common location for tuberculosis after the lung. Currently, incidence of urogenital tuberculosis is increasing due to factors such as a higher prevalence of immunosuppression (especially that caused by human immunodeficiency virus infection) and drug abuse. Herein a new case of male genital primary tuberculosis is reported presenting as a scrotal tumor; the originality of this observation lies in its unusual pseudotumor form. PMID:22114548

  13. An Unusual Presentation of Primary Male Genital Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lakmichi, Mohamed Amine; Kamaoui, Imane; Eddafali, Brahim; Sellam, A. Ibn; Dahami, Zakaria; Moudouni, Said Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Urogenital tuberculosis is a rare disease; however, it is the second most common location for tuberculosis after the lung. Currently, incidence of urogenital tuberculosis is increasing due to factors such as a higher prevalence of immunosuppression (especially that caused by human immunodeficiency virus infection) and drug abuse. Herein a new case of male genital primary tuberculosis is reported presenting as a scrotal tumor; the originality of this observation lies in its unusual pseudotumor form. PMID:22114548

  14. Caring for the critically ill patient with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    York, Nancy L; Kane, Christy

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is still a major health problem in the United States as well as around the world. The purpose of this article is to provide critical care nursing staff as well as other healthcare providers with a foundation to recognize and manage patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Topics discussed include etiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, extrapulmonary tuberculosis, signs and symptoms, diagnostic testing, and the role of the critical care nurse in the management of these patients. PMID:23222220

  15. 9 CFR 77.34 - Official tuberculosis tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official tuberculosis tests. 77.34 Section 77.34 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.34 Official tuberculosis...

  16. Tuberculosis in domestic livestock: pathogenesis, transmission, and vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex includes agents such as M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, the cause of tuberculosis in most animals and a zoonotic pathogen. Mycobacterium bovis has one of the broadest host ranges of any pathogen, infecting most mammals, including humans. Models are used to study ...

  17. 76 FR 26239 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis... framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis programs in the United States. The... tuberculosis (TB) and bovine brucellosis in the United States. In keeping with its commitment to...

  18. Lumbar Tuberculosis Associated with Membranous Nephropathy and Interstitial Nephritis▿

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Quan; Sun, Li; Feng, Jiangmin; Liu, Nan; Jiang, Yi; Ma, Jianfei; Wang, Lining

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a common disease worldwide. However, it now is clear that tuberculosis can affect the kidney more insidiously. We describe a case of lumbar tuberculosis associated with simultaneous membranous nephropathy and interstitial nephritis, in which recovery of renal function occurred after treatment with steroids in addition to antituberculosis agents. PMID:20375238

  19. Leukoplakia associated with renal tuberculosis in the chemotherapeutic era.

    PubMed

    Byrd, R B; Viner, N A; Omell, G H; Trunk, G

    1976-10-01

    The association of renal tuberculosis and leukoplakia of the renal pelvis was quite common in the prechemotherapy era of tuberculosis but has apparently not been seen since effective drugs became available. Despite a prompt response of the tuberculosis to chemotherapy the leukoplakia formation with intermittent passage of keratinised material continued. Surgical removal of the accumulated material was of no lasting benefit. PMID:990686

  20. Duration of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapy and Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation: Association with Mortality in HIV-Related Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Claudia P.; Wehbe, Firas H.; McGowan, Catherine C.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Duda, Stephany N.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Gonzalez, Elsa; Carriquiry, Gabriela; Schechter, Mauro; Padgett, Denis; Cesar, Carina; Madero, Juan Sierra; Pape, Jean W.; Masys, Daniel R.; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) decreases mortality risk in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients, but the effect of the duration of anti-tuberculosis therapy and timing of anti-tuberculosis therapy initiation in relation to ART initiation on mortality, is unclear. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational multi-center cohort study among HIV-infected persons concomitantly treated with Rifamycin-based anti-tuberculosis therapy and ART in Latin America. The study population included persons for whom 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy is recommended. Results Of 253 patients who met inclusion criteria, median CD4+ lymphocyte count at ART initiation was 64 cells/mm3, 171 (68%) received >180 days of anti-tuberculosis therapy, 168 (66%) initiated anti-tuberculosis therapy before ART, and 43 (17%) died. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for CD4+ lymphocytes and HIV-1 RNA, tuberculosis diagnosed after ART initiation was associated with an increased risk of death compared to tuberculosis diagnosis before ART initiation (HR 2.40; 95% CI 1.15, 5.02; P = 0.02). In a separate model among patients surviving >6 months after tuberculosis diagnosis, after adjusting for CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV-1 RNA, and timing of ART initiation relative to tuberculosis diagnosis, receipt of >6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy was associated with a decreased risk of death (HR 0.23; 95% CI 0.08, 0.66; P=0.007). Conclusions The increased risk of death among persons diagnosed with tuberculosis after ART initiation highlights the importance of screening for tuberculosis before ART initiation. The decreased risk of death among persons receiving > 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy suggests that current anti-tuberculosis treatment duration guidelines should be re-evaluated. PMID:24066096

  1. Interferon-Gamma Improves Macrophages Function against M. tuberculosis in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Humaira; Muhammad, Niaz; Abbas, Muhammad Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) that causes tuberculosis (TB) kills millions of infected people annually especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). On infection, macrophages recognize the mycobacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR) followed by phagocytosis and control of mycobacteria. In addition, macrophages also secrete IL-12 to induce IFN-γ production by T, which, in turn, increases the phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Individuals with defects in innate or adaptive immunity exhibit increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. Understanding these immunologic mechanisms will help in TB control. We aimed to investigate the immunopathologic mechanisms in MDR-TB and role of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-γ). Study Design and Methods. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects and were investigated for immunologic response by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results. Different functional and molecular anomalies were observed in macrophages. In addition, a defective immune response to M. tuberculosis from the patient's MDMs was characterized, which in turn improved by pretreatment with rhIFN-γ. Conclusion. This work highlights the fact that rhIFN-γ improves macrophages function against M. tuberculosis and treatment of patients with poor responsiveness to TB therapy may be needed in future to include IFN-γ as adjuvant therapy after the full characterization of pathological and molecular mechanisms in these and in other more multidrug-resistant TB patients. PMID:27478636

  2. [Advantages and drawbacks of expectoration decontamination methods for tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Zingué, Dezemon; Hien, Hervé; Méda, Nicolas; Zida, Sylvie; Kaboré, Antoinette; Sanou, Adama; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Gomgnimbou, Michel; Diandé, Souba; Tarnagda, Zékiba; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    In the actual context of increasing tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, the laboratory diagnosis of Mycobacterial infections remain the primordial objective of control and surveillance of human tuberculosis. The diagnosis and following of tuberculosis in resource limited settings are done by microscopy Ziehl-Neelsen method which is poor sensitive (20-53%) and have poor specificity because it's can't distinguish tuberculosis mycobacterium and atypical tuberculoid mycobacterium. Mycobacterium culture on solid media is the gold standard method for tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance diagnosis. Here, the challenge is that expectorations using for culture contain mycobacterium and others contaminating bacteria responsible of culture contamination. Many different methods of homogenization and decontamination of sputum specimens for culturing exist and each laboratory had to do a choice of the better method to optimize isolating of mycobacterium. This review is a summary of homogenization and decontamination methods described in literature and used by certain laboratories for diagnosis of TB by culture. However, it's essential for each laboratory to conduct evaluation of the different methods and do the choice of the appropriate one by taking into account factors such as the feasibility and cost effectively. Nine methods of decontaminations are described in this review taking account of their advantages, drawbacks and their feasibility in resource limited settings. PMID:23747665

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis TlyA Protein Negatively Regulates T Helper (Th) 1 and Th17 Differentiation and Promotes Tuberculosis Pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Aejazur; Sobia, Parveen; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Bhawsar, Aakansha; Singh, Dhiraj Kumar; Sharma, Pawan; Moodley, Prashini; Van Kaer, Luc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is an ancient pathogen and a major cause of death worldwide. Although various virulence factors of M. tuberculosis have been identified, its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. TlyA is a virulence factor in several bacterial infections and is evolutionarily conserved in many Gram-positive bacteria, but its function in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we report that TlyA significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. We show that a TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis strain induces increased IL-12 and reduced IL-1β and IL-10 cytokine responses, which sharply contrasts with the immune responses induced by wild type M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, compared with wild type M. tuberculosis, TlyA-deficient M. tuberculosis bacteria are more susceptible to autophagy in macrophages. Consequently, animals infected with the TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis organisms exhibited increased host-protective immune responses, reduced bacillary load, and increased survival compared with animals infected with wild type M. tuberculosis. Thus, M. tuberculosis employs TlyA as a host evasion factor, thereby contributing to its virulence. PMID:25847237

  4. Combating Tuberculosis Infection: A Forbidding Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Tejal; Butani, Shital

    2016-01-01

    After 50 years drought, several drugs are looming from the pipeline to combat tuberculosis. They will serve as a boon to the field that has been burdened with primitive, inadequate treatments and drug-resistant bacterial strains. From the decades, due to lack of interest and resources, the field has suffered a lot. Learning from the flaws, scientists have renovated their approaches to the finding of new antitubercular drugs. The first line drugs take about six months or more for the entire treatment. The second line remedy for resistant-tuberculosis requires daily injections which carry severe side effects. Drug resistance remains a constant menace because patients stop the medication once they start feeling better. So new drugs are required to be explored which are effective against tuberculosis especially drug resistant tuberculosis. These drugs need to work well with other drugs as well as with antivirals used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. It is also very important to be considered that the treatments need to be cheap, as tuberculosis primarily affects people more in the developing countries. Further, new drugs must cure the disease in short span of time than the current six to nine month regimen. Recently a few new and potent drugs such as bedaquiline, delamanid, teixobactin have been evolved which may serve as a nice step forward, with a better outcome. Teixobactin, a new antibiotic has been found to have promising action against resistant strains, is also under consideration. PMID:27168676

  5. [New methods of diagnosis in tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Slim-Saidi, L; Mehiri-Zeghal, E; Ghariani, A; Tritar, F

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriological diagnosis of tuberculosis has benefited in recent years from many technological advances to improve rapidity and sensitivity of the techniques. Thus, new LED fluorescence microscopes are in the process of replacing the optical microscopes and the Ziehl-Neelsen technique, making the examination more precise, faster and easier. The manual and automatic liquid culture has improved Lowenstein-Jensen culture and helped shorten antibiotic sensitivity test, allowing appropriate management of patients. The development and standardization of molecular biology methods led to the rapid detection and identification of mycobacterium directly in clinical samples but also of resistance genes for early diagnosis of MDR-TB and dealing with them quickly. However, the performance of these techniques does not sufficiently cover the diagnosis of smear-negative tuberculosis, extrapulmonary forms, children- and immune-compromised tuberculosis where sensitivity is limited. The diagnosis of latent tuberculosis is reinforced by the in vitro release testing of gamma interferon overcoming the lack of specificity of the tuberculin skin test. Despite considerable progress, more amelioration is still needed to improve these techniques in order to extend them to the paucibacillary tuberculosis and to facilitate their access to low-resource countries. PMID:25754128

  6. Health-system strengthening and tuberculosis control.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; Weil, Diana E C; Eang, Mao Tan; Mwakyusa, David

    2010-06-19

    Weak health systems are hindering global efforts for tuberculosis care and control, but little evidence is available on effective interventions to address system bottlenecks. This report examines published evidence, programme reviews, and case studies to identify innovations in system design and tuberculosis control to resolve these bottlenecks. We outline system bottlenecks in relation to governance, financing, supply chain management, human resources, health-information systems, and service delivery; and adverse effects from rapid introduction of suboptimum system designs. This report also documents innovative solutions for disease control and system design. Solutions pursued in individual countries are specific to the nature of the tuberculosis epidemic, the underlying national health system, and the contributors engaged: no one size fits all. Findings from countries, including Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Tanzania, Thailand, and Vietnam, suggest that advances in disease control and system strengthening are complementary. Tuberculosis care and control are essential elements of health systems, and simultaneous efforts to innovate systems and disease response are mutually reinforcing. Highly varied and context-specific responses to tuberculosis show that solutions need to be documented and compared to develop evidence-based policies and practice. PMID:20488514

  7. Combating Tuberculosis Infection: A Forbidding Challenge.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Tejal; Butani, Shital

    2016-01-01

    After 50 years drought, several drugs are looming from the pipeline to combat tuberculosis. They will serve as a boon to the field that has been burdened with primitive, inadequate treatments and drug-resistant bacterial strains. From the decades, due to lack of interest and resources, the field has suffered a lot. Learning from the flaws, scientists have renovated their approaches to the finding of new antitubercular drugs. The first line drugs take about six months or more for the entire treatment. The second line remedy for resistant-tuberculosis requires daily injections which carry severe side effects. Drug resistance remains a constant menace because patients stop the medication once they start feeling better. So new drugs are required to be explored which are effective against tuberculosis especially drug resistant tuberculosis. These drugs need to work well with other drugs as well as with antivirals used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. It is also very important to be considered that the treatments need to be cheap, as tuberculosis primarily affects people more in the developing countries. Further, new drugs must cure the disease in short span of time than the current six to nine month regimen. Recently a few new and potent drugs such as bedaquiline, delamanid, teixobactin have been evolved which may serve as a nice step forward, with a better outcome. Teixobactin, a new antibiotic has been found to have promising action against resistant strains, is also under consideration. PMID:27168676

  8. Optimizing Tuberculosis Testing for Basic Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Eric; Schumacher, Samuel G.; Siedner, Mark; Herrera, Beatriz; Quino, Willi; Alvarado, Jessica; Montoya, Rosario; Grandjean, Louis; Martin, Laura; Sherman, Jonathan M.; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal tuberculosis testing usually involves sputum centrifugation followed by broth culture. However, centrifuges are biohazardous and scarce in the resource-limited settings where most tuberculosis occurs. To optimize tuberculosis testing for these settings, centrifugation of 111 decontaminated sputum samples was compared with syringe-aspiration through polycarbonate membrane-filters that were then cultured in broth. To reduce the workload of repeated microscopic screening of broth cultures for tuberculosis growth, the colorimetric redox indicator 2,3-diphenyl-5-(2-thienyl) tetrazolium chloride was added to the broth, which enabled naked-eye detection of culture positivity. This combination of filtration and colorimetric growth-detection gave similar results to sputum centrifugation followed by culture microscopy regarding mean colony counts (43 versus 48; P = 0.6), contamination rates (0.9% versus 1.8%; P = 0.3), and sensitivity (94% versus 95%; P = 0.7), suggesting equivalency of the two methods. By obviating centrifugation and repeated microscopic screening of cultures, this approach may constitute a more appropriate technology for rapid and sensitive tuberculosis diagnosis in basic laboratories. PMID:20889887

  9. Autophagy in the Fight Against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Carla F.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest diseases that has afflicted humanity since ancient times. Although the number of people falling ill with TB each year is declining, its incidence in many developing countries is still a major cause of concern. Upon invading host cells by phagocytosis, M. tuberculosis can replicate within infected cells by arresting the maturation of the phagosome whose function is to target the pathogen for elimination. Host cells have mechanisms of controlling this evasion by inducing autophagy, an elaborate cellular process that targets bacteria for progressive elimination, decreasing bacterial loads within infected cells. In addition, autophagy activation also aids in the control of inflammation, contributing to a more efficient innate immune response against M. tuberculosis. Several innovative TB therapies have been envisaged based on autophagy manipulation, with some of them revealing high potential for future clinical trials and eventual implementation in healthcare systems. Thus, this review highlights the recent advances on the innate immune response regulation by autophagy upon M. tuberculosis infection and the promising new autophagy-based therapies for TB. PMID:25607549

  10. Peculiarities of tuberculosis in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Bappa

    2013-01-01

    Renal transplant is becoming increasingly available in developing countries. Significant advances have been made globally since the first successful kidney transplant in 1954, with the advent of newer, more effective and more selective immunosuppressants. As a result, allograft and patient survival has increased, leaving infection and malignancy as major challenges. The incidence rate of tuberculsis in renal transplant recipients is directly proportional to the prevalence in the general population with the developing countries having the highest rates. The objective of this paper is to review the existing literature on post renal transplant tuberculosis with a view to highlighting its peculiarities compared to tuberculosis in the general population. Several databases (Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane data base, Google Scholar and AJOL) were searched for articles using the key words Tuberculosis (MESH), Renal (OR Kidney), AND transplant. Hand search was also made of reference list of retrieved articles. Full text of relevant original articles were retrieved and appraised. Several studies have demonstrated increased risk of tuberculosis in renal transplant recipients, especially in developing countries. Tuberculosis in renal transplant recipients has peculiarities such as difficulty in diagnosing latent TB, atypical presentations, increased risk of dissemination, increased mortality and interactions of anti-Tb drugs with transplant medications. Clinicians managing renal transplant recipients especially in developing countries should have a high index of suspicion for TB and be aware of its peculiarities in this patient population. PMID:24005585

  11. The Prevalence of Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Smear Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in People with Household Close Contact with Tuberculosis in North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Khanjani, Narges; Parsaee, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    One of the recommended strategies for preventing tuberculosis is to screen high-risk populations with respect to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection. The aim of the present study was to investigate latent infection and active tuberculosis in people with close household contact. It was a cross-sectional descriptive, analytical study with the sample size of 668 people from homes with one infected resident. In order to diagnose tuberculosis latent infection, the PPD test was done. To determine patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis, three sputum samples were taken from every patient and were examined using direct microscopy and culture. Data was analyzed by SPSS20 software. The prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were 42.8% and 0.9% respectively. The prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection and smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in people with close household contact were less than that of other studies. However, smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in people with close household contact was 199.5 times more than that of the general population. PMID:25821296

  12. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  13. Synthetic Long Peptide Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latency Antigen Rv1733c Protects against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Responsible for 9 million new cases of active disease and nearly 2 million deaths each year, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of overwhelming dimensions. Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine available, fails to confer lifelong protection and to prevent reactivation of latent infection. Although 15 new vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials, an effective vaccine against TB remains elusive, and new strategies for vaccination are vital. BCG vaccination fails to induce immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency antigens. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) combined with adjuvants have been studied mostly for therapeutic cancer vaccines, yet not for TB, and proved to induce efficient antitumor immunity. This study investigated an SLP derived from Rv1733c, a major M. tuberculosis latency antigen which is highly expressed by “dormant” M. tuberculosis and well recognized by T cells from latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In order to assess its in vivo immunogenicity and protective capacity, Rv1733c SLP in CpG was administered to HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Immunization with Rv1733c SLP elicited gamma interferon-positive/tumor necrosis factor-positive (IFN-γ+/TNF+) and IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells and Rv1733c-specific antibodies and led to a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-challenged mice. This was observed both in a pre- and in a post-M. tuberculosis challenge setting. Moreover, Rv1733c SLP immunization significantly boosted the protective efficacy of BCG, demonstrating the potential of M. tuberculosis latency antigens to improve BCG efficacy. These data suggest a promising role for M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv1733c-derived SLPs as a novel TB vaccine approach, both in a prophylactic and in a postinfection setting. PMID:26202436

  14. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  15. The Social Determinants of Tuberculosis: From Evidence to Action

    PubMed Central

    Boccia, Delia; Evans, Carlton A.; Adato, Michelle; Petticrew, Mark; Porter, John D. H.

    2011-01-01

    Growing consensus indicates that progress in tuberculosis control in the low- and middle-income world will require not only investment in strengthening tuberculosis control programs, diagnostics, and treatment but also action on the social determinants of tuberculosis. However, practical ideas for action are scarcer than is notional support for this idea. We developed a framework based on the recent World Health Organization Commission on Social Determinants of Health and on current understanding of the social determinants of tuberculosis. Interventions from outside the health sector—specifically, in social protection and urban planning—have the potential to strengthen tuberculosis control. PMID:21330583

  16. Diagnosis of Childhood Tuberculosis and Host RNA Expression in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, Claire M.; Chagaluka, George; Crampin, Amelia C.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; French, Neil; Hamilton, Melissa S.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Kern, Florian; Langford, Paul R.; Ling, Ling; Mlotha, Rachel; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Pienaar, Sandy; Pillay, Vashini; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Twahir, Hemed; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Improved diagnostic tests for tuberculosis in children are needed. We hypothesized that transcriptional signatures of host blood could be used to distinguish tuberculosis from other diseases in African children who either were or were not infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS The study population comprised prospective cohorts of children who were undergoing evaluation for suspected tuberculosis in South Africa (655 children), Malawi (701 children), and Kenya (1599 children). Patients were assigned to groups according to whether the diagnosis was culture-confirmed tuberculosis, culture-negative tuberculosis, diseases other than tuberculosis, or latent tuberculosis infection. Diagnostic signatures distinguishing tuberculosis from other diseases and from latent tuberculosis infection were identified from genomewide analysis of RNA expression in host blood. RESULTS We identified a 51-transcript signature distinguishing tuberculosis from other diseases in the South African and Malawian children (the discovery cohort). In the Kenyan children (the validation cohort), a risk score based on the signature for tuberculosis and for diseases other than tuberculosis showed a sensitivity of 82.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68.6 to 94.3) and a specificity of 83.6% (95% CI, 74.6 to 92.7) for the diagnosis of culture-confirmed tuberculosis. Among patients with cultures negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis who were treated for tuberculosis (those with highly probable, probable, or possible cases of tuberculosis), the estimated sensitivity was 62.5 to 82.3%, 42.1 to 80.8%, and 35.3 to 79.6%, respectively, for different estimates of actual tuberculosis in the groups. In comparison, the sensitivity of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay for molecular detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in cases of culture-confirmed tuberculosis was 54.3% (95% CI, 37.1 to 68.6), and the sensitivity in highly probable, probable, or possible cases was an estimated 25.0 to 35

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiansong; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Chen, Zhiwei

    2016-05-01

    Following HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) continues to be the second most deadly infectious disease in humans. The global TB prevalence has become worse in recent years due to the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug resistant (XDR) strains, as well as co-infection with HIV. Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has nearly been used for a century in many countries, it does not protect adult pulmonary tuberculosis and even causes disseminated BCG disease in HIV-positive population. It is impossible to use BCG to eliminate the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection or to prevent TB onset and reactivation. Consequently, novel vaccines are urgently needed for TB prevention and immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the TB prevalence, interaction between M. tb and host immune system, as well as recent progress of TB vaccine research and development. PMID:27156616

  18. Tuberculosis of Navicular Bone - A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kadu, Vikram V; Saindane, K A; Godghate, Ninad; Godghate, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis of Navicular bone is a rare entity. Osteoarticular tuberculosis of foot is uncommon and that of navicular bone is extremely rare. It is important to recognize skeletal tuberculosis in the initial stages as early treatment can effectively eliminate long-term morbidity. Case presentation: A 42 yrs old male presented to OPD with swelling and dull aching pain over dorsum of left foot. Radiograph of foot showed lytic puctate lesion in the navicular bone. Further investigations in the form of aspiration biopsy and ZN staining showed presence of multiple tuberculous bacilli. Anti-Kochs treatment was started immediately and patient was treated conservatively. Four drugs (HRZE) were given for a period of 12 months. Radiographs at 2 years follow-up showed a healed lesion. Conclusion: TB navicular bone is a very rare condition and can be treated conservatively unless associated with metastatic changes or any other complications. Conservative treatment with AKT has excellent results without any complications PMID:27299135

  19. [Spinal tuberculosis or bone metastases? Case report].

    PubMed

    Dima-Cozma, Corina; Mitu, F; Rezuş, Elena; Arhire, Oana; Petcu, I; Grigoraş, C; Banu, Claudia; Cozma, S

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the most important infectious disease worldwide and skeletal form has an incidence between 3% and 10%, depending on geographic area. The thoracolumbar junction is the most commonly involved in vertebral tuberculosis; some radiologic features are specifics, but other could be indistinguishable from that of lymphoma or metastases. We discuss the case of a 80-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of thoracolumbar pain, fatigability and fever. The vertebral radiography showed narrowing of the intervertebral disc space between T1 and T12, adjacent irregularity, erosion and lisis of vertebres, features visibles also on computed tomography. After the exclusion of the other causes of osteolisis, we started a standard regimen of tuberculostatic treatment and after one month of treatment the symptoms of patient improved noticeably. Other problems of diagnostic and treatment modalities of spinal tuberculosis are discussed. PMID:20509287

  20. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Torrey, Heather L; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  1. [New drugs for treatment of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Schaberg, T

    2016-02-01

    New effective drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) are necessary for two main reasons: firstly, it would be desirable to reduce the duration of TB treatment from 6 to 4 months and secondly, new drugs are urgently needed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For the first time since 1960 the two new drugs bedaquiline and delamanid were approved and licensed in 2014 for the treatment of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis; however, efforts to reduce the duration of treatment to 4 months using fluoroquinolones have not been successful. Further new drugs are currently in phase 2 and phase 3 studies; therefore, new treatment options can be expected within the next few years. PMID:26787496

  2. Tuberculosis of symphysis pubis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Gangary, Shreesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Symphysis pubis is an uncommon site of tuberculosis and only few cases have been reported in the literature. It is important to distinguish it from the more common entities like Osteitis pubis and Osteomyelitis of pubis symphysis to prevent delay in diagnosis and minimize morbidity and prevent complications. We report a rare case of tuberculosis of symphysis pubis in a 50-year-old Indian female from low socioeconomic status. Diagnosis is not difficult if one is aware of the condition. A high index of suspicion along with radiograph and fine needle aspiration led to the diagnosis. The patient had an excellent outcome following a complete course of anti-tuberculous chemotherapy for tuberculosis. PMID:25767530

  3. Tuberculosis of symphysis pubis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Gangary, Shreesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Symphysis pubis is an uncommon site of tuberculosis and only few cases have been reported in the literature. It is important to distinguish it from the more common entities like Osteitis pubis and Osteomyelitis of pubis symphysis to prevent delay in diagnosis and minimize morbidity and prevent complications. We report a rare case of tuberculosis of symphysis pubis in a 50-year-old Indian female from low socioeconomic status. Diagnosis is not difficult if one is aware of the condition. A high index of suspicion along with radiograph and fine needle aspiration led to the diagnosis. The patient had an excellent outcome following a complete course of anti-tuberculous chemotherapy for tuberculosis. PMID:25767530

  4. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  5. Florida's tuberculosis epidemic. Public health response.

    PubMed

    Witte, J J; Bigler, W J

    1994-03-01

    Florida ranked fourth in the nation with 1,707 tuberculosis cases reported in 1992 for a rate of 12.7 per 100,000 population. Thirteen percent of these patients had AIDS. Recent cases in prisons, shelters, hospitals and schools have stimulated interest and media coverage. Resurgence of strains of multiple-drug resistant tuberculosis is a serious concern. The Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, in collaboration with allied agencies, has utilized several initiatives in response. The most significant, Tuberculosis Epidemic Containment Plan, details intervention strategies needed to eliminate TB in the state by the year 2010. Successful implementation depends upon local TB prevention and control coalitions that include private and public sector providers. PMID:8195774

  6. Complicated urinary infection and extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Marcelo Rodrigues; Namura, José Jorge; Lera, Andrea Thaumaturgo

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world population presents with tuberculosis. In developed countries, genitourinary manifestation is responsible for over 40% of extrapulmonary cases. Genitourinary tuberculosis is often diagnosed in the later stage due to the fact that the symptoms are non-specific and technical difficulties to isolate the tubercle bacillus through bacilloscopy or culture in specific medium are many. We present a case of a 47-year-old African-American woman with relapsing urinary infection and sterile pyuria. After a 4 four-year evolution, the patient developed functional exclusion of the right kidney as a consequence of chronic pyelonephritis. The investigation result for alcohol-acid bacillus resistant in urine was positive along with the culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:23257271

  7. How to manage neonatal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Di Comite, A; Esposito, S; Villani, A; Stronati, M

    2016-02-01

    This article reports the recommendations for managing neonatal tuberculosis (TB) drawn up by a group of Italian scientific societies. The Consensus Conference method was used, and relevant publications in English were identified through a systematic review of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from their inception until 31 December 2014. Group experts concluded that if suspicion is aroused, it is necessary to undertake promptly all of the investigations useful for identifying the disease not only in the newborn, but also in the mother and family contacts because a diagnosis of TB in the family nucleus can guide its diagnosis and treatment in the newborn. If the suspicion is confirmed, empirical treatment should be started. Breast-fed newborns being treated with isoniazid should be given pyridoxine supplementation at a dose of 1 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Mothers with active-phase TB can breast-feed once they have become smear negative after having received appropriate treatment. PMID:26270256

  8. Tuberculosis notifications in Australia, 2010.

    PubMed

    Bareja, Christina; Waring, Justin; Stapledon, Richard

    2014-03-01

    The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received 1,353 tuberculosis (TB) notifications in 2010, representing a rate of 6.1 cases per 100,000 population. While rates of 5 to 6 cases per 100,000 population for TB have been maintained in Australia, since first achieved in the mid-1980s, there has been a steady increase in incidence over the past decade. The incidence in the Australian-born Indigenous population was 7.5 per 100,000 population, which is 11 times the incidence reported in the Australian-born non-Indigenous population of 0.7 per 100,000 population. Overseas-born people accounted for 90% of all cases notified in 2010 and represented a rate of 24 per 100,000 population. International students have been recognised as an increasingly important group, representing 25% of all overseas-born cases notified in 2010, and are a focus of this report. Household or other close contact with TB or past residence in a high risk country were the most commonly reported risk factors for TB infection. Outcome data for the 2009 TB cohort indicate that treatment success was attained in more than 95% of cases. As Australia continues to contribute to global TB control it is important to maintain good centralised national reporting of TB to identify populations at risk and monitor trends in TB. PMID:25409354

  9. Diagnostic 'omics' for active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Haas, Carolin T; Roe, Jennifer K; Pollara, Gabriele; Mehta, Meera; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-01-01

    The decision to treat active tuberculosis (TB) is dependent on microbiological tests for the organism or evidence of disease compatible with TB in people with a high demographic risk of exposure. The tuberculin skin test and peripheral blood interferon-γ release assays do not distinguish active TB from a cleared or latent infection. Microbiological culture of mycobacteria is slow. Moreover, the sensitivities of culture and microscopy for acid-fast bacilli and nucleic acid detection by PCR are often compromised by difficulty in obtaining samples from the site of disease. Consequently, we need sensitive and rapid tests for easily obtained clinical samples, which can be deployed to assess patients exposed to TB, discriminate TB from other infectious, inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, and to identify subclinical TB in HIV-1 infected patients prior to commencing antiretroviral therapy. We discuss the evaluation of peripheral blood transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to develop the next generation of rapid diagnostics for active TB. We catalogue the studies published to date seeking to discriminate active TB from healthy volunteers, patients with latent infection and those with other diseases. We identify the limitations of these studies and the barriers to their adoption in clinical practice. In so doing, we aim to develop a framework to guide our approach to discovery and development of diagnostic biomarkers for active TB. PMID:27005907

  10. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  11. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  12. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  13. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  14. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  15. BCG and New Preventive Tuberculosis Vaccines: Implications for Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    Hatherill, Mark; Scriba, Thomas J; Udwadia, Zarir F; Mullerpattan, Jai B; Hawkridge, Anthony; Mahomed, Hassan; Dye, Christopher

    2016-05-15

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and tuberculosis disease, but also play a crucial role in implementing healthcare. Preexposure tuberculosis vaccination, including revaccination with BCG, might benefit Mtb-uninfected HCWs, but most HCWs in tuberculosis-endemic countries are already sensitized to mycobacteria. A new postexposure tuberculosis vaccine offers greatest potential for protection, in the setting of repeated occupational Mtb exposure. Novel strategies for induction of mycobacteria-specific resident memory T cells in the lung by aerosol administration, or induction of T cells with inherent propensity for residing in mucosal sites, such as CD1-restricted T cells and mucosa-associated innate T cells, should be explored. The need for improved protection of HCWs against tuberculosis disease is clear. However, health systems in tuberculosis-endemic countries would need significantly improved occupational health structures to implement a screening and vaccination strategy for HCWs. PMID:27118856

  16. Treatment of Tuberculosis. A Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Murray, John F; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Hopewell, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    Of all achievements in medicine, the successful treatment of tuberculosis has had one of the greatest impacts on society. Tuberculosis was a leading cause of disease and a mortal enemy of humanity for millennia. The first step in finding a cure was the discovery of the cause of tuberculosis by Robert Koch in 1882. The sanatorium movement that began shortly afterward in Europe, and soon spread to the United States, brought attention to the plight of afflicted persons, and catalyzed public health action. The antituberculosis benefit of streptomycin was announced in 1945, although application was limited by the rapid development of resistance. para-Aminosalicylic acid, also discovered in 1945, when combined with streptomycin was found to greatly reduce the occurrence of drug resistance. In 1952, isoniazid opened the modern era of treatment; it was inexpensive, well tolerated, and safe. In the early 1960s, ethambutol was shown to be effective and better tolerated than para-aminosalicylic acid, which it replaced. In the 1970s, rifampin found its place as a keystone in the therapy of tuberculosis. The use of rifampin enabled the course of treatment to be reduced to nine months. Incorporation of pyrazinamide into the first-line regimen led to a further reduction of treatment duration to six months. Treatment of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis remains a difficult problem requiring lengthy treatment with toxic drugs. However, shortened regimens show promise, and two new drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, have demonstrated effectiveness in preliminary studies and are being used for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:26653188

  17. [Imaging and Laboratory Diagnostics for Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Bauer, C M; Schmähl, A; Kreuter, M

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is difficult, since symptoms are often very unspecific or lacking. However active, prompt and accurate diagnosis is the key element in the public health response to tuberculosis and the cornerstone of tuberculosis control. Different diagnostic methods for an assured diagnosis of TB are necessary. Chest radiography is a useful keystone to identify tuberculosis, but diagnosis of tuberculosis cannot be established by radiography alone. CT scanning is used in patients without pathological chest radiography but clinically suspected active TB and to differentiate TB from other diseases. Radiological appearance is primarily determined by the immune status of patients and caverns and disseminated disease foci are often observed. Laboratory diagnostic methods include microscopic identification of acid-fast mycobacteria from any body fluid (especially sputum), as well as isolation and characterisation of mycobacteria in culture. It is then possible to type the pathogens by the shape of their colony, their growth behavior and their biochemical characteristics. These methods are regarded as the gold standard in diagnosis of active TB. In patients who are highly suspected of having TB, but whose sputum specimens tested negative for mycobacteria, a nucleic acid amplification test is additionally performed. Moreover, sensitivity testing with first and second line antitubercular drugs is applied as standard. Laboratory diagnostic testing of cellular immunity against pathogenic mycobacteria employs the tuberculin skin test (TST, Mantoux tuberculin test) or the more specific interferon γ test to determine γ interferon released by T lymphocytes stimulated in vitro. The new ELISA and ELISPOT procedures exhibit higher test specificity and less cross reactivity to NTM (non-tuberculosis mycobacteria), are independent of BCG-vaccination status and correlate better with the degree of exposure than does the TST. PMID:27187878

  18. Rectal tuberculosis after infliximab therapy despite negative screening for latent tuberculosis in a patient with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinderpal; Sachdeva, Sanjeev; Sakhuja, Puja; Arivarasan, Kulandaivelu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors are now considered as standard therapy for patients with severe inflammatory bowel disease who do not respond to corticosteroids, but they carry a definite risk of reactivation of tuberculosis. We present a case in which a patient with inflammatory bowel disease developed a de novo tuberculosis infection after the start of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α treatment despite showing negative results in tuberculosis screening. Although there are many case reports of pleural, lymph nodal and disseminated tuberculosis following infliximab therapy, we present the first case report of rectal tuberculosis following infliximab therapy. PMID:27175120

  19. [Levofloxacin (Tavanic) in complex therapy of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, G B; Kunichan, A D; Lazareva, Ia V

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical investigations of levofloxacin in complex with antituberculosis drugs of the main and reserve groups in 152 patients with newly diagnosticated drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis demonstrated its efficacy and safety. The adverse events due to levofloxacin (8.6% of the cases) disappeared after discontinuation of the drug use without any affection of the patient's organs. Levofloxacin is applicable in antituberculosis therapy of patients with extended, acute progressing or polycavernous tuberculosis of the lungs. It provides significant clinical improvement and if necessary allows to prepare the patient in a short period for surgical operation. PMID:19499715

  20. Animal models of cavitation in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Helke, Kris L; Mankowski, Joseph L; Manabe, Yukari C

    2006-09-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis occurs with the highest frequency from patients with extensive, cavitary, pulmonary disease and positive sputum smear microscopy. In animal models of tuberculosis, the development of caseous necrosis is an important prerequisite for the formation of cavities although the immunological triggers for liquefaction are unknown. We review the relative merits and the information gleaned from the available animal models of pulmonary cavitation. Understanding the host-pathogen interaction important to the formation of cavities may lead to new strategies to prevent cavitation and thereby, block transmission. PMID:16359922

  1. Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Challenges and Progress.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Sebastian G; Furin, Jennifer J; Bark, Charles M

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a natural evolutionary process, which in the case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is based on spontaneous chromosomal mutations, meaning that well-designed combination drug regimens provided under supervised therapy will prevent the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Unfortunately, limited resources, poverty, and neglect have led to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis throughout the world. The international community has responded with financial and scientific support, leading to new rapid diagnostics, new drugs and regimens in advanced clinical development, and an increasingly sophisticated understanding of resistance mechanisms and their application to all aspects of TB control and treatment. PMID:27208770

  2. Laryngeal Leishmaniasis with Extra-pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Swati; Khatiwada, Saurav; Sehrawat, Priyanka; Nischal, Neeraj; Jorwal, Pankaj; Soneja, Manish; Sharma, M C; Sharma, S K; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Anup

    2015-09-01

    Clinical presentations of Leishmania infection include visceral (most common form), cutaneous, mucocutaneous, mucosal and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. Mucosal form of leishmaniasis mostly involves oral and nasal mucosa. Rarely, laryngeal and pharyngeal mucosa may also be involved. Its concomitant presence with tuberculosis (TB), a disease rampant in India, is uncommon. Here we are reporting a case of isolated laryngeal leishmaniasis associated with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), with approach to diagnosis and treatment in a tropical resource-limited setting. PMID:27608871

  3. Peritoneal tuberculosis in pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Alaoui, Fatima Zohra Fdili; Rachad, Myriem; Chaara, Hikmat; Bouguern, Hakima; Melhouf, Moulay Abdilah

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneal tuberculosis in pregnancy is one of the least common forms of extrapulmonory tuberculosis in pregnancy. Early diagnosis is important to prevent obstetrical and neonatal morbidity. We report the case of a 37-year-old pregnant woman who presented with abdominal volume increase, night-sweat, anorexia, loss of weight and abdominal pain at 23 weeks. A peritoneal laparoscopic biopsy was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis. The patient received antituberculosis chemotherapy. The recovery was good as gave birth to a healthy infant of 3200Kg at 37th week's gestation by vaginal delivery. PMID:23024824

  4. Peritoneal tuberculosis in pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alaoui, Fatima Zohra Fdili; Rachad, Myriem; Chaara, Hikmat; Bouguern, Hakima; Melhouf, Moulay Abdilah

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneal tuberculosis in pregnancy is one of the least common forms of extrapulmonory tuberculosis in pregnancy. Early diagnosis is important to prevent obstetrical and neonatal morbidity. We report the case of a 37-year-old pregnant woman who presented with abdominal volume increase, night-sweat, anorexia, loss of weight and abdominal pain at 23 weeks. A peritoneal laparoscopic biopsy was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis. The patient received antituberculosis chemotherapy. The recovery was good as gave birth to a healthy infant of 3200Kg at 37th week's gestation by vaginal delivery. PMID:23024824

  5. Aggressive Regimens for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Reduce Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Molly F.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Mitnick, Carole D.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Bayona, Jaime; Chalco, Katiuska; Shin, Sonya; Murray, Megan; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Recurrent tuberculosis disease occurs within 2 years in as few as 1% and as many as 29% of individuals successfully treated for multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis. A better understanding of treatment-related factors associated with an elevated risk of recurrent tuberculosis after cure is urgently needed to optimize MDR tuberculosis therapy. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among adults successfully treated for MDR tuberculosis in Peru. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine whether receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion from positive to negative was associated with a reduced rate of recurrent tuberculosis. Results. Among 402 patients, the median duration of follow-up was 40.5 months (interquartile range, 21.2–53.4). Receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion was associated with a lower risk of recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 0.40 [95% confidence interval, 0.17–0.96]; P = .04). A baseline diagnosis of diabetes mellitus also predicted recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 10.47 [95% confidence interval, 2.17–50.60]; P = .004). Conclusions. Individuals who received an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion experienced a lower rate of recurrence after cure. Efforts to ensure that an aggressive regimen is accessible to all patients with MDR tuberculosis, such as minimization of sequential ineffective regimens, expanded drug access, and development of new MDR tuberculosis compounds, are critical to reducing tuberculosis recurrence in this population. Patients with diabetes mellitus should be carefully managed during initial treatment and followed closely for recurrent disease. PMID:23223591

  6. Clinical Evaluation of Tuberculosis Viability Microscopy for Assessing Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sumona; Sherman, Jonathan M.; Bravard, Marjory A.; Valencia, Teresa; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. It is difficult to determine whether early tuberculosis treatment is effective in reducing the infectiousness of patients' sputum, because culture takes weeks and conventional acid-fast sputum microscopy and molecular tests cannot differentiate live from dead tuberculosis. Methods. To assess treatment response, sputum samples (n = 124) from unselected patients (n = 35) with sputum microscopy–positive tuberculosis were tested pretreatment and after 3, 6, and 9 days of empiric first-line therapy. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy with fluorescein diacetate, quantitative culture, and acid-fast auramine microscopy were all performed in triplicate. Results. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy predicted quantitative culture results such that 76% of results agreed within ±1 logarithm (rS = 0.85; P < .0001). In 31 patients with non-multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, viability and quantitative culture results approximately halved (both 0.27 log reduction, P < .001) daily. For patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and available data, by treatment day 9 there was a >10-fold reduction in viability in 100% (24/24) of cases and quantitative culture in 95% (19/20) of cases. Four other patients subsequently found to have MDR tuberculosis had no significant changes in viability (P = .4) or quantitative culture (P = .6) results during early treatment. The change in viability and quantitative culture results during early treatment differed significantly between patients with non-MDR tuberculosis and those with MDR tuberculosis (both P < .001). Acid-fast microscopy results changed little during early treatment, and this change was similar for non-MDR tuberculosis vs MDR tuberculosis (P = .6). Conclusions. Tuberculosis quantitative viability microscopy is a simple test that within 1 hour predicted quantitative culture results that became available weeks later, rapidly indicating whether patients were responding to tuberculosis therapy

  7. [Pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with tuberculosis of oral mucosa, mandible and cervical lymph nodes].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Ueda, S; Horie, T

    1995-04-01

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with tuberculous of oral mucosa, mandible and cervical lymph nodes in 53-year-old man is reported. He was firstly treated for right side dental caries. He also received routinely an empiric antibiotic therapy, but discharge of pus continued. Then, pain of oral cavities spread to the right shoulder. The diagnosis of oral mucosa, osteomyelitis of mandible and lymph node tuberculosis was made by the histological examination of biopsy specimens and positive smear test for M. tuberculosis in granulation. The chest X-ray film showed multiple nodular shadows in bilateral lungs. The combination of INH, RFP and SM was applied initially and then SM was replaced by CS due to its side effect. Negative smear test for M. tuberculosis of oral mucosa was achieved five months after the initiation of treatment. PMID:7760539

  8. Overview and phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms: implications for diagnostics and legislation of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Campos, Sabrina; Smith, Noel H; Boniotti, Maria B; Aranaz, Alicia

    2014-10-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) cause a serious disease with similar pathology, tuberculosis; in this review, bovine tuberculosis will be considered as disease caused by any member of the MTBC in bovids. Bovine tuberculosis is responsible for significant economic loss due to costly eradication programs and trade limitations and poses a threat to both endangered and protected species as well as to public health. We here give an overview on all members of the MTBC, focusing on their isolation from different animal hosts. We also review the recent advances made in elucidating the evolutionary and phylogenetic relationships of members of the MTBC. Because the nomenclature of the MTBC is controversial, its members have been considered species, subspecies or ecotypes, this review discusses the possible implications for diagnostics and the legal consequences of naming of new species. PMID:24630673

  9. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system-Urinary tract tuberculosis: Renal tuberculosis-Part II

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Suleman; Bharati, Alpa; Merchant, Neesha

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of renal tuberculosis (TB), including TB in transplant recipients and immunocompromised patients. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) forms the mainstay of cross-sectional imaging in renal TB. It can easily identify calcification, renal scars, mass lesions, and urothelial thickening. The combination of uneven caliectasis, with urothelial thickening and lack of pelvic dilatation, can also be demonstrated on MDCT. MRI is a sensitive modality for demonstration of features of renal TB, including tissue edema, asymmetric perinephric fat stranding, and thickening of Gerota's fascia, all of which may be clues to focal pyelonephritis of tuberculous origin. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values may help in differentiating hydronephrosis from pyonephrosis. ADC values also have the potential to serve as a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of renal fibrosis. Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of renal TB. In transplant patients, renal TB, including tuberculous interstitial nephritis, is an important cause of graft dysfunction. Renal TB in patients with HIV more often shows greater parenchymal affection, with poorly formed granulomas and relatively less frequent findings of caseation and stenosis. Atypical mycobacterial infections are also more common in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23986619

  10. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system-Urinary tract tuberculosis: Renal tuberculosis-Part II.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Suleman; Bharati, Alpa; Merchant, Neesha

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of renal tuberculosis (TB), including TB in transplant recipients and immunocompromised patients. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) forms the mainstay of cross-sectional imaging in renal TB. It can easily identify calcification, renal scars, mass lesions, and urothelial thickening. The combination of uneven caliectasis, with urothelial thickening and lack of pelvic dilatation, can also be demonstrated on MDCT. MRI is a sensitive modality for demonstration of features of renal TB, including tissue edema, asymmetric perinephric fat stranding, and thickening of Gerota's fascia, all of which may be clues to focal pyelonephritis of tuberculous origin. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values may help in differentiating hydronephrosis from pyonephrosis. ADC values also have the potential to serve as a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of renal fibrosis. Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of renal TB. In transplant patients, renal TB, including tuberculous interstitial nephritis, is an important cause of graft dysfunction. Renal TB in patients with HIV more often shows greater parenchymal affection, with poorly formed granulomas and relatively less frequent findings of caseation and stenosis. Atypical mycobacterial infections are also more common in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23986619

  11. Granuloma Correlates of Protection Against Tuberculosis and Mechanisms of Immune Modulation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Smriti; Alvarez, Xavier; Didier, Peter J.; Doyle, Lara A.; Blanchard, James L.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Background. The BCG vaccine is ineffective against adult tuberculosis. Hence, new antituberculosis vaccines are needed. Correlates of protection against tuberculosis are not known. We studied the effects of BCG vaccination on gene expression in tuberculosis granulomas using macaques. Methods. Macaques were BCG-vaccinated or sham-vaccinated and then challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Lung lesions were used for comparative transcriptomics. Results. Vaccinated macaques were protected with lower bacterial burden and immunopathology. Lesions from BCG-vaccinated nonhuman primates (NHPs) showed a better balance of α- and β-chemokine gene expression with higher levels of β-chemokine expression relative to nonvaccinated animals. Consistent with this, sham-vaccinated macaques recruited fewer macrophages relative to neutrophils in their lungs. The expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a known immunosuppressor, was significantly higher in both week 5 and 10 lesions from sham-vaccinated, relative to BCG-vaccinated, NHPs. IDO expression was primarily limited to the nonlymphocytic region of the lesions, within the inner ring structure surrounding the central necrosis. Conclusions. Our study defines lung gene expression correlates of protective response against tuberculosis, relative to disease, which can potentially be employed to assess the efficacy of candidate antituberculosis vaccines. Mycobacterium tuberculosis may modulate protective immune responses using diverse mechanisms, including increased recruitment of inflammatory neutrophils and the concomitant use of IDO to modulate inflammation. PMID:23255564

  12. Associations between national tuberculosis program budgets and tuberculosis outcomes: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Will; Katz, Alan Roy; Li, Dongmei

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to explore the associations between national tuberculosis program (NTP) budget allocation and tuberculosis related outcomes in the World Health Organization's 22 high burden countries from 2007–2009. Methods This ecological study used mixed effects and generalized estimating equation models to identify independent associations between NTP budget allocations and various tuberculosis related outcomes. Models were adjusted for a number of independent variables previously noted to be associated with tuberculosis incidence. Results Increasing the percent of the NTP budget for advocacy, communication and social mobilization was associated with an increase in the case detection rate. Increasing TB-HIV funding was associated with an increase in HIV testing among TB patients. Increasing the percent of the population covered by the Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) program was associated with an increase in drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory funding was positively associated with tuberculosis notification. Increasing the budgets for first line drugs, management and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) was associated with a decrease in smear positive deaths. Conclusion Effective TB control is a complex and multifaceted challenge. This study revealed a number of budget allocation related factors associated with improved TB outcome parameters. If confirmed with future longitudinal studies, these findings could help guide NTP managers with allocation decisions. PMID:23024825

  13. Malaria and tuberculosis: our concerns.

    PubMed

    Shiva, M

    1997-01-01

    In 1978 the concept of primary health care was adopted by 116 countries at Alma Ata, yet the negative impact of structural readjustment programs in Africa and South America could be felt due to the cuts in expenditures on health, education, and social matters. The result is a resurgence of communicable diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis. Another factor in this resurgence is extreme poverty. In 1994 over 1000 people died in Rajasthan, India, of a malaria epidemic, and during the same time in Delhi over 300 deaths were attributed to hemorrhagic dengue fever. Malariogenic and tuberculous conditions continue to flourish owing to distorted development patterns and commercialization of medical care as public health and community health services are being replaced by profit-oriented curative care, 80% of which is in private hands. This has resulted in spiraling medical care costs and rural indebtedness. Socioeconomic deprivation in developing countries threatens TB control. Factors contributing to the spread of TB were established in 1899 and are still valid in India and other developing countries: TB contamination of air, inadequate food, overcrowded dwelling, and low state of physical health. Even in developed countries TB is on the rise: there were 172 cases in 1991 in England vs. 305 cases in 1993, half of them among immigrants. The increase occurred in the poorest 30% of the population. The World Bank is providing loans for a revised TB and malaria strategy, and the Disability Adjusted Life Year has been used to identify the greatest burden of diseases. On the other hand, the Indian National Health Policy has not been revised since 1983. Priority must be given to those living in extreme poverty to curb the resurgence of once controlled diseases. PMID:12348003

  14. Redox biology of tuberculosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Abhishek; Singh, Nisha; Bhat, Shabir Ahmed; Gupta, Pawan; Kumar, Ashwani

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the most successful human pathogens. Mtb is persistently exposed to numerous oxidoreductive stresses during its pathogenic cycle of infection and transmission. The distinctive ability of Mtb, not only to survive the redox stress manifested by the host but also to use it for synchronizing the metabolic pathways and expression of virulence factors, is central to its success as a pathogen. This review describes the paradigmatic redox and hypoxia sensors employed by Mtb to continuously monitor variations in the intracellular redox state and the surrounding microenvironment. Two component proteins, namely, DosS and DosT, are employed by Mtb to sense changes in oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide levels, while WhiB3 and anti-sigma factor RsrA are used to monitor changes in intracellular redox state. Using these and other unidentified redox sensors, Mtb orchestrates its metabolic pathways to survive in nutrient-deficient, acidic, oxidative, nitrosative, and hypoxic environments inside granulomas or infectious lesions. A number of these metabolic pathways are unique to mycobacteria and thus represent potential drug targets. In addition, Mtb employs versatile machinery of the mycothiol and thioredoxin systems to ensure a reductive intracellular environment for optimal functioning of its proteins even upon exposure to oxidative stress. Mtb also utilizes a battery of protective enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (KatG), alkyl hydroperoxidase (AhpC), and peroxiredoxins, to neutralize the redox stress generated by the host immune system. This chapter reviews the current understanding of mechanisms employed by Mtb to sense and neutralize redox stress and their importance in TB pathogenesis and drug development. PMID:22633061

  15. Pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a horse: zoonotic concerns and limitations of antemortem testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of disease. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid...

  16. Co-evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Brites, Daniela; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of human tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an obligate pathogen that evolved to exclusively persist in human populations. For M. tuberculosis to transmit from person to person, it has to cause pulmonary disease. Therefore, M. tuberculosis virulence has likely been a significant determinant of the association between M. tuberculosis and humans. Indeed, the evolutionary success of some M. tuberculosis genotypes seems at least partially attributable to their increased virulence. The latter possibly evolved as a consequence of human demographic expansions. If co-evolution occurred, humans would have counteracted to minimize the deleterious effects of M. tuberculosis virulence. The fact that human resistance to infection has a strong genetic basis is a likely consequence of such a counter-response. The genetic architecture underlying human resistance to M. tuberculosis remains largely elusive. However, interactions between human genetic polymorphisms and M. tuberculosis genotypes have been reported. Such interactions are consistent with local adaptation and allow for a better understanding of protective immunity in TB. Future ‘genome-to-genome’ studies, in which locally associated human and M. tuberculosis genotypes are interrogated in conjunction, will help identify new protective antigens for the development of better TB vaccines. PMID:25703549

  17. Evaluation of a Tuberculosis Skin Testing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    There has been a recent slowdown in the decline of rates of tuberculosis (TB) in the United States. However, there are disparities in TB diagnosis between U.S.-born and foreign-born persons and between Whites and minorities. Measures for achieving TB elimination include identification of high-risk persons, including children and adolescents, at…

  18. Targeting the histidine pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Juleane; Nunes, José Eduardo S; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Machado, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to a single bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The increasing prevalence of this disease, the emergence of multi-, extensively, and totally drug-resistant strains, complicated by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, and the length of tuberculosis chemotherapy have led to an urgent and continued need for the development of new and more effective antitubercular drugs. Within this context, the L-histidine biosynthetic pathway, which converts 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate to L-histidine in ten enzymatic steps, has been reported as a promising target of antimicrobial agents. This pathway is found in bacteria, archaebacteria, lower eukaryotes, and plants but is absent in mammals, making these enzymes highly attractive targets for the drug design of new antimycobacterial compounds with selective toxicity. Moreover, the biosynthesis of L-histidine has been described as essential for Mtb growth in vitro. Accordingly, a comprehensive overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis histidine pathway enzymes as attractive targets for the development of new antimycobacterial agents is provided, mainly summarizing the previously reported inhibition data for Mtb or orthologous proteins. PMID:24111909

  19. Activities of the korean institute of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Sungweon; Kim, Hee Jin

    2014-12-01

    The Korean National Tuberculosis Association (KNTA) set up the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis (KIT) in 1970 to foster research and technical activities pertaining to tuberculosis (TB). The KNTA/KIT had successfully conducted a countrywide TB prevalence survey from 1965 to 1995 at 5-year intervals. The survey results (decline in TB rates) established Korea as a country that had successfully implemented national control programs for TB. The KIT developed the Korea Tuberculosis Surveillance System and the Laboratory Management Information System, both of which were transferred to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention after its establishment. The KIT functions as a central and supranational reference TB laboratory for microbiological and epidemiological research and provides training and education for health-care workers and medical practitioners. Recently, the KIT has expanded its activities to countries such as Ethiopia, Laos, and Timor-Leste to support TB control and prevention. The KIT will continue to support research activities and provide technical assistance in diagnosing the infection until it is completely eliminated in Korea. PMID:25861580

  20. Tuberculosis in wild and captive deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deer are found on every continent, save for Antarctica and Australia. Of the over 50 species of deer worldwide, tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis has been documented in at least 14. The broad host range of M. bovis includes most mammals, including humans and livestock. Eradication programs hav...

  1. Quest for Correlates of Protection against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Kamlesh; Verma, Sheetal; Ellner, Jerrold J.

    2015-01-01

    A major impediment to tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development is the lack of reliable correlates of immune protection or biomarkers that would predict vaccine efficacy. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) produced by CD4+ T cells and, recently, multifunctional CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) have been used in vaccine studies as a measurable immune parameter, reflecting activity of a vaccine and potentially predicting protection. However, accumulating experimental evidence suggests that host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is independent of IFN-γ and TNF secretion from CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, the booster vaccine MVA85A, despite generating a high level of multifunctional CD4+ T cell response in the host, failed to confer enhanced protection in vaccinated subjects. These findings suggest the need for identifying reliable correlates of protection to determine the efficacy of TB vaccine candidates. This article focuses on alternative pathways that mediate M. tuberculosis control and their potential for serving as markers of protection. The review also discusses the significance of investigating the natural human immune response to M. tuberculosis to identify the correlates of protection in vaccination. PMID:25589549

  2. Congenital Tuberculosis Complicated by Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Osowicki, Joshua; Wang, Shiqi; McKenzie, Christopher; Marshall, Carolyn; Gard, Jye; Ke Juin, Wong; Steer, Andrew C; Connell, Tom G

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a male infant with congenital tuberculosis in a nonendemic setting complicated by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, who was treated successfully with antituberculous therapy and corticosteroids. We review the pediatric literature concerning the unusual association of these 2 rare conditions. PMID:26398869

  3. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  4. Radioimmunoassay of tuberculoprotein derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, E; Wu, N

    1980-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for constituent of the purified-protein derivative obtained from cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Crossreacting immunoreactive material was detected in cultures of other mycobacterial species, but no immunoreactivity was present in cultures of various fungal and bacterial species. The development of specific radioimmunoassays for tuberculoproteins offers a new research and diagnostic approach. Images PMID:6933481

  5. Public Transportation and Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Héctor J.; Sánchez, Inma; Bedoya, Alfredo; Martín, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The association between public transportation for commuting and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) was analyzed in workers in Lima, Peru. Traveling in minibuses was a risk factor for pulmonary TB. Preventive measures need to be taken by health services to prevent spread of this disease. PMID:18257992

  6. Homogeneity of Antibody Responses in Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Samanich, K.; Belisle, J. T.; Laal, S.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of the present study were twofold: (i) to compare the repertoires of antigens in culture filtrates of in vitro-grown Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are recognized by antibodies from noncavitary and cavitary tuberculosis (TB) patients and (ii) to determine the extent of variation that exists between the antigen profiles recognized by individual TB patients. Lipoarabinomannan-free culture filtrate proteins of M. tuberculosis were fractionated by one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the Western blots were probed with sera from non-human immunodeficiency virus (non-HIV)-infected cavitary and noncavitary TB patients and from HIV-infected, noncavitary TB patients. In contrast to earlier studies based on recombinant antigens of M. tuberculosis which suggested that antibody responses in TB patients were heterogeneous (K. Lyashchenko et al., 1998, Infect. Immun. 66:3936–3940, 1998), our studies with native culture filtrate proteins show that the antibody responses in TB patients show significant homogeneity in being directed against a well-defined subset of antigens. Thus, there is a well-defined subset of culture filtrate antigens that elicits antibodies during noncavitary and cavitary disease. In addition, another set of antigens is recognized primarily by cavitary TB patients. The mapping with individual patient sera presented here suggests that serodiagnostic tests based on the subset of antigens recognized during both noncavitary and cavitary TB will enhance the sensitivity of antibody detection in TB patients, especially in difficult-to-diagnose, smear-negative, noncavitary TB patients. PMID:11402004

  7. Efficacies of selected disinfectants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Best, M; Sattar, S A; Springthorpe, V S; Kennedy, M E

    1990-10-01

    The activities of 10 formulations as mycobactericidal agents in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-contaminated suspensions (suspension test) and stainless steel surfaces (carrier test) were investigated with sputum as the organic load. The quaternary ammonium compound, chlorhexidine gluconate, and an iodophor were ineffective in all tests. Ethanol (70%) was effective against M. tuberculosis only in suspension in the absence of sputum. Povidone-iodine was not as efficacious when the test organism was dried on a surface as it was in suspension, and its activity was further reduced in the presence of sputum. Sodium hypochlorite required a higher concentration of available chlorine to achieve an effective level of disinfection than did sodium dichloroisocyanurate. Phenol (5%) was effective under all test conditions, producing at least a 4-log10 reduction in CFU. The undiluted glutaraldehyde-phenate solution was effective against M. tuberculosis and a second test organism, Mycobacterium smegmatis, even in the presence of dried sputum, whereas the diluted solution (1:16) was only effective against M. smegmatis in the suspension test. A solution of 2% glutaraldehyde was effective against M. tuberculosis. This investigation presents tuberculocidal efficacy data generated by methods simulating actual practices of routine disinfection. PMID:2121783

  8. Neither Neoplasia Nor Tuberculosis, but Francisella

    PubMed Central

    Mambie, Adeline; Wallet, Frédéric; Scherman, Laurine; Armand, Sylvie; Vervelle, Christine; Faure, Karine; Guery, Benoit; Titécat, Marie; Loïez, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Tularaemia is an emerging anthropozoonosis transmitted by contact with infected animals and through arthropod bites, inhalation, or ingestion. We describe a pulmonary nodule suggesting cancer in a 70-year-old man. Histological analysis excluded neoplasia, and bacteriological culture excluded tuberculosis. Serological testing and PCR Francisella were positive for this hunter patient, then treated by ciprofloxacin with a favourable outcome. PMID:27419157

  9. [Tuberculosis infection control - recommendations of the DZK].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R; Just, H-M; Castell, S; Diel, R; Gastmeier, P; Haas, W; Hauer, B; Loytved, G; Mielke, M; Moser, I; Nienhaus, A; Richter, E; Rüden, H; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Schaberg, T; Wischnewski, N; Loddenkemper, R

    2012-06-01

    The epidemiological situation of tuberculosis (TB) in Germany has improved considerably during the past few years. However, those in unprotected contact with infectious tuberculosis patients frequently and/or over longer periods of time and/or intensively continue to have a higher risk for TB infection. Rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of effective treatment, and adequate infection control measures are of particular importance to prevent infection. The present recommendations depict the essentials of infection control as well as specific measures in the hospital (isolation, criteria for its duration and technical requirements, types of respiratory protection, disinfection measures, waste disposal). The specific requirements for outpatients (medical practice), at home, for ambulance services, and in congregate settings, including prisons, are also addressed. Compared with the previous recommendations the pattern of respiratory protection measures has been simplified. As a rule, hospital staff and those visiting infectious tuberculosis patients are advised to wear respiratory protection that satisfies the criteria of FFP2-masks (DIN EN 149), while patients should wear mouth-nose protectors (surgical masks) in the presence of others and outside the isolation room. A detailed depiction of criteria for isolation and its duration in smear positive and only culturally confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis has been added. PMID:22723258

  10. [Immune complex glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Villar, I; Hernández, E; Cozzi, J; Paletta, C; Mathurín, S

    1994-01-01

    A 32 year old man was admitted for dyspnea, hemoptysis, macroscopic hematuria, hypertension (140/100), peripheral edema and hemodynamic decompensation. Lung Xrays revealed pulmonary edema and a cavity in the left apex. Laboratory determinations revealed an altered renal function with increased creatinine and urea levels and nephrotic syndrome. There was leucocyturia, hematuria and cylindruria. The sputum showed a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The patient began anti-tuberculosis treatment with three drugs (isoniacid, rifampicin, pirazinamide). On ultrasonography, both kidneys revealed ecogenic lesions with size, shape and cortico-medular relationship preserved. The patient persisted with altered renal function, steady levels of urea nitrogen, creatinine and potassium, preserved diuresis and hypertension. Bidimensional echocardiogram: LVDD 55 mm, hypoquinetic septum, pericardic effusion, thickened pericardium, pleural effusion, shortening fraction decreased. He received treatment for this congestive cardiac failure and hypertension with enalapril, nifedipine and fursemide. A percutaneous renal biopsy was performed with anatomopathologic diagnosis of diffuse encocapillar proliferative glomerulonephritis with crescents (15%) and total glomerular sclerosis (33%). Immunofluorescence: positive, immune-complexes with IgM and C3. The patient gradually recovered his normal renal function, improved his pleural effusions and normalized his cardiac function. He was discharged in good clinical condition on the 69th day of anti-tuberculosis treatment. An association between pulmonary tuberculosis and glomerulonephritis is discussed. It is proposed that renal lesions might be the consequence of the tuberculosis due to the sedimentation of circulating immune-complexes. PMID:7854090

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses two chaperonin-60 homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, T H; Coates, A R; Butcher, P D; Hickman, C J; Shinnick, T M

    1993-01-01

    A 65-kDa protein and a 10-kDa protein are two of the more strongly immunoreactive components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. The 65-kDa antigen has homology with members of the GroEL or chaperonin-60 (Cpn60) family of heat shock proteins. The 10-kDa antigen has homology with the GroES or chaperonin-10 family of heat shock proteins. These two proteins are encoded by separate genes in M. tuberculosis. The studies reported here reveal that M. tuberculosis contains a second Cpn60 homolog located 98 bp downstream of the 10-kDa antigen gene. The second Cpn60 homolog (Cpn60-1) displays 61% amino acid sequence identity with the 65-kDa antigen (Cpn60-2) and 53% and 41% identity with the Escherichia coli GroEL protein and the human P60 protein, respectively. Primer-extension analysis revealed that transcription starts 29 bp upstream of the translation start of the Cpn60-1 homolog and protein purification studies indicate that the cpn60-1 gene is expressed as an approximately 60-kDa polypeptide. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7681982

  12. [Vulval tuberculosis: a rare case report].

    PubMed

    Amhager, N; Bouguern, H; Jayi, S; Bouchikhi, C; Belkheiri, M; Chaara, H; Bannani, A; Melhouf, M-A

    2007-02-01

    The authors report an observation of a rare case of vulvar tuberculosis in its hypertrophic form it is observed in a 16-years-old girl. The diagnosis was retained on a beam of arguments anamnestic, clinical, histological and evolutionary. A medical treatment based on antibacillar was founded supplemented of a surgical reduction for aesthetic concern. PMID:17293256

  13. [Actual issues of pathogenesis of tuberculosis of male genital organs].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, P I

    2014-01-01

    Based on a survey of 467 men with genital tuberculosis, following conclusions were made. The presence of morphological signs of nonspecific prostatitis of toxic-allergic genesis in patients with newly diagnosed tuberculosis of the urinary and genital organs proves the possibility of primary infection of the epididymis with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Primarily isolated epididymal tuberculosis was diagnosed in 21 (4,5%) patients. Tuberculous of testicles is in direct relationship to the duration of the existence of tuberculous infection in the epididymis. Bilateral tuberculous of the epididymis is always combined with tuberculosis of the prostate. Opportunity of both primary and secondary infection of the prostate gland with Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be considered as proved. 15 (3,2%) patients had initially isolated prostatic tuberculosis. Based on clinical observations, exogenous way of introduction of infection in tuberculosis of genital organs in men was not confirmed. The lymphogenous and hematogenous pathways are leading and most common pathways of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the male genitals. In patients with tuberculosis of the prostate, which is combined with a lesion of urinary organs, without involvement of scrotum in the pathological process, infection of prostate occurs by urinogenous way. Tuberculosis of the seminal vesicles is always secondary; none of the patients were initially diagnosed with isolated process. Based on the clinical manifestations of the disease and a detailed examination of the patient, it is virtually impossible to establish a particular way of infection in the male genitals. The main value of the information about the possible ways of tuberculosis infection consists of fully examination of reproductive system with histological and bacteriological verification of the diagnosis of each genital organs in each man with suspected tuberculosis. PMID:24956670

  14. Global and Regional Burden of Isoniazid-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Courtney M.; Jenkins, Helen E.; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Keshavjee, Salmaan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Isoniazid has been the backbone of tuberculosis chemotherapy for 6 decades. Resistance to isoniazid threatens the efficacy of treatment of tuberculosis disease and infection. To inform policies around treatment of tuberculosis disease and infection in children, we sought to estimate both the proportion of child tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance and the number of incident isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis cases in children, by region. METHODS: We determined the relationship between rates of isoniazid resistance among child cases and among treatment-naive adult cases through a systematic literature review. We applied this relationship to regional isoniazid resistance estimates to estimate proportions of childhood tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance. We applied these proportions to childhood tuberculosis incidence estimates to estimate numbers of children with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. RESULTS: We estimated 12.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8% to 14.8%) of all children with tuberculosis had isoniazid-resistant disease, representing 120 872 (95% CI 96 628 to 149 059) incident cases of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in children in 2010. The majority of these occurred in the Western Pacific and Southeast Asia regions; the European region had the highest proportion of child tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance, 26.1% (95% CI: 20.0% to 33.6%). CONCLUSIONS: The burden of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in children is substantial, and risk varies considerably by setting. The large number of child cases signals extensive ongoing transmission from adults with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. The risk of isoniazid resistance must be considered when evaluating treatment options for children with disease or latent infection to avoid inadequate treatment and consequent poor outcomes. PMID:26034243

  15. [Evaluation of the tuberculosis control program through tuberculosis surveillance].

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Masako

    2008-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) surveillance has involved three main functions: (1) data collection, (2) data analysis, and (3) feedback. There is now one more important function: (4) a new action plan based on the results of feedback. If all four functions are operating smoothly, the result will be effective so-called "program surveillance". In Japan, the first nationwide computerized TB surveillance system was established in 1987 and it was revised in 1992, 1998 and 2007. Treatment outcomes have been decided automatically in this system since 1998, based on data concerning treatment status, bacteriological test results and so on. Two optional systems, the recording of DOTS and managing of contact tracing, were added to this system in 2007. Since we can thus obtain and use a large amount of surveillance data, we have developed assessment indicators and methods of evaluating the national or regional TB control programs (Fig. 1). However, the accuracy of surveillance data entered into computers at public health centers has been inadequate. Therefore, one of the objectives of evaluating regional TB control program activities is to improve the quality of surveillance data. As regional governments have responsibility for TB control programs in Japan, TB control is generally evaluated at the regional level; i.e. prefecture and designated city. This evaluation process should be done in the cycle of "Plan-Do-See" (planning, execution, evaluation). However, the priority of "See" in this cycle seems to be low, because of the heavy workload of TB control activities. Nevertheless, the evaluation of TB control is very important, so I have introduced some examples of evaluation methods in WHO and Osaka city, and propose the optimum approach to evaluating TB control programs at the regional level. This approach is: (1) to observe the correct epidemiological situation, (2) to set a clear goal, (3) to announce the strategy, and (4) to carry out an annual evaluation. It might also be possible to

  16. Is Early Tuberculosis Death Associated with Increased Tuberculosis Transmission?

    PubMed Central

    Parhar, Anu; Gao, Zhiwei; Heffernan, Courtney; Ahmed, Rabia; Egedahl, Mary Lou; Long, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) is now a relatively uncommon disease in high income countries. As such, its diagnosis may be missed or delayed resulting in death before or shortly after the introduction of treatment. Whether early TB death is associated with increased TB transmission is unknown. To determine the transmission risk attributable to early TB death we undertook a case-control study. Methods All adults who were: (1) diagnosed with culture-positive pulmonary TB in the Province of Alberta, Canada between 1996 and 2012, and (2) died a TB-related death before or within the first 60 days of treatment, were identified. For each of these “cases” two sets of “controls” were randomly selected from among culture-positive pulmonary TB cases that survived beyond 60 days of treatment. “Controls” were matched by age, sex, population group, +/- smear status. Secondary cases of “cases” and “controls” were identified using conventional and molecular epidemiologic tools and compared. In addition, new infections were identified and compared in contacts of “cases” that died before treatment and contacts of their smear-matched “controls”. Conditional logistic regression was used to find associations in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Results “Cases” were as, but not more, likely than “controls” to transmit. This was so whether transmission was measured in terms of the number of “cases” and smear-unmatched or -matched “controls” that had a secondary case, the number of secondary cases that they had or the number of new infections found in contacts of “cases” that died before treatment and their smear-matched “controls”. Conclusion In a low TB incidence/low HIV prevalence country, pulmonary TB patients that die a TB-related death before or in the initial phase of treatment and pulmonary TB patients that survive beyond the initial phase of treatment are equally likely to transmit. PMID:25622038

  17. CCL2 Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Are Associated with Disease Severity in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zahra; Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Jamil, Bushra; Irfan, Muhammad; Ashraf, Mussarat; Hussain, Rabia

    2009-01-01

    Background Leucocyte activating chemokines such as CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL8 together with proinflammatory IFNγ, TNFα and downmodulatory IL10 play a central role in the restriction of M. tuberculosis infections, but is unclear whether these markers are indicative of tuberculosis disease severity. Methodology We investigated live M. tuberculosis- and M. bovis BCG- induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses in patients with tuberculosis (TB) and healthy endemic controls (ECs, n = 36). TB patients comprised pulmonary (PTB, n = 34) and extrapulmonary groups, subdivided into those with less severe localized extrapulmonary TB (L-ETB, n = 16) or severe disseminated ETB (D-ETB, n = 16). Secretion of CCL2, IFNγ, IL10 and CCL3, and mRNA expression of CCL2, TNFα, CCL3 and CXCL8 were determined. Results M. tuberculosis- and BCG- induced CCL2 secretion was significantly increased in both PTB and D-ETB (p<0.05, p<0.01) as compared with L-ETB patients. CCL2 secretion in response to M. tuberculosis was significantly greater than to BCG in the PTB and D-ETB groups. M. tuberculosis-induced CCL2 mRNA transcription was greater in PTB than L-ETB (p = 0.023), while CCL2 was reduced in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB (p = 0.005) patients. M. tuberculosis –induced IFNγ was greater in L-ETB than PTB (p = 0.04), while BCG-induced IFNγ was greater in L-ETB as compared with D-ETB patients (p = 0.036). TNFα mRNA expression was raised in PTB as compared with L-ETB group in response to M. tuberculosis (p = 0.02) and BCG (p = 0.03). Mycobacterium-induced CCL3 and CXCL8 was comparable between TB groups. Conclusions The increased CCL2 and TNFα in PTB patients may support effective leucocyte recruitment and M. tuberculosis localization. CCL2 alone is associated with severity of TB, possibly due to increased systemic inflammation found in severe disseminated TB or due to increased monocyte infiltration to lung parenchyma in pulmonary disease. PMID

  18. Ethnic Variation in Inflammatory Profile in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Anna K.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Elkington, Paul T.; Hanifa, Yasmeen; Islam, Kamrul; Timms, Peter M.; Bothamley, Graham H.; Claxton, Alleyna P.; Packe, Geoffrey E.; Darmalingam, Mathina; Davidson, Robert N.; Milburn, Heather J.; Baker, Lucy V.; Barker, Richard D.; Drobniewski, Francis A.; Mein, Charles A.; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Nuamah, Rosamond A.; Griffiths, Christopher J.; Martineau, Adrian R.

    2013-01-01

    Distinct phylogenetic lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) cause disease in patients of particular genetic ancestry, and elicit different patterns of cytokine and chemokine secretion when cultured with human macrophages in vitro. Circulating and antigen-stimulated concentrations of these inflammatory mediators might therefore be expected to vary significantly between tuberculosis patients of different ethnic origin. Studies to characterise such variation, and to determine whether it relates to host or bacillary factors, have not been conducted. We therefore compared circulating and antigen-stimulated concentrations of 43 inflammatory mediators and 14 haematological parameters (inflammatory profile) in 45 pulmonary tuberculosis patients of African ancestry vs. 83 patients of Eurasian ancestry in London, UK, and investigated the influence of bacillary and host genotype on these profiles. Despite having similar demographic and clinical characteristics, patients of differing ancestry exhibited distinct inflammatory profiles at presentation: those of African ancestry had lower neutrophil counts, lower serum concentrations of CCL2, CCL11 and vitamin D binding protein (DBP) but higher serum CCL5 concentrations and higher antigen-stimulated IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-12 secretion. These differences associated with ethnic variation in host DBP genotype, but not with ethnic variation in MTB strain. Ethnic differences in inflammatory profile became more marked following initiation of antimicrobial therapy, and immunological correlates of speed of elimination of MTB from the sputum differed between patients of African vs. Eurasian ancestry. Our study demonstrates a hitherto unappreciated degree of ethnic heterogeneity in inflammatory profile in tuberculosis patients that associates primarily with ethnic variation in host, rather than bacillary, genotype. Candidate immunodiagnostics and immunological biomarkers of response to antimicrobial therapy should be derived

  19. [Tuberculosis pulmonum--"threaten us of epidemic"?].

    PubMed

    Chyczewska, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a deadly infectious disease affecting millions of people worldwide with 95% of cases and 98% of deaths occuring in developing countries (9 milion new cases, 1 million deaths annually) vs.WHO. Tuberculosis is on the increase in developed countries, because of AIDS, the use of immunosuppresive drugs which depress the host defence mechanism, decreased socioeconomic conditions, as well as increased immigration of persons from areas of high endemicity. The major reason for this increase was because of rapid rise in cases from sub-Saharan Africa (due to AIDS) nad Russia. Incidense of tuberculosis in Poland 2007--the number of notified cases was 8014. Pulmonary cases represented 92.7% of total all TB cases and 628 cases of extrapulmonary TB. Chidren TB cases represented 0.9% (74 cases) of all cases notified in Poland. The incidence of tuberculosis increases with age from 1.1 in children do 41.2 among 65 and older. The incidence of men (31.5) was two times higher than in women--14.5 per 100 000 respectivly. There were 716 deaths due to pulmonary TB and 23 from extrapulmonary TB. Multidrug resistance (MDR) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major therapeutic problem, in the world, with a high mortality and occurs mainly in HIV-infected patients. The WHO estimates that around 50 million people are infected with MDR-TB! WHO suggest that a greater investment in the establishment treatment strategy of DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment Short-course) into all posible regions. PMID:22320031

  20. Differential influence of nutrient-starved Mycobacterium tuberculosis on adaptive immunity results in progressive tuberculosis disease and pathology.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jes; Roy, Sugata; Rosenkrands, Ida; Lindenstrøm, Thomas; Filskov, Jonathan; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Cassidy, Joseph; Andersen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    When infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, most individuals will remain clinically healthy but latently infected. Latent infection has been proposed to partially involve M. tuberculosis in a nonreplicating stage, which therefore represents an M. tuberculosis phenotype that the immune system most likely will encounter during latency. It is therefore relevant to examine how this particular nonreplicating form of M. tuberculosis interacts with the host immune system. To study this, we first induced a state of nonreplication through prolonged nutrient starvation of M. tuberculosis in vitro. This resulted in nonreplicating persistence even after prolonged culture in phosphate-buffered saline. Infection with either exponentially growing M. tuberculosis or nutrient-starved M. tuberculosis resulted in similar lung CFU levels in the first phase of the infection. However, between week 3 and 6 postinfection, there was a very pronounced increase in bacterial levels and associated lung pathology in nutrient-starved-M. tuberculosis-infected mice. This was associated with a shift from CD4 T cells that coexpressed gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 to T cells that only expressed IFN-γ. Thus, nonreplicating M. tuberculosis induced through nutrient starvation promotes a bacterial form that is genetically identical to exponentially growing M. tuberculosis yet characterized by a differential impact on the immune system that may be involved in undermining host antimycobacterial immunity and facilitate increased pathology and transmission. PMID:26416911

  1. Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Real-Time High-Resolution Imaging of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Asmar, Shady; Betzner, Marlena; Linet, Marie; Pierquin, Joseph; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Culture remains the cornerstone of diagnosis for pulmonary tuberculosis, but the fastidiousness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may delay culture-based diagnosis for weeks. We evaluated the performance of real-time high-resolution imaging for the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis colonies growing on a solid medium. A total of 50 clinical specimens, including 42 sputum specimens, 4 stool specimens, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens, and 2 bronchial aspirate fluid specimens were prospectively inoculated into (i) a commercially available Middlebrook broth and evaluated for mycobacterial growth indirectly detected by measuring oxygen consumption (standard protocol) and (ii) a home-made solid medium incubated in an incubator featuring real-time high-resolution imaging of colonies (real-time protocol). Isolates were identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. Use of the standard protocol yielded 14/50 (28%) M. tuberculosis isolates, which is not significantly different from the 13/50 (26%) M. tuberculosis isolates found using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00 by Fisher's exact test), and the contamination rate of 1/50 (2%) was not significantly different from the contamination rate of 2/50 (4%) using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00). The real-time imaging protocol showed a 4.4-fold reduction in time to detection, 82 ± 54 h versus 360 ± 142 h (P < 0.05). These preliminary data give the proof of concept that real-time high-resolution imaging of M. tuberculosis colonies is a new technology that shortens the time to growth detection and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26085608

  2. Genetic Diversity and Dynamic Distribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates Causing Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Srilohasin, Prapaporn; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nishida, Nao; Prammananan, Therdsak; Smittipat, Nat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chaiyasirinroje, Boonchai; Yanai, Hideki; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the genetic diversity and dynamicity of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Thailand using nearly neutral molecular markers. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotypes of 1,414 culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates from 1,282 pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 132 extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) patients collected from 1995 to 2011 were characterized. Among the eight SNP cluster groups (SCG), SCG2 (44.1%), which included the Beijing (BJ) genotype, and SCG1 (39.4%), an East African Indian genotype, were dominant. Comparisons between the genotypes of M. tuberculosis isolates causing PTB and EPTB in HIV-negative cases revealed similar prevalence trends although genetic diversity was higher in the PTB patients. The identification of 10 reported sequence types (STs) and three novel STs was hypothesized to indicate preferential expansion of the SCG2 genotype, especially the modern BJ ST10 (15.6%) and ancestral BJ ST19 (13.1%). An association between SCG2 and SCG1 genotypes and particular patient age groups implies the existence of different genetic advantages among the bacterial populations. The results revealed that increasing numbers of young patients were infected with M. tuberculosis SCGs 2 and 5, which contrasts with the reduction of the SCG1 genotype. Our results indicate the selection and dissemination of potent M. tuberculosis genotypes in this population. The determination of heterogeneity and dynamic population changes of circulating M. tuberculosis strains in countries using the Mycobacterium bovis BCG (bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine are beneficial for vaccine development and control strategies. PMID:25297330

  3. Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Real-Time High-Resolution Imaging of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Colonies.

    PubMed

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Asmar, Shady; Betzner, Marlena; Linet, Marie; Pierquin, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Culture remains the cornerstone of diagnosis for pulmonary tuberculosis, but the fastidiousness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may delay culture-based diagnosis for weeks. We evaluated the performance of real-time high-resolution imaging for the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis colonies growing on a solid medium. A total of 50 clinical specimens, including 42 sputum specimens, 4 stool specimens, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens, and 2 bronchial aspirate fluid specimens were prospectively inoculated into (i) a commercially available Middlebrook broth and evaluated for mycobacterial growth indirectly detected by measuring oxygen consumption (standard protocol) and (ii) a home-made solid medium incubated in an incubator featuring real-time high-resolution imaging of colonies (real-time protocol). Isolates were identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Use of the standard protocol yielded 14/50 (28%) M. tuberculosis isolates, which is not significantly different from the 13/50 (26%) M. tuberculosis isolates found using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00 by Fisher's exact test), and the contamination rate of 1/50 (2%) was not significantly different from the contamination rate of 2/50 (4%) using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00). The real-time imaging protocol showed a 4.4-fold reduction in time to detection, 82 ± 54 h versus 360 ± 142 h (P < 0.05). These preliminary data give the proof of concept that real-time high-resolution imaging of M. tuberculosis colonies is a new technology that shortens the time to growth detection and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26085608

  4. Tuberculosis in haemodialysis patients: A single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Rao, T Manmadha; Ram, R; Swarnalatha, G; Santhosh Pai, B H; Ramesh, V; Rao, C Shyam Sunder; Naidu, G Diwaker; Dakshinamurty, K V

    2013-09-01

    We prospectively followed-up new patients of tuberculosis while on maintenance hemodialysis at a State Government-run tertiary care institute. Between 2000 and 2010, 1237 new patients were initiated on maintainence hemodialysis. The number of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis after initiation of hemodialysis was 131 (10.5% of 1237). The age was 46.4 ± 10.4 (range 8-85) years and there were 90 (68.7%) males. The number of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis on the basis of organ involvement were: Pulmonary-60, pleural effusion-31, lymph node-21, meningitis-8, pericardial effusion-7, peritoneum-2, latent tuberculosis-2. The incidence of tuberculosis in hemodialysis was found to be 105.9 per 1000 patient years. Male gender, diabetes mellitus, past history of tuberculosis, mining as an occupation, low serum albumin, and duration of hemodialysis more than 24 months, and unemployment were found to be significant risk-factors on univariate analysis. PMID:24049269

  5. Human Xenobiotic Nuclear Receptor PXR Augments Mycobacterium tuberculosis Survival.

    PubMed

    Bhagyaraj, Ella; Nanduri, Ravikanth; Saini, Ankita; Dkhar, Hedwin Kitdorlang; Ahuja, Nancy; Chandra, Vemika; Mahajan, Sahil; Kalra, Rashi; Tiwari, Drishti; Sharma, Charu; Janmeja, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Pawan

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can evade host defense processes, thereby ensuring its survival and pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the role of nuclear receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), in M. tuberculosis infection in human monocyte-derived macrophages. In this study, we demonstrate that PXR augments M. tuberculosis survival inside the host macrophages by promoting the foamy macrophage formation and abrogating phagolysosomal fusion, inflammation, and apoptosis. Additionally, M. tuberculosis cell wall lipids, particularly mycolic acids, crosstalk with human PXR (hPXR) by interacting with its promiscuous ligand binding domain. To confirm our in vitro findings and to avoid the reported species barrier in PXR function, we adopted an in vivo mouse model expressing hPXR, wherein expression of hPXR in mice promotes M. tuberculosis survival. Therefore, pharmacological intervention and designing antagonists to hPXR may prove to be a promising adjunct therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:27233963

  6. Diabetes mellitus with pulmonary tuberculosis--a double trouble.

    PubMed

    Kant, Surya; Lata, Hem; Natu, S M; Mishra, Arvind Kumar; Verma, N S

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic patients are often at a higher risk for developing several types of infections and infection does alter the handling of glucose by tissues. Pulmonary infections in diabetics are characterised by alteration in host defence, in entire body and in the lung locally as well as in the function of respiratory epithelium and ciliary motility. Association between diabetes mellitus and pulmonary tuberculosis is well established, while the prevalence of tuberculosis is increased 4-5 times more among diabetics. Impairment of host defence plays an important role for changing the clinical, radiological and bacteriological presentation in diabetic patients. It is also reported by the various studies that hyperglycaemia favours the growth of tuberculosis bacilli. So the severity of tuberculosis appears more cirtical with the degree of hyperglycaemia and host defence activity. This overlap between the diabetic and tuberculosis epidemics could adversely affect global tuberculosis control efforts. PMID:24592761

  7. Genital tuberculosis in the infertile women - an update.

    PubMed

    Ishrat, S; Fatima, P

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is endemic in many developing countries of the world including Bangladesh. Genital tuberculosis is a significant cause of infertility in the women of these countries. The diagnosis of genital tuberculosis in infertile women is difficult as most of the cases are usually asymptomatic. A high index of clinical suspicion is required. Genital tuberculosis always affects the fallopian tubes. It affects the endometrium in half of the cases. In addition to tuberculin skin tests and interferon gamma release assays, procedures like hysterosalpingography, laparoscopy-dye test, endometrial curettage and laparoscopy with multiple sampling for smear microscopy and culture for mycobacterium tuberculosis can detect the cases. In recent years diagnosis has been improved by polymerase chain reaction targeted against mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. Following early diagnosis, treatment with anti-tubercular drugs is favourable for fertility only when tubal and endometrial damage is minimal. In cases where the organs are more severely involved the outcome is poor even with in- vitro fertilization. PMID:25725695

  8. Tuberculosis or sarcoidosis: Opposite ends of the same disease spectrum?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Kee, Ae Ra; Ang, Leslie; Tun Hang, Yeo; Gupta, Vishali; Kon, Onn Min; Mitchell, Donald; Zierhut, Manfred; Pavesio, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis are chronic systemic diseases that have similar pulmonary and extra-pulmonary manifestations. Multiple studies have found an epidemiological, molecular, and immunological link between the two. It has been suggested that mycobacterium tuberculosis could be a common pathophysiologic mechanism for tuberculosis and sarcoidosis, and that both clinical entities can trigger similar immunological response in patients. Due to this close association, together with possible coexistence in the same patient, the diagnosis of one disease from another may be difficult. In our paper, we suggest that tuberculosis and sarcoidosis are two ends of the same spectrum. Given the pathophysiological and clinical link between the two, we also propose a classification system for tuberculosis and sarcoidosis: Sarcoidosis (S); Sarcoid-Tuberculous (ST); Tuberculous Sarcoid (TS) and Tuberculosis (TB). More research and clinical trials should first be done to affirm the link between the two disease entities. PMID:27156614

  9. Comprehensive Treatment of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Shin, Sonya S.; Seung, Kwonjune J.; Rich, Michael L.; Atwood, Sidney S.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Alcantara Viru, Felix A.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Bayona, Jaime N.; Bonilla, Cesar A.; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F.; Fraser, Hamish S.F.; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M.; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. METHODS A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. RESULTS Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [±SD] number of regimens, 4.2±1.9 vs. 3.2±1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4±1.1 vs. 5.3±1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3±1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). CONCLUSIONS Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:18687637

  10. The rise of tuberculosis in America before 1820.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, S D

    1990-11-01

    Bills of mortality, newspaper and gazette articles, journals, and other records with specific references to "consumption," "phthisis," and other terms for tuberculosis were reviewed to determine the occurrence and importance of tuberculosis in the American colonies before 1820. Review of these sources indicates a marked increase in the proportional mortality from tuberculosis in the United States in the 18th century. "Consumption" may have been the leading cause of death in adult American colonists. PMID:2240850

  11. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults.

    PubMed

    Dey, Jaideep; Gautam, Hitender; Venugopal, Shwetha; Porwal, Chhavi; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Gupta, Naresh; Singh, Urvashi B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  12. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Aguado, J M; Noriega, A R

    1996-01-01

    A method based on DNA amplification and hybridization has been used for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood samples from 38 hospitalized patients (15 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 23 HIV negative) in whom localized or disseminated forms of tuberculosis were suspected. In 32 of these patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was eventually confirmed by conventional bacteriological or histological procedures. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected with the PCR technique in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 of 11 (82%) HIV-infected patients and in 7 of 21 (33%) HIV-negative patients (P < 0.01), while M. tuberculosis blood cultures were positive in 1 of 8 (12.5%) and 1 of 18 (5.5%) patients, respectively. PCR was positive in all cases with disseminated disease in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and also in the HIV-positive patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Seven samples from patients with documented illness other than tuberculosis and 12 specimens from healthy volunteers, including seven volunteers with a recent positive purified protein derivative test, were used as controls and had a negative PCR. These results suggest that detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of disseminated and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, especially in an HIV-positive population. PMID:8904404

  13. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in prison inmates, Azerbaijan.

    PubMed Central

    Pfyffer, G. E.; Strässle, A.; van Gorkum, T.; Portaels, F.; Rigouts, L.; Mathieu, C.; Mirzoyev, F.; Traore, H.; van Embden, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    In a tuberculosis (TB) program in the Central Penitentiary Hospital of Azerbaijan, we analyzed 65 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by IS6110-based restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) and spoligotyping. From 11 clusters associated with 33 patients, 31 isolates had an IS6110-based banding pattern characteristic of the Beijing genotype of M. tuberculosis. In addition, 15 M. tuberculosis isolates with similar RFLP patterns constituted a single group by spoligotyping, matching the Beijing genotype. Multidrug resistance, always involving isoniazid and rifampin, was seen in 34 (52.3%) of 65 isolates, with 28 belonging to the Beijing genotype. PMID:11747699

  14. [Update on the radiological study of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro Ballester, A; Marco Domenech, S F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis has made a comeback in recent years. This upsurge has been attributed to factors such as increased immigration and the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifests radiologically with parenchymal involvement, lymph node involvement, pleural effusion, and/or miliary disease. In post-primary tuberculosis, the earliest radiological sign is small nodules and branching centrilobular lesions that increase in size and coalesce to form ill-defined patchy consolidations; cavitations are very characteristic of active disease. The aim of this article is to describe the radiologic findings for pulmonary tuberculosis and its complications. PMID:26074301

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique*, **

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. METHODS: We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. RESULTS: During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. CONCLUSIONS: M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients. PMID:24831398

  16. [The satisfaction of personal needs in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sukhova, E V

    2005-01-01

    The founder of humanistic psychology A. Maslow divided the needs of a personality into several levels--from the lowest to the highest ones. Higher-leveled needs rise when the lower-leveled needs are satisfied. A great deal of factors affect the origination and satisfaction of needs, but they are always interrelated with social values. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis has not been studied. A special questionnaire has been drawn up to study the extent to which personality needs are met. Its suitability has been determined, by using a group of patients with bronchial asthma. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis was studied in 178 patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis and 253 patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis. The results have shown that the extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with tuberculosis is lower than that in apparently healthy individuals of the same social status. In females with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the needs for safety are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, and self-realization needs is decreased. In males with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the physiological, noetic, and self-realization needs are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, group decision-making, noetic and self-realization needs is decreased. PMID:15801639

  17. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Jaideep; Venugopal, Shwetha; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE protein Rv0256c induces strong B cell response in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Philip Raj; Latha, Gaddam Suman; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important diseases of humans and major public health problem worldwide. Early and accurate diagnosis of TB is necessary for the treatment, prevention, and control of TB. Therefore, it is important to identify suitable antigens that can differentiate active tuberculosis patients from BCG-vaccinated individuals. In the present study, we have used Rv0256c (PPE2) protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to screen the sera of infected patients belonging to different clinical TB presentations, and BCG-vaccinated clinically healthy individuals by enzyme immunoassay. Our results demonstrated that Rv0256c displayed stronger and specific immunoreactivity against the sera obtained from clinically active tuberculosis patients compared to PPD and ESAT-6 and could differentiate the TB-patients from the BCG-vaccinated controls. Importantly, Rv0256c was also found to detect even the extrapulmonary and smear-negative pulmonary cases which often are tedious and difficult to detect using conventional diagnostic methods. This study suggests that Rv0256c can be used as a potential marker for the serodiagnosis of tuberculosis patients. PMID:23827809

  19. Natural History of Tuberculosis: Duration and Fatality of Untreated Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Negative Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Williams, Brian G.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis, specifically the case fatality and duration, of untreated tuberculosis is important as many patients are not correctly diagnosed and therefore receive inadequate or no treatment. Furthermore, duration and case fatality of tuberculosis are key parameters in interpreting epidemiological data. Methodology and Principal Findings To estimate the duration and case fatality of untreated pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV negative patients we reviewed studies from the pre-chemotherapy era. Untreated smear-positive tuberculosis among HIV negative individuals has a 10-year case fatality variously reported between 53% and 86%, with a weighted mean of 70%. Ten-year case fatality of culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis was nowhere reported directly but can be indirectly estimated to be approximately 20%. The duration of tuberculosis from onset to cure or death is approximately 3 years and appears to be similar for smear-positive and smear-negative tuberculosis. Conclusions Current models of untreated tuberculosis that assume a total duration of 2 years until self-cure or death underestimate the duration of disease by about one year, but their case fatality estimates of 70% for smear-positive and 20% for culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis appear to be satisfactory. PMID:21483732

  20. Association-rule-based tuberculosis disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, T.; Natarajan, S.; Murthy, K. N. B.

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It usually spreads through the air and attacks low immune bodies such as patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This work focuses on finding close association rules, a promising technique in Data Mining, within TB data. The proposed method first normalizes of raw data from medical records which includes categorical, nominal and continuous attributes and then determines Association Rules from the normalized data with different support and confidence. Association rules are applied on a real data set containing medical records of patients with TB obtained from a state hospital. The rules determined describes close association between one symptom to another; as an example, likelihood that an occurrence of sputum is closely associated with blood cough and HIV.

  1. Pulmonary Tuberculosis Diagnosis: Where We Are?

    PubMed Central

    Leylabadlo, Hamed Ebrahimzadeh; Yousefi, Mehdi; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, in spite of medical advancement, tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem. Although many laboratory methods have been developed to expedite the diagnosis of TB, delays in diagnosis remain a major problem in the clinical practice. Because of the slow growth rate of the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, isolation, identification, and drug susceptibility testing of this organism and other clinically important mycobacteria can take several weeks or longer. During the past several years, many methods have been developed for direct detection, species identification, and drug susceptibility testing of TB. A good understanding of the effectiveness and practical limitations of these methods is important to improve diagnosis. This review summarizes the currently-used advances in nonmolecular and molecular diagnostics. PMID:27433173

  2. Observations on Genito-urinary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Carver, James

    1937-01-01

    Early and reliable diagnosis is obtained by cultural methods. Pyelographic evidence of renal destruction is necessary as a rule to supplement the positive laboratory findings before resorting to nephrectomy. Bilateral renal tuberculosis should not be diagnosed on the findings of cystoscopy alone. Nephro-ureterectomy is the ideal operation. It prevents the prolongation of the bladder symptoms and the breaking-down of the operation wound and the risk of another operation for the removal of the ureter, not forgetting the danger of infection of the other kidney. Bad results are probably due, in the case of poor patients, to economic and sociological factors which interfere with restoration to health after operation. Genito-urinary tuberculosis is to be regarded not as a localized disorder but as a manifestation of a generalized disease, a fact which necessitates a guarded prognosis and prolonged after-treatment. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:19991279

  3. Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) with Abdominal Tuberculosis (TB).

    PubMed

    Bhatty, Shaheen A; Lal, Hari; Talib, Abu; Mahmood, Khalid; Naqvi, Iftekhar; Zaidi, Syeda Shaheera

    2015-10-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO), previously regarded as a form of multiple sclerosis, is defined by Gault and Devic, as a retrobulbar neuritis or papillitis accompanied by acute myelitis and occasionally other neurological symptom or signs not restricted to the spinal cord or optic nerves. With the diagnosis of specific antibodies, probable role of humoral immunity supports its pathogenesis. Only a few cases of NMO have been reported in association with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Here we report a case of young girl with acute onset paraplegia diagnosed to have NMO, who later on during hospital stay developed ascites which cultured positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This association of abdominal TB with NMO is under-reported in literature. PMID:26522188

  4. Consequences of genomic diversity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2014-12-01

    The causative agent of human tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), comprises seven phylogenetically distinct lineages associated with different geographical regions. Here we review the latest findings on the nature and amount of genomic diversity within and between MTBC lineages. We then review recent evidence for the effect of this genomic diversity on mycobacterial phenotypes measured experimentally and in clinical settings. We conclude that overall, the most geographically widespread Lineage 2 (includes Beijing) and Lineage 4 (also known as Euro-American) are more virulent than other lineages that are more geographically restricted. This increased virulence is associated with delayed or reduced pro-inflammatory host immune responses, greater severity of disease, and enhanced transmission. Future work should focus on the interaction between MTBC and human genetic diversity, as well as on the environmental factors that modulate these interactions. PMID:25453224

  5. Microbiome Changes during Tuberculosis and Antituberculous Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bo-Young; Maulén, Nancy Paula; Adami, Alexander J; Granados, Hector; Balcells, María Elvira; Cervantes, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    The critical role of commensal microbiota in the human body has been increasingly recognized, and our understanding of its implications in human health and disease has expanded rapidly. The lower respiratory tract contains diverse communities of microbes known as lung microbiota, which are present in healthy individuals and in individuals with respiratory diseases. The dysbiosis of the airway microbiota in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) may play a role in the pathophysiological processes associated with TB disease. Recent studies of the lung microbiome have pointed out changes in lung microbial communities associated with TB and other lung diseases and have also begun to elucidate the profound effects that antituberculous drug therapy can have on the human lung microbiome composition. In this review, the potential role of the human microbiome in TB pathogenesis and the changes in the human microbiome with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and TB therapy are presented and discussed. PMID:27608937

  6. Miliary tuberculosis presenting with hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, D. W.; Donevan, R. E.; Copland, G. M.; Ibbott, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman with miliary tuberculosis had moderately severe hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) and very severe thrombocytopenia without other hematologic abnormalities. She was treated with isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, prednisone, vincristine and fluid restriction and recovered completely. The SIADH may have been a response by the posterior pituitary to a decrease in intravascular volume resulting from the extensive pulmonary disease or associated hypoxia, or the tuberculous lung may have released ADH or an ADH-like substance. The thrombocytopenia may have resulted from a direct or indirect toxic effect of infection or, less likely, the tuberculosis may have activated latent idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:991033

  7. Epidemiology and Treatment of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Shin, Sonya S.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistant tuberculosis is now thought to afflict between 1 and 2 million patients annually. Although significant regional variability in the distribution of disease has been recorded, surveillance data are limited by several factors. The true burden of disease is likely underestimated. Nevertheless, the estimated burden is substantial enough to warrant concerted action. A range of approaches is possible, but all appropriate interventions require scale-up of laboratories and early treatment with regimens containing a sufficient number of second-line drugs. Ambulatory treatment for most patients, and improved infection control, can facilitate scale-up with decreased risk of nosocomial transmission. Several obstacles have been considered to preclude worldwide scale-up of treatment, mostly attributable to inadequate human, drug, and financial resources. Further delays in scale-up, however, risk continued generation and transmission of resistant tuberculosis, as well as associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:18810684

  8. Counting Children with Tuberculosis: Why Numbers Matter

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, James A; Jenkins, Helen E; Liu, Li; Cohen, Ted; Black, Robert E; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Graham, Stephen M; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Dodd, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Summary In the last five years, childhood tuberculosis (TB) has received increasing attention from international organisations, national tuberculosis programmes, and academics. For the first time, a number of different groups are developing techniques to estimate the burden of childhood TB. We review the challenges in diagnosing TB in children and the reasons cases in children can go unreported. We discuss the importance of an accurate understanding of burden for identifying problems in programme delivery, targeting interventions, monitoring trends, setting targets, allocating resources appropriately and providing strong advocacy. We briefly review the estimates produced by new analytical methods, outline the reasons for recent improvements in our understanding, and potential future directions. We conclude that while innovation, collaboration and better data have improved our understanding of childhood TB burden, it remains substantially incomplete. PMID:26564535

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Merlin; AlGherbawe, Mushtak

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old immunocompetent man presenting with fever, cough, anorexia, weight loss, and cervical lymphadenopathy. Blood investigations revealed severe neutropenia with monocytosis. Chest imaging showed bilateral reticular infiltrates with mediastinal widening. Bronchoalveolar lavage culture and molecular test were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treatment with isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol was started. Although pulmonary tuberculosis could explain this clinical presentation we suspected associated blood dyscrasias in view of significant monocytosis and mild splenomegaly. Bone marrow aspiration revealed acute myeloid leukemia. Thereafter the patient received induction chemotherapy and continued antituberculous treatment. After first induction of chemotherapy patient was in remission and successfully completed 6 months antituberculosis therapy without any complications. To our knowledge there has been no such case reported from the State of Qatar to date. PMID:24987539

  10. Animal models of tuberculosis: Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon; Hall, Yper; Williams, Ann

    2015-05-01

    The progression of the disease that follows infection of guinea pigs with Mycobacterium tuberculosis displays many features of human tuberculosis (TB), and the guinea pig model of TB has been used for more than 100 years as a research tool to understand and describe disease mechanisms. Changes in the bacterial burden and pathology following infection can be readily monitored and used to evaluate the impact of TB interventions. Demonstration of the protective efficacy of vaccines in the low-dose aerosol guinea pig model is an important component of the preclinical data package for novel vaccines in development, and there is a continual need to improve the model to facilitate progression of vaccines to the clinic. Development of better tools with which to dissect the immune responses of guinea pigs is a focus of current research. PMID:25524720

  11. [Clinical and immunological features of concomitant HIV/tuberculosis infection and HIV infection without tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Khaertynova, I M; Valiev, R Sh; Tsibul'kin, A P; Valiev, N R; Khamzina, R V; Lazarenko, O G; Romanenko, S E

    2009-01-01

    The clinical and hematological manifestations and functional state of the immune system were comparatively evaluated in patients with concomitant HIV/tuberculosis (TB) infection (n = 84) and in those with HIV infection without tuberculosis (n = 106). The course of concomitant HIV-TB infection was ascertained to differ from HIV monoinfection in a diversity of additional exposures that aggravated the patients' general condition. These included: the parameters of a long proceeding inflammatory process, which were accompanied by the signs of the infection-toxic syndrome, inflammatory changes in the hemogram, by a sharp stimulation of the nonspecific link of immunity. So the comparative analysis of the trend in HIV infection in combination with active tuberculosis and HIV monoinfection revealed a prompter progression of the disease in the former case. PMID:19642574

  12. Acquired Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Poor Outcomes among Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kipiani, Maia; Mirtskhulava, Veriko; Tukvadze, Nestani; Magee, Matthew J.; Blumberg, Henry M.

    2015-01-01

    Rates and risk factors for acquired drug resistance and association with outcomes among patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are not well defined. In an MDR TB cohort from the country of Georgia, drug susceptibility testing for second-line drugs (SLDs) was performed at baseline and every third month. Acquired resistance was defined as any SLD whose status changed from susceptible at baseline to resistant at follow-up. Among 141 patients, acquired resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed in 19 (14%); prevalence was 9.1% for ofloxacin and 9.8% for capreomycin or kanamycin. Baseline cavitary disease and resistance to >6 drugs were associated with acquired resistance. Patients with M. tuberculosis that had acquired resistance were at significantly increased risk for poor treatment outcome compared with patients without these isolates (89% vs. 36%; p<0.01). Acquired resistance occurs commonly among patients with MDR TB and impedes successful treatment outcomes. PMID:25993036

  13. Tuberculosis Risk among Medical Trainees, Pune, India

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay; Patil, Akhil; Kadam, Dileep; Joshi, Samir; Gupte, Nikhil; McIntire, Katie; Jain, Divyashri; Dalal, Hamza; Badave, Rohan; DeLuca, Andrea; Gupta, Amita; Bollinger, Robert; Mave, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    During 2012–2013, at a public hospital in Pune, India, 26 (3.9%) cases of tuberculosis were reported among 662 medical trainees, representing an estimated incidence of 3,279 cases/100,000 person-years. Three of these infections were isoniazid-resistant, 1 was multidrug-resistant, and 1 occurred in a trainee who had fulminant hepatitis after starting treatment for TB. PMID:26889712

  14. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  15. Pulmonary tuberculosis: clinical features and patient management.

    PubMed

    Gough, Andrea; Kaufman, Gerri

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is a common infectious disease and a major cause of illness and death throughout the world, particularly in developing countries. This article explores the difference between latent TB infection and active TB disease, and discusses the pharmacological management of TB and issues around adherence to medication. Although TB is usually managed by specialist teams it is essential that all practitioners have an understanding of the signs and symptoms of the disease to ensure early referral and accurate diagnosis. PMID:21888103

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Manipulator of Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Vanessa C.; Chuturgoon, Anil A.; Moodley, Devapregasan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful pathogens in human history and remains a global health challenge. MTB has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade the immune response sufficiently to survive within the macrophage in a bacterial-immunological equilibrium, yet causes sufficient immunopathology to facilitate its transmission. This review highlights MTB as the driver of disease pathogenesis and presents evidence of the mechanisms by which MTB manipulates the protective immune response into a pathological productive infection. PMID:26927066

  17. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis spoligotype distribution in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. PMID:24850349

  18. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotype Distribution in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. PMID:24850349

  19. Nasopharyngeal tuberculosis presenting with auditory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pankhania, Miran; Elloy, Marianne; Conboy, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a 54-year-old Chinese lady presenting to the ears, nose and throat clinic after family members noticed that her hearing had progressively deteriorated over the preceding weeks. She also complained of tinnitus. Examination of the ears, nose and throat was unremarkable. Flexible nasoendoscopy demonstrated swelling in the postnasal space, which, following biopsy, was shown to be pathognomonic of tuberculosis. This was successfully treated with multidisciplinary input and the patient made a complete recovery. PMID:23047991

  20. Spinal Tuberculosis with Paraplegia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, S; Dora, S K; Thakur, S

    2015-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis leading to paraplegia is uncommon in pregnancy and is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We report a case of tubercular paraplegia presenting at 35 weeks of gestation. She was managed with Anti-tubercular drugs and did not require surgical intervention. Her neurological status improved and she was allowed to go in labour. She delivered a healthy term infant by cesarean. At three months follow-up, both mother and child are doing well. PMID:26994033

  1. An isolated case of first metatarsal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Madi, Sandesh; Naik, Monappa; Vijayan, Sandeep; Rao, Sharath

    2015-03-01

    An apparently healthy adolescent presented to us with multiple discharging sinuses from his right foot for the past 1 year. All serological parameters were within normal limits. X-ray picture revealed an expansile osteolytic lesion of first metatarsal. Tissue biopsy and PCR confirmed it be of tubercular etiology. The incidence of isolated occurrence of metatarsal tuberculosis is very rare and the diagnostic dilemma it brings about is briefly discussed in the following report. PMID:26634134

  2. Tuberculosis of the Spermatic Cord: Case Report☆

    PubMed Central

    Benjelloun, Amine; Elktaibi, Abderrahim; Elharrech, Younes; Touiti, Driss; Ghoundale, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The spermatic cord tuberculoma is uncommon, especially in its lower portion. Most cases were described in Japanese literature. We report a case of tuberculosis of the spermatic cord in a sexually active young man, revealed by a scrotal mass mimicking a tumor of the testicle and discuss the suitable diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with preservation of the testes and the other sexual organs. PMID:26958480

  3. Tuberculosis in Sudan: a study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain genotype and susceptibility to anti-tuberculosis drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sudan is a large country with a diverse population and history of civil conflict. Poverty levels are high with a gross national income per capita of less than two thousand dollars. The country has a high burden of tuberculosis (TB) with an estimated 50,000 incident cases during 2009, when the estimated prevalence was 209 cases per 100,000 of the population. Few studies have been undertaken on TB in Sudan and the prevalence of drug resistant disease is not known. Methods In this study Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 235 patients attending three treatment centers in Sudan were screened for susceptibility to isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin by the proportion method on Lowenstein Jensen media. 232 isolates were also genotyped by spoligotyping. Demographic details of patients were recorded using a structured questionnaire. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine the associations between drug resistance with risk ratios computed for a set of risk factors (gender, age, case status - new or relapse, geographic origin of the patient, spoligotype, number of people per room, marital status and type of housing). Results Multi drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), being resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid, was found in 5% (95% CI: 2,8) of new cases and 24% (95% CI: 14,34) of previously treated patients. Drug resistance was associated with previous treatment with risk ratios of 3.51 (95% CI: 2.69-4.60; p < 0.001) for resistance to any drug and 5.23 (95% CI: 2.30-11.90; p < 0.001) for MDR-TB. Resistance was also associated with the geographic region of origin of the patient, being most frequently observed in patients from the Northern region and least in the Eastern region with risk ratios of 7.43 (95%CI:3.42,16.18; p: < 0.001) and 14.09 (95%CI:1.80,110.53; p:0.026) for resistance to any drug and MDR-TB. The major genotype observed was of the Central Asia spoligotype family (CAS1_Delhi), representing 49% of the 232 isolates

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in 100 Patients With Tuberculosis Using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Pooideh, Mohammad; Jabbarzadeh, Ismail; Ranjbar, Reza; Saifi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a widespread infectious disease. Today, TB has created a public health crisis in the world. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is useful for surveying the dynamics of TB infection, identifying new outbreaks, and preventing the disease. Different molecular methods for clustering of M. tuberculosis isolates have been used. Objectives: During a one year study of genotyping, 100 M. tuberculosis isolates from patients referred to Pasteur Institute of Iran were collected and their genotyping was accomplished using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. Materials and Methods: Identification of all M. tuberculosis isolates was accomplished using standard biochemical and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using proportional method. After preparing PFGE plaques for each isolate of M. tuberculosis, XbaI restriction enzyme was applied for genome digestion. Finally, the digested DNA fragments were separated on 1% agarose gel and analyzed with GelCompar II software. Results: Genotyping of the studied isolates in comparison with the molecular weight marker revealed two common types; pulsotype A with 71 isolates and one multidrug resistant mycobacterium (MDR) case, and pulsotype B including 29 isolates and three MDR cases. No correlation between the antibiotypes and pulsotypes was observed. Conclusions: Molecular epidemiology studies of infectious diseases have been useful when bacterial isolates have been clustered in a period of time and in different geographical regions with variable antibiotic resistance patterns. In spite of high geographical differences and different antibiotic resistant patterns, low genetic diversity among the studied TB isolates may refer to the low rate of mutations in XbaI restriction sites in the mycobacterial genome. We also identified three MDR isolates in low-incidence pulsotype B, which could be disseminated and is highly

  5. Dispersal of Mycobacterium tuberculosis via the Canadian fur trade

    PubMed Central

    Pepperell, Caitlin S.; Granka, Julie M.; Alexander, David C.; Behr, Marcel A.; Chui, Linda; Gordon, Janet; Guthrie, Jennifer L.; Jamieson, Frances B.; Langlois-Klassen, Deanne; Long, Richard; Nguyen, Dao; Wobeser, Wendy; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of gene flow can have marked effects on the evolution of populations. To better understand the migration dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we studied genetic data from European M. tuberculosis lineages currently circulating in Aboriginal and French Canadian communities. A single M. tuberculosis lineage, characterized by the DS6Quebec genomic deletion, is at highest frequency among Aboriginal populations in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; this bacterial lineage is also dominant among tuberculosis (TB) cases in French Canadians resident in Quebec. Substantial contact between these human populations is limited to a specific historical era (1710–1870), during which individuals from these populations met to barter furs. Statistical analyses of extant M. tuberculosis minisatellite data are consistent with Quebec as a source population for M. tuberculosis gene flow into Aboriginal populations during the fur trade era. Historical and genetic analyses suggest that tiny M. tuberculosis populations persisted for ∼100 y among indigenous populations and subsequently expanded in the late 19th century after environmental changes favoring the pathogen. Our study suggests that spread of TB can occur by two asynchronous processes: (i) dispersal of M. tuberculosis by minimal numbers of human migrants, during which small pathogen populations are sustained by ongoing migration and slow disease dynamics, and (ii) expansion of the M. tuberculosis population facilitated by shifts in host ecology. If generalizable, these migration dynamics can help explain the low DNA sequence diversity observed among isolates of M. tuberculosis and the difficulties in global elimination of tuberculosis, as small, widely dispersed pathogen populations are difficult both to detect and to eradicate. PMID:21464295

  6. Dispersal of Mycobacterium tuberculosis via the Canadian fur trade.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, Caitlin S; Granka, Julie M; Alexander, David C; Behr, Marcel A; Chui, Linda; Gordon, Janet; Guthrie, Jennifer L; Jamieson, Frances B; Langlois-Klassen, Deanne; Long, Richard; Nguyen, Dao; Wobeser, Wendy; Feldman, Marcus W

    2011-04-19

    Patterns of gene flow can have marked effects on the evolution of populations. To better understand the migration dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we studied genetic data from European M. tuberculosis lineages currently circulating in Aboriginal and French Canadian communities. A single M. tuberculosis lineage, characterized by the DS6(Quebec) genomic deletion, is at highest frequency among Aboriginal populations in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; this bacterial lineage is also dominant among tuberculosis (TB) cases in French Canadians resident in Quebec. Substantial contact between these human populations is limited to a specific historical era (1710-1870), during which individuals from these populations met to barter furs. Statistical analyses of extant M. tuberculosis minisatellite data are consistent with Quebec as a source population for M. tuberculosis gene flow into Aboriginal populations during the fur trade era. Historical and genetic analyses suggest that tiny M. tuberculosis populations persisted for ∼100 y among indigenous populations and subsequently expanded in the late 19th century after environmental changes favoring the pathogen. Our study suggests that spread of TB can occur by two asynchronous processes: (i) dispersal of M. tuberculosis by minimal numbers of human migrants, during which small pathogen populations are sustained by ongoing migration and slow disease dynamics, and (ii) expansion of the M. tuberculosis population facilitated by shifts in host ecology. If generalizable, these migration dynamics can help explain the low DNA sequence diversity observed among isolates of M. tuberculosis and the difficulties in global elimination of tuberculosis, as small, widely dispersed pathogen populations are difficult both to detect and to eradicate. PMID:21464295

  7. Compartmentalization of Immune Responses in Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sayma; Gudetta, Berhanu; Fink, Joshua; Granath, Anna; Ashenafi, Senait; Aseffa, Abraham; Derbew, Milliard; Svensson, Mattias; Andersson, Jan; Brighenti, Susanna Grundström

    2009-01-01

    Immune responses were assessed at the single-cell level in lymph nodes from children with tuberculous lymphadenitis. Tuberculosis infection was associated with tissue remodeling of lymph nodes as well as altered cellular composition. Granulomas were significantly enriched with CD68+ macrophages expressing the M. tuberculosis complex-specific protein antigen MPT64 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. There was a significant increase in CD8+ cytolytic T cells surrounding the granuloma; however, CD8+ T cells expressed low levels of the cytolytic and antimicrobial effector molecules perforin and granulysin in the granulomatous lesions. Quantitative real-time mRNA analysis revealed that interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 were not up-regulated in infected lymph nodes, but there was a significant induction of both transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-13. In addition, granulomas contained an increased number of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells co-expressing the immunoregulatory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor molecules. Low numbers of CD8+ T cells in the lesions correlated with high levels of transforming growth factor-β and FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, suggesting active immunosuppression at the local infection site. Compartmentalization and skewing of the immune response toward a regulatory phenotype may result in an uncoordinated effector T-cell response that reduces granule-mediated killing of M. tuberculosis-infected cells and subsequent disease control. PMID:19435796

  8. Mortality of tuberculosis patients in Chennai, India.

    PubMed Central

    Kolappan, C.; Subramani, R.; Karunakaran, K.; Narayanan, P. R.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to measure the mortality rate and excess general mortality as well as identify groups at high risk for mortality among a cohort of tuberculosis patients treated in Chennai Corporation clinics in south India. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study we followed up 2674 patients (1800 males and 874 females) who were registered and treated under the DOTS strategy in Chennai Corporation clinics in 2000. The follow-up period from the date of start of treatment to either the date of interview, or death was 600 days. FINDINGS: The mortality rate among this cohort of tuberculosis patients was 60/1000 person-years. The excess general mortality expressed as standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 6.1 (95% confidence interval (CI)=5.4-6.9). Younger patients, men, patients with Category II disease, patients who defaulted on, or failed courses of treatment, and male smokers who were alcoholics, all had higher mortality ratios when compared to the rest of the cohort. CONCLUSION: The excess mortality in this cohort was six times more than that in the general population. Young age, male sex, smear-positivity, treatment default, treatment failure and the combination of smoking and alcoholism were identified as risk factors for tuberculosis mortality. We suggest that mortality rate and excess mortality be routinely used as a monitoring tool for evaluating the efficiency of the national control programme. PMID:16878229

  9. [Tuberculosis microepidemic in a commuter bus].

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Sasaki, Y; Yamagishi, F; Mizutani, F; Wada, A; Kuroda, F

    1999-06-01

    A tuberculosis microepidemic in a commuter bus was reported. Index patient was a 22-year-old woman who was an employee of an electronic company. An abnormal shadow was found on her chest roentgenogram during an annual medical check-up in June, 1996. As her sputum smear was Gaffky 6, she was admitted to our hospital for medication. Extraordinary examinations including PPD skin test and chest X-ray were carried out on 49 employees of the company in October, 1996. As the result of these examinations, the distribution of maximum diameters of erythema in PPD skin test showed bimodal distribution, and tuberculosis was discovered in two patients by Chest X-ray examination. Moreover, preventive administration of Isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) was indicated for 3 employees based on very strong skin reaction to PPD. These five employees were working separately from the index patient and had little contact with the patient in the work places, but using a same commuter bus. Therefore, we strongly suspect that they were infected from the index patient not in the work place but in the commuter bus. The air-conditioning of the bus used a closed recirculation system, hence insufficient ventilation in the bus contributed to the spread of tuberculosis infection. PMID:10423962

  10. Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism in Tuberculosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naserpour Farivar, Taghi; Sharifi Moud, Batool; Sargazi, Mansur; Moeenrezakhanlou, Alireza

    In this study, we aimed to determine the significance of association between Tuberculosis and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. The apolipoprotein E genotypes were assayed in 250 tuberculosis patients by polymerase chain reaction followed by enzymatic digestion with Hha I. The results were compared with the results of the same experiments on 250 sex and age matched control peoples. Present results showed that in studied populations, prevalence of E4 genotype was lower in controls than in patients (8 v. 13.2%; OR = 1.75, p<0.05) and prevalence of E3 genotype was high in controls than in patients (86 v.51%; OR = 0.17, p<0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between patients and controls with respect to ɛ2 allele frequencies, while ɛ2 allele frequency was found to be much less prevalent in controls (6%) than in patients (35.8%; OR = 8.72, p<0.05). Also, our study revealed that there is an association between apolipoprotein E genotypes and amplitude to tuberculosis in studied populations. However, large population-based studies are needed to understand the exact role played by the locus in causing the condition.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis: Current Insights

    PubMed Central

    Mathema, Barun; Kurepina, Natalia E.; Bifani, Pablo J.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis (TB) have focused largely on utilizing molecular techniques to address short- and long-term epidemiologic questions, such as in outbreak investigations and in assessing the global dissemination of strains, respectively. This is done primarily by examining the extent of genetic diversity of clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When molecular methods are used in conjunction with classical epidemiology, their utility for TB control has been realized. For instance, molecular epidemiologic studies have added much-needed accuracy and precision in describing transmission dynamics, and they have facilitated investigation of previously unresolved issues, such as estimates of recent-versus-reactive disease and the extent of exogenous reinfection. In addition, there is mounting evidence to suggest that specific strains of M. tuberculosis belonging to discrete phylogenetic clusters (lineages) may differ in virulence, pathogenesis, and epidemiologic characteristics, all of which may significantly impact TB control and vaccine development strategies. Here, we review the current methods, concepts, and applications of molecular approaches used to better understand the epidemiology of TB. PMID:17041139

  12. The 65-kilodalton antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shinnick, T M

    1987-01-01

    The immune response of the host to the antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays the key role in determining immunity from infection with as well as the pathogenicity of this organism. A 65-kilodalton (kDa) protein has been identified as one of the medically important antigens of M. tuberculosis. The gene encoding this antigen was isolated from a lambda gt11-M. tuberculosis recombinant DNA library using monoclonal antibodies directed against the 65-kDa antigen as the specific probes. The nucleotide sequence of this gene was determined, and a 540-amino-acid sequence was deduced. This sequence was shown to correspond to that of the 65-kDa antigen by constructing a plasmid in which this open reading frame was fused to the lacZ gene. The resulting fusion protein reacted specifically with the anti-65-kDa protein antibodies. A second long open reading frame was found downstream of the 65-kDa antigen gene which could encode a protein of 517 amino acids. This putative protein contained 29 tandemly arranged partial or complete matches to a pentapeptide sequence. Images PMID:3029018

  13. Tuberculosis of Calcaneum – A Rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kadu, Vikram V; Saindane, K A; Godghate, Ninad; Godghate, Neha N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis of calcaneum is a rare entity. Osteoarticular tuberculosis of foot is uncommon and that of calcaneum is very rare. In children, diagnosis is often delayed as clinical presentation is non-specific and awareness is low due to its rare presentation. Also pediatric tuberculosis has traditionally received a lower priority than adult TB in National TB programmes. Case presentation: 8 yr old girl presented to OPD with swelling and dull aching pain over left heel. Radiograph of calcaneum showed small lytic puctate lesions in the calcaneum. Further investigations showed presence of multiple tuberculous bacilli. Anti-Kochs treatment was started immediately and patient was treated conservatively. Four drugs (HRZE) were prescribed for a period of 12 months. Radiographs at 2 years follow-up showed a healed lesion. Conclusion: Rare and unusual locations of osteoarticular TB often pose a problem of differential diagnosis. Meticulous history and clinical examination helps in reaching the diagnosis. Start of AKT drugs as soon as reports show presence of tubercular bacilli plays a vital role in treatment as well as functional outcome of the patient. PMID:27299130

  14. Breath-based biomarkers for tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, Arend H. J.; van Berkel, Joep J. B. N.; Claassens, Mareli M.; Walters, Elisabeth; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Dallinga, Jan W.; van Schooten, Fredrik-Jan

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the potential of breath analysis by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to discriminate between samples collected prospectively from patients with suspected tuberculosis (TB). Samples were obtained in a TB endemic setting in South Africa where 28% of the culture proven TB patients had a Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) negative sputum smear. A training set of breath samples from 50 sputum culture proven TB patients and 50 culture negative non-TB patients was analyzed by GC-MS. A classification model with 7 compounds resulted in a training set with a sensitivity of 72%, specificity of 86% and accuracy of 79% compared with culture. The classification model was validated with an independent set of breath samples from 21 TB and 50 non-TB patients. A sensitivity of 62%, specificity of 84% and accuracy of 77% was found. We conclude that the 7 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that discriminate breath samples from TB and non-TB patients in our study population are probably host-response related VOCs and are not derived from the VOCs secreted by M. tuberculosis. It is concluded that at present GC-MS breath analysis is able to differentiate between TB and non-TB breath samples even among patients with a negative ZN sputum smear but a positive culture for M. tuberculosis. Further research is required to improve the sensitivity and specificity before this method can be used in routine laboratories.

  15. Tuberculosis: a new vision for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Small, Peter M

    2009-11-01

    Tuberculosis is a global problem that we can't afford to keep ignoring. In 2006, tuberculosis killed 1.7 million people--almost twice as many people as malaria--and it is the leading cause of death among people living with HIV/AIDS. This is all the more tragic because these deaths are preventable. For a long time the world thought that we had defeated tuberculosis, but just because tuberculosis doesn't make headlines doesn't mean it has gone away. The fact is that tuberculosis is getting worse, as complacency and lack of adequate tools and funding fuel the disease and the spread of drug resistance. Drug resistant tuberculosis is the wake-up call, it is an airborne epidemic of increasingly untreatable disease. Drug resistant tuberculosis develops when tuberculosis patients take low-quality drugs, do not finish their full course of treatment, or pass drug resistant tuberculosis from one person to another. In 2007, there were approximately 500,000 cases of drug resistant tuberculosis globally. MDR-TB is resistant to the two most commonly used first-line TB drugs, and requires long, complex and expensive treatment. XDR-TB is resistant to first- and second-line drugs, severely limiting treatment options. While progress is being made, much more is needed. Basic tuberculosis control is one of the most cost-effective interventions in global health. Appropriate treatment can save a life and stop the spread of disease for US$14. It is essential that countries implement the World Health Organization's (WHO) internationally recommended Stop TB strategy, which includes DOTS. But due to outdated tools and methods, DOTS alone is not enough. The remarkable fact is that global control of tuberculosis, a disease that kills someone every 20 seconds, depends upon a 125-year-old test, an 85-year-old vaccine and drugs that take six months to cure and haven't changed in four decades. To successfully treat tuberculosis and prevent resistance, we need to use current tools better and

  16. Microarray analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected monocytes reveals IL26 as a new candidate gene for tuberculosis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Laso, José M; Raposo-García, Sara; García-García, Silvia; Diez-Tascón, Cristina; Rivero-Lezcano, Octavio M

    2015-01-01

    Differences in the activity of monocytes/macrophages, important target cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, might influence tuberculosis progression. With the purpose of identifying candidate genes for tuberculosis susceptibility we infected monocytes from both healthy elderly individuals (a tuberculosis susceptibility group) and elderly tuberculosis patients with M. tuberculosis, and performed a microarray experiment. We detected 78 differentially expressed transcripts and confirmed these results by quantitative PCR of selected genes. We found that monocytes from tuberculosis patients showed similar expression patterns for these genes, regardless of whether they were obtained from younger or older patients. Only one of the detected genes corresponded to a cytokine: IL26, a member of the interleukin-10 (IL-10) cytokine family which we found to be down-regulated in infected monocytes from tuberculosis patients. Non-infected monocytes secreted IL-26 constitutively but they reacted strongly to M. tuberculosis infection by decreasing IL-26 production. Furthermore, IL-26 serum concentrations appeared to be lower in the tuberculosis patients. When whole blood was infected, IL-26 inhibited the observed pathogen-killing capability. Although lymphocytes expressed IL26R, the receptor mRNA was not detected in either monocytes or neutrophils, suggesting that the inhibition of anti-mycobacterial activity may be mediated by lymphocytes. Additionally, IL-2 concentrations in infected blood were lower in the presence of IL-26. The negative influence of IL-26 on the anti-mycobacterial activity and its constitutive presence in both serum and monocyte supernatants prompt us to propose IL26 as a candidate gene for tuberculosis susceptibility. PMID:25157980

  17. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  18. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a) Basic... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a...

  19. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  20. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  1. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a) Basic... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a...

  2. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  3. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  4. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  5. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a) Basic... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a...

  6. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a) Basic... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a...

  7. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  8. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a) Basic... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a...

  9. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  10. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  11. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolate Spoligotype SIT745/EAI1-MYS.

    PubMed

    Suraiya, S; Semail, N; Ismail, M F; Abdullah, J M

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to cause pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. This organism showed special phylogeographical specificity. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of M. tuberculosis clinical isolate spoligotype SIT745/EAI1-MYS, which was isolated from a Malaysian tuberculosis patient. PMID:27198011

  13. Evaluation of the results of Mycobacterium tuberculosis direct test (MTD) and Mycobacterial culture in urine samples

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Asli Gamze; Kurultay, Nukhet; Afsar, Ilhan

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a public health problem in Turkey. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays a key role in control of infection. In this article, the Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test (MTD) was evaluated for detection of M. tuberculosis in urine samples. The performance of the MTD was very good and appropriate for routine laboratory diagnosis. PMID:24031287

  14. Integration of Antiretroviral Therapy with Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grobler, Anneke; Padayatchi, Nesri; Baxter, Cheryl; Gray, Andrew L.; Gengiah, Tanuja; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Naidoo, Anushka; Jithoo, Niraksha; Nair, Gonasagrie; El-Sadr, Wafaa M.; Friedland, Gerald; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously reported that integrating antiretroviral therapy (ART) with tuberculosis treatment reduces mortality. However, optimal time to initiate ART during tuberculosis treatment remains contentious. Methods To address this, we conducted a 3-arm, open-label randomized controlled trial in South Africa in acid-fast bacilli smear positive patients (n=642) with HIV and CD4+ counts <500 cells/mm3. Findings on the early therapy group (ART initiated within 4 weeks of tuberculosis treatment initiation, n=214) and late therapy group (ART initiated within the first 4 weeks of the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment, n=215) are presented here. Results Median CD4+ count and viral load at baseline was 150 cells/mm3 and 161000 copies/ml, being similar in both groups. Incidence rate of AIDS or death was 6.9 (18/259.4) and 7.8 (19/244.2) per 100 person-years in the early and late therapy groups respectively (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR)=0.89; 95%Confidence Interval (95%CI): 0.44,1.79; P=0.73). However, in patients with CD4+ counts <50 cells/mm3, the incidence rates of AIDS or death were 8.5 (early) and 26.3 (late) per 100 person-years (IRR=0.32; 95%CI: 0.07,1.13; P=0.06). Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) incidence rates were 20.2 (early) and 7.7 (late) per 100 person-years (IRR=2.62; 95%CI: 1.48,4.82; P<0.001). Adverse events requiring antiretroviral drug switches occurred in 10 (early) and 1 (late) patients (P=0.006). Conclusions The benefits of AIDS-free survival balanced against the risks of IRIS and ART-related adverse events, support early ART initiation in patients with CD4+ counts <50 cells/mm3 and deferred ART initiation to the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment when CD4+ counts are higher. PMID:22010915

  15. Human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Wallis, R S; Boom, W H; Daniel, T M; Chervenak, K; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the immunodominant or protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans. Cell-mediated immunity is necessary for protection, and healthy tuberculin-positive individuals are relatively resistant to exogenous reinfection. We compared the targets of the cell-mediated immune response in healthy tuberculin-positive individuals to those of tuberculosis patients and tuberculin-negative persons. By using T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) of nitrocellulose-bound M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, peaks of T-cell blastogenic activity were identified in the healthy tuberculin reactors at 30, 37, 44, 57, 64, 71 and 88 kDa. Three of these fractions (30, 64, and 71 kDa) coincided with previously characterized proteins: antigen 6/alpha antigen, HSP60, and HSP70, respectively. The blastogenic responses to purified M. tuberculosis antigen 6/alpha antigen and BCG HSP60 were assessed. When cultured with purified antigen 6/alpha antigen, lymphocytes of healthy tuberculin reactors demonstrated greater [3H]thymidine incorporation than either healthy tuberculin-negative controls or tuberculous patients (8,113 +/- 1,939 delta cpm versus 645 +/- 425 delta cpm and 1,019 +/- 710 delta cpm, respectively; P less than 0.01). Healthy reactors also responded to HSP60, although to a lesser degree than antigen 6/alpha antigen (4,276 +/- 1,095 delta cpm; P less than 0.05). Partially purified HSP70 bound to nitrocellulose paper elicited a significant lymphocyte blastogenic response in two of six of the tuberculous patients but in none of the eight healthy tuberculin reactors. Lymphocytes of none of five tuberculin-negative controls responded to recombinant antigens at 14 or 19 kDa or to HSP70. Antibody reactivity generally was inversely correlated with blastogenic response: tuberculous sera had high titer antibody to M. tuberculosis culture filtrate in a range from 35 to 180 kDa. This is the first systematic evaluation of the human response to a panel of native

  16. Paleopathology of human tuberculosis and the potential role of climate.

    PubMed

    Nerlich, Andreas G; Lösch, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Both origin and evolution of tuberculosis and its pathogens (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex) are not fully understood. The paleopathological investigation of human remains offers a unique insight into the molecular evolution and spread including correlative data of the environment. The molecular analysis of material from Egypt (3000-500 BC), Sudan (200-600 AD), Hungary (600-1700 AD), Latvia (1200-1600 AD), and South Germany (1400-1800 AD) urprisingly revealed constantly high frequencies of tuberculosis in all different time periods excluding significant environmental influence on tuberculosis spread. The typing of various mycobacteria strains provides evidence for ancestral M. tuberculosis strains in Pre- to early Egyptian dynastic material (3500-2650 BC), while typical M. africanum signatures were detected in a Middle Kingdom tomb (2050-1650 BC). Samples from the New Kingdom to Late Period (1500-500 BC) indicated modern M. tuberculosis strains. No evidence was seen for M. bovis in Egyptian material while M. bovis signatures were first identified in Siberian biomaterial dating 2000 years before present. These results contraindicates the theory that M. tuberculosis evolved from M. bovis during early domestication in the region of the "Fertile Crescent," but supports the scenario that M. tuberculosis probably derived from an ancestral progenitor strain. The environmental influence of this evolutionary scenario deserves continuing intense evaluation. PMID:19360109

  17. Tuberculosis Outbreak in Marijuana Users, Seattle, Washington, 2004

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Eyal; Haddad, Maryam B.; Lake, Linda K.; Harrington, Theresa A.; Ijaz, Kashef; Narita, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    Matching Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were noted among 11 young tuberculosis patients socially linked through illicit drug–related activities. A large proportion of their friends, 14 (64%) of 22, had positive tuberculin skin-test results. The behavior of "hotboxing" (smoking marijuana inside a closed car with friends to repeatedly inhale exhaled smoke) fueled transmission. PMID:16836841

  18. 9 CFR 77.34 - Official tuberculosis tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official tuberculosis tests. 77.34 Section 77.34 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS...

  19. 9 CFR 77.34 - Official tuberculosis tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official tuberculosis tests. 77.34 Section 77.34 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS...

  20. Understanding the Mechanisms of Immunopathogenesis of Human and Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive investigations have revealed that zoonotic pathogens in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) evolved from a common ancestor. Although all the members can cause disease in one or more species of mammals, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and M. bovis (Mbv) are the major pathogens ...

  1. [The role of pharmacogenomics in the tuberculosis treatment regime].

    PubMed

    Guio, Heinner; Levano, Kelly S; Sánchez, Cesar; Tarazona, David

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a health problem worldwide with one-third of the population infected with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli. The first-line of treatment for tuberculosis includes the drugs Isoniazid (INH) and Rifampicin (RIF) metabolized in the liver. Drug metabolism is directly related to the genetic variation of NAT2 and CYP2E1 (associated with INH metabolism) and AADAC (associated with RIF metabolism), and the effects produced in an individual may be a fast, intermediate or slow metobolizer. Polymorphisms in genes of people in standard tuberculosis treatment can cause effects on drug metabolism with consequences of hepatotoxicity and even drug resistance. Countries have began clinical trials focused on personalization of tuberculosis treatment to reduce the consequences for patients in treatment. In countries like Peru, where high rates of tuberculosis are recorded and therefore more people in treatment, the pharmacogenomic of individuals becomes a crucial tool for an optimum tuberculosis treatment. This review highlights the importance of having pharmacogenomic studies and having the identification of polymorphisms associated to the metabolism of the anti-tuberculosis drugs in our Peruvian population. PMID:26732931

  2. Characterization of Mycobacterium orygis as M. tuberculosis complex subspecies.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Rahim, Zeaur; Mulder, Arnout; Boeree, Martin J; Simeone, Roxane; Brosch, Roland; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-04-01

    The oryx bacilli are Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms for which phylogenetic position and host range are unsettled. We characterized 22 isolates by molecular methods and propose elevation to subspecies status as M. orygis. M. orygis is a causative agent of tuberculosis in animals and humans from Africa and South Asia. PMID:22469053

  3. Prisons as reservoir for community transmission of tuberculosis, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Flávia P C; Praça, Renata M; Tatara, Mariana B; Simonsen, Vera; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine; Croda, Mariana G; Suffys, Philip N; Ko, Albert I; Andrews, Jason R; Croda, Julio

    2015-03-01

    We conducted a population-based study of tuberculosis (TB) cases in Dourados, Brazil, to assess the relationship between incarceration and TB in the general population. Incarceration was associated with TB in an urban population; 54% of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were related to strains from persons in prisons. TB control in prisons is critical for reducing disease prevalence. PMID:25642998

  4. Prisons as Reservoir for Community Transmission of Tuberculosis, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Flávia P.C.; Praça, Renata M.; Tatara, Mariana B.; Simonsen, Vera; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine; Croda, Mariana G.; Suffys, Philip N.; Ko, Albert I.; Andrews, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a population-based study of tuberculosis (TB) cases in Dourados, Brazil, to assess the relationship between incarceration and TB in the general population. Incarceration was associated with TB in an urban population; 54% of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were related to strains from persons in prisons. TB control in prisons is critical for reducing disease prevalence. PMID:25642998

  5. Models of latent tuberculosis: their salient features, limitations, and development.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kamlesh; Jhamb, Sarbjit Singh; Singh, Prati Pal

    2011-07-01

    Latent tuberculosis is a subclinical condition caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which affects about one-third of the population across the world. To abridge the chemotherapy of tuberculosis, it is necessary to have active drugs against latent form of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, it is imperative to devise in vitro and models of latent tuberculosis to explore potential drugs. In vitro models such as hypoxia, nutrient starvation, and multiple stresses are based on adverse conditions encountered by bacilli in granuloma. Bacilli experience oxygen depletion condition in hypoxia model, whereas the nutrient starvation model is based on deprivation of total nutrients from a culture medium. In the multiple stress model dormancy is induced by more than one type of stress. In silico mathematical models have also been developed to predict the interactions of bacilli with the host immune system and to propose structures for potential anti tuberculosis compounds. Besides these in vitro and in silico models, there are a number of in vivo animal models like mouse, guinea pig, rabbit, etc. Although they simulate human latent tuberculosis up to a certain extent but do not truly replicate human infection. All these models have their inherent merits and demerits. However, there is no perfect model for latent tuberculosis. Therefore, it is imperative to upgrade and refine existing models or develop a new model. However, battery of models will always be a better alternative to any single model as they will complement each other by overcoming their limitations. PMID:22219558

  6. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:25676469

  7. 9 CFR 77.34 - Official tuberculosis tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official tuberculosis tests. 77.34 Section 77.34 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS...

  8. Wheeling and Dealing With Antigen Presentation in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    In tuberculosis, antigens are transferred from infected to uninfected dendritic cells. Does this favor T lymphocyte response and anti-mycobacterial host defense? In a recent report published in Cell Host & Microbe, Ernst and colleagues show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis seems to have hijacked this mechanism for its own benefit. PMID:26794467

  9. Stopping tuberculosis: a biosocial model for sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Ortblad, Katrina F; Salomon, Joshua A; Bärnighausen, Till; Atun, Rifat

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis transmission and progression are largely driven by social factors such as poor living conditions and poor nutrition. Increased standards of living and social approaches helped to decrease the burden of tuberculosis before the introduction of chemotherapy in the 1940s. Since then, management of tuberculosis has been largely biomedical. More funding for tuberculosis since 2000, coinciding with the Millennium Development Goals, has yielded progress in tuberculosis mortality but smaller reductions in incidence, which continues to pose a risk to sustainable development, especially in poor and susceptible populations. These at-risk populations need accelerated progress to end tuberculosis as resolved by the World Health Assembly in 2015. Effectively addressing the worldwide tuberculosis burden will need not only enhancement of biomedical approaches but also rebuilding of the social approaches of the past. To combine a biosocial approach, underpinned by social, economic, and environmental actions, with new treatments, new diagnostics, and universal health coverage, will need multisectoral coordination and action involving the health and other governmental sectors, as well as participation of the civil society, and especially the poor and susceptible populations. A biosocial approach to stopping tuberculosis will not only target morbidity and mortality from disease but would also contribute substantially to poverty alleviation and sustainable development that promises to meet the needs of the present, especially the poor, and provide them and subsequent generations an opportunity for a better future. PMID:26515678

  10. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in Seibert fractions by immunoblotting.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, S R; Hansen, D; Schecter, G; Slutkin, G; Hopewell, P; Affronti, L; Echenberg, D F

    1986-01-01

    Seibert fractions prepared from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrates were evaluated by immunoblotting with a serum pool from patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Antibody activity was observed primarily with antigens in the polysaccharide II and A protein fractions; these fractions were further evaluated by immunoblotting with sera from individual patients with tuberculosis, from individuals without tuberculosis and positive for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test, and from individuals negative for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test. The antigens identified in the protein A fraction, a 32,000-molecular-weight antigen and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen, reacted with antibody found in sera from all patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from over 25% of the control individuals. A 10,000-molecular-weight antigen, a 30,000- to 44,000-molecular-weight antigen, and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen were observed in the polysaccharide II fraction; these antigens reacted with serum antibody from 70% or more of the patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from 20 to 70% of the control individuals. One of the antigens, with a molecular weight ranging from 17,000 to 28,000 in the polysaccharide II fraction, reacted with antibody in 64% of the sera from patients with tuberculosis but with only 1 of 15 control normal sera. This antigen may elicit an antibody response specifically associated with tuberculosis. Images PMID:3088029

  11. Substantial Overlap Between Incarceration and Tuberculosis in Atlanta, Georgia, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Maryam B.; Foote, Mary K.; Ray, Susan M.; Maggio, David M.; Sales, Rose-Marie F.; Kim, Min Jung; Kempker, Russell R.; Spaulding, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Standard tuberculosis case reporting captures incarceration at diagnosis only. This retrospective analysis of 106 US-born adults with prevalent tuberculosis in 2011 found that 46.2% had documented histories of being in jail or prison, including 16.0% during the year before diagnosis. PMID:25734108

  12. Novel cause of tuberculosis in meerkats, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sven D C; Drewe, Julian A; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Warren, Robin M; van Helden, Paul D

    2013-12-01

    The organism that causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) has been poorly characterized. Our genetic analysis showed it to be a novel member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and closely related to the dassie bacillus. We have named this epidemiologically and genetically unique strain M. suricattae. PMID:24274183

  13. Deprivation, immigration and tuberculosis incidence in Naples, 1996-2000.

    PubMed

    Ponticiello, Antonio; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Simonetti, Andrea; Ortolani, Rosanna; Malerba, Mario; Sanduzzi, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    Most of the tuberculosis cases in Campania occur in Naples, the biggest city in the South of Italy with the highest unemployment and immigration rates. However, the occurrence of tuberculosis differs between the different neighbourhoods and it is not known whether these differences are associated with poverty or with immigration. We describe tuberculosis incidence and its association with socio-economic status and immigration in the city of Naples during the period 1996-2000. The basic design was an ecological study, correlating the incidence of tuberculosis which was calculated on the basis of notified tuberculosis cases to census data on immigration and socio-economic deprivation per neighbourhood. Immigrants had a high risk for tuberculosis (RR=34 for Africans) but the incidence of TB varied largely by districts and seemed independent of immigration. All socioeconomic factors increased the incidence of TB significantly. In a multivariate Poisson regression analysis only the rate of unemployment (p=0.02) and the population density (p=0.002) remained independently associated with tuberculosis incidence. In this study we showed that deprivation explained differences in tuberculosis incidence in Naples to a greater extent than immigration. PMID:16151887

  14. Pseudotumor presentation of renal tuberculosis mimicking renal cell carcinoma: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Anubhav; Ranjan, Raju; Drall, Nityasha; Mishra, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis can involve any part of the body. Urogenital tuberculosis is a fairly common extra-pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis and renal tuberculosis is the most common form of urogenital tuberculosis. Renal tuberculosis seldom presents as a mass, usually due to hydronephrosis of the involved kidney. However in extremely rare cases it may present as an inflammatory pseudotumor which may mimic renal cell carcinoma. We present a case of a 65- year- old male who was provisionally diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma based on clinical and radiological findings and managed accordingly but was finally diagnosed as renal tuberculosis based on histopathological examination of surgical specimen.

  15. Drug testing in mouse models of tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Nikonenko, Boris V; Apt, Alexander S

    2013-05-01

    Mice as a species are susceptible to tuberculosis infection while mouse inbred strains present wide spectrum of susceptibility/resistance to this infection. However, non-tuberculosis Mycobacterial infections usually cannot be modeled in mice of common inbred strains. Introduction of specific properties, such as gene mutations, recombinants, targeted gene knockouts significantly extended the use of mice to mimic human Mycobacterial infections, including non-tuberculosis ones. This review describes the available mouse models of tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis infections and drug therapy in these models. Mouse models of non-tuberculosis infections are significantly less developed than tuberculosis models, hampering the development of therapies. PMID:23491715

  16. Insights into redox sensing metalloproteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chim, Nicholas; Johnson, Parker M; Goulding, Celia W

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the pathogen that causes tuberculosis, has evolved sophisticated mechanisms for evading assault by the human host. This review focuses on M. tuberculosis regulatory metalloproteins that are sensitive to exogenous stresses attributed to changes in the levels of gaseous molecules (i.e., molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide) to elicit an intracellular response. In particular, we highlight recent developments on the subfamily of Whi proteins, redox sensing WhiB-like proteins that contain iron-sulfur clusters, sigma factors and their cognate anti-sigma factors of which some are zinc-regulated, and the dormancy survival regulon DosS/DosT-DosR heme sensory system. Mounting experimental evidence suggests that these systems contribute to a highly complex and interrelated regulatory network that controls M. tuberculosis biology. This review concludes with a discussion of strategies that M. tuberculosis has developed to maintain redox homeostasis, including mechanisms to regulate endogenous nitric oxide and carbon monoxide levels. PMID:24314844

  17. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): a rare association of lymph node tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Surana, Anuj P; Shelgikar, Kishor M; Melinkeri, Sameer; Phadke, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Although various haematologic abnormalities are known to occur with tuberculosis, association of immune thrombocytopenia with tuberculosis is uncommon. We report a case of retroperitoneal lymph node tuberculosis who presented with ITP. A 76 year old female was admitted to our hospital with oral mucosal bleed and petechial lesions over extremities and abdomen. A diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) was established. Intravenous Anti-D immunoglobulin and Dexamethasone therapy was started, but failed to elicit any sustained platelet response. CT abdomen revealed multiple retroperitoneal lymph nodes with central necrosis. Histopathology (HPE) of these revealed caseating lymphadenitis suggestive of tuberculosis. After 2 months of anti-tuberculous therapy, the platelet counts returned to normal and patient was off all therapy for ITP thereby suggesting likely association between tuberculosis and immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:25327103

  18. Transforming the Fight Against Tuberculosis: Targeting Catalysts of Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dowdy, David W.; Azman, Andrew S.; Kendall, Emily A.; Mathema, Barun

    2014-01-01

    The global tuberculosis control community has committed itself to ambitious 10-year targets. To meet these targets, biomedical advances alone will be insufficient; a more targeted public health tuberculosis strategy is also needed. We highlight the role of “tuberculosis transmission catalysts,” defined as variabilities in human behavior, bacillary properties, and host physiology that fuel the propagation of active tuberculosis at the local level. These catalysts can be categorized as factors that increase contact rates, infectiousness, or host susceptibility. Different catalysts predominate in different epidemiological and sociopolitical settings, and public health approaches are likely to succeed only if they are tailored to target the major catalysts driving transmission in the corresponding community. We argue that global tuberculosis policy should move from a country-level focus to a strategy that prioritizes collection of data on key transmission catalysts at the local level followed by deployment of “catalyst-targeted” interventions, supported by strengthened health systems. PMID:24982034

  19. Tuberculosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Spain's situation.

    PubMed

    Arenas Miras, María del Mar; Hidalgo Tenorio, Carmen; Jimenez Alonso, Juan

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been an increase in the incidence of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) due mainly to earlier diagnosis, and increased survival. Tuberculosis in our country is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases, and one of the underlying causes would be HIV infection and increased immigration from areas with high tuberculosis prevalence; this phenomenon is truly important in patients with autoimmune diseases, as clinical presentation, severity and prognosis of tuberculosis are often different to that of immunocompetent patients. Studies of tuberculosis in patients with SLE are scarce and inconclusive, with many doubts existing about the performance or non-tuberculous prophylaxis in this population and the absence of a protocol due to lack of conclusive studies. New techniques for diagnosis of tuberculosis (IGRAs) may be useful in this population due to higher sensitivity than Mantoux, helping avoid false negatives. PMID:23102827

  20. Genome Sequencing and Annotation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PR08 strain.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Mohammad Maaruf; Halim, Mohd Zakihalani A; Ismail, Mohamad Izwan; Shien, Lee Lian; Kek, Teh Lay; Fong, Ngeow Yun; Nor, Norazmi Mohd; Zainuddin, Zainul Fadziruddin; Hock, Tang Thean; Najimudin, Mohd Nazalan Mohd; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an acid fast bacterial species in the family Mycobacteriaceae and is the causative agent of most cases of tuberculosis. Here, we report the genomic features of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a patient diagnosed with both pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB). The isolated strain was identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis PR08 (MTB PR08). Genomic DNA of the MTB PR08 strain was extracted and subjected to whole genome sequencing using MiSeq (Illumina, CA,USA). The draft genome size of MTB PR08 strain is 4,292,364 bp with a G + C content of 65.2%. This strain was annotated to have 4723 genes and 48 RNAs. This whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010895. PMID:26981383

  1. Biosensing Technologies for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Detection: Status and New Developments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lixia; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Dinggeng; Wang, Kemin; Qin, Dilan

    2011-01-01

    Biosensing technologies promise to improve Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) detection and management in clinical diagnosis, food analysis, bioprocess, and environmental monitoring. A variety of portable, rapid, and sensitive biosensors with immediate “on-the-spot” interpretation have been developed for M. tuberculosis detection based on different biological elements recognition systems and basic signal transducer principles. Here, we present a synopsis of current developments of biosensing technologies for M. tuberculosis detection, which are classified on the basis of basic signal transducer principles, including piezoelectric quartz crystal biosensors, electrochemical biosensors, and magnetoelastic biosensors. Special attention is paid to the methods for improving the framework and analytical parameters of the biosensors, including sensitivity and analysis time as well as automation of analysis procedures. Challenges and perspectives of biosensing technologies development for M. tuberculosis detection are also discussed in the final part of this paper. PMID:21437177

  2. Transmission of Mycobacterium orygis (M. tuberculosis complex species) from a tuberculosis patient to a dairy cow in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Kara L; Bell, Anita; Kawakami, R Pamela; Coley, Kathryn; Yates, Gary; Collins, Desmond M

    2012-09-01

    Mycobacterium orygis, previously called the oryx bacillus, is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and has been reported only recently as a cause of human tuberculosis in patients of South Asian origin. We present the first case documenting the transmission of this organism from a human to a cow. PMID:22785186

  3. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical specimens by polymerase chain reaction and Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, C; Hirano, K; Wada, M; Kazumi, Y; Takahashi, M; Fukasawa, Y; Yoshimura, T; Miyagi, C; Goto, S

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using oligonucleotides based on the repetitive sequence (IS986) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a primer and the Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test (MTD), which combines an M. tuberculosis rRNA amplification method with the hybridization protection assay format, were evaluated for detection of M. tuberculosis in clinical samples. The detection limits of these two assay systems based on nucleic acid amplification for cultured M. tuberculosis were less than 10 cells per reaction. A total of 135 sputum specimens were examined by the two assay systems. The PCR and the MTD systems for detection of M. tuberculosis gave overall positivity rates of 84.2% (32 of 38) and 91.9% (34 of 37), respectively, as compared with 71.9% (23 of 32) by smear and 96.9% (31 of 32) by culture in the liquid medium MB-Check. Procedures for sample preparation used in the two methods were different. Although the sensitivities of the PCR and MTD appeared to be similar to that of culture with the MB-Check system, the two methods based on nucleic acid amplification should be very useful for rapid detection of M. tuberculosis infections without the long time required for culture of M. tuberculosis. Images PMID:8308121

  4. Bovine tuberculosis in Europe from the perspective of an officially tuberculosis free country: Trade, surveillance, and diagnostics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switzerland is officially free of bovine tuberculosis (OTF) since 1960. A mandatory eradication program had been launched in 1950. Since 1980 the control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) has been reduced to passive abattoir surveillance. Single cases of bTB, partly due to reactivation of human Mycobacte...

  5. Tuberculosis and subsequent risk of lung cancer in Xuanwei, China

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Eric A.; Shen, Min; Chapman, Robert S.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Yu, Ying-Ying; He, Xingzhou; Lan, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco and indoor air pollution from smoky coal are major causes of lung cancer in rural Xuanwei County, China. Tuberculosis has been suggested to increase lung cancer risk, but data from prior studies are limited. We conducted an analysis of data from a retrospective cohort study of 42,422 farmers in Xuanwei. In 1992, interviewers administered a standardized questionnaire that included lifetime medical history, including tuberculosis. Subjects were followed from 1976, with deaths from lung cancer ascertained through 1996. We used proportional hazards regression to assess the association between tuberculosis and subsequent lung cancer mortality. Tuberculosis was reported by 246 subjects (0.6%), and 2459 (5.8%) died from lung cancer during follow-up. Lung cancer mortality was substantially higher in subjects with tuberculosis than in those without (25 vs. 3.1 per 1000 person-years). The association was especially pronounced in the first five years after tuberculosis diagnosis (hazard ratios [HRs] ranging 6.7–13) but remained strong 5–9.9 years (HR 3.4, 95%CI 1.3–9.1) and 10+ years (HR 3.0, 95%CI 1.3–7.3) after tuberculosis. These associations were similar among men and women, and among smoky coal users (70.5% of subjects). Adjustment for demographic characteristics, lung disease, and tobacco use did not affect results. In Xuanwei, China, tuberculosis is an important risk factor for lung cancer. The increased lung cancer risk, persisting years after a tuberculosis diagnosis, could reflect the effects of chronic pulmonary inflammation and scarring arising from tuberculosis. PMID:19058197

  6. Low level nitrogen laser therapy in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, C.C.; Sharma, N.; Hemvani, N.; Chitnis, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: WHO estimated 9 million new Tuberculosis cases and 1.5 million TB deaths in 2013. Globally 480000 Multi drug resistant tuberculosis cases were noted and majority of them were in India, China and Russian federation. Multi drug resistant tuberculosis cases are difficult to treat and have high mortality. Presently, it was aimed to assess prevalence of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis isolates in Central India, to check the in-vitro effect of N2 Laser on M. tuberculosis and to study the therapeutic effect of intra cavitary N2 laser on pulmonary Tuberculosis cases not responding to chemotherapy. Materials and methods: Drug sensitivity testing was carried out on 567 isolates of M. tuberculosis by proportion method. To check the effect of N2 laser on M. tuberculosis, suspension spread on LJ plate and part of the plate exposed to N2 laser for 10 min and plate incubated for 4 weeks to see the effect. For exposure to lung cavity a needle was introduced into the lung through which fiber was passed to the cavity for N2 laser irradiation for 10 min. Results: Only 12.8% isolates of M. tuberculosis were sensitive to all anti-Tubercular drugs and 21.5% were found to be resistant to Rifampicin qualifying definition of Multi drug resistant tuberculosis. Bactericidal effect for N2 laser was seen in-vitro on exposure to N2 laser. Clinical improvement occurred in 90% of the 96 patients; 60% of the patients showed improvement on their X-rays and 75% turned out to be Acid fast bacilli smear negative in 4 to 15 days. Conclusions: Intra-cavitory N2 laser therapy was found to have remarkable success as an adjunct to chemotherapy. PMID:26557736

  7. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed among the three groups. In addition, we analyzed the predictive factors for a prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and the correlation between the level of procalcitonin and the GCS score at discharge. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a low level of procalcitonin (≤1.27 ng/mL) independently distinguished tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis. The sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis were 96.2% and 62.9%, respectively. However, the level of procalcitonin in patients with tuberculosis meningitis did not differ significantly from that in patients with viral meningitis. In patients with tuberculosis meningitis, a high level of procalcitonin (>0.4 ng/mL) was a predictor of a poor prognosis, and the level of procalcitonin was negatively correlated with the GCS score at discharge (r=-0.437, p=0.026). Conclusions We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis and is also valuable for predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:27165424

  8. Tuberculosis and subsequent risk of lung cancer in Xuanwei, China

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, E.A.; Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Pfeiffer, R.M.; Yu, Y.Y.; He, X.Z.; Lan, Q.

    2009-03-15

    Tobacco and indoor air pollution from smoky coal are major causes of lung cancer in rural Xuanwei County, China. Tuberculosis has been suggested to increase lung cancer risk, but data from prior studies are limited. We conducted an analysis of data from a retrospective cohort study of 42,422 farmers in Xuanwei. In 1992, interviewers administered a standardized questionnaire that included lifetime medical history, including tuberculosis. Subjects were followed from 1976, with deaths from lung cancer ascertained through 1996. We used proportional hazards regression to assess the association between tuberculosis and subsequent lung cancer mortality. Tuberculosis was reported by 246 subjects (0.6%), and 2,459 (5.8%) died from lung cancer during follow-up. Lung cancer mortality was substantially higher in subjects with tuberculosis than in those without (25 vs. 3.1 per 1,000 person-years). The association was especially pronounced in the first 5 years after tuberculosis diagnosis (hazard ratios (HRs) ranging 6.7-13) but remained strong 5-9.9 years (HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.3-9.1) and 10+ years (HR 3.0, 95% CI 1.3-7.3) after tuberculosis. These associations were similar among men and women and among smoky coal users (70.5% of subjects). Adjustment for demographic characteristics, lung disease and tobacco use did not affect results. In Xuanwei, China, tuberculosis is an important risk factor for lung cancer. The increased lung cancer risk, persisting years after a tuberculosis diagnosis, could reflect the effects of chronic pulmonary inflammation and scarring arising from tuberculosis.

  9. A tuberculosis nationwide prevalence survey in Gambia, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Lindsay; Bashorun, Adedapo; Linda, Christopher; Omoleke, Semeeh; Jeffries, David; Maane, Rahmatulai; Alorse, Beatrice Dei; Alorse, William Dei; Okoi, Catherine Bi; Mlaga, Kodjovi D; Kinteh, Ma Ansu; Donkor, Simon; de Jong, Bouke C; Antonio, Martin; d’Alessandro, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the population prevalence of active pulmonary tuberculosis in Gambia. Methods Between December 2011 and January 2013, people aged ≥ 15 years participating in a nationwide, multistage cluster survey were screened for active pulmonary tuberculosis with chest radiography and for tuberculosis symptoms. For diagnostic confirmation, sputum samples were collected from those whose screening were positive and subjected to fluorescence microscopy and liquid tuberculosis cultures. Multiple imputation and inverse probability weighting were used to estimate tuberculosis prevalence. Findings Of 100 678 people enumerated, 55 832 were eligible to participate and 43 100 (77.2%) of those participated. A majority of participants (42 942; 99.6%) were successfully screened for symptoms and by chest X-ray. Only 5948 (13.8%) were eligible for sputum examination, yielding 43 bacteriologically confirmed, 28 definite smear-positive and six probable smear-positive tuberculosis cases. Chest X-ray identified more tuberculosis cases (58/69) than did symptoms alone (43/71). The estimated prevalence of smear-positive and bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis were 90 (95% confidence interval, CI: 53–127) and 212 (95% CI: 152–272) per 100 000 population, respectively. Tuberculosis prevalence was higher in males (333; 95% CI: 233–433) and in the 35–54 year age group (355; 95% CI: 219–490). Conclusion The burden of tuberculosis remains high in Gambia but lower than earlier estimates of 490 per 100 000 population in 2010. Less than half of all cases would have been identified based on smear microscopy results alone. Successful control efforts will require interventions targeting men, increased access to radiography and more accurate, rapid diagnostic tests. PMID:27274595

  10. Transregional movement of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in north China: an underlying threat to tuberculosis control

    PubMed Central

    An, Jun; Gao, Mengqiu; Chu, Naihui; Huang, Hairong; Pang, Yu; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Due to unbalanced distribution of health care resource in China, tuberculosis patients, especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), prefer to suffer transregional movement for seeking better health care service in the first-tier cities. Here, we performed a study on the current status of transregional movement of tuberculosis in northern China by reviewing the medical record of TB patients hospitalized in Beijing Chest Hospital from 2011 to 2015. From 2011 to 2015, the proportion of non-Beijing in-patients had increased from 55.0% (996/1810) to 67.2% (1860/2769). In addition, we found that the rate of re-treated among non-Beijing group was significantly higher than that among Beijing-group. Compared with the proportion of pulmonary TB patients from non-Beijing, there were more extra-pulmonary TB patients from non-Beijing. In addition, 10.5% (164/1568) of Beijing in-patients and 26.5% (491/1858) of non-Beijing in-patients had MDR tuberculosis, and statistical analysis revealed that there was significantly higher proportion of MDR cases among non-Beijing group than Beijing group. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that an increasing proportion of TB patients from northern China seek health care in Beijing. In view of higher prevalence of MDR-TB cases among these patients, the transregional movement of MDR-TB will lead to ongoing MDR TB transmission in the community. PMID:27411739

  11. Transcriptional Adaptation of Drug-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis During Treatment of Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Nicholas D.; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Worodria, William; Andama, Alfred; Musisi, Emmanuel; Ayakaka, Irene; Van, Tran T.; Voskuil, Martin I.; de Jong, Bouke C.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Kechris, Katerina; Palmer, Claire; Nahid, Payam; Daley, Charles L.; Geraci, Mark; Huang, Laurence; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Strong, Michael; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Davis, John Lucian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment initiation rapidly kills most drug-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but a bacterial subpopulation tolerates prolonged drug exposure. We evaluated drug-tolerant bacilli in human sputum by comparing messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of drug-tolerant bacilli that survive the early bactericidal phase with treatment-naive bacilli. Methods. M. tuberculosis gene expression was quantified via reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in serial sputa from 17 Ugandans treated for drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis. Results. Within 4 days, bacterial mRNA abundance declined >98%, indicating rapid killing. Thereafter, the rate of decline slowed >94%, indicating drug tolerance. After 14 days, 16S ribosomal RNA transcripts/genome declined 96%, indicating slow growth. Drug-tolerant bacilli displayed marked downregulation of genes associated with growth, metabolism, and lipid synthesis and upregulation in stress responses and key regulatory categories—including stress-associated sigma factors, transcription factors, and toxin-antitoxin genes. Drug efflux pumps were upregulated. The isoniazid stress signature was induced by initial drug exposure, then disappeared after 4 days. Conclusions. Transcriptional patterns suggest that drug-tolerant bacilli in sputum are in a slow-growing, metabolically and synthetically downregulated state. Absence of the isoniazid stress signature in drug-tolerant bacilli indicates that physiological state influences drug responsiveness in vivo. These results identify novel drug targets that should aid in development of novel shorter tuberculosis treatment regimens. PMID:25762787

  12. Transregional movement of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in north China: an underlying threat to tuberculosis control.

    PubMed

    An, Jun; Gao, Mengqiu; Chu, Naihui; Huang, Hairong; Pang, Yu; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Due to unbalanced distribution of health care resource in China, tuberculosis patients, especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), prefer to suffer transregional movement for seeking better health care service in the first-tier cities. Here, we performed a study on the current status of transregional movement of tuberculosis in northern China by reviewing the medical record of TB patients hospitalized in Beijing Chest Hospital from 2011 to 2015. From 2011 to 2015, the proportion of non-Beijing in-patients had increased from 55.0% (996/1810) to 67.2% (1860/2769). In addition, we found that the rate of re-treated among non-Beijing group was significantly higher than that among Beijing-group. Compared with the proportion of pulmonary TB patients from non-Beijing, there were more extra-pulmonary TB patients from non-Beijing. In addition, 10.5% (164/1568) of Beijing in-patients and 26.5% (491/1858) of non-Beijing in-patients had MDR tuberculosis, and statistical analysis revealed that there was significantly higher proportion of MDR cases among non-Beijing group than Beijing group. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that an increasing proportion of TB patients from northern China seek health care in Beijing. In view of higher prevalence of MDR-TB cases among these patients, the transregional movement of MDR-TB will lead to ongoing MDR TB transmission in the community. PMID:27411739

  13. Axillary lymph node tuberculosis masquerading as inflammatory breast carcinoma in an immune-compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Vani, B R; Benachinmardi, Kirtilaxmi; Murthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-02-01

    While tuberculosis is still the leading opportunistic infection among human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients, extra-pulmonary tuberculosis is more common than pulmonary tuberculosis, with lymph nodes being a common site. Axillary lymph node pathology such as tuberculosis and lymphoma rarely mimics inflammatory breast carcinoma by producing lymphatic obstruction. We report a case of axillary lymph node tuberculosis in a 40-year-old immune-compromised woman, clinically presenting as inflammatory breast carcinoma. PMID:25681261

  14. Analysis of 30 Patients with Acupuncture-Induced Primary Inoculation Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangbo; Pan, Jingye; Jin, Keke; Liu, Cailong; Wang, Jing; Chen, Li; Chen, Lei; Yuan, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Primary inoculation tuberculosis is a skin condition that develops at the site of inoculation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tuberculosis-free individuals. This report describes the diagnosis, treatment and >1 year follow-up of 30 patients presenting with acupuncture-induced primary inoculation tuberculosis. Our data provide a deeper insight into this rare route of infection of tuberculosis. We also review effective treatment options. PMID:24959854

  15. Primary Isoniazid Prophylaxis against Tuberculosis in HIV-Exposed Children

    PubMed Central

    Madhi, Shabir A.; Nachman, Sharon; Violari, Avy; Kim, Soyeon; Cotton, Mark F.; Bobat, Raziya; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; McSherry, George; Mitchell, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Background The dual epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis is a major cause of sickness and death in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of preexposure isoniazid prophylaxis against tuberculosis in HIV-infected children and uninfected children exposed to HIV during the perinatal period. Methods We randomly assigned 548 HIV-infected and 804 HIV-uninfected infants (91 to 120 days of age) to isoniazid (10 to 20 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) or matching placebo for 96 weeks. All patients received bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccination against tuberculosis within 30 days after birth. HIV-infected children had access to antiretroviral therapy. The primary outcome measures were tuberculosis disease and death in HIV-infected children and latent tuberculosis infection, tuberculosis disease, and death in HIV-uninfected children within 96 to 108 weeks after randomization. Results Antiretroviral therapy was initiated in 98.9% of HIV-infected children during the study. Among HIV-infected children, protocol-defined tuberculosis or death occurred in 52 children (19.0%) in the isoniazid group and 53 (19.3%) in the placebo group (P = 0.93). Among HIV-uninfected children, there was no significant difference in the combined incidence of tuberculosis infection, tuberculosis disease, or death between the isoniazid group (39 children, 10%) and the placebo group (45 children, 11%; P = 0.44). The rate of tuberculosis was 121 cases per 1000 child-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 95 to 153) among HIV-infected children as compared with 41 per 1000 child-years (95% CI, 31 to 52) among HIV-uninfected children. There were no significant differences in clinical or severe laboratory toxic effects between treatment groups. Conclusions Primary isoniazid prophylaxis did not improve tuberculosis-disease–free survival among HIV-infected children or tuberculosis-infection–free survival among HIV

  16. Diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis and the mycobacteria: two millenia of enigma.

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    The thought that tuberculosis and the mycobacteria could cause diabetes seems farfetched, but is not. The peculiar relationship and frequent association of diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis has been observed for more than 2000 years, yet the reason for this correlation is, to this day, not known. Before the discovery of insulin, a diagnosis of diabetes was a death sentence within 5 years, and the usual cause of that death was tuberculosis. Despite this, in the 5th century, tuberculosis was already being portrayed as a "complication" of diabetes, a view little changed to this day, parroting Root's original 1934 description of "a one-sided relationship": tuberculosis still seen as a common complication of diabetes, while diabetes is thought to be no more common among TB patients than in the population at large. To Nichol's, this was "not logically tenable" and in his study of 178 otherwise healthy, non-diabetic military men with tuberculosis at Fitzsimmons Army Hospital, one-third had abnormal glucose screening tests. But despite his findings and those of Reaud in New York and others, this was not being recognized elsewhere, and Nichols wanted to know why. Nichols concluded that the incidence of diabetes among tuberculosis patients was considerably underestimated and that in tuberculosis patients, diabetes develops quite commonly. Diabetes was easy to detect. Tuberculosis and the mycobacteria were not. The evidence for a mycobacterial cause of diabetes is mounting rapidly. Schwartz and Haas both linked Type-2 diabetes to tuberculosis. And the pancreatic islet amyloid deposits that they found as a by-product of systemic tubercular infection have recently been dissolved by rifampicin, a first line drug against tuberculosis. Engelbach spoke of "transitory" diabetes in TB and Karachunskii noted changes in carbohydrate metabolism in patients with tuberculosis which commonly led to insulin deficiency with persistent hyperglycemia. Furthermore, mycobacterial elements have

  17. Prediction of Drug Penetration in Tuberculosis Lesions.

    PubMed

    Sarathy, Jansy P; Zuccotto, Fabio; Hsinpin, Ho; Sandberg, Lars; Via, Laura E; Marriner, Gwendolyn A; Masquelin, Thierry; Wyatt, Paul; Ray, Peter; Dartois, Véronique

    2016-08-12

    The penetration of antibiotics in necrotic tuberculosis lesions is heterogeneous and drug-specific, but the factors underlying such differential partitioning are unknown. We hypothesized that drug binding to macromolecules in necrotic foci (or caseum) prevents passive drug diffusion through avascular caseum, a critical site of infection. Using a caseum binding assay and MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of tuberculosis drugs, we showed that binding to caseum inversely correlates with passive diffusion into the necrotic core. We developed a high-throughput assay relying on rapid equilibrium dialysis and a caseum surrogate designed to mimic the composition of native caseum. A set of 279 compounds was profiled in this assay to generate a large data set and explore the physicochemical drivers of free diffusion into caseum. Principle component analysis and modeling of the data set delivered an in silico signature predictive of caseum binding, combining 69 molecular descriptors. Among the major positive drivers of binding were high lipophilicity and poor solubility. Determinants of molecular shape such as the number of rings, particularly aromatic rings, number of sp(2) carbon counts, and volume-to-surface ratio negatively correlated with the free fraction, indicating that low-molecular-weight nonflat compounds are more likely to exhibit low caseum binding properties and diffuse effectively through caseum. To provide simple guidance in the property-based design of new compounds, a rule of thumb was derived whereby the sum of the hydrophobicity (clogP) and aromatic ring count is proportional to caseum binding. These tools can be used to ensure desirable lesion partitioning and guide the selection of optimal regimens against tuberculosis. PMID:27626295

  18. Occupational risk factors for developing tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, K D; Hall, N

    1996-08-01

    We sought to assess whether there is an increased risk of tuberculosis among individuals who work in certain industries or occupations. A case-referent study of 149 male tuberculosis (TB) patients reported to the New Jersey Health Department from 1985 to 1987 and 290 referents was performed. Standardized interviews were conducted via the telephone or in person. Increased risk of TB was highest in heavy drinkers (OR = 3.33, 95% CL 1.99-5.59) and those who had a history of living with someone who had a history of TB (OR = 10.92, 95% CL 4.92-24.22). Occupations and industries associated with elevated risk for TB included: four silica-using industries-quarrying (OR = 3.96, 95% CL 0.36-44.02), pottery and related products (OR = 1.99, 95% CL 0.49-8.06), nonmetallic mineral and stone products (OR = 4.00, 95% CL 0.72-22.10), and ship and boat building and repair (OR = 1.84, 95% CL 0.76-4.43); hospitals (OR = 2.10, 95% CL 1.08-4.10); light truck drivers (OR = 2.49, 95% CL 1.30-4.77); agriculture (OR = 2.31, 95% CL 0.82-6.50); eating and drinking establishments (OR = 2.83, 95% CL 1.11-7.20); and janitors/cleaners (OR = 2.00, 95% CL 0.63-6.31). Except for janitors/cleaners, these elevated odds ratios remained for the above occupations/industries after controlling for alcohol or a history of having lived with someone with tuberculosis. Limitations of the study include a poor response rate (38%) and the exclusion of women from the study. PMID:8844044

  19. Economic challenges associated with tuberculosis diagnostic development

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Colleen F.; Shah, Maunank

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health crisis in part due to underdiagnosis. Technological innovations are needed to improve diagnostic test accuracy and reduce the reliance on expensive laboratory infrastructure. However, there are significant economic challenges impeding the development and implementation of new diagnostics. The aim of this piece is to examine the current state of TB diagnostics, outline the unmet needs for new tests, and detail the economic challenges associated with development of new tests from the perspective of developers, policy makers and implementers. PMID:24766367

  20. Congenital Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Espiritu, Nora; Aguirre, Lino; Jave, Oswaldo; Sanchez, Luis; Kirwan, Daniela E.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in a Peruvian infant. His mother was diagnosed with disseminated TB, and treatment commenced 11 days postpartum. The infant was diagnosed with TB after 40 days and died at 2 months and 2 days of age. Congenital transmission of TB to the infant was suspected, because direct postpartum transmission was considered unlikely; also, thorough screening of contacts for TB was negative. Spoligotyping confirmed that both mother and baby were infected with identical strains of the Beijing family (SIT1). PMID:24821847

  1. Novel approaches to tuberculosis prevention: DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R

    2014-03-01

    It is estimated that there are approximately eight million new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) worldwide annually. There is only 1 vaccine available for prevention: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). This has variable efficacy and is only protective for certain extrapulmonary TB cases in children, therefore new strategies for the creation of novel vaccines have emerged. One of the promising approaches is the DNA vaccine, used as a direct vaccination or as a prime-boost vaccine. This review describes the experimental data obtained during the design of DNA vaccines for TB. PMID:24450840

  2. Tuberculosis Biomarker and Surrogate Endpoint Research Roadmap

    PubMed Central

    Saukkonen, Jussi; Kenzie, William R. Mac; Johnson, John L.; Phillips, Patrick P. J.; Andersen, Janet; Bliven-Sizemore, Erin; Belisle, John T.; Boom, W. Henry; Luetkemeyer, Annie; Campbell, Thomas B.; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Hafner, Richard; Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Swindells, Susan; Villarino, M. Elsa; Weiner, Marc; Benson, Constance; Burman, William

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Institutes of Health convened a multidisciplinary meeting to discuss surrogate markers of treatment response in tuberculosis. The goals were to assess recent surrogate marker research and to provide specific recommendations for (1) the qualification and validation of biomarkers of treatment outcome; (2) the standardization of specimen and data collection for future clinical trials, including a minimum set of samples and collection time points; and (3) the creation of a specimen repository to support biomarker testing. This article summarizes these recommendations and provides a roadmap for their implementation. PMID:21737585

  3. The innate immune response in human tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Borel, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Summary M ycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection can be cleared by the innate immune system before the initiation of an adaptive immune response. This innate protection requires a variety of robust cell autonomous responses from many different host immune cell types. However, Mtb has evolved strategies to circumvent some of these defences. In this mini‐review, we discuss these host–pathogen interactions with a focus on studies performed in human cells and/or supported by human genetics studies (such as genome‐wide association studies). PMID:26135005

  4. Oesophageal tuberculosis: a review of eleven cases.

    PubMed Central

    Mokoena, T.; Shama, D. M.; Ngakane, H.; Bryer, J. V.

    1992-01-01

    Tuberculous infection of the oesophagus is rare. This is confirmed by our present review of cases managed in our teaching hospitals over a period of 18 years which uncovered only 11 patients. The main presentation is that of dysphagia whose algorithm of investigation should seek to differentiate tuberculosis from carcinoma, the more common cause of this symptom. Of the 11 patients, 9 presented with dysphagia while 2 had haemorrhage; 7 had an abnormal plain chest radiograph, of whom 4 had a mediastinal mass lesion (3 were lymphadenopathy and one an abscess). All but one had an abnormal radio-contrast oesophagogram, including a mediastinal sinus in two and a traction diverticulum in another two. The mainstay of investigation was oesophagoscopy through which diagnostic biopsy material was obtained in half of the patients. In the other half diagnosis was by either biopsy of associated mediastinal (3) or cervical (1) lymph node masses or by acid fast bacilli positive sputum (1). The diagnosis was established post-mortem in one patient. Treatment was primarily non-operative with standard anti-tuberculosis drug therapy. Two patients underwent a diagnostic thoracotomy and one a drainage of mediastinal abscess together with resection and repair of oesophago-mediastinal sinus during the early part of the series. Outcome of management was very rewarding in 9 patients and death occurred in 2 patients, one of whom had his anti-tuberculosis drug therapy interrupted by severe hepatitis B virus infection. The other death occurred in a patient whose haemorrhage from an aorta-oesophageal fistula was not established ante-mortem. It is recommended that when biopsy material of the oesophagus is unobtainable or non-diagnostic in patients with dysphagia, especially with an abnormal chest radiograph or human immunodeficiency virus infection, effort should be made to obtain biopsy material from associated lymph nodes, even by thoracotomy if necessary, or culture of biopsy from the

  5. Multifocal skeletal tuberculosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LIANG; WANG, JINGCHENG; FENG, XINMIN; TAO, YUPING; YANG, JIANDONG; ZHANG, SHENFEI; CAI, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) of the musculoskeletal system is a rare clinical condition. Multifocal bone involvement is extremely rare and difficult to recognize. Thus, due to the diverse and atypical clinical manifestations of multifocal skeletal TB, the disease is easy to misdiagnose. In the present study, a rare case of atypical disseminated multifocal skeletal TB was reported, which exhibited uncommon findings in radiological images that were more suggestive of a hematological malignancy or metastatic disease. In conclusion, the diagnosis of this condition by conventional diagnostic methods is challenging. The importance of CT-guided needle biopsy and open biopsy in the diagnosis of skeletal TB was emphasized. PMID:27073438

  6. Tuberculosis Diagnostics in 2015: Landscape, Priorities, Needs, and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Madhukar; Schito, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In 2015, tuberculosis remains a major global health problem, and drug-resistant tuberculosis is a growing threat. Although tuberculosis diagnosis in many countries is still reliant on older tools, new diagnostics are changing the landscape. Stimulated, in part, by the success and roll out of Xpert MTB/RIF, there is now considerable interest in new technologies. The landscape looks promising, with a robust pipeline of new tools, particularly molecular diagnostics, and well over 50 companies actively engaged in product development. However, new diagnostics are yet to reach scale, and there needs to be greater convergence between diagnostics development and development of shorter-duration tuberculosis drug regimens. Another concern is the relative absence of non–sputum-based diagnostics in the pipeline for children and of biomarker tests for triage, cure, and progression of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Several initiatives, described in this supplement, have been launched to further stimulate product development and policy, including assessment of needs and priorities, development of target product profiles, compilation of data on resistance-associated mutations, and assessment of market size and potential for new diagnostics. Advocacy is needed to increase funding for tuberculosis research and development, and governments in high-burden countries must invest more in tuberculosis control to meet post-2015 targets for care, control, and prevention. PMID:25765103

  7. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R.G.; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R.; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  8. Presentations and Challenges in Tuberculosis of Head and Neck Region.

    PubMed

    Yashveer, J K; Kirti, Y K

    2016-09-01

    (1) To study the different patterns of presentations of tuberculosis in Head and Neck region. (2) To know the importance and reliability of ESR and Mantoux test as an aid in diagnosis of tuberculosis. This study was conducted at Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery, Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh from January 2014 to June 2015. Patients presenting with lesions in the Head and Neck region suspected of tuberculosis were subjected for cytological and histological investigations. Those cases confirmed to be tuberculosis on the basis of either of these tests were included in the study. Study comprised of 113 proven cases of tuberculosis of Head and Neck region. A female preponderance of 1:1.97 (M:F) ratio was noted. Most commonly involved structure was cervical lymph node (92.92 %) followed by larynx, skin and oral mucosa (1.76 %). It was also noted that Mantoux test was positive in 93.8 % of patients and ESR was >30 mm (first hour) in 95.5 % of patients with tuberculosis. Most common presentation of Tuberculosis in Head and Neck area was cervical lymphadenopathy. In a developing country like India the population is mostly in the lower socioeconomic strata. Access to various modern investigations is limited and diagnosis is challenging. Here ESR and Mantoux test are helpful in purusing the case for further evaluation. Based on these pointers cytologically negative cases can be taken up for biopsy. PMID:27508125

  9. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Thomas R; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R G; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M; Wilkinson, Robert J; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G

    2016-03-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  10. Stigma against Tuberculosis Patients in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Sebsibe

    2016-01-01

    Background Stigma attached to tuberculosis contributes to the limited effectiveness of current TB control approaches. However, there is a dearth of studies that explore the causes of stigma attached to tuberculosis and its effects on patients and tuberculosiscontrol programs in Ethiopia. Methods An institution-based qualitative study was conducted at St. Peter Tuberculosis Specialized Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from July to August, 2015. Ten in-depth interviews and 6 key-informant interviews were carried out among tuberculosis patients and healthcare workers, respectively.The Open Code computer software package was used to analyze the data thematically. Results The study revealed that fear of infection and inappropriate health education messages by media were the main causes of tuberculosis stigma. The patients experienced isolation within their family and community, separation, and financial crisis. The stigma attached to tuberculosis may contribute to delayed healthcare seeking, poor treatment adherence, and poor prognosis. Conclusion Interventions thatreduce the stigma attached to tuberculosis should target on areas, such as creating community awareness, patient counseling on problem-solving and emotional skills, preparing culturally sensitive and scientifically sound media messages, providing financial support for the patients, and enhancing the qualities of the healthcare workers, such as empathy, concern, respect for the patient and cultural sensitivity. PMID:27054714

  11. Polymorphisms in Autophagy Genes and Susceptibility to Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Alisjahbana, Bachti; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Parwati, Ida; Oosting, Marije; Plantinga, Theo S.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Netea, Mihai G.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; van de Vosse, Esther; van Crevel, Reinout

    2012-01-01

    Recent data suggest that autophagy is important for intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and polymorphisms in the autophagy gene IRGM have been linked with susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) among African-Americans, and with TB caused by particular M. tuberculosis genotypes in Ghana. We compared 22 polymorphisms of 14 autophagy genes between 1022 Indonesian TB patients and 952 matched controls, and between patients infected with different M. tuberculosis genotypes, as determined by spoligotyping. The same autophagy polymorphisms were studied in correlation with ex-vivo production of TNF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-17 in healthy volunteers. No association was found between TB and polymorphisms in the genes ATG10, ATG16L2, ATG2B, ATG5, ATG9B, IRGM, LAMP1, LAMP3, P2RX7, WIPI1, MTOR and ATG4C. Associations were found between polymorphisms in LAMP1 (p = 0.02) and MTOR (p = 0.02) and infection with the successful M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype. The polymorphisms examined were not associated with M. tuberculosis induced cytokines, except for a polymorphism in ATG10, which was linked with IL-8 production (p = 0.04). All associations found lost statistical significance after correction for multiple testing. This first examination of a broad set of polymorphisms in autophagy genes fails to show a clear association with TB, with M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype infection or with ex-vivo pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:22879892

  12. The epidemiological consequences of leprosy-tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, N; Voss-Böhme, A

    2013-02-01

    While in antiquity both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe, leprosy declined thereafter and, simultaneously, tuberculosis prevalence increased. Since both diseases are caused by mycobacterial infections, it has been suggested that there might be a causal relationship between both epidemics. Chaussinand observed the inverse prevalence of leprosy and tuberculosis and suggested that individuals with a latent tuberculosis infection are protected from acquiring leprosy. His cross-immunity hypothesis has been countered more recently by a co-infection hypothesis. The latter suggestion, proposed by Donoghue, states that people being infected with multi-bacillary leprosy are more susceptible to tuberculosis, which leads to increased mortality from the disease. This study utilizes mathematical modeling to explore the epidemiological consequences of the co-infection hypothesis for realistically confined parameter values. While the co-infection hypothesis appears plausible at first glance, a second thought reveals that it comprises also substantial consequences for tuberculosis epidemics: if co-infection raises the mortality rate above that of purely tuberculosis infected persons, then tuberculosis might as well be eradicated by leprosy. It is the specific interplay of both increased susceptibility towards tuberculosis and increased death rate when co-infected that determines the epidemiological fate. As a result of this analysis, it is shown that there is a large parameter region where the eventual disappearance of leprosy could indeed be explained by co-infection. This parameter region is considerably larger than that predicted by the cross-immunity hypothesis. This shows that the co-infection hypothesis should be considered a significant alternative to the cross-immunity hypothesis. The time scales at which the effects of co-infection are observed depend critically on the spatial distribution of the individuals but reach epidemiologically realistic values for

  13. Isolated axillary lymph node tuberculosis in ultrasonography. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Urbańska-Krawiec, Dagmara; Kajor, Maciej; Stefański, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case of isolated axillary lymph node tuberculosis. A 66-year-old patient was admitted in order to perform the diagnostics of a painless tumor of the left armpit. Blood biochemistry tests and chest X-ray did not show any abnormalities. In the ultrasound examination a solid structure of the dimensions of 1.8×1 cm of irregular outline with adjacent hypoechogenic lymph nodes was visualized. The diagnosis of tuberculosis was based on histopathologic examination of the excised tumor. In the latter years an increase in extrapulmonary type of tuberculosis has been observed. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis may appear in practically each organ, nevertheless it affects pleura most often. Lymph node tuberculosis is the second, when it comes to the prevalence rate, type of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. In the majority of cases of lymph node tuberculosis it affects superficial lymph nodes. In the ultrasound examination a packet of pathological, enlarged and hypoechogenic lymph nodes is stated. In 1/3 of cases the central part of the nodes is hyperechogenic which indicates its caseation necrosis. Lymph nodes have a tendency to be matted and they have blurred outline. We observed this type of lymph node image in the presented patient. This image may be a diagnostic hint. Nevertheless, in the differentiation diagnostics one should take many other disease entities into consideration, inter alia: sarcoidosis, lymphomas, fungal infections, neoplastic metastases; the latter ones have an image most similar to tuberculosis lymph nodes. Tuberculosis ought to be considered in differential diagnosis of atypical masses. PMID:26674808

  14. [Tuberculosis in cattle - surprisingly re-emerging or continuously present?].

    PubMed

    Moser, I; Köhler, H; Menge, C

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis in cattle, caused by Mycobacterium (M.) bovis/M. caprae, is globally one of the most important zoonotic diseases in cattle. It was widespread in Germany until the second half of the 20th century. Due to the effective control and eradication campaigns in Germany, the epidemic was almost eradicated. Consequently, Germany was regarded as essentially tuberculosis free since the end of 1961 (West) and the end of 1978 (East). By declaring the unified Germany "officially free of tuberculosis" (OTF) in 1996, freedom from tuberculosis was officially ratified by the European Commission. The prerequisite was the detection of tuberculosis in less than 0.1% of the cattle holdings per year in Germany. This status has been steadily maintained hitherto, thus resulting in some loss of awareness of bovine tuberculosis by veterinarians, farmers and the public over many decades. After 1996, the number of notified outbreaks had been on average less than 10 per 200,000 cattle holdings per year for many years. It was the year 2008 when the numbers increased. Based in part on subsequently enhanced ante mortem testing efforts, 46 outbreaks were notified in 2013. Bavaria and Lower Saxony were the federal states with the highest number of cases. Consequently, the national tuberculosis regulation was revised in 2009, 2012 and 2013 to form the basis for a modification of tuberculosis surveillance. Regionally, an improvement of the control strategy was considered necessary. In addition to the traditionally applied examination and detection methods of the tuberculin skin test (ante mortem) and bacteriological culture (post mortem), the gamma-interferon-release assay (ante mortem) and the molecular detection of the causative pathogen (post mortem) were introduced into the official collection of recommended methods. Consequently, the diagnostic procedure of tuberculosis has been accelerated. However, in many cases the increase in the range of available test systems did not increase

  15. Pulmonary tuberculosis and lung cancer: simultaneous and sequential occurrence*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise Rossato; Valentini, Dirceu Felipe; Müller, Alice Mânica; de Almeida, Carlos Podalirio Borges; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lung cancer (LC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death and represents a major public health problem worldwide. Another major cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in developing countries, is tuberculosis. The simultaneous or sequential occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis and LC in the same patient has been reported in various case series and case-control studies. The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients developing tuberculosis and LC, either simultaneously or sequentially. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study based on the review of medical charts. RESULTS: The study involved 24 patients diagnosed with tuberculosis and LC between 2009 and 2012. The diagnoses of tuberculosis and LC occurred simultaneously in 10 patients, whereas tuberculosis was diagnosed prior to LC in 14. The median time between the two diagnoses was 5 years (interquartile range: 1-30 years). Fourteen patients (58.3%) were male, 20 (83.3%) were White, and 22 (91.7%) were smokers or former smokers. The most common histological type was adenocarcinoma, identified in 14 cases (58.3%), followed by epidermoid carcinoma, identified in 6 (25.0%). Seven patients (29.2%) presented with distant metastases at diagnosis; of those 7 patients, 5 (71%) were diagnosed with LC and tuberculosis simultaneously. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, most of the patients with tuberculosis and LC were smokers or former smokers, and tuberculosis was diagnosed either before or simultaneously with LC. Non-small cell lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma, was the most common histological type. PMID:24068271

  16. Proteome Analysis of the Plasma Membrane of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shalini; Kosalai, K.; Namane, Abdelkader; Pym, Alex S.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is likely to contain proteins that could serve as novel drug targets, diagnostic probes or even components of a vaccine against tuberculosis. With this in mind, we have undertaken proteome analysis of the membrane of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Isolated membrane vesicles were extracted with either a detergent (Triton X114) or an alkaline buffer (carbonate) following two of the protocols recommended for membrane protein enrichment. Proteins were resolved by 2D-GE using immobilized pH gradient (IPG) strips, and identified by peptide mass mapping utilizing the M. tuberculosis genome database. The two extraction procedures yielded patterns with minimal overlap. Only two proteins, both HSPs, showed a common presence. MALDI–MS analysis of 61 spots led to the identification of 32 proteins, 17 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome database. We classified 19 of the identified proteins as ‘membrane-associated’; 14 of these were further classified as ‘membrane-bound’, three of which were lipoproteins. The remaining proteins included four heat-shock proteins and several enzymes involved in energy or lipid metabolism. Extraction with Triton X114 was found to be more effective than carbonate for detecting ‘putative’ M. tuberculosis membrane proteins. The protocol was also found to be suitable for comparing BCG and M. tuberculosis membranes, identifying ESAT-6 as being expressed selectively in M. tuberculosis. While this study demonstrates for the first time some of the membrane proteins of M. tuberculosis, it also underscores the problems associated with proteomic analysis of a complex membrane such as that of a mycobacterium. PMID:18629250

  17. Understanding the incremental value of novel diagnostic tests for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Dowdy, David

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is a major source of global mortality caused by infection, partly because of a tremendous ongoing burden of undiagnosed disease. Improved diagnostic technology may play an increasingly crucial part in global efforts to end tuberculosis, but the ability of diagnostic tests to curb tuberculosis transmission is dependent on multiple factors, including the time taken by a patient to seek health care, the patient's symptoms, and the patterns of transmission before diagnosis. Novel diagnostic assays for tuberculosis have conventionally been evaluated on the basis of characteristics such as sensitivity and specificity, using assumptions that probably overestimate the impact of diagnostic tests on transmission. We argue for a shift in focus to the evaluation of such tests' incremental value, defining outcomes that reflect each test's purpose (for example, transmissions averted) and comparing systems with the test against those without, in terms of those outcomes. Incremental value can also be measured in units of outcome per incremental unit of resource (for example, money or human capacity). Using a novel, simplified model of tuberculosis transmission that addresses some of the limitations of earlier tuberculosis diagnostic models, we demonstrate that the incremental value of any novel test depends not just on its accuracy, but also on elements such as patient behaviour, tuberculosis natural history and health systems. By integrating these factors into a single unified framework, we advance an approach to the evaluation of new diagnostic tests for tuberculosis that considers the incremental value at the population level and demonstrates how additional data could inform more-effective implementation of tuberculosis diagnostic tests under various conditions. PMID:26633767

  18. A cross-sectional and follow-up study of leukopenia in tuberculosis patients: prevalence, risk factors and impact of anti-tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fei-Shen; Wu, Mei-Ying; Tu, Wen-Jun; Pan, Hong-Qiu; Zheng, Jian; Shi, Jun-Wei; Fei, Zhong-Ting; Zhang, Rui-Mei; Yan, Wei-Guo; Shang, Ming-Qun; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Meng-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for leukopenia in tuberculosis patients and the impact of anti-tuberculosis regimens on the occurrence of leukopenia in newly treated tuberculosis patients. Methods A total of 1,904 tuberculosis patients were included in the study. A cross-sectional survey of the prevalence of leukopenia was initially conducted, and then factors influencing leukopenia were identified using Logistic regression analysis. Non-treatment factors influencing peripheral blood leukocyte counts were analyzed using univariate COX proportional hazards models. Covariate analysis was used to assess the independent effect of different anti-tuberculosis regimens on peripheral blood leukocyte counts. Results Being female, advanced age and longer duration of previous anti-tuberculosis treatment (>6 month) were risk factors for leukopenia in tuberculosis patients, while secondary pulmonary tuberculosis, higher body mass index (BMI: 24−27.9 kg/m2), and higher degree of education (senior high school or above) were protective factors. Gender, vegetable consumption, drinking, pulmonary infection, other chronic diseases, and use of antibiotics were significantly associated with the development of leukopenia in patients on anti-tuberculosis treatment. In tuberculosis patients treated with anti-tuberculosis regimens not containing antibiotics, peripheral blood leukocyte levels gradually declined with the prolongation of treatment duration. In tuberculosis patients treated with anti-tuberculosis regimens containing antibiotics, peripheral blood leukocyte levels showed a declining trend. Conclusions Female patients, patients at advanced age and recurrent tuberculosis patients having longer previous anti-tuberculosis treatment are high-risk populations for leukopenia. Attention should be paid to the influence of vegetable consumption and drinking, co-morbidities and use of antibiotics during anti-tuberculosis treatment. PMID:26793345

  19. Nutritional Supplementation Is a Necessary Complement to Dietary Counseling among Tuberculosis and Tuberculosis-HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bacelo, Adriana Costa; Ramalho, Andrea; Brasil, Pedro Emmanuel; Cople-Rodrigues, Cláudia dos Santos; Georg, Ingebourg; Paiva, Eliane; Argolo, Sheila Vasques Leandro; Rolla, Valeria Cavalcante

    2015-01-01

    The Brazilian Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization recommend dietary counseling for patients with malnutrition during tuberculosis treatment. Patients under tuberculosis therapy (infected and not infected with HIV) were followed-up to evaluate the effectiveness of dietary counseling. Objective: describe the nutritional status of patients with tuberculosis. Methods: an observational follow-up study over a 180-day period of tuberculosis therapy in adults was conducted. Subjects were assessed for body composition (using BMI, TSF and MUAC parameters), serum biomarkers and offered dietary counseling. The data obtained at each visit (D15, D30, D60, D90, D120, D150, and D180) were analyzed, showing trajectories over time and central tendencies each time. Results: at baseline, the mean age was 41.1 (±13.4) years; they were predominantly male, with income lower than a local minimum wage and at least six years of schooling. Patients showed predominantly pulmonary tuberculosis. At baseline, all patients suffered from malnutrition. The overall energy malnutrition prevalence was of 70.6%. Anemia at baseline was observed in both groups (63.2%), however, it was significantly more pronounced in the HIV+. At the end, energy malnutrition was reduced to 57.1% (42.9% of HIV- and 71.4% of the HIV+). Micronutrients malnutrition was evident in 71.4% of the HIV- patients and 85.7% of HIV+ patients at the end of tuberculosis therapy. Using BMI (≤18.5 kg/m2cutoff) as an index of malnutrition, it was detected in 23.9% of the HIV- and 27.3% of the HIV+ patients at baseline, with no evident improvement over time; using TSF (≤11.4mm as cutoff) or MUAC (≤28.5cm as cutoff), malnutrition was detected in 70.1% and 85.3% of all patients, respectively. Nevertheless, combining all biomarkers, at the end of follow-up, all patients suffered from malnutrition. Conclusion: Although with a limited number of patients, the evidence does not support that dietary counseling is effective

  20. Interleukin-10 Family and Tuberculosis: An Old Story Renewed

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Lambert, Nzungize; Duan, Xiangke; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin-10 (IL-10) family of cytokines consists of six immune mediators, namely IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24 and IL-26. IL-10, IL-22, IL-24 and IL-26 are critical for the regulation of host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Specifically, IL-10 and IL-26 can suppress the antimycobacterial immunity and promote the survival of pathogen, while IL-22 and IL-24 can generate protective responses and inhibit the intracellular growth of pathogen. Knowledge about the new players in tuberculosis immunology, namely IL-10 family, can inform novel immunity-based countermeasures and host directed therapies against tuberculosis. PMID:27194948

  1. [Cecal tuberculosis: the importance of a high diagnostic suspicion].

    PubMed

    Valdivielso Cortázar, E; Bolado Concejo, F; Jiménez Pérez, F J; Couto Wörner, I; Alonso Aguirre, P A

    Intestinal tuberculosis is less common than pulmonary tuberculosis. Its clinical and endoscopic features are nonspe-cific, so diagnostic suspicion must be high in order to make an early diagnosis and prevent iatrogenia. Pharmacotherapy is often effective, with an excellent clinical and endoscopic evolution. Surgical treatment is reserved for complications. We present the case of cecal tuberculosis diagnosed endoscopically; this is the second case diagnosed in a few months in our center. In this case there were no risk factors, such as recent travel, risk of contacts or inmunosupression. PMID:27599955

  2. Recent tuberculosis diagnosis toward the end TB strategy.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Seon Ah; Cho, Hyun Hee; Kim, Jeonghyo; Lee, Jaebeom; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite global TB eradication efforts, it is still a global public health concern, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Most of the active TB infections are curable with early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, but drug-resistant TB is difficult and expensive to treat in immunocompetent as well as immunocompromised individuals. Thus, rapid, economic, and accurate point-of care tools for TB diagnosis are required urgently. This review describes the history of M. tuberculosis detection methods up to date and the recent advances using nanotechnology for point-of-care testing of TB diagnosis. PMID:26853124

  3. [Seasonal variation and related influencing factors for tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z B; Lu, Z Q; Xie, H; Duan, Q H

    2016-08-10

    Tuberculosis is recognized as a chronic respiratory infectious disease and still one of the important public health issues in the world. Douglas reported an unique seasonal pattern (summer peak) of tuberculosis, when compared with most other respiratory diseases in 1996. Since then, there had been many other researchers notified various patterns of seasonality on TB. This paper reviewed all the studies published in the last five years and analyzed the current findings on seasonal variability and influencing factors, in order to explore the risk factors to provide evidence for prevention and control strategies on tuberculosis. PMID:27539356

  4. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  5. A Case of Sigmoid Colon Tuberculosis Mimicking Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Min; Kim, Min-Dae; Lee, Hee-Ryong; Jung, Peel; Ryu, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Seung-Ho; Lee, Il-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the sigmoid colon is a rare disorder. An 80-year-old man visited Bongseng Memorial Hospital for medical examination. A colonoscopy was performed, and a lesion in the sigmoid colon that was suspected to be colon cancer was found. A biopsy was performed, and tuberculous enteritis with chronic granulomatous inflammation was diagnosed. Intestinal tuberculosis is most frequent in the ileocecal area, followed by the ascending colon, transverse colon, duodenum, stomach, and sigmoid colon, in descending order. Hence, we report a case of intestinal tuberculosis in the sigmoid colon, which is rare and almost indistinguishable from colon cancer. PMID:23185709

  6. Targeting tuberculosis: a glimpse of promising drug targets.

    PubMed

    Arora, N; Banerjee, A K

    2012-03-01

    Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has emerged as the biggest curse of our time causing significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing resistance in mycobacterium to existing drugs calls for exploration of metabolic pathways for finding novel drug targets and also for prioritization of known drug targets. Recent advances in molecular biology, bioinformatics and structural biology coupled with availability of M. tuberculosis genome sequence have provided much needed boost to drug discovery process. This review provides a glimpse of attractive drug targets for development of anti-mycobacterial drug development. PMID:22356190

  7. Summary of follow-up results from potential tuberculosis exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    There were two isolated episodes of LeRC workers who were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) during the fall of 1990. The specifics surrounding each case were very different, and it is clear that the two episodes were completely unrelated. The fact that the final diagnoses of pulmonary tuberculosis came within three weeks of each other was purely coincidental. The Occupational Medicine Service (OMS) conducted separate informational sessions and offered free PPD skin testing to all employees, both NASA and contractors, who felt that they were at risk of having been exposed to tuberculosis from either individual. The procedures and results of these are briefly discussed.

  8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important occupational risks for healthcare workers (HCWs) in South Korea. Many policies regarding the control and prevention of TB in healthcare settings recommend that HCWs are tested for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in addition to active TB. Moreover, the Korean Tuberculosis Prevention Act also recommends that HCWs receive regular testing for LTBI. However, there are no specific or detailed guidelines for dealing with LTBI in HCWs. Herein, we discuss the diagnosis and treatment of LTBI in HCWs and focus particularly on the baseline screening of hired HCWs, routine follow-up, and contact investigation. PMID:27433172

  9. Interleukin-10 Family and Tuberculosis: An Old Story Renewed.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Lambert, Nzungize; Duan, Xiangke; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin-10 (IL-10) family of cytokines consists of six immune mediators, namely IL-10, IL-19, IL-20, IL-22, IL-24 and IL-26. IL-10, IL-22, IL-24 and IL-26 are critical for the regulation of host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Specifically, IL-10 and IL-26 can suppress the antimycobacterial immunity and promote the survival of pathogen, while IL-22 and IL-24 can generate protective responses and inhibit the intracellular growth of pathogen. Knowledge about the new players in tuberculosis immunology, namely IL-10 family, can inform novel immunity-based countermeasures and host directed therapies against tuberculosis. PMID:27194948

  10. Cutaneous tuberculosis: diagnosis, histopathology and treatment - Part II*

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Josemir Belo; Figueiredo, Ana Roberta; Ferraz, Cláudia Elise; de Oliveira, Márcia Helena; da Silva, Perla Gomes; de Medeiros, Vanessa Lucília Sileira

    2014-01-01

    The evolution in the knowledge of tuberculosis' physiopathology allowed not only a better understanding of the immunological factors involved in the disease process, but also the development of new laboratory tests, as well as the establishment of a histological classification that reflects the host's ability to contain the infectious agent. At the same time, the increasing bacilli resistance led to alterations in the basic tuberculosis treatment scheme in 2009. This article critically examines laboratory and histological investigations, treatment regimens for tuberculosis and possible adverse reactions to the most frequently used drugs. PMID:25054739

  11. Dorsolumbar junction spinal tuberculosis in an infant: case report.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Kadir; Dogulu, Fikret; Kardes, Ozgur; Oztanir, Namik; Baykaner, M Kemali

    2005-05-01

    The treatment of spinal tuberculosis is a challenging and controversial problem. The authors present the rare case of an 8-month-old infant with dorsolumbar junction tuberculosis. The child did not sit or stand and a hump was noted on his back. Radiological evaluations demonstrated destruction by a tuberculous abscess of the T-12 and L-1 vertebral bodies, extending into the psoas muscles and spinal canal. In addition to medical therapy, radical debridement and grafting were performed via an anterolateral approach. The follow-up period was 2 years. The difficulties in the management of spinal tuberculosis in infants are discussed. PMID:15926398

  12. Deep vein thrombosis and tuberculosis: a causative link?

    PubMed Central

    Kechaou, Ines; Cherif, Eya; Ben Hassine, Lamia; Khalfallah, Narjess

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is very devastating in developing countries and its thrombogenic potential is a disturbing new entity. We report an 18-year-old woman who presented with a first episode of deep vein thrombosis. Pulmonary, hepatic and splenic tuberculosis was diagnosed while looking for secondary causes. The patient was treated with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol along with low-molecular-weight heparin and antivitamin K. Tuberculosis has several mechanisms that induce a hypercoagulable state and can lead to thromboembolic complications. PMID:24859543

  13. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ben; Smith, Robert; Nguyen, Quyen; Roberts, Julia; Ling, Yan; Lopez Quezada, Landys; Somersan, Selin; Warrier, Thulasi; Little, David; Pingle, Maneesh; Zhang, David; Ballinger, Elaine; Zimmerman, Matthew; Dartois, Véronique; Hanson, Paul; Mitscher, Lester A; Porubsky, Patrick; Rogers, Steven; Schoenen, Frank J; Nathan, Carl; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2016-07-14

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  14. Tuberculosis in Pregnant and Postpartum Women: Epidemiology, Management, and Research Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Mathad, Jyoti S.; Gupta, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is most common during a woman's reproductive years and is a major cause of maternal–child mortality. National guidelines for screening and management vary widely owing to insufficient data. In this article, we review the available data on (1) the global burden of tuberculosis in women of reproductive age; (2) how pregnancy and the postpartum period affect the course of tuberculosis; (3) how to screen and diagnose pregnant and postpartum women for active and latent tuberculosis; (4) the management of active and latent tuberculosis in pregnancy and the postpartum period, including the safety of tuberculosis medications; and (5) infant outcomes. We also include data on HIV/tuberculosis coinfection and drug-resistant tuberculosis. Finally, we highlight research gaps in tuberculosis in pregnant and postpartum women. PMID:22942202

  15. Tuberculosis in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis: one year follow up study from Nepal.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, S S; Bhattarai, L; Manandhar, D N; Devkota, K C; Sharma, S K; Bhatta, N

    2012-09-01

    In Nepal where tuberculosis is endemic and data regarding the prevalence of tuberculosis in patients undergoing maintenance haemodialysis is not known we tried to see the cumulative incidence of tuberculosis in these higher risk groups' patients. Forty patients were followed up for one year after initial screening for tuberculosis. Among forty patients 34 (85%) were male and 6 (15%) were female. During initial screening four patients had sputum positive tuberculosis and three more patients had sputum positive tuberculosis during follow up. Among nine patients with pleural effusion two patients had pulmonary tuberculosis. One patient had tubercular cervical lymphadenitis. Two patients died during follow up and the rest improved with anti tubercular treatment. So in the part of the world where tuberculosis is endemic patients undergoing maintenance haemodialysis should be screened for tuberculosis regularly. PMID:24047026

  16. MicroRNA-365 in macrophages regulates Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced active pulmonary tuberculosis via interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingzhang; Li, Hui; Shao, Hua; Li, Chunling; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the relationship between microRNA (miR)-365 expression and the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein in patients with active tuberculosis. From June 2011 to June 2014, 48 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were included in the study. In addition, 23 healthy subjects were enrolled as control. Macrophages were collected by pulmonary alveolus lavage. In addition, serum and mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood. The levels of miR-365 and IL-6 in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of IL-6 in macrophages and mononuclear cells was measured using Western blotting, while that in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Expression of IL-6 mRNA and protein was significantly enhanced in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Increase of IL-6 protein concentration in serum was probably due to the release of IL-6 protein from mononuclear cells in the blood. In addition, miR-365 levels were significantly lowered in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Up-regulated IL-6 expression in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis is related to the down-regulation of miR-365, suggesting that miR-365 may regulate the occurrence and immune responses of active pulmonary tuberculosis via IL-6. PMID:26629035

  17. MicroRNA-365 in macrophages regulates Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced active pulmonary tuberculosis via interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qingzhang; Li, Hui; Shao, Hua; Li, Chunling; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the relationship between microRNA (miR)-365 expression and the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein in patients with active tuberculosis. From June 2011 to June 2014, 48 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were included in the study. In addition, 23 healthy subjects were enrolled as control. Macrophages were collected by pulmonary alveolus lavage. In addition, serum and mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood. The levels of miR-365 and IL-6 in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of IL-6 in macrophages and mononuclear cells was measured using Western blotting, while that in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Expression of IL-6 mRNA and protein was significantly enhanced in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Increase of IL-6 protein concentration in serum was probably due to the release of IL-6 protein from mononuclear cells in the blood. In addition, miR-365 levels were significantly lowered in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Up-regulated IL-6 expression in macrophages, mononuclear cells and serum in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis is related to the down-regulation of miR-365, suggesting that miR-365 may regulate the occurrence and immune responses of active pulmonary tuberculosis via IL-6. PMID:26629035

  18. Diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis: programmatic management issues.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Kumar, A M V; Satyanarayana, S; Lin, Y; Zachariah, R; Lönnroth, K; Kapur, A

    2015-08-01

    In August 2011, the World Health Organization and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease launched the Collaborative Framework for Care and Control of Tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) to guide policy makers and implementers in combatting the epidemics of both diseases. Progress has been made, and includes identifying how best to undertake bidirectional screening for both diseases, how to provide optimal treatment and care for patients with dual disease and the most suitable framework for monitoring and evaluation. Key programmatic challenges include the following: whether screening should be directed at all patients or targeted at those with high-risk characteristics; the most suitable technologies for diagnosing TB and diabetes in routine settings; the best time to screen TB patients for DM; how to provide an integrated, coordinated approach to case management; and finally, how to persuade non-communicable disease programmes to adopt a cohort analysis approach, preferably using electronic medical records, for monitoring and evaluation. The link between DM and TB and the implementation of the collaborative framework for care and control have the potential to stimulate and strengthen the scale-up of non-communicable disease care and prevention programmes, which may help in reducing not only the global burden of DM but also the global burden of TB. PMID:26162352

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Karima; Gargah, Tahar; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Kheder, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Post-transplant tuberculosis (TB) is a problem in successful long-term outcome of renal transplantation recipients. Our objective was to describe the pattern and risk factors of TB infection and the prognosis in our transplant recipients. Patients and Methods. This study was a retrospective review of the records of 491 renal transplant recipients in our hospital during the period from January 1986 to December 2009. The demographic data, transplant characteristics, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, treatment protocol, and long-term outcome of this cohort of patients were analyzed. Results. 16 patients (3,2%) developed post-transplant TB with a mean age of 32,5 ± 12,7 (range: 13–60) years and a mean post-transplant period of 36,6months (range: 12,3 months–15,9 years). The forms of the diseases were pulmonary in 10/16 (62,6%), disseminated in 3/16 (18,7%), and extrapulmonary in 3/16 (18,7%). Graft dysfunction was observed in 7 cases (43,7%) with tissue-proof acute rejection in 3 cases and loss of the graft in 4 cases. Hepatotoxicity developed in 3 patients (18,7%) during treatment. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases after early stop of treatment. Two patients (12.5%) died. Conclusion. Extra pulmonary and disseminated tuberculosis were observed in third of our patients. More than 9months of treatment may be necessary to prevent recurrence. PMID:24222903

  20. Hematemesis: Unusual presentation of isolated gastric tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Mukesh; Kumar, Arvind; Phadke, Aniruddha; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old male presented with hematemesis, epigastric pain, and melena. He had dyspepsia with significant weight loss for 3 months period. On clinical examination, he was pale with no organomegaly or lymphadenopathy. The X-ray chest was normal, and ultrasound abdomen was normal. Upper GI endoscopy revealed nodularity and ulceration along proximal part of lesser curvature of the stomach. CT scan abdomen showed thickening of lesser curvature just below gastro-esophageal junction. The biopsies were negative for malignancy. Repeat upper GI endoscopy showed a nonhealing ulcer, on repeat well biopsies taken from the base of ulcer primary gastric tuberculosis was diagnosed. It showed many epithelioid cell granulomas and multinucleated giant cells with caseous necrosis on histology. Acid-fast bacilli on Zeil Neelsen staining and TB PCR were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. He was put on four-drug anti-tuberculous treatment. On follow-up, the patient gradually improved and regained weight. Repeat upper GI endoscopy done after 8 weeks showed healing of the ulcer with decrease in nodularity. PMID:27235948